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Sample records for swallowing ingestion cycles

  1. Non-invasive monitoring of chewing and swallowing for objective quantification of ingestive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, Edward; Schuckers, Stephanie; Lopez-Meyer, Paulo; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Sazonova, Nadezhda; Melanson, Edward L.; Neuman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A methodology of studying of ingestive behavior by non-invasive monitoring of swallowing (deglutition) and chewing (mastication) has been developed. The target application for the developed methodology is to study the behavioral patterns of food consumption and producing volumetric and weight estimates of energy intake. Monitoring is non-invasive based on detecting swallowing by a sound sensor located over laryngopharynx or by a bone conduction microphone and detecting chewing through a below-the-ear strain sensor. Proposed sensors may be implemented in a wearable monitoring device, thus enabling monitoring of ingestive behavior in free living individuals. In this paper, the goals in the development of this methodology are two-fold. First, a system comprised of sensors, related hardware and software for multimodal data capture is designed for data collection in a controlled environment. Second, a protocol is developed for manual scoring of chewing and swallowing for use as a gold standard. The multi-modal data capture was tested by measuring chewing and swallowing in twenty one volunteers during periods of food intake and quiet sitting (no food intake). Video footage and sensor signals were manually scored by trained raters. Inter-rater reliability study for three raters conducted on the sample set of 5 subjects resulted in high average intra-class correlation coefficients of 0.996 for bites, 0.988 for chews, and 0.98 for swallows. The collected sensor signals and the resulting manual scores will be used in future research as a gold standard for further assessment of sensor design, development of automatic pattern recognition routines, and study of the relationship between swallowing/chewing and ingestive behavior. PMID:18427161

  2. Lung Volume Measured during Sequential Swallowing in Healthy Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegland, Karen Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul W.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Outcomes from studying the coordinative relationship between respiratory and swallow subsystems are inconsistent for sequential swallows, and the lung volume at the initiation of sequential swallowing remains undefined. The first goal of this study was to quantify the lung volume at initiation of sequential swallowing ingestion cycles and…

  3. Perception of Breakfast Ingestion Enhances High Intensity Cycling Performance.

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    Mears, Stephen A; Dickinson, Kathryn; Bergin-Taylor, Kurt; Dee, Reagan; Kay, Jack; James, Lewis J

    2017-09-27

    To examine the effect on short duration, high intensity cycling time trial performance when a semi-solid breakfast containing carbohydrate or a taste and texture matched placebo is ingested 90 minutes pre-exercise compared to a water control. Thirteen well trained cyclists (25 ± 8 years, 71.1 ± 5.9 kg, 1.76 ± 0.04 m, 383 ± 46 Wmax, VO2peak 4.42 ± 0.53 L·min(-1)) performed three experimental trials examining breakfast ingestion 90 minutes before a 10 minute steady state cycle (60% Wmax) and a ~20 minute time trial (to complete a workload target of 376 ± 36 kJ). Subjects consumed either water (WAT), a semi-solid carbohydrate breakfast (2 g carbohydrate·kg(-1) body mass; CHO) or a taste and texture matched placebo (PLA). Blood lactate and glucose concentrations were measured periodically throughout the rest and exercise periods. The time trial was completed quicker in CHO (1120 ± 69 s; P=0.006) and PLA (1112 ± 50 s; P=0.030) compared to WAT (1146 ± 74 s). Ingestion of carbohydrate caused an increase in blood glucose concentration throughout the rest period in CHO (peak at 30 minutes rest: 7.37 ± 1.10 mmol·l(-1); Pbreakfast (PLA or CHO) 90 minutes prior to the start of exercise. The improvement in performance is likely attributable to a psychological rather than physiological effect.

  4. Muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery from cycle exercise: no effect of additional protein ingestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Shirreffs, S M; Calbet, J A

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the effect of carbohydrate and protein hydrolysate ingestion on muscle glycogen resynthesis during 4 h of recovery from intense cycle exercise. Five volunteers were studied during recovery while they ingested, immediately after exercise, a 600-ml bolus...

  5. The effect of ice slurry ingestion on body temperature and cycling performance in competitive athletes.

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    Mejuto, Gaizka; Chalmers, Samuel; Gilbert, Stephanie; Bentley, David

    2018-02-01

    The effects of pre cooling on endurance performance are widely known. In contrast, the approach of cooling during endurance exercise in combination with pre-exercise cooling has been poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the effects of precooling and cooling during exercise enhance exercise performance compared to the ingestion of a thermo-neutral beverage (20 °C) or precooling alone in cycling performance. This was an experimental study using a randomised crossover design in which 7 cyclists underwent three trials comprising of 45 min steady state cycling (SS) at 70% VO 2 max and a subsequent 10 km time trial (TT) in hot conditions (32 °C, 50% relative humidity). Rectal temperature (T re ), heat storage (HS), heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration (BLA) and thermal sensation (TS) were measured. The intervention consisted of: (1) ingestion of thermo-neutral beverage before and during SS cycling (TN), (2) ingestion of ice slurry beverage and application of iced towels (precooling) prior to exercise, and then ingestion of thermo-neutral beverage during SS (PRE) and (3) precooling strategy as above plus ice slurry ingestion during SS cycling (PRE + MID). The intake of thermo-neutral or ice slurry beverage (14 g/kg) occurred over 30 min before and every 15 min during SS cycling. There was no significant difference in TT performance between all the conditions (P =0.72). However, PRE and PRE + MID caused a significant decrease in T re (P < 0.05) from TN during exercise. Accordingly, both precooling and a combination of precooling and mid-cooling during exercise in hot conditions may be a practical and effective way of reducing core temperature. Future studies should investigate longer distance events and timing of ice slurry ingestion. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Effect of L-ornithine hydrochloride ingestion on intermittent maximal anaerobic cycle ergometer performance and fatigue recovery after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Shinichi; Morishita, Koji; Yamada, Takayoshi; Yamaji, Shunsuke; Komatsu, Miho

    2011-11-01

    L-Ornithine plays an important role in ammonia metabolism via the urea cycle. This study aimed to examine the effect of L-ornithine hydrochloride ingestion on ammonia metabolism and performance after intermittent maximal anaerobic cycle ergometer exercise. Ten healthy young adults (age, 23.8 ± 3.9 year; height, 172.3 ± 5.5 cm; body mass, 67.7 ± 6.1 kg) with regular training experience ingested L-ornithine hydrochloride (0.1 g/kg, body mass) or placebo after 30 s of maximal cycling exercise. Five sets of the same maximal cycling exercise were conducted 60 min after ingestion, and maximal cycling exercise was conducted after a 15 min rest. The intensity of cycling exercise was based on each subject's body mass (0.74 N kg(-1)). Work volume (watt), peak rpm (rpm) before and after intermittent maximal ergometer exercise and the following serum parameters were measured before ingestion, immediately after exercise and 15 min after exercise: ornithine, ammonia, urea, lactic acid and glutamate. Peak rpm was significantly greater with L-ornithine hydrochloride ingestion than with placebo ingestion. Serum ornithine level was significantly greater with L-ornithine hydrochloride ingestion than with placebo ingestion immediately and 15 min after intermittent maximal cycle ergometer exercise. In conclusion, although maximal anaerobic performance may be improved by L-ornithine hydrochloride ingestion before intermittent maximal anaerobic cycle ergometer exercise, the above may not depend on increase of ammonia metabolism with L-ornithine hydrochloride.

  7. Improved cycling performance with ingestion of hydrolyzed marine protein depends on performance level

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    Vegge Geir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect on performance of protein ingestion during or after exercise is not clear. This has largely been attributed to the utilization of different scientific protocols and the neglection of accounting for factors such as differences in physical and chemical properties of protein supplements and differences in athletic performance level. Methods We hypothesized that ingestion of unprocessed whey protein (15.3 g·h-1 together with carbohydrate (60 g·h-1, would provide no ergogenic effect on 5-min mean-power performance following 120 min cycling at 50% of maximal aerobic power (2.8 ± 0.2 W·kg-1, corresponding to 60 ± 4% of VO2max, compared to CHO alone (60 g·h-1. Conversely, we hypothesized that ingestion of the hydrolyzed marine protein supplement NutriPeptin™ (Np, 2.7 g·h-1, a processed protein supplement with potentially beneficial amino acid composition, together with a PROCHO beverage (12.4 g·h-1 and 60 g·h-1, respectively would provide an ergogenic effect on mean-power performance. We also hypothesized that the magnitude of the ergogenic effect of NpPROCHO would be dependent on athletic performance. As for the latter analysis, performance level was defined according to a performance factor, calculated from individual pre values of Wmax, VO2max and 5-min mean-power performance, wherein the performance of each subject was ranked relative to the superior cyclist whos performance was set to one. Twelve trained male cyclists (VO2max = 65 ± 4 ml·kg-1·min-1 participated in a randomized double-blinded cross-over study. Results and conclusions Overall, no differences were found in 5-min mean-power performance between either of the beverages (CHO 5.4 ± 0.5 W·kg-1; PROCHO 5.3 ± 0.5 W·kg-1; NpPROCHO 5.4 ± 0.3 W·kg-1 (P = 0.29. A negative correlation was found between NpPROCHO mean-power performance and athletic performance level (using CHO-performance as reference; Pearson R = -0.74, P = 0.006. Moreover

  8. Swallowing Trouble

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    ... it is important to seek treatment to avoid malnutrition and dehydration. How are swallowing disorders treated? Many ... causing discomfort. Other causes may include: hypertension; diabetes; thyroid disease; stroke; progressive neurologic disorder; the presence of ...

  9. Swallowing difficulty

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007543.htm Swallowing difficulty To use the sharing features on this page, ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  10. Swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamolar Andrés, Sandra; Santamarina Rabanal, María Liliana; Granda Membiela, Carla María; Fernández Gutiérrez, María José; Sirgo Rodríguez, Paloma; Álvarez Marcos, César

    Parkinson's disease is a type of chronic neurodegenerative pathology with a typical movement pattern, as well as different, less studied symptoms such as dysphagia. Disease-related disorders in efficacy or safety in the process of swallowing usually lead to malnutrition, dehydration or pneumonias. The aim of this study was identifying and analyzing swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease. The initial sample consisted of 52 subjects with Parkinson's disease to whom the specific test for dysphagia SDQ was applied. Nineteen participants (36.5%) with some degree of dysphagia in the SDQ test were selected to be evaluated by volume-viscosity clinical exploration method and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Disorders in swallowing efficiency and safety were detected in 94.7% of the selected sample. With regards to efficiency, disorders were found in food transport (89.5%), insufficient labial closing (68.4%) and oral residues (47.4%), relating to duration of ingestion. Alterations in security were also observed: pharynx residues (52.7%), coughing (47.4%), penetration (31.64%), aspiration and decrease of SaO 2 (5.3%), relating to the diagnosis of respiratory pathology in the previous year. The SDQ test detected swallowing disorders in 36.5% of the subjects with Parkinson's disease. Disorders in swallowing efficiency and safety were demonstrated in 94.7% of this subset. Disorders of efficiency were more frequent than those of safety, establishing a relationship with greater time in ingestion and the appearance of respiratory pathology and pneumonias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  11. Oral Health and Swallowing Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Furuta, Michiko; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Oral health impacts systemic health. Therefore, oral care is an important consideration in maintaining quality of life (QOL). Previously, maintenance and improvement of oral hygiene was considered essential for achieving oral health. In addition to oral hygiene, oral care in terms of oral function is now considered to maintain QOL. Ingestion of exogenous nutrients via the oral cavity is fundamental to the function of all higher animals, not only human beings. Chewing and swallowing processes ...

  12. Sensory regulation of swallowing and airway protection: a role for the internal superior laryngeal nerve in humans

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    Jafari, Samah; Prince, Rebecca A; Kim, Daniel Y; Paydarfar, David

    2003-01-01

    During swallowing, the airway is protected from aspiration of ingested material by brief closure of the larynx and cessation of breathing. Mechanoreceptors innervated by the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (ISLN) are activated by swallowing, and connect to central neurones that generate swallowing, laryngeal closure and respiratory rhythm. This study was designed to evaluate the hypothesis that the ISLN afferent signal is necessary for normal deglutition and airway protection in humans. In 21 healthy adults, we recorded submental electromyograms, videofluoroscopic images of the upper airway, oronasal airflow and respiratory inductance plethysmography. In six subjects we also recorded pressures in the hypopharynx and upper oesophagus. We analysed swallows that followed a brief infusion (4–5 ml) of liquid barium onto the tongue, or a sip (1–18 ml) from a cup. In 16 subjects, the ISLN was anaesthetised by transcutaneous injection of bupivacaine into the paraglottic compartment. Saline injections using the identical procedure were performed in six subjects. Endoscopy was used to evaluate upper airway anatomy, to confirm ISLN anaesthesia, and to visualise vocal cord movement and laryngeal closure. Comparisons of swallowing and breathing were made within subjects (anaesthetic or saline injection vs. control, i.e. no injection) and between subjects (anaesthetic injection vs. saline injection). In the non-anaesthetised condition (saline injection, 174 swallows in six subjects; no injection, 522 swallows in 20 subjects), laryngeal penetration during swallowing was rare (1.4 %) and tracheal aspiration was never observed. During ISLN anaesthesia (16 subjects, 396 swallows), all subjects experienced effortful swallowing and an illusory globus sensation in the throat, and 15 subjects exhibited penetration of fluid into the larynx during swallowing. The incidence of laryngeal penetration in the anaesthetised condition was 43 % (P deglutition, especially for

  13. Expectancy of ergogenicity from sodium bicarbonate ingestion increases high-intensity cycling capacity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Higgins, Matthew F; Shabir, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    ... ) influenced subsequent high-intensity cycling capacity. Eight recreationally active males (age, 21 ± 1 years; body mass, 75 ± 8 kg; height, 178 ± 4 cm; W PEAK = 205 ± 22 W) performed a graded incremental test to assess peak power output...

  14. Comparison of the effects of cold water and ice ingestion on endurance cycling capacity in the heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Naito

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Crushed ice ingestion before and during exercise in a hot environment may be a preferred and effective approach for minimizing thermal strain, and for improving endurance performance as compared with cold water ingestion.

  15. Evaluation of liquid ingestion after bariatric surgery

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    Roberto Oliveira Dantas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for obesity; however, after surgery the patient may have difficulty in swallowing liquid and solid foods. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate liquid ingestion in patients who had undergone bariatric surgery. METHOD: We studied 43 volunteers with normal body mass index (BMI (BMI: 18.5-24.9 kg/m², 55 subjects with class III obesity (BMI: >40.0 kg/m², and 48 subjects with bariatric surgery for treatment of class III obesity. The method chosen for evaluation was the water swallowing test. The subjects drank in triplicate 50 mL of water while being precisely timed and the number of swallows were counted. RESULTS: There was no difference between subjects with normal BMI and subjects with class III obesity. During the first 2 months after bariatric surgery the patients showed an increase in the time needed to drink the entire volume, in the number of swallows, and in the inter-swallow interval, and a decrease in the volume swallowing capacity (volume/swallowing and swallowing flow rate (volume swallowed/second. After 2 months, the results of the swallowing measurements moved in the direction of normal values. CONCLUSION: Bariatric surgery may cause more intense alterations of liquid bolus swallowing within 2 months after the procedure, which moved to normal values after this time.

  16. Effect of ad Libitum Ice-Slurry and Cold-Fluid Ingestion on Cycling Time-Trial Performance in the Heat.

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    Maunder, Ed; Laursen, Paul B; Kilding, Andrew E

    2017-01-01

    To compare the physiological and performance effects of ad libitum cold-fluid (CF) and ice-slurry (IS) ingestion on cycling time-trial (TT) performance in the heat. Seven well-trained male triathletes and cyclists completed 2 maximaleffort 40-km cycling TTs in hot (35°C) and humid (60% relative humidity) conditions. In randomized order, participants ingested CF or IS (initial temperatures 4°C and -1°C, respectively) ad libitum during exercise. At each 5-km interval, time elapsed, power output, rectal and skin temperature, heart rate, and perceptual measures were recorded. The actual CF and IS temperatures during the 40-km TT were determined post hoc. Performance time (2.5% ± 2.6%, ES = 0.27) and mean power (-2.2% ± 3.2%, ES = -0.15) were likely worse in the IS trial. Differences in thermoregulatory and cardiovascular measures were largely unclear between trials, while feeling state was worse in the later stages of the IS trial (ES = -0.31 to -0.95). Fluid-ingestion volume was very likely lower in the IS trial (-29.7% ± 19.4%, ES = -0.97). The temperatures of CF and IS increased by 0.37°C/min and 0.02°C/min, respectively, over the mean TT duration. Ad libitum ingestion of CF resulted in improved 40-km cycling TT performance compared with IS. Participants chose greater fluid-ingestion rates in the CF trial than in the IS trial and had improved feeling state. These findings suggest that ad libitum CF ingestion is preferable to IS during cycling TTs under conditions of environmental heat stress.

  17. POSTFUNDOPLICATION DYSPHAGIA CAUSES SIMILAR WATER INGESTION DYNAMICS AS ACHALASIA.

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    Dantas, Roberto Oliveira; Santos, Carla Manfredi; Cassiani, Rachel Aguiar; Alves, Leda Maria Tavares; Nascimento, Weslania Viviane

    2016-01-01

    - After surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease dysphagia is a symptom in the majority of patients, with decrease in intensity over time. However, some patients may have persistent dysphagia. - The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the dynamics of water ingestion in patients with postfundoplication dysphagia compared with patients with dysphagia caused by achalasia, idiopathic or consequent to Chagas' disease, and controls. - Thirty-three patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, assessed more than one year after surgery, together with 50 patients with Chagas' disease, 27 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 88 controls were all evaluated by the water swallow test. They drunk, in triplicate, 50 mL of water without breaks while being precisely timed and the number of swallows counted. Also measured was: (a) inter-swallows interval - the time to complete the task, divided by the number of swallows during the task; (b) swallowing flow - volume drunk divided by the time taken; (c) volume of each swallow - volume drunk divided by the number of swallows. - Patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia took longer to ingest all the volume, had an increased number of swallows, an increase in interval between swallows, a decrease in swallowing flow and a decrease in water volume of each swallow compared with the controls. There was no difference between the three groups of patients. There was no correlation between postfundoplication time and the results. - It was concluded that patients with postfundoplication dysphagia have similar water ingestion dynamics as patients with achalasia.

  18. EFFECT OF GUM CHEWING ON AIR SWALLOWING, SALIVA SWALLOWING AND BELCHING

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    Ana Cristina Viana da SILVA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEructation is a physiologic event which allows gastric venting of swallowed air and most of the time is not perceived as a symptom. This is called gastric belching. Supragastric belching occurs when swallowed air does not reach the stomach and returns by mouth a short time after swallowing. This situation may cause discomfort, life limitations and problems in daily life.ObjectiveOur objective in this investigation was to evaluate if gum chewing increases the frequency of gastric and/or supragastric belches.MethodsEsophageal transit of liquid and gas was evaluated by impedance measurement in 16 patients with complaint of troublesome belching and in 15 controls. The Rome III criteria were used in the diagnosis of troublesome belching. The esophageal transit of liquid and gas was measured at 5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm and 20 cm from the lower esophageal sphincter. The subjects were evaluated for 1 hour which was divided into three 20-minute periods: (1 while sitting for a 20-minute base period; (2 after the ingestion of yogurt (200 mL, 190 kcal, in which the subjects were evaluated while chewing or not chewing gum; (3 final 20-minute period in which the subjects then inverted the task of chewing or not chewing gum. In gastric belch, the air flowed from the stomach through the esophagus in oral direction and in supragastric belch the air entered the esophagus rapidly from proximal and was expulsed almost immediately in oral direction. Air swallows were characterized by an increase of at least 50% of basal impedance and saliva swallow by a decrease of at least 50% of basal impedance, that progress from proximal to distal esophagus.ResultsIn base period, air swallowing was more frequent in patients than in controls and saliva swallowing was more frequent in controls than in patients. There was no difference between the medians of controls and patients in the number of gastric belches and supragastric belches. In six patients, supragastric belches

  19. Speech and Swallowing

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    ... You are here Home › Speech and Swallowing Problems Speech and Swallowing Problems People with Parkinson’s may notice ... How do I know if I have a speech or voice problem? My voice makes it difficult ...

  20. Swallowed dentures: Two cases and a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Isaev, Mubariz; Orujova, Lala; Isaev, Emin; Yaskin, Evgeniy; Neronov, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Denture ingestion or aspiration is a problem requiring awareness of different specialists including dentists, surgeons, otolaryngologists, anesthesiologists etc. in terms of prevention, early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Complications of swallowed dentures include hollow viscus necrosis, perforation, penetration to neighbor organs leading to fistulae, bleeding and obstruction. Presentation of cases First case is a 54-year-old female who accidentally swallowed retractable one-tooth denture during fall about 22 h before admission and clinical manifestation of acute small bowel obstruction developed. The patient underwent laparotomy, enterotomy with retrieval of the foreign body. The second case is a 31-year-old male who accidentally ingested fixed one-tooth prosthesis while eating which impacted in the ileocaecal valve. During the preparation to colonoscopy the denture spontaneously passed out with stools. Discussion Denture ingestion is more common among patients with psychoneurologic deficit, alcohol and drug abusers. Among healthy and younger population denture ingestion is rare. Both reported patients are not elder. Thus dislodgement of removable or fixed dentures is another risk factor of denture ingestion. Most common site of denture impaction is esophagus; small bowel impaction is rare. Moreover, in most reported cases, small bowel impaction of ingested dentures leads to small bowel perforation. In our first case the complication of denture ingestion appeared to be bowel obstruction what is even rarer. Conclusion Fixed dentures can be accidentally ingested as well as removable dentures. Denture loosening leads to accidental denture ingestion. Patients with denture loosening should be recommended to visit dentist as soon as possible. PMID:26635957

  1. The Test of Masticating and Swallowing Solids (TOMASS): reliability, validity and international normative data.

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    Huckabee, Maggie-Lee; McIntosh, Theresa; Fuller, Laura; Curry, Morgan; Thomas, Paige; Walshe, Margaret; McCague, Ellen; Battel, Irene; Nogueira, Dalia; Frank, Ulrike; van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; Sella-Weiss, Oshrat

    2017-07-05

    Clinical swallowing assessment is largely limited to qualitative assessment of behavioural observations. There are limited quantitative data that can be compared with a healthy population for identification of impairment. The Test of Masticating and Swallowing Solids (TOMASS) was developed as a quantitative assessment of solid bolus ingestion. This research programme investigated test development indices and established normative data for the TOMASS to support translation to clinical dysphagia assessment. A total of 228 healthy adults (ages 20-80+ years) stratified by age and sex participated in one or more of four consecutive studies evaluating test-retest and interrater reliability and validity to instrumental assessment. For each study the test required participants to ingest a commercially available cracker with instructions to 'eat this as quickly as is comfortably possible'. Further averaged measures were derived including the number of masticatory cycles and swallows per bite, and time per bite, masticatory cycle and swallow. Initial analyses identified significant differences on salient measures between two commercially available crackers that are nearly identical in shape, size and ingredients, suggesting the need for separate normative samples for specific regional products. Additional analyses on a single cracker identified that the TOMASS was sensitive at detecting changes in performance based on age and sex. Test-retest reliability across days and interrater reliability between clinicians was high, as was validation of observational measures to instrumental correlates of the same behaviours. Therefore, normative data are provided for the TOMASS from a minimum of 80 healthy controls, stratified by age and sex, for each of seven commercially available crackers from broad regions worldwide. Analyses on a single cracker identified Arnott's Salada, and that TOMASS measures were sensitive for detecting changes in performance based on age and sex. Interrater

  2. Caustic Ingestions and Foreign Bodies Ingestions in Pediatric Patients.

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    Kurowski, Jacob A; Kay, Marsha

    2017-06-01

    Children inevitably swallow foreign material accidentally or intentionally. Each type of ingestion carries their own set of risks and complications, short and long term, some requiring immediate attention while others close monitoring. Alkalotic household cleaning products and lithium button batteries are increasingly common and damage the esophagus quickly. While many toys with rare-earth metals are banned, they are already present in many households and can cause necrosis of bowel that is between the magnets. This article reviews the incidence and assessment along with current literature to provide guidelines for management of pediatric patients with suspected caustic or foreign body ingestion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The temperature of water ingested ad libitum does not influence performance during a 40-km self-paced cycling trial in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, M V; De Andrade, M T; Ramos, G P; Maia-Lima, A; Pereira, E R; Mendes, T T; Marins, J C; Amorim, F T; Silami-Garcia, E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the temperature of ingested water on performance during a 40-km self-paced cycling trial in the heat (35º C and 60% relative humidity). The study was randomized, counterbalanced, crossover and single-blinded. Ten well-trained male cycling athletes (cyclists, mountain bikers or triathletes) who were non-acclimatized to heat were subjected to four experimental situations divided into two sets. In the first set, the participants performed two trials, during which they were given either cold (10º C) or warm water (37º C) ad libitum. In these situations, the volume and timing of the water ingestion (when each bolus was ingested) were recorded and replicated in the second set, but the water temperature was reversed. The performance times were unaffected by the water intake volume (P=0.425), but the water at a temperature of 37º C tended to induce lower performance times (P=0.078) during the trials (AL10=93.0±3.5 min; AL37=94.4±4.1 min; SC10=93.4±4.0; SC37=97.4±4.3 min). The water intake was greater when the water was cold (Pcycling trial in the heat were unaffected by different water temperatures.

  4. Gas swallow during meals in patients with excessive belching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, N; Serra, J

    2017-09-01

    Swallowed gas is an important source of abdominal gas, and aerophagia is often believed as a putative cause of gas-related abdominal symptoms. However, altered gas-swallow during meals has not been demonstrated. Our aim was to characterize the number of gas swallows during meals in patients complaining of excessive belching and gaseousness and a control group without abdominal symptoms during a 24-h period. A 24-h pH-impedance monitoring was performed in 10 patients with excessive belching, and 11 patients without digestive symptoms or reflux in the pH-impedance study. During the study, patients followed their daily routine and customary meals, without any specific limitation. In each patient the number and content of swallows and belches were analyzed. Total meal periods were similar in controls (75±26 min) and patients (79±21 min; P=.339), but the number of gaseous swallows was greater in patients (114±13 swallows) than controls (71±8 swallows; P=.007), due to a greater frequency of gaseous swallows during meals (15±2 swallows/10 min vs 10±1 swallows/10 min, respectively; P=.008). During the 24-h study period, 66±13 belches were recorded in patients, but only 13±3 belches in controls (PGas is frequently swallowed during meals. Patients complaining of excessive belching have a different swallow pattern during meals, with an increased ingestion of gas that correlates with increased gastric belching events. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Chemical Sensing Regulates Mastication/Swallowing.

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    Yamamura, Kensuke; Kurose, Masayuki; Okamoto, Keiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Mastication and swallowing are the first stage of digestion involving several motor processes such as food intake, intra-oral food transport, bolus formation and chewing and swallowing reflex. These complicated motor functions are accomplished by the well-coordinated activities in the jaw, hyoid, tongue, facial and pharyngeal muscles. Although the basic activity patterns of these movements are controlled by the brainstem pattern generators, these movements generate various peripheral sensory inputs. Among the sensory inputs, it is well-known that somatic sensory inputs play important roles in reflexively modulating the movements so that the final motor outputs fit the environmental demand. However, little is known about the effects of chemical sensory inputs such as taste and olfaction originating from the ingested foods by these movements. A possible reason could be raised that cognition of the chemical sensory inputs at the higher brain also influences the movements, so it is difficult to discuss the neural mechanisms underlying the observed effect. In this review, we focus on the effects of chemical sensory inputs on the masticatory movements and initiation of swallowing. We first summarize chemical sensory inputs occurring during mastication and swallowing, and their receptive mechanisms. In addition, we will introduce the effect of application of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) solution as an umami taste to the oropharynx on the swallow initiation which is involuntary controlled and the possible neural mechanisms underlying this effect is discussed.

  6. Swallowed toothbrush: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Toothbrush swallowing is rare, and most cases are seen in young women with anorexia nervosa or bulimia or associated with mental retardation or schizophrenia. Prompt removal is recommended because no cases of spontaneous passage have been reported. There is no previously reported case series on swallowed toothbrush in mentally normal young men. Here, we report three cases of swallowed toothbrush found in the esophagus and stomach on endoscopy. In our case series, successful removal of the toothbrush was done without endotracheal intubation or over tube, without any complications. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case series of swallowed toothbrush managed successfully endoscopically.

  7. Promoting safe swallowing when puree is swallowed without aspiration but thin liquid is aspirated: nectar is enough.

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    Leder, Steven B; Judson, Benjamin L; Sliwinski, Edward; Madson, Lindsay

    2013-03-01

    The use of thickened liquids is a common compensatory strategy to improve swallow safety. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal liquid viscosity to use to promote successful swallowing in a specific subset of dysphagic patients who swallow puree without aspiration but thin liquid with aspiration. A referral-based sample of 84 consecutive inpatients from a large, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital who met the study criteria was analyzed prospectively. Inclusion criteria were no preexisting dysphagia, a successful pharyngeal swallow without aspiration with puree consistency but pharyngeal dysphagia with aspiration of thin liquid consistency, and stable medical, surgical, and neurological status at the time of transnasal fiberoptic swallow testing and up to 24 h after recommendations for oral alimentation with a modified diet consisting of nectar-like and honey-like thickened liquids. Success with ingesting both nectar-like and honey-like thickened liquids and clinically evident aspiration events were recorded. Care providers were blinded to the study's purpose. All 84 patients were successfully ingesting nectar-like and honey-like thickened liquids at the time of swallow testing and up to 24 h after testing. A specific subset of dysphagic patients who swallowed puree without aspiration but aspirated thin liquid demonstrated 100 % successful swallowing of both nectar-like and honey-like thickened liquids. Therefore, a nectar-like thickened liquid appears to be adequate to promote safe swallowing in these patients and, because of patient preference for the least thick liquid, may enhance compliance and potentially contribute to maintenance of adequate hydration requirements.

  8. POSTFUNDOPLICATION DYSPHAGIA CAUSES SIMILAR WATER INGESTION DYNAMICS AS ACHALASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Oliveira DANTAS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - After surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease dysphagia is a symptom in the majority of patients, with decrease in intensity over time. However, some patients may have persistent dysphagia. Objective - The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the dynamics of water ingestion in patients with postfundoplication dysphagia compared with patients with dysphagia caused by achalasia, idiopathic or consequent to Chagas' disease, and controls. Methods - Thirty-three patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, assessed more than one year after surgery, together with 50 patients with Chagas' disease, 27 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 88 controls were all evaluated by the water swallow test. They drunk, in triplicate, 50 mL of water without breaks while being precisely timed and the number of swallows counted. Also measured was: (a inter-swallows interval - the time to complete the task, divided by the number of swallows during the task; (b swallowing flow - volume drunk divided by the time taken; (c volume of each swallow - volume drunk divided by the number of swallows. Results - Patients with postfundoplication dysphagia, Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia took longer to ingest all the volume, had an increased number of swallows, an increase in interval between swallows, a decrease in swallowing flow and a decrease in water volume of each swallow compared with the controls. There was no difference between the three groups of patients. There was no correlation between postfundoplication time and the results. Conclusion - It was concluded that patients with postfundoplication dysphagia have similar water ingestion dynamics as patients with achalasia.

  9. ACIDIC AND NEUTRAL LIQUID INGESTION IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafne Calsoni GOMES

    Full Text Available Context Sour acidic liquid has a slower distal esophageal transit than a neutral liquid. Our hypothesis was that an acidic sour bolus has a different ingestion dynamic than a neutral bolus. Method In 50 healthy volunteers and 29 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, we evaluated the ingestion dynamics of 100 mL of acidic sour liquid (concentrated lemon juice, pH: 3.0 and 100 mL of water (pH: 6.8. The time to ingest the total volume, the number of swallows to ingest the volume, the interval between swallows, the flux of ingestion and the volume ingested in each swallow was measured. Results In both groups, healthy volunteers and patients in treatment for GERD, the acidic liquid took longer to be ingested, a higher number of swallows, a slower flux of ingestion and a smaller volume in each swallow than the neutral bolus. There was no difference between healthy volunteers and patients with GERD. The ingestion in women was longer than in men for acidic and neutral liquids. Conclusion Acidic liquid has a different dynamic of ingestion than the neutral liquid, which may be consequence of the slower transit through the distal esophageal body or an anticipation to drink a sour bolus. Patients with GERD have the same prolonged ingestion of the acidic liquid bolus as seen in healthy volunteers.

  10. Ginger Orally Disintegrating Tablets to Improve Swallowing in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Ayumu; Funato, Hiroki; Nakai, Megumi; Iizuka, Michiro; Abe, Noriaki; Yagi, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Hisashi; Jobu, Kohei; Yokota, Junko; Hirose, Kahori; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We previously prepared and pharmaceutically evaluated ginger orally disintegrating (OD) tablets, optimized the base formulation, and carried out a clinical trial in healthy adults in their 20 s and 50s to measure their effect on salivary substance P (SP) level and improved swallowing function. In this study, we conducted clinical trials using the ginger OD tablets in older people to clinically evaluate the improvements in swallowing function resulting from the functional components of the tablet. The ginger OD tablets were prepared by mixing the excipients with the same amount of mannitol and sucrose to a concentration of 1% ginger. Eighteen healthy older adult volunteers aged 63 to 90 were included in the swallowing function test. Saliva was collected before and 15 min after administration of the placebo and ginger OD tablets. Swallowing endoscopy was performed by an otolaryngologist before administration and 15 min after administration of the ginger OD tablets. A scoring method was used to evaluate the endoscopic swallowing. Fifteen minutes after taking the ginger OD tablets, the salivary SP amount was significantly higher than prior to ingestion or after taking the placebo (pginger OD tablets. Our findings showed that the ginger OD tablets increased the salivary SP amount and improved swallowing function in older people with appreciably reduced swallowing function.

  11. Respiratory phase resetting and airflow changes induced by swallowing in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydarfar, D; Gilbert, R J; Poppel, C S; Nassab, P F

    1995-01-01

    1. Relationships between the timing of respiration and deglutition were studied in thirty awake healthy subjects at rest. Deglutition was monitored by submental electromyography, pharyngeal manometry and videofluoroscopy. Respiration was recorded by measurement of oronasal airflow and chest wall movement. Three types of deglutition were studied: injected bolus swallows, spontaneous swallows, and visually cued swallows of boluses previously placed in the mouth. 2. The effect of each swallow on respiratory rhythm was characterized by measurement of cophase, defined as the interval between the onset of deglutitive submental EMG activity to the onset of subsequent rescheduled inspirations. Cophase was determined for swallows initiated at different phases of the respiratory cycle. In all subjects deglutition caused phase resetting of respiratory rhythm. Cophase was largest for swallows initiated near the the inspiratory-expiratory (E-I) transition and smallest for swallows initiated near the expiratory-inspiratory (E-I) transition. The pattern of respiratory resetting by deglutition was topologically classified as type 0. This pattern was shown for swallows induced by bolus injection or visual cue, and for spontaneous swallows. 3. The incidence of spontaneous deglutition was influenced by the position of the swallow in the respiratory cycle. Few spontaneous swallows were initiated near the E-I transition whereas most occurred from late inspiration to mid-expiration. 4. Deglutition caused an abrupt decrease in airflow leading to an interval of apnoea, followed by a period of expiration. The duration of deglutition apnoea for spontaneous swallows was shorter than that for 5 ml bolus swallows, and was unaffected by the respiratory phase of swallow initiation. The period of expiration after swallowing was longest for swallows initiated at the I-E transition, and shortest for E-I swallows. 5. The intervals between bolus injection and the onset of deglutition apnoea, and the

  12. Speech and Swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Smell Cognitive Changes Depression Fatigue Constipation & Nausea Hallucinations/Delusions Pain Skeletal & Bone Health Skin Changes Sleep Disorders Speech & Swallowing Problems Urinary Incontinence Vision Changes Weight Management Help Us Make a Difference ...

  13. Caustic Ingestions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rafeey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prevention has a main role in reducing the occurrence of corrosive ingestion especially in children, yet this goal is far from being reached in developing countries, where such injuries are largely unreported and their true prevalence simply cannot be extrapolated from random articles or personal experience. Because of the accidental nature of the ingestions, the case fatality rate for pediatric patients is significantly less than that of adolescents and adults.  Currently, esophagoscopy is recommended for all patients with a history of caustic substance ingestion because clinical criteria have not proved to be reliable predictors of esophageal injury. The presence or absence of three serious signs and symptoms-vomiting, drooling, and stridor—as well as the presence and location of oropharyngeal burns could be  compared with the findings on subsequent esophagoscopy. Medical or endoscopic prevention of stricture is debatable, yet esophageal stents, absorbable or not, show promising data. The purpose of this lecture is to outline the current epidemiology, mechanism of injury, clinical manifestations, management and long-term complications of caustic ingestions in pediatric patients.   Key Words: Caustic, Children, Ingestions.

  14. Impact of sodium citrate ingestion during recovery after dehydrating exercise on rehydration and subsequent 40-km cycling time-trial performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvi, Silva; Mooses, Martin; Timpmann, Saima; Medijainen, Luule; Narõškina, Daria; Unt, Eve; Ööpik, Vahur

    2018-01-11

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of sodium citrate (CIT) ingestion (600 mg·kg‒1) during recovery from dehydrating cycling exercise (DE) on subsequent 40-km cycling performance in a warm environment (32 °C). Twenty male non-heat-acclimated endurance athletes exercised in the heat until 4% body mass (BM) loss occurred. After 16 h recovery with consumption of water ad libitum and prescribed diet (evening meal 20 kcal·kg‒1, breakfast 12 kcal·kg‒1) supplemented in a double-blind, randomized, crossover manner with CIT or placebo (PLC), they performed 40-km time-trial (TT) on a cycle ergometer in a warm environment. During recovery greater increases in BM and plasma volume (PV) concomitant with greater water intake and retention occurred in CIT compared with PLC trial (p p p ˃ 0.05) in sweat loss, PV decrement, ratings of perceived exertion or TT time (CIT 68.10±3.28 min, PLC 68.11±2.87 min) occurred. At the end of TT blood lactate concentration was higher (7.58±2.44 mmol·L‒1 vs 5.58±1.32 mmol·L‒1; p = 0.0002) and rectal temperature lower (39.54±0.50 °C vs 39.65±0.52 °C; p = 0.033) in CIT than in PLC trial. Compared with pre-DE time point, PV had decreased to a lower level in PLC than in CIT trial (p = 0.0001). In conclusion, CIT enhances rehydration after exercise-induced dehydration but has no impact on subsequent 40-km cycling TT performance in a warm uncompensable environment.

  15. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Heroes Among Us Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia) Updated:Nov 15,2016 Excerpted and adapted from "Swallowing Disorders After a Stroke," Stroke Connection Magazine July/August ...

  16. Atypical swallowing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, C; Prevedello, C; Giannini, L; Galbiati, G; Farronato, G

    2014-06-01

    Atypical swallowing is a myofunctional problem consisting of an altered tongue position during the act of swallowing. High incidence in population, multifactorial etiology and the recurring connection with the presence of malocclusions made it a topic of strong interest and discussion in science. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the current orientation on the topic of atypical swallowing, trying in particular to answer two questions: 1) what kind of connection is there between atypical swallowing and malocclusion; 2) what kind of therapy should be used to solve it. This review was conducted on the Medline database [www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/pubmed] searching for the keywords "atypical swallowing" and "tongue thrust". We examined all the documents from the year 1990 onwards, excluding the ones about syndromic cases of the central motor system. The causal relation between the two problems seems to be biunique: some authors affirm that this oral habit starts as a compensation mechanism for a preexisting malocclusion (especially in case of open-bite); other texts show that it has a tendency to exacerbate cases of malocclusion; it is also proven that a non-physiological tongue thrust can negatively influence the progress of an ongoing orthodontic therapy. Thereby, the best therapeutic approach seems to be a multidisciplinary one: beside orthodontics, which is necessary to correct the malocclusion, it is essential to set up a myofunctional rehabilitation procedure to correct the oral habit, therefore granting long time permanent results. There is also proof of a substantial difference between the results obtained from early (deciduous or primary mixed dentition) or later treatments. The biunique causal relation between atypical swallowing and malocclusion suggests a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach, orthodontic and myofunctional, to temporarily solve both problems. An early diagnosis and a prompt intervention have a significantly positive influence on the

  17. Using devices to upregulate nonnutritive swallowing in typically developing infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi Szynkiewicz, Sarah; Mulheren, Rachel W; Palmore, Kathryn W; O'Donoghue, Cynthia R; Ludlow, Christy L

    2016-10-01

    The role of various sensory stimuli for stimulating swallowing in infants may be of importance for assisting infants to develop oral feeding. We evaluated the swallowing mechanism response to two devices for increasing the rate of nonnutritive swallowing in two typically developing infant age groups, ages 2-4 mo and 7-9 mo. One device was a pacifier familiar to the infant; the other was a small vibrator placed on the skin overlying the thyroid cartilage. The rate of nonnutritive swallowing while infants were awake was compared in three 10-min conditions: at rest without stimulation (spontaneous); during nonnutritive sucking with a pacifier; and over 10 min containing 18 epochs of vibratory stimulation for 10 s each. To assess whether vibration on the throat over the laryngeal area altered respiration, the mean cycle length was compared between 10-min intervals either containing vibratory stimulation or without stimulation at rest. Both the pacifier and laryngeal vibration stimulation doubled the rate of swallowing in the infants with a mean age of 3 mo 16 days and infants with a mean age of 8 mo 8 days. No differences occurred in the mean respiratory cycle length between intervals with and without vibration in either age group. Results suggest that nonnutritive sucking, vibration, or both might be beneficial in enhancing swallowing in young infants. Because vibration on the neck would not interfere with oral transfer of liquid, it might provide additional stimulation for swallowing during oral feeding. Both stimulation types should be evaluated for enhancing swallowing in infants with immature swallowing skills. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. The effects of ingestion of sugarcane juice and commercial sports drinks on cycling performance of athletes in comparison to plain water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpana, Kommi; Lal, Priti Rishi; Kusuma, Doddipalli Lakshmi; Khanna, Gulshan Lal

    2013-09-01

    Sugarcane juice (ScJ) is a natural drink popular in most tropical Asian regions. However, research on its effect in enhancing sports performance is limited. The present investigation was to study the effect of sugarcane juice on exercise metabolism and sport performance of athletes in comparison to a commercially available sports drinks. Fifteen male athletes (18-25 yrs) were asked to cycle until volitional exhaustion at 70% VO2 max on three different trials viz. plain water (PW), sports drink (SpD) and ScJ. In each trial 3ml/kg/BW of 6 % of carbohydrate (CHO) fluid was given at every 20 min interval of exercise and a blood sample was taken to measure the hematological parameters. During recovery 200 ml of 9% CHO fluid was given and blood sample was drawn at 5, 10, 15 min of recovery. Ingestion of sugarcane juice showed significant increase (Pdrink than SpD and PW in post exercise as it enhances muscle glycogen resynthesis.

  19. Unilateral Superior Laryngeal Nerve Lesion in an Animal Model of Dysphagia and Its Effect on Sucking and Swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Malone, Regina; Holman, Shaina D.; Lukasik, Stacey L.; Fukuhara, Takako; Gierbolini-Norat, Estela M.; Thexton, Allan J.; German, Rebecca Z.

    2013-01-01

    We tested two hypotheses relating to the sensory deficit that follows a unilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) lesion in an infant animal model. We hypothesized that it would result in (1) a higher incidence of aspiration and (2) temporal changes in sucking and swallowing. We ligated the right-side SLN in six 2–3-week-old female pigs. Using videofluoroscopy, we recorded swallows in the same pre- and post-lesion infant pigs. We analyzed the incidence of aspiration and the duration and latency of suck and swallow cycles. After unilateral SLN lesioning, the incidence of silent aspiration during swallowing increased from 0.7 to 41.5 %. The durations of the suck containing the swallow, the suck immediately following the swallow, and the swallow itself were significantly longer in the post-lesion swallows, although the suck prior to the swallow was not different. The interval between the start of the suck containing a swallow and the subsequent epiglottal movement was longer in the post-lesion swallows. The number of sucks between swallows was significantly greater in post-lesion swallows compared to pre-lesion swallows. Unilateral SLN lesion increased the incidence of aspiration and changed the temporal relationships between sucking and swallowing. The longer transit time and the temporal coordinative dysfunction between suck and swallow cycles may contribute to aspiration. These results suggest that swallow dysfunction and silent aspiration are common and potentially overlooked sequelae of unilateral SLN injury. This validated animal model of aspiration has the potential for further dysphagia studies. PMID:23417250

  20. Swallowing of bolus types by postsurgical head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachler, R J; Hamlet, S L; Mathog, R H; Jones, L; Heilbrun, L K; Manov, L J; O'Campo, J M

    1994-01-01

    Clinically, head and neck cancer patients with anterior resections have better postoperative outcomes than do patients with posterior resections. Videofluoroscopy was used to study the swallowing characteristics in postsurgery head and neck cancer patients and normal controls. Most patients received post-operative radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and no cancer recurrence was noted at the time of study, 4-8 months posttreatment. Bolus types included: 3 mL and 10 mL liquid barium, barium paste, and barium-coated cookie. Temporal measurements and a count of the number of swallows required to ingest each material were made from the videotaped data. Statistical analysis using an unbalanced univariate repeated measures ANOVA was performed. The major differences were found between bolus types, with few differences noted between surgical groups (anterior vs posterior resections) and normal controls. Patients took longer to ingest viscous material, accomplishing this by multiple piecemeal and clearing swallows. Coordination of mastication and swallowing of the cookie was different between normal and patient groups. Patients who are able to swallow reasonably well postoperatively maintain normal coordination and timing of swallowing activity and do not vary these parameters to compensate for structural inadequacy. Instead, repeated swallows are used.

  1. Ingestion accidentelle de pile bouton en intra-oesophagien ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Digestive foreign bodies in children are a frequent reason for consultation. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy confirms the diagnostic of foreign body ingestion and allows extraction in most cases. A 2-year old child with no notable medical history was admitted to pediatric emergency for swallowing a foreign body three days ...

  2. Effects of lowering body temperature via hyperhydration, with and without glycerol ingestion and practical precooling on cycling time trial performance in hot and humid conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Megan LR

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypohydration and hyperthermia are factors that may contribute to fatigue and impairment of endurance performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of combining glycerol hyperhydration and an established precooling technique on cycling time trial performance in hot environmental conditions. Methods Twelve well-trained male cyclists performed three 46.4-km laboratory-based cycling trials that included two climbs, under hot and humid environmental conditions (33.3 ± 1.1°C; 50 ± 6% r.h.. Subjects were required to hyperhydrate with 25 g.kg-1 body mass (BM of a 4°C beverage containing 6% carbohydrate (CON 2.5 h prior to the time trial. On two occasions, subjects were also exposed to an established precooling technique (PC 60 min prior to the time trial, involving 14 g.kg-1 BM ice slurry ingestion and applied iced towels over 30 min. During one PC trial, 1.2 g.kg-1 BM glycerol was added to the hyperhydration beverage in a double-blind fashion (PC+G. Statistics used in this study involve the combination of traditional probability statistics and a magnitude-based inference approach. Results Hyperhydration resulted in large reductions (−0.6 to −0.7°C in rectal temperature. The addition of glycerol to this solution also lowered urine output (330 ml, 10%. Precooling induced further small (−0.3°C to moderate (−0.4°C reductions in rectal temperature with PC and PC+G treatments, respectively, when compared with CON (0.0°C, P Conclusions Despite increasing fluid intake and reducing core temperature, performance and thermoregulatory benefits of a hyperhydration strategy with and without the addition of glycerol, plus practical precooling, were not superior to hyperhydration alone. Further research is warranted to further refine preparation strategies for athletes competing in thermally stressful events to optimize health and maximize performance outcomes.

  3. Normal swallowing acoustics across age, gender, bolus viscosity, and bolus volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youmans, Scott R; Stierwalt, Julie A G

    2011-12-01

    Cervical auscultation has been proposed as an augmentative procedure for the subjective clinical swallowing examination due to the tangible differences between normal and dysphagic swallowing sounds. However, the research is incomplete regarding cervical auscultation and swallowing acoustics in that the differences between the sounds of normal versus dysphagic swallowing have yet to be fully understood or quantified. The swallows of 96 reportedly healthy adults, balanced for gender and divided into younger, middle, and older age groups, were audio-recorded while ingesting several boluses of varying viscosity and volume. The audio signals were then analyzed to determine their temporal and acoustic characteristics. Results indicated increasing pharyngeal swallowing duration with increasing age, bolus viscosity, and bolus volume. In addition, an increased duration to peak intensity with increasing age was found in one of our two analyses, as well as with some of the more viscous versus less viscous boluses. Men and older persons produced higher peak intensities and peak frequencies than women and younger persons. Thin liquids were produced with more intensity than honey or more viscous boluses, and with greater frequency than mechanical soft solids. Larger volumes resulted in greater peak frequency values. Some of the acoustic measurements appear to be more useful than others, including the duration of the acoustic swallowing signal and the within-subjects peak intensity variable. We noted that differences in swallowing acoustics were more related to changes in viscosity rather than volume. Finally, within-participant observations were more useful than between-participant observations.

  4. Swallowing transit times and valleculae residue in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Breathing and swallowing are physiologically linked to ensure effortless gas exchange during oronasal breathing and to prevent aspiration during swallowing. Studies have indicated consistent aspiration in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mainly related to delayed swallowing reflex and problems with lingual propulsion and pharyngeal peristalsis as a result of bilateral weakness and incoordination of the related muscles. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate swallowing transit times and valleculae residue characteristics of stable COPD patients who have no swallowing complaints. Methods Our study population included 20 stable patients with COPD and no swallowing complaints and 20 healthy controls. Swallowing was assessed through videofluoroscopic examination and involved the analysis of the following parameters: (1) pharyngeal stages of deglutition; (2) the duration of bolus movement through the oral cavity and pharynx (i.e. transit times); (3) valleculae residue ratio; (4) penetration/aspiration. Results Participants of the study did not present any signs of penetration-aspiration for any of the tested consistencies. Patients with COPD presented longer pharyngeal transit times during the ingestion of the liquid consistency and during the ingestion of the paste consistency. Regarding the duration of tongue base contact with the posterior pharyngeal wall, COPD patients also presented longer durations for the liquid and paste consistencies. No significant difference was observed for the distribution of individuals among the different valleculae residue severity levels. Conclusions Our study suggests that stable COPD patients may present physiological adaptations as a protective swallowing maneuver to avoid aspiration/penetration of pharyngeal contents. Moreover, valleculae residue cannot be seen as an isolated factor when trying to explain swallowing alterations in this population. PMID:24739506

  5. VIDEOFLUOROSCOPIC SWALLOWING STUDY: esophageal alterations in patients with dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina SCHEEREN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Videofluoroscopic swallowing study is a dynamic exam and allows the evaluation of the complete swallowing process. However, most published studies have only reported alterations in the oropharynx and pharyngoesophageal transition, leaving the analysis of the esophagus as a secondary goal. Objectives The goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alterations in the esophageal phase thorough videofluoroscopic swallowing study in patients with dysphagia. Methods Consecutive patients with dysphagia who underwent videofluoroscopic swallowing study including esophageal analysis between May 2010 and May 2012 had their exams retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified into two groups: Group I - without a pre-established etiological diagnosis and Group II - with neurological disease. During the exam, the patients ingested three different consistencies of food (liquid, pasty and solid contrasted with barium sulfate and 19 items were analyzed according to a protocol. The esophageal phase was considered abnormal when one of the evaluated items was compromised. Results Three hundred and thirty-three (n = 333 consecutive patients were studied - 213 (64% in Group I and 120 (36% in Group II. Esophageal alterations were found in 104 (31% patients, with a higher prevalence in Group I (36.2%, especially on the items esophageal clearance (16.9% and tertiary contractions (16.4%. It was observed that 12% of individuals in Group I only presented alterations on the esophageal phase. Conclusion Evaluation of the esophageal phase of swallowing during videofluoroscopic swallowing study detects abnormalities in patients with cervical dysphagia, especially in the group without pre-established etiological diagnosis.

  6. Tracking the hyoid bone in videofluoroscopic swallowing studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellen, Patrick M.; Becker, Darci; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; van Daele, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    Difficulty swallowing, or dysphagia, has become a growing problem. Swallowing complications can lead to malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infection, and even death. The current gold standard for analyzing and diagnosing dysphagia is the videofluoroscopic barium swallow study. In these studies, a fluoroscope is used to image the patient ingesting barium solutions of different volumes and viscosities. The hyoid bone anchors many key muscles involved in swallowing and plays a key role in the process. Abnormal hyoid bone motion during a swallow can indicate swallowing dysfunction. Currently in clinical settings, hyoid bone motion is assessed qualitatively, which can be subject to intra-rater and inter-rater bias. This paper presents a semi-automatic method for tracking the hyoid bone that makes quantitative analysis feasible. The user defines a template of the hyoid on one frame, and this template is tracked across subsequent frames. The matching phase is optimized by predicting the position of the template based on kinematics. An expert speech pathologist marked the position of the hyoid on each frame of ten studies to serve as the gold standard. Results from performing Bland-Altman analysis at a 95% confidence interval showed a bias of 0.0+/-0.08 pixels in x and -0.08+/-0.09 pixels in y between the manually-defined gold standard and the proposed method. The average Pearson's correlation between the gold standard and the proposed method was 0.987 in x and 0.980 in y. This paper also presents a method for automatically establishing a patient-centric coordinate system for the interpretation of hyoid motion. This coordinate system corrects for upper body patient motion during the study and identifies superior-inferior and anterior-posterior motion components. These tools make the use of quantitative hyoid motion analysis feasible in clinical and research settings.

  7. A model experiment to study swallowing of spherical and elongated particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconati, Marco; Raut, Sharvari; Charkhi, Farshad; Burbidge, Adam; Engmann, Jan; Ramaioli, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Swallowing disorders are not uncommon among elderly and people affected by neurological diseases. For these patients the ingestion of solid grains, such as pharmaceutical oral solid formulations, could result in choking. This generally results in a low compliance in taking solid medications. The effect of the solid medication size on the real or perceived ease of swallowing is still to be understood from the mechanistic viewpoint. The interplay of the inclusion shape and the rheology of the liquid being swallowed together with the medication is also not fully understood. In this study, a model experiment was developed to study the oropharyngeal phase of swallowing, replicating the dynamics of the bolus flow induced by the tongue (by means of a roller driven by an applied force). Experiments were performed using a wide set of solid inclusions, dispersed in a thick Newtonian liquid. Predictions for a simple theory are compared with experiments. Results show that an increase in the grain size results in a slower dynamics of the swallowing. Furthermore, the experiments demonstrated the paramount role of shape, as flatter and more streamlined inclusions flow faster than spherical. This approach can support the design of new oral solid formulations that can be ingested more easily and effectively also by people with mild swallowing disorders.

  8. A model experiment to study swallowing of spherical and elongated particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marconati Marco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Swallowing disorders are not uncommon among elderly and people affected by neurological diseases. For these patients the ingestion of solid grains, such as pharmaceutical oral solid formulations, could result in choking. This generally results in a low compliance in taking solid medications. The effect of the solid medication size on the real or perceived ease of swallowing is still to be understood from the mechanistic viewpoint. The interplay of the inclusion shape and the rheology of the liquid being swallowed together with the medication is also not fully understood. In this study, a model experiment was developed to study the oropharyngeal phase of swallowing, replicating the dynamics of the bolus flow induced by the tongue (by means of a roller driven by an applied force. Experiments were performed using a wide set of solid inclusions, dispersed in a thick Newtonian liquid. Predictions for a simple theory are compared with experiments. Results show that an increase in the grain size results in a slower dynamics of the swallowing. Furthermore, the experiments demonstrated the paramount role of shape, as flatter and more streamlined inclusions flow faster than spherical. This approach can support the design of new oral solid formulations that can be ingested more easily and effectively also by people with mild swallowing disorders.

  9. Ingestion of swimming pool water by recreational swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, A P; Behymer, T D; Cantú, R; Magnuson, M; Wymer, L J

    2017-06-01

    The volume of water ingested by swimmers while swimming is of great interest to individuals who develop risk assessments using quantitative microbial risk assessment or epidemiological approaches. We have used chloroisocyanurate disinfected swimming pool waters to determine the amount of water swallowed by swimmers during swimming activity. The chloroisocyanurate, which is in equilibrium with chlorine and cyanuric acid in the pool water, provides a biomarker, cyanuric acid, that once swallowed passes through the body into the urine unchanged. The concentration of cyanuric acid in a 24 hour urine specimen and the concentration in pool water can be used to calculate the amount of water swallowed. Our study population of 549 participants, which was about evenly divided by gender, and young and adult swimmers, indicated that swimmers ingest about 32 mL per hour (arithmetic mean) and that children swallowed about four times as much water as adults during swimming activities. It was also observed that males had a tendency to swallow more water than females during swimming activity and that children spent about twice as much time in the water than adults.

  10. Lost and found…Tracking a swallowed denture: Role of radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita Khalekar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Denture ingestion or aspiration is a problem requiring awareness of different specialists including dentists, surgeons, otolaryngologists, and anesthesiologists for prevention, early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Complications of swallowed dentures include hollow viscous necrosis, perforation, and penetration to neighbouring organs leading to fistulae, bleeding and obstruction. Here, we present the case of a 65 year old female patient who swallowed the denture, which was detected by barium swallow and removed by endoscopy. Hence, the management of swallowed denture needs a multidisciplinary approach with the help of a dentist, otolaryngologist and anesthesiologists. Dentists should recommend patients to visit them for planned check ups or revisit them in case of denture dislodgement or loosening as soon as possible to prevent such life threatening events.

  11. Difficulties in thickened water ingestion in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Dauana Cássia; Dantas, Roberto Oliveira

    2017-12-01

    For some patients with dysphagia who have airway aspiration, it is not possible to drink water as a thin liquid, as they need their water to be thickened. To evaluate in healthy volunteers the difficulties and dynamics of ingestion of thickened water. In 94 healthy volunteers aged 18-67 years, the ingestion of 100 mL of water with consistencies of thin liquid and thickened with 1.2 g (nectar-thick), 2.4 g (honey-thick) and 3.6 g (pudding-thick) of a commercial thickener with maltodextrin, xanthan gum and potassium chloride was evaluated. The volunteers drank in a random sequence 100 mL of each consistency. The duration and the number of swallows to drink the volume were measured. The interval between swallows, the flux of ingestion and the volume of each swallow were calculated. After each test, the individual was asked about the sensation during drinking, with ten as the best sensation and zero as the worst sensation, and about the difficulty to swallow each consistency. The analysis was done using a linear model with mixed effects. The time to ingest the volume increased (liquid: 5.8 s; nectar: 7.9 s; honey: 9.5 s; pudding: 12.7 s; p thickener (prosthesis: 11.1 mL/s, no prosthesis: 6.8 mL/s, p = 0.05) and a decrease in the volume in each swallow (prosthesis: 17.6 mL, no prosthesis: 10.5 mL). There is some difficulty to drink thickened water. The use of dental prosthesis cause further difficulties. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Utility of a Clinical Swallowing Exam for Understanding Swallowing Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarathnam, Balaji; McCullough, Gary H

    2016-08-01

    A clinical swallowing examination (CSE) is generally believed to be inadequate for making judgments regarding swallowing physiology compared to objective assessments. A large volume of studies has heavily focused on identifying aspiration using a CSE and research addressing physiologic information gathered from a CSE is sparse. The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of the CSE for assessing physiology compared to videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS). Data were derived from a prior investigation of sixty adult patients post-stroke tested with CSE and VFSS. The CSE included an examination of historical measures, oral motor/speech/voice, and trial swallows. The VFSS consisted of swallows of controlled portions of thin, thick, puree, and solid boluses. Previous results from these patients demonstrated significant accuracy in making binary estimates of aspiration and the presence of dysphagia. This analysis of data focused on physiologic measures, as well as overall dysphagia severity and diet recommendations. Significant associations between CSE and VFSS ratings were observed for hyolaryngeal elevation, overall swallowing severity, and diet recommendations. These findings were specific for certain bolus consistencies. These data suggest that the CSE may not provide significant physiological information other than hyolaryngeal excursion. This does not preclude the fact that the CSE is important in providing substantial information about overall dysphagia severity. It appears that the CSE is more powerful than simply a "screening" tool. More prospective research designs are warranted to substantiate the strengths of the CSE.

  13. Bank Swallow - Monitoring [ds6

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The data set represents the annual count of bank swallow burrows at nesting colonies located along the Sacramento River. The data set contains two databases which...

  14. Effect of posture on swallowing.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neck flexed, head/neck extend- ed and lying supine. There are individual differences in swallowing and dys- phagia limit depending on individual condition, prefer- ences and habits. However, different head and neck posi- tions can facilitate ...

  15. Sword swallowing and its side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcombe, Brian; Meyer, Dan

    2006-12-23

    To evaluate information on the practice and associated ill effects of sword swallowing. Letters sent to sword swallowers requesting information on technique and complications. Membership lists of the Sword Swallowers' Association International. 110 sword swallowers from 16 countries. We had information from 46 sword swallowers. Major complications are more likely when the swallower is distracted or swallows multiple or unusual swords or when previous injury is present. Perforations mainly involve the oesophagus and usually have a good prognosis. Sore throats are common, particularly while the skill is being learnt or when performances are too frequent. Major gastrointestinal bleeding sometimes occurs, and occasional chest pains tend to be treated without medical advice. Sword swallowers without healthcare coverage expose themselves to financial as well as physical risk. Sword swallowers run a higher risk of injury when they are distracted or adding embellishments to their performance, but injured performers have a better prognosis than patients who suffer iatrogenic perforation.

  16. Ingestion of Sodium Bicarbonate (NaHCO3) Following a Fatiguing Bout of Exercise Accelerates Post-Exercise Acid-Base Balance Recovery and Improves Subsequent High-Intensity Cycling Time to Exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Lewis A; Rimmer, Steven; Osler, Callum J; Higgins, Matthew F

    2017-05-22

    This study evaluated the ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) on post-exercise acid-base balance recovery kinetics and subsequent high-intensity cycling time to exhaustion. In a counterbalanced, crossover design, nine healthy and active males (age: 23±2 years, height: 179±5 cm, body mass: 74±9 kg, peak mean minute power (WPEAK) 256±45 W, peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2PEAK) 46±8 ml.kg(-1).min(-1)) performed a graded incremental exercise test, two familiarisation and two experimental trials. Experimental trials consisted of cycling to volitional exhaustion (TLIM1) at 100% WPEAK on two occasions (TLIM1 and TLIM2) interspersed by a 90 min passive recovery period. Using a double blind approach, 30 min into a 90 min recovery period participants ingested either 0.3 g.kg(-1) body mass sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) or a placebo (PLA) containing 0.1 g.kg(-1) body mass sodium chloride (NaCl) mixed with 4 ml.kg(-1) tap water and 1 ml.kg(-1) orange squash. The mean differences between TLIM2 and TLIM1 was larger for PLA compared to NaHCO3 (-53±53 vs. -20±48 s; P=0.008, d=0.7, CI=-0.3, 1.6), indicating superior subsequent exercise time to exhaustion following NaHCO3. Blood lactate [BLa(-)] was similar between treatments post TLIM1, but greater for NaHCO3 post TLIM2 and 5 min post TLIM2. Ingestion of NaHCO3 induced marked increases (Pacid-base after TLIM1 contributed to greater TLIM2 performance compared to the PLA condition.

  17. Swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Camargo Remesso

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate occurrences of swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke. METHOD: This was a retrospective study on 596 medical files. The inclusion criterion was that the patients needed to have been hospitalized with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke; the exclusion criteria were the presence of associated cardiac problems and hospital stay already more than 14 days. RESULTS: 50.5% were men and 49.5% women; mean age 65.3 years (SD=±11.7 (p<0.001. Among the risk factors, 79.4% had hypertension, 36.7% had diabetes (p<0.001 and 42.7% were smokers. 13.3% of the patients died. Swallowing disorders occurred in 19.6%, among whom 91.5% had mild difficulty and 8.5% had severe difficulty. 87.1% had spontaneous recovery after a mean of 2.4 months. A lesion in the brainstem region occurred in 6.8% (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Swallowing disorders occurred in almost 20% of the population and most of the difficulty in swallowing found was mild. The predictors for swallowing disorders were older age, diabetes mellitus and lesions in the brainstem region.

  18. A contrasting study: cliff and bank swallows

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the project was to contrast as population of Cliff Swallows and a population of Bank Swallows. Both populations had nests located in a gravel pit near...

  19. Impact of rhythmic oral activity on the timing of muscle activation in the swallow of the decerebrate pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thexton, Allan J; Crompton, A W; Owerkowicz, Tomasz; German, Rebecca Z

    2009-03-01

    The pharyngeal swallow can be elicited as an isolated event but, in normal animals, it occurs within the context of rhythmic tongue and jaw movement (RTJM). The response includes activation of the multifunctional geniohyoid muscle, which can either protract the hyoid or assist jaw opening; in conscious nonprimate mammals, two bursts of geniohyoid EMG activity (GHemg) occur in swallow cycles at times consistent with these two actions. However, during experimentally elicited pharyngeal swallows, GHemg classically occurs at the same time as hyoglossus and mylohyoid activity (short latency response) but, when the swallow is elicited in the decerebrate in the absence of RTJM, GHemg occurs later in the swallow (long latency response). We tested the hypothesis that it was not influences from higher centers but a brain stem mechanism, associated with RTJM, which caused GHemg to occur earlier in the swallow. In 38 decerebrate piglets, RTJM occurred sporadically in seven animals. Before RTJM, GHemg had a long latency, but, during RTJM, swallow related GHemg occurred synchronously with activity in hyoglossus and mylohyoid, early in the swallow. Both early and late responses were present during the changeover period. During this changeover period, duplicate electrodes in the geniohyoid could individually detect either the early or the late burst in the same swallow. This suggested that two sets of geniohyoid task units existed that were potentially active in the swallow and that they were differentially facilitated or inhibited depending on the presence or absence of rhythmic activity originating in the brain stem.

  20. Does Barium Influence Tongue Behaviors during Swallowing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M.; van Lieshout, Pascal H. H. M.

    2005-01-01

    The validity of videofluoroscopic swallowing assessments rests on the understanding that thin, nectar-, honey-, and spoon-thick radiopaque liquids resemble nonopaque liquids, both in their consistency and in the variations in swallowing that they elicit. Tongue movements during sequential swallows of opaque and nonopaque liquids were studied in 8…

  1. Pharyngeal Swallowing Mechanics Secondary to Hemispheric Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Nelson H; Pisegna, Jessica M; Marchina, Sarah; Langmore, Susan E; Kumar, Sandeep; Pearson, William G

    2017-05-01

    Computational analysis of swallowing mechanics (CASM) is a method that utilizes multivariate shape change analysis to uncover covariant elements of pharyngeal swallowing mechanics associated with impairment using videofluoroscopic swallowing studies. The goals of this preliminary study were to (1) characterize swallowing mechanics underlying stroke-related dysphagia, (2) decipher the impact of left and right hemispheric strokes on pharyngeal swallowing mechanics, and (3) determine pharyngeal swallowing mechanics associated with penetration-aspiration status. Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies of 18 dysphagic patients with hemispheric infarcts and age- and gender-matched controls were selected from well-controlled data sets. Patient data including laterality and penetration-aspiration status were collected. Coordinates mapping muscle group action during swallowing were collected from videos. Multivariate morphometric analyses of coordinates associated with stroke, affected hemisphere, and penetration-aspiration status were performed. Pharyngeal swallowing mechanics differed significantly in the following comparisons: stroke versus controls (D = 2.19, P mechanics associated with each comparison were visualized using eigenvectors. Whereas current literature focuses on timing changes in stroke-related dysphagia, these data suggest that mechanical changes are also functionally important. Pharyngeal swallowing mechanics differed by the affected hemisphere and the penetration-aspiration status. CASM can be used to identify patient-specific swallowing impairment associated with stroke injury that could help guide rehabilitation strategies to improve swallowing outcomes. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mastication and swallowing: influence of fluid addition to foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano José Pereira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The production of sufficient saliva is indispensable for good chewing. Recent research has demonstrated that salivary flow rate has little influence on the swallowing threshold. OBJECTIVES: The hypothesis examined in the present study was that adding fluids to foods will influence chewing physiology. Materials and METHODS: Twenty subjects chewed on melba toast, cake, carrot, peanut and Gouda cheese. They also chewed on these foods after addition of different volumes of water or alpha-amylase solution. Jaw muscle activity, number of chewing cycles until swallowing and chewing cycle duration were measured. Repeated measures analysis of variance was applied to test the null hypothesis that there would be no statistically significant difference among the results obtained for the various food types and fluids. Subsequently, contrasts were determined to study the levels of intra-subjects factors (food type and fluid volume. Linear regression was used to determine the changes in muscle activity and cycle duration as a function of the chewing cycles. RESULTS: Fluid addition significantly decreased muscle activity and swallowing threshold for melba, cake and peanut (p0.05. Doubling the volume of tap water had a greater effect. CONCLUSIONS: Fluid addition facilitated chewing of dry foods (melba, cake, but did not influence the chewing of fatty (cheese and wet products (carrot. This study is relevant to improve patients' life quality and the management of chewing and feeding disorders caused by hyposalivation.

  3. Swallowing dysfunction in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Brennan, M.T.; Verdonck- de Leeuw, I.M.; Gibson, R.J.; Eilers, J.G.; Waltimo, T.; Bots, C.P.; Michelet, M.; Sollecito, T.P.; Rouleau, T.S.; Sewnaik, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Fliedner, M.C.; Silverman, S.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication in cancer patients that is likely underreported. The present paper is aimed to review relevant dysphagia literature between 1990 and 2010 with a focus on assessment tools,

  4. Swallowing dysfunction in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Brennan, Mike T.; Leeuw, Irma M. Verdonck-de; Gibson, Rachel J.; Eilers, June G.; Waltimo, Tuomas; Bots, Casper P.; Michelet, Marisol; Sollecito, Thomas P.; Rouleau, Tanya S.; Sewnaik, Aniel; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Fliedner, Monica C.; Silverman, Sol; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.

    Purpose Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication in cancer patients that is likely underreported. The present paper is aimed to review relevant dysphagia literature between 1990 and 2010 with a focus on assessment tools,

  5. Effect of posture on swallowing.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lowing stroke, motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, etc.3,4 It can further lead to aspiration pneu- ... umes of water, healthy adults didn't experience piecemeal deglutition or aspiration; however while ... help in treatment of dysphagia by affecting bolus flow to improve speed and safety of swallowing by ...

  6. Coordination of Mastication, Swallowing and Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Koichiro; Palmer, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The pathways for air and food cross in the pharynx. In breathing, air may flow through either the nose or the mouth, it always flows through the pharynx. During swallowing, the pharynx changes from an airway to a food channel. The pharynx is isolated from the nasal cavity and lower airway by velopharyngeal and laryngeal closure during the pharyngeal swallow. During mastication, the food bolus accumulates in the pharynx prior to swallow initiation. The structures in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx serve multiple functions in breathing, speaking, mastication and swallowing. Thus, the fine temporal coordination of feeding among breathing, mastication and swallowing is essential to provide proper food nutrition and to prevent pulmonary aspiration. This review paper will review the temporo-spatial coordination of the movements of oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal structures during mastication and swallowing, and temporal coordination between breathing, mastication, and swallowing. PMID:20161022

  7. Neonatal swallowing assessment using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter-Laracy, Susanne; Osona, Borja; Roca, Antonia; Peña-Zarza, Jose A; Gil, Jose A; Figuerola, Joan

    2018-01-22

    Swallowing disorders which lead to aspiration are common in premature infants with a postmenstrual age (PMA) of >36 weeks. Aspiration is often silent and the unique symptom is desaturation during feeding. The aim of this study was 1) to determine the number of prematures with desaturations during feeding due to aspiration, using Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES); 2) to relate clinical factors and FEES findings to aspiration; and 3) to describe type and efficacy of suggested treatments. A retrospective review of 62 ex-premature babies with a median PMA of 40 weeks which underwent FEES due to persistent feeding desaturations. Aspiration was related to other FEES findings and to clinical and demographic data. The efficacy of the treatment was evaluated during the FEES and by comparing recorded desaturations during feeding 7 days before and after FEES. A total of 44 (71%) infants were diagnosed with aspiration and/or penetration. No relation was found to demographic or clinical data. The accumulation of saliva and residues post-swallowing were related to aspiration (P thickener seemed to reduce aspiration during FEES and was suggested as a treatment. 13.6% of infants received anti-reflux treatment after FEES and 9.1% required gastrostomy. Aspiration is very frequent in premature infants who present desaturations during feeding and FEES is a useful method for diagnosing and suggesting treatments. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A Timely Intervention: Endoscopic Retrieval of a Swallowed Magnetized Activity Watch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S. Radowsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The accidental ingestion of a foreign object often presents a difficult scenario for the clinician. This includes not only the decision to retrieve the material but also the appropriate technique to use. We present the case of a young asymptomatic girl who swallowed a magnetic activity watch, which was then successfully retrieved with an endoscopic snare. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of salvaging an operational watch from the stomach using an endoscopic technique.

  9. Surface electromyography pattern of human swallowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spadaro Alessandro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiology of swallowing is characterized by a complex and coordinated activation of many stomatognathic, pharyngeal, and laryngeal muscles. Kinetics and electromyographic studies have widely investigated the pharyngeal and laryngeal pattern of deglutition in order to point out the differences between normal and dysphagic people. In the dental field, muscular activation during swallowing is believed to be the cause of malocclusion. Despite the clinical importance given to spontaneous swallowing, few physiologic works have studied stomatognathic muscular activation and mandibular movement during spontaneous saliva swallowing. The aim of our study was to investigate the activity patterns of the mandibular elevator muscles (masseter and anterior temporalis muscles, the submental muscles, and the neck muscles (sternocleidomastoid muscles in healthy people during spontaneous swallowing of saliva and to relate the muscular activities to mandibular movement. Methods The spontaneous swallowing of saliva of 111 healthy individuals was analyzed using surface electromyography (SEMG and a computerized kinesiography of mandibular movement. Results Fifty-seven of 111 patients swallowed without occlusal contact (SNOC and 54 individuals had occlusal contact (SOC. The sternocleidomastoid muscles showed a slight, but constant activation during swallowing. The SEMG of the submental and sternocleidomastoid muscles showed no differences between the two groups. The SEMG of the anterior temporalis and masseter muscles showed significant differences (p Conclusion The data suggest that there is not a single "normal" or "typical" pattern for spontaneous saliva swallowing. The polygraph seemed a valuable, simple, non-invasive and reliable tool to study the physiology of swallowing.

  10. Surface Electromyographic Assessment of Swallowing Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Poorjavad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of surface electromyographic (sEMG variables during swallowing determines the potential usefulness of these measures in swallowing assessment and treatment. This study aimed to establish the reliability of the sEMG measures of the swallowing function of muscles during different swallowing conditions in healthy young and old volunteers. Two groups of volunteers (24 older adults, 10 younger adults participated in this cross-sectional study during 2014. The activity of masseter, submental, and infrahyoid groups were measured using sEMG during three repetitions of different swallowing tasks. Both the relative and absolute reliability (characterized respectively by ICC, SEM%, and SRD% were calculated for the sEMG indices of muscle activity during swallowing events. Statistical analyses were performed by the SPSS 19.0 and Microsoft Excel 2007 software packages. Statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. The relative reliability calculations showed significant agreements between repetitions for the mean and peak amplitude and the average of median frequency (MDF of the studied muscles function during most swallowing types in both groups. However, the duration and particularly the time to peak of muscle activity showed significant agreements during fewer swallowing conditions. Excluding MDF, we found high SEM% and SRD% for the studied measures (particularly timing measures of muscles function during most swallowing types in both groups. The reliability of sEMG measures was influenced by the age and swallowing types. Our findings suggest that the MDF of muscle function during almost all studied swallowing types can be a reliable measure for the sEMG assessment of swallowing function in both younger and older adults.

  11. The Effects of Removable Denture on Swallowing

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Dae-Sik; Seong, Jin Wan; Kim, Younghoon; Chee, Youngjoon; Hwang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between removable dentures and swallowing and describe risks. Methods Twenty-four patients with removable dentures who were referred for videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were enrolled. We evaluated the change of swallowing function using VFSS before and after the removal of the removable denture. The masticatory performance by Kazunori's method, sensation of oral cavity by Christian's method, underlying disease, and National Institutes of Hea...

  12. Esophageal contractions, bolus transit and perception of transit after swallows of liquid and solid boluses in normal subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juciléia Dalmazo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Esophageal dysphagia is the sensation that the ingested material has a slow transit or blockage in its normal passage to the stomach. It is not always associated with motility or transit alterations. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate in normal volunteers the possibility of perception of bolus transit through the esophagus after swallows of liquid and solid boluses, the differences in esophageal contraction and transit with these boluses, and the association of transit perception with alteration of esophageal contraction and/or transit. METHODS: The investigation included 11 asymptomatic volunteers, 4 men and 7 women aged 19-58 years. The subjects were evaluated in the sitting position. They performed swallows of the same volume of liquid (isotonic drink and solid (macaroni boluses in a random order and in duplicate. After each swallow they were asked about the sensation of bolus passage through the esophagus. Contractions and transit were evaluated simultaneously by solid state manometry and impedance. RESULTS: Perception of bolus transit occurred only with the solid bolus. The amplitude and area under the curve of contractions were higher with swallows of the solid bolus than with swallows of the liquid bolus. The difference was more evident in swallows with no perception of transit (n = 12 than in swallows with perception (n = 10. The total bolus transit time was longer for the solid bolus than for the liquid bolus only with swallows followed by no perception of transit. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the perception of esophageal transit may be the consequence of inadequate adaptation of esophageal transit and contraction to the characteristics of the swallowed bolus.

  13. Lung Volume during Swallowing: Single Bolus Swallows in Healthy Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegland, Karen M. Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relationship between swallowing and lung volume initiation in healthy adults during single swallows of boluses differing in volume and consistency. Differences in lung volume according to respiratory phase surrounding the swallow were also assessed. Method: Nine men and 11 women between the ages of 19 and 28 years…

  14. Videofluoroscopy of the oral phase of swallowing in eight to twelve years old children with dental malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Patricia; Costa, Milton Melciades

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the oral phase of swallowing in individuals with dental malocclusion and to generate data that would contribute to the rehabilitation of those patients. The study was based on the evaluation of the swallowing system through videofluoroscopy on thirty-four children of both genders, aged eight to twelve years old who present with Angle Class II and III dental malocclusions. Thirteen children of similar age and gender presenting normal dental occlusion formed the control group. The results indicated that the oral phase of swallowing is different between individuals with normal occlusion and malocclusion. Dental occlusion types Angle Class II and III did not present a swallowing pattern, independently of the amount of liquid ingested. The swallowing appeared effective in the oral phase of individuals with dental malocclusion, even though adaptations were identified. The outcome, in the absence of a single pattern and the efficiency of the adapted swallowing demonstrates, first a need for additional research investigating orofacial myofunctional treatment for patients with malocclusion and second how such analyses should focus on contributing positively to the rehabilitation of these patients.

  15. Microplastic ingestion by zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew; Lindeque, Pennie; Fileman, Elaine; Halsband, Claudia; Goodhead, Rhys; Moger, Julian; Galloway, Tamara S

    2013-06-18

    Small plastic detritus, termed "microplastics", are a widespread and ubiquitous contaminant of marine ecosystems across the globe. Ingestion of microplastics by marine biota, including mussels, worms, fish, and seabirds, has been widely reported, but despite their vital ecological role in marine food-webs, the impact of microplastics on zooplankton remains under-researched. Here, we show that microplastics are ingested by, and may impact upon, zooplankton. We used bioimaging techniques to document ingestion, egestion, and adherence of microplastics in a range of zooplankton common to the northeast Atlantic, and employed feeding rate studies to determine the impact of plastic detritus on algal ingestion rates in copepods. Using fluorescence and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy we identified that thirteen zooplankton taxa had the capacity to ingest 1.7-30.6 μm polystyrene beads, with uptake varying by taxa, life-stage and bead-size. Post-ingestion, copepods egested faecal pellets laden with microplastics. We further observed microplastics adhered to the external carapace and appendages of exposed zooplankton. Exposure of the copepod Centropages typicus to natural assemblages of algae with and without microplastics showed that 7.3 μm microplastics (>4000 mL(-1)) significantly decreased algal feeding. Our findings imply that marine microplastic debris can negatively impact upon zooplankton function and health.

  16. Swallowing dysfunction in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raber-Durlacher, Judith E; Brennan, Mike T; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Gibson, Rachel J; Eilers, June G; Waltimo, Tuomas; Bots, Casper P; Michelet, Marisol; Sollecito, Thomas P; Rouleau, Tanya S; Sewnaik, Aniel; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Fliedner, Monica C; Silverman, Sol; Spijkervet, Fred K L

    2012-03-01

    Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication in cancer patients that is likely underreported. The present paper is aimed to review relevant dysphagia literature between 1990 and 2010 with a focus on assessment tools, prevalence, complications, and impact on quality of life in patients with a variety of different cancers, particularly in those treated with curative chemoradiation for head and neck cancer. The literature search was limited to the English language and included both MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE. The search focused on papers reporting dysphagia as a side effect of cancer and cancer therapy. We identified relevant literature through the primary literature search and by articles identified in references. A wide range of assessment tools for dysphagia was identified. Dysphagia is related to a number of factors such as direct impact of the tumor, cancer resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy and to newer therapies such as epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. Concomitant oral complications such as xerostomia may exacerbate subjective dysphagia. Most literature focuses on head and neck cancer, but dysphagia is also common in other types of cancer. Swallowing impairment is a clinically relevant acute and long-term complication in patients with a wide variety of cancers. More prospective studies on the course of dysphagia and impact on quality of life from baseline to long-term follow-up after various treatment modalities, including targeted therapies, are needed.

  17. Quantitative classification of pediatric swallowing through accelerometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste Merey

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia or swallowing disorder negatively impacts a child’s health and development. The gold standard of dysphagia detection is videofluoroscopy which exposes the child to ionizing radiation, and requires specialized clinical expertise and expensive institutionally-based equipment, precluding day-to-day and repeated assessment of fluctuating swallowing function. Swallowing accelerometry is the non-invasive measurement of cervical vibrations during swallowing and may provide a portable and cost-effective bedside alternative. In particular, dual-axis swallowing accelerometry has demonstrated screening potential in older persons with neurogenic dysphagia, but the technique has not been evaluated in the pediatric population. Methods In this study, dual-axis accelerometric signals were collected simultaneous to videofluoroscopic records from 29 pediatric participants (age 6.8 ± 4.8 years; 20 males previously diagnosed with neurogenic dysphagia. Participants swallowed 3-5 sips of barium-coated boluses of different consistencies (normally, from thick puree to thin liquid by spoon or bottle. Videofluoroscopic records were reviewed retrospectively by a clinical expert to extract swallow timings and ratings. The dual-axis acceleration signals corresponding to each identified swallow were pre-processed, segmented and trimmed prior to feature extraction from time, frequency, time-frequency and information theoretic domains. Feature space dimensionality was reduced via principal components. Results Using 8-fold cross-validation, 16-17 dimensions and a support vector machine classifier with an RBF kernel, an adjusted accuracy of 89.6% ± 0.9 was achieved for the discrimination between swallows with and with out airway entry. Conclusions Our results suggest that dual-axis accelerometry has merit in the non-invasive detection of unsafe swallows in children and deserves further consideration as a pediatric medical device.

  18. An electrophysiological study of the sequential water swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürgör, N; Arıcı, Ş; Kurt Incesu, Tülay; Seçil, Y; Tokuçoğlu, F; Ertekin, C

    2013-06-01

    Sequential water swallowing (SWS) was mostly investigated by the videofluoroscopic and endoscopic methods. However some physiological features of SWS was rarely evaluated by neurophysiological techniques. Our aim was to investigate some neural and muscular changes on sequences of SWS using electromyography (EMG) methods. Fifty-eight normal adults were investigated. SWS was initiated voluntarily with 50ml and 100ml water volumes from a cup. Submental EMG, respiratory signals, heart rate, and sympathetic skin responses (SSR) were measured during SWS. All parameters were increased significantly during the 100ml SWS. During swallowing apnea period, compensatory respiration cycles occurred in 24% and 48% of participants in the 50ml and 100ml SWS, respectively. Heart rate increased during swallowing apnea. SSR were evoked just before and just after the SWS in more than halves of participants. A foreburst EMG in SM muscles at the initiation of SWS was recorded in 86% of normal participants. Older age was associated with a prolonged duration of the apnea period. All parameters of the SWS could be recorded numerically and objectively using electrphysiological methods. These are similar to those obtained by videofluoroscopic and similar methods. The foreburst activity of the initiation of SWS may represents preparatory activity from the activation of the fast cortical descending motor pathway. Increasing heart rate and the prolonged apnea urged that older people and patients could be carefully tested for respiratory and cardiac rhythm disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Post-prandial carbohydrate ingestion during 1-h of moderate-intensity, intermittent cycling does not improve mood, perceived exertion, or subsequent power output in recreationally-active exercisers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Neal Eric K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study compared the effects of ingesting water (W, a flavored carbohydrate-electrolyte (CE or a flavored non-caloric electrolyte (NCE beverage on mood, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE, and sprint power during cycling in recreational exercisers. Methods Men (n = 23 and women (n = 13 consumed a 24–h standardized diet and reported 2–4 h post-prandial for all test sessions. After a familiarization session, participants completed 50 min of stationary cycling in a warm environment (wet bulb globe temperature = 25.0°C at ~ 60-65% of heart rate reserve (146 ± 4 bpm interspersed with 5 rest periods of 2 min each. During exercise, participants consumed W, CE, or NCE, served in a counterbalanced cross-over design. Beverage volume was served in 3 aliquots equaling each individual’s sweat losses (mean 847 ± 368 mL during the familiarization session. Profiles of Mood States questionnaires (POMS were administered and blood glucose levels were determined pre- and post- sub-maximal cycling. Following sub-maximal exercise, participants completed 3 30–s Wingate anaerobic tests (WAnT with 2.5 min rest between tests to assess performance. Results Blood glucose was higher (p AnT for CE (6.1 ± 1.7 mmol/L compared to W (4.9 ± 1.5 mmol/L and NCE (4.6 ± 1.2 mmol/L. Nonetheless, there were no differences among treatments in peak (642 ± 153, 635 ± 143, 650 ± 141 watts for W, NCE, and CE, respectively; p  =  0.44 or mean (455 ± 100, 458 ± 95, 454 ± 95 watts for W, NCE, and CE, respectively; p = 0.62 power for the first WAnT or mean (414 ± 92, 425 ± 85, 423 ± 82 watts, respectively; p = 0.13 power output averaged across all 3 WAnT. Likewise, RPE during submaximal exercise, session RPE, and fatigue and vigor assessed by POMS did not differ among beverage treatments (p > 0.05. Conclusions Carbohydrate ingestion consumed by recreational

  20. Movements of temporomandibular condyles during swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čimić, Samir; Šimunković, Sonja Kraljević; Gospić, Renata Kevilj; Badel, Tomislav; Dulčić, Nikša; Ćatić, Amir

    2015-03-01

    There have been studies that investigated mandibular movements and positioning during swallowing, but the results were inconsistent, and still the exact position of the condyles during swallowing is unknown. The purpose of this investigation was to study the kinematics of the mandible and the condyles, and to determine the actual movement paths and position of mandible and condyles during the process of swallowing. The study was performed on a sample of 44 dental students. Measurements were done with an electronic axiograph. After non-occlusing attachment was fixed in the mouth, every subject swallowed for five times from the rest position. The final swallowing position of the left and the right condyles was measured in the sagittal plane. The final swallowing position of the sagittal incisal point was measured in sagittal, frontal and horizontal plane, and data was statistically analyzed. The condyles showed average movement toward posterior (left 0.17 mm, SD 0.28, right 0.16 mm, SD 0.25) and superior (left 0.14 mm, SD 0.20, right 0.14 mm, SD 0.23). Anterior and/or inferior position had 20% of participants. The average sagittal incisal point movement during swallowing was toward anterior (0.30 mm, SD 0.53) and superior (0.81 mm, SD 0.84). The mean mandibular lateral movement was 0.1 mm (SD 0.1). The results of the study suggest that retrusion during swallowing is not the rule, although on average there is a slight tendency of condylar movement toward posterior. Swallowing can be used as auxiliary method for determining vertical dimension of occlusion.

  1. Identification of Swallowing Tasks from a Modified Barium Swallow Study That Optimize the Detection of Physiological Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelwood, R. Jordan; Armeson, Kent E.; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Bonilha, Heather Shaw; Martin-Harris, Bonnie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify which swallowing task(s) yielded the worst performance during a standardized modified barium swallow study (MBSS) in order to optimize the detection of swallowing impairment. Method: This secondary data analysis of adult MBSSs estimated the probability of each swallowing task yielding the derived…

  2. Management of sword-swallower injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberly, A C; Fritsch, M H; Mosier, K M

    2011-02-01

    To report an unusual case of hypopharyngeal perforation in a sword-swallower, with emphasis on management options. Case report and review of the English language literature concerning sword-swallowing injuries to the hypopharynx and oesophagus. A 29-year-old male sword-swallower suffered hypopharyngeal perforation during a performance. The patient received conservative management, with intensive care unit admission, infectious disease consultation, intravenous antibiotics, discontinuation of oral intake and close observation. He progressed well, resumed oral intake on hospital day six, and was discharged home on hospital day eight. Sword-swallowing is an unusual vocation which may lead to potentially devastating injuries. This case report and review of the literature illustrates the management options for such hypopharyngeal and oesophageal injuries.

  3. [The physiologic and the pathologic swallowing process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantemir, S; Laubert, A

    2017-03-01

    It is estimated that 5 million people in Germany currently suffer from swallowing disorders. Due to increasing life expectancy and the good outcome of very premature infants, this number is expected to increase. Swallowing normally occurs in four phases, and for each phase there are diagnostic tools to assess whether the problem is anatomic-organic or functional. A detailed case history is followed by clinical examination of the cranial nerves, the orofacial region, the swallowing reflex, and pharyngeal and esophageal transit. Attention is also paid to age-related changes in the swallowing process, nasal regurgitation, retention at the base of the tongue or in the hypopharynx, and signs of aspiration.

  4. Paraffin ingestion - the problem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An integrated energy petroleum strategy for the developing sector. Pretoria: Department of Mineral and Energy Affairs, January 1992. 7. Scherz RG, Latham GH, Stracener CE. Child-resistant containers can prevent poisoning. Pediatrics 1969; 43: 84-87. 8. Clarke A, Walton WW. Effect of safety packaging on aspirin ingestion ...

  5. The Andean Swallow (Orochelidon andecola) in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Mazar Barnett, Juan; Pugnali, Germán D.; Pearman Morrison, Mark; Bodrati, Alejandro; Moschione, Flavio; Clark, Ricardo; Roesler, Carlos Ignacio; Monteleone, Diego; Casañas, Hernán; Burgos Gallardo, Freddy; Segovia, José; Pagano, Luis; Povedano, Hernán; Areta, Juan Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    During ornithological studies in the provinces of Jujuy, Salta, and San Juan, we recorded the Andean Swallow Orochelidon andecola at 40 localities. These are the first records in Argentina, and also represent the southernmost for the species. Some of these localities are up to 1500 m lower than the previously known elevational limit (now 800 masl), and up to 1100 km southwards. This is a relatively poorly known swallow, and we present novel natural history data. We found evidence of breeding ...

  6. Instrumentation for bedside analysis of swallowing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Catiuscia S S; Nunes, Luiz G Q; Melo, Pedro L

    2010-01-01

    Disordered swallowing, or dysphagia, is a common problem seen in patients undergoing treatment for cancer, stroke and neurodegenerative illnesses. This disease is associated with aspiration-induced chest infections. The methods currently used for diagnosis, however, are qualitative or based on expensive equipment. Swallowing accelerometry is a promising low-cost, quantitative and noninvasive tool for the evaluation of swallowing. This work describes the design and application of a bedside instrument able to evaluate swallowing mechanisms and to identify patients at risk of aspiration. Three-axis swallowing accelerometry was used to measure the neck vibrations associated with deglutition, providing analog signals to a virtual instrument developed in LabVIEW environment. In vivo tests in normal subjects as well as tests with disphagic patients showed that the system was able to easily and non-invasively detect changes in the swallowing acceleration pattern associated with increasing values of water volume (p disphagia. We concluded that the developed system could be a useful tool for the objective bedside evaluation of patients at risk of aspiration.

  7. Swallowed dentures: Two cases and a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Gachabayov

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Fixed dentures can be accidentally ingested as well as removable dentures. Denture loosening leads to accidental denture ingestion. Patients with denture loosening should be recommended to visit dentist as soon as possible.

  8. New evidence for self-medication in bonobos: Manniophyton fulvum leaf- and stemstrip-swallowing from LuiKotale, Salonga National Park, DR Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruth, Barbara; Ikombe, Nono Bondjengo; Matshimba, Gaby Kitengie; Metzger, Sonja; Muganza, Désiré Musuyu; Mundry, Roger; Fowler, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    The swallowing of entire leaves by apes across Africa without chewing has been observed for over 40 plant species. Here we add evidence for (a) a new site, LuiKotale where leaf-swallowing of Manniophyton fulvum (Euphorbiaceae) is observed in bonobos, (b) a so far unreported ingestion of unchewed stemstrips of M. fulvum, we name stemstrip-swallowing; and (c) a test of some of the requirements put forward by Huffman for the assessment of plants ingested for medical purpose. As ecological correlates we analyzed M. fulvum phenological data and examined 1,094 dung piles collected between 2002 and 2009. By that we assessed availability and choice of leaves. In addition, we provide the first full description of the behavior related to this plant species' use by chimpanzees or bonobos using 56 bouts of M. fulvum ingestion observed between October 2007 and February 2010. With these data we tested and met 4 of the 6 requirements given by Huffman, supporting ingestion of this species as self-medication. Despite species' year-round availability and abundance, M. fulvum was ingested only at specific times, in very small amounts, and by a small proportion of individuals per party. In the absence of our own parasitological data, we used M. fulvum swallowing as evidence for parasite infestation, and seasonality as a proxy for stressors underlying seasonal fluctuation and impacting immune responses. Using these indirect factors available, we investigated conditions for a parasite to develop to its infective stage as well as conditions for the host to cope with infections. Both rain and temperature were good predictors for M. fulvum ingestion. We discuss the use of M. fulvum with respect to its hispidity and subsequent purging properties and provide insight into its ethnomedicinal uses by humans, stimulating speculations about potentially additional pharmacological effects. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Endoscopic evaluation of food bolus formation and its relationship with the number of chewing cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukatsu, H; Nohara, K; Kotani, Y; Tanaka, N; Matsuno, K; Sakai, T

    2015-08-01

    It is known that solid food is transported to the pharynx actively in parallel to it being crushed by chewing and mixed with saliva in the oral cavity. Therefore, food bolus formation should be considered to take place from the oral cavity to the pharynx. In previous studies, the chewed food was evaluated after the food had been removed from the oral cavity. However, it has been pointed out that spitting food out of the oral cavity interferes with natural food bolus formation. Therefore, we observed food boluses immediately before swallowing using an endoscope to establish a method to evaluate the food bolus-forming function, and simultaneously performed endoscopic evaluation of food bolus formation and its relationship with the number of chewing cycles. The subject was inserted the endoscope nasally and instructed to eat two coloured samples of boiled rice simultaneously in two ingestion conditions ('as usual' and 'chewing well'). The condition of the food bolus was graded into three categories for each item of grinding, mixing and aggregation and scored 2, 1 and 0. The score of aggregation was high under both ingestion conditions. The scores of grinding and mixing tended to be higher in subjects with a high number of chewing cycles, and the score of aggregation was high regardless of the number of chewing cycles. It was suggested that food has to be aggregated, even though the number of chewing cycles is low and the food is not ground or mixed for a food bolus to reach the swallowing threshold. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The interaction between breathing and swallowing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Nazan Simsek; Karaali, Kamil; Ünal, Ali; Kızılay, Ferah; Öğüş, Candan; Uysal, Hilmi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the association between respiratory swallow patterns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Furthermore, it aims to clarify the role of the dysphagia limit in defining the relationship between swallowing disorders and respiratory disorders. Functional rating scales were used to describe swallowing and respiratory function. Swallowing was observed using the dysphagia limit. Dysphagia limit is the volume at which a second or more swallows are required to swallow the whole bolus. Laryngeal and chest movement sensors, pulmonary function tests, submental, and diaphragm electromyography activity were used to evaluate the relationship between swallowing and respiratory phase. Of the 27 patients included in the study, 14 were dysphagic and 13 were non-dysphagic. Tests showed normal respiratory function in 11 of the non-dysphagic patients and 3 of the dysphagic patients. There was a high correlation between the dysphagia limit and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale swallowing parameters. Non-dysphagic patients were able to swallow during inspiration but only six patients in the dysphagic group were able to swallow during inspiration. The occurrence of dysphagia in ALS is related to piecemeal deglutition and respiration consistency during swallowing. Detecting the timing of disturbances in the relationship between swallowing and respiration may be a way of identifying dysphagia. Dysphagia limit may be a useful, complementary test for assessing swallowing disturbances in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  11. Remote management of voice and swallowing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashima, Pauline A; Brown, Janet E

    2011-12-01

    Telehealth or telepractice can alleviate shortages of speech-language pathologists, particularly in rural and underserved areas, where specialists in voice and swallowing disorders may not be available. In addition to improving access to services, telehealth offers the opportunity for patients to receive care in their natural environment, as in the case of home health care where treatment can include family members and caregivers. This article presents an overview of telehealth applications in the remote management of voice and swallowing disorders including historical background, current issues, and a brief review of clinical effectiveness studies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Nonspecific effects of gap paradigm on swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Masaki; Saitoh, Kazuya

    2017-02-01

    Analogous to the gap paradigm in experiments for saccadic eye movements with very short reaction times, we hypothesized that the initiation of oropharyngeal swallowing movements guided by visual cues are encouraged under experimental conditions using a similar gap paradigm. A red visual cue indicating to hold a bolus in the mouth and a blue one indicating to swallow the bolus were sequentially provided on a computer display to 11 healthy participants. The gap period between these cues varied from 0 to 800ms. Swallowing kinetics and kinematics were recorded using surface electromyography and a laser displacement sensor, respectively. In comparison with the no-gap paradigm, the delay from the onset of muscle activities to initiation of movement significantly decreased with a 100- (pparadigm of 100-200ms. Wrist flexion was boosted in a similar manner. Thus, the gap effect may be a generalized warning effect. Our findings might provide insights into the contribution of the basal ganglia to volitional swallowing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. National Urea Cycle Disorders Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... INGESTING HIGH-PROTEIN FOODS AND PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTS FOR BODYBUILDING : Symptoms of urea cycle disorder went unrecognized as young mother, Meegan Hefford, prepared for a bodybuilding competition. Undiagnosed urea cycle disorders can be triggered ...

  14. Senescent Swallowing: Impact, Strategies and Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Denise; Weiss, Jennifer; Kind, Amy; Robbins, JoAnne

    2010-01-01

    The risk for disordered oropharyngeal swallowing (dysphagia) increases with age. Loss of swallowing function can have devastating health implications including dehydration, malnutrition, and pneumonia, as well as reduced quality of life. Age-related changes place older adults at risk for dysphagia for two major reasons: One is that natural, healthy aging takes its toll on head and neck anatomy and physiologic and neural mechanisms underpinning swallowing function. This progression of change contributes to alterations in the swallowing in healthy older adults and is termed presbyphagia, naturally diminishing functional reserve. Second, disease prevalence increases with age and dysphagia is a co-morbidity of many age-related diseases and/or their treatments. Sensory changes, medication, sarcopenia and age-related diseases are discussed herein. Relatively recent findings that health complications are associated with dysphagia are presented. Nutrient requirements, fluid intake and nutritional assessment for older adults are reviewed relative to their relations to dysphagia. Dysphagia screening and the pros and cons of tube feeding as a solution are discussed. Optimal intervention strategies for elders with dysphagia ranging from compensatory interventions to more rigorous exercise approaches are presented. Compelling evidence of improved functional swallowing and eating outcomes resulting from active rehabilitation focusing on increasing strength of head and neck musculature is provided. In summary, while oropharyngeal dysphagia may be life-threatening, so are some of the traditional alternatives, particularly for frail, elderly patients. While the state of the evidence calls for more research, this review indicates the behavioral, dietary and environmental modifications emerging in this past decade are compassionate, promising and in many cases preferred alternatives to the always present option of tube feeding. PMID:19483069

  15. The effects of removable denture on swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Dae-Sik; Seong, Jin Wan; Kim, Younghoon; Chee, Youngjoon; Hwang, Chang Ho

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between removable dentures and swallowing and describe risks. Twenty-four patients with removable dentures who were referred for videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were enrolled. We evaluated the change of swallowing function using VFSS before and after the removal of the removable denture. The masticatory performance by Kazunori's method, sensation of oral cavity by Christian's method, underlying disease, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale for level of consciousness were collected. Functional dysphagia scales, including the oral transit time (OTT), pharyngeal transit time (PTT), percentage of oral residue, percentage of pharyngeal residue, oropharyngeal swallow efficiency (OPSE), and presence of aspiration were measured. Four patients dropped out and 20 patients were analyzed (stroke, 13 patients; pneumonia, 3 patients; and others, 4 patients). The mean age was 73.3±11.4 years. There were significant differences before and after the removal of the denture for the OTT. OTT was significantly less after the removal of the denture (8.87 vs. 4.38 seconds, p=0.01). OPSE increased remarkably after the removal of the denture, but without significance (18.24%/sec vs. 25.26%/sec, p=0.05). The OTT and OPSE, while donning a removable denture, were correlated with the masticatory performance (OTT, p=0.04; OPSE, p=0.003) and sensation of oral cavity (OTT, p=0.006; OPSE, p=0.007). A removable denture may have negative effects on swallowing, especially OTT and OPSE. These affects may be caused by impaired sensation of the oral cavity or masticatory performance induced by the removable denture.

  16. Swallowing Disorders in Severe Brain Injury in the Arousal Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremare, A; Rapin, A; Veber, B; Beuret-Blanquart, F; Verin, E

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of swallowing disorders in severe brain injury in the arousal phase after coma. Between December 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014, eleven patients with severe acquired brain injury who were admitted to rehabilitation center (Male 81.8 %; 40.7 ± 14.6 years) were included in the study. Evaluation of swallowing included a functional examination, clinical functional swallowing test, and naso-endoscopic swallowing test. All patients had swallowing disorders at admission. The first functional swallowing test showed oral (77.8 %) and pharyngeal (66.7 %) food bolus transport disorders; and alterations in airway protection mechanisms (80 %). Swallowing test under endoscopic control showed a disorder in swallowing coordination in 55.6 % of patients tested. Seven (63.6 %) patients resumed oral feeding within an average of 6 weeks after admission to rehabilitation center and 14 weeks after acquired brain injury. Six (85.7 %) of these seven patients continued to require modified solid and liquid textures. Swallowing disorders are a major concern in severe brain injury in the arousal phase. Early bedside assessment of swallowing is essential for detection of swallowing disorders to propose appropriate medical rehabilitation care to these patients in a state of altered consciousness.

  17. The effect of cool water ingestion on gastrointestinal pill temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, David M; Carter, James M; Richmond, Victoria L; Blacker, Sam D; Rayson, Mark P

    2008-03-01

    Telemetric gastrointestinal (GI) temperature pills are now commonly used to measure core body temperature and could minimize the risk of heat illness while maximizing operational effectiveness in workers subject to high levels of thermal strain. To quantify the effect of repeated cool water ingestion on the accuracy of GI pill temperature. Ten operational firefighters ingested a pill to measure GI temperature (T1int) before overnight sleep. Two hours following breakfast and 11.5 h after ingesting T1int, the firefighters ingested a second pill (T2int) before performing 8.5 h of intermittent activity (repetitive cycles of 30 min of seated rest followed by 30 min of general firefighter duties). During the first 2 min of each 30-min rest period, the firefighters consumed 250 mL of chilled water (5-8 degrees C). Water ingestion had a highly variable effect both within and between subjects in transiently (32 +/- 10 min) reducing the temperature of T2int in comparison with T1int. In general, this transient reduction in T2int became progressively smaller as time following ingestion increased. In some firefighters, the difference between T1int and T2int became negligible (+/- 0.1 degrees C) after 3 h, whereas in two others, large differences (peaking at 2.0 degrees C and 6.3 degrees C) were still observed when water was consumed 8 h after pill ingestion. These results show that a GI pill ingested immediately prior to physical activity cannot be used to measure core body temperature accurately in all individuals during the following 8 h when cool fluids are regularly ingested. This makes GI temperature measurement unsuitable for workers who respond to emergency deployments when regular fluid consumption is recommended operational practice.

  18. Aspirating and Nonaspirating Swallow Sounds in Children: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakking, Thuy; Chang, Anne; O'Grady, Kerry; David, Michael; Weir, Kelly

    2016-12-01

    Cervical auscultation (CA) may be used to complement feeding/swallowing evaluations when assessing for aspiration. There are no published pediatric studies that compare the properties of sounds between aspirating and nonaspirating swallows. To establish acoustic and perceptual profiles of aspirating and nonaspirating swallow sounds and determine if a difference exists between these 2 swallowing types. Aspiration sound clips were obtained from recordings using CA simultaneously undertaken with videofluoroscopic swallow study. Aspiration was determined using the Penetration-Aspiration Scale. The presence of perceptual swallow/breath parameters was rated by 2 speech pathologists who were blinded to the type of swallow. Acoustic data between groups were compared using Mann Whitney U-tests, while perceptual differences were determined by a test of 2 proportions. Combinations of perceptual parameters of 50 swallows (27 aspiration, 23 no aspiration) from 47 children (57% male) were statistically analyzed using area under a receiver operating characteristic (aROC), sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values to determine predictors of aspirating swallows. The combination of post-swallow presence of wet breathing and wheeze and absence of GRS and normal breathing was the best predictor of aspiration (aROC = 0.82, 95% CI, 0.70-0.94). There were no significant differences between these 2 swallow types for peak frequency, duration, and peak amplitude. Our pilot study has shown that certain characteristics of swallow obtained using CA may be useful in the prediction of aspiration. However, further research comparing the acoustic swallowing sound profiles of normal children to children with dysphagia (who are aspirating) on a larger scale is required. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Speech, language and swallowing in Huntington’ Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryluz Camargo-Mendoza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD has been described as a genetic condition caused by a mutation in the CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine nucleotide sequence. Depending on the stage of the disease, people may have difficulties in speech, language and swallowing. The purpose of this paper is to describe these difficulties in detail, as well as to provide an account on speech and language therapy approach to this condition. Regarding speech, it is worth noticing that characteristics typical of hyperkinetic dysarthria can be found due to underlying choreic movements. The speech of people with HD tends to show shorter sentences, with much simpler syntactic structures, and difficulties in tasks that require complex cognitive processing. Moreover, swallowing may present dysphagia that progresses as the disease develops. A timely, comprehensive and effective speech-language intervention is essential to improve the quality of life of people and contribute to their communicative welfare.

  20. Assessing children's swallowing: Parent and professional perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Cockerill, H.; Van Den Engel-Hoek, L.; Harding, C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose-For infants and children who have difficulties with eating, drinking and swallowing (dysphagia), there are significant health risks that include aspiration (food and fluid entering the lungs) and poor growth. Videofluoroscopy is often the instrumental method of assessment used to exclude or confirm aspiration. The purpose of this paper is to investigate parental and referrer perceptions of the reasons for and the outcomes of videofluoroscopy. \\ud \\ud Design/methodology/approach-Data w...

  1. Salt ingestion caves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundquist Charles A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Large vertebrate herbivores, when they find a salt-bearing layer of rock, say in a cliff face, can produce sizable voids where, overgenerations, they have removed and consumed salty rock. The cavities formed by this natural animal process constitute a uniqueclass of caves that can be called salt ingestion caves. Several examples of such caves are described in various publications. Anexample in Mississippi U.S.A., Rock House Cave, was visited by the authors in 2000. It seems to have been formed by deer orbison. Perhaps the most spectacular example is Kitum Cave in Kenya. This cave has been excavated to a length over 100 metersby elephants. An ancient example is La Cueva del Milodon in Chile, which is reported to have been excavated by the now extinctmilodon, a giant ground sloth. Still other possible examples can be cited. This class of caves deserves a careful definition. First, thecavity in rock should meet the size and other conventions of the locally accepted definition of a cave. Of course this requirement differsin detail from country to country, particularly in the matter of size. The intent is to respect the local conventions. The characteristicthat human entry is possible is judged to be a crucial property of any recognized cave definition. Second, the cavity should besignificantly the result of vertebrate animal consumption of salt-bearing rock. The defining process is that rock removed to form thecave is carried away in the digestive track of an animal. While sodium salts are expected to be the norm, other salts for which thereis animal hunger are acceptable. Also some other speleogenesis process, such as solution, should not be excluded as long as it issecondary in formation of a cave in question.

  2. Functional connectivity patterns of normal human swallowing: difference among various viscosity swallows in normal and chin-tuck head positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L; Perera, Subashan; Sejdić, Ervin

    2016-12-01

    Consuming thicker fluids and swallowing in the chin-tuck position has been shown to be advantageous for some patients with neurogenic dysphagia who aspirate due to various causes. The anatomical changes caused by these therapeutic techniques are well known, but it is unclear whether these changes alter the cerebral processing of swallow-related sensorimotor activity. We sought to investigate the effect of increased fluid viscosity and chin-down posture during swallowing on brain networks. 55 healthy adults performed water, nectar-thick, and honey thick liquid swallows in the neutral and chin-tuck positions while EEG signals were recorded. After pre-processing of the EEG timeseries, the time-frequency based synchrony measure was used for forming the brain networks to investigate whether there were differences among the brain networks between the swallowing of different fluid viscosities and swallowing in different head positions. We also investigated whether swallowing under various conditions exhibit small-world properties. Results showed that fluid viscosity affects the brain network in the Delta, Theta, Alpha, Beta, and Gamma frequency bands and that swallowing in the chin-tuck head position affects brain networks in the Alpha, Beta, and Gamma frequency bands. In addition, we showed that swallowing in all tested conditions exhibited small-world properties. Therefore, fluid viscosity and head positions should be considered in future swallowing EEG investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional connectivity patterns of normal human swallowing: difference among various viscosity swallows in normal and chin-tuck head positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L.; Perera, Subashan

    2016-01-01

    Consuming thicker fluids and swallowing in the chin-tuck position has been shown to be advantageous for some patients with neurogenic dysphagia who aspirate due to various causes. The anatomical changes caused by these therapeutic techniques are well known, but it is unclear whether these changes alter the cerebral processing of swallow-related sensorimotor activity. We sought to investigate the effect of increased fluid viscosity and chin-down posture during swallowing on brain networks. 55 healthy adults performed water, nectar-thick, and honey thick liquid swallows in the neutral and chin-tuck positions while EEG signals were recorded. After pre-processing of the EEG timeseries, the time-frequency based synchrony measure was used for forming the brain networks to investigate whether there were differences among the brain networks between the swallowing of different fluid viscosities and swallowing in different head positions. We also investigated whether swallowing under various conditions exhibit small-world properties. Results showed that fluid viscosity affects the brain network in the Delta, Theta, Alpha, Beta, and Gamma frequency bands and that swallowing in the chin-tuck head position affects brain networks in the Alpha, Beta, and Gamma frequency bands. In addition, we showed that swallowing in all tested conditions exhibited small-world properties. Therefore, fluid viscosity and head positions should be considered in future swallowing EEG investigations. PMID:27693396

  4. Anatomical Directional Dissimilarities in Tri-axial Swallowing Accelerometry Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Faezeh; Kurosu, Atsuko; Coyle, James L; Perera, Subashan; Sejdic, Ervin

    2017-05-01

    Swallowing accelerometry is a noninvasive approach currently under consideration as an instrumental screening test for swallowing difficulties, with most current studies focusing on the swallowing vibrations in the anterior-posterior (A-P) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions. However, the displacement of the hyolaryngeal structure during the act of swallowing in patients with dysphagia involves declination of the medial-lateral (M-L), which suggests that the swallowing vibrations in the M-L direction have the ability to reveal additional details about the swallowing function. With this motivation, we performed a broad comparison of the swallowing vibrations in all three anatomical directions. Tri-axial swallowing accelerometry signals were concurrently collected from 72 dysphagic patients undergoing videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing (mean age: 63.94 ± 12.58 years period). Participants swallowed one or more thickened liquids with different consistencies including thin-thick liquids, nectar-thick liquids, and pudding-thick liquids with either a comfortable self-selected volume from a cup or a controlled volume by the examiner from a 5-ml spoon. Swallows were grouped based on the viscosity of swallows and the participant's stroke history. Then, a comprehensive set of features was extracted in multiple signal domains from 881 swallows. The results highlighted inter-axis dissimilarities among tri-axial swallowing vibrations including the extent of variability in the amplitude of signals, the degree of predictability of signals, and the extent of disordered behavior of signals in time-frequency domain. First, the upward movement of the hyolaryngeal structure, representing the S-I signals, were actually more variable in amplitude and showed less predictable behavior than the sideways and forward movements, representing the A-P and M-L signals, during swallowing. Second, the S-I signals, which represent the upward movement of the hyolaryngeal structure

  5. Importance of the swallowing atypical in them malocclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Jiménez, Jonatan; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Odontología.

    2017-01-01

    This review aims to determine the atypical swallowing malocclusions. When there are inadequate move-ments of the tongue and / or other structures during oral and pharyngolaryngeal phase of swallowing, talking about atypical swallowing, as a non-physiological habit. Its objectives may be multiple, simul-taneously acting alone or cumulatively. The size of a large tongue has been found as an impediment to correct such alternations, though this is a cause of causing malocclusion. the importance o...

  6. Assessment of swallowing sounds by digital cervical auscultation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Sheila T; Ferlin, Elton L; Parente, Maria Alice M P; Goldani, Helena A S

    2008-04-01

    There is a lack of studies regarding swallowing sounds in children 3 to 11 years of age. This study aimed to assess swallowing sounds by digital cervical auscultation in children of this age group without symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Digital cervical auscultation was performed in 118 subjects by use of a piezoelectric microphone. The children swallowed 5 mL of liquid and yogurt. The components of perceptual acoustic analysis were discrete initial signal (DIS), main signal of swallowing sound (MS), discrete final signal (DFS), and expiratory return (ER). Duration in seconds was the objective parameter of the swallowing sound signal analyzed. Fifty-six boys and 62 girls were evaluated at a mean (+/- SD) age of 6.9 +/- 2.03 years. A complete DIS-MS-DFS-ER swallowing sequence was found in 60% of the children. There was no significant difference in swallowing sound duration between both food consistencies (p = .189) or between genders either for liquid (p = .327) or yogurt (p = .792). There was no correlation between age and duration of the swallowing sound for liquid or yogurt. We concluded that digital cervical auscultation was able to provide objective information about the swallowing process that could contribute to methodological standardization in children.

  7. A simple bedside test to assess the swallowing dysfunction in Parkinson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Vinoth Kanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Swallowing changes are common in Parkinson′s disease (PD. Early identification is essential to avoid complications of aspiration. Objectives: To evaluate the swallowing ability of the PD patients and to correlate it with the indicators of disease progression. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 PD patients (70 males and 30 females aged between 50 years and 70 years with varying stage, duration, and severity were enrolled in a cross-sectional study carried out between January and May 2012. A simple bedside water swallowing test was performed using standard 150 ml of water. Swallowing process was assessed under three categories-swallowing speeds (ml/s, swallowing volume (ml/swallow and swallowing duration (s/swallow. Equal number of age and sex matched controls were also evaluated. Results: All of them completed the task of swallowing. A mean swallowing speed (27.48 ml/s, swallowing volume (28.5 ml/s, and swallowing duration (1.05 s/swallow was established by the control group. The PD patients showed decreased swallowing speed (7.15 ml/s in males and 6.61 ml/s in females, decreased swallowing volume (14.59 ml/swallow and 14 ml/swallow in females, and increased swallowing duration (2.37 s/swallow and 2.42 s/swallow which are statistically significant. There was a significant positive correlation between the severity, duration, and staging of the disease with the swallowing performance and a poor correlation between the subjective reports of dysphagia and the objective performance on water swallow test. Conclusion: The water swallowing test is a simple bedside test to identify the swallowing changes early in PD. It is recommended to do the test in all PD Patients to detect dysphagia early and to intervene appropriately.

  8. Swallowing difficulties in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: indications for feeding assessment and outcome of videofluroscopic swallow studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aloysius, A.; Born, P.; Kinali, M.

    2008-01-01

    Feeding difficulties are known to occur with advancing age in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We evaluated the role of videofluoroscopy swallow study (VFSS) in a group of 30 DMD patients with feeding difficulties. Indications for feeding assessment were: respiratory infections potentially...

  9. Simple battery armor to protect against gastrointestinal injury from accidental ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulicht, Bryan; Traverso, Giovanni; Deshpande, Vikram; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2014-11-18

    Inadvertent battery ingestion in children and the associated morbidity and mortality results in thousands of emergency room visits every year. Given the risk for serious electrochemical burns within hours of ingestion, the current standard of care for the treatment of batteries in the esophagus is emergent endoscopic removal. Safety standards now regulate locked battery compartments in toys, which have resulted in a modest reduction in inadvertent battery ingestion; specifically, 3,461 ingestions were reported in 2009, and 3,366 in 2013. Aside from legislation, minimal technological development has taken place at the level of the battery to limit injury. We have constructed a waterproof, pressure-sensitive coating, harnessing a commercially available quantum tunneling composite. Quantum tunneling composite coated (QTCC) batteries are nonconductive in the low-pressure gastrointestinal environment yet conduct within the higher pressure of standard battery housings. Importantly, this coating technology enables most battery-operated equipment to be powered without modification. If these new batteries are swallowed, they limit the external electrolytic currents responsible for tissue injury. We demonstrate in a large-animal model a significant decrease in tissue injury with QTCC batteries compared with uncoated control batteries. In summary, here we describe a facile approach to increasing the safety of batteries by minimizing the risk for electrochemical burn if the batteries are inadvertently ingested, without the need for modification of most battery-powered devices.

  10. The surgical management and speech and swallowing rehabilitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Advanced tongue cancer may have a devastating effect on a person's ability to speak and to swallow. Very little is known about the surgical management and speech and swallowing rehabilitation of persons with advanced tongue cancer in South Africa. The aim of this study was to obtain information regarding clinical ...

  11. Breeding biology and taxonomy of the Red-breasted Swallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nocturnal trapping and ringing of swallows around Harare, Zimbabwe, showed that at least five species have adapted their breeding behaviour to manmade road culverts, none more so than the Red-breasted Swallow, Hirundo semirufa, which may be found nesting in the smallest (46cm diameter) of pipe culverts.

  12. Vocalizations of the South African cliff swallow Hirundo spilodera

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the impression that all chicks had these facial markings but never actually stated the number that really had these markings. In the South African swallow less than 250/0 of all chicks examined had any white markings, probably too few for facial recognition of chicks to be universal in a South. African cliff swallow colony.

  13. Swallow Characteristics in Patients with Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Neel, Amy T.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective investigation evaluates oral weakness and its impact on swallow function, weight, and quality of life in patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Method: Intraoral pressure, swallow pressure, and endurance were measured using an Iowa Oral Performance Instrument in participants with OPMD and matched…

  14. Emetic stimulation inhibits the swallowing reflex in decerebrate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurozumi, Chiharu; Yamagata, Ryuzo; Himi, Naoyuki; Koga, Tomoshige

    2008-06-01

    The effects of emetic stimulation on the swallowing reflex were investigated in decerebrated rats. Hypoxia, gastric distension and LiCl administration were used as emetic stimulations. The swallowing reflex was elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN, 20 Hz, 3-5 V, 0.3 ms duration) for 20 s. To examine the effect of hypoxia, nitrogen gas was inhaled under artificial ventilation. There were significantly fewer swallows during a decrease in PO(2) than under air ventilation (p<0.05). The number of swallows during 3-ml stomach distension was significantly lower than that before distension (p<0.05). Intravenous administration of LiCl (100 mg/kg) also significantly reduced the number of swallows (p<0.05). The combination of SLN stimulation and emetic stimuli occasionally produced burst activity of abdominal muscles, which might be associated with the gag reflex. Both the gag and swallowing reflexes are well known to be mediated by the nucleus of the solitary tract. The physiological roles of the gag reflex and the swallowing reflex are considered to be reciprocal. Taken together, these results suggest that emetic stimulation inhibits the swallowing pattern generator via the nucleus of the solitary tract, which in turn facilitates the gag reflex.

  15. Prophylactic Swallowing Exercises in Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, H R; Jensen, Kenneth; Aksglæde, K

    2015-01-01

    Many head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors experience reduced quality of life due to radiotherapy (RT)-related dysphagia. The aim of this prospective randomized trial was to evaluate the impact of prophylactic swallowing exercises on swallowing-related outcomes in HNC patients treated with curativ...

  16. Swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum spp.) biological control update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum = Cynanchum rossicum) and black swallow-wort (V. nigrum = C. louiseae) are herbaceous, perennial, viney milkweeds introduced from Europe (Apocynaceae-subfamily Asclepiadoideae). Both species are becoming increasingly invasive in a variety of natural and manag...

  17. Current distribution and population size of the Blue Swallow Hirundo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two surveys of Blue Swallows were conducted in the southern Tanzanian highland grasslands in order to determine the habitat preferences and estimate the size of this subpopulation. During the 2008/09 and 2012 surveys, a total distance of 3 635 km was travelled in search of Blue Swallows (at an altitude of above 1 400 ...

  18. Influence of sensor ingestion timing on consistency of temperature measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Daniel A; Kenefick, Robert W; Cadarette, Bruce S; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2009-03-01

    The validity and the reliability of using intestinal temperature (T int) via ingestible temperature sensors (ITS) to measure core body temperature have been demonstrated. However, the effect of elapsed time between ITS ingestion and T int measurement has not been thoroughly studied. Eight volunteers (six men and two women) swallowed ITS 5 h (ITS-5) and 29 h (ITS-29) before 4 h of varying intensity activity. T int was measured simultaneously from both ITS, and T int differences between the ITS-5 and the ITS-29 over the 4 h of activity were plotted and compared relative to a meaningful threshold of acceptance (+/-0.25 degrees C). The percentage of time in which the differences between paired ITS (ITS-5 vs ITS-29) were greater than or less than the threshold of acceptance was calculated. T int values showed no systematic bias, were normally distributed, and ranged from 36.94 degrees C to 39.24 degrees C. The maximum T int difference between paired ITS was 0.83 degrees C with a minimum difference of 0.00 degrees C. The typical magnitude of the differences (SE of the estimate) was 0.24 degrees C, and these differences were uniform across the entire range of observed temperatures. Paired T int measures fell outside of the threshold of acceptance 43.8% of the time during the 4 h of activity. The differences between ITS-5 and ITS-29 were larger than the threshold of acceptance during a substantial portion of the observed 4-h activity period. Ingesting an ITS more than 5 h before activity will not completely eliminate confounding factors but may improve accuracy and consistency of core body temperature.

  19. Hadoop Tutorial - Efficient data ingestion

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Baranowski, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The Hadoop ecosystem is the leading opensource platform for distributed storage and processing of "big data". The Hadoop platform is available at CERN as a central service provided by the IT department. Real-time data ingestion to Hadoop ecosystem due to the system specificity is non-trivial process and requires some efforts (which is often underestimated) in order to make it efficient (low latency, optimize data placement, footprint on the cluster). In this tutorial attendees will learn about: The important aspects of storing the data in Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS).  Data ingestion techniques and engines that are capable of shipping data to Hadoop in an efficient way. Setting up a full data ingestion flow into a Hadoop Distributed Files System from various sources (streaming, log files, databases) using the best practices and components available around the ecosystem (including Sqoop, Kite, Flume, Kafka...

  20. Revisiting the psychometric properties of a revised Danish version of the McGill ingestive skills assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina; Kristiansen, Dorte Melgaard

    2017-01-01

    Background: During a longstanding validation process of the Danish version of the McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment (MISA2-DK) for measuring mealtime performance in dysphagic clients, extensive revisions have been undertaken. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the psychometric properties...... of this revised version. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 328 adults referred to occupational therapy for swallowing evaluation were included. MISA2-DK with 36 items distributed into four subscales (positioning for meals, self-feeding skills, liquid ingestion, and solid ingestion) was administered...... dependency. However, when testing the items within each subscale, the subscale structure was not supported. The EFA and further item analysis by the Rasch model suggested a different distribution of items—namely, anticipation, bolus preparation, bolus propulsion, and airway protection. Conclusion: The total...

  1. Foreign bodies ingestion: what responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Serafino; Massoni, Francesco; Schiffino, Luigi; Pelosi, Marcello; Salesi, Marialucia

    2014-03-01

    The ingestion of foreign bodies is one of the most important and difficult emergencies for a physician to diagnose. Accidental ingestion is more common in children, in patients with dental implants, in individuals with mental disability and in drug users. Voluntary ingestion is found in patients who are psychologically unstable, in prisoners or those who attempt suicide. Foreign bodies may be divided into food as fish bones, chicken bones, food bolus, meat, etc. or real foreign bodies such as orthodontic implants, needles, pins, glass, coins, etc. The authors present a case of management, from the medicolegal point of view, of a female patient age 80, who complained, for some weeks of modest pain in the left iliac fossa, and afterwards the endoscopy showed a toothpick into the wall of the sigmoid colon. Assessed of the clinical status of the patient presented severe cardiac comorbidities so that before processing the patient to a second resolutive endoscopy, it was necessary to obtain the hemodynamic stability. However the management of cases of accidental ingestion of foreign bodies is particularly difficult. Medical errors can arise from the very first contact with the patient resulting in delays in appropriate treatment. The doctor to avoid compromising its position on medical liability, must use all the knowledge and diligence known by the art and science of medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  2. Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin's 1825 treatise on the mouth and ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Gabriel Tse Feng

    2012-12-01

    This article quotes and discusses Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin's musings on the mouth and ingestion as described in his book The Physiology of Taste. The book was first published in France in December 1825, and is still widely read as a key work in Gastronomy today. The mouth is intimately related to the acts of chewing, swallowing and eating and it would be interesting to report an early 19th century epicurean's views on the mouth. Passages from Brillat-Savarin's book describing the functions of the teeth and tongue and the acts of tasting, chewing, and swallowing are quoted in full. Anecdotes also include one on the horrifying punishment of having one's tongue removed and another illustrating the poor oral health found among Europeans of that era. His work offers a unique glimpse into how a 19th century gastronome viewed the oral cavity and its gastronomical functions. While some of his writings may appear archaic and antediluvian to the modern reader; others relating to, for example chewing and swallowing, are surprisingly accurate by contemporary standards. Nonetheless, the gastronomic savant seemed to know a lot right about modern stomatology! Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Lighter Ingestion as an Uncommon Cause of Severe Vomiting in a Schizophrenia Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Atayan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Foreign bodies in the gastrointestinal tract are important morbid and mortal clinical conditions. Particularly, emergency treatment is required for cutting and drilling bodies. The majority of ingested foreign bodies (80–90% leave gastrointestinal tract without creating problems. In 10–20% of cases, intervention is absolutely required. Less than 1% of cases need surgery. In this paper, we present a schizophrenia patient who swallowed multiple lighters. Case. A 21-year-old male schizophrenic patient who uses psychotic drugs presented to the emergency department with the complaints of abdominal pain, severe vomiting, and inability to swallow for a week. His physical examination revealed epigastric tenderness. A plain radiograph of the abdomen revealed multiple tiny metallic densities. Gastroscopy was performed. The lighters were not allowing the passage, and some of them had penetrated the gastric mucosa, and bezoars were observed. One lighter was extracted with the help of the polypectomy snare. Other lighters as a bezoar were removed by surgery. Conclusion. Excessive vomiting of swallowed foreign bodies in the etiology of psychotic patients should be kept in mind. Endoscopic therapy can be performed in the early stages in these patients, but in the late stage surgery is inevitable.

  4. Risk factors for swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Flávia Ferraz Barros Baroni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Stroke is a frequent cause of dysphagia. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in a tertiary care hospital the prevalence of swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients, to analyze factors associated with the dysfunction and to relate swallowing dysfunction to mortality 3 months after the stroke. METHODS: Clinical evaluation of deglutition was performed in 212 consecutive patients with a medical and radiologic diagnosis of stroke. The occurrence of death was determined 3 months after the stroke. RESULTS: It was observed that 63% of the patients had swallowing dysfunction. The variables gender and specific location of the lesion were not associated with the presence or absence of swallowing dysfunction. The patients with swallowing dysfunction had more frequently a previous stroke, had a stroke in the left hemisphere, motor and/or sensitivity alterations, difficulty in oral comprehension, alteration of oral expression, alteration of the level of consciousness, complications such as fever and pneumonia, high indexes on the Rankin scale, and low indexes on the Barthel scale. These patients had a higher mortality rate. CONCLUSIONS: Swallowing evaluation should be done in all patients with stroke, since swallowing dysfunction is associated with complications and an increased risk of death.

  5. Tactile thermal oral stimulation increases the cortical representation of swallowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suntrup Sonja

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia is a leading complication in stroke patients causing aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition and increased mortality. Current strategies of swallowing therapy involve on the one hand modification of eating behaviour or swallowing technique and on the other hand facilitation of swallowing with the use of pharyngeal sensory stimulation. Thermal tactile oral stimulation (TTOS is an established method to treat patients with neurogenic dysphagia especially if caused by sensory deficits. Little is known about the possible mechanisms by which this interventional therapy may work. We employed whole-head MEG to study changes in cortical activation during self-paced volitional swallowing in fifteen healthy subjects with and without TTOS. Data were analyzed by means of synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM and the group analysis of individual SAM data was performed using a permutation test. Results Compared to the normal swallowing task a significantly increased bilateral cortical activation was seen after oropharyngeal stimulation. Analysis of the chronological changes during swallowing suggests facilitation of both the oral and the pharyngeal phase of deglutition. Conclusion In the present study functional cortical changes elicited by oral sensory stimulation could be demonstrated. We suggest that these results reflect short-term cortical plasticity of sensory swallowing areas. These findings facilitate our understanding of the role of cortical reorganization in dysphagia treatment and recovery.

  6. Tactile thermal oral stimulation increases the cortical representation of swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teismann, Inga K; Steinsträter, Olaf; Warnecke, Tobias; Suntrup, Sonja; Ringelstein, Erich B; Pantev, Christo; Dziewas, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Background Dysphagia is a leading complication in stroke patients causing aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition and increased mortality. Current strategies of swallowing therapy involve on the one hand modification of eating behaviour or swallowing technique and on the other hand facilitation of swallowing with the use of pharyngeal sensory stimulation. Thermal tactile oral stimulation (TTOS) is an established method to treat patients with neurogenic dysphagia especially if caused by sensory deficits. Little is known about the possible mechanisms by which this interventional therapy may work. We employed whole-head MEG to study changes in cortical activation during self-paced volitional swallowing in fifteen healthy subjects with and without TTOS. Data were analyzed by means of synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM) and the group analysis of individual SAM data was performed using a permutation test. Results Compared to the normal swallowing task a significantly increased bilateral cortical activation was seen after oropharyngeal stimulation. Analysis of the chronological changes during swallowing suggests facilitation of both the oral and the pharyngeal phase of deglutition. Conclusion In the present study functional cortical changes elicited by oral sensory stimulation could be demonstrated. We suggest that these results reflect short-term cortical plasticity of sensory swallowing areas. These findings facilitate our understanding of the role of cortical reorganization in dysphagia treatment and recovery. PMID:19566955

  7. Fabrication of Artificial Food Bolus for Evaluation of Swallowing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyu Hosotsubo

    Full Text Available Simple and easy methods to evaluate swallowing are required because of the recently increased need of rehabilitation for dysphagia. "Artificial food bolus", but not "artificial food", would be a valuable tool for swallowing evaluation without considering the mastication effect which is altered according to the individual's oral condition. Thus, this study was carried out to fabricate artificial bolus resembling natural food bolus. The mechanical property and the volume change of food bolus in normal people were firstly investigated. Thirty healthy adults without dysphagia were selected and asked to chew four sample foods (rice cake, peanut, burdock, and gummy candy. The results indicated that Young's modulus of bolus before swallowing was below 150 kPa. The bolus volume before swallowing was below 400 mm3. In addition, the saliva component ratio of each bolus was approximately 30wt%, and the average saliva viscosity of research participants was approximately 10 mPa•s. Based on the obtained data, artificial food bolus was designed and fabricated by using alginate hydrogel as a visco-elastic material and gelatin solution as a viscotic material with a ratio of 7:3 based on weight. Consequently, the swallowing time of fabricated artificial food bolus was measured among the same participants. The results indicated the participants swallowed fabricated food bolus with similar manner reflecting their mechanical property and volume. Thus, this artificial food bolus would be a promising tool for evaluation of swallowing.

  8. Anticipated radiological impacts from the mining and milling of thorium for the nonproliferative fuels. [Dose commitments to individuals and populations from inhalation or ingestion of thorium-cycle-related radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, H. R.; Till, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Recent emphasis on proliferation-resistant fuel cycles utilizing thorium--uranium-233 fuels has necessitated evaluation of the potential radiological impact of mining and milling thorium ore. Therefore, an analysis has been completed of hypothetical mine-mill complexes using population and meteorological data representative of a thorium resource site in the Lemhi Pass area of Idaho/Montana, United States of America. Source terms for the site include thorium-232 decay chain radionuclides suspended as dusts and radon-220 and daughters initially released as gas. Fifty-year dose commitments to maximally exposed individuals of 2.4 mrem to total body, 9.5 mrem to bone, and 35 mrem to lungs are calculated to result from facility operation. Radium-228, thorium-228, thorium-232 and lead-212 (daughter of radon-220) are found to be the principal contributors to dose. General population doses for a 50-mile radius surrounding the facility are estimated to be 0.05 man-rem to total body, 0.1 man-rem to bone, and 0.7 man-rem to lungs. Generally speaking, the results of this study indicate that the radiological aspects of thorium mining and milling should pose no significant problems with regard to implementation of thorium fuel cycles.

  9. Oral medication delivery in impaired swallowing: thickening liquid medications for safe swallowing alters dissolution characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Yady J; Sparkes, Arron M; Cichero, Julie A Y; Stokes, Jason R; Nissen, Lisa M; Steadman, Kathryn J

    2016-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is available in a wide range of oral formulations designed to meet the needs of the population across the age-spectrum, but for people with impaired swallowing, i.e. dysphagia, both solid and liquid medications can be difficult to swallow without modification. The effect of a commercial polysaccharide thickener, designed to be added to fluids to promote safe swallowing by dysphagic patients, on rheology and acetaminophen dissolution was tested using crushed immediate-release tablets in water, effervescent tablets in water, elixir and suspension. The inclusion of the thickener, comprised of xanthan gum and maltodextrin, had a considerable impact on dissolution; acetaminophen release from modified medications reached 12-50% in 30 min, which did not reflect the pharmacopeia specification for immediate release preparations. Flow curves reflect the high zero-shear viscosity and the apparent yield stress of the thickened products. The weak gel nature, in combination with high G' values compared to G'' (viscoelasticity) and high apparent yield stress, impact drug release. The restriction on drug release from these formulations is not influenced by the theoretical state of the drug (dissolved or dispersed), and the approach typically used in clinical practice (mixing crushed tablets into pre-prepared thickened fluid) cannot be improved by altering the order of incorporation or mixing method.

  10. Tachyarrhythmias triggered by swallowing and belching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmshurst, P

    1999-01-01

    Three cases with supraventricular tachyarrhythmias related to oesophageal transit are reported. A 61 year old man had episodes of atrial tachycardia on each swallow of food but not liquid; this has been reported only rarely. A 55 year old man had atrial fibrillation initiated by drinking ice cold beverages; this has not been described previously although atrial tachycardia triggered by drinking ice cold beverages has been described once. A 68 year old man had supraventricular tachycardia initiated by belching; this has not been described previously. These cases illustrate the diversity of atrial tachyarrhythmias that can be precipitated by oesophageal stimulation and suggest that what is regarded as a very rare phenomenon may be found more commonly when sought.

 Keywords: atrial tachycardia; atrial fibrillation; deglutition; eructation; arrhythmias PMID:10026360

  11. Functional Connectivity of the Cortical Swallowing Network in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Arash; Ward, B. Douglas; Siwiec, Robert; Ahmad, Shahryar; Kern, Mark; Nencka, Andrew; Li, Shi-Jiang; Shaker, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Coherent fluctuations of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal have been referred as “functional connectivity” (FC). Our aim was to systematically characterize FC of underlying neural network involved in swallowing, and to evaluate its reproducibility and modulation during rest or task performance. Methods Activated seed regions within known areas of the cortical swallowing network (CSN) were independently identified in 16 healthy volunteers. Subjects swallowed using a paradigm driven protocol, and the data analyzed using an event-related technique. Then, in the same 16 volunteers, resting and active state data were obtained for 540 seconds in three conditions: 1) swallowing task; 2) control visual task; and 3) resting state; all scans were performed twice. Data was preprocessed according to standard FC pipeline. We determined the correlation coefficient values of member regions of the CSN across the three aforementioned conditions and compared between two sessions using linear regression. Average FC matrices across conditions were then compared. Results Swallow activated twenty-two positive BOLD and eighteen negative BOLD regions distributed bilaterally within cingulate, insula, sensorimotor cortex, prefrontal and parietal cortices. We found that: 1) Positive BOLD regions were highly connected to each other during all test conditions while negative BOLD regions were tightly connected amongst themselves; 2) Positive and negative BOLD regions were anti-correlated at rest and during task performance; 3) Across all three test conditions, FC among the regions was reproducible (r > 0.96, p<10-5); and 4) The FC of sensorimotor region to other regions of the CSN increased during swallowing scan. Conclusions 1) Swallow activated cortical substrates maintain a consistent pattern of functional connectivity; 2) FC of sensorimotor region is significantly higher during swallow scan than that observed during a non-swallow visual task or at rest. PMID

  12. Decoding human swallowing via electroencephalography: a state-of-the-art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L; Sejdić, Ervin

    2015-10-01

    Swallowing and swallowing disorders have garnered continuing interest over the past several decades. Electroencephalography (EEG) is an inexpensive and non-invasive procedure with very high temporal resolution which enables analysis of short and fast swallowing events, as well as an analysis of the organizational and behavioral aspects of cortical motor preparation, swallowing execution and swallowing regulation. EEG is a powerful technique which can be used alone or in combination with other techniques for monitoring swallowing, detection of swallowing motor imagery for diagnostic or biofeedback purposes, or to modulate and measure the effects of swallowing rehabilitation. This paper provides a review of the existing literature which has deployed EEG in the investigation of oropharyngeal swallowing, smell, taste and texture related to swallowing, cortical pre-motor activation in swallowing, and swallowing motor imagery detection. Furthermore, this paper provides a brief review of the different modalities of brain imaging techniques used to study swallowing brain activities, as well as the EEG components of interest for studies on swallowing and on swallowing motor imagery. Lastly, this paper provides directions for future swallowing investigations using EEG.

  13. Decoding human swallowing via electroencephalography: a state-of-the-art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L.; Sejdić, Ervin

    2015-10-01

    Swallowing and swallowing disorders have garnered continuing interest over the past several decades. Electroencephalography (EEG) is an inexpensive and non-invasive procedure with very high temporal resolution which enables analysis of short and fast swallowing events, as well as an analysis of the organizational and behavioral aspects of cortical motor preparation, swallowing execution and swallowing regulation. EEG is a powerful technique which can be used alone or in combination with other techniques for monitoring swallowing, detection of swallowing motor imagery for diagnostic or biofeedback purposes, or to modulate and measure the effects of swallowing rehabilitation. This paper provides a review of the existing literature which has deployed EEG in the investigation of oropharyngeal swallowing, smell, taste and texture related to swallowing, cortical pre-motor activation in swallowing, and swallowing motor imagery detection. Furthermore, this paper provides a brief review of the different modalities of brain imaging techniques used to study swallowing brain activities, as well as the EEG components of interest for studies on swallowing and on swallowing motor imagery. Lastly, this paper provides directions for future swallowing investigations using EEG.

  14. Clock gene variation in Tachycineta swallows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dor, Roi; Cooper, Caren B; Lovette, Irby J; Massoni, Viviana; Bulit, Flor; Liljesthrom, Marcela; Winkler, David W

    2012-01-01

    Many animals use photoperiod cues to synchronize reproduction with environmental conditions and thereby improve their reproductive success. The circadian clock, which creates endogenous behavioral and physiological rhythms typically entrained to photoperiod, is well characterized at the molecular level. Recent work provided evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q length polymorphism and latitude and, within a population, an association with the date of laying and the length of the incubation period. Despite relatively high overall breeding synchrony, the timing of clutch initiation has a large impact on the fitness of swallows in the genus Tachycineta. We compared length polymorphism in the Clock poly-Q region among five populations from five different Tachycineta species that breed across a hemisphere-wide latitudinal gradient (Fig. 1). Clock poly-Q variation was not associated with latitude; however, there was an association between Clock poly-Q allele diversity and the degree of clutch size decline within breeding seasons. We did not find evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q variation and date of clutch initiation in for any of the five Tachycineta species, nor did we found a relationship between incubation duration and Clock genotype. Thus, there is no general association between latitude, breeding phenology, and Clock polymorphism in this clade of closely related birds. Figure 1 Photos of Tachycineta swallows that were used in this study: A) T. bicolor from Ithaca, New York, B) T. leucorrhoa from Chascomús, Argentina, C) T. albilinea from Hill Bank, Belize, D) T. meyeni from Puerto Varas, Chile, and E) T. thalassina from Mono Lake, California, Photographers: B: Valentina Ferretti; A, C-E: David Winkler. PMID:22408729

  15. Mis-swallowing of cleaning naphtha: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C Y; Lee, C Y

    1990-01-01

    Cleaning naphtha, a product of Chinese Petroleum Corporation, is a complex hydrocarbon mixture which contains mainly aliphatic hydrocarbons. It is used as a cleaning fluid and solvent. Three toddlers mis-swallowed a mouth of cleaning naphtha accidentally. One developed multiple organ failure before death, another completely recovered without sequelae, and the other died very soon after mis-swallowing. Two fatal cases were both induced vomiting with aspiration immediately after mis-swallowing by their parents. Therefore, inducing vomiting should not be encouraged especially at home, and prevention of aspiration is very important in the management of such cases.

  16. Ingestion of swimming pool water by recreational

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Swimming pool water ingestion data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Dufour, A., L. Wymer, M. Magnuson, T. Behymer, and R. Cantu. Ingestion...

  17. Intestinal perforation caused by multiple magnet ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergul Corduk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple magnet ingestion is rare, but can cause serious gastrointestinal complications. We report a case of 7-year-old girl with multiple intestinal perforations caused by multiple magnet ingestion. The aim of this report is to draw attention to magnetic toys, results of magnet ingestion and the importance of timing of operation.

  18. Cliff swallow populations in the southern Askinuk Mountains, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During breeding season, cliff swallows are widely distributed throughout Alaska and North America south to Mexico, and they are locally common in western and...

  19. Role of Basal Ganglia in Swallowing Process: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Ghaemi

    2016-12-01

    Discussion: Swallowing is a multifaceted performance that needs contribution of the tongue, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus as well as the neurological structures such as neocortex and subcortical regions - BG and brainstem.

  20. Weather-related Tree Swallow Mortality and Reduced Nesting Effort

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report documents the spring 2007 die-off of 216 Tree Swallows in western New York due to a period of unseasonably warm temperatures followed immediately by a...

  1. Automated Detection and Evaluation of Swallowing Using a Combined EMG/Bioimpedance Measurement System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Schultheiss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Developing an automated diagnostic and therapeutic instrument for treating swallowing disorders requires procedures able to reliably detect and evaluate a swallow. We tested a two-stage detection procedure based on a combined electromyography/bioimpedance (EMBI measurement system. EMBI is able to detect swallows and distinguish them from similar movements in healthy test subjects. Study Design. The study was planned and conducted as a case-control study (EA 1/019/10, and EA1/160/09, EA1/161/09. Method. The study looked at differences in swallowing parameters in general and in the event of penetration during swallows in healthy subjects and in patients with an oropharyngeal swallowing disorder. A two-stage automated swallow detection procedure which used electromyography (EMG and bioimpedance (BI to reliably detect swallows was developed. Results. Statistically significant differences between healthy subjects and patients with a swallowing disorder were found in swallowing parameters previously used to distinguish between swallowing and head movements. Our two-stage algorithm was able to reliably detect swallows (sensitivity = 96.1%, specificity = 97.1% on the basis of these differences. Discussion. Using a two-stage detection procedure, the EMBI measurement procedure is able to detect and evaluate swallows automatically and reliably. The two procedures (EMBI + swallow detection could in future form the basis for automated diagnosis and treatment (stimulation of swallowing disorders.

  2. Automated detection and evaluation of swallowing using a combined EMG/bioimpedance measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, Corinna; Schauer, Thomas; Nahrstaedt, Holger; Seidl, Rainer O

    2014-01-01

    Developing an automated diagnostic and therapeutic instrument for treating swallowing disorders requires procedures able to reliably detect and evaluate a swallow. We tested a two-stage detection procedure based on a combined electromyography/bioimpedance (EMBI) measurement system. EMBI is able to detect swallows and distinguish them from similar movements in healthy test subjects. The study was planned and conducted as a case-control study (EA 1/019/10, and EA1/160/09, EA1/161/09). The study looked at differences in swallowing parameters in general and in the event of penetration during swallows in healthy subjects and in patients with an oropharyngeal swallowing disorder. A two-stage automated swallow detection procedure which used electromyography (EMG) and bioimpedance (BI) to reliably detect swallows was developed. Statistically significant differences between healthy subjects and patients with a swallowing disorder were found in swallowing parameters previously used to distinguish between swallowing and head movements. Our two-stage algorithm was able to reliably detect swallows (sensitivity = 96.1%, specificity = 97.1%) on the basis of these differences. Using a two-stage detection procedure, the EMBI measurement procedure is able to detect and evaluate swallows automatically and reliably. The two procedures (EMBI + swallow detection) could in future form the basis for automated diagnosis and treatment (stimulation) of swallowing disorders.

  3. Swallow syncope caused by third-degree atrioventricular block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roust Aaberg, Anne Marie; Eriksson, Anna Elin; Madsen, Per Lav

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with more than 30 years of repeated syncopes, always following food intake. The patient was diagnosed with a swallow-related third-degree atrioventricular block and successfully treated with an artificial pacemaker.......We report a case of a patient with more than 30 years of repeated syncopes, always following food intake. The patient was diagnosed with a swallow-related third-degree atrioventricular block and successfully treated with an artificial pacemaker....

  4. Changes in Swallowing Symptoms and Esophageal Motility After Thyroid Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Markoew, Simone; Døssing, Helle

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Swallowing difficulties, the pathophysiology behind which is incompletely understood, have been reported in 47-83% of goiter patients referred for thyroidectomy. We aimed at examining the influence of thyroid surgery on swallowing symptoms and esophageal motility. METHODS: Thirty-th...... to esophageal motility disturbances. This information is essential when interpreting dysphagia in patients with nodular goiter, and when balancing patients' expectations to surgical goiter therapy. REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03100357 ( www.clinicaltrials.org )....

  5. Observation the swallowing mechanism in elderly patients with pharyngeal dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ximena Campo-Cañar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Observation of the swallowing dynamics is an issue that demands close attention by the health professionals involved in the diagnosis and management of patients with dysphagia. This article is a review of the literature aimed to enhance the knowledge regarding the speech therapy assessment of pharyngeal dysphagia in elder adults. The disorder of the swallowing is called dysphagia and it is defined as difficulty swallowing. The dysphagia is often caused by affectation of mechanical or neuromuscular components of the swallowing mechanism. This type of disorder is likely to impact the the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of the swallowing. The speech therapist should take into account assessing aspects such as level of consciousness, vital signs, whether or not the patient is ventilator dependent, means of feeding, if intubated what type of cannula, whether or not the patient uses a speaking valve (if a trach tube is present, nutritional status, the patient’s expressive and receptive language, the anatomical and physiological state of the oral motor structures. When assessing swallowing clinicians should also make sure to develop an adequate beside clinical, voice assessment and videofluoroscopy.

  6. Functional magnetic resonance and swallowing: critical literature review,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Santilli de Lima

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Aspects of the neuroanatomical representation of swallowing have been investigated in humans through brain mapping techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. OBJECTIVE: This critical qualitative review of the literature analyzed international scientific publications in the PubMed database that investigated the activation of the central nervous system in humans during the act of swallowing. METHODS: This investigation was limited to articles that investigated adults older than 18 years, published in English or Portuguese, between January 2002 and December 2013. Publications that did not have access to the full text, that were repeated by overlapping keywords, case studies, literature reviews, letters to the editor, and those not directly related to the topic of the investigation were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 649 articles were identified, of which 21 matched the inclusion criteria. CONCLUSION: The main purpose of the manuscripts that investigate the swallowing process through fMRI were: to characterize swallowing in different pathologies; to compare swallowing in different age groups; to describe brain activation in different stimulation conditions. These studies indicate multiple cortical regions involved in swallowing control. Overall, the studies indicate that fMRI is a non-invasive and quantitative method that allows the investigation of characteristics that are quite often not clinically visible.

  7. Normal erect swallowing. Normal function and incidence of variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, D J; Cruess, D F; Dachman, A H

    1985-10-01

    Of 871 candidates presenting for upper gastrointestinal examinations, 16 met the rigorous criteria established for selecting asymptomatic normal volunteers. Frame-by-frame evaluation of their videorecorded pharyngeal swallow confirmed many observations made previously utilizing cine recording at much higher radiation dosages. In addition, new observations were made: the nasopharynx may not occlude until the bolus is entirely within the pharynx; air mixes with the bolus if the swallow is an "open" type; the epiglottis always inverts in normal individuals regardless of the type of swallow ("open," air filled oro-and hypopharynx into which the swallowed bolus is dropped; "closed," airless oropharynx into which the swallowed bolus is pushed by a continuous peristaltic drive of the tongue and palate, thus reconstituting the pharyngeal space); laryngeal descent may aid in stripping the bolus from the pharynx; the vestibule may not completely close during the swallow and the larynx can still be impervious to the bolus; the peristaltic wave does not begin until the bolus has breeched the cricopharyngeus; the cricopharyngeus may be seen frequently in normal individuals, but does not delay the passage of the bolus; asymmetric flow of the bolus around the larynx is common and may not be the result of epiglottic tilt or head positioning.

  8. Disk Battery Ingestion A Malpractice Case that Results in Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihat Şarkış

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline batteries have become the second most swallowed foreign bodies following coins. Most cases have an uncomplicated course, but some may lead to serious complications and even death. Here we report a 28 months old boy who had experienced discomfort, eating refusal, vomiting and slightly wheezing after falling from a sofa bed. He has been in three different county hospitals and two private hospitals due to complaints, has been examined by two pediatricians and a cranial surgeon. A cranial CT imaging, a cranial X-ray radiograph and a chest X-ray radiograph was obtained. Firstly, diagnosed as head and neck trauma, then diagnosed as acute bronchiolitis, and finally pneumonia. Hospitalized twice. Finally, a chest radiograph revealed a button battery in the esophagus. The foreign body was endoscopic removed. The child had a quick clinical impairment after removal of the battery. As a result, alkaline batteries with their increasing risk of engulfment poses very serious problems. The parents and physicians should be informed against increasing frequency of ingestion of alkaline batteries by infants and children. Also, clinicians should be careful about the risk of these batteries that they can cause pneumonia and infiltration which may make it difficult to detect the foreign body.

  9. Alternative antiretroviral therapy formulations for patients unable to swallow solid oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Joan M; Akpanudo, Barbara; Shukla, Vipul; Gutterson, Glen; Eitniear, Lindsey; Sahloff, Eric G

    2015-09-15

    Evidence-based guidance is presented to assist clinicians in selecting alternative formulations of antiretroviral (ARV) agents for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who are unable to swallow tablets or capsules. The inability to take medications in standard oral dosage forms can be associated with nonadherence or the use of alternative administration strategies such as capsule or tablet breaking, crushing, or chewing. Patients with HIV infection require long-term ARV therapy to maintain viral suppression; ARV agents are predominately available as tablets and capsules that may pose swallowing difficulties for some patients. Using a variety of sources (the primary literature, pharmaceutical package inserts, and requests for unpublished data from drug manufacturers), available evidence on the bioavailability of ARV medications after disruption of the capsule or tablet matrix was reviewed; information on alternative formulations of ARV agents was also assessed. With several ARV agents, disruption of the solid oral dosage form by crushing, chewing, or breaking tablets or opening capsules prior to ingestion has been shown to result in altered bioavailability or pharmacokinetics and thus the potential for incomplete virological suppression, increased adverse effects, and suboptimal health outcomes. Of the 33 single-agent ARV medications and combination ARV products in five classes available at the time of review, approximately half exist as powders, liquids, injectables, or chewable or dissolvable tablets. If alternative ARV formulations or administration methods are used, close monitoring for achievement of virological and immunologic success and potential toxicities is recommended. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of strengthening exercises on swallowing musculature and function in senior healthy subjects; a prospective effectiveness and feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijenga, S.A.C.; van der Molen, L.; Stuiver, M.M.; Teertstra, H.J.; Hilgers, F.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients may develop dysphagia due to muscle atrophy and fibrosis following chemoradiotherapy. Strengthening of the swallowing muscles through therapeutic exercise is potentially effective for improving swallowing function. We hypothesize that a customized Swallow Exercise

  11. Effects of Strengthening Exercises on Swallowing Musculature and Function in Senior Healthy Subjects: a Prospective Effectiveness and Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijenga, S. A. C.; van der Molen, L.; Stuiver, M. M.; Teertstra, H. J.; Hilgers, F. J. M.; van den Brekel, M. W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients may develop dysphagia due to muscle atrophy and fibrosis following chemoradiotherapy. Strengthening of the swallowing muscles through therapeutic exercise is potentially effective for improving swallowing function. We hypothesize that a customized Swallow Exercise

  12. Gamma radiation effects on nestling Tree Swallows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zach, R.; Mayoh, K.R.

    1984-10-01

    The sensitivity of Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) to the stress of ionizing radiation was investigated with growth analysis. Freshly hatched nestlings were temporarily removed from nests, taken to the laboratory and acutely exposed to 0.9, 2.7, or 4.5 Gy gamma radiation. Some of the unirradiated control nestlings were also taken to the laboratory whereas others were left in the nests. Growth of all the nestlings was measured daily and analyzed by fitting growth models. There was no detectable radiation-induced mortality up to fledgling, approx. = 20 d after irradiation. Radiation exposure did not affect the basic growth pattern; the logistic growth model was most suitable for body mass and foot length, and the von Bertalanffy model for primary-feather length, irrespective of treatment. Parameter values from these models indicated pronounced growth depression in the 2.7-Gy and 4.5-Gy groups, particularly for body mass. Radiation also affected the timing of development. The growth depression of the 2.7-Gy group was similar to that caused by hatching asynchrony in unirradiated nestlings. The 4.5-Cy nestlings grew as well as unexposed nestlings that died from natural causes. Chronic irradiation at approx. = 1.0 Cy/d caused more severe growth effects than acute exposure to 4.5 Gy and may have caused permanent stunting. Growth analysis is a potent tool for assessing man-made environmental stresses. Observed body-mass statistics and model parameters seem to be most sensitive to environmental stresses, but coefficients of variation are not necessarily correlated with sensitivity. 34 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  13. Liquid nitrogen ingestion followed by gastric perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrizbeitia, Luis D; Calello, Diane P; Dhir, Nisha; O'Reilly, Colin; Marcus, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Ingestion of liquid nitrogen is rare but carries catastrophic complications related to barotrauma to the gastrointestinal tract. We describe a case of ingestion of liquid nitrogen followed by gastric perforation and respiratory insufficiency and discuss the mechanism of injury and management of this condition. Liquid nitrogen is widely available and is frequently used in classroom settings, in gastronomy, and for recreational purposes. Given the potentially lethal complications of ingestion, regulation of its use, acquisition, and storage may be appropriate.

  14. Effect of wearing a palatal plate on swallowing function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshita, Yoshifumi; Koshino, Hisashi; Hirai, Toshihiro; Matsumi, Tamachi

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of wearing a palatal plate on swallowing function. The subject group consisted of 10 healthy, fully dentate males. Two experimental palatal plates (EPP) were used in this study: one was 1.4mm thick (EPP1), and the other was 2.8mm thick (EPP2). Tongue movements and swallowing sounds were simultaneously recorded. The position of the surface of the tongue was recorded by using ultrasound diagnostic equipment in the sagittal plane. Swallowing tests were performed under three conditions: without EPP (WOE), with EPP1 (WP1), and with EPP2 (WP2). Swallowing index (SI) and tongue contact time (TCT) was calculated. The value of SI was lowest under WOE, and highest under WP2, with a statistically significant difference. There was no statistical significance, however, between SI under WOE and that under WP1. The value of TCT was longest under WOE, and shortest under WP2, with a statistically significant difference. This investigation suggests that the thickness of a palatal plate influences SI and TCT, which correlate with swallowing function.

  15. Hard to Swallow: Developmental Biological Insights into Pediatric Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel; Moody, Sally A.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Karpinski, Beverly A.; Zohn, Irene E.; Mendelowitz, David; Lee, Norman H.; Popratiloff, Anastas

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric dysphagia—feeding and swallowing difficulties that begin at birth, last throughout childhood, and continue into maturity—is one of the most common, least understood complications in children with developmental disorders. We argue that a major cause of pediatric dysphagia is altered hindbrain patterning during pre-natal development. Such changes can compromise craniofacial structures including oropharyngeal muscles and skeletal elements as well as motor and sensory circuits necessary for normal feeding and swallowing. Animal models of developmental disorders that include pediatric dysphagia in their phenotypic spectrum can provide mechanistic insight into pathogenesis of feeding and swallowing difficulties. A fairly common human genetic developmental disorder, DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) includes a substantial incidence of pediatric dysphagia in its phenotypic spectrum. Infant mice carrying a parallel deletion to 22q11DS patients have feeding and swallowing difficulties. Altered hindbrain patterning, neural crest migration, craniofacial malformations, and changes in cranial nerve growth prefigure these difficulties. Thus, in addition to craniofacial and pharyngeal anomalies that arise independently of altered neural development, pediatric dysphagia may reflect disrupted hindbrain patterning and its impact on neural circuit development critical for feeding and swallowing. The mechanisms that disrupt hindbrain patterning and circuitry may provide a foundation to develop novel therapeutic approaches for improved clinical management of pediatric dysphagia. PMID:26554723

  16. Videofluoroscopic evaluation of mastication and swallowing in individuals with TMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, Carla; Mello, Marçal Motta de; Biase, Noemi Grigoletto de; Pasetti, Lilian; Camargo, Paulo A Monteiro; Silvério, Kelly Cristina Alves; Gonçalves, Maria Inês Rebelo

    2012-01-01

    To study mastication and swallowing disorders in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). To investigate mastication and swallowing disorders in patients with severe TMD referred to surgery. Clinical and experimental study involving ten individuals with TMD submitted to deglutition videofluoroscopy. These patients did not have posterior teeth, mastication pain and food replacement in favor of pasty consistence food. The assessment of the oral and pharyngeal phases approached the following aspects: side of onset and preferential side for chewing, premature escape, remains of food residues in the oral cavity or in the pharyngeal recesses, number of necessary swallowing efforts, laryngeal penetration and/or tracheal aspiration. During mastication and the oral phase we observed tongue compensatory movements upon chewing (n = 7; 70%), premature escape (n = 4; 40%), food remains in the cavity after swallowing (n = 5; 50%) and an excessive number of deglutition efforts (n = 5; 50%). On the pharyngeal phase we observed food remains in the valleculae (n = 6; 60%), in the pyriform sinuses (n = 4; 40%); laryngeal penetration (n = 1; 10%) and tracheal aspiration (n = 4; 40%). TMD patients may have alterations in their chewing and swallowing patterns, with laryngeal penetration and/or tracheal aspiration. The study indicates the need for a multidisciplinary assessment because of dysphagia in TMD patients.

  17. Prevalence of swallowing dysfunction screened in Swedish cohort of COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Lindh, Margareta; Blom Johansson, Monica; Jennische, Margareta; Koyi, Hirsh

    2017-01-01

    COPD is a common problem associated with morbidity and mortality. COPD may also affect the dynamics and coordination of functions such as swallowing. A misdirected swallow may, in turn, result in the bolus entering the airway. A growing body of evidence suggests that a subgroup of people with COPD is prone to oropharyngeal dysphagia. The aim of this study was to evaluate swallowing dysfunction in patients with stable COPD and to determine the relation between signs and symptoms of swallowing dysfunction and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted). Fifty-one patients with COPD in a stable phase participated in a questionnaire survey, swallowing tests, and spirometry. A post-bronchodilator ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second/best of forced vital capacity and vital capacity <0.7 was used to define COPD. Swallowing function was assessed by a questionnaire and two swallowing tests (water and cookie swallow tests). Sixty-five percent of the patients reported subjective signs and symptoms of swallowing dysfunction in the questionnaire and 49% showed measurable ones in the swallowing tests. For the combined subjective and objective findings, 78% had a coexisting swallowing dysfunction. No significant difference was found between male and female patients. Swallowing function is affected in COPD patients with moderate to severe airflow limitation, and the signs and symptoms of this swallowing dysfunction were subjective, objective, or both.

  18. Esophageal button battery ingestion in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şencan, Arzu; Genişol, İncinur; Hoşgör, Münevver

    2017-07-01

    Button battery lodged in the esophagus carries a high risk of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to present cases of patients with esophageal button battery ingestion treated at our clinic and to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and treatment. Records of patients admitted to our hospital for foreign body ingestion between January 2010 and May 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Cases with button battery lodged in the esophagus were included in the study. Patient data regarding age, sex, length of time after ingestion until admission, presenting clinical symptoms, type and localization of the battery, management, and prognosis were analyzed. Among 1891 foreign body ingestions, 71 were localized in the esophagus, and 8 of those (11.2%) were cases of button battery ingestion. Mean age was 1.7 years. Admission was within 6 hours of ingestion in 5 cases, after 24 hours had elapsed in 2, and 1 month after ingestion in 1 case. All patients but 1 knew the history of ingestion. Prompt endoscopic removal was performed for all patients. Three patients developed esophageal stricture, which responded to dilatation. Early recognition and timely endoscopic removal is mandatory in esophageal button battery ingestion. It should be suspected in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  19. Cold drink ingestion improves exercise endurance capacity in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason K W; Shirreffs, Susan M; Maughan, Ronald J

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the effect of drink temperature on cycling capacity in the heat. On two separate trials, eight males cycled at 66 +/- 2% VO2peak (mean +/- SD) to exhaustion in hot (35.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C) and humid (60 +/- 1%) environments. Participants ingested three 300-mL aliquots of either a cold (4 degrees C) or a warm (37 degrees C) drink during 30 min of seated rest before exercise and 100 mL of the same drink every 10 min during exercise. Rectal and skin temperatures, heart rate, and sweat rate were recorded. Ratings of thermal sensation and perceived exertion were assessed. Exercise time was longer (P drink (63.8 +/- 4.3 min) than with the warm drink (52.0 +/- 4.1 min). Rectal temperature fell by 0.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C (P drinks. There was no effect of drink temperature on mean skin temperature at rest (P = 0.870), but mean skin temperature was lower from 20 min during exercise with ingestion of the cold drink than with the warm drink (P drink than with the warm drink (P Drink temperature influenced sweat rate (1.22 +/- 0.34 and 1.40 +/- 0.41 L x h(-1) for the cold and the warm drink, respectively; P drink was ingested. Compared with a drink at 37 degrees C, the ingestion of a cold drink before and during exercise in the heat reduced physiological strain (reduced heat accumulation) during exercise, leading to an improved endurance capacity (23 +/- 6%).

  20. The ingestible thermal monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Hogrefe, Arthur F.; Lesho, Jeffery C.

    1988-03-01

    A thermal monitoring system for measuring body core temperatures was developed that contains an ingestible pill which is both commandable and rechargeable, and which uses magnetic induction for command and telemetry as well as for recharging. The pill electronics consist of a battery power source, a crystal-controlled oscillator that drives a small air coil, and a command detection circuit. The resulting 262-kHz magnetilc field can be easily detected from a distance of 1 m. The pill oscillator functions at voltages less than 1 V, supplied by a single Ni-Cd battery, which must be recharged after 72 h of continuous transmission. The pill can be recalibrated periodically to compensate for long-term drift.

  1. Recent Advances in Sensing Oropharyngeal Swallowing Function in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ono

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia (difficulty in swallowing is an important issue in the elderly because it causes aspiration pneumonia, which is the second largest cause of death in this group. It also causes decline in activities of daily living and quality of life. The oral phase of swallowing has been neglected, despite its importance in the evaluation of dysphagia, because adequate protocols and measuring devices are unavailable. However, recent advances in sensor technology have enabled straightforward, non-invasive measurement of the movement of important swallowing-related organs such as the lips and tongue, as well as the larynx. In this article, we report the present state and possibility of clinical application of such systems developed in Japan.

  2. The effect of dairy farm management regime on swallow (Hirundo rustica) abundance in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbe, S.K.; Snoo, de G.R.

    2007-01-01

    Aim To identify differences in Swallow abundance between organically and conventionally managed dairy farms, by examining three factors: farm buildings, food availability and farmer attitudes to Swallows. Methods Organic and conventional dairy farm holdings were compared in pairwise fashion. On

  3. [Migration of eight harmful elements from household products made with synthetic resin that infants may swallow by mistake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isama, Kazuo; Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Nishimura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Harmful elements are used as stabilizers and colorants in synthetic resin products. Accidental ingestion of harmful elements from such synthetic resins by infants is a dangerous health hazard. The Japanese Food Sanitation Law and the International Standard ISO 8124-3 "Safety of toys-Part 3: Migration of certain elements" control the levels of migrated harmful elements, such as lead or cadmium, from infants toys. However, the levels of migrated harmful elements from household products that are not infants toys are not controlled, since they are not covered by the law or standard. Therefore, we investigated the level of eight harmful elements (antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury and selenium) migrated from household products made of synthetic resin that infants may swallow by mistake. The extraction test of ISO 8124-3: 2010 was executed in 135 products (total 150 specimens), and the concentration of these elements was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). As a result, 1810 mg/kg and 1660 mg/kg of lead, exceeding the maximum acceptable level of the ISO standard, migrated from two products. In addition, lead and/or chromium at levels more than 1/10 of the maximum acceptable levels of the ISO standard migrated from four products. Household products that infants may swallow by mistake should ideally not release harmful elements such as lead and chromium.

  4. Examining user perceptions of SwallowIT: A pilot study of a new telepractice application for delivering intensive swallowing therapy to head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Laurelie R; Ward, Elizabeth C; Cartmill, Bena; Hill, Anne J; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2017-01-01

    Consumer feedback and end-user perceptions provide important information regarding the clinical acceptability of new telepractice systems. This pilot investigation aimed to evaluate end-user perceptions of a new asynchronous telepractice application, ' SwallowIT', designed to support patients to remotely complete intensive swallowing therapy during curative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) treatment for head and neck cancer (HNC). Insights were sought from 15 patients with oropharyngeal cancer who used SwallowIT to complete supported home swallowing therapy. Perceptions were evaluated via structured questionnaires, completed following initial orientation to SwallowIT and on completion of CRT. Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted ≥3 months post-treatment. The majority of patients reported positive initial perceptions towards SwallowIT for comfort (87%), confidence (87%), motivation (73%) and support (87%). No statistically significant change in perceptions was observed from baseline to end of CRT ( p > 0.05). Thematic analysis of interviews revealed four main themes: the ease of use of SwallowIT, motivating factors, circumstances which made therapy difficult, and personal preferences for service-delivery models. These preliminary findings demonstrate that SwallowIT was well-perceived by the current group of HNC consumers and suggest that SwallowIT may be well-accepted as an alternate service-delivery model for delivering intensive swallowing therapy during CRT.

  5. Prevention of ingestion injuries in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [6] Ingestion of multiple magnets results in bowel perforations in at least half of children affected.[7] Primary prevention through education and awareness is crucial to reduce the substantial healthcare burden that such incidents present. The majority of these accidental ingestions occur in the home and nearby areas.

  6. Ingestion of Microplastics by Freshwater Tubifex Worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Rachel R; Woodward, Jamie C; Rothwell, James J

    2017-11-07

    Microplastic contamination of the aquatic environment is a global issue. Microplastics can be ingested by organisms leading to negative physiological impacts. The ingestion of microplastics by freshwater invertebrates has not been reported outside the laboratory. Here we demonstrate the ingestion of microplastic particles by Tubifex tubifex from bottom sediments in a major urban waterbody fed by the River Irwell, Manchester, UK. The host sediments had microplastic concentrations ranging from 56 to 2543 particles kg-1. 87% of the Tubifex-ingested microplastic particles were microfibers (55-4100 μm in length), while the remaining 13% were microplastic fragments (50-4500 μm in length). FT-IR analysis revealed ingestion of a range of polymers, including polyester and acrylic fibers. While microbeads were present in the host sediment matrix, they were not detected in Tubifex worm tissue. The mean concentration of ingested microplastics was 129 ± 65.4 particles g-1 tissue. We also show that Tubifex worms retain microplastics for longer than they retain other particulate components of the ingested sediment matrix. Microplastic ingestion by Tubifex worms poses a significant risk for trophic transfer and biomagnification of microplastics up the aquatic food chain.

  7. Voice and swallowing outcomes of an organ-preservation trial for advanced laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Kevin; Lyden, Teresa H; Lee, Julia; Urba, Susan G; Worden, Frank; Eisbruch, Avraham; Tsien, Christina; Bradford, Carol R; Chepeha, Douglas B; Hogikyan, Norman D; Prince, Mark E P; Teknos, Theodoros N; Wolf, Gregory T

    2005-12-01

    Organ-preservation treatment approaches for advanced laryngeal cancer patients that use combination chemoradiotherapy result in cure rates similar to primary laryngectomy with postoperative radiotherapy. In the national VA Larynx Cancer Trial, successful organ preservation was associated with an overall improvement in quality of life but not in subjective speech compared with long-term laryngectomy survivors. As part of a Phase II clinical trial, a prospective study of speech and swallowing results was conducted to determine if larynx preservation is associated with improved voice and swallowing compared with results in patients who require salvage laryngectomy. A total of 97 patients with advanced laryngeal cancer (46 Stage III, 51 Stage IV) were given a single course of induction chemotherapy (cisplatin 100 mg/m2 on Day 1 and 5-FU 1,000 mg/m2/day x 5 days), followed by assessment of response. Patients with less than 50% response underwent early salvage laryngectomy, and patients with 50% or better response underwent concurrent chemoradiation (72 Gy and cisplatin 100 mg/m2 on Days 1, 22, and 43), followed by two cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy (DDP/5-FU). Direct laryngoscopy and biopsy were performed 8 weeks after radiation therapy to determine final tumor response. Late salvage surgery was performed on patients with persistent or recurrent disease. Completed survey data on voice and swallowing utilizing the Voice-Related Quality of Life Measure (V-RQOL) and the List Performance Status Scale for Head and Neck Cancer Patients (PSS-HN) were obtained from 56 patients who were alive and free of disease at the time of survey, with a minimum follow-up of 8 months. Comparisons were made between patients with an intact larynx (n = 37) vs. laryngectomy (n = 19), as well as early (n = 12) vs. late salvage laryngectomy (n = 7). Multivariate analysis was performed to determine factors predictive of voice and swallowing outcomes. Overall 3-year determinant survival was 87

  8. Ultrasound of oral and masticatory muscles: Why every neuromuscular swallow team should have an ultrasound machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Lagarde, M.L.J.; Alfen, N. van

    2017-01-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disorders often present with swallowing difficulties due to oral phase problems and pharyngeal residue after swallow. It is important to assess the underlying pathology and cause of the swallowing disturbance in this patient group, such as dystrophic changes in oral and

  9. A Pilot Study of the Head Extension Swallowing Exercise: New Method for Strengthening Swallowing-Related Muscle Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jong-Chi

    2016-10-01

    This pilot study examined the effect of a new head extension swallowing exercise (HESE) on submental muscle activity and tongue strength in healthy volunteers. Fifteen young adults (10 females and 5 males) were instructed to extend their head backwards as much as possible, and while watching the ceiling, swallowed their saliva every 10 s for a duration of 20 min. Twenty-four treatments were performed over 8 weeks. The outcome variables evaluated at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks of training, and 12-week follow-up included mean and peak submental muscle activation amplitudes during normal and effortful swallowing measured via surface electromyography, and anterior and posterior isometric tongue pressures were measured with the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument. Results indicated that the muscle activation amplitudes during effortful swallowing increased significantly at 4 and 8 weeks compared to baseline (p < 0.025). However, the increases in amplitudes during normal swallowing were minor (nonsignificant) after 8 weeks compared to baseline. The isometric pressures of the tongue tip and the posterior part of the oral tongue were significantly higher at 8 weeks compared to baseline (p < 0.025). Thus, the 8-week HESE protocol significantly improved suprahyoid muscle activity during effortful swallowing as well as the isometric tongue pressures. The HESE appears effective in exercising and strengthening the suprahyoid muscles and tongue muscles in healthy participants. Although encouraging, these results need to be replicated in clinical trials for testing the therapeutic effects of the HESE in older adults and patients with dysphagia who present with decreased hyolaryngeal elevation.

  10. Ice ingestion with a long rest interval increases the endurance exercise capacity and reduces the core temperature in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Takashi; Iribe, Yuka; Ogaki, Tetsuro

    2017-01-05

    The timing in which ice before exercise should be ingested plays an important role in optimizing its success. However, the effects of differences in the timing of ice ingestion before exercise on cycling capacity, and thermoregulation has not been studied. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of length of time after ice ingestion on endurance exercise capacity in the heat. Seven males ingested 1.25 g kg body mass-1 of ice (0.5 °C) or cold water (4 °C) every 5 min, six times. Under three separate conditions after ice or water ingestion ([1] taking 20 min rest after ice ingestion, [2] taking 5 min rest after ice ingestion, and [3] taking 5 min rest after cold water ingestion), seven physically active male cyclists exercised at 65% of their maximal oxygen uptake to exhaustion in the heat (35 °C, 30% relative humidity). Participants cycled significantly longer following both ice ingestion with a long rest interval (46.0 ± 7.7 min) and that with a short rest interval (38.7 ± 5.7 min) than cold water ingestion (32.3 ± 3.2 min; both p Heat storage under condition of ice ingestion with a long rest interval during the pre-exercise period was significantly lower than that observed with a short rest interval (-4.98 ± 2.50 W m-2; p heat, which is suggested to be driven by a reduced rectal temperature and heat storage before the start of exercise.

  11. An Unusual Case of Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture after Swallowing a Boneless Chicken Nugget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenia Aga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old previously healthy man presented to our Emergency Department with shortness of breath and epigastric pain after swallowing a boneless chicken nugget one hour prior to presentation. Physical examination revealed epigastric rigidity and tenderness. Serology was normal except for mildly elevated bilirubin and amylase. Computed tomography (CT scan of the chest revealed a distal esophageal rupture with accompanying pneumomediastinum and left-sided pleural effusion. Treatment was initiated with administration of intravenous fluids and broad-spectrum antibiotics. Subsequently, an esophageal stent was inserted endoscopically in addition to VATS (Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery drainage of the left-sided pleural space. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of Boerhaave’s syndrome: a rare and life-threatening form of noniatrogenic esophageal rupture most often preceded by forceful vomiting. Our case demonstrates that physicians should maintain an index of suspicion for spontaneous esophageal rupture in patients presenting with shortness of breath and epigastric pain even in the absence of preceding vomiting, cough, or seizure. Additionally, ingestion of boneless, shell-less foods may be sufficient to cause rupture in individuals without underlying esophageal pathology. CT scan of the thorax and upper abdomen should be performed in these patients to rule out this rare and life-threatening diagnosis.

  12. Differences in Swallowing between High and Low Concentration Taste Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nagy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Taste is a property that is thought to potentially modulate swallowing behavior. Whether such effects depend on taste, intensity remains unclear. This study explored differences in the amplitudes of tongue-palate pressures in swallowing as a function of taste stimulus concentration. Tongue-palate pressures were collected in 80 healthy women, in two age groups (under 40, over 60, stratified by genetic taste status (nontasters, supertasters. Liquids with different taste qualities (sweet, sour, salty, and bitter were presented in high and low concentrations. General labeled magnitude scale ratings captured perceived taste intensity and liking/disliking of the test liquids. Path analysis explored whether factors of taste, concentration, age group, and/or genetic taste status impacted: (1 perceived intensity; (2 palatability; and (3 swallowing pressures. Higher ratings of perceived intensity were found in supertasters and with higher concentrations, which were more liked/disliked than lower concentrations. Sweet stimuli were more palatable than sour, salty, or bitter stimuli. Higher concentrations elicited stronger tongue-palate pressures independently and in association with intensity ratings. The perceived intensity of a taste stimulus varies as a function of stimulus concentration, taste quality, participant age, and genetic taste status and influences swallowing pressure amplitudes. High-concentration salty and sour stimuli elicit the greatest tongue-palate pressures.

  13. Swallowing Disorders in Parkinson's Disease: Impact of Lingual Pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argolo, Natalie; Sampaio, Marília; Pinho, Patrícia; Melo, Ailton; Nóbrega, Ana Caline

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lingual pumping (LP) is a repetitive, involuntary, anteroposterior movement of the tongue on the soft palate that is executed prior to transferring the food bolus to the pharynx, but we also observed LP when multiple swallows were taken. LP may be associated with rigidity and bradykinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This…

  14. Time budget of South African cliff swallows during breeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for predicting standard metabolic rate and the cost of flight. The highest daily energy expenditur.e was ... predict standard metabolic rate (SMR) of the South African cliff swallow and the cost of flight was estimated from ... estimation of the time spent in social activities was made. To calculate the cost of building a nest the time ...

  15. Evaluation of swallowing in infants with congenital heart defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Karine da Rosa; Firpo, Cora; Gasparin, Marisa; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro; Dornelles, Silvia; Bacaltchuk, Tzvi; Levy, Deborah Salle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical repair of congenital heart disease in the first years of life compromises the coordination of the suction, breathing, and swallowing functions. Objective To describe the alterations in swallowing found in infants with congenital heart defect during their hospitalization. Methods Prospective, cross-sectional study in a reference hospital for heart disease. The sample consisted of 19 postsurgical patients who underwent an evaluation of swallowing. The infants included were younger than 7 months and had a diagnosis of congenital heart defect and suspected swallowing difficulties. Results Of the 19 infants with congenital heart defect, the median age was 3.2 months. A significant association was found between suction rhythm and dysphagia (p = 0.036) and between oral-motor oral feeding readiness and dysphagia (p = 0.014). Conclusions The data suggest that dysphagia often occurs after surgery in infants with congenital heart defect. Infants with congenital heart defect had very similar behavior to preterm infants in terms of oral feeding readiness.

  16. Evaluation of Swallowing in Infants with Congenital Heart Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira, Karine da Rosa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Surgical repair of congenital heart disease in the first years of life compromises the coordination of the suction, breathing, and swallowing functions. Objective To describe the alterations in swallowing found in infants with congenital heart defect during their hospitalization. Methods Prospective, cross-sectional study in a reference hospital for heart disease. The sample consisted of 19 postsurgical patients who underwent an evaluation of swallowing. The infants included were younger than 7 months and had a diagnosis of congenital heart defect and suspected swallowing difficulties. Results Of the 19 infants with congenital heart defect, the median age was 3.2 months. A significant association was found between suction rhythm and dysphagia (p = 0.036 and between oral-motor oral feeding readiness and dysphagia (p = 0.014. Conclusions The data suggest that dysphagia often occurs after surgery in infants with congenital heart defect. Infants with congenital heart defect had very similar behavior to preterm infants in terms of oral feeding readiness.

  17. Swallow syncope caused by third-degree atrioventricular block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaberg, Anne Marie Roust; Eriksson, Anna Elin; Madsen, Per Lav; Dixen, Ulrik

    2015-10-27

    We report a case of a patient with more than 30 years of repeated syncopes, always following food intake. The patient was diagnosed with a swallow-related third-degree atrioventricular block and successfully treated with an artificial pacemaker. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Short communications: White-throated Swallow Hirundo albigularis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short communications: White-throated Swallow Hirundo albigularis in Tanzania. NE Baker, EM Baker. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  19. Effect of posture on swallowing | Alghadir | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Swallowing is a systematic process. Any structural, physiological or neurological disturbance in this process may cause dysphagia. Although there are studies that report head/neck movements during mastication, there are fewer studies that show the effect of different head/neck postures on difficulty while ...

  20. [Specialties in dentistry. Salivary flow and swallowing in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierink, C.D.; Spijker, P.C.; Baat, C. de

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a slowly progressive and irreversible disorder of the nervous system. Drooling is listed as a secondary symptom of Parkinson's disease. Its cause is insufficiently clear. In the literature 2 possible causes are described: hypersalivation and swallowing abnormalities. These

  1. Time budget of South African cliff swallows during breeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973) (see Appendix). The South African cliff swallow spent most of the 24-h day in the nest (Table 1). This included about 9 h spent sleeping in the nest at night. Nest building was a minor component of total activity during the incubation and ...

  2. \\'The snake will swallow you': supernatural snakes and the creation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    \\'The snake will swallow you': supernatural snakes and the creation of the Khotso legend. Felicity Wood. Abstract. No Abstract. Indilinga: African Journal of Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IAJIKS) Vol. 4(1) 2005: 347-359. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  3. Predictable swallowing function after open horizontal supraglottic partial laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Christine; Benter, Philipp; Seidl, Rainer O; Coordes, Annekatrin

    2016-12-01

    After horizontal supraglottic partial laryngectomy, patients have an increased risk of dysphagia as they are not able to close the laryngeal entrance during swallowing, especially if the surgical defect of the tongue base has increased. There is no investigation that studies risk factors for impaired swallow function, or that predicts postoperative swallow outcomes based on radiologically determined tumor dimensions. The present study investigated the impact of the tongue base tumor extension (determined by CT scan in patients undergoing partial laryngectomy) on the recovery rate of swallow function. The retrospective study in a tertiary hospital between 2000 and 2015 included all patients who underwent open horizontal supraglottic partial laryngectomy due to oropharyngeal cancer of the tongue base, or supraglottic laryngeal cancer with tongue base infiltration. All clinicopathological data were collected. The dimension of tongue base infiltration was measured using CT scan. Swallow function was recorded by Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing and determined by evaluating both the duration until nasogastric tube removal and changing of the cuffed tracheostomy tube for an uncuffed speech cannula. The study included 26 patients (44-76 years, median 59 years). The clinical tumor (cT) classification included cT2 and cT3, while the pathologic tumor (pT) classification included pT2 and pT3 in 90% and pT1 and pT4 in 10% respectively. The duration until using the speech cannula was not associated with clinicopathological data, including the investigated radiologic tumor dimensions (biggest tumor diameter, tongue base infiltration depth, width, height, area and volume). The duration until nasogastric tube removal was significantly associated with the tongue base infiltration width (p=0.012), height (p=0.026) and area (pfunction after open horizontal supraglottic partial laryngectomy depends on the tumor extension of the tongue base. The tongue base infiltration

  4. Physiology and Pathophysiology of the Swallowing Area of Human Motor Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hamdy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Swallowing problems can affect as many as one in three patients in the period immediately after stroke. Despite this, in the majority of cases, recovery usually occurs to a safe level after a month or two. In this review, we show. how the organization of the cortical projections to swallowing nuscles can account for many of the clinical observations on swallowing after stroke and explain why recovery is common in the long term. In addition, we examine approaches that may be useful in speeding up recovery of swallowing. Swallowing may be a useful model in which to study central nervous reorganization after injury.

  5. Radiation doses to children during modified barium swallow studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, Kelly A. [University of Queensland, Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, School of Medicine, Herston, Queensland (Australia); McMahon, Sandra M. [SpeechNet Speech Pathology Services, Brisbane (Australia); Long, Gillian; Bunch, Judith A. [Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Herston (Australia); Pandeya, Nirmala [Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston (Australia); Coakley, Kerry S. [Biomedical Technology Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston (Australia); Chang, Anne B. [Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Herston (Australia)

    2007-03-15

    There are minimal data on radiation doses to infants and children undergoing a modified barium swallow (MBS) study. To document screening times, dose area product (DAP) and effective doses to children undergoing MBS and to determine factors associated with increased screening times and effective dose. Fluoroscopic data (screening time, DAP, kVp) for 90 consecutive MBS studies using pulse fluoroscopy were prospectively recorded; effective dose was calculated and data were analyzed for effects of behavior, number of swallow presentations, swallowing dysfunction and medical problems. Mean effective dose for the entire group was 0.0826 {+-} 0.0544 mSv, screening time 2.48 {+-} 0.81 min, and DAP 28.79 {+-} 41.72 cGy cm{sup 2}. Significant differences were found across three age groups ({<=}1.0, >1.0-3.0 and >3.0 years) for effective dose (mean 0.1188, 0.0651 and 0.0529 mSv, respectively; P < 0.001), but not for screening time or DAP. Effective dose was correlated with screening time (P = 0.007), DAP (P < 0.001), number of swallow presentations (P = 0.007), lower age (P = 0.017), female gender (P = 0.004), and height (P < 0.001). Screening time was correlated with total number of swallow presentations (P < 0.001) and DAP (P < 0.001). Screening times, DAP, effective dose, and child and procedural factors associated with higher effective doses are presented for children undergoing MBS studies. (orig.)

  6. A comparison between swallowing sounds and vibrations in patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Faezeh; Kurosu, Atsuko; Coyle, James L; Perera, Subashan; Sejdić, Ervin

    2017-06-01

    The cervical auscultation refers to the observation and analysis of sounds or vibrations captured during swallowing using either a stethoscope or acoustic/vibratory detectors. Microphones and accelerometers have recently become two common sensors used in modern cervical auscultation methods. There are open questions about whether swallowing signals recorded by these two sensors provide unique or complementary information about swallowing function; or whether they present interchangeable information. This study aims to compare of swallowing signals recorded by a microphone and a tri-axial accelerometer from 72 patients (mean age 63.94 ± 12.58 years, 42 male, 30 female), who had videofluoroscopic examination. The participants swallowed one or more boluses of thickened liquids of different consistencies, including thin liquids, nectar-thick liquids, and pudding. A comfortable self-selected volume from a cup or a controlled volume by the examiner from a 5 ml spoon was given to the participants. A broad feature set was extracted in time, information-theoretic, and frequency domains from each of 881 swallows presented in this study. The swallowing sounds exhibited significantly higher frequency content and kurtosis values than the swallowing vibrations. In addition, the Lempel-Ziv complexity was lower for swallowing sounds than those for swallowing vibrations. To conclude, information provided by microphones and accelerometers about swallowing function are unique and these two transducers are not interchangeable. Consequently, the selection of transducer would be a vital step in future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Differences in brain networks during consecutive swallows detected using an optimized vertex-frequency algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L; Sejdić, Ervin

    2017-03-06

    Patients with dysphagia can have higher risks of aspiration after repetitive swallowing activity due to the "fatigue effect". However, it is still unknown how consecutive swallows affect brain activity. Therefore, we sought to investigate differences in swallowing brain networks formed during consecutive swallows using a signal processing on graph approach. Data were collected from 55 healthy people using electroencephalography (EEG) signals. Participants performed dry swallows (i.e., saliva swallows) and wet swallows (i.e., water, nectar-thick, and honey thick swallows). After standard pre-processing of the EEG time series, brain networks were formed using the time-frequency-based synchrony measure, while signals on graphs were formed as a line graph of the brain networks. For calculating the vertex frequency information from the signals on graphs, the proposed algorithm was based on the optimized window size for calculating the windowed graph Fourier transform and the graph S-transform. The proposed algorithms were tested using synthetic signals and showed improved energy concentration in comparison to the original algorithm. When applied to EEG swallowing data, the optimized windowed graph Fourier transform and the optimized graph S-transform showed that differences exist in brain activity between consecutive swallows. In addition, the results showed higher differences between consecutive swallows for thicker liquids. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Soft-robotic esophageal swallowing as a clinically-inspired bolus rheometry technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirven, Steven; Allen, Jacqueline; (Peter Xu, Weiliang; Cheng, Leo K.

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the impact of viscosity and peristaltic transport parameters on manometric pressure signatures, a reproducible swallowing process is required. Due to inter- and intra-subject variability from swallow to swallow, the human body does not represent an optimal mechanism for such an investigation. A smooth and continuous swallowing soft-robot has been developed to produce biomimetic swallowing trajectories, and is proposed to operate as a bench-top bolus rheometric investigation method. The method compares conventional viscometry and pressure signature findings from robotic swallowing experiments. The robotic aspect of experimentation involved 450 biomimetic swallows (10 repetitions of 45 unique experiments). The method examined swallowing transport in three dimensions: bolus formulation, peristaltic wavelength, and peristaltic velocity, each of which are known to contribute to safe and effective swallowing in vivo. It is found that the pressure gradients and magnitudes are commensurate with clinical reports on biological swallowing, on the order of 100 mmHg peak, however, the relationship between viscosity and pressure signatures is less clear. Bolus transport cannot be predicted as a function of bolus viscosity alone. Traditional viscometric data at 50 s-1, as used in clinical practice, may not be a strong indicator of swallow effort, safety, or efficacy in vivo.

  9. Submental sEMG and Hyoid Movement during Mendelsohn Maneuver, Effortful Swallow, and Expiratory Muscle Strength Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler-Hegland, Karen M.; Rosenbek, John C.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the concurrent biomechanical and electromyographic properties of 2 swallow-specific tasks (effortful swallow and Mendelsohn maneuver) and 1 swallow-nonspecific (expiratory muscle strength training [EMST]) swallow therapy task in order to examine the differential effects of each on hyoid motion and associated…

  10. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koontz, A. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Sivaraman, C. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for ingests maintained by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new ingests for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing ingests, (3) future ingests that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to an ingest, and (5) top requested ingests from the ARM Data Archive. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  11. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koontz, A. [ARM Climate Reesearch Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Sivaraman, C. [ARM Climate Reesearch Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for ingests maintained by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new ingests for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing ingests, (3) future ingests that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to an ingest, and (5) top requested ingests from the ARM Data Archive. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  12. Human swallowing simulation based on videofluorography images using Hamiltonian MPS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Takahiro; Michiwaki, Yukihiro; Kamiya, Tetsu; Toyama, Yoshio; Tamai, Tasuku; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    In developed nations, swallowing disorders and aspiration pneumonia have become serious problems. We developed a method to simulate the behavior of the organs involved in swallowing to clarify the mechanisms of swallowing and aspiration. The shape model is based on anatomically realistic geometry, and the motion model utilizes forced displacements based on realistic dynamic images to reflect the mechanisms of human swallowing. The soft tissue organs are modeled as nonlinear elastic material using the Hamiltonian MPS method. This method allows for stable simulation of the complex swallowing movement. A penalty method using metaballs is employed to simulate contact between organ walls and smooth sliding along the walls. We performed four numerical simulations under different analysis conditions to represent four cases of swallowing, including a healthy volunteer and a patient with a swallowing disorder. The simulation results were compared to examine the epiglottic downfolding mechanism, which strongly influences the risk of aspiration.

  13. The swallowing reflex and its significance as an airway defensive reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eNishino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Swallowing function, in humans, is very complex. Swallowing plays, not only an important role in food digestion, but also a major role in preventing the entrance of food and/or other materials into the lower respiratory tract. To achieve this, precise coordination is necessary between breathing and swallowing since the pharynx serves as a common pathway for both respiration and digestion. The swallowing reflex consists of afferent pathways, central integration, and efferent pathways. Any defect or disorder along reflex arc can cause a potential delay or impairment in swallow function. The swallowing reflex can be modulated not only by pathological factors but also by physiological factors. Among these, timing of swallows in relation to the phase of respiration may be the most important factor that determines the occurrence of pulmonary aspiration, since phases of inspiration and the expiration-inspiration transition are the most vulnerable for pulmonary aspiration.

  14. Potassium permanganate ingestion as a suicide attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Cimilli Ozturk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium permanganate is a highly corrosive, water-soluble oxidizing antiseptic. A 68- year-old female patient was admitted to our Emergency Department after ingestion of 3 tablets of 250 mg potassium permanganate as a suicide attempt. The physical exam revealed brown stained lesions in the oropharynx. Emergency endoscopy was performed by the gastroenterologist after the third hour of ingestion. Emergency endoscopy revealed multiple superficial (Grade I-II lesions on the esophagus and cardia, which were considered secondary to the caustic substance. The mainstay in the treatment of potassium permanganate is supportive and the immediate priority is to secure the airway. Emergency endoscopy is an important tool used to evaluate the location and severity of injury to the esophagus, stomach and duodenum after caustic ingestion. Patients with signs and symptoms of intentional ingestion should undergo endoscopy within 12 to 24 h to define the extent of the disease.

  15. Acute toxicity from baking soda ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S H; Stone, C K

    1994-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate is an extremely well-known agent that historically has been used for a variety of medical conditions. Despite the widespread use of oral bicarbonate, little documented toxicity has occurred, and the emergency medicine literature contains no reports of toxicity caused by the ingestion of baking soda. Risks of acute and chronic oral bicarbonate ingestion include metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, hypertension, gastric rupture, hyporeninemia, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, intravascular volume depletion, and urinary alkalinization. Abrupt cessation of chronic excessive bicarbonate ingestion may result in hyperkalemia, hypoaldosteronism, volume contraction, and disruption of calcium and phosphorus metabolism. The case of a patient with three hospital admissions in 4 months, all the result of excessive oral intake of bicarbonate for symptomatic relief of dyspepsia is reported. Evaluation and treatment of patients with acute bicarbonate ingestion is discussed.

  16. Aging-related changes in swallowing, and in the coordination of swallowing and respiration determined by novel non-invasive measurement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chin-Man; Chen, Ji-Yih; Chuang, Chiung-Cheng; Tseng, Wen-Chun; Wong, Alice M K; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the process of swallowing changes with aging, a phenomenon known as presbyphagia. These subtle and subclinical age-related changes make older adults more vulnerable to dysphagia during disease insults. However, there are limited studies of the swallowing process in older adults, because measurements are typically invasive or require exposure to X-rays. In the present study, we used integrated non-invasive measurements to determine aging-related changes of swallowing, and in the coordination of swallowing and respiration for a population of healthy participants. The non-invasive system provided measurements of larynx movement with piezoelectric sensors, submental muscle activity with surface electromyography and respiration-swallowing coordination by measurement of nasal airflow. We recruited 112 healthy participants from the community, 35 in a young-age group (age 20-30 years), 38 in a middle-age group (age 31-50 years) and 39 in an old-age group (age 51-70 years). The oropharyngeal swallowing parameters of the old-age group had delayed onset latency and longer swallowing apnea duration relative to the other groups, and these differences were greater for larger boluses. The middle- and old-age groups had less expiratory-expiratory respiratory phase pattern than the young-age group. The probability of piecemeal deglutition was highest in the old-age group and lowest in the young-age group. These results show that the phases of oropharyngeal swallowing and the coordination of swallowing with respiration gradually change with aging. We used integrated non-invasive measurements to document age-related changes in swallowing, and in the coordination of swallowing and respiration in healthy adults. © 2014 The Authors. Geriatrics & Gerontology International published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. Cyanide poisoning after bitter almond ingestion

    OpenAIRE

    Y Mouaffak; F Zegzouti; Boutbaoucht, M; Najib, M.; A G El Adib; M. Sbihi; S. Younous

    2013-01-01

    Plants are responsible for 5% poisoning recorded by Poison Control Centers. Among all known toxic plants, some present a real danger if ingested. We report the case of a five years old child, who presented, after ten bitter almonds ingestion, consciousness disorders progressing to coma with generalized tonic-clonic seizures, miosis and metabolic acidosis. Bitter almonds and nuclei of stone fruits or other rosaceae (apricot, peach, plum) contain cyanogenic glycosides, amygdalin, that yields hy...

  18. Autonomous Preservation Tools in Minimal Effort Ingest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurik, Bolette Ammitzbøll; Blekinge, Asger Askov; Andersen, Thorbjørn Ravn

    2016-01-01

    This poster presents the concept of Autonomous Preservation Tools, as developed by the State and University Library, Denmark. The work expands the idea of Minimal Effort Ingest, where most preservation actions such as Quality Assurance and enrichment of the digital objects are performed after...... content is ingested for preservation, rather than before. We present our Newspaper Digitisation Project as a case-study of real-world implementations of Autonomous Preservation Tools....

  19. Ingested foreign bodies in the paediatric patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, G C

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Paediatric foreign body (FB) ingestion is a common problem and while most can be managed conservatively, a sub-population require intervention. AIMS: To establish clear guidelines for management of paediatric FB ingestion. METHODS: A retrospective chart review analysing all paediatric admissions with FB ingestion over a 10-year period from 1990 to 1999. RESULTS: Of 339 patients presenting to the accident and emergency department with FB ingestion, 59 required admission. Ingestion was accidental in 93.0% of patients. The reasons for admission were as follows: large FBs; dangerous FBs; and living far from the hospital. Nineteen patients (32.2%) were discharged without intervention. Thirty-seven (62.7%) required endoscopic retrieval. In two, the FB was not identified at endoscopy. Only three (5%) required surgery. CONCLUSION: Conservative management of FB ingestion in the paediatric population is possible in the majority of cases. However, a minority require intervention. While guidelines for intervention are ill-defined, definitive indications include symptomatic patients, or dangerous objects.

  20. Prolonged psychosis after Amanita muscaria ingestion.

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    Brvar, Miran; Mozina, Martin; Bunc, Matjaz

    2006-05-01

    Amanita muscaria has a bright red or orange cap covered with small white plaques. It contains the isoxazole derivatives ibotenic acid, muscimol and muscazone and other toxins such as muscarine. The duration of clinical manifestations after A. muscaria ingestion does not usually exceed 24 hours; we report on a 5-day paranoid psychosis after A. muscaria ingestion. A 48-year-old man, with no previous medical history, gathered and ate mushrooms he presumed to be A. caesarea. Half an hour later he started to vomit and fell asleep. He was found comatose having a seizure-like episode. On admission four hours after ingestion he was comatose, but the remaining physical and neurological examinations were unremarkable. Creatine kinase was 8.33 microkat/l. Other laboratory results and brain CT scan were normal. Toxicology analysis did not find any drugs in his blood or urine. The mycologist identified A. muscaria among the remaining mushrooms. The patient was given activated charcoal. Ten hours after ingestion, he awoke and was completely orientated; 18 hours after ingestion his condition deteriorated again and he became confused and uncooperative. Afterwards paranoid psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations appeared and persisted for five days. On the sixth day all symptoms of psychosis gradually disappeared. One year later he is not undergoing any therapy and has no symptoms of psychiatric disease. We conclude that paranoid psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations can appear 18 hours after ingestion of A. muscaria and can last for up to five days.

  1. Effects of capsinoid ingestion on energy expenditure and lipid oxidation at rest and during exercise

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    Staples Aaron W

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thermogenic and metabolic properties of capsinoids appear to mimic those of the more pungent sister compound capsaicin. However, few data exist on how capsinoid ingestion affects energy expenditure in humans and no data exist on its interaction with exercise. We aimed to determine how ingestion of capsinoids affected energy expenditure, lipid oxidation and blood metabolites at rest and during moderate intensity exercise. Methods Twelve healthy young men (age = 24.3 ± 3 yr, BMI = 25.5 ± 1.7 kg·m-2 were studied on two occasions in a double-blind design following ingestion of either placebo or 10 mg of purified capsinoids at rest, after 90 min of cycling at 55% VO2 peak, and for 30 min into recovery. Subjects ingested the capsules 30 min prior to exercise. Results At rest, following ingestion of capsinoids, we observed increases in VO2 and plasma norepinephrine levels, and decreases in concentrations of serum free fatty acids, plasma glycerol and the respiratory exchange ratio (all P Conclusion The ingestion of 10 mg of capsinoids increased adrenergic activity, energy expenditure, and resulted in a shift in substrate utilization toward lipid at rest but had little effect during exercise or recovery. The changes we observed confirm previous data on the thermogenic and metabolic effects of capsinoids at rest and further promote its potential role as an adjunct weight loss aid, in addition to diet and exercise.

  2. Fetal swallowing as a protective mechanism against oligohydramnios and polyhydramnios in late gestation sheep.

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    Brace, Robert A; Anderson, Debra F; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2013-03-01

    Our objectives were to (1) quantify the relationship between daily swallowed volume and amniotic fluid volume (AF volume) in late gestation ovine fetuses and (2) use the resulting regression equation to explore the role of swallowing in regulating AF volume. Daily swallowed volume ranged from 36 to 1963 mL/d while experimental AF volume ranged from 160 to 6150 mL (n = 115). Swallowed volume was near zero when AF volume was far below normal, a maximum of 635 ± 41 (standard error) mL/d when AF volume was 1682 ± 31 mL and did not increase further with higher AF volumes. Computer simulations predicted that fetal swallowing would (1) return AF volume to normal in 5 to 6 days following an acute volume change in the absence of changes in other amniotic inflows or outflows and (2) stabilize AF volume in 4 to 8 days following sustained alterations in amniotic inflows or outflows other than swallowing. The volume of AF swallowed each day by the fetus is a strong function of AF volume and reaches a maximum when mild polyhydramnios develops. With deviations in AF volume from normal, changes in fetal swallowing protect against oligohydramnios and polyhydramnios because the changes in swallowing over time reduce the extent of the AF volume change. However, with experimental changes in AF volume stabilizing in 1 to 2 days, it appears that swallowing is not the major regulator of AF volume.

  3. Enhancing effects of flavored nutritive stimuli on cortical swallowing network activity

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    Babaei, Arash; Kern, Mark; Antonik, Stephen; Mepani, Rachel; Ward, B. Douglas; Li, Shi-Jiang; Hyde, James

    2010-01-01

    A better understanding of the central control of the physiology of deglutition is necessary for devising interventions aimed at correcting pathophysiological conditions of swallowing. Positive modulation of the cortical swallowing network can have clinical ramifications in dysphagia due to central nervous system deficits. Our aim was to determine the effect of nutritive sensory input on the cortical swallowing network. In 14 healthy right-handed volunteers, we utilized a paradigm-driven protocol to quantify the number of activated voxels and their signal intensity within the left hemispheric cortical swallowing network by high-resolution functional MRI (fMRI) during five different swallowing conditions. Swallowing conditions included a dry swallow (saliva) and natural water-, lemon-, popcorn-, and chocolate-flavored liquid swallows. Each flavored liquid was presented simultaneously by its image, scent, and taste in random order and tested over three runs. fMRIs were analyzed in a blinded fashion. Average fMRI blood oxygenation level-dependent signal intensity and number of activated voxels during swallowing concurrent with nutritive gustatory, olfactory, and visual stimulations were significantly increased compared with dry/natural water swallows throughout the cortical swallowing network (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Subregion analysis showed the increased activity for flavored liquids in prefrontal, cingulate gyrus, and sensory/motor cortex, but not in precuneus and insula. Concurrent gustatory, olfactory, and visual nutritive stimulation enhances the activity of the cortical swallowing network. This finding may have clinical implications in management of swallowing disorders due to cortical lesions. PMID:20508154

  4. Clinical Characteristics and Lesions Responsible for Swallowing Hesitation After Acute Cerebral Infarction.

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    Saito, Tsukasa; Hayashi, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Hajime; Ota, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Some stroke patients with a unilateral lesion demonstrate acute dysphagia characterized by a markedly prolonged swallowing time, making us think they are reluctant to swallow. In order to clarify the clinical characteristics and causative lesions of delayed swallowing, we conducted a retrospective analysis of 20 right-handed patients without a history of swallowing dysfunction who underwent videofluorography on suspicion of dysphagia after a first ischemic stroke. The oral processing time plus the postfaucial aggregation time required to swallow jelly for patients classified as having delayed swallowing was over 10 s. The time required for swallowing jelly was significantly longer than that without the hesitation (median value, 24.1 vs. 8.9 s, P oral processing time plus the postfaucial aggregation time required for patients with delayed swallowing to swallow thickened water was largely over 5 s and significantly longer than that of patients without swallowing hesitation (median value, 10.2 vs. 3.3 s, P acute unilateral infarction could be separated into two different patterns. Because four of the five patients with a rippling tongue movement in the swallowing hesitation pattern had a lesion in the left primary motor cortex, which induces some kinds of apraxia, swallowing hesitation with a rippling tongue movement seems to be a representative characteristic of apraxia. The patients with swallowing hesitation with a temporary stasis of the tongue in this study tended to have broad lesions in the frontal lobe, especially in the middle frontal gyrus, which is thought to be involved in higher cognition.

  5. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

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    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  6. Coordination of respiration and swallowing: functional pattern and relevance of vocal folds closure

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    Milton Melciades Barbosa Costa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Breathing and swallowing coordination, despite the expressive number of study, remain as theme deserving further research. OBJECTIVE: To identify a coordination pattern between swallowing and the natural breathing pause that occur in association with it (swallowing apnea and also the relevance of the vocal folds closure in this process. METHODS: Sixty-six adults, male and female, including normal health people, post-laryngectomy individuals and patients with digestive complaints without dysphagia were analyzed. The respiratory air flux interruptions produced by wet requested swallows and dry, requested and spontaneous swallows, were registered using thermo and piezoelectric receptors coupled to synectics medical manometry equipment, using Polygram upper 4.21 software. The results were analyzed with the Chi-square (3×2 and (2×2 nonparametric independency test with P = 0.05. RESULTS: Swallowing apnea is a preventive breathing stop that start just before and stay present during all deglutition pharyngeal phase. It is a well coordinated phenomena that occur as pattern in association with low elastic resistance of the lung, on the expiratory final phase until inspiration initial phase. This breathing stoppage it is usually followed by a short expiraton preceding a new breathing cycle. The swallow apnea and vocal folds closure are both independents mechanisms. CONCLUSION: It is possible to suppose that in the subconscious condition, swallowing apnea is integrated under coordination of the same control mechanism that also involves the elastic resistance of the lung.CONTEXTO: Apesar do expressivo número de estudos sobre a coordenação da respiração com a deglutição, o tema permanece aberto à pesquisa. OBJETIVO: Identificar um padrão de coordenação entre a pausa respiratória e a deglutição que ocorre em associação a esta usual apneia (apneia de deglutição e estabelecer a importância do fechamento das pregas vocais que ocorre

  7. Speech and swallowing outcomes in buccal mucosa carcinoma

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    Sunila John

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Buccal carcinoma is one of the most common malignant neoplasms among all oral cancers in India. Understanding the role of speech language pathologists (SLPs in the domains of evaluation and management strategies of this condition is limited, especially in the Indian context. This is a case report of a young adult with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa with no deleterious habits usually associated with buccal mucosa carcinoma. Following composite resection, pectoralis major myocutaneous flap reconstruction, he developed severe oral dysphagia and demonstrated unintelligible speech. This case report focuses on the issues of swallowing and speech deficits in buccal mucosa carcinoma that need to be addressed by SLPs, and the outcomes of speech and swallowing rehabilitation and prognostic issues.

  8. Innate immune response development in nestling tree swallows

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    Stambaugh, T.; Houdek, B.J.; Lombardo, M.P.; Thorpe, P.A.; Caldwell, Hahn D.

    2011-01-01

    We tracked the development of innate immunity in nestling Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and compared it to that of adults using blood drawn from nestlings during days 6, 12, and 18 of the ???20-day nestling period and from adults. Innate immunity was characterized using an in vitro assay of the ability of whole blood to kill Escherichia coli. The ability of whole blood to kill E. coli increased as nestlings matured. Neither this component of innate immunity nor right wing chord length on day18 were as developed as in adults indicating that development of the innate immune system and growth both continued after fledging. Narrow sense heritability analyses suggest that females with strong immune responses produced nestlings with strong immune responses. These data suggest nestling Tree Swallows allocated sufficient energy to support rapid growth to enable fledging by day 18, but that further development of innate immunity occurred post-fledging. ?? 2011 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  9. Pain, masticatory performance and swallowing threshold in orthodontic patients

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    Marcos Porto Trein

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess pain, masticatory performance and swallowing threshold of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. METHODS: Ten patients of both genders (mean age of 17.25 ± 5.21 years, with complete permanent dentition, who underwent orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances were evaluated. The masticatory performance and the swallowing threshold were assessed by patient's individual capacity of fragmenting an artificial test food (Optocal which was chewed and had the resulting particles processed by a standardized sieving method, presenting the median particle size (MPS of crushed units. The intensity of pain / discomfort during chewing was evaluated by means of a visual analog scale. All tests were performed at the following times: T0 - before activating the orthodontic appliance; T1 - 24 hours after activation, and T2 - 30 days after activation. RESULTS: The results showed a significant increase in pain at T1 (T0 - 0.60 ± 0.70 mm; T1 - 66.2 ± 34.5 mm, returning to baseline values at T2 (3.20 ± 3.82 mm. Masticatory performance was also reduced in T1 (MPS 10.15 ± 1.1 mm² in comparison to T0 (MPS 7.01 ± 2.9 mm² and T2 (MPS 6.76 ± 1.3 mm². However, particle size was not affected in the swallowing threshold test (T0 - 5.47 ± 2.37 mm²; T1 - 6.19 ± 2.05 mm²; T2 - 5.94 ± 2.36 mm². CONCLUSION: The orthodontic appliances did not interfere in the size of the particles that would be swallowed, even in the presence of pain.

  10. Difficult to swallow: patient preferences for alternative valproate pharmaceutical formulations

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    Monali Bhosle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Monali Bhosle,1 Joshua S Benner,1 Mitch DeKoven,1 Jeff Shelton21Health Economics and Outcomes Research, IMS Health Inc, Falls Church, VA, USA; 2Answers and Insights Market Research, Inc, Indianapolis, IN, USAObjective: To determine the degree to which swallowing valproate (VP tablets is an issue, the proportion of patients who would prefer an alternative formulation, and the predictors of preference.Methods: A quantitative telephone survey of eligible adults (n = 400, ≥18 years old who currently take (n = 236 or previously took (n = 164 VP tablets within the past 6 months was conducted.Results: More than half of the patients indicated that VP tablets were ‘uncomfortable to swallow’ (68.5%, n = 274 and were ‘very interested’ (65.8%, n = 263 in medications that were easier to swallow. When choosing conceptually between taking VP tablet once/day or an equally safe and effective but significantly smaller soft gel capsule twice per day, the 82.8%, (n = 331 preferred the soft gel capsule. In the multivariate regression analysis, perceiving soft gel capsules to be easier to swallow (OR = 73.54; 95% CI = 15.01 to 360.40 and taking VP more frequently (OR = 2.02; 95% CI = 1.13 to 3.61 were significant predictors of soft gel capsule treatment preference.Conclusion: VP users would prefer a formulation that is easier to swallow, even if it is needed to be taken twice per day. When choosing between medications with similar efficacy and safety, physicians can consider patient preferences to optimize conditions for medication adherence.Keywords: patient preference, valproate formulations, tablet characteristics

  11. Epidermal electronics for electromyography: An application to swallowing therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Gabriela; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Li, Xinda; Scott, Dylan K; Jang, Kyung-In; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Rogers, John A; Rieger, Jana

    2016-08-01

    Head and neck cancer treatment alters the anatomy and physiology of patients. Resulting swallowing difficulties can lead to serious health concerns. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is used as an adjuvant to swallowing therapy exercises. sEMG signal collected from the area under the chin provides visual biofeedback from muscle contractions and is used to help patients perform exercises correctly. However, conventional sEMG adhesive pads are relatively thick and difficult to effectively adhere to a patient's altered chin anatomy, potentially leading to poor signal acquisition in this population. Here, the emerging technology of epidermal electronics is introduced, where ultra-thin geometry allows for close contouring of the chin. The two objectives of this study were to (1) assess the potential of epidermal electronics technology for use with swallowing therapy and (2) assess the significance of the reference electrode placement. This study showed comparative signals between the new epidermal sEMG patch and the conventional adhesive patches used by clinicians. Furthermore, an integrated reference yielded optimal signal for clinical use; this configuration was more robust to head movements than when an external reference was used. Improvements for future iterations of epidermal sEMG patches specific to day-to-day clinical use are suggested. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of age on proximal esophageal response to swallowing

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    Roberto Oliveira Dantas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: It has been demonstrated that the ageing process affects esophageal motility. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of the age on the proximal esophageal response to wet swallows. METHOD: We measured the proximal esophageal response to swallows of a 5 mL bolus of water in 69 healthy volunteers, 20 of them aged 18-30 years (group I, 27 aged 31-50 years (group II, and 22 aged 51-74 years (group III. We used the manometric method with continuous perfusion. The proximal esophageal contractions were recorded 5 cm from a pharyngeal recording site located 1 cm above the upper esophageal sphincter. The time between the onset of the pharyngeal and of the proximal esophageal recording (pharyngeal-esophageal time and the amplitude, duration and area under the curve of the proximal esophageal contraction were measured. RESULTS: The pharyngeal-esophageal time was shorter in group I subjects than in group II and III subjects (P<0.05. The duration of proximal esophageal contractions was longer in group I than in groups II and III (P<0.001. There was no differences between groups in the amplitude or area under the curve of contractions. There were no differences between groups II and III for any of the measurements. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the age may affects the response of the proximal esophagus to wet swallows.

  13. Pattern of tongue pressure on hard palate during swallowing.

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    Ono, Takahiro; Hori, Kazuhiro; Nokubi, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Contact of the tongue against the hard palate plays an important role in swallowing. This study aimed to clarify the pattern of contact between the tongue and hard palate by analyzing tongue pressure produced in swallowing 15 ml of water by healthy subjects wearing an experimental palatal plate with seven pressure sensors. Tongue pressure was generated initially by close contact with the anteriomedian part of the hard palate, then with the circumferential part, and finally softly with the posteriomedian part. Tongue pressure reached a peak quickly, then decreased gradually before disappearing almost simultaneously at each measured part of the hard palate. Magnitude and duration were significantly larger in the anteriomedian part compared to the other six parts measured, and was significantly smaller in the posteriomedian part. No laterality was found in tongue pressure produced at the circumferential parts of the hard palate. Our findings indicate that the order of tongue contact against each part of the hard palate as well as duration and magnitude of tongue pressure are coordinated precisely during swallowing. These findings could aid assessment of the tongue movement of dysphagic patients during rehabilitation.

  14. Thirty years of blackouts: a case report of swallow syncope

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    Irene Lambiris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deglutition syncope has been demonstrated in isolated case reports, the first being described over 50 years ago. It is thought to be caused by a hypersensitive vagotonic reflex in response to esophageal dilation after swallowing. It can cause syncope due to complete atrioventricular (AV block and acute reduction of cardiac output. Although rare, its lethality is worthy of discussion, as early recognition can offer complete treatment with placement of a pacemaker. A 54-year-old man presented with 30 years of lightheadedness and syncope, followed by disorientation and tremors, after eating sandwiches or drinking carbonated beverages. He initially was evaluated by a neurologist. Work-up included cardiac 2D transthoracic echocardiogram, electroencephalogram, swallow stud, pulmonary function tests, electrocardiogram, and cardiac stress testing. All tests were within normal limits, and it was determined that he was suffering from convulsive syncope and deglutition syncope. Referral to the cardiac electrophysiology department with tilt-table testing accompanied by swallow evaluation was then recommended. The tests demonstrated marked vagal response resulting in sinus bradycardia with second-degree AV block and pauses up to 3.5 seconds. Patient experienced near syncope. A rate-responsive, dual-chamber Boston Scientific pacemaker with DDDR programming was implanted. Patient has remained asymptomatic at follow-up.

  15. Suck, swallow and breathing coordination in infants with infantile colic

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    Hanlie Degenaar

    2015-12-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to explore the suck, swallow and breathing coordination in infants with infantile colic and compare it with infants without the condition. Method: An assessment protocol for suck, swallow and breathing coordination was compiled from literature. This protocol was performed on a research group of 50 infants, independently diagnosed with infantile colic, and a control group of 28 infants without the condition. All participants were from two rural towns in the North–West province, South Africa, selected with a snowball selection method and strict selection criteria. The study followed a static comparison group design. Results: A significant difference in the key components of feeding and the presence of colic in participants of four age categories were found. The correlation between postural control and the presence of infantile colic were sustained in participants from 2–19 weeks old. Conclusion: Suck, swallow and breathing were found to be significantly associated with infantile colic. The findings should be investigated further. It appears that speech-language therapists may play an expanding role in infantile colic. [pdf to follow

  16. Cine-MRI swallowing evaluation after tongue reconstruction

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    Hartl, Dana M. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)], E-mail: dmhartl@aol.com; Kolb, Frederic; Bretagne, Evelyne [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Bidault, Francois; Sigal, Robert [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2010-01-15

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of cine-MRI for non-invasive swallowing evaluation after surgery for lingual carcinoma with reconstruction using microvascular free flaps. Methods: Ten patients with stage IV carcinoma of the mobile tongue and/or tongue base treated by surgical resection and reconstruction with a free flap were evaluated after an average of 4.3 years (range: 1.5-11 years), using cine-MRI in 'single-shot fast spin echo' (SSFSE) mode. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy of swallowing was performed before MRI to detect aspiration. The tolerance and ability to complete the exam were noted. The mobilities of the oral and pharyngeal structures visualized were evaluated as normal, reduced or increased. Results: Cine-MRI was well tolerated in all cases; 'dry' swallow was performed for the 2 patients with clinical aspiration. Tongue base-pharyngeal wall contact was observed in 5 cases. An increased anterior tongue recoil, increased mandibular recoil, increased posterior oropharyngeal wall advancement and an increased laryngeal elevation were observed in 4 cases. One case of a passive 'slide' mechanism was observed. Conclusions: Cine-MRI is a safe, non-invasive technique for the evaluation of the mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures after free-flap reconstruction of the tongue. For selected cases, it may be complementary to clinical examination for evaluation of dysphagia after surgery and free-flap reconstruction. Further technical advances will be necessary before cine-MRI can replace videofluoroscopy, however.

  17. Ingestion of host immunoglobulin by Sarcoptes scabiei

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    Simson Tarigan

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Scabies is one of the most important diseases in human and veterinary medicine. The available control measures that rely on acaricides are unsustainable, costly and environmentally unfriendly. Vaccination which is supposedly the most attractive alternative control, is sustainable, potentially cheap and environmentally friendly. Recent development in protein biochemistry and recombinant technology have facilitated the development of anti-parasite vaccine which in the past was impossible. One prerequisite for the anti-parasite-vaccine development is that the parasite has to ingest its host immunoglobulin. This study, therefore, was designed to determine whether Sarcoptes scabiei, a non blood-feeding parasite that resides on the avascular cornified layer of the skin, ingest its host immunoglobulin. Sections of routinely processed mites and skin from a mangy goat were probed with peroxidase-conjugated-anti-goat IgG and the immune complex was visualised with diaminobenzidine solution. To determine whether the ingested IgG was still intact or had been fragmented by the proteolytic enzymes, immunoblotting analysis of SDS-PAGE- fractionated proteins extracted from washed mites was performed. Quantification of IgG was done byan Elisa using purified goat IgG as control. This study showed that IgG in the mites confined to the mite’s gut only, and only a fraction of mite population ingested the IgG. The ingested IgG, as shown by immunoblot analysis, was mostly still intact. This study indicates that development of anti-scabies vaccines is reasonable.

  18. Disc battery ingestion; a single event with different outcomes

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    E. Sindi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body (FB ingestion is a common problem especially in children below the age of 5 years. This is fueled by their curiosity to explore their surroundings. The ingested foreign body finds its way out of the gastrointestinal tract without any serious consequences most of the time. On the other hand, disc battery ingestion has been reported to cause serious harm when ingested including death. We report two patients who had ingested disc batteries and their respective outcomes.

  19. Timing of molt of barn swallows is delayed in a rare Clock genotype

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    Nicola Saino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoperiodic responses are major factors entraining circannual life-cycles, functioning to adaptively synchronize annual routines to seasonal fluctuations in ecological conditions. Photoperiodism in physiology and behaviour is enforced by genes, including the vertebrate Clock orthologues, which are associated, for example, with phenology of migration in fish and breeding in birds. However, the role of Clock in photoperiodic plumage molt processes is unknown. We analyzed variation in molt schedules in relation to Clock genotype, using the long-distance migratory barn swallow (Hirundo rustica as a model and by identifying males and females using molecular sexing techniques. Consistently with previous studies, we found one very common (Q7 and two rare (Q6, Q8 variants of a functionally significant Clock polyglutamine repeat. Molt schedules of primary wing feathers of swallows during their wintering period in Nigeria differed among Clock genotypes: rare (1.1% Q7/Q8 heterozygotes had significantly delayed molt compared to the other genotypes. Molt schedules did not differ between males and females, and no differential association between molt and Clock in relation to sex emerged. The same rare Clock genotype that exhibited delayed breeding in Europe was here found to delay molt in Africa. Though based on a limited number of Q7/Q8 individuals from an otherwise very large sample, these novel results suggest that Clock is involved in the photoperiodic control of both molt and breeding, potentially also via reciprocal carry-over effects. If confirmed in species with higher Clock polymorphism, present results may have far-reaching consequences for the study of photoperiodic control of molt and expression of annual routines.

  20. Anesthesia and increased hypercarbic drive impair the coordination between breathing and swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Olivia M.; Diaz-Gil, Daniel; Nunn, Danuza; Simons, Jeroen C.P.; Gianatasio, Chloe; Mueller, Noomi; Meyer, Matthew J.; Pierce, Eric; Rosow, Carl; Eikermann, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Background Coordination between breathing and swallowing helps prevent aspiration of foreign material into the respiratory tract. We examined the effects of anesthesia, and hypercapnia on swallowing-breathing coordination. Methods In a randomized controlled cross-over study, general anesthesia with propofol or sevoflurane was titrated using an up-down method to identify the threshold for suppression of the motor response to electrical stimulation of the forearm. Additional measurements included bispectral index, genioglossus electromyogram, ventilation (pneumotachometer), and hypopharyngeal pressure. During wakefulness and at each level of anesthetic, carbon dioxide was added to increase its end tidal pressure by 4 and 8 mmHg. A swallow was defined as increased genioglossus activity with deglutition apnea and an increase in hypopharyngeal pressure. Spontaneous swallows were categorized as physiological (during expiration or followed by expiration), or pathological (during inspiration or followed by an inspiration). Results A total of 224 swallows were analyzed. Anesthesia increased the proportion of pathological swallows (25.9% versus 4.9%), and decreased the number of swallows per hour (1.7 ± 3.3 versus 28.0 ± 22.3) compared to wakefulness. During anesthesia, hypercapnia decreased hypopharyngeal pressure during inspiration (-14.1±3.7 versus -8.7±2 mmHg), and increased minute ventilation the proportion of pathological swallows (19.1% versus 12.3%), and the number of swallows per hour (5.5 ±17.0. versus 1.3 ± 5.5). Conclusions Anesthesia impaired the coordination between swallowing and respiration. Mild hypercapnia increased the frequency of swallowing during anesthesia and the likelihood of pathological swallowing. During anesthesia, the risk for aspiration may be further increased when ventilatory drive is stimulated. PMID:25275368

  1. An ingestible sensor for measuring medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafezi, Hooman; Robertson, Timothy L; Moon, Greg D; Au-Yeung, Kit-Yee; Zdeblick, Mark J; Savage, George M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and performance of the first integrated-circuit microsensor developed for daily ingestion by patients. The ingestible sensor is a device that allows patients, families, and physicians to measure medication ingestion and adherence patterns in real time, relate pharmaceutical compliance to important physiologic metrics, and take appropriate action in response to a patient's adherence pattern and specific health metrics. The design and theory of operation of the device are presented, along with key in-vitro and in-vivo performance results. The chemical, toxicological, mechanical, and electrical safety tests performed to establish the device's safety profile are described in detail. Finally, aggregate results from multiple clinical trials involving 412 patients and 5656 days of system usage are presented to demonstrate the device's reliability and performance as part of an overall digital health feedback system.

  2. Metabolism of ingested uranium and radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrenn, M.D.; Durbin, P.W.; Howard, B.; Lipsztein, J.; Rundo, J.; Still, E.T.; Willis, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Metabolic models for U and Ra are described to estimate the risks to human health from ingesting these elements in drinking water. Chemical toxicity, which is relevant to U in its natural, depleted or slightly enriched state, is addressed, as are the radiotoxicity and the radiobiological effects of the important alpha-emitting isotopes of Ra, including /sup 224/Ra, /sup 226/Ra, and /sup 228/Ra. This paper estimates the kinetics of skeletal U deposition, so that risk coefficients for bone cancer induction can be applied. Skeletal cancer is regarded as the major potential radiobiological effect of ingested alpha-emitting radioisotopes of Ra and the presumed radiobiological effect of U, if any. Best estimates of normal U metabolism are used, because even in extreme cases the amounts of U or Ra ingested in potable water are not great enough to chemically or radiobiologically modify their metabolic behavior.

  3. Effects of liquid stimuli on dual-axis swallowing accelerometry signals in a healthy population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejdić Ervin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dual-axis swallowing accelerometry has recently been proposed as a tool for non-invasive analysis of swallowing function. Although swallowing is known to be physiologically modifiable by the type of food or liquid (i.e., stimuli, the effects of stimuli on dual-axis accelerometry signals have never been thoroughly investigated. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate stimulus effects on dual-axis accelerometry signal characteristics. Signals were acquired from 17 healthy participants while swallowing 4 different stimuli: water, nectar-thick and honey-thick apple juices, and a thin-liquid barium suspension. Two swallowing tasks were examined: discrete and sequential. A variety of features were extracted in the time and time-frequency domains after swallow segmentation and pre-processing. A separate Friedman test was conducted for each feature and for each swallowing task. Results Significant main stimulus effects were found on 6 out of 30 features for the discrete task and on 5 out of 30 features for the sequential task. Analysis of the features with significant stimulus effects suggested that the changes in the signals revealed slower and more pronounced swallowing patterns with increasing bolus viscosity. Conclusions We conclude that stimulus type does affect specific characteristics of dual-axis swallowing accelerometry signals, suggesting that associated clinical screening protocols may need to be stimulus specific.

  4. Central inhibition of initiation of swallowing by systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Sakai, Shogo; Suzuki, Taku; Ujihara, Izumi; Tsuji, Kojun; Magara, Jin; Canning, Brendan J; Inoue, Makoto

    2017-05-01

    Dysphagia is caused not only by neurological and/or structural damage but also by medication. We hypothesized memantine, dextromethorphan, diazepam, and baclofen, all commonly used drugs with central sites of action, may regulate swallowing function. Swallows were evoked by upper airway (UA)/pharyngeal distension, punctate mechanical stimulation using a von Frey filament, capsaicin or distilled water (DW) applied topically to the vocal folds, and electrical stimulation of a superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in anesthetized rats and were documented by recording electromyographic activation of the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles and by visualizing laryngeal elevation. The effects of intraperitoneal or topical administration of each drug on swallowing function were studied. Systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen, but not memantine or dextromethorphan, inhibited swallowing evoked by mechanical, chemical, and electrical stimulation. Both benzodiazepines and GABA A receptor antagonists diminished the inhibitory effects of diazepam, whereas a GABA B receptor antagonist diminished the effects of baclofen. Topically applied diazepam or baclofen had no effect on swallowing. These data indicate that diazepam and baclofen act centrally to inhibit swallowing in anesthetized rats. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Systemic administration of diazepam and baclofen, but not memantine or dextromethorphan, inhibited swallowing evoked by mechanical, chemical, and electrical stimulation. Both benzodiazepines and GABA A receptor antagonists diminished the inhibitory effects of diazepam, whereas a GABA B receptor antagonist diminished the effects of baclofen. Topical applied diazepam or baclofen was without effect on swallowing. Diazepam and baclofen act centrally to inhibit swallowing in anesthetized rats. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Spontaneous swallowing frequency has potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael F

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases, swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute [SPM]) were compared with stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with versus without clinically significant dysphagia. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM, which was compared with a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was used to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis yielded a threshold of SPM≤0.40 that identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5- to 10-minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel.

  6. Spontaneous Swallowing Frequency [Has Potential to] Identify Dysphagia in Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. Methods In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute: SPM) were compared to stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with vs. without clinically significant dysphagia. ROC analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM which was compared to a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was employed to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. Results SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. ROC analysis yielded a threshold of SPM ≤ 0.40 which identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5 to 10 minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Conclusions Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel. PMID:24149008

  7. The relationship between limit of Dysphagia and average volume per swallow in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Luciana Rodrigues; Gomes, Nathália Angelina Costa; Coriolano, Maria das Graças Wanderley de Sales; de Souza, Elizabete Santos; Moura, Danielle Albuquerque Alves; Asano, Amdore Guescel; Lins, Otávio Gomes

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to obtain the limit of dysphagia and the average volume per swallow in patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease (PD) but without swallowing complaints and in normal subjects, and to investigate the relationship between them. We hypothesize there is a direct relationship between these two measurements. The study included 10 patients with idiopathic PD and 10 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was recorded over the suprahyoid muscle group. The limit of dysphagia was obtained by offering increasing volumes of water until piecemeal deglutition occurred. The average volume per swallow was calculated by dividing the time taken by the number of swallows used to drink 100 ml of water. The PD group showed a significantly lower dysphagia limit and lower average volume per swallow. There was a significantly moderate direct correlation and association between the two measurements. About half of the PD patients had an abnormally low dysphagia limit and average volume per swallow, although none had spontaneously related swallowing problems. Both measurements may be used as a quick objective screening test for the early identification of swallowing alterations that may lead to dysphagia in PD patients, but the determination of the average volume per swallow is much quicker and simpler.

  8. Objective Measures of Swallowing Function Applied to the Dysphagia Population: A One Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Katherine A; Ellerston, Julia; Heller, Amanda; Houtz, Daniel R; Zhang, Chong; Presson, Angela P

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative, reliable measures of swallowing physiology can be made from an modified barium swallowing study. These quantitative measures have not been previously employed to study large dysphagic patient populations. The present retrospective study of 139 consecutive patients with dysphagia seen in a university tertiary voice and swallowing clinic sought to use objective measures of swallowing physiology to (1) quantify the most prevalent deficits seen in the patient population, (2) identify commonly associated diagnoses and describe the most prevalent swallowing deficits, and (3) determine any correlation between objective deficits and Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) scores and body mass index. Poor pharyngeal constriction (34.5 %) and airway protection deficits (65.5 %) were the most common swallowing abnormalities. Reflux-related dysphagia (36 %), nonspecific pharyngeal dysphagia (24 %), Parkinson disease (16 %), esophageal abnormality (13 %), and brain insult (10 %) were the most common diagnoses. Poor pharyngeal constriction was significantly associated with an esophageal motility abnormality (p < 0.001) and central neurologic insult. In general, dysphagia symptoms as determined by the EAT-10 did not correlate with swallowing function abnormalities. This preliminary study indicates that reflux disease is common in patients with dysphagia and that associated esophageal abnormalities are common in dysphagic populations and may be associated with specific pharyngeal swallowing abnormalities. However, symptom scores from the EAT-10 did not correspond to swallowing pathophysiology.

  9. The importance of the reproducibility of oropharyngeal swallowing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. An electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, G; Alfonsi, E; Mainardi, L; Alvisi, E; Brighina, F; Valentino, F; Fierro, B; Sandrini, G; Bertino, G; Berlangieri, M; De Icco, R; Fresia, M; Moglia, A

    2017-05-01

    To investigate electrophysiologically the reproducibility of oropharyngeal swallowing in patients with ALS. We enrolled 26 ALS patients, both with and without clinical signs of dysphagia, and 30 age-matched controls. The reproducibility of the electrophysiological signals related to the oral phase (electromyographic activity of the submental/suprahyoid muscles) and the pharyngeal phase (laryngeal-pharyngeal mechanogram) of swallowing across repeated swallows was assessed. To do this we computed two similarity indexes (SI) by using previously described mathematical algorithms. The reproducibility of oropharyngeal swallowing was significantly reduced both in patients with and in those without clinical signs of dysphagia, with more marked alterations being detected in the dysphagic group. The SI of both phases of swallowing, oral and pharyngeal, correlated significantly with dysphagia severity and disease severity. In ALS different pathophysiological mechanisms can alter the stereotyped motor behaviors underlying normal swallowing, thus reducing the reproducibility of the swallowing act. A decrease in swallowing reproducibility could be a preclinical sign of dysphagia and, beyond a certain threshold, a pathological hallmark of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Electrophysiological assessment is a simple and useful tool for the early detection of swallowing abnormalities, and for the management of overt dysphagia in ALS. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Computational Analysis of Pharyngeal Swallowing Mechanics in Patients with Motor Neuron Disease: A Pilot Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garand, K L; Schwertner, Ryan; Chen, Amy; Pearson, William G

    2017-10-20

    Swallowing impairment (dysphagia) is a common sequela in patients with motor neuron disease (MND). The purpose of this retrospective, observational pilot investigation was to characterize how pharyngeal swallowing mechanics are impacted in patients with MND using a comparison with healthy, non-dysphagic control group. Computational analysis of swallowing mechanics (CASM) was used to determine covariate biomechanics of pharyngeal swallowing from videofluoroscopic assessment in 15 patients with MND and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Canonical variant analysis with post hoc discriminate function analysis (DFA) was performed on coordinate data mapping functional muscle groups underlying pharyngeal swallowing. Differences in swallowing mechanics associated with group (MND; control), motor neuron predominance (upper; lower), onset (bulbar; spinal), and swallow task (thin, pudding) were evaluated and visualized. Pharyngeal swallowing mechanics differed significantly in patients with MND compared with healthy controls (D = 2.01, p mechanics by motor neuron predominance (D = 5.03, p mechanics of patients with MND differ from and are more heterogeneous than healthy controls. These findings suggest patients with MND may compensate reductions in pharyngeal shortening and tongue base retraction by extending the head and neck and increasing hyolaryngeal excursion. This work and further CASM investigations will lead to further insights into development and evaluation of targeted clinical treatments designed to prolong safe and efficient swallowing function in patients with MND.

  11. Pharyngeal electrical stimulation can modulate swallowing in cortical processing and behavior - magnetoencephalographic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntrup, Sonja; Teismann, Inga; Wollbrink, Andreas; Winkels, Martin; Warnecke, Tobias; Pantev, Christo; Dziewas, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The act of swallowing is a complex neuromuscular function that is processed in a distributed network involving cortical, subcortical and brainstem structures. Difficulty in swallowing arises from a variety of neurologic diseases for which therapeutic options are currently limited. Pharyngeal electrical stimulation (PES) is a novel intervention designed to promote plastic changes in the pharyngeal motor cortex to aid dysphagia rehabilitation. In the present study we evaluate the effect of PES on cortical swallowing network activity and associated changes in swallowing performance. In a randomized, crossover study design 10min of real (0.2-ms pulses, 5Hz, 280V, stimulation intensity at 75% of maximum tolerated threshold) or sham PES were delivered to 14 healthy volunteers in two separate sessions. Stimulation was delivered via a pair of bipolar ring electrodes mounted on an intraluminal catheter positioned in the pharynx. Before and after each intervention swallowing capacity (ml/s) was tested using a 150ml-water swallowing stress test. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) of cortical oscillatory activity during volitional swallowing was recorded applying whole-head magnetoencephalography before, immediately after and 45min past the intervention. A prominent reduction of ERD in sensorimotor brain areas occurred in the alpha and beta frequency ranges immediately after real PES but not after sham stimulation (pefficiency, which is associated with subtle changes in swallowing function in healthy subjects. Our data contribute evidence that swallowing network organization and behavior can effectively be modulated by PES. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anaphylaxis after accidental ingestion of kiwi fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrońska-Ukleja, Ewa; Różalska, Anna; Ukleja-Sokołowska, Natalia; Zbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2013-06-01

    Numerous cases of anaphylaxis after ingestion of kiwi fruit, after the skin tests and during oral immunotherapy were described. The article describes the case of severe anaphylactic reaction that occurred in a 55-year-old patient after accidental ingestion of kiwi. Allergy to kiwi fruit was confirmed by a native test with fresh kiwi fruit. After the test, the patient experienced generalized organ response in the form of headache, general weakness and rashes on the neck and breast, and dyspnea. The patient had significantly elevated levels of total IgE and IgE specific to kiwi fruit.

  13. Stridor after ingestion of dettol and domestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Colin A

    2004-02-01

    Dettol (4.8% chloroxylenol, 9% pine oil and 12% isopropyl alcohol) has previously been reported to cause delayed upper airway obstruction when ingested, despite the product being labelled as non-poisonous. Domestos (1-5% sodium hypochlorite) is used as a household and toilet cleaner. This paper reports a rare case in which both agents were consumed together in significant quantities, and caused stridor and impending airway obstruction requiring endotracheal intubation in the emergency department. Patients who have ingested this combination of cleaning agents are at high risk of acute airway compromise, and should have expert upper airway evaluation and control as soon as possible after admission.

  14. A comparative analysis of DBSCAN, K-means, and quadratic variation algorithms for automatic identification of swallows from swallowing accelerometry signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudik, Joshua M; Kurosu, Atsuko; Coyle, James L; Sejdić, Ervin

    2015-04-01

    Cervical auscultation with high resolution sensors is currently under consideration as a method of automatically screening for specific swallowing abnormalities. To be clinically useful without human involvement, any devices based on cervical auscultation should be able to detect specified swallowing events in an automatic manner. In this paper, we comparatively analyze the density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise algorithm (DBSCAN), a k-means based algorithm, and an algorithm based on quadratic variation as methods of differentiating periods of swallowing activity from periods of time without swallows. These algorithms utilized swallowing vibration data exclusively and compared the results to a gold standard measure of swallowing duration. Data was collected from 23 subjects that were actively suffering from swallowing difficulties. Comparing the performance of the DBSCAN algorithm with a proven segmentation algorithm that utilizes k-means clustering demonstrated that the DBSCAN algorithm had a higher sensitivity and correctly segmented more swallows. Comparing its performance with a threshold-based algorithm that utilized the quadratic variation of the signal showed that the DBSCAN algorithm offered no direct increase in performance. However, it offered several other benefits including a faster run time and more consistent performance between patients. All algorithms showed noticeable differentiation from the endpoints provided by a videofluoroscopy examination as well as reduced sensitivity. In summary, we showed that the DBSCAN algorithm is a viable method for detecting the occurrence of a swallowing event using cervical auscultation signals, but significant work must be done to improve its performance before it can be implemented in an unsupervised manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Carbohydrate ingestion and soccer skill performance during prolonged intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ajmol; Williams, Clyde

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ingesting a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution, during the 90-min Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test, on soccer skill performance. Seventeen male soccer players ingested either a 6.4% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution or placebo solution equivalent to 8 ml . kg(-1) body mass before exercise and 3 ml . kg(-1) body mass after every 15 min of exercise, in a double-blind randomized cross-over design, with the trials separated by 7 days. The evening before the main trial, the participants performed glycogen-reducing exercise on a cycle ergometer (80 min at 70%[Vdot]O(2max)) and were then fed a low-carbohydrate meal. After a 12-h overnight fast, they performed The Loughborough Soccer Passing Test before and after every 15 min of exercise. Analysis of the combined skill test data showed a significant time effect (P = 0.001) with differences between 0-45 and 75-90 min (P exercise in the carbohydrate-electrolyte trial, whereas in the placebo trial the decrease was 14% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, skill performance during the simulated soccer activity appeared to deteriorate in the last 15-30 min of exercise. However, providing 52 g . h(-1) carbohydrate during exercise showed a tendency to better maintain soccer skill performance than a taste-matched placebo.

  16. Plastic debris ingestion by marine catfish: an unexpected fisheries impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possatto, Fernanda E; Barletta, Mário; Costa, Monica F; do Sul, Juliana A Ivar; Dantas, David V

    2011-05-01

    Plastic marine debris is a pervasive type of pollution. River basins and estuaries are a source of plastics pollution for coastal waters and oceans. Estuarine fauna is therefore exposed to chronic plastic pollution. Three important catfish species [Cathorops spixii (N=60), Cathorops agassizii (N=60) and Sciades herzbergii (N=62)] from South Western Atlantic estuaries were investigated in a tropical estuary of the Brazilian Northeast in relation to their accidental ingestion of plastic marine debris. Individuals from all three species had ingested plastics. In C. spixii and C. agassizii, 18% and 33% of individuals had plastic debris in their stomachs, respectively. S. herzbergii showed 18% of individuals were contaminated. All ontogenetic phases (juveniles, sub-adults and adults) were contaminated. Nylon fragments from cables used in fishery activities (subsistence, artisanal and commercial) played a major role in this contamination. These catfish spend their entire life cycles within the estuary and are an important feeding resource for larger, economically important, species. It is not yet possible to quantify the scale and depth of the consequences of this type of pollution. However, plastics are well known threat to living resources in this and other estuaries. Conservation actions will need to from now onto take plastics pollution into consideration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Global analysis of anthropogenic debris ingestion by sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuyler, Qamar; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Wilcox, Chris; Townsend, Kathy

    2014-02-01

    Ingestion of marine debris can have lethal and sublethal effects on sea turtles and other wildlife. Although researchers have reported on ingestion of anthropogenic debris by marine turtles and implied incidences of debris ingestion have increased over time, there has not been a global synthesis of the phenomenon since 1985. Thus, we analyzed 37 studies published from 1985 to 2012 that report on data collected from before 1900 through 2011. Specifically, we investigated whether ingestion prevalence has changed over time, what types of debris are most commonly ingested, the geographic distribution of debris ingestion by marine turtles relative to global debris distribution, and which species and life-history stages are most likely to ingest debris. The probability of green (Chelonia mydas) and leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) ingesting debris increased significantly over time, and plastic was the most commonly ingested debris. Turtles in nearly all regions studied ingest debris, but the probability of ingestion was not related to modeled debris densities. Furthermore, smaller, oceanic-stage turtles were more likely to ingest debris than coastal foragers, whereas carnivorous species were less likely to ingest debris than herbivores or gelatinovores. Our results indicate oceanic leatherback turtles and green turtles are at the greatest risk of both lethal and sublethal effects from ingested marine debris. To reduce this risk, anthropogenic debris must be managed at a global level. © 2013 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of the Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. Redotex ingestions reported to Texas poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-09-01

    Although the multi-component weight loss supplement Redotex is banned in the United States, the supplement can be obtained in Mexico. The intent of this report was to describe the pattern of Redotex calls received by a statewide poison center system. Cases were all Redotex calls received by Texas poison centers during 2000-2008. The distribution of total calls and those involving ingestion of the supplement were determined for selected demographic and clinical factors. Of 34 total Redotex calls received, 55.9% came from the 14 Texas counties that border Mexico. Of the 22 reported Redotex ingestions, 77.3% of the patients were female and 45.5% 20 years or more. Of the 17 ingestions involving no co-ingestants, 52.9% were already at or en route to a health care facility, 41.2% were managed on site, and 5.9% was referred to a health care facility. The final medical outcome was no effect in 23.5% cases, minor effect in 5.9%, moderate effect in 11.8%, not followed but minimal clinical effects possible in 47.1%, and unable to follow but judged to be potentially toxic in 11.8%. Most Redotex calls to the Texas poison center system originated from counties bordering Mexico.

  19. Intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolodi, Gabriel Cleve; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda F.S.; Castro, Francisco Gomes de; Miller, Wagner Peitl; Lima, Raphael Rodrigues de; Tazima, Leandro; Geraldo, Jamylle, E-mail: gabrielnicolodi@gmail.com [Hospital Sao Vicente - Funef, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Objective: To identify the computed tomography findings suggestive of intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of four cases of surgically proven intestinal perforation by a foreign body, comparing the computed tomography findings with those described in the literature. Results: None of the patients reported having ingested a foreign body, all were over 60 years of age, three of the four patients used a dental prosthesis, and all of the foreign bodies were elongated and sharp. In all four patients, there were findings indicative of acute abdomen. None of the foreign bodies were identified on conventional X-rays. The computed tomography findings suggestive of perforation were thickening of the intestinal walls (in all four cases), increased density of mesenteric fat (in all four cases), identification of the foreign body passing through the intestinal wall (in three cases), and gas in the peritoneal cavity (in one case). Conclusion: In cases of foreign body ingestion, intestinal perforation is more common when the foreign body is elongated and sharp. Although patients typically do not report having ingested such foreign bodies, the scenario should be suspected in elderly individuals who use dental prostheses. A computed tomography scan can detect foreign bodies, locate perforations, and guide treatment. The findings that suggest perforation are thickening of the intestinal walls, increased mesenteric fat density, and, less frequently, gas in the peritoneal cavity, often restricted to the point of perforation. (author)

  20. Severe Coagulopathy after Ingestion of "Snake Wine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeong Mi; Chun, Byeong Jo

    2016-06-01

    This report describes a patient who developed coagulopathy after ingesting snake wine, which is an alcoholic libation containing an entire venomous snake. A 68-year-old man was admitted to the hospital 19 h after ingesting snake wine. The laboratory features upon admission included unmeasurable activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT) values, prolonged prothrombin time (PT) values, increased fibrinogen levels, modestly elevated fibrin degradation product and D-dimer values, uncorrected aPTT and PT values after a mixing test, and normal levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase. No pesticides, warfarin, or superwarfarin in the patient's blood or urine were detected. His coagulation profile normalized on the 6(th) day after admission after antivenom treatment. He was discharged 10 days later without sequelae. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: The physician should be aware that ingesting snake wine may lead to systemic envenomation. As for coagulopathy, which may develop by ingesting snake venom, related laboratory findings may differ from the features observed after direct envenomation by snakebite. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Successful Laparoscopic Removal of an Ingested Toothbrush

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prosthesis (3). Toothbrush ingestion most typically affects young females with an age range of 15-23 years old and with a significant incidence of psychiatric problems including bulimia or schizhophrenia.[3] Food bolus impaction is often secondary to underlying oesophageal pathology, such as eosinophilic oesophagitis.[4].

  2. Cyclopia and maternal ingestion of salicylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitos, M; Georgiou-Theodoropoulou, M; Koutselinis, A; Papacharalampus, N

    1986-01-01

    Salicylates are teratogens in animals, but their teratogenicity in man remains controverted. The possibility that massive oral intake in the first 3 months of pregnancy may induce malformations has not been eliminated. We report a second case of cyclopia associated with daily maternal ingestion of up to 4 g of acetylsalicylic acid in the first trimester.

  3. Survival After Severe Rhabdomyolysis Following Monensin Ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Michela; Garrard, Alexander; Poppenga, Robert; Chen, Betty; Valento, Matthew; Halliday Gittinger, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    Monensin is a veterinary antibiotic with a narrow therapeutic window that has led to lethal intoxication in many animal species. Only two prior cases of human toxicity have been reported, both fatal. We present the first case of survival from severe toxicity following monensin ingestion. A 58-year-old man presented with 8 days of vomiting and abdominal pain. Due to delusions of central nervous system toxoplasmosis, he ingested 300 mg of monensin. His laboratory studies revealed severe rhabdomyolysis without renal dysfunction. Total creatine kinase (CK) peaked above 100,000 U/L. His CK decreased to 5192 U/L after 15 days of aggressive hydration and sodium bicarbonate therapy. His ejection fraction on echocardiogram decreased from 69 to 56%. Reports on acute clinical effects after human exposure to monensin are limited. Ingestion is known to cause skeletal and cardiac muscle rhabdomyolysis and necrosis. Animal studies demonstrate that monensin's toxicity is due to increases in intracellular sodium concentrations and Ca2+ release. To date, no effective antidotal treatment has been described. Monensin is a veterinary medication not approved for human use by the US Food and Drug Administration. Though poorly studied in humans, this case demonstrates the severe harm that may occur following ingestion.

  4. Intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Cleve Nicolodi

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To identify the computed tomography findings suggestive of intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of four cases of surgically proven intestinal perforation by a foreign body, comparing the computed tomography findings with those described in the literature. Results: None of the patients reported having ingested a foreign body, all were over 60 years of age, three of the four patients used a dental prosthesis, and all of the foreign bodies were elongated and sharp. In all four patients, there were findings indicative of acute abdomen. None of the foreign bodies were identified on conventional X-rays. The computed tomography findings suggestive of perforation were thickening of the intestinal walls (in all four cases, increased density of mesenteric fat (in all four cases, identification of the foreign body passing through the intestinal wall (in three cases, and gas in the peritoneal cavity (in one case. Conclusion: In cases of foreign body ingestion, intestinal perforation is more common when the foreign body is elongated and sharp. Although patients typically do not report having ingested such foreign bodies, the scenario should be suspected in elderly individuals who use dental prostheses. A computed tomography scan can detect foreign bodies, locate perforations, and guide treatment. The findings that suggest perforation are thickening of the intestinal walls, increased mesenteric fat density, and, less frequently, gas in the peritoneal cavity, often restricted to the point of perforation.

  5. The anatomy and physiology of normal and abnormal swallowing in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasegbon, A; Hamdy, S

    2017-11-01

    Eating and drinking are enjoyable activities that positively impact on an individual's quality of life. The ability to swallow food and fluid is integral to the process of eating. Swallowing occupies a dual role being both part of the enjoyment of eating and being a critically important utilitarian activity to enable adequate nutrition and hydration. Any impairment to the process of swallowing can negatively affect a person's perception of their quality of life. The process of swallowing is highly complex and involves muscles in the mouth, pharynx, larynx, and esophagus. The oropharynx is the anatomical region encompassing the oral cavity and the pharynx. Food must be masticated, formed into a bolus and transported to the pharynx by the tongue whereas fluids are usually held within the mouth before being transported ab-orally. The bolus must then be transported through the pharynx to the esophagus without any matter entering the larynx. The muscles needed for all these steps are coordinated by swallowing centers within the brainstem which are supplied with sensory information by afferent nerve fibers from several cranial nerves. The swallowing centers also receive modulatory input from higher centers within the brain. Hence, a swallow has both voluntary and involuntary physiologic components and the term dysphagia is given to difficult swallowing while oropharyngeal dysphagia is difficult swallowing due to pathology within the oropharynx. Problems affecting any point along the complex swallowing pathway can result in dysphagia. This review focuses on the anatomy and physiology behind normal and abnormal oropharyngeal swallowing. It also details the common diseases and pathology causing oropharyngeal dysphagia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Influence of attention and bolus volume on brain organization during swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L; Perera, Subashan; Sejdić, Ervin

    2017-10-20

    It has been shown that swallowing involves certain attentional and cognitive resources which, when disrupted can influence swallowing function with in dysphagic patient. However, there are still open questions regarding the influence of attention and cognitive demands on brain activity during swallowing. In order to understand how brain regions responsible for attention influence brain activity during swallowing, we compared brain organization during no-distraction swallowing and swallowing with distraction. Fifteen healthy male adults participated in the data collection process. Participants performed ten 1 ml, ten 5 ml, and ten 10 ml water swallows under both no-distraction conditions and during distraction while EEG signals were recorded. After standard pre-processing of the EEG signals, brain networks were formed using the time-frequency based synchrony measure. The brain networks formed were then compared between the two sets of conditions. Results showed that there are differences in the Delta, Theta, Alpha, Beta, and Gamma frequency bands between no-distraction swallowing and swallowing with distraction. Differences in the Delta and Theta frequency bands can be attributed to changes in subliminal processes, while changes in the Alpha and Beta frequency bands are directly associated with the various levels of attention and cognitive demands during swallowing process, and changes in the Gamma frequency band are due to changes in motor activity. Furthermore, we showed that variations in bolus volume influenced the swallowing brain networks in the Delta, Theta, Alpha, Beta, and Gamma frequency bands. Changes in the Delta, Theta, and Alpha frequency bands are due to sensory perturbations evoked by the various bolus volumes. Changes in the Beta frequency band are due to reallocation of cognitive demands, while changes in the Gamma frequency band are due to changes in motor activity produced by variations in bolus volume. These findings could potentially lead to

  7. Dose-dependent deterioration of swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haderlein, M.; Semrau, S.; Ott, O.; Speer, S.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Bohr, C. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate the influence of clinical, treatment- and dose-dependent factors on posttreatment swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy in a group of homogeneously treated laryngopharyngeal cancer patients. From 28 May 2008 to 15 February 2013, 45 patients with borderline inoperable laryngopharyngeal cancer that had responded well to induction chemotherapy were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 22 months. Swallowing function and clinical data were prospectively analyzed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Swallowing structures were retrospectively delineated on the original treatment planning CT. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for swallowing structures and D{sub mean}, D{sub max} and V50-V64 values (in 2 Gy increments) were determined for each patient. Tumor volume and infiltration of the swallowing apparatus was defined by CT before induction chemotherapy. Of the 45 patients, 26 (57.8 %) fully regained swallowing function after chemoradiotherapy. A further 12 patients (26.7 %) were able to manage soft, pureed and/or liquid foods; the remaining 7 (15.6 %) were completely dependent on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Posttreatment swallowing function was significantly influenced by D{sub mean} to the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (PCM, p = 0.041). Correlations between late dysphagia and dose-volume relationships in the superior PCM and soft palate were also observed, which were significant from V60 (p = 0.043) and V58 for the soft palate and superior PCM, respectively. Of the evaluated clinical and tumor-related factors, only alcohol abuse (p = 0.024) had an influence on posttreatment swallowing function. Almost 50 % of patients had deterioration of swallowing function after definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer. The dose to anatomical structures responsible for swallowing function appears to play a role. Therefore, in selected patients, target

  8. Ingestion of a Cold Temperature/Menthol Beverage Increases Outdoor Exercise Performance in a Hot, Humid Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Tran Trong, Than; Riera, Florence; Rinaldi, K?vin; Briki, Walid; Hue, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A recent laboratory study demonstrated that the ingestion of a cold/menthol beverage improved exercise performance in a hot and humid environment during 20 km of all-out cycling. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether the ingestion of cold water/ice-slurry with menthol would improve performance in hot and humid outdoor conditions. Methods Ten trained males completed three trials of five blocks consisting of 4-km cycling and 1.5-km running. During warm-up, every bloc...

  9. Windage rise and flowpath gas ingestion in turbine rim cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaser, Fred; Jack, James; McGreehan, William

    1987-05-01

    A method for modeling the windage rise and flowpath gas ingestion in turbine rim cavities on a macroscopic scale is presented, with application to the minimization of the necessary required cooling air in order to provide optimum turbine cycle performance and hardware durability. Comparison is made between measured and predicted results for: (1) the prediction of critical flow in a turbine aeroperformance rig; (2) a boltless blade retainer design; (3) the impact of instrumentation wire; and (4) a modulated throughflow test. It is noted that the effects of inner and outer flow extraction, rotor and stator drag, rotor and stator bolt drag, leakages, and injection momentum must be accounted for to accurately model the wheel space.

  10. Fluid mechanics of eating, swallowing and digestion - overview and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engmann, Jan; Burbidge, Adam S

    2013-02-26

    From a very simplistic viewpoint, the human digestive system can be regarded as a long tube (with dramatic variations in diameter, cross-section, wall properties, pumping mechanisms, regulating valves and in-line sensors). We single out a few fluid mechanical phenomena along the trajectory of a food bolus from the mouth to the small intestine and discuss how they influence sensorial perception, safe transport, and nutrient absorption from a bolus. The focus is on lubrication flows between the tongue and palate, the oropharyngeal stage of swallowing and effects of flow on absorption in the small intestine. Specific challenges and opportunities in this research area are highlighted.

  11. Graphic representation of pharyngeal wall motion during swallow: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, O; Borgstrom, P S

    1989-01-01

    Movements of the pharyngeal wall were measured at 12 transverse levels, on consecutive cineradiograms obtained during swallowing of thin, liquid barium, in a single nondysphagic volunteer. By graphic representation of these measurements on the IBM personal computer, it was possible to analyze in detail pharyngeal motor activity in terms of displacement of the pharyngeal wall. The contraction created a fairly steep narrowing of the lumen. The peristaltic wave was more difficult to analyze. Movements of the pharyngeal wall in posteroanterior projection gave good information about the constrictors. Although this technique has several inherent methodologic difficulties, its use may expand our knowledge of pharyngeal peristalsis.

  12. Acetonitrile ingestion: delayed onset of cyanide poisoning due to concurrent ingestion of acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggild, M. D.; Peck, R. W.; Tomson, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    A fatal case of acetonitrile ingestion is reported. The patient presented having apparently taken an overdose but was well until around 24 hours after the supposed ingestion, when cardiovascular collapse and profound metabolic acidosis developed. Later investigation revealed that the patient had taken acetone and acetonitrile. Acetone is known to slow the metabolism of acetonitrile to cyanide, thereby delaying the appearance of toxicity. PMID:2349164

  13. A predictive model for swallowing dysfunction after curative radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langendijk, Johannes A.; Doornaert, Patricia; Rietveld, Derek H. F.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Leemans, C. Rene; Slotman, Ben J.

    Introduction: Recently, we found that swallowing dysfunction after curative (chemo) radiation (CH) RT has a strong negative impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), even more than xerostomia. The purpose of this study was to design a predictive model for swallowing dysfunction after

  14. A predictive model for swallowing dysfunction after curative radiotherapy in head and neck cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langendijk, J.A.; Doornaert, P.A.H.; Rietveld, D.H.F.; de Leeuw, I.M.; Leemans, C.R.; Slotman, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, we found that swallowing dysfunction after curative (chemo) radiation (CH) RT has a strong negative impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), even more than xerostomia. The purpose of this study was to design a predictive model for swallowing dysfunction after

  15. Tongue Pressure and Submental Surface Electromyography Measures during Noneffortful and Effortful Saliva Swallows in Healthy Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Erin M.; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The effortful swallow, a compensatory technique frequently employed by speech-language pathologists for their patients with dysphagia, is still not fully understood in terms of how it modifies the swallow. In particular, although age-related changes are known to reduce maximum isometric tongue pressure, it is not known whether age affects…

  16. Effect of aging on oral and swallowing function after meal consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Tetsuya; Kataoka, Hideyuki; Osaki, Mari; Hagino, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia may worsen due to fatigue of the infrahyoid and suprahyoid muscle groups as a result of repetitive swallowing during a meal. We investigated the hypothesis that meal consumption may reduce tongue strength and endurance in older adults (OAs). Tongue-palate pressure, oral diadochokinesis, repetitive saliva swallowing, and surface electromyography activity before and after a meal were measured in 23 young adults (YAs) and 23 OA volunteers. There was a statistically significant difference in both tongue pressure and the number of voluntary swallows between YAs and OAs. Peak tongue pressure was significantly lower in OAs than YAs both before and after meal consumption. The most notable finding was that the first time interval (the time from test initiation to the beginning of the first swallow) was prolonged after meal consumption only in OAs, whereas the first time interval showed no difference between YAs and OAs before meal consumption with reference to the repetitive saliva swallowing test. The initiation of swallowing was prolonged by both meal consumption and aging; there was a significant interaction between these two factors. The number of repetitions of the monosyllable/pa/was statistically similar between YAs and OAs before meal consumption, but it was significantly lower in OAs after meal consumption. Aging leads to declining tongue pressure and motor function of the lips. It is possible that swallowing function declines in older individuals when meal consumption is prolonged, especially at the end of mealtime, as a result of their efforts in mastication and swallowing.

  17. Relationships between air swallowing, intragastric air, belching and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Timmer, R.; Akkermans, L. M. A.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With each swallow a certain amount of air is transported to the stomach. The stomach protects itself against excessive distention by swallowed air through belching (gas reflux). The mechanism of belching (transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation) is also one of the mechanisms

  18. Relationships between air swallowing, intragastric air, belching and gastro-oesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, AJ; Weusten, BLAM; Timmer, R; Akkermans, LMA; Smout, AJPM

    Background: With each swallow a certain amount of air is transported to the stomach. The stomach protects itself against excessive distention by swallowed air through belching (gas reflux). The mechanism of belching (transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation) is also one of the mechanisms

  19. Tongue Pressure Modulation during Swallowing: Water versus Nectar-Thick Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M.; Bailey, Gemma L.; Molfenter, Sonja M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence of tongue-palate pressure modulation during swallowing between thin and nectar-thick liquids stimuli has been equivocal. This mirrors a lack of clear evidence in the literature of tongue and hyoid movement modulation between nectar-thick and thin liquid swallows. In the current investigation, the authors sought to confirm whether…

  20. The interactions between different tastes on initiation of reflex swallow elicited by electrical stimulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, Masanori; Kurose, Masayuki; Uchida, Yoshiaki; Hasegawa, Mana; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Saito, Isao; Yamamura, Kensuke

    2016-09-01

    The act of eating is a source of pleasure for people and is a major factor in maintaining a good quality of life. Several types of products for dysphagia patients are available to decrease aspiration of food that often accompanies daily food intake. The final goal of these products is to improve the ease of forming a food bolus and/or the safety of the swallowing process; however, tastes of products are not a major concern with initiation of swallowing. In the present study, we investigated the effect of bitter taste stimuli (quinine) and the combination of quinine and umami (monosodium glutamate: MSG) applied to the oropharynx on reflex swallows evoked by electrical stimulation to the oropharyngeal mucosa. Each of the distilled water (DW), quinine and quinine-MSG mixture solution (volume of each solutions, 100 µl) was applied 1 s prior to electrical stimulation. No swallow was evoked when each of the solutions was applied without electrical stimulation. The application of DW and lower concentration of quinine (<100 µM) did not affect the latency of reflex swallow, but 100 µM quinine application increased the latency of the reflex swallow. In addition, application of quinine-MSG mixture solution counteracted the increase in latency induced by quinine application alone. These findings suggest that MSG enhances the initiation of swallowing along with its well-known increase in appetite stimulation. Adding MSG might be effective when creating food to promote swallowing.

  1. Prevalence of Auditory Problems in Children with Feeding and Swallowing Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawool, Vishakha Waman

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Although an interdisciplinary approach is recommended for assessment and management of feeding or swallowing difficulties, audiologists are not always included in the interdisciplinary team. The purpose of this study is to report the prevalence of middle ear and hearing problems in children with feeding and swallowing disorders and to…

  2. Prevalence and Severity of Voice and Swallowing Difficulties in Mitochondrial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jennifer L.; Whittaker, Roger G.; Miller, Nick; Clark, Sue; Taylor, Robert; McFarland, Robert; Turnbull, Douglass

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cause a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Anecdotal evidence suggests that voice and swallow problems are a common feature of these diseases. Aims: To characterize accurately the prevalence and severity of voice and swallow problems in a large cohort of patients with mitochondrial disease.…

  3. Extraction of average neck flexion angle during swallowing in neutral and chin-tuck positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejdić Ervin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common but debated technique in the management of swallowing difficulties is the chin tuck swallow, where the neck is flexed forward prior to swallowing. Natural variations in chin tuck angles across individuals may contribute to the differential effectiveness of the technique. Methodology To facilitate the study of chin tuck angle variations, we present a template tracking algorithm that automatically extracts neck angles from sagittal videos of individuals performing chin tuck swallows. Three yellow markers geometrically arranged on a pair of dark visors were used as tracking cues. Results The algorithm was applied to data collected from 178 healthy participants during neutral and chin tuck position swallows. Our analyses revealed no major influences of body mass index and age on neck flexion angles during swallowing, while gender influenced the average neck angle only during wet swallows in the neutral position. Chin tuck angles seem to be independent of anthropometry and gender in healthy adults, but deserve further study in pathological populations. Conclusion The proposed neck flexion angle extraction algorithm may be useful in future studies where strict participant compliance to swallowing task protocol can be assured.

  4. Extraction of average neck flexion angle during swallowing in neutral and chin-tuck positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Delbert; Sejdić, Ervin; Steele, Catriona M; Chau, Tom

    2009-10-07

    A common but debated technique in the management of swallowing difficulties is the chin tuck swallow, where the neck is flexed forward prior to swallowing. Natural variations in chin tuck angles across individuals may contribute to the differential effectiveness of the technique. To facilitate the study of chin tuck angle variations, we present a template tracking algorithm that automatically extracts neck angles from sagittal videos of individuals performing chin tuck swallows. Three yellow markers geometrically arranged on a pair of dark visors were used as tracking cues. The algorithm was applied to data collected from 178 healthy participants during neutral and chin tuck position swallows. Our analyses revealed no major influences of body mass index and age on neck flexion angles during swallowing, while gender influenced the average neck angle only during wet swallows in the neutral position. Chin tuck angles seem to be independent of anthropometry and gender in healthy adults, but deserve further study in pathological populations. The proposed neck flexion angle extraction algorithm may be useful in future studies where strict participant compliance to swallowing task protocol can be assured.

  5. [Swallowing after non-surgical treatment (radiation therapy / radiochemotherapy protocol) of laryngeal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portas, Juliana; Socci, Claudia Pereira; Scian, Eliana Perissato; Queija, Débora Dos Santos; Ferreira, Alessandra Sampaio; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido; Barros, Ana Paula Brandão

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy and radiochemotherapy protocols can cause swallowing difficulties. To evaluate swallowing in patients undergoing radiation therapy and radiochemotherapy protocol only for the treatment of laryngeal tumors. A prospective study of 20 patients, with a mean age of 62 years, at the end of oncological therapy. Six patients (30%) underwent radiation therapy, and 14 patients (70%) underwent combined therapy. The mean time between treatment and an evaluation of swallowing was 8.5 months. Videofluoroscopy was done to assess the preparatory, oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing. All patients had only an oral diet. Normal swallowing was present in only 25% of patients. The swallowing videofluoroscopic examination identified the following changes: bolus formation (85%), bolus ejection (60%), oral cavity stasis (55%), changes in the onset of the pharyngeal phase (100%), decreased laryngeal elevation (65%), and hypopharyngeal stasis (80%). Laryngeal penetration was observed in 25% of the cases; 40% presented tracheal aspiration. The grade of penetration/aspiration was mild in 60% of cases. Aspiration was silent in 35% of patients. Although 75% of patients had dysphagia, only 25% complained of swallowing difficulties. Patients with laryngeal cancer that underwent radiation therapy/combined treatment can present changes in all swallowing phases, or may be asymptomatic.

  6. Population Trends and Management of the Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia) on the Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett A. Garrison; Ronald W. Schlorff; Joan M. Humphrey; Stephen A. Laymon; Frank J. Michny

    1989-01-01

    Annual monitoring of Bank Swallows (Riparia riparia) along the Sacramento River, California has been conducted since 1986 to determine population trends, evaluate impacts from bank protection and flood control projects, and implement and monitor mitigation efforts. The population of Bank Swallows in a 50-mile river reach remained static over 3...

  7. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing and Neural Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Arvedson, Joan; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the literature examining the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on swallowing and neural activation. The review was conducted as part of a series examining the effects of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech, swallowing, and neural activation. Method: A systematic search was conducted to…

  8. Mechanism of Sequential Swallowing during Straw Drinking in Healthy Young and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Corey, David M.; Hadskey, Leslie D.; Legendre, Calli; Priestly, Daniel H.; Rosenbek, John C.; Foundas, Anne L.

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has revealed differences between isolated and sequential swallowing in healthy young adults; however, the influence of normal aging on sequential swallowing has not been studied. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of normal aging on deglutition during sequential straw drinking. Videofluoroscopic…

  9. Effects of Pacifier and Taste on Swallowing, Esophageal Motility, Transit and Respiratory Rhythm in Human Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubert, Theresa R.; Sitaram, Swetha; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pacifier use is widely prevalent globally despite hygienic concerns and uncertain mechanistic effects on swallowing or airway safety. Aims The effects of pacifier and taste interventions on pharyngo-esophageal motility, bolus transit and respiratory rhythms were investigated by determining the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), esophageal body, esophagogastric junction (EGJ) motor patterns as well as deglutition apnea, respiratory rhythm disturbances and esophageal bolus clearance. Methods Fifteen infants (6 males; median gestation 31 wks and birth weight 1.4 kg) underwent high resolution impedance manometry at 43 (41-44) weeks post-menstrual age. Manometric, respiratory, and impedance characteristics of spontaneous swallows, pacifier associated dry swallowing and taste (pacifier dipped in 3% sucrose) associated swallowing were analyzed. Linear mixed and generalized estimating equation models were used. Data are presented as mean ± SEM, %, or median (IQR). Key Results Pharyngo-esophageal motility, respiratory, and impedance characteristics of 209 swallows were analyzed (85 spontaneous swallows, 63 pacifier associated dry swallows, 61 taste associated swallows). Basal UES and EGJ pressures decreased upon pacifier (P<0.05) and taste interventions (P<0.05); however, esophageal motility, respiratory rhythm, and impedance transit characteristics were similar with both interventions. Conclusions and Inferences Oral stimulus with pacifier or taste interventions decreases UES and EGJ basal pressure, but has no effects on pharyngo-esophageal motility, airway interactions, or esophageal bolus transit. A decrease in central parasympathetic-cholinergic excitatory drive is likely responsible for the basal effects. PMID:26727930

  10. Relationship between ease of swallowing and deglutition-related muscle activity in various postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, T; Kida, I

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the ease of swallowing and the deglutition-related muscle activity in various body and head postures by surface electromyography (EMG). Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on the right suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscles of nine healthy adults (19-28 years) while swallowing jelly. Ten postures per subject were examined: five body angulations (0 degrees [supine], 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees [upright] and 120 degrees from the horizontal) and two head positions (chin-up and chin-down). The duration and amplitude of suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscle activity were measured by an electromyograph, and the ease of swallowing was subjectively determined by using a rating scale (0 = difficult to swallow, 10 = easy to swallow). The group-average duration and amplitude of muscle activity and the group-average rating scales mostly showed insignificant changes with the body angulations independent of the head positions. Interestingly, the duration and amplitude of muscle activity during swallowing were negatively correlated with the rating scales, indicating that a shorter duration and smaller activity of muscle activity corresponds to easier swallowing. Consequently, the duration and amplitude of suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscle activity measured by surface EMG would be a useful indicator of the easy-to-swallow performance.

  11. Respiratory-swallow training in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Harris, Bonnie; McFarland, David; Hill, Elizabeth G; Strange, Charlton B; Focht, Kendrea L; Wan, Zhuang; Blair, Julie; McGrattan, Katlyn

    2015-05-01

    To test a novel intervention to train swallowing to occur in the midexpiratory to low expiratory phase of quiet breathing to improve swallowing safety and efficiency. Safety and efficacy nonrandomized controlled trial with 1-month follow-up. Ambulatory clinics. Patients (N=30) with head and neck cancer (HNC) and chronic dysphagia completed the intervention. Fifteen of these patients participated in a 1-month follow-up visit. Training protocol based on hierarchy of motor skill acquisition to encourage autonomous and optimal respiratory-swallowing coordination. Visual feedback of respiratory phase and volume for swallowing initiation was provided by nasal airflow and rib cage/abdomen signals. Respiratory-swallow phase pattern, Modified Barium Swallow Impairment Profile (MBSImP) scores, Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS) scores, and MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory scores. Using visual feedback, patients were trained to initiate swallows during the midexpiratory phase of quiet breathing and continue to expire after swallowing. This optimal phase patterning increased significantly after treatment (Pdysphagia, with favorable effects on airway protection and bolus clearance. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Leaf anthracnose, a new disease of swallow-worts from Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black swallow-wort Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench (synonym=Cynanchum louiseae Kartesz & Gandhi) and pale swallow-wort Vincetoxicum rossicum (Kleopow) Borhidi (synonym=Cynanchum rossicum (Kleopow) Borhidi) are invasive plants belonging to the family Apocynaceae and are the targets of biological cont...

  13. New biological information on the invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench [Cynanchum louiseae Kartesz & Gandhi] (black swallow-wort) and V. rossicum (Kleopow) Barbar. [Cynanchum rossicum (Kleopow) Borhidi] (pale swallow-wort) are herbaceous perennial vines in the Apocynaceae native to Europe. Both species are considered invasive in their in...

  14. Leaf anthracnose, a new disease of swallow-worts caused by Colletotrichum lineola from Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black swallow-wort Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench and pale swallow-wort Vincetoxicum rossicum (Kleopow) Borhidi (family Apocynaceae subfamily Asclepiadoideae) are invasive plants and are the targets of biological control efforts to control their spread in the USA. In 2010, diseased leaves of a rela...

  15. Relating the ability of mallards to ingest high levels of sediment to potential contaminant exposure in waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Gary H.; Beyer, W. Nelson; Hoffman, David J.; Audet, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    When waterfowl feed from the bottom of bodies of water, they sometimes ingest sediments along with their food, and this sediment can be a major source of contaminants. Learning how much sediment waterfowl can consume in their diet and still maintain their health would be helpful in assessing potential threats from contaminants in sediment. In a controlled laboratory study the maximum tolerated percentage of sediment in the diet of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) was measured. When fed a well-balanced commercial avian diet, 50, 60, or 70% sediment in the diet on a dry-weight basis did not cause weight loss over a two-week period. Ducks fed this same commercial diet, but containing 80 or 90% sediment, lost 8.6 and 15.6% of their body weight, respectively, in the first week on those diets. After factoring in the ability of the mallards to sieve out some of the sediment from their diet before swallowing it, we concluded that the mallards could maintain their health even when approximately half of what they swallowed, on a dry-weight basis, was sediment.

  16. Soft Electronics Enabled Ergonomic Human-Computer Interaction for Swallowing Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongkuk; Nicholls, Benjamin; Sup Lee, Dong; Chen, Yanfei; Chun, Youngjae; Siang Ang, Chee; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-04-01

    We introduce a skin-friendly electronic system that enables human-computer interaction (HCI) for swallowing training in dysphagia rehabilitation. For an ergonomic HCI, we utilize a soft, highly compliant (“skin-like”) electrode, which addresses critical issues of an existing rigid and planar electrode combined with a problematic conductive electrolyte and adhesive pad. The skin-like electrode offers a highly conformal, user-comfortable interaction with the skin for long-term wearable, high-fidelity recording of swallowing electromyograms on the chin. Mechanics modeling and experimental quantification captures the ultra-elastic mechanical characteristics of an open mesh microstructured sensor, conjugated with an elastomeric membrane. Systematic in vivo studies investigate the functionality of the soft electronics for HCI-enabled swallowing training, which includes the application of a biofeedback system to detect swallowing behavior. The collection of results demonstrates clinical feasibility of the ergonomic electronics in HCI-driven rehabilitation for patients with swallowing disorders.

  17. Prediction of complications following caustic ingestion in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christesen, H B

    1995-01-01

    The records of 86 adults admitted to hospital following caustic ingestion were reviewed. Eighteen patients (21%) developed complications; of these, six were fatal. Patients without symptoms or signs did not develop complications. Complications occurred only following lye ingestion, or intentional...

  18. Debris ingestion by juvenile marine turtles: an underestimated problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Robson Guimarães; Andrades, Ryan; Boldrini, Marcillo Altoé; Martins, Agnaldo Silva

    2015-04-15

    Marine turtles are an iconic group of endangered animals threatened by debris ingestion. However, key aspects related to debris ingestion are still poorly known, including its effects on mortality and the original use of the ingested debris. Therefore, we analysed the impact of debris ingestion in 265 green turtles (Chelonia mydas) over a large geographical area and different habitats along the Brazilian coast. We determined the death rate due to debris ingestion and quantified the amount of debris that is sufficient to cause the death of juvenile green turtles. Additionally, we investigated the original use of the ingested debris. We found that a surprisingly small amount of debris was sufficient to block the digestive tract and cause death. We suggested that debris ingestion has a high death potential that may be masked by other causes of death. An expressive part of the ingested debris come from disposable and short-lived products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydrocarbon ingestion: an unusual cause of multiple pulmonary pseudotumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, P P

    1989-08-01

    I have reported a case of multiple pseudotumors seen on chest x-ray film after ingestion of roach killer in a suicide attempt. Hydrocarbon ingestion should be added to the list of causes of multiple pulmonary mass lesions.

  20. Intrarater and interrater reliability for measurements in videofluoroscopy of swallowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baijens, Laura, E-mail: laura.baijens@mumc.nl [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Barikroo, Ali, E-mail: a.Barikroo@ufl.edu [Swallowing Research Laboratory, Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Pilz, Walmari, E-mail: walmari.pilz@mumc.nl [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-01

    Objective: Intrarater and interrater reliability is crucial to the quality of diagnostic and therapy-effect studies. This paper reports on a systematic review of studies on intrarater and interrater reliability for measurements in videofluoroscopy of swallowing. The aim of this review was to summarize and qualitatively analyze published studies on that topic. Materials and methods: Those published up to March 2013 were found through a comprehensive electronic database search using PubMed, Embase, and The Cochrane Library. Two reviewers independently assessed the studies using strict inclusion criteria. Results: Nineteen studies were included and then qualitatively analyzed. In several of these, methodological problems were found. Moreover, intrarater and interrater reliability varied with the measure applied. A meta-analysis was not carried out as studies were not of sufficient quality to warrant doing so. Conclusion: In order to achieve reliable measurements in videofluoroscopy of swallowing, it is recommended that raters use well-defined guidelines for the levels of ordinal visuoperceptual variables. Furthermore, in order to make the measurements reliable (intrarater and interrater) it is recommended that, following protocolled pre-experimental training, the raters should have maximum consensus about the definition of the measured variables.

  1. A Mathematical Model for Swallowing of Concentrated Fluids in Oesophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Pandey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This model investigates particularly the impact of an integral and a non-integral number of waves on the swallowing of food stuff such as jelly, tomato puree, soup, concentrated fruits juices and honey transported peristaltically through the oesophagus. The fluid is considered as a Casson fluid. Emphasis is on the study of the dependence of local pressure distribution on space and time. Mechanical efficiency, reflux limit and trapping are also discussed. The effect of Casson fluid vis-à-vis Newtonian fluid is investigated analytically and numerically too. The result is physically interpreted as that the oesophagus makes more efforts to swallow fluids with higher concentration. It is observed that the pressure is uniformly distributed when an integral number of waves is there in the oesophagus; but it is non-uniform when a non-integral number of waves is present therein. It is further observed that as the plug flow region widens, the pressure difference increases, which indicates that the averaged flow rate will reduce for a Casson fluid. It is also concluded that Casson fluids are more prone to reflux.

  2. Neural activation of swallowing and swallowing-related tasks in healthy young adults: an attempt to separate the components of deglutition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Sutton, Bradley P; Perlman, Adrienne L; Karampinos, Dimitrios C; Conway, Charles

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the underlying neural pathways that govern the highly complex neuromuscular action of swallowing is considered crucial in the process of correctly identifying and treating swallowing disorders. The aim of the present investigation was to identify the neural activations of the different components of deglutition in healthy young adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Ten right-handed young healthy individuals were scanned in a 3-Tesla Siemens Allegra MRI scanner. Participants were visually cued for both a "Swallow" task and for component/control tasks ("Prepare to swallow", "Tap your tongue", and "Clear your throat") in a randomized order (event-related design). Behavioral interleaved gradient (BIG) methodology was used to address movement-related artifacts. Areas activated during each of the three component tasks enabled a partial differentiation of the neural localization for various components of the swallow. Areas that were more activated during throat clearing than other components included the posterior insula and small portions of the post- and pre-central gyri bilaterally. Tongue tapping showed higher activation in portions of the primary sensorimotor and premotor cortices and the parietal lobules. Planning did not show any areas that were more activated than in the other component tasks. When swallowing was compared with all other tasks, there was significantly more activation in the cerebellum, thalamus, cingulate gyrus, and all areas of the primary sensorimotor cortex bilaterally.

  3. Global Analysis of Anthropogenic Debris Ingestion by Sea Turtles

    OpenAIRE

    Schuyler, Qamar; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Wilcox, Chris; Townsend, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Ingestion of marine debris can have lethal and sublethal effects on sea turtles and other wildlife. Although researchers have reported on ingestion of anthropogenic debris by marine turtles and implied incidences of debris ingestion have increased over time, there has not been a global synthesis of the phenomenon since 1985. Thus, we analyzed 37 studies published from 1985 to 2012 that report on data collected from before 1900 through 2011. Specifically, we investigated whether ingestion prev...

  4. Evaluation of an EMG bioimpedance measurement system for recording and analysing the pharyngeal phase of swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, Corinna; Schauer, Thomas; Nahrstaedt, Holger; Seidl, Rainer O

    2013-07-01

    A neuroprosthetic device for treating swallowing disorders requires an implantable measurement system capable to analysing the timing and quality of the swallowing process in real time. A combined EMG bioimpedance (EMBI) measurement system was developed and is evaluated here. The study was planned and performed as a case-control study. The studies were approved by the Charité Berlin ethics committee in votes EA1/160/09 and EA1/161/09. Investigations were carried out on healthy volunteers in order to examine the usefulness and reproducibility of measurements, the ability to distinguish between swallowing and head movements and the effect of different food consistencies. The correlation between bioimpedance and anatomical and functional changes occurring during the pharyngeal phase of swallowing in non-healthy patients was examined using videofluoroscopy (VFSS). 31 healthy subjects (15♂, 16♀) were tested over the course of 1350 swallows and 19 (17♂, 2♀) non-healthy patients over the course of 54 swallows. The signal curves obtained from both transcutaneous and subcutaneous measurement were similar, characteristic and reproducible (r > 0.5) and correlated with anatomical and functional changes during the pharyngeal phase of swallowing observed using VFSS. Statistically significant differences between head movements and swallowing movements, food volumes and consistencies were found. Neither the conductivity of the food, the sex of the test subject nor the position of the measurement electrodes exerted a statistically significant effect on the measured signal. EMBI is able to reproducibly map the pharyngeal phase of swallowing and changes associated with it both transcutaneously and subcutaneously. The procedure therefore appears to be suitable for use in performing automated evaluation of the swallowing process and for use as a component of an implant.

  5. Jejunal perforation by swallowed ibuprofen caplet | Njoku | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case of jejunal perforation caused by an unusual foreign body, an ibuprofen caplet in its blister packing believed to be the first of its kind, perforation of the intestine caused by an ingested medication. The patient eventually developed an enterocutaneous fistula through the weak wall of a preexisting incisional ...

  6. Propylene Glycol Poisoning From Excess Whiskey Ingestion

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    Courtney A. Cunningham MD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we describe a case of high anion gap metabolic acidosis with a significant osmolal gap attributed to the ingestion of liquor containing propylene glycol. Recently, several reports have characterized severe lactic acidosis occurring in the setting of iatrogenic unintentional overdosing of medications that use propylene glycol as a diluent, including lorazepam and diazepam. To date, no studies have explored potential effects of excess propylene glycol in the setting of alcohol intoxication. Our patient endorsed drinking large volumes of cinnamon flavored whiskey, which was likely Fireball Cinnamon Whisky. To our knowledge, this is the first case of propylene glycol toxicity from an intentional ingestion of liquor containing propylene glycol.

  7. Glyphosate herbicide formulation: a potentially lethal ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Julian; Ryan, Matthew

    2004-06-01

    Glyphosate surfactant herbicide (GlySH) toxicity is an uncommon poisoning. We report two fatalities involving suicidal ingestion of this herbicide. Both deaths occurred despite early recognition of the serious nature of the poisoning and aggressive treatment. The deaths in this series are analysed in the context of a review of existing literature. Although traditionally regarded as minimally toxic, many deaths have been reported following suicidal ingestion. Severe GlySH toxicity may be refractory even to the most intensive supportive care. The triad of pulmonary oedema, metabolic acidosis and hyperkalaemia portends poor outcome. While containing a carbon phosphorus moiety, GlySH does not exhibit organophosphate toxicity. A clinical guide to assessing severity of GlySH toxicity is proposed and treatment modalities discussed.

  8. Intestinal perforation caused by multiple magnet ingestion | Corduk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiple magnet ingestion is rare, but can cause serious gastrointestinal complications. We report a case of 7-year-old girl with multiple intestinal perforations caused by multiple magnet ingestion. The aim of this report is to draw attention to magnetic toys, results of magnet ingestion and the importance of timing of operation.

  9. Ingested Button Battery Retrieved by a Modified Magnet Endoscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jue Soong

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Ingestion of button battery (BB by toddlers has been seen with increasing frequency over the past decade. Significant morbidity may develop if the ingested BB cannot be removed in time. Herein, we describe 2 infants whose ingested BBs were smoothly and successfully retrieved, from a stenotic esophagus and stomach, by the use of a self-made modified magnet endoscope.

  10. Batch Ingesting into EPrints Digital Repository Software

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    Tomasz Neugebauer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the batch importing strategy and workflow used for the import of theses metadata and PDF documents into the EPrints digital repository software. A two-step strategy of importing metadata in MARC format followed by attachment of PDF documents is described in detail, including Perl source code for scripts used.  The processes described were used in the ingestion of 6,000 theses metadata and PDFs into an EPrints institutional repository.

  11. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Hughes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  12. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    OpenAIRE

    Adrienne Hughes; Alisha Brown; Matthew Valento

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. [West J Emerg Med. 20XX;XX(X...

  13. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  14. Ketone Diester Ingestion Impairs Time-Trial Performance in Professional Cyclists

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    Jill J. Leckey

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of pre- “race” ingestion of a 1,3-butanediol acetoacetate diester on blood ketone concentration, substrate metabolism and performance of a cycling time trial (TT in professional cyclists. In a randomized cross-over design, 10 elite male cyclists completed a ~31 km laboratory-based TT on a cycling ergometer programmed to simulate the 2017 World Road Cycling Championships course. Cyclists consumed a standardized meal [2 g/kg body mass (BM carbohydrate (CHO] the evening prior to a trial day and a CHO breakfast (2 g/kg BM CHO with 200 mg caffeine on the morning of a trial day. Cyclists were randomized to consume either the ketone diester (2 × 250 mg/kg or a placebo drink, followed immediately by 200 mL diet cola, given ~ 30 min before and immediately prior to commencing a 20 min incremental warm-up. Blood samples were collected prior to and during the warm-up, pre- and post- TT and at regular intervals after the TT. Urine samples were collected pre- and post- warm-up, immediately post TT and 60 min post TT. Pre-exercise ingestion of the diester resulted in a 2 ± 1% impairment in TT performance that was associated with gut discomfort and higher perception of effort. Serum β-hydroxybutyrate, serum acetoacetate, and urine ketone concentrations increased from rest following ketone ingestion and were higher than placebo throughout the trial. Ketone ingestion induces hyperketonemia in elite professional cyclists when in a carbohydrate fed state, and impairs performance of a cycling TT lasting ~50 min.

  15. Trichloroacetic Acid Ingestion: Self-Harm Attempt

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    E. R. Black

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA, or trichloroethanoic acid, is a chemical analogue of acetic acid where three methyl group hydrogen atoms are replaced by chlorine. TCAAs are also abbreviated and referred to as TCAs, causing confusion with the psychiatric antidepressant drug class, especially among patients. TCAAs exist in dermatological treatments such as chemical peels or wart chemoablation medication. TCAA ingestion or overdose can cause gastric irritation symptoms including vomiting, diarrhea, or lassitude. This symptomatology is less severe than TCA overdose, where symptoms may include elevated body temperature, blurred vision, dilated pupils, sleepiness, confusion, seizures, rapid heart rate, and cardiac arrest. Owing to the vast difference in symptoms, the need for clinical intervention differs greatly. While overdose of either in a self-harm attempt can warrant psychiatric hospital admission, the risk of death in TCAA ingestion is far less. Case Report. A patient ingested TCAA in the form of a commercially available dermatological chemical peel as a self-harm attempt, thinking that it was a more injurious TCA. Conclusion. Awareness among physicians, particularly psychiatrists, regarding this relatively obscure chemical compound (TCAA and its use by suicidal patients mistakenly believing it to be a substance that can be significantly more lethal (TCA, is imperative.

  16. Kounis syndrome following canned tuna fish ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gennaro, Luisa; Brunetti, Natale Daniele; Locuratolo, Nicola; Ruggiero, Massimo; Resta, Manuela; Diaferia, Giuseppe; Rana, Michele; Caldarola, Pasquale

    2017-04-01

    Kounis syndrome (KS) is a complex of cardiovascular symptoms and signs following either allergy or hypersensitivity and anaphylactic or anaphylactoid insults. We report the case of 57-year-old man, with hypertension and history of allergy, referred for facial rash and palpitations appeared after consumption of canned tuna fish. Suddenly, the patient collapsed: electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation in inferior leads. The patient was transferred from the spoke emergency room for coronary angio, which did not show any sign of coronary atherosclerosis. A transient coronary spasm was therefore hypothesized and the final diagnosis was KS. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first cases of KS following the ingestion of tuna fish. KS secondary to food allergy has also been reported, and shellfish ingestion has been considered as one of the most active KS inducer foods. Canned tuna fish too is well known as an allergy inducer. Tuna fish allergy should be considered, however, within the context of scombroid food poisoning, also called histamine fish poisoning. Fish with high levels of free histidine, the enzyme substrate converted to histamine by bacterial histidine decarboxylase, are those most often implicated in scombroid poisoning. Inflammatory mediators such as histamine constitute the pathophysiologic basis of Kounis hypersensitivity-associated acute coronary syndrome. Patients with coronary risk factors, allergic reaction after food ingestion, and suspected scombroid poisoning should be therefore carefully monitored for a prompt diagnosis of possible coronary complications.

  17. Systemic effects of Leucaena leucocephala ingestion on ringtailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at Berenty Reserve, Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Graham; Puschner, Birgit; Affolter, Verena; Stalis, Ilse; Davidson, Autumn; Baker, Tomas; Tahara, John; Jolly, Alison; Ostapak, Susan

    2015-06-01

    Leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala) is a leguminous tree that is nutritious forage for domestic livestock when ingested in limited amounts. Unfortunately, leucaena contains mimosine, a plant amino acid, that can be toxic when ingested at higher concentrations. Reported toxic effects include alopecia (fur loss), poor body condition, infertility, low birth weight, thyroid gland dysfunction, and organ toxicity. Originally native to Mexico and Central America, leucaena has been introduced throughout the tropics, including Berenty Reserve, Madagascar where it was planted as supplemental browse for livestock. In Berenty, a seasonal syndrome of alopecia in ringtailed lemurs (Lemur catta) is associated with eating leucaena. Although much is known about the toxic effects of leucaena and mimosine on domestic animals and humans, the systemic effects on wildlife had not been studied. In a comparison of lemurs that include leucaena in their diet and those that do not, we found that animals that ingest leucaena absorb mimosine but that ingestion does not affect body condition, cause kidney or liver toxicity, or affect the intestinal tract. Alopecia is due to mimosine's interference of the hair follicle cycle. Leucaena ingestion is associated with higher serum albumin, α-tocopherol, and thyroxine concentrations, suggesting that leucaena may provide some nutritional benefit and that lemurs can detoxify and convert mimosine to a thyroid stimulating metabolite. The primary conservation consequence of leucaena ingestion at Berenty may be increased infant mortality due to the infants' inability cling to their alopecic mothers. The widespread introduction of leucaena throughout the tropics and its rapid spread in secondary forest conditions mean that many other leaf-eating mammals may be including this tree in their diet. Thus, exposure to leucaena should be considered when wildlife health is being evaluated, and the potential effects on wildlife health should be considered when

  18. Ingestion of a moderately high caffeine dose before exercise increases postexercise energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Elías, Valentín E; Del Coso, Juan; Hamouti, Nassim; Ortega, Juan F; Muñoz, Gloria; Muñoz-Guerra, Jesus; Mora-Rodríguez, Ricardo

    2015-02-01

    Caffeine is an ergogenic aid widely used before and during prolonged exercise. Due to its prolonged biological half-life caffeine effects could remain after exercise. We aimed to investigate the metabolic, respiratory, and cardiovascular postexercise responses to preexercise graded caffeine ingestion. Twelve aerobically trained subjects (mean VO₂max = 54 ± 7 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹) cycled for 60-min at 75% VO₂max after ingesting placebo (0 mg of caffeine per kg of body weight) or 0.5, 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 mg · kg⁻¹ on five occasions. During the 3 hr postexercise, heart rate, blood pressure, glucose, lactate, and fatty acids were analyzed. None of these variables were statistically affected by preexercise caffeine ingestion between 0.5 and 4.5 mg · kg⁻¹. However, ingestion of 4.5 mg · kg⁻¹ of caffeine raised postexercise energy expenditure 15% above placebo (233 ± 58 vs. 202 ± 49 kcal/3 hr; p < .05). Ventilation and tidal volume were elevated after the 4.5 mg · kg⁻¹ caffeine dose above placebo (9.2 ± 2.5 L · min⁻¹ and 0.67 ± 0.29 L · breath⁻¹ vs. 7.8 ± 1.5 L · min⁻¹ and 0.56 ± 0.20 L · breath⁻¹, respectively; p < .05). Ventilation correlated with tidal volume (r = .45; p < .05) and energy expenditure (r = .72; p < .05). In summary, preexercise ingestion of ergogenic caffeine doses do not alter postexercise cardiovascular responses. However, ingestion of 4.5 mg · kg⁻¹ of caffeine raises 3-hr postexercise energy expenditure (i.e., 31 kcal) likely through increased energy cost of ventilation.

  19. Water and carbohydrate ingestion during prolonged exercise increase maximal neuromuscular power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, R G; Switzer, T W; Hodgkinson, B J; Lee, S H; Martin, J C; Coyle, E F

    2000-02-01

    This study investigated the individual and combined effects of water and carbohydrate ingestion during prolonged cycling on maximal neuromuscular power (P(max)), thermoregulation, cardiovascular function, and metabolism. Eight endurance-trained cyclists exercised for 122 min at 62% maximal oxygen uptake in a 35 degrees C environment (50% relative humidity, 2 m/s fan speed). P(max) was measured in triplicate during 6-min periods beginning at 26, 56, 86, and 116 min. On four different occasions, immediately before and during exercise, subjects ingested 1) 3.28 +/- 0.21 liters of water with no carbohydrate (W); 2) 3.39 +/- 0.23 liters of a solution containing 204 +/- 14 g of carbohydrate (W+C); 3) 204 +/- 14 g of carbohydrate in only 0.49 +/- 0.03 liter of solution (C); and 4) 0. 37 +/- 0.02 liter of water with no carbohydrate (placebo; Pl). These treatments were randomized, disguised, and presented double blind. At 26 min of exercise, P(max) was similar in all trials. From 26 to 116 min, P(max) declined 15.2 +/- 3.3 and 14.5 +/- 2.1% during C and Pl, respectively; 10.4 +/- 1.9% during W (W > C, W > Pl; P W, W+C > C, and W+C > Pl; P < 0. 05). As an interesting secondary findings, we also observed that carbohydrate ingestion increased heat production, final core temperature, and whole body sweating rate. We conclude that, during prolonged moderate-intensity exercise in a warm environment, ingestion of W attenuates the decline in P(max). Furthermore, ingestion of W+C attenuates the decline in maximal power more than does W alone, and ingestion of C alone does not attenuate the decline in P(max) compared with Pl.

  20. Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, William G., E-mail: bp1@bu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hindson, David F. [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Langmore, Susan E. [Department of Otolaryngology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Speech and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zumwalt, Ann C. [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions

  1. Factors associated with swallowing assessment after oral endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation for acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Martin B; González-Fernández, Marlís; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Shanholtz, Carl; Palmer, Jeffrey B; Needham, Dale M

    2014-12-01

    Endotracheal intubation is associated with postextubation swallowing dysfunction, but no guidelines exist for postextubation swallowing assessments. We evaluated the prevalence, patient demographic and clinical factors, and intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital organizational factors associated with swallowing assessment after oral endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation in patients with acute lung injury (ALI). We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study in which investigators evaluated 178 eligible patients with ALI who were mechanically ventilated via oral endotracheal tube. The patients were recruited from 13 ICUs at four teaching hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland. Patient demographic and clinical factors, types of ICU, and hospital study sites were evaluated for their association with completion of a swallowing assessment both in the ICU and after the ICU stay before hospital discharge. Factors significantly associated with a swallow assessment were evaluated in a multivariable logistic regression model. Before hospital discharge, 79 (44%) patients completed a swallowing assessment, among whom 59 (75%) had their assessments initiated in ICU and 20 (25%) had their assessments initiated on the hospital ward. Female sex (odds ratio [OR] = 2.01; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.03-3.97), orotracheal intubation duration (OR = 1.13 per day; 95% CI = 1.05-1.22), and hospital study site (Site 3: OR = 2.41; 95% CI = 1.00-5.78) were independently associated with swallowing assessment. Although Site 3 had a twofold increase in swallowing assessments in the ICU, there was no significant difference between hospitals in the frequency of swallowing assessments completed after ICU discharge (P = 0.287) or in the proportion of patients who failed a swallowing assessment conducted in the ICU (P = 0.468) or on the ward (P = 0.746). In this multisite prospective study, female sex, intubation duration, and

  2. Automatic discrimination between safe and unsafe swallowing using a reputation-based classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikjoo Mohammad S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swallowing accelerometry has been suggested as a potential non-invasive tool for bedside dysphagia screening. Various vibratory signal features and complementary measurement modalities have been put forth in the literature for the potential discrimination between safe and unsafe swallowing. To date, automatic classification of swallowing accelerometry has exclusively involved a single-axis of vibration although a second axis is known to contain additional information about the nature of the swallow. Furthermore, the only published attempt at automatic classification in adult patients has been based on a small sample of swallowing vibrations. Methods In this paper, a large corpus of dual-axis accelerometric signals were collected from 30 older adults (aged 65.47 ± 13.4 years, 15 male referred to videofluoroscopic examination on the suspicion of dysphagia. We invoked a reputation-based classifier combination to automatically categorize the dual-axis accelerometric signals into safe and unsafe swallows, as labeled via videofluoroscopic review. From these participants, a total of 224 swallowing samples were obtained, 164 of which were labeled as unsafe swallows (swallows where the bolus entered the airway and 60 as safe swallows. Three separate support vector machine (SVM classifiers and eight different features were selected for classification. Results With selected time, frequency and information theoretic features, the reputation-based algorithm distinguished between safe and unsafe swallowing with promising accuracy (80.48 ± 5.0%, high sensitivity (97.1 ± 2% and modest specificity (64 ± 8.8%. Interpretation of the most discriminatory features revealed that in general, unsafe swallows had lower mean vibration amplitude and faster autocorrelation decay, suggestive of decreased hyoid excursion and compromised coordination, respectively. Further, owing to its performance-based weighting of component classifiers, the static

  3. Natural capsaicinoids improve swallow response in older patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofes, Laia; Arreola, Viridiana; Martin, Alberto; Clavé, Pere

    2013-09-01

    There is no pharmacological treatment for oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD). The aim of this study was to compare the therapeutic effect of stimulation of oropharyngeal transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) with that of thickeners in older patients with OD. A clinical videofluoroscopic non-randomised study was performed to assess the signs of safety and efficacy of swallow and the swallow response in (1) 33 patients with OD (75.94 ± 1.88 years) while swallowing 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquid (20.4 mPa.s), nectar (274.4 mPa.s), and pudding (3930 mPa.s) boluses; (2) 33 patients with OD (73.94 ± 2.23 years) while swallowing 5, 10 and 20 ml nectar boluses, and two series of nectar boluses with 150 μM capsaicinoids and (3) 8 older controls (76.88 ± 1.51 years) while swallowing 5, 10 and 20 ml nectar boluses. Increasing bolus viscosity reduced the prevalence of laryngeal penetrations by 72.03% (p capsaicinoids reduced both, penetrations by 50.% (p capsaicinoids strongly improved safety and efficacy of swallow and shortened the swallow response in older patients with OD. Stimulation of TRPV1 might become a pharmacologic strategy to treat OD.

  4. Effect of oral piperine on the swallow response of patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofes, Laia; Arreola, Viridiana; Martin, Alberto; Clavé, Pere

    2014-12-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a major gastrointestinal motility disorder that causes severe nutritional and respiratory complications in elderly and neurological patients. In an earlier study, we found that stimulation of pharyngeal sensory neurons by capsaicinoids acting on transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) improved the swallow response of dysphagic patients. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of piperine, a dual TRPV1/TRPA1 agonist, on the swallow response of dysphagic patients. A videofluoroscopic study was performed to assess the signs of impaired safety and efficacy of swallow and the swallow response of 40 dysphagic patients while swallowing one series of nectar control boluses and two series of nectar boluses supplemented with piperine. Patients were randomized into two groups: one group received 150 μM piperine and the other group received 1 mM. Piperine improved the safety of swallow by: (a) reducing the prevalence of unsafe swallows by -34.48% (P = 0.004) at 150 μM and -57.19% (P sensory neurons is a very promising neurostimulation strategy for dysphagic patients.

  5. Characterizing Dysphagia and Swallowing Intervention in the Traumatic Spinal Injury Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Teresa J.; Waito, Ashley A.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is reported to be a common secondary complication for individuals with traumatic spinal injuries. Different etiologies of traumatic spinal injuries may lead to different profiles of swallowing impairment. We conducted a systematic review to determine the characteristics of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and to describe interventions currently used to improve swallowing function in this population. A comprehensive multi-engine literature search identified 137 articles of which 5 were judged to be relevant. These underwent review for study quality, rating for level of evidence, and data extraction. The literature describing dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury was comprised predominantly of low level evidence and single case reports. Aspiration, pharyngeal residue, and decreased/absent hyolaryngeal elevation were found to be common characteristics of dysphagia in this population. The most commonly used swallowing interventions included tube feeding, compensatory swallowing strategies, and steroids/antibiotics. Improvement in swallowing function following swallowing intervention was reported in all studies, however there was no control for spontaneous recovery. The results demonstrate a need for high-quality research to profile the pathophysiology of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and controlled studies to demonstrate the efficacy of swallowing interventions in this population. PMID:27412004

  6. Evaluation of Swallow Function in Patients with Craniofacial Microsomia: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Lande, Lara S; Caron, Cornelia J J M; Pluijmers, Britt I; Joosten, Koen F M; Streppel, Marloes; Dunaway, David J; Koudstaal, Maarten J; Padwa, Bonnie L

    2017-11-04

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is characterized by underdevelopment of the structures derived from the first and second pharyngeal arches resulting in aesthetic, psychological, and functional problems including feeding and swallowing difficulties. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into swallowing difficulties in patients with CFM. A retrospective study was conducted in the population of patients diagnosed with CFM at three major craniofacial units. Patients with feeding difficulties and those who underwent video fluoroscopic swallow (VFS) studies were included for further analyses. The outcome of the VFS-studies was reviewed with regard to the four phases of swallowing. In our cohort, 13.5% of the 755 patients were diagnosed with swallowing difficulties. The outcome of the VFS-studies of 42 patients showed difficulties in the oral and pharyngeal phases with both thin and thick liquids. Patients with more severe mandibular hypoplasia showed more difficulties to form an appropriate bolus compared to patients who were less severely affected. This is the first study to document swallowing problems in patients with CFM. Difficulties were seen in both the oral and pharyngeal phases. We recommend routine screening for swallowing issues by a speech and language therapist in all patients with CFM and to obtain a VFS-study in patients with a type III mandible.

  7. Therapeutic singing as an early intervention for swallowing in persons with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemöller, E L; Hibbing, P; Radig, H; Wingate, J

    2017-04-01

    For persons with Parkinson's disease (PD), secondary motor symptoms such as swallow impairment impact the quality of life and are major contributors to mortality. There is a present need for therapeutic interventions aimed at improving swallow function during the early stages of PD. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of a group therapeutic singing intervention on swallowing in persons with PD with no significant dysphagia symptoms. Cohort study. University in the United States. Twenty-four participants with PD. Eight weeks of group therapeutic singing. Electromyography (EMG) was used to assess muscle activity associated with swallow pre and post the group singing intervention. Swallow quality of life (SWAL-QOL) and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) were also obtained pre- and post-intervention. Participants reported minimal difficulty with swallowing, yet results revealed a significant increase in EMG outcome measures, as well as significant improvement in UPDRS total and UPDRS motor scores. No significant differences were revealed for SWAL-QOL. Increases in EMG timing measures may suggest that group singing results in the prolongation of laryngeal elevation, protecting the airway from foreign material for longer periods of time during swallow. Combined with the improvement in UPDRS clinical measures, therapeutic singing may be an engaging early intervention strategy to address oropharyngeal dysphagia while also benefiting additional clinical symptoms of PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of swallowing and its disorders—A dynamic MRI study

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    Vijay Kumar, K.V., E-mail: vijaykumarkv@yahoo.in [Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, SRU (India); Shankar, V., E-mail: drshankarv@yahoo.co.in [Department of Neurology, SRU (India); Santosham, Roy, E-mail: santoshamroy@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, SRU (India)

    2013-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging overcomes the limitations of videofluoroscopy in assessing without radiation exposure. The clinical utility of dynamic MRI for swallowing disorders is not well documented. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using dynamic MRI in assessment of swallowing disorders. Ten normal and three brainstem lesion patients participated in this study. GE Signa HDxt 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner with head-and-neck coil as a receiver and fast imaging employing steady state acquisition sequence was used. The swallow was analyzed in terms of symmetry and amplitude of movements of velum, faucial pillars, tongue, epiglottis and cricopharyngeous and images from the sagittal, coronal and axial planes. In sagittal plane posterior movement of tongue and its compression on velum, elevation of hyoid bone, elevation of larynx and lid action of epiglottis, in the coronal view the symmetrical movements of the faucial pillars and pharyngeal constrictor muscles and in axial plane three anatomical landmarks were targeted based on their role in swallowing, viz. velum, epiglottis and cricopharyngeous were studied. In brainstem lesion individuals, posterior movement of tongue, and elevation of larynx were not seen. Asymmetrical movements of faucial pillars and cricopharyngeous muscle were appreciated in the dynamic MRI. This demonstrates that, dynamic MRI is an efficient tool to understand the swallowing physiology and helps the speech language pathologist in modifying the swallowing maneuvers. Dynamic MRI is an effective tool in assessing swallowing and its disorders. This muscle specific information is not appreciated in videofluoroscopy and this information is necessary to modify the therapy maneuvers.

  9. Influence of the cuff pressure on the swallowing reflex in tracheostomized intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amathieu, R; Sauvat, S; Reynaud, P; Slavov, V; Luis, D; Dinca, A; Tual, L; Bloc, S; Dhonneur, G

    2012-10-01

    Because recovery of an efficient swallowing reflex is a determining factor for the recovery of airway protective reflexes, we have studied the influence of the tracheostomy tube cuff pressure (CP) on the swallowing reflex in tracheotomized patients. Twelve conscious adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients who had been weaned from mechanical ventilation were studied. Simultaneous EMG of the submental muscles with measurement of peak activity (EMGp) and amplitude of laryngeal acceleration (ALA) were performed during reflex swallows elicited by pharyngeal injection of distilled water boluses during end expiration. After cuff deflation, characteristics of the swallowing reflex (latency time: LaT, EMGp, and ALA) were measured at CPs of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 60 cm H(2)O. LaT and CP were linearly related (P<0.01). CP was inversely correlated (P<0.01) to both ALA and EMGp. We demonstrated that LaT, EMGp, and ALA of the swallowing reflex were influenced by tracheostomy tube CP. The swallowing reflex was progressively more difficult to elicit with increasing CP and when activated, the resulting motor swallowing activity and efficiency at elevating the larynx were depressed.

  10. Pre-emptive swallowing stimulation in long-term intubated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chang Ho; Choi, Kyoung Hyo; Ko, Yoon Suk; Leem, Chae Man

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of pre-emptive swallowing stimulation on the recovery of swallowing function in long-term intubated patients. Patients in the intensive care unit intubated for at least 48 hours due to respiratory distress from March to August 2004 were randomly divided into two groups. Fifteen patients of mean age 55.39+/-17.9 years were stimulated (experimental group) and 18 patients of mean age 61.39+/-13.5 years were not stimulated (control group). The duration of intubation was 15.59+/-6.7 days in the experimental group and 15.79+/-6.5 days in the control group. Duration of stimulation in the experimental group was 7.39+/-3.6 days. After extubation, we compared the severity of dysphagia via video-fluoroscopic swallow study. There were no statistically significant differences in the percentage of aspiration and the swallowed volume between the two groups. However, oral transit time in the experimental group (0.379+/-0.07 seconds) was significantly shorter than that of the control group (0.839+/-0.10 seconds), and the oropharyngeal swallowing efficiency of the experimental group (73.39+/-17.4%/s) was significantly higher than that of the control group (50.19+/-13.0%/s). Pre-emptive swallowing stimulation during intubation assists in the recovery of swallowing function in long-term intubated patients.

  11. Effect of carrot puree in vegetable juice on linguapalatal swallowing pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritaka, Hatsue; Mineki, Machiko; Kobayashi, Makoto; Ono, Takahiro; Hori, Kazuhiro

    2017-12-11

    This study aimed to ascertain the influence of various amounts (0-30%) of carrot puree (CP) in vegetable juice on linguapalatal swallowing pressure in healthy volunteers. Twenty healthy women (age range: 20-22 years) swallowed a 17-ml drink in a natural state, and linguapalatal swallowing pressure was measured using a special sensor sheet. Peak magnitude (maximum pressure of the tongue pushing on the hard palate), integrated values of linguapalatal swallowing pressure on the waveform, and duration of linguapalatal swallowing pressure were increased with increases in CP concentrations. The total integrated value for 30% CP vegetable juice was larger than that of vegetable juice with no CP. The apparent viscosity of the vegetable juice with a low CP concentration was smaller than that with a high CP concentration at the same shear rate. These results suggest that vegetable juice containing CP affects mechanoreceptor activity in the mouth and generates a neuromotor response. This study aimed to ascertain the influence of various amounts of carrot puree (CP) in vegetable juice on linguapalatal swallowing pressure measured by using a special sensor sheet in healthy volunteers. Obtained results of this study clearly showed that vegetable juice containing CP affects the movement of the tongue in maneuvering the bolus. Moreover, the results demonstrated that this effect depended on the concentration of CP in the vegetable juice. These findings are expected to provide clinically valuable data on the effect of mechanical stimulation during the oral stage of swallowing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. MRI findings in 6 cases of children by inadvertent ingestion of diphenoxylate-atropine

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    Xiao Lianxiang [Shandong University School of Medicine, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute , No. 44 West Wenhua Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Lin Xiangtao, E-mail: yishui1982@126.com [Shandong University School of Medicine, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, No. 44 West Wenhua Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Cao Jinfeng [Shandong University School of Medicine, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute , No. 44 West Wenhua Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Wang Xueyu [Division of Pediatrics, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, No. 324 Jingwu Road, Jinan 250021 (China); Wu Lebin [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, No. 324 Jingwu Road, Jinan 250021 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Compound diphenoxylate (diphenoxylate-atropine) poisoning can cause toxic encephalopathy in children, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in this condition has not been reported. This study is to analyze brain MRI findings and to investigate the relations between MRI features and possible pathophysiological changes in children. Methods: Six children accidentally swallowed compound diphenoxylate, 4 males, 2 females, aged 20-46 months, average 33 months. Quantity of ingested diphenoxylate-atropine was from 6 to 30 tablets, each tablet contains diphenoxylate 2.5 mg and atropine 0.025 mg. These patients were referred to our hospital within 24 h after diphenoxylate-atropine ingestion, and underwent brain MRI scan within 24-72 h after emergency treatment. The characteristics of conventional MRI were analyzed. Results: These pediatric patients had various symptoms of opioid intoxication and atropine toxicity. Brain MRI showed abnormal low signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and abnormal high signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging in bilateral in all cases; abnormal high signal intensity on T1WI, T2WI and FLAIR in 4 cases. Encephalomalacia was observed in 3 cases during follow-up. Conclusion: In the early stage of compound diphenoxylate poisoning in children, multiple extensive edema-necrosis and hemorrhagic-necrosis focus were observed in basic nucleus, pallium and cerebellum, these resulted in the corresponding brain dysfunction with encephalomalacia. MRI scan in the early stage in this condition may provide evidences of brain impairment, and is beneficial for the early diagnosis, treatment and prognosis assessment.

  13. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation Improves Breathing-Swallowing Interaction of Ventilator Dependent Neuromuscular Patients: A Prospective Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garguilo, Marine; Lejaille, Michèle; Vaugier, Isabelle; Orlikowski, David; Terzi, Nicolas; Lofaso, Frédéric; Prigent, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory involvement in neuromuscular disorders may contribute to impaired breathing-swallowing interactions, swallowing disorders and malnutrition. We investigated whether the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) controlled by the patient could improve swallowing performances in a population of neuromuscular patients requiring daytime NIV. Ten neuromuscular patients with severe respiratory failure requiring extensive NIV use were studied while swallowing without and with NIV (while ventilated with a modified ventilator allowing the patient to withhold ventilation as desired). Breathing-swallowing interactions were investigated by chin electromyography, cervical piezoelectric sensor, nasal flow recording and inductive plethysmography. Two water-bolus sizes (5 and 10ml) and a textured yogurt bolus were tested in a random order. NIV use significantly improved swallowing fragmentation (defined as the number of respiratory interruption of the swallowing of a single bolus) (p = 0.003) and breathing-swallowing synchronization (with a significant increase of swallows followed by an expiration) (p controlled NIV improves swallowing parameters in patients with severe neuromuscular respiratory failure requiring daytime NIV, without impairing swallowing comfort. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01519388.

  14. Evaluation of normal swallowing functions by using dynamic high-density surface electromyography maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingxing; Yu, Bin; Yang, Wanzhang; Jiang, Yanbing; Lu, Lin; Huang, Zhen; Chen, Shixiong; Li, Guanglin

    2017-11-21

    Swallowing is a continuous process with substantive interdependencies among different muscles, and it plays a significant role in our daily life. The aim of this study was to propose a novel technique based on high-density surface electromyography (HD sEMG) for the evaluation of normal swallowing functions. A total of 96 electrodes were placed on the front neck to acquire myoelectric signals from 12 healthy subjects while they were performing different swallowing tasks. HD sEMG energy maps were constructed based on the root mean square values to visualize muscular activities during swallowing. The effects of different volumes, viscosities, and head postures on the normal swallowing process were systemically investigated by using the energy maps. The results showed that the HD sEMG energy maps could provide detailed spatial and temporal properties of the muscle electrical activity, and visualize the muscle contractions that closely related to the swallowing function. The energy maps also showed that the swallowing time and effort was also explicitly affected by the volume and viscosity of the bolus. The concentration of the muscular activities shifted to the opposite side when the subjects turned their head to either side. The proposed method could provide an alternative method to physiologically evaluate the dynamic characteristics of normal swallowing and had the advantage of providing a full picture of how different muscle activities cooperate in time and location. The findings from this study suggested that the HD sEMG technique might be a useful tool for fast screening and objective assessment of swallowing disorders or dysphagia.

  15. Swallowing function after laryngeal cleft repair: more than just fixing the cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Alexander J; de Alarcon, Alessandro; Tabangin, Meredith E; Miller, Claire K; Cotton, Robin T; Rutter, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate and describe the swallowing function in children after laryngeal cleft repair. Ten-year (2002-2012) retrospective chart review. Academic tertiary care pediatric otolaryngology practice. Records of 60 children who had surgical repair of laryngeal cleft (ages 2 weeks-14 years) and postoperative functional endoscopic evaluation of swallowing or videofluoroscopic swallow studies were examined retrospectively. Twenty-nine children had one postoperative swallow evaluation, 19 children had two, 4 children had three, 5 children had four, and 3 children had five. Median time to the first evaluation was 10.8 weeks (interquartile range [IQR]: 36.5, 231). On the final swallow evaluation, 34 (57%) children demonstrated normal swallowing parameters, 12 (20%) children showed penetration, and 14 (23%) children showed aspiration. Forty-three (72%) children were able to take everything by mouth normally or with minor behavioral modifications, 11 (18%) children required thickened fluids, and six (10%) children were kept nil per os (NPO). Mean improvement on the penetration-aspiration (pen-asp) scale was 2.13. On multivariable analysis, neurodevelopmental issues and gastronomy tube use were associated with the need for NPO status. Despite a high rate of surgical success, a substantial minority of children have persistent swallowing dysfunction after laryngeal cleft repair. Swallowing dysfunction after repair is multifactorial and arises from concomitant neurologic, anatomic, or other comorbidities that contribute to oropharyngeal and pharyngeal dysphagia. Based on our results, we recommend a testing schedule for postoperative swallowing evaluations after cleft repair. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. The prevalence of pediatric voice and swallowing problems in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Neil

    2015-03-01

    Determine the prevalence of pediatric voice and swallowing problems in the United States. The 2012 National Health Interview Survey pediatric voice and language module was analyzed, identifying children reporting a voice or swallowing problem in the preceding 12 months. In addition to demographic data, specific data regarding visits to health care professionals for voice or swallowing problems, diagnoses given, and severity of voice or swallowing problem were analyzed. An estimated 839 ± 89 thousand children (1.4% ± 0.1%) reported a voice problem. Overall, 53.5% ± 1.9% were given a diagnosis for the voice problem and 22.8% ± 4.6% received voice services. Laryngitis (16.6% ± 5.5%) and allergies (10.4% ± 4.0%) were the most common diagnoses. A total of 16.4% graded the voice problem as a "big" or "very big" problem. An estimated 569 ± 63 thousand children (0.9% ± 0.1%) reported a swallowing problem. A total of 12.7% ± 3.8% received swallowing services and 13.4% ± 1.6% were given a diagnosis for their swallowing problem. Neurological problems were the most common diagnoses (11.1% ± 4.5%). A total of 17.9% graded the swallowing problem as a "big" or "very big" problem. These data provide the first insight into the prevalence of childhood voice and swallowing problems, which affect approximately 1% of children annually. A relative minority seek care for their problem, despite the disease impact. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. [Clinical characterisation and course following therapeutic intervention for swallowing disorders in hospitalised paediatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Valdebenito, Luis; Núñez-Farias, Alicia C; Milagros, Angeli; Escobar-Henríquez, Raúl G

    Swallowing disorders are common in hospitalised patients and are an added difficulty when it comes to discharging them from hospital. Suitable characterisation performed by means of assessments conducted by a neurologist and a speech and language therapist allows for more accurate therapeutic decision-making. To describe swallowing disorders from the speech and language therapy evaluation performed on admission until discharge in paediatric patients and their relation with the therapeutic intervention that was implemented. We performed a retrospective analysis consisting in the examination of the medical records of 38 paediatric patients hospitalised between May 2007 and June 2008. Functional clinical evaluation was carried out in 100% of patients, and a video swallow study was conducted in 34%. Swallowing disorders were characterised as mild, moderate and severe, according to the stage that was altered and aspiratory risk to the airway. A speech therapist provided therapeutic intervention, and parents and caregivers were given special training. Swallowing disorders were chiefly associated to prematurity. The most frequently used therapeutic techniques were: tactile stimulation, providing patterns and training of parents. In the speech and language therapy evaluation performed on admission, 37% of disorders were severe, 21% were moderate and 42% were mild disorders. In most of the newborn infants, progress was favourable, as shown by a shift to normal swallowing in 48% and to mild in 8%. In the 17 preterm newborn infants, there was a change to normal swallowing in 65% and to mild in 12%. Swallowing disorders in this group of patients is mainly associated to prematurity. Systematic therapeutic intervention would help in the recovery from swallowing disorders, especially in preterm newborn infants.

  18. Implication of the vagus nerve in breathing pattern during sequential swallowing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouahchi, Yacine; Duclos, Celia; Marie, Jean Paul; Verin, Eric

    2017-10-01

    The ventilatory pattern during sequential swallowing is influenced by the vagal activity. As the vagus nerve is paired and mixed, we aimed (1) to determine if vagal implication in swallowing and breathing coordination is symmetric. (2) to study the importance of vagal afferences in swallowing and breathing coordination. Sixty two Wistar rats (7-11weeks, 260-400g) were studied by barometric plethysmography. In the first part of the study, we determined the effects of a right cervical vagotomy and the effects of a left cervical vagotomy on ventilatory pattern at rest and during sequential swallowing (14 rats with right vagotomy, 14 rats with left vagotomy and 14 rats with sham surgery). Comparisons of ventilatory variables were made between right and left vagotomized animals. Thereafter, we determined the effects of electrical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) on ventilatory pattern at rest and during sequential swallowing (10 rats with electrical VNS and 10 rats with sham VNS). We showed that a right or a left cervical vagotomy does not alter ventilation at rest, but induces during sequential swallowing a decrease in respiratory rate (RR) (p0.05). Electrical VNS had no effect on ventilation at rest, but it minimized during sequential swallowing a decrease in RR related to a local alteration of the vagus nerve after placement of the electrodes as shown following sham VNS. In conclusion, the implication of vagus nerve in breathing pattern during sequential swallowing seems symmetric and influenced by activation of the vagal afferent pathway. These data can be useful when testing electrical VNS in swallowing disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Combined effect of coffee ingestion and repeated bouts of low-intensity exercise on fat oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurobe, Kazumichi; Nakao, Saori; Nishiwaki, Masato; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the effect of the combination of coffee ingestion and repeated bouts of low-intensity exercise on fat oxidation. Subjects were seven young, healthy male adults. They performed four trials: a single 30-min bout of exercise following ingestion of plain hot water (WS) or coffee (CS); a trial with three 10-min bouts of exercise separated by 10-min periods of rest following ingestion of plain hot water (WR) or coffee (CR). The coffee contained 5 mg kg-1 of caffeine. All trials were performed on a cycle ergometer at 40% maximal oxygen uptake for each subject an hour after beverage ingestion. Oxygen uptake in the CS and CR trials was higher compared with the WS and WR trials at 90 min after exercise (Pcoffee intake and repeated bouts of low-intensity exercise enhances fat oxidation in the period after exercise. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Hemorrhagic shock secondary to button battery ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Andreia Takesaki

    Full Text Available CONTEXT:Button battery ingestion is a frequent pediatric complaint. The serious complications resulting from accidental ingestion have increased significantly over the last two decades due to easy access to gadgets and electronic toys. Over recent years, the increasing use of lithium batteries of diameter 20 mm has brought new challenges, because these are more detrimental to the mucosa, compared with other types, with high morbidity and mortality. The clinical complaints, which are often nonspecific, may lead to delayed diagnosis, thereby increasing the risk of severe complications.CASE REPORT:A five-year-old boy who had been complaining of abdominal pain for ten days, was brought to the emergency service with a clinical condition of hematemesis that started two hours earlier. On admission, he presented pallor, tachycardia and hypotension. A plain abdominal x-ray produced an image suggestive of a button battery. Digestive endoscopy showed a deep ulcerated lesion in the esophagus without active bleeding. After this procedure, the patient presented profuse hematemesis and severe hypotension, followed by cardiorespiratory arrest, which was reversed. He then underwent emergency exploratory laparotomy and presented a new episode of cardiorespiratory arrest, which he did not survive. The battery was removed through rectal exploration.CONCLUSION:This case describes a fatal evolution of button battery ingestion with late diagnosis and severe associated injury of the digestive mucosa. A high level of clinical suspicion is essential for preventing this evolution. Preventive strategies are required, as well as health education, with warnings to parents, caregivers and healthcare professionals.

  1. Caffeine ingestion and fluid balance: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, R J; Griffin, J

    2003-12-01

    Caffeine and related methylxanthine compounds are recognized as having a diuretic action, and consumers are often advised to avoid beverages containing these compounds in situations where fluid balance may be compromised. The aim of this review is to evaluate the available literature concerning the effect of caffeine ingestion on fluid balance and to formulate targeted and evidence-based advice on caffeinated beverages in the context of optimum hydration. A literature search was performed using the Medline database of articles published in the medical and scientific literature for the period of January 1966-March 2002. Subject headings and key words used in this search were: tea, coffee, caffeine, diuresis, fluid balance and water-electrolyte balance. A secondary search was performed using the bibliographies of publications identified in the initial search. The available literature suggests that acute ingestion of caffeine in large doses (at least 250-300 mg, equivalent to the amount found in 2-3 cups of coffee or 5-8 cups of tea) results in a short-term stimulation of urine output in individuals who have been deprived of caffeine for a period of days or weeks. A profound tolerance to the diuretic and other effects of caffeine develops, however, and the actions are much diminished in individuals who regularly consume tea or coffee. Doses of caffeine equivalent to the amount normally found in standard servings of tea, coffee and carbonated soft drinks appear to have no diuretic action. The most ecologically valid of the published studies offers no support for the suggestion that consumption of caffeine-containing beverages as part of a normal lifestyle leads to fluid loss in excess of the volume ingested or is associated with poor hydration status. Therefore, there would appear to be no clear basis for refraining from caffeine containing drinks in situations where fluid balance might be compromised.

  2. Moderate Ethanol Ingestion and Cardiovascular Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenz, Maike; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    While ethanol intake at high levels (3-4 or more drinks), either in acute (occasional binge drinking) or chronic (daily) settings, increases the risk for myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke, an inverse relationship between regular consumption of alcoholic beverages at light to moderate levels (1-2 drinks per day) and cardiovascular risk has been consistently noted in a large number of epidemiologic studies. Although initially attributed to polyphenolic antioxidants in red wine, subsequent work has established that the ethanol component contributes to the beneficial effects associated with moderate intake of alcoholic beverages regardless of type (red versus white wine, beer, spirits). Concerns have been raised with regard to interpretation of epidemiologic evidence for this association including heterogeneity of the reference groups examined in many studies, different lifestyles of moderate drinkers versus abstainers, and favorable risk profiles in moderate drinkers. However, better controlled epidemiologic studies and especially work conducted in animal models and cell culture systems have substantiated this association and clearly established a cause and effect relationship between alcohol consumption and reductions in tissue injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), respectively. The aims of this review are to summarize the epidemiologic evidence supporting the effectiveness of ethanol ingestion in reducing the likelihood of adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke, even in patients with co-existing risk factors, to discuss the ideal quantities, drinking patterns, and types of alcoholic beverages that confer protective effects in the cardiovascular system, and to review the findings of recent experimental studies directed at uncovering the mechanisms that underlie the cardiovascular protective effects of antecedent ethanol ingestion. Mechanistic interrogation of the signaling pathways invoked by antecedent ethanol

  3. Enhanced ghrelin secretion in the cephalic phase of food ingestion in women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Serritella, Cristina; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Maj, Mario

    2010-02-01

    In humans, the cephalic phase response to food ingestion consists mostly of vagal efferent activation, which promotes the secretion of entero-pancreatic hormones, including ghrelin. Since symptomatic patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) are characterized by increased vagal tone, we hypothesized an enhanced ghrelin secretion in the cephalic phase of vagal stimulation. Therefore, we investigated ghrelin response to modified sham feeding (MSF) in both BN and healthy women. Six drug-free BN women and 7 age-matched healthy females underwent MSF with initially seeing and smelling a meal, and then chewing the food without swallowing it. Blood samples were drawn immediately before and after MSF for hormone assay. Circulating ghrelin increased after MSF in both groups with BN individuals exhibiting a greater ghrelin increase, which positively correlated with the patients' weekly frequency of binge-purging. These results show for the first time an increased ghrelin secretion in the cephalic phase of vagal stimulation in symptomatic BN patients, likely resulting in a potentiation of the peripheral hunger signal, which might contribute to their aberrant binge-purging behavior. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rotifers ingest oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayer, R.; Trout, J.M.; Walsh, E.; Cole, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Six genera of rotifers including Philodina, Monostyla, Epiphanes, Euchlanis, Brachionus, and Asplanchna were exposed to oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum cleaned of fecal debris. Unstained oocysts and those stained with fluorescein-conjugated monoclonal antibody were added to suspensions of viable rotifers and were examined by phase-contrast, differential interference contrast, and fluorescence microscopy. Rotifers of all six genera were observed ingesting oocysts. A maximum of 25 oocysts was observed in the stomachs of Euchlanis and Brachionus. Euchlanis and Epiphanes were observed excreting boluses containing up to eight oocysts. It was not determined whether rotifers digested or otherwise rendered oocysts nonviable.

  5. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing in swallowing disorders – fees-. Case report at Popayán, Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Molina-García

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is a frequently pathological condition in pa­tients with stroke and carries a substantial risk of dehy­dration, malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. So far there are two methods for diagnosis; Videofluoroscopy (VFC and Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swa­llowing (FEES. The first is considered the gold standard method, with a high cost, radiation exposure that requires the transfer of the patient to radiology, the patient’s abili­ty to follow simple commands and time required to com­plete. VFC does not replicate physiological conditions in which the patient is routinely, so it is considered that its representation is limited, the second test is an alternative procedure to be more economical, safe, well tolerated, wi­dely available, lasting approximately 20 minutes and with the possibility of doing it in the patient’s bed. Unlike FVC, to evaluate the presence of pharyngeal, this correlates with the risk of aspiration. Clinical report: The objective of this report is to present a male patient, 33 years old, who admitted to a health institution because it presents a clini­ cal picture compatible with stroke, as findings found right hemiplegia and swallowing disorder, as required gastros­tomy tubes. We performed Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evalua­tion of Swallowing (FEES as a diagnostic method, which allowed visualization of the anatomic and functional en­vironment, the type of food consistency could be secure in their feeding process, thus avoiding silent aspirations and insights that could lead an aspiration pneumonia. It also allowed the group to make recommendations for nutritio­nal support, physiotherapy and speech therapy for ambu­latory management of the patient.

  6. Applied physiology of cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, I E

    1984-01-01

    Historically, the bicycle has evolved through the stages of a machine for efficient human transportation, a toy for children, a finely-tuned racing machine, and a tool for physical fitness development, maintenance and testing. Recently, major strides have been made in the aerodynamic design of the bicycle. These innovations have resulted in new land speed records for human powered machines. Performance in cycling is affected by a variety of factors, including aerobic and anaerobic capacity, muscular strength and endurance, and body composition. Bicycle races range from a 200m sprint to approximately 5000km. This vast range of competitive racing requires special attention to the principle of specificity of training. The physiological demands of cycling have been examined through the use of bicycle ergometers, rollers, cycling trainers, treadmill cycling, high speed photography, computer graphics, strain gauges, electromyography, wind tunnels, muscle biopsy, and body composition analysis. These techniques have been useful in providing definitive data for the development of a work/performance profile of the cyclist. Research evidence strongly suggests that when measuring the cyclist's aerobic or anaerobic capacity, a cycling protocol employing a high pedalling rpm should be used. The research bicycle should be modified to resemble a racing bicycle and the cyclist should wear cycling shoes. Prolonged cycling requires special nutritional considerations. Ingestion of carbohydrates, in solid form and carefully timed, influences performance. Caffeine appears to enhance lipid metabolism. Injuries, particularly knee problems which are prevalent among cyclists, may be avoided through the use of proper gearing and orthotics. Air pollution has been shown to impair physical performance. When pollution levels are high, training should be altered or curtailed. Effective training programmes simulate competitive conditions. Short and long interval training, blended with long

  7. Calibration of an ingestible temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A P; Stewart, I B

    2008-11-01

    An ingestible telemetric sensor for measuring core body temperature is increasingly being utilized in occupational and athletic studies of heat strain. There is a need for a uniform method of calibrating these sensors in the scientific community in order to effectively compare the results of different researchers. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine and present such a calibration procedure. Sensors were placed in a water bath heated to nine discrete temperatures, and the recorded values were compared to that of a traceable thermometer. It was observed that sensor 2 recorded temperatures higher than sensors 1 and 3, and that all sensors were higher than the traceable thermometer, highlighting the need for a calibration procedure. The findings of this study suggest a number of recommendations for a calibration procedure including: (1) four water bath temperatures in the range of 33-41 degrees C should be utilized; (2) sensors should be immersed for a minimum of 4 min prior to taking a measurement; (3) a linear regression relating sensor temperature to a traceable thermometer is an appropriate method to adjust raw data. Switching the sensor off after calibration and reactivating it prior to ingestion will not influence the accuracy of temperature measurement.

  8. Swallowing abnormalities in multiple sclerosis: correlation between videofluoroscopy and subjective symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, W.; Steinbrich, W. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Basel (Switzerland); Wetzel, S.G.; Radue, E.W. [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Basel (Switzerland); Kappos, L.; Hoshi, M.M. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Basel (Switzerland); Witte, U. [Section of Logopedia, University Hospital of Basel (Switzerland)

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if subjective symptoms indicating an impaired deglutition correlate with videofluoroscopic findings in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Videofluoroscopic examinations of 18 MS patients were analyzed by a radiologist and a logopedist and compared with the symptoms of these patients. Four patients complained about permanent dysphagia. Six patients reported mild and intermittent difficulties in swallowing, but were asymptomatic at the time of videofluoroscopy. Eight patients had no symptoms regarding their deglutition. All patients (n=4) who complained of permanent dysphagia showed aspiration. All patients (n=6) with mild and intermittent difficulties in swallowing showed undercoating of the epiglottis and/or laryngeal penetration. Of those 8 patients without any swallowing symptoms, only 2 had a normal videofluoroscopy. Swallowing abnormalities seem to be much more frequent in patients with MS than generally believed and they may easily be missed clinically as long as the patients do not aspirate. (orig.)

  9. SWALLOWING DISORDERS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY, ASSESSMENT AND REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STANESCU Ioana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Swallowing is a complex process consisting in transporting food from mouth to the stomach; it involves voluntary and reflex activity of more than 30 nerves and muscles, requiring complex neuromuscular coordination and brainstem and cortical centers for controle. Dysphagia is defined as a alteration in the swallowing process, which cause difficulty in transporting saliva and aliments from the mouth trough the pharynx and esophagus into the stomach . It is a frequent symptom, affecting especially old people, people with neurological diseases, cancers of head and neck or severe reflux . Dysphagia can result from a wide variety of functional or structural deficits of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx or esophagus, which could e caused by neurological conditions. Dysphagia carries serious health risks: malnutrition, dehydration, increase risk of infections. Effective dysphagia management requires an interdisciplinary approach; the goal of rehabilitation is to identify and treat abnormalities of swallowing while maintaining safe and efficient nutrition. KEY WORDS: swallowing, dysphagia, functional anatomy, rehabilitation, neuroplasticity

  10. Time-Frequency Analysis and Hermite Projection Method Applied to Swallowing Accelerometry Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin Sejdić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast Hermite projections have been often used in image-processing procedures such as image database retrieval, projection filtering, and texture analysis. In this paper, we propose an innovative approach for the analysis of one-dimensional biomedical signals that combines the Hermite projection method with time-frequency analysis. In particular, we propose a two-step approach to characterize vibrations of various origins in swallowing accelerometry signals. First, by using time-frequency analysis we obtain the energy distribution of signal frequency content in time. Second, by using fast Hermite projections we characterize whether the analyzed time-frequency regions are associated with swallowing or other phenomena (vocalization, noise, bursts, etc.. The numerical analysis of the proposed scheme clearly shows that by using a few Hermite functions, vibrations of various origins are distinguishable. These results will be the basis for further analysis of swallowing accelerometry to detect swallowing difficulties.

  11. Randomized trial of two swallowing assessment approaches in patients with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard, Annette; Nielsen, Lars Hedemann; Sjölund, Bengt H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether patients assessed for initiation of oral intake only by Facial-Oral Tract Therapy had a greater risk of developing aspiration pneumonia during neurorehabilitation than patients assessed by Fibreoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing. DESIGN: Randomized controlled ...

  12. Contribution of the lateral lemniscus to the control of swallowing in decerebrate cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, R; Takakusaki, K; Katada, A; Harada, H; Nonaka, S; Harabuchi, Y

    2013-12-19

    Lateral lemniscus, a relay nucleus of auditory sensation, is involved in the control of phonatory movements such as human speech and vocalization of animals. The present study was designed to test whether neurons in the lateral lemniscus contributed to the control of swallowing, one of non-phonic oro-pharyngolaryngeal movements. In acutely decerebrated cats (n=15), swallowing was induced by electrical stimulation (20-80μA at 10Hz for 20s with rectangular pulses of 0.2ms duration) delivered to the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN). Repetitive electrical stimulation (30-50μA at 50Hz for 10-20s) applied to the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (LLD) increased the number and reduced the latency to the onset of the SLN-induced swallowing. On the other hand, stimulation of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus and the paralemniscal area, corresponding to the ventrolateral part of the parabrachial nucleus and the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus, often suppressed the SLN-induced swallowing. Microinjection of NMDA (0.1-0.15μl, 5.0-10mM) into the LLD through a stereotaxically placed glass micropipette facilitated the SLN-induced swallowing, i.e., the number was increased and the latency of swallowing was reduced. We also injected muscimol (a gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA)A receptor agonist), bicuculline (a GABAA receptor antagonist) and baclofen (a GABAB receptor agonist) into the LLD (0.1-0.15μl and 5.0mM for each substance). It was observed that an injection of muscimol suppressed the SLN-induced swallowing. However, an injection of bicuculline facilitated the swallowing. An injection of baclofen did not alter the swallowing. These results suggest the presence of functional topography in the lateral lemniscus and the paralemniscal area in relation to the control of swallowing. The facilitatory LLD-effects on swallowing are modulated by glutamatergic and GABAergic receptors on neurons in the LLD. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Accumulation of PCB congeners in nestling tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) on the Hudson River, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echols, Kathy R.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Nichols, John W.; Secord, Anne L.; McCarty, John P.

    2004-01-01

    Tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) were used as a sentinel species to monitor the contamination and bioavailability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Hudson River watershed. Several tree swallow nest box colonies around and downstream from Hudson Falls, NY, were studied. Tree swallow eggs, adults, and 5-, 10-, and 15-day-old nestlings were collected and analyzed for 103 PCB congeners. Emergent insects collected by net (primarily Odonata) or as a food bolus (primarily Diptera) taken from the mouths of adult tree swallows returning to the nest were analyzed in the same manner. Total PCB concentrations (wet weight) in eggs from two contaminated sites ranged from 9000 to 25 000 ng/g and accumulated to 32 000 and 96 000 ng/g in 15-day-old nestling at two contaminated sites. The congener patterns of PCBs in eggs, nestlings, and adults were compared to those found in emergent insects (Odonata and Diptera) using principal components analysis. The PCB patterns of the biota differed from that of Aroclor technical mixtures. PCB patterns in adult tree swallows were similar to those in eggs, while the patterns in dietary insects were similar to nestling tree swallows. Uptake rate constants were determined for tree swallow nestlings and compared between the two contaminated sites. The estimated PCB congener uptake rate constants were 0.008-0.02 d-1 based on uptake in nestlings until day 15 post-hatch. The rate constants were comparable between the two study areas and may be used to predict nestling contamination at other locations. Our studies confirm the utility of nestling tree swallows to evaluate localized PCB contamination.

  14. Deleterious sucking habits and atypical swallowing in children with otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralli, Giovanni; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; Mora, Renzo; Guastini, Luca

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible correlation between otitis media with effusion, bad sucking habits and atypical swallowing in children affected by otitis media with effusion. 65 children, aged from 7 to 12 years, observed in the ENT Department of the "La Sapienza" University of Rome, were enrolled in the study group (group A). All children were affected by otitis media with effusion for more than 3 months. As control group, 60 healthy children, aged from 7 to 12 years were identified (group B). All the children underwent medical history, with evaluation of the sucking habits, ENT examination, tympanometry, orthodontic examination and evaluation of swallowing. In the orthodontic examination the variables analyzed were: maximum mouth opening, right and left mandibular lateral movements and mandibular protrusion. Atypical swallowing was considered to occur when lip activity produced strong tension in the perioral musculature, and/or the tip of the tongue was placed or pushed against the anterior teeth during swallowing. In the group A, atypical swallowing was found in 33/65 subjects out of the 65 children (50.7%). In the control group (group B) 16/60 children (26.6%) showed atypical swallowing. Compared with group B, deleterious sucking habits were significantly higher (phabits were present in almost all children with atypical swallowing (28/33 in group A and 12/16 in group B). Our data suggest a correlation between otitis media with effusion, deleterious sucking habits and prevalence of atypical swallowing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of aging on oral and swallowing function after meal consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiramatsu T

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetsuya Hiramatsu,1,2 Hideyuki Kataoka,3 Mari Osaki,4 Hiroshi Hagino3,4 1Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Matsue Co-medical College, Matsue, Japan; 2Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Tottori University, 3School of Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 4Rehabilitation Division, Tottori University Hospital, Yonago, Japan Background/purpose: Dysphagia may worsen due to fatigue of the infrahyoid and suprahyoid muscle groups as a result of repetitive swallowing during a meal. We investigated the hypothesis that meal consumption may reduce tongue strength and endurance in older adults (OAs.Methods: Tongue–palate pressure, oral diadochokinesis, repetitive saliva swallowing, and surface electromyography activity before and after a meal were measured in 23 young adults (YAs and 23 OA volunteers.Results: There was a statistically significant difference in both tongue pressure and the number of voluntary swallows between YAs and OAs. Peak tongue pressure was significantly lower in OAs than YAs both before and after meal consumption. The most notable finding was that the first time interval (the time from test initiation to the beginning of the first swallow was prolonged after meal consumption only in OAs, whereas the first time interval showed no difference between YAs and OAs before meal consumption with reference to the repetitive saliva swallowing test. The initiation of swallowing was prolonged by both meal consumption and aging; there was a significant interaction between these two factors. The number of repetitions of the monosyllable/pa/was statistically similar between YAs and OAs before meal consumption, but it was significantly lower in OAs after meal consumption.Conclusion: Aging leads to declining tongue pressure and motor function of the lips. It is possible that swallowing function declines in older individuals when meal consumption is prolonged, especially at the end of mealtime, as a result of their

  16. Swallowing dysfunction among patients with laryngeal cleft: More than just aspiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strychowsky, Julie E; Dodrill, Pamela; Moritz, Ethan; Perez, Jennifer; Rahbar, Reza

    2016-03-01

    The Modified Barium Swallow (MBS) is the most widely utilized instrumental assessment of swallowing disorders in children; however, the exact role in the evaluation of laryngeal clefts remains controversial. This study was an IRB-approved retrospective review on patients diagnosed with laryngeal cleft from 2002 to 2014. The objective was to describe the range of swallowing dysfunction that may be present in patients with laryngeal clefts both pre- and post-intervention (conservative management versus surgery). A speech-language pathologist reviewed MBS studies and medical records to determine Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS) and Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) scores. One hundred seventy-five patients who underwent laryngeal cleft repair during the study period (type 1, n=111; type 2, n=54; type 3, n=9; type 4, n=1) were included. Fifty patients who were managed conservatively (type 1) were also included. Swallowing impairment was demonstrated in all phases of swallowing for all cleft types. Oral phase impairment ranged from 27-67% pre-intervention to 19-75% post-intervention, triggering impairment from 24-42% pre-intervention to 24-75% post-intervention, and pharyngeal phase impairment (laryngeal penetration and aspiration) from 57-100% pre-intervention to 40-100% post-intervention. Laryngeal penetration and aspiration on thin and thick liquids, silent aspiration, PAS, and FOIS scores are reported. Significant improvements in swallowing function (p<0.05) were documented in all of the conservatively and surgically managed sub-groups. The MBS study is a useful tool for evaluating swallowing function in patients with laryngeal cleft and provides information beyond the lack or presence of aspiration. Understanding impairments in all phases of swallowing may be beneficial for perioperative management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Age-related Differences in Tongue-Palate Pressures for Strength and Swallowing Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Fei, Tiffany; Polacco, Rebecca Cliffe; Hori, Sarah E.; Molfenter, Sonja M.; Peladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Tsang, Clemence; Steele, Catriona M.

    2013-01-01

    The tongue plays a key role in the generation of pressures for transporting liquids and foods through the mouth in swallowing. Recent studies suggest that there is an age-related decline in tongue strength in healthy adults. However, whether age-related changes occur in tongue pressures generated for the purpose of swallowing remains unclear. Prior literature in this regard does not clearly explore the influence of task on apparent age-related differences in tongue pressure amplitudes. Furthe...

  18. Favorable Swallowing Outcomes following Vagus Nerve Sacrifice for Vagal Schwannoma Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mira A; Eytan, Danielle F; Bishop, Justin; Califano, Joseph A

    2017-02-01

    Objective To determine the impact of unilateral vagal sacrifice for vagal schwannoma on postoperative swallowing function. Study Design Case series, chart review. Setting Academic medical institution. Subjects and Methods Ten patients underwent vagus nerve sacrifice for vagal schwannoma resection. Archived pathology records dating from 1985 through 2012 at our institution were retrospectively queried for cases of vagal schwannoma with vagus nerve sacrifice. Medical records were abstracted for demographic and disease information as well as cranial nerve and swallowing function. Preoperative and postoperative cranial nerve function, subjective and objective measures of swallowing function, Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) level, and need for vocal fold medialization were variables collected. Data were analyzed with summary statistics. Results The patients who underwent vagal sacrifice for vagal schwannoma at our institution had a mean age of 42.3 years (median, 44 years; range, 15-63 years) and follow-up of 35.6 months (median, 9 months; range, 1-115 months). Most presented with no preoperative cranial nerve deficit or difficulty swallowing. Immediately postoperatively, 90% had a vagus nerve deficit, but 50% had no subjective difficulty swallowing, and 70% had a FOIS level of 7 at postoperative hospital discharge. Within 1 month after surgery, 70% had normal swallowing function according to a modified barium swallow study. A full diet was tolerated by mouth within an average of 2.7 days (median, 2 days; range, 1-6 days) after surgery in this cohort. Seventy percent required vocal fold medialization postoperatively for incomplete glottic closure. Conclusion Vagal nerve sacrifice during resection of vagal schwannoma can be performed with normal postoperative swallowing function.

  19. An unusual presentation of hydrochloric acid ingestion: a mystery unraveled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Vinod Prabhu; Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Chinnakkannan, Selvakumar; Panda, Shasanka Shekhar

    2015-03-01

    Unintentional acid ingestion is less commonly encountered than alkali ingestion. The injury develops for hours to days after ingestion and often results in progressively increasing difficulty in airway management. However, gastric perforation is rare. A 3-year-old boy presented to us with an orotonsillopharyngeal membrane and severe upper airway obstruction. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with a case of gastric perforation due to unintentional hydrochloric acid ingestion. He was treated with partial gastrectomy and feeding jejunostomy, and the recovery was good. Unintentional hydrochloric acid ingestion is rare in children. The manifestations masquerade many other clinical conditions, and the diagnosis is difficult in cases in which history of ingestion is not available. Treatment is symptomatic, and emergency surgery is indicated in case of gastrointestinal perforation.

  20. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes of tree swallows influenced by oil sands aquatic reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farwell, A.; Dixon, D. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada); Harms, J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Smits, J. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation reported on a study in which tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) were studied to evaluate reclamation strategies used by oil sand operators in Alberta. Wetland reclamation involves the transformation of tailings water and solids into functioning aquatic ecosystems. Naphthenic acids (NAs) and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in tailing/reclamation material are toxic constituents that pose concern for growth rate, reproductive function and immune function in tree swallows. Exposure to xenobiotics from these tailings-based sites was determined by increased detoxification enzyme (EROD) activity. The dietary exposure of tree swallows to oil sands constituents was determined through stable isotope analysis. Previous studies revealed trends of 13C depletion and 15N enrichment in benthic invertebrates from reclaimed wetlands on the oil sands. Since most food consumed by tree swallow nestlings is aquatic, the isotope signatures in tree swallows should provide evidence of exposure to oil sands constituents. Tree swallow feather and muscle tissues were examined in this study to determine if stable isotopes could be used to identify dietary contributions from oil sands reclamation sites versus reference sites containing no tailings materials.

  1. Cine MRI of swallowing in patients with advanced oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreeft, Anne Marijn; Rasch, Coen R N; Muller, Sara H; Pameijer, Frank A; Hallo, Eeke; Balm, Alfons J M

    2012-06-01

    Treatment of oral and oropharyngeal cancer may cause dysphagia. Purpose is to examine whether cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields additional information compared to standard examination in the evaluation of posttreatment dysphagia and mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures. Thirty-four cine MRIs were made in 23 patients with advanced oral and oropharyngeal cancer, consisting of an MR image every 800 ms during swallowing which is compared to videofluoroscopy and quality of life questionnaires. A scoring system was applied to assess mobility on cine MR and videofluoroscopy leading to a score ranging from 9 to 17. Cine MRI of the swallowing in a midsagittal plane visualized the tumor (if located in the same plane), important anatomic structures and surgical reconstructions. Posttreatment mobility on cine MRI and videofluoroscopy was significantly diminished compared to pretreatment, mean pretreatment cine MRI score was 10.8 and posttreatment 12.4 (p = 0.017). Impaired mobility on cine MRI was significantly correlated to more swallowing problems (Spearman's correlation coefficient 0.73, p = 0.04), on videofluoroscopy not. Cine MRI is a promising new technique as an adjunct to standard examinations for evaluation of swallowing in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Cine MRI directly visualizes the dynamics of swallowing and allows evaluation of pre- and posttreatment differences. Abnormal findings are significantly correlated with subjective swallowing complaints of patients.

  2. Intensive swallowing and orofacial contracture rehabilitation after severe burn: A pilot study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Nicola A; Ward, Elizabeth C; Maitz, Peter K

    2017-02-01

    Dysphagia following severe burns can be significant and protracted, yet there is little evidence describing the rehabilitation principles, process or outcomes. Outline current evidence and detail the clinical outcomes of two cases who underwent a multifaceted intensive treatment programme aimed at rehabilitating dysphagia by strengthening swallow function and minimising orofacial contractures after severe head and neck burns. Two men (54 and 18 years) with full-thickness head and neck burns and inhalation injury underwent intensive orofacial scar management and dysphagia rehabilitation. Therapy was prescribed, consisting of scar stretching, splinting and pharyngeal swallow tasks. Horizontal and vertical range of movement (HROM; VROM), physiological swallow features, functional swallowing outcomes and related distress, were collected at baseline and routinely until dysphagia resolution and scar stabilisation. At presentation, both cases demonstrated severely reduced HROM and VROM, profound dysphagia and moderate dysphagia related distress. Therapy adherence was high. Resolution of dysphagia to full oral diet, nil physiological swallowing impairment, and nil dysphagia related distress was achieved by 222 and 77 days post injury respectively. VROM and HROM achieved normal range by 237 and 204 days. Active rehabilitation achieved full functional outcomes for swallowing and orofacial range of movement. A protracted duration of therapy can be anticipated in this complex population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a Portable Non-Invasive Swallowing and Respiration Assessment Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Yun Shieh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is a condition that happens when a person cannot smoothly swallow food from the mouth to the stomach. It causes malnourishment in patients, or can even cause death due to aspiration pneumonia. Recently, more and more researchers have focused their attention on the importance of swallowing and respiration coordination, and the use of non-invasive assessment systems has become a hot research trend. In this study, we aimed to integrate the timing and pattern monitoring of respiration and swallowing by using a portable and non-invasive approach which can be applied at the bedside in hospitals or institutions, or in a home environment. In this approach, we use a force sensing resistor (FSR to detect the motions of the thyroid cartilage in the pharyngeal phase. We also use the surface electromyography (sEMG to detect the contraction of the submental muscle in the oral phase, and a nasal cannula to detect nasal airflow for respiration monitoring during the swallowing process. All signals are received and processed for swallowing event recognition. A total of 19 volunteers participated in the testing and over 57 measurements were made. The results show that the proposed approach can effectively distinguish the swallowing function in people of different ages and genders.

  4. Swallowing outcomes following surgical and non-surgical treatment for advanced laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnip, E; Owen, S J; Barker, S; Patterson, J M

    2013-11-01

    Treatment for advanced laryngeal cancer includes surgery, and/or chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy. Each of these treatments results in major changes to the swallowing mechanism. Dysphagia is strongly correlated with poorer quality of life. A good understanding of outcomes is needed for well-informed treatment decisions. This study reports on patients' swallowing outcomes following surgical and non-surgical treatments based on the results of three different swallowing tests. A total of 123 data sets were collected in out-patient clinics across two hospitals in North East England. There were no significant differences between treatment groups for patient-reported swallowing outcomes or swallowing performance. However, patients who had undergone chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy (with or without laryngectomy) had significantly more diet restrictions than other groups. Long-term dysphagia is a common outcome of treatment for advanced laryngeal cancer. Patients treated with chemoradiotherapy and laryngectomy reported the worst overall outcomes. More longitudinal prospective research with large treatment groups is needed to investigate swallowing outcomes following different treatment methods.

  5. Swallowing function outcomes following nonsurgical therapy for advanced-stage laryngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, James Paul; Hill, Samuel L; Stachler, Robert J; Meleca, Robert J; Kewson, Danny

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (1) evaluate swallowing function using both subjective and objective measures in patients treated nonsurgically for stages III and IV laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, (2) assess the effect of time from treatment completion on swallowing function, and (3) assess sequelae associated with modality of treatment. To achieve these objectives, a retrospective study of 14 patients was conducted. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) was performed and evaluated by three independent judges for seven functional criteria: standing secretions, valleculae spillage, valleculae residue, postcricoid residue, laryngeal penetration, aspiration, and cough. Patient interviews were performed to establish patient perception of swallowing and his/her current posttreatment diet. Results revealed that each patient exhibited swallowing abnormalities in at least one of the seven objective functional categories studied. Ten patients suffered from variable degrees of dysphagia, ranging from mild to severe, on all measures. No significant differences were noted between those patients with less than or greater than 12 months posttreatment. Common treatment sequelae included PEG tube placement for nutritional supplementation, tracheostomy placement for airway security and/or pulmonary toilet, repeated episodes of aspiration pneumonia requiring hospital admission, and radiation-induced oropharyngeal stricture. Further studies using subjective and objective swallowing function measures for patients treated with alternative chemoradiation regimens versus surgery (with or without adjuvant therapies) for advanced stage laryngeal cancer are needed.

  6. Swallowing Disorders after Oral Cavity and Pharyngolaryngeal Surgery and Role of Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Giannitto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is the sixth most common cancer diagnosed worldwide and the eighth most common cause of cancer death. Malignant tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and larynx can be treated by surgical resection or radiotheraphy with or without chemotheraphy and have a profound impact on quality of life functions, including swallowing. When surgery is the chosen treatment modality, the patient may experience swallowing impairment in the oral and pharyngeal phases of deglutition. A videofluoroscopic study of swallow enables the morphodynamics of the pharyngeal-esophageal tract to be accurately examined in patients with prior surgery. These features allow an accurate tracking of the various phases of swallowing in real time, identifying the presence of functional disorders and of complications during the short- and long-term postoperative recovery. The role of imaging is fundamental for the therapist to plan rehabilitation. In this paper, the authors aim to describe the videofluoroscopic study of swallow protocol and related swallowing impairment findings in consideration of different types of surgery.

  7. Viscosity threshold that allows safe swallow in elderly with post-stroke dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Peña

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the viscosity threshold that allows safe swallowing in older adults with post-stroke dysphagia. Method: Cross-sectional analytical study. 6 patients over 60 years old with dysphagia participated. Were given six viscosities (50mPa s, 110mPa s, 170mPa s, 230mPa s, 290mPa s and 350mPa s made from no carbonated water and a corn starch-based thickener. Swallowing safety signs (wet voice, cough and oxygen saturation were assessed in each viscosity by Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES. Viscosities’ performances in swallowing safety signs were compared in order to know which viscosity would be the safest. Results: 100% of swallowing safety signs did not appear in any viscosity assessed. Conclusions: It is not possible to determine the viscosity threshold that allows safe swallowing in patients with post-stroke dysphagia in the viscosities assessed. We discuss about multiple factors that had had affect our results: size sample, use of FEES to assess low viscosities, and viscosities’ intervals used.

  8. Efficacy of EMG/bioimpedance-triggered functional electrical stimulation on swallowing performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Schultheiss

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to support swallowing, the efficacy of functional electrical stimulation for different stimulation settings of the submental musculature has been investigated. The stimulation was administrated at rest and synchronously to voluntary initiated swallows. The onset of a swallow was detected in real-time by a combined electromyography/ bioimpedance measurement at the neck in order to trigger the stimulation. The amplitude and speed of larynx elevation caused by the FES has been assessed by the observed change in bioimpedance whereas a reduction of bioimpedance corresponds to an increase in larynx elevation. Study results from 40 healthy subjects revealed that 73% of the subjects achieved a larger and faster larynx elevation during swallowing with triggered FES and therefor a better protection of their airways. However, we also observed a decrease in larynx elevation compared to normal swallowing in 11 out of the 40 subjects what might not benefit from such a treatment. The largest improvement of larynx elevation and speed during swallowing could be achieved with three stimulation channels formed by four electrodes in the submental region.

  9. Contemporary management of voice and swallowing disorders in patients with advanced lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Grainne C; Carding, Paul N; Bhosle, Jaishree; Roe, Justin W G

    2015-06-01

    Advanced lung cancer can cause changes to swallowing and communication function. Direct tumour invasion, dyspnoea and deconditioning can all impact on swallowing function and communication. Cancer treatment, if administered, may cause or compound symptoms. In this study, the nature of swallowing and communication difficulties in patients with advanced lung cancer will be discussed, and management options including medical management, speech and language therapy (SLT) intervention, and surgical interventions will be considered. Advanced lung cancer can result in voice and swallowing difficulties, which can increase symptom burden and significantly impact on quality of life (QOL). There is a growing evidence base to support the use of injection laryngoplasty under local anaesthetic to offer immediate improvement in voice, swallowing and overall QOL. There is limited literature on the nature and extent of voice and swallowing impairment in patients with lung cancer. Well designed studies with robust and sensitive multidimensional dysphagia and dysphonia assessments are required. Outcome studies examining interventions with clearly defined treatment goals are required. These studies should include both functional and patient-reported outcome measures to develop the evidence base and to ensure that interventions are both timely and appropriate.

  10. Acute p-synephrine ingestion increases fat oxidation rate during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Hellín, Jorge; Del Coso, Juan

    2016-08-01

    p-Synephrine is a protoalkaloid widely used in dietary supplements for weight management because of its purported thermogenic effects. However, there is a lack of scientific information about its effectiveness to increase fat metabolism during exercise. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of an acute ingestion of p-synephrine on fat oxidation at rest and during exercise. In a double-blind, randomized and counterbalanced experimental design, 18 healthy subjects performed two acute experimental trials after the ingestion of p-synephrine (3 mg kg(-1) ) or after the ingestion of a placebo (cellulose). Energy expenditure and fat oxidation rates were measured by indirect calorimetry at rest and during a cycle ergometer ramp exercise test (increases of 25 W every 3 min) until volitional fatigue. In comparison with the placebo, the ingestion of p-synephrine did not change energy consumption (1.6 ± 0.3 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3 kcal min(-1) ; P = 0.69) or fat oxidation rate at rest (0.08 ± 0.02 vs. 0.10 ± 0.04 g min(-1) ; P = 0.15). However, the intake of p-synephrine moved the fat oxidation-exercise intensity curve upwards during the incremental exercise (P exercise although it did not affect the intensity at which maximal fat oxidation was achieved (55.8 ± 7.7 vs. 56.7 ± 8.2% VO2peak ; P = 0.51). The acute ingestion of p-synephrine increased the fat oxidation rate while it reduced the carbohydrate oxidation rate when exercising at low-to-moderate exercise intensities. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Anthropogenic Debris Ingestion by Avifauna in Eastern Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Roman

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic debris in the world's oceans and coastal environments is a pervasive global issue that has both direct and indirect impacts on avifauna. The number of bird species affected, the feeding ecologies associated with an increased risk of debris ingestion, and selectivity of ingested debris have yet to be investigated in most of Australia's coastal and marine birds. With this study we aim to address the paucity of data regarding marine debris ingestion in Australian coastal and marine bird species. We investigated which Australian bird groups ingest marine debris, and whether debris-ingesting groups exhibit selectivity associated with their taxonomy, habitat or foraging methods. Here we present the largest multispecies study of anthropogenic debris ingestion in Australasian avifauna to date. We necropsied and investigated the gastrointestinal contents of 378 birds across 61 species, collected dead across eastern Australia. These species represented nine taxonomic orders, five habitat groups and six feeding strategies. Among investigated species, thirty percent had ingested debris, though ingestion did not occur uniformly within the orders of birds surveyed. Debris ingestion was found to occur in orders Procellariiformes, Suliformes, Charadriiformes and Pelecaniformes, across all surveyed habitats, and among birds that foraged by surface feeding, pursuit diving and search-by-sight. Procellariiformes, birds in pelagic habitats, and surface feeding marine birds ingested debris with the greatest frequency. Among birds which were found to ingest marine debris, we investigated debris selectivity and found that marine birds were selective with respect to both type and colour of debris. Selectivity for type and colour of debris significantly correlated with taxonomic order, habitat and foraging strategy. This study highlights the significant impact of feeding ecology on debris ingestion among Australia's avifauna.

  12. Development of an Ingestion Pathway Model for AXAIRQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, A.A.

    1999-01-13

    AXAIRQ is a dose mode code used for prospective accident assessment at the Savannah River Site and is primarily used to show regulatory compliance. For completeness of pathway analysis, an ingestion model, AXINGST, has been developed for use with, and incorporation in, AXAIRQ. Currently available ingestion models were referenced as a basis for AXINGST. AXINGST calculates a conservative ingestion dose following an atmospheric release of radionuclides and includes site specific variables where applicable.

  13. Clinical Evaluation of Disc Battery Ingestion in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Mirshemirani, Alireza; Khaleghnejad-Tabari, Ahmad; Kouranloo, Jaefar; Sadeghian, Naser; Rouzrokh, Mohsen; Roshanzamir, Fatolah; Razavi, Sajad; Sayary, Ali Akbar; IMANZADEH, Farid

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics, management, and outcomes of disc battery ingestion in children. METHODS We reviewed the medical records of children admitted to Mofid Children’s Hospital due to disc battery ingestion from January 2006 to January 2010. Clear history, clinical symptoms and results of imaging studies revealed diagnosis of disc battery ingestion in suspected patients. The clinical data reviewed included age, gender, clinical manifestation,...

  14. Taste and Temperature in Swallowing Transit Time after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula C. Cola

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oropharyngeal dysphagia is common in individuals after stroke. Taste and temperature are used in dysphagia rehabilitation. The influence of stimuli, such as taste and temperature, on swallowing biomechanics has been investigated in both healthy individuals and in individuals with neurological disease. However, some questions still remain unanswered, such as how the sequence of offered stimuli influences the pharyngeal response. The goal of the present study was to determine the influence of the sequence of stimuli, sour taste and cold temperature, on pharyngeal transit time during deglutition in individuals after stroke. Methods: The study included 60 individuals with unilateral ischemic stroke, 29 males and 31 females, aged 41–88 years (mean age: 66.2 years examined 0–50 days after ictus (median: 6 days, with mild to moderate oropharyngeal dysphagia. Exclusion criteria were hemorrhagic stroke patients, patients with decreased level of consciousness, and clinically unstable patients, as confirmed by medical evaluation. The individuals were divided into two groups of 30 individuals each. Group 1 received a nonrandomized sequence of stimuli (i.e. natural, cold, sour, and sour-cold and group 2 received a randomized sequence of stimuli. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study was performed to analyze the pharyngeal transit time. Four different stimuli (natural, cold, sour, and sour-cold were offered. The images were digitalized and specific software was used to measure the pharyngeal transit time. Since the values did not present regular distribution and uniform variances, nonparametric tests were performed. Results: Individuals in group 1 presented a significantly shorter pharyngeal transit time with the sour-cold stimulus than with the other stimuli. Individuals in group 2 did not show a significant difference in pharyngeal transit time between stimuli. Conclusions: The results showed that the sequence of offered stimuli influences

  15. Metabolic responses to exercise on land and in water following glucose ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurobe, Kazumichi; Kousaka, Ayaka; Ogita, Futoshi; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2018-03-01

    Although aerobic exercise after a meal decreases postprandial blood glucose, the differences in glucose response between land and aquatic exercise are unclear. Thus, we examined the effect of different modes of exercise with same energy expenditure following glucose ingestion on carbohydrate metabolism. Ten healthy sedentary men (age, 22 ± 1 years) participated in this study. All subjects performed each of three exercise modes (cycling, walking and aquatic exercise) for 30 min after ingestion of a 75-g glucose solution with 1-2 weeks between trials. The exercise intensity was set at 40% of the maximum oxygen uptake that occurred during cycling. The velocity during walking and the target heart rate during aquatic exercise were predetermined in a pretest. The plasma glucose concentration at 30 min after exercise was significantly lower with aquatic exercise compared to that with cycling and walking (Pexercise modes in respiratory exchange ratio. On the other hand, serum free fatty acid concentration with aquatic exercise was significantly higher at 120 min after exercise compared with that after walking (Paquatic exercise reduces postprandial blood glucose compared with both cycling and walking with the same energy expenditure. Aquatic exercise shows potential as an exercise prescription to prevent postprandial hyperglycaemia. © 2016 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Voluntary ingestion of buprenorphine as a refined analgesic strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Kalliokoski, Otto Henrik; Hau, Jann

    2011-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a widely used analgesic for laboratory rodents. Administration of the drug in an attractive food item for voluntary ingestion is a desirable way to administer the drug noninvasively. The method refi nes the standard analgesic procedure and has the potential to improve the welfare...... of laboratory mice and rats. However, many aspects of the voluntary ingestion method still need to be investigated. This paper examines the concept of voluntary ingestion of analgesia and reports new findings about voluntary ingestion of buprenorphine in mice....

  17. Regaining water swallowing function in the rehabilitation of critically ill patients with intensive-care-unit acquired muscle weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Simone; Sauter, Wolfgang; Starrost, Ulrike; Pohl, Marcus; Mehrholz, Jan

    2017-03-21

    Treatment in intensive care units (ICUs) often results in swallowing dysfunction. Recent longitudinal studies have described the recovery of critically ill people, but we are not aware of studies of the recovery of swallowing function in patients with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. This paper aims to describe the time course of regaining water swallowing function in patients with ICU-acquired weakness in the post-acute phase and to describe the risks of regaining water swallowing function and the risk factors involved. This cohort study included patients with ICU-acquired muscle weakness in our post-acute department, who were unable to swallow. We monitored the process of regaining water swallowing function using the 3-ounce water swallowing test. We included 108 patients with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Water swallowing function was regained after a median of 12 days (interquartile range =17) from inclusion in the study and after a median of 59 days (interquartile range= 36) from the onset of the primary illness. Our multivariate Cox Proportional Hazard model yielded two main risk factors for regaining water swallowing function: the number of medical tubes such as catheters at admission to the post-acute department (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.282; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.099-1.495) and the time until weaning from the respirator in days (adjusted HR =1.02 per day; 95%CI: 0.998 to 1.008). We describe a time course for regaining water swallowing function based on daily tests in the post-acute phase of critically ill patients. Risk factors associated with regaining water swallowing function in rehabilitation are the number of medical tubes and the duration of weaning from the respirator. Implications for rehabilitation Little guidance is available for the management of swallowing dysfunction in the rehabilitation of critically ill patients with intensive-care-units acquired muscle weakness. There is a time dependent pattern of recovery from

  18. Muscle metabolism during exercise with carbohydrate or protein-carbohydrate ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, Naomi M; Solheim, Amy S; Gardner, Melanie S; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Gibala, Martin J

    2009-12-01

    Ingesting protein (PRO) with CHO during prolonged exercise is purported to improve performance compared with CHO alone by altering the regulation of skeletal muscle energy provision. However, no study has directly investigated this issue. We tested the hypothesis that compared with CHO alone, coingestion of PRO would alter markers of metabolic control, including the magnitude of glycogen use and the net expansion of the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate pool, which has been linked to the capacity for oxidative energy delivery. Eight trained men (mean +/- SE: age = 29 +/- 2 yr; VO2peak = 55 +/- 2 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) cycled at 69% +/- 1% VO2peak for 90 min on two occasions, and biopsy samples (vastus lateralis) were obtained before and after exercise. In a randomized, double-blind manner, subjects ingested one of two drinks during exercise that contained either 6% CHO or 6% CHO + 2% PRO (CHO + PRO) at a rate of 1 L x h(-1) to deliver 60 g x h(-1) CHO +/- 20 g x h(-1) PRO. CHO + PRO ingestion increased the plasma concentration of branched chain (561 +/- 46 vs 301 +/- 32 micromol x L(-1)) and essential amino acids (1071 +/- 98 vs 670 +/- 71 micromol x L(-1)) after exercise versus CHO (both P values exercise bout were not different between treatments. When trained men ingest CHO at a rate on the upper end of the range generally recommended to improve endurance performance, coingestion of PRO does not alter specific markers proposed to reflect an enhanced capacity for skeletal muscle energy delivery.

  19. Effects of caffeine ingestion on endurance performance in mentally fatigued individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Rafael; Silva-Cavalcante, Marcos David; Gualano, Bruno; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Bertuzzi, Romulo

    2016-12-01

    To examine the effects of caffeine ingestion on physiological and perceptual responses in mentally fatigued individuals. Eight male physically active subjects completed four cycling constant-workload tests in four experimental conditions at 80 % of maximal power output: control (C), mental fatigue (MF), mental fatigue plus caffeine ingestion (5 mg/kg) (MF-CAF), and mental fatigue plus placebo (MF-PLA). The mental fatigue was induced by a continuous performance task A-X version (AX-CPT). Before and after the AX-CPT, the profile of mood state (POMS) and blood samples for lactate measurement were collected. Oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and electromyography (EMG) activity were measured during the cycling test. The time to exhaustion in C, MF, MF-PLA, and MF-CAF were 251 ± 30, 222 ± 23, 248 ± 28, and 285 ± 42 s, respectively. Delta values (corrected by C condition) were higher in MF-CAF than MF (P = 0.031). MF-CAF reported higher Vigor scores when compared with C (P = 0.046) and MF (P = 0.020). RPE at the first minute was significantly higher in MF-PLA than in C (P = 0.050); at the second minute, RPE was higher in MF-PLA than in C (P = 0.049) and MF-CAF (P = 0.048). EMG activity was not different between the conditions. Caffeine ingestion increased approximately 14 % endurance performance after the induction of mental fatigue. This effect was accompanied by a tendency to improvement in mood state (i.e., vigor). Therefore, caffeine ingestion can promote a beneficial effect on endurance performance in mentally fatigued individuals.

  20. Posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome after kratom ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Austin; Payne, J Drew; Nugent, Kenneth

    2017-07-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome has been associated with hypertension, preeclampsia, cancer chemotherapy, and drugs of abuse, such as amphetamine and methamphetamine. We report a young man who suddenly developed severe headache, disorientation, and aphasia following ingestion of kratom and Adderall. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of his head revealed foci of vasogenic edema in the posterior occipital lobes, frontal lobes, and brainstem. In addition, he had a small area of hemorrhage in the left posterior occipital lobe. Lumbar puncture revealed an increased number of red blood cells but no other abnormalities. His initial blood pressure was elevated but returned to normal during hospitalization. This case suggests that kratom can cause posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and needs to be considered when patients present to emergency centers with headaches, confusion, and visual disturbances.

  1. Data, Meet Compute: NASA's Cumulus Ingest Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) houses nearly 30PBs of critical Earth Science data and with upcoming missions is expected to balloon to between 200PBs-300PBs over the next seven years. In addition to the massive increase in data collected, researchers and application developers want more and faster access - enabling complex visualizations, long time-series analysis, and cross dataset research without needing to copy and manage massive amounts of data locally. NASA has looked to the cloud to address these needs, building its Cumulus system to manage the ingest of diverse data in a wide variety of formats into the cloud. In this talk, we look at what Cumulus is from a high level and then take a deep dive into how it manages complexity and versioning associated with multiple AWS Lambda and ECS microservices communicating through AWS Step Functions across several disparate installations

  2. Endurance exercise after orange ingestion anaphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise after orange ingestion cause anaphylaxis which is food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA which is a form of exercise-induced anaphylaxis. In this article, an individual develops symptoms such as flushing, itching, urticaria, angioedema, and wheezing after eating a food allergen and proceeds to exercise. Neither the food alone nor exercise alone is sufficient to induce a reaction. This case report describes a 36-year-old asthmatic male athlete who experienced nausea, vomiting, flushing, urticaria, and facial swelling while exercising in a gymnasium after eating oranges. Neither oranges alone nor exercise alone induced the reaction. Total avoidance of suspected food allergens would be ideal. Persons with FDEIA should keep at hand an emergency kit with antihistamines, injectable rapid action corticoids, and adrenaline.

  3. Anaphylaxis/angioedema caused by honey ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezir, Emine; Kaya, Ayşenur; Toyran, Müge; Azkur, Dilek; Dibek Mısırlıoğlu, Emine; Kocabaş, Can Naci

    2014-01-01

    Honey allergy is a very rare, but serious health condition. In this study, we presented six patients who described systemic allergic reactions after ingestion of honey. Three of the six patients had suffered from anaphylaxis. Honey-specific IgE was measured and skin-prick tests for honey were performed to diagnose honey allergy. The results of honey-specific IgE of all patients were positive. Four patients had high serum-specific IgE for honey bee venom and two of five patients had also experienced anaphylaxis due to bee stings. Skin-prick tests with honey and pollens were positive in five patients. Honey is one of the foods that can cause severe systemic reactions. Specific IgE and skin-prick tests are helpful for the diagnosis of honey allergy.

  4. Zinc toxicity following massive coin ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, D R; Baird, C J; Chan, K M; Crookes, P F; Bremner, C G; Gottlieb, M M; Naritoku, W Y

    1997-06-01

    This is the first reported case of human fatality associated with zinc intoxication following a massive ingestion of coins. Four hundred and sixty-one coins were removed form the gastrointestinal tract of a schizophrenic patient during the course of hospitalization. Many of the post-1981 pennies, which consist primarily of zinc, showed severe corrosion due to their prolonged contact with acidic gastric juice. The patient presented with clinical manifestations consistent with the local corrosive as well as systemic effects of zinc intoxication and died 40 days after admission with multi-system organ failure. Tissue samples of the kidneys, pancreas, and liver obtained at autopsy revealed acute tubular necrosis, mild fibrosis, and acute massive necrosis, respectively, and contained high levels of zinc. The overall effects of zinc intoxication on the various organ systems, possible hematological derangement, and the impairment of copper absorption as well as the outcome with treatment are discussed.

  5. Cancer risks from ingestion of radiostrontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raabe, O. G.

    2004-07-01

    Studies have been conducted of the lifetime effects in 403 beagles of the skeletal uptake in seven logarithmically increasing dosage groups of ingested Sr-90. The Sr-90 was fed during skeletal developmental from mid-gestation to adulthood at age 540 days resulting in lifetime protracted beta radiation exposure of the skeleton and some adjacent tissues. Statistical analysis of all types of cancer deaths in the 403 exposed beagles and in 162 unexposed controls indicated that deaths caused by five types of cancer were significantly elevated by high level exposure to Sr-90; these were (1) myeloid leukemia, (2) bone sarcoma, (3) squamous cell carcinoma of periodontal origin, (4) nasal carcinoma, and (5) oral carcinoma. Dose response analysis of these radiation-induced cancer deaths showed non-linear relationships with marked thresholds. A mean lifetime skeletal absorbed dose of 22.5 +/-5.7 Gy SD (22.5 +/-5.7 Sv SD) was associated with the lowest dosage group in which any radiation induced cancer deaths were observed. Three-dimensional models of the observed dose-rate/time/response relationships were fir with maximum likelihood regression methods to describe the risks of death associated with the different types of radiation-induced cancer. The models show that a life-time virtual threshold for cancer risk occurs because the time required to induce cancer is longer at lower radiation dose rates and may exceed the natural life span. Scaling these results to predict human cancer risks from ingestion of Sr-90 shows negligible risks for people whose lifetime cumulative skeletal dose is less than 10 Sv. (Author)

  6. Acute immunomodulatory effects of binge alcohol ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Majid; Richards, Stephanie; Mann, Dean; Cross, Alan; Smith, Gordon B; Netzer, Giora; Kovacs, Elizabeth; Hasday, Jeffrey

    2015-02-01

    Blood alcohol is present in a third of trauma patients and has been associated with organ dysfunction. In both human studies and in animal models, it is clear that alcohol intoxication exerts immunomodulatory effects several hours to days after exposure, when blood alcohol is no longer detectable. The early immunomodulatory effects of alcohol while blood alcohol is still elevated are not well understood. Human volunteers achieved binge alcohol intoxication after high-dose alcohol consumption. Blood was collected for analysis prior to alcohol ingestion, and 20 min, 2 h, and 5 h after alcohol ingestion. Flow cytometry was performed on isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and cytokine generation in whole blood was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) after 24-h stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phytohemagglutinin-M (PHA) stimulation. An early pro-inflammatory state was evident at 20 min when blood alcohol levels were ∼130 mg/dL, which was characterized by an increase in total circulating leukocytes, monocytes, and natural killer cells. During this time, a transient increase in LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels and enhanced LPS sensitivity occurred. At 2 and 5 h post-alcohol binge, an anti-inflammatory state was shown with reduced numbers of circulating monocytes and natural killer cells, attenuated LPS-induced interleukin (IL)-1β levels, and a trend toward increased interleukin (IL)-10 levels. A single episode of binge alcohol intoxication exerted effects on the immune system that caused an early and transient pro-inflammatory state followed by an anti-inflammatory state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cannabinoids and the regulation of ingestive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, S P; Kennett, G A

    2005-03-01

    Over past centuries, Cannabis sativa (Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol being the principal active ingredient) has been used extensively for both medicinal and recreational uses, and one widely reported effect is the onset of a ravenous appetite and eating behaviour. The pharmacological properties of such exogenous cannabinoids are mediated through the activation of two receptor subtypes, the CB(1) and CB(2) receptors. A number of endogenous ligands for these receptors, the endocannabinoids, have now also been identified allowing their effects on ingestive behaviour to be determined. In a number of species, including man, the administration of exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids leads to robust increases in food intake and can promote body weight gain. These effects are believed to be mediated through activation of the CB(1) receptor. Conversely, experiments with selective CB(1) receptor antagonists have demonstrated reductions in food intake and body weight with repeated compound administration. These reductions in body weight appear to be greater in obese animals and may be the result of a dual effect on both food intake and metabolic processes. Such findings have led to a number of pharmaceutical companies developing selective CB(1) receptor antagonists for the treatment of obesity. The most advanced compound is Sanofi-Synthelabo's inverse agonist, rimonabant (Acomplia; SR-141716), and early Phase III results have recently demonstrated significant reductions in body weight, waist circumference and improvement of lipid and glucose metabolism in overweight and obese humans. Accordingly, the cannabinoid system appears to have an important role in the regulation of ingestive behaviour in man and animals.

  8. Swallowing and respiratory distress in hospitalized patients with bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffey, Alberto; Moviglia, Teresita; Mirabello, Catalina; Blumenthal, Lidia; Gentile, Luis; Niremberg, Mabel; Gilligan, Guillermo; Teper, Alejandro

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of airway and/or pulmonary food or saliva aspiration in infants with moderate respiratory distress who are hospitalized with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis. This prospective, descriptive study was conducted during two epidemic RSV seasons at the Ricardo Gutiérrez Children's Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Included were otherwise healthy infants in their first wheezing episode with a modified Tal clinical score between 5 and 9. Swallowing was evaluated using a dynamic technetium-99 m colloid radionuclide salivagram using a gamma camera, followed by video fluoroscopy using nonionic and ionic contrast material. Fifteen patients (7 boys) were included. Age at evaluation (mean ± SD) was 4.3 ± 1.5 months; clinical score was 7.5 ± 1.4. Patients required (mean ± SD) supplemental oxygen and hospitalization 7.5 ± 3.7 and 8.8 ± 4.3 days, respectively. All technetium-99 m salivagram (10/10, as the gamma camera equipment was out of service during part of the study) and video fluoroscopy (15/15) studies were normal. No episodes of aspiration or laryngeal penetration were detected in any patient. Our study found that infants hospitalized with moderate respiratory distress due to RSV bronchiolitis did not show aspiration.

  9. Severe breathing and swallowing difficulties during routine restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lococo, Filippo; Trabucco, Laura; Leuzzi, Giovanni; Salvo, Fulvio; Paci, Massimiliano; Sgarbi, Giorgio; Ferrari, Anna Maria

    2015-04-30

    Although sporadically reported after dental examination, subcutaneous emphysema may be erroneously confused with an allergic, or anaphylactic, reaction. We herein report a case of a 57-year-old Caucasian woman who came to our attention after restorative treatment for a carious mandibular right second primary molar. During dental examination, an air driven hand-piece was used to restore occlusal caries. Suddenly, swallowing and breathing difficulties and a facial swelling involving the neck and, partially, the face occurred. She was urgently transported to the Emergency Department with the suspicious of allergic reaction. Clinical examination revealed palpable crepitus at the level of the head, neck and pre-sternal region but no inflammation, trismus or fluid collection was detected. A Chest X-ray first and a computed tomography scan later showed air in the deeper regions from the peri-mandibular and retro-mandibular spaces to the sub-maxillary and latero-cervical area along the vascular sulcus and retropharyngeal space descending into the mediastinal space. So, the patient was admitted for respiratory monitoring and started intravenous administration of largespectrum antibiotics and analgesics. Her hospital course was unremarkable and 5 days later she was discharged after regression of symptoms and complete radiological resolution. Three months after discharge, the patient was clinically free of recurrence. Dental care, Pneumomediastinum, Restorative dentistry.

  10. [Functional endoscopic evaluation of swallowing in infants with deglutition disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partida-Justo, I; Israel Grijalva-Otero, J E; Ramírez-Figueroa, J L; Sepúlveda-Vildosola, A C; Zurita-Cruz, J N

    2017-10-25

    Functional endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) is a recognized method for Deglutition Disorders (DD) in adults, with anecdotal experience in children, obtaining not conclusive results. To compare the accuracy of test FEES in infants with high suspicion of altered DD seen in a third level hospital with the gold standard Videofluoroscopic (VF). The results and findings by FEES and VF of 66 children with clinical diagnosis of DD were compared. An estimate of the sensitivity and specificity of FEES was performed. As well as calculating positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and likelihood ratios. 60 patients enrolled, 4 and FEES showed high sensitivity to identify the presence of aspiration and penetration (9 98%) and high specificity for the arrest of spillage and waste (94% and 95%). Gastroesophageal reflux to make the diagnosis of DD with FEES had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 84%. Spill and penetration had the highest agreement with respect to the gold standard of 0.81. FEES in infants diagnosed with DD had a sensitivity of 80.8% and specificity 85.3%. 0696 concordance regarding to the VFD in the diagnosis of DD, and to identify suction stroke had a kappa of 0815.

  11. Swallowing performance after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, I.C.; Tiver, K.; Bull, C.; Gebski, V.; Langlands, A.O.

    1988-05-15

    The purpose of the study reported in this article was to tabulate the incidence and etiologic factors of importance in the development of strictures after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the esophagus and to analyze the outcome of patients who develop such strictures. Eighty patients were treated with radiotherapy, 50 having radical and 30 having palliative treatment. Sixty-nine patients had squamous cell carcinoma, four had adenocarcinoma, one had sarcoma, one had mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and five had undifferentiated tumors. Forty percent developed no stricture, 30% had benign fibrotic stricture, and 28% developed malignant stricture. The etiologic factors analysed included age, pretreatment swallowing score, histology and length (size) of tumor; stage of disease, dose of radiotherapy, and use of chemotherapy. None of these factors were shown to be of etiologic importance. The survival of patients who developed benign strictures was found to be significantly longer (1-year survival 88%) than those who developed no stricture (50%) or malignant stricture (19%). Using a success score for palliation of dysphagia, it was found that the majority of patients (71%) who developed a benign stricture had a moderately successful outcome--they were able to tolerate a full or soft diet and required dilatation with a median duration between dilatations of 5 months. Patients who developed a malignant stricture were palliated poorly by dilatation alone, and most required esophageal intubation.

  12. The mechanics and behavior of cliff swallows during tandem flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Ryan M; Jackson, Brandon E; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2014-08-01

    Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) are highly maneuverable social birds that often forage and fly in large open spaces. Here we used multi-camera videography to measure the three-dimensional kinematics of their natural flight maneuvers in the field. Specifically, we collected data on tandem flights, defined as two birds maneuvering together. These data permit us to evaluate several hypotheses on the high-speed maneuvering flight performance of birds. We found that high-speed turns are roll-based, but that the magnitude of the centripetal force created in typical maneuvers varied only slightly with flight speed, typically reaching a peak of ~2 body weights. Turning maneuvers typically involved active flapping rather than gliding. In tandem flights the following bird copied the flight path and wingbeat frequency (~12.3 Hz) of the lead bird while maintaining position slightly above the leader. The lead bird turned in a direction away from the lateral position of the following bird 65% of the time on average. Tandem flights vary widely in instantaneous speed (1.0 to 15.6 m s(-1)) and duration (0.72 to 4.71 s), and no single tracking strategy appeared to explain the course taken by the following bird. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Swallow-induced esophageal shortening in patients without hiatal hernia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, T; Singhal, S; Akimoto, S; Bremner, R M; Mittal, S K

    2017-12-21

    Longitudinal esophageal body shortening with swallow-induced peristalsis has been reported in healthy individuals. Esophageal shortening is immediately followed by esophageal re-elongation, and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) returns to the baseline position. High-resolution manometry (HRM) allows for objective assessment of extent of shortening and duration of shortening. In patients without hiatal hernia at rest, swallow-induced esophageal shortening can lead to transient hiatal hernia (tHH) which at times may persist after the completion of swallow. This manometric finding has not been investigated in the literature, but a question arises whether this swallow-induced transient herniation can effect on the likelihood of gastroesophageal reflux. This study aims to assess the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and the subtypes of swallow-induced esophageal shortening, i.e. tHH and non-tHH, in patients without hiatal hernia at rest. After Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, we queried a prospectively maintained database to identify patients who underwent HRM evaluation and 24-hour pH study between January to December 2015. Patients with type-I esophagogastric junction (EGJ) morphology (i.e. no hiatal hernia) according to the Chicago classification v3.0 were included. The patterns of the esophageal shortening with swallows were divided into two subtypes, i.e. tHH and non-tHH. tHH was defined as an EGJ double high-pressure zones (≥1 cm) at the second inspiration after the termination of swallow-induced esophageal body contraction. The number of episodes of tHH was counted per 10 swallows and tHH size was measured for each patient. In total, 41 patients with EGJ morphology Type-I met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 47.2 years, 35 patients (85.4%) were women, and the mean body mass index was 33.9 kg/m2. The mean number of tHH episodes was 3 out of 10 swallows; mean maximal tHH size was 1.3 cm. Patients who had tHH in ≥3 out of 10

  14. SU-D-BRA-01: Feasibility Study for Swallowing Prediction Using Pressure Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, M; Kim, T; Kim, D; Kang, S; Kim, K; Shin, D; Noh, Y; Suh, T [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a swallowing prediction system (SPS) using force sensing sensors and evaluate its feasibility. Methods: The SPS developed consists of force sensing sensor units, a thermoplastic mask, a signal transport device and a control PC installed with an in-house software. The SPS is designed to predict the pharyngeal stage of swallowing because it is known that internal organ movement occurs in pharyngeal stage. To detect prediction signal in the SPS, the force sensing sensor units were attached on both the submental muscle region and thyroid cartilage region of the thermoplastic mask. While the signal from the thyroid cartilage region informs the action of swallowing, the signal from the submental muscle region is utilized as a precursor for swallowing. Since the duration of swallowing is relatively short, using such precursor (or warning) signals for machine control is considered more beneficial. A volunteer study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the system. In this volunteer study, we intended to verify that the system could predict the pharyngeal stage of the swallowing. We measured time gaps between obtaining the warning signals in the SPS and starting points of the pharyngeal stage of swallowing. Results: The measured data was examined whether the time gaps were in reasonable order to be easily utilized. The mean and standard deviation values of these time gaps were 0.550 s ± 0.183 s. in 8 volunteers. Conclusion: The proposed method was able to predict the on-set of swallowing of human subjects inside the thermoplastic mask, which has never been possible with other monitoring systems such as camera-based monitoring system. With the prediction ability of swallowing incorporated into the machine control mechanism (in the future), beam delivery can be controlled to skip swallowing periods and significant dosimetric gain is expected in head & neck cancer treatments. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2015M

  15. EFFECT OF THE VOLUME OF FLUID INGESTED ON URINE CONCENTRATING ABILITY DURING PROLONGED HEAVY EXERCISE IN A HOT ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Otani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of the volume of fluid ingested on urine concentrating ability during prolonged heavy exercise in a hot environment at low levels of dehydration. Seven healthy males performed 105 min of intermittent cycle exercise at 70% maximum oxygen uptake (32°C, 60% relative humidity while receiving no fluid ingestion (NF, voluntary fluid ingestion (VF, partial fluid ingestion equivalent to one-half of body mass loss (PF, and full fluid ingestion equivalent to body mass loss (FF. Fluid (5°C, 3.4% carbohydrate, 10.5 mmol·L-1 sodium was ingested just before commencing exercise and at 15, 33, 51, 69, and 87 min of exercise, and the total amount of fluid ingested in PF and FF was divided into six equal volumes. During exercise, body mass loss was 2.2 ± 0.2, 1.1 ± 0.5, 1.1 ± 0.2, and 0.1 ± 0.2% in NF, VF, PF, and FF, respectively, whereas total sweat loss was about 2% of body mass in each trial. Subjects in VF ingested 719 ± 240 ml of fluid during exercise; the volume of fluid ingested was 1.1 ± 0.4% of body mass. Creatinine clearance was significantly higher and free water clearance was significantly lower in FF than in NF during exercise. Urine flow rate during exercise decreased significantly in NF. There were significant decreases in creatinine and osmolar clearance and was a significant increase in free water clearance during exercise in NF and VF. Creatinine clearance decreased significantly and free water clearance increased significantly during exercise in PF. There was no statistical change in urinary indices of renal function during exercise in FF. The findings suggest that full fluid ingestion equivalent to body mass loss has attenuated the decline in urine concentrating ability during prolonged heavy exercise in a hot environment at low levels of dehydration.

  16. Effect of ingested raw ginger (zingerber officinale ) on tear production

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4.36years to chew and swallow as a bolus. Its effect on tear production was then monitored using Schirmer's test. The initial rate of tear production was measured before administration of ginger for each subject. Subsequent measurements were ...

  17. The effects of caffeine ingestion on exercise-induced hypoalgesia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christopher D; Gonglach, Alexander R; Renfroe, Jessica B; Hight, Robert E

    2016-07-01

    Exercise acutely reduces pain sensitivity, termed exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). The mechanisms underlying EIH remain unclear. Caffeine, a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist has been shown to attenuate EIH in animals-suggesting the involvement of the adenosinergic system. This pilot study investigated the effects of caffeine on pain sensitivity following cycling exercise in college-aged men. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) and thermal pain threshold (TPT) were assessed in thirteen low caffeine consuming men prior to ingestion of a counter-balanced 5mg·kg(-1) dose of caffeine or a placebo (Pre), 60min following ingestion (Post-In), and then following a 15min bout of cycling exercise (Post-Ex) at an intensity eliciting a quadriceps muscle pain rating of 3 out of 10. Nine of the men completed follow-up testing which was identical except that the exercise consisted of 10min of cycling eliciting a pain rating of 5 out of 10. Caffeine had no effect compared to placebo on PPT (p≥0.15) or TPT (p≥0.41) 60min following ingestion and following exercise. PPT increased from 599±176kPa to 648±202kPa (p=0.009) and from 578±217kPa to 666±278kPa (p=0.01) following 15 and 10min of cycling, respectively. TPT increased from 46.2±2.9°C to 46.8±2.6°C (p=0.008) following the 15min exercise bout, but did not change (46.4±3.6°C vs. 46.8±3.3°C; p=0.24) following the shorter, higher intensity exercise bout. The results from this study indicate cycling exercise reduces pain sensitivity, especially to pressure stimuli. Caffeine ingestion did not alter the EIH response-suggesting adenosine may not play a prominent role in the EIH response in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of proprioception during the oral phase on initiating the swallowing reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hikaru; Saitoh, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    We hypothesized that proprioceptive signals during the oral phase play a pivotal role in the initiation of pharyngeal phase during volitional swallowing. Therefore, we tested if swallowing could be modified by changing the amount of proprioceptive feedback from a number of different receptors while holding a food bolus in the mouth and clenching. Basic research. Surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings of the masticatory muscles were obtained during volitional swallowing movements from seven healthy adults with no clinical history of swallowing difficulties. The swallowing procedure involved holding 5 ml of jelly on the tongue before swallowing it completely, according to visual cues on a computer display. Initiation of the swallowing reflex was detected by an anterior shift of the thyroid cartilage using a laser displacement sensor and by submental sEMG signals. To vary the proprioceptive input, the participants were instructed to occlude their teeth at various intensities (weak, intermediate, and strong) while holding the 5-ml jelly bolus on the tongue. Rectified and integrated sEMG (iEMG) signals obtained from the submental area showed two upward deflections. Contractile forces of the masseter muscles showed significant negative values for Pearson correlation coefficient against time intervals from the onset of the second submental iEMG deflection to the onset of the anterior shift of the thyroid cartilage in six of the seven participants (average -0.534, standard deviation 0.176). Contractile forces of the masseter muscles during occlusion tended to correlate negatively with electromechanical delays on suprahyoid muscle contraction. NA Laryngoscope, 126:1595-1599, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Effects of early intervention of swallowing therapy on recovery from dysphagia following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiyari, Jalal; Sarraf, Payam; Nakhostin-Ansari, Noureddin; Tafakhori, Abbas; Logemann, Jeri; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-07-06

    Dysphagia is common after stroke. The onset time of swallowing rehabilitation following stroke has an important role in the recovery of dysphagia and preventing of its complications, but it was either highly variable or was not stated in previous trials. The aim of this study was investigation effects of onset time of swallowing therapy on recovery from dysphagia following stroke. Sixty dysphagia patients due to stroke range of age 60-74 (67.1 ± 3.8), participated in this randomized clinical trial study. The patients allocated in Early, Medium and Late groups, on the base of initiation of swallowing therapy after the stroke. After basic clinical and video fluoroscopic swallowing study assessments, traditional swallowing therapy was initiated 3 times per week for 3 months. The outcome measures were North-Western dysphagia patient check sheet, functional oral intake scale, video fluoroscopy, and frequency of pneumonia. Statistical analysis was done by repeated measure ANOVA, Bonferroni and χ(2) tests. Three groups of patients in terms of demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in the pre-treatment P > 0.050. Onset time of swallowing therapy after stroke was effective on swallowing recovery on the main outcome variables. So that in first group patients, recovery was rather than other groups P < 0.050. Furthermore, the frequency of pneumonia in the early group was less than other groups and in the early group no patients experienced pneumonia P = 0.002. Our data suggested that early interventions for dysphagia in stroke have an important role in recovery from dysphagia and prevention of complications like aspiration pneumonia.

  20. Comparison of ease of swallowing of dietary supplement products for age-related eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherman, Donald P; Bayraktaroglu, Tolgar O; Garofalo, Renee J

    2004-01-01

    To examine patients' perceptions on the relative importance of the physical characteristics and appearance of dietary supplements, and to evaluate two supplements with the same combination of vitamins and minerals used in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) with respect to ease of swallowing and other features in elderly patients. A single-site, single-visit, crossover design, subject-masked comparison of two dietary supplements (ICaps AREDS Formula--Alcon; Ocuvite PreserVision-Bausch & Lomb). Ophthalmology practice. 50 patients aged 50 years or older. Patients ranked the importance of eight physical characteristics of a vitamin tablet or capsule (ease of swallowing, size, shape, color, smell, coating, texture, and taste) irrespective of the test products used in the study and then took both test products randomly and were asked to indicate which product they preferred based on the same eight characteristics. Overall patient preference and preference for swallowing two tablets at once. The highest rated (most important) characteristic in a vitamin supplement was ease of swallowing, with a median score of 9.0 on a 0-10 visual analogue scale. The characteristic of least importance was tablet color, with the lowest median score of 1.0. Statistically significant differences were detected between the products with regard to preferences for ease of swallowing, swallowing two tablets at once, size, and coating (P preferred the ICaps AREDS formula to Ocuvite PreserVision with respect to these characteristics and overall preference (P preferences. Based on the results of this study, ease of swallowing is the most important characteristic of dietary supplement tablets for elderly patients, followed by taste, size, and smell. Significant differences in preference exist between the study products, which contain similar formulations but have different physical characteristics.

  1. Effects of coal fly ash on tree swallow reproduction in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Suzanne J; Meyer, Carolyn B; Iannuzzi, Jacqueline; Schlekat, Tamar H

    2015-01-01

    Coal-fly ash was released in unprecedented amounts (4.1 × 10(6) m(3) ) into the Emory River from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant on Watts Bar Reservoir in Tennessee. Tree swallows were exposed to ash-related constituents at the ash release via their diet of emergent aquatic insects, whose larval forms can accumulate constituents from submerged river sediments. Reproduction of tree swallow colonies was assessed over a 2-year period by evaluating whether 1) ash constituent concentrations were elevated in egg, eggshell, and nestling tissues at colonies near ash-impacted river reaches compared to reference colonies, 2) production of fledglings per nesting female was significantly lower in ash-impacted colonies versus reference colonies, and 3) ash constituent concentrations or diet concentrations were correlated with nest productivity measures (clutch size, hatching success, and nestling survival, and fledglings produced per nest). Of the 26 ash constituents evaluated, 4 (Se, Sr, Cu, and Hg) were significantly elevated in tissues potentially from the ash, and 3 (Se, Sr, and Cu) in tissues or in swallow diet items were weakly correlated to at least one nest-productivity measure or egg weight. Tree swallow hatching success was significantly reduced by 12%, but fledgling production per nest was unaffected due to larger clutch sizes in the impacted than reference colonies. Bioconcentration from the ash to insects in the diet to tree swallow eggs appears to be low. Overall, adverse impacts of the ash on tree swallow reproduction were not observed, but monitoring is continuing to further ensure Se from the residual ash does not adversely affect tree swallow reproduction over time. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2015;11:56-66. © 2014 SETAC. © 2014 SETAC.

  2. A trade-off between reproduction and feather growth in the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Saino

    Full Text Available Physiological trade-offs mediated by limiting energy, resources or time constrain the simultaneous expression of major functions and can lead to the evolution of temporal separation between demanding activities. In birds, plumage renewal is a demanding activity, which accomplishes fundamental functions, such as allowing thermal insulation, aerodynamics and socio-sexual signaling. Feather renewal is a very expensive and disabling process, and molt is often partitioned from breeding and migration. However, trade-offs between feather renewal and breeding have been only sparsely studied. In barn swallows (Hirundo rustica breeding in Italy and undergoing molt during wintering in sub-Saharan Africa, we studied this trade-off by removing a tail feather from a large sample of individuals and analyzing growth bar width, reflecting feather growth rate, and length of the growing replacement feather in relation to the stage in the breeding cycle at removal and clutch size. Growth bar width of females and length of the growing replacement feather of both sexes were smaller when the original feather had been removed after clutch initiation. Importantly, in females both growth bar width and replacement feather length were negatively predicted by clutch size, and more strongly so for large clutches and when feather removal occurred immediately after clutch completion. Hence, we found strong, coherent evidence for a trade-off between reproduction, and laying effort in particular, and the ability to generate new feathers. These results support the hypothesis that the derived condition of molting during wintering in long-distance migrants is maintained by the costs of overlapping breeding and molt.

  3. Voluntary Modulation of Hemodynamic Responses in Swallowing Related Motor Areas: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy-Based Neurofeedback Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Erika Kober

    Full Text Available In the present study, we show for the first time that motor imagery of swallowing, which is defined as the mental imagination of a specific motor act without overt movements by muscular activity, can be successfully used as mental strategy in a neurofeedback training paradigm. Furthermore, we demonstrate its effects on cortical correlates of swallowing function. Therefore, N = 20 healthy young adults were trained to voluntarily increase their hemodynamic response in swallowing related brain areas as assessed with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. During seven training sessions, participants received either feedback of concentration changes in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb group, N = 10 or deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxy-Hb group, N = 10 over the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG during motor imagery of swallowing. Before and after the training, we assessed cortical activation patterns during motor execution and imagery of swallowing. The deoxy-Hb group was able to voluntarily increase deoxy-Hb over the IFG during imagery of swallowing. Furthermore, swallowing related cortical activation patterns were more pronounced during motor execution and imagery after the training compared to the pre-test, indicating cortical reorganization due to neurofeedback training. The oxy-Hb group could neither control oxy-Hb during neurofeedback training nor showed any cortical changes. Hence, successful modulation of deoxy-Hb over swallowing related brain areas led to cortical reorganization and might be useful for future treatments of swallowing dysfunction.

  4. Ingestion of six cylindrical and four button batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Simon U; Rasmussen, Morten; Hoegberg, Lotte C G

    2010-01-01

    We report a suicidal ingestion of six cylindrical and four button batteries, in combination with overdosed prescription medicine and smoking of cannabis.......We report a suicidal ingestion of six cylindrical and four button batteries, in combination with overdosed prescription medicine and smoking of cannabis....

  5. 14 CFR 33.78 - Rain and hail ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... distribution at the inlet plane, of at least four percent. Acceptable engine operation precludes flameout, run... for flight operation, then (4) Continuation of the rain ingestion during subsequent rapid acceleration... the engine's critical face area, and their ingestion must not cause unacceptable mechanical damage or...

  6. The anesthetic management of button battery ingestion in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Richard J; Hoagland, Monica; Mayes, Lena; Twite, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Injuries related to button battery ingestion are common in children. This review provides an outline of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and anesthetic implications in children who have ingested a button battery. A literature search was conducted in the United States National Library of Medicine PubMed database using the terms "button battery ingestion" and "children' and "removal" and "surgery" and "anesthesia". Ninety-six articles published in English were found from 1983-2017, and 62 of these articles were incorporated into this review. Additionally, the Internet was searched with the terms "button battery ingestion and children" to identify further entities, organizations, and resources affiliated with button battery ingestion in children. These additional sources were studied and included in this review. Button batteries are ubiquitous in homes and electronic devices. Since 2006, larger-diameter and higher-voltage batteries have become available. These are more likely to become impacted in the esophagus after ingestion and lead to an increase in severe morbidity and mortality due to caustic tissue injury. Children at the highest risk for complications are those under six years of age who have ingested batteries > 20 mm in diameter and sustain prolonged esophageal impaction at the level of the aortic arch with the negative pole oriented anteriorly. Anesthesiologists need to know about the epidemiology, pathophysiology, complications, and anesthetic management of children who have ingested button batteries.

  7. Impacted metallic foreign body in colon following ingestion: report of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Foreign body ingestion is a common clinical problem in early childhood. However, it may occur even in adults, unknowingly especially in depressed patients. Most ingested foreign bodies entering the stomach pass through the gastrointestinal tract uneventfully. Management protocol may vary depending on ...

  8. Acute barium toxicity from ingestion of "snake" fireworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyee, Sean H; Heard, Kennon

    2009-12-01

    Ingestion of fireworks has been infrequently reported in the medical literature. We describe a case of acute barium poisoning following firework ingestion. A 35-year-old male with a history of severe mental retardation presented with vomiting and diarrhea following ingestion of 16 small fireworks ("color snakes" and "black snakes"). His condition rapidly deteriorated and he developed obtundation, wide complex dysrhythmias, and respiratory failure. Approximately 12 hours following ingestion, his serum potassium level was 1.5 mmol/L with a serum barium level of 20,200 microg/mL (reference range firework ingestion is uncommon, clinicians should be prepared for potentially severe complications. In the case of barium poisoning, treatment consists of potassium supplementation, along with respiratory and hemodynamic support.

  9. Aging of microplastics promotes their ingestion by marine zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroom, Renske J E; Koelmans, Albert A; Besseling, Ellen; Halsband, Claudia

    2017-12-01

    Microplastics (microplastics to test their impacts, while aging processes such as weathering and biofouling alter the characteristics of plastic particles in the marine environment. We investigated zooplankton ingestion of polystyrene beads (15 and 30 μm) and fragments (≤30 μm), and tested the hypothesis that microplastics previously exposed to marine conditions (aged) are ingested at higher rates than pristine microplastics. Polystyrene beads were aged by soaking in natural local seawater for three weeks. Three zooplankton taxa ingested microplastics, excluding the copepod Pseudocalanus spp., but the proportions of individuals ingesting plastic and the number of particles ingested were taxon and life stage specific and dependent on plastic size. All stages of Calanus finmarchicus ingested polystyrene fragments. Aged microbeads were preferred over pristine ones by females of Acartia longiremis as well as juvenile copepodites CV and adults of Calanus finmarchicus. The preference for aged microplastics may be attributed to the formation of a biofilm. Such a coating, made up of natural microbes, may contain similar prey as the copepods feed on in the water column and secrete chemical exudates that aid chemodetection and thus increase the attractiveness of the particles as food items. Much of the ingested plastic was, however, egested within a short time period (2-4 h) and the survival of adult Calanus females was not affected in an 11-day exposure. Negative effects of microplastics ingestion were thus limited. Our findings emphasize, however, that aging plays an important role in the transformation of microplastics at sea and ingestion by grazers, and should thus be considered in future microplastics ingestion studies and estimates of microplastics transfer into the marine food web. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute acetaminophen (paracetamol) ingestion improves time to exhaustion during exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, Alexis R; Taylor, Lee; Harding, Christopher; Wright, Benjamin; Foster, Josh; Castle, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic and antipyretic and has previously been shown to improve exercise performance through a reduction in perceived pain. This study sought to establish whether its antipyretic action may also improve exercise capacity in the heat by moderating the increase in core temperature. On separate days, 11 recreationally active participants completed two experimental time-to-exhaustion trials on a cycle ergometer in hot conditions (30°C, 50% relative humidity) after ingesting a placebo control or an oral dose of acetaminophen in a randomized, double-blind design. Following acetaminophen ingestion, participants cycled for a significantly longer period of time (acetaminophen, 23 ± 15 min versus placebo, 19 ± 13 min; P = 0.005; 95% confidence interval = 90-379 s), and this was accompanied by significantly lower core (-0.15°C), skin (-0.47°C) and body temperatures (0.19°C; P 0.05). This is the first study to demonstrate that an acute dose of acetaminophen can improve cycling capacity in hot conditions, and that this may be due to the observed reduction in core, skin and body temperature and the subjective perception of thermal comfort. These findings suggest that acetaminophen may reduce the thermoregulatory strain elicited from exercise, thus improving time to exhaustion.

  11. Swallowing disorders in nursing home residents: how can the problem be explained?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira D

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dália Nogueira,1 Elizabeth Reis21Speech Therapy Department, Escola Superior de Saúde de Alcoitão, Estoril, Portugal; 2Department of Quantitative Methods, Lisbon University Institute ISCTE/IUL, Lisbon, PortugalBackground: The swallowing mechanism changes significantly as people age, even in the absence of chronic diseases. Presbyphagia, a term that refers to aging-related changes in the swallowing mechanism, may be linked to many health conditions and presents itself in distinct ways. Swallowing disorders are also identified as a major problem amongst the elderly population living in nursing homes.Methods: The study sought to determine the prevalence of swallowing disorders in nursing home residents, to identify the relationship between self-perceived swallowing disorders, cognitive functions, autonomy, and depression, and also to analyze which variables explain the score of the Dysphagia Self-Test (DST. For this purpose, the researchers chose to apply a survey conveying questions on demographic aspects, general health, eating and feeding, as well as instruments to assess functional performance and the 3 ounce Water Swallow Test.Results: The sample consisted of 272 elderly people living in eight nursing homes in Portugal. Six did not sign the informed consent form. Of the total, 29% were totally dependent, 33% were depressed, 45% had cognitive impairment, and 38% needed help with feeding. About 43% of the individuals reported having problems related to eating. Regarding the DST, 40% showed signs of dysphagia. With respect to the 3 ounce Water Swallow Test, 38% revealed at least one of the symptoms, wet voice being the most prevalent. Correlation measures showed that age had no linear association with the DST score although correlation with the Barthel Index and Mini Mental State Examination was found to be significant. A linear regression model was estimated with the DST score as the dependent variable and the MMSE and BI scores, gender, age

  12. On the Physiology of Normal Swallowing as Revealed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Real Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Olthoff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the physiology of normal swallowing using recent advances in real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Therefore ten young healthy subjects underwent real-time MRI and flexible endoscopic evaluations of swallowing (FEES with thickened pineapple juice as oral contrast bolus. MRI movies were recorded in sagittal, coronal, and axial orientations during successive swallows at about 25 frames per second. Intermeasurement variation was analyzed and comparisons between real-time MRI and FEES were performed. Twelve distinct swallowing events could be quantified by real-time MRI (start time, end time, and duration. These included five valve functions: oro-velar opening, velo-pharyngeal closure, glottal closure, epiglottic retroflexion, and esophageal opening; three bolus transports: oro-velar transit, pharyngeal delay, pharyngeal transit; and four additional events: laryngeal ascent, laryngeal descent, vallecular, and piriform sinus filling and pharyngeal constriction. Repetitive measurements confirmed the general reliability of the MRI method with only two significant differences for the start times of the velo-pharyngeal closure (t(8=-2.4, P≤0.046 and laryngeal ascent (t(8=-2.6, P≤0.031. The duration of the velo-pharyngeal closure was significantly longer in real-time MRI compared to FEES (t(8=-3.3, P≤0.011. Real-time MRI emerges as a simple, robust, and reliable tool for obtaining comprehensive functional and anatomical information about the swallowing process.

  13. Analysis of oropharyngeal dysphagia through fibroendoscopy evaluation of swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Flores, Melissa; Arch-Tirado, Emilio; Villeda-Miranda, Alicia; Rocha-Cacho, Karina Elizabeth; Verduzco-Mendoza, Antonio; Hernández-López, Xochiquetzal

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a high incidence in Mexico and is estimated at approximately 500,000 patients. One of the main clinical manifestations of PD is dysphagia, which is the difficult passage of food from the mouth to the stomach. The aim of this study was to assess oropharyngeal dysphagia through fibroendoscopy evaluation of swallowing in patients with PD. We conducted a census sample of patients with PD: 17 males and 10 females, aged >49 years. Clinical history, physical examination and neurological evaluation of swallowing fibroendoscopy were carried out. Of the symptomatic patients, 16 patients (59.25%) reported dysphagia. Fibroendoscopic evaluation demonstrated swallowing disorders in 25 patients (92.59%). The main findings were poor bolus control in 19 patients (70.37%), deficits in bolus propulsion in 25 patients (92.59%), impaired swallowing in 14 patients (51.85%), fractional swallowing in 11 patients (40.74%), reduced epiglottic tilting in 11 patients (48.14%), food residue in vallecula in 24 patients (88.88%) and piriform sinus in 19 patients (70.37%). There was no correlation between duration of PD and degree of involvement of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with PD is a common symptom and can range from the oral cavity to the upper esophageal sphincter. Early onset of severe dysphagia is exceptional in this disease and should alert the clinician to the diagnostic possibility of parkinsonism.

  14. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nin, Carlos Shuler; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Paludo, Artur de Oliveira; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Hochhegger, Daniela Reis; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough. Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological changes. Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test for categorical data were used in the comparisons. The images taken immediately after barium swallow revealed significant pathological conditions that were potentially related to chronic cough in 12 (12.6%) of the 95 patients. These conditions, which included diaphragmatic hiatal hernia, esophageal neoplasm, achalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and abnormal esophageal dilatation, were not detected on the images taken without contrast. After appropriate treatment, the symptoms disappeared in 11 (91.6%) of the patients, whereas the treatment was ineffective in 1 (8.4%). We observed no complications related to barium swallow, such as contrast aspiration. Barium swallow improved the detection of significant radiographic findings related to chronic cough in 11.5% of patients. These initial findings suggest that the routine use of barium swallow can significantly increase the sensitivity of chest X-rays in the detection of chronic cough-related etiologies.

  15. Application of Kinesio Taping method for newborn swallowing difficultly: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Lin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Chang, Ke-Vin; Lin, Hong-Yi; Chou, Li-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Preterm infants are at an increased risk of sucking problems, swallowing difficulty, and poor nourishment. During the neonatal period, the neurobehavioral organization of a preterm baby is poor compared with that of appropriate gestational age infants. Kinesio Taping has been widely used for edema control, joint protection, and proprioception training. With the help of augmentation of the sensory input for muscle facilitation and inhibition through tapping, the coordination of the target muscle groups can be improved. Until now, no research is available on the use of Kinesio Taping for the swallowing difficulty of infant. We reported a preterm infant suffering from brain edema at birth and swallowing difficultly until 40 weeks. The swallowing reflex was delayed. Moreover, lip closure and rooting reflex combined with the dysfunction grade of jaw movement were poor. We performed KT methods on the baby under the theory of the direction of the tape for facilitate or inhibit the muscle. After the Kinesio Taping treatment, the sucking function was improved with good lip closure.One week later, the baby was discharged without the use of an oral gastric tube. Kinesio Taping contributed significantly to the improvement of impaired sucking and swallowing and could be implemented as a regular rehabilitative approach for infants suffering from these difficulties.

  16. Experimental infection of cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) with varying doses of West Nile virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterle, P.T.; Nemeth, N.M.; VanDalen, Kaci K.; Sullivan, H.; Bentler, K.T.; Young, G.R.; McLean, R.G.; Clark, L.; Smeraski, C.; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) were inoculated with differing doses of West Nile virus (WNV) to evaluate their potential role as reservoir hosts in nature. Swallows often nest in large colonies in habitats and months associated with high mosquito abundance and early WNV transmission in North America. Additionally, cliff swallow diet consists of insects, including mosquitoes, leading to an additional potential route of WNV infection. The average peak viremia titer among infected cliff swallows was 106.3 plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL serum and the reservoir competence index was 0.34. There was no correlation between dose and probability of becoming infected or viremia peak and duration. Oral shedding was detected from 2 to 14 days post-inoculation with an average peak titer of 1044 PFU/swab. These results suggest that cliff swallows are competent reservoir hosts of WNV and therefore, they may play a role in early seasonal amplification and maintenance of WNV. Copyright ?? 2009 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  17. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Shuler Nin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough.METHODS: Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological changes. Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test for categorical data were used in the comparisons.RESULTS: The images taken immediately after barium swallow revealed significant pathological conditions that were potentially related to chronic cough in 12 (12.6% of the 95 patients. These conditions, which included diaphragmatic hiatal hernia, esophageal neoplasm, achalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and abnormal esophageal dilatation, were not detected on the images taken without contrast. After appropriate treatment, the symptoms disappeared in 11 (91.6% of the patients, whereas the treatment was ineffective in 1 (8.4%. We observed no complications related to barium swallow, such as contrast aspiration.CONCLUSIONS: Barium swallow improved the detection of significant radiographic findings related to chronic cough in 11.5% of patients. These initial findings suggest that the routine use of barium swallow can significantly increase the sensitivity of chest X-rays in the detection of chronic cough-related etiologies.

  18. Impacts of palatal coverage on bolus formation during mastication and swallowing and subsequent adaptive changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Furuya, J; Tamada, Y; Kondo, H

    2013-10-01

    Palatal coverage is often required for elderly edentulous patients with complete dentures. The purpose of this study was to clarify impacts of palatal coverage on bolus formation and subsequent adaptive changes. Subjects were 18 healthy young dentulous adults who wore 1·5-mm-thick palatal plates. Subjects were asked to feed 12 g of bicoloured rice as usual, and the bolus formation by mastication and swallowing in the pharynx was observed using a nasal videoendoscopy. The bolus formation index (BFI), number of mastication strokes until swallowing, visual analogue scale about swallowing easiness and masticatory performance using colour-changeable gum were measured under three conditions: before placement of the palatal plate (day 0), immediately after placement (day 1) and after 7 days of wearing the plate (day 7). BFI and visual analogue scale on day 1 were significantly lower than those on day 0, but those on day 7 significantly recovered to the level of day 0. The number of mastication strokes did not change from day 0 to day 1, however, that on day 7 was significantly higher. Masticatory performance on days 1 and 7 was significantly lower than that on day 0. Although palatal coverage inhibits bolus formation during feeding, subjects increased the number of mastication strokes until swallowing threshold as they adapted to palatal coverage over time. This adaptive change was due to compensate for the lowered masticatory performance to achieve bolus formation for comfortable swallowing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Swallowing rehabilitation of dysphagic tracheostomized patients under mechanical ventilation in intensive care units: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Katia Alonso; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro; Chiari, Brasília Maria; Rosseti, Heloísa Baccaro; Lorenzon, Paula; Gonçalves, Maria Inês Rebelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of the early implementation of a swallowing rehabilitation program in tracheostomized patients under mechanical ventilation with dysphagia. This prospective study was conducted in the intensive care units of a university hospital. We included hemodynamically stable patients under mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours following 48 hours of tracheostomy and with an appropriate level of consciousness. The exclusion criteria were previous surgery in the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx and/or esophagus, the presence of degenerative diseases or a past history of oropharyngeal dysphagia. All patients were submitted to a swallowing rehabilitation program. An oropharyngeal structural score, a swallowing functional score and an otorhinolaryngological structural and functional score were determined before and after swallowing therapy. We included 14 patients. The mean duration of the rehabilitation program was 12.4 ± 9.4 days, with 5.0 ± 5.2 days under mechanical ventilation. Eleven patients could receive oral feeding while still in the intensive care unit after 4 (2 - 13) days of therapy. All scores significantly improved after therapy. In this small group of patients, we demonstrated that the early implementation of a swallowing rehabilitation program is feasible even in patients under mechanical ventilation.

  20. Sensory and instrumental analysis for slipperiness and compliance of food during swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, H-S; Hwang, I K; Han, T R; Kim, I S

    2007-11-01

    In spite of its importance, there have been few attempts to evaluate the sensory attributes of the food bolus during swallowing. In the current study, the slipperiness, the degree of slide for the food bolus through the mucosal surface of the oro-pharynx, and the compliance, how easily the shape of a food bolus can be transformed for automatic and comfortable swallowing, were derived among several sensory attributes related to the swallowing. Therefore, the study aims were twofold: (1) to develop the methods of sensory and instrumental analyses for determining the slipperiness and compliance of the food bolus during swallowing and (2) to examine the appropriateness of the newly designed devices by correlating the data between the sensory and instrumental analyses. Six commercial food products were evaluated by 10 trained panelists for each attribute. The devices for assessing each attribute were developed in consideration of the oro-pharyngeal movements. The sensory and instrumental analyses showed high correlation and regression coefficients as well as intensity differences of the 6 samples for each attribute. In conclusion, the slipperiness and the compliance were suitable for acquiring a better understanding of the sensory attributes of the food bolus during swallowing, and the newly developed devices showed a high potential for determining those attributes.

  1. Multisensor classification system for triggering FES in order to support voluntary swallowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Riebold

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In dysphagia the ability of elevating the larynx and hyoid is usually impaired. Electromyography (EMG and Bioimpedance (BI measurements at the neck can be used to trigger functional electrical stimulation (FES of swallowing related muscles. Nahrstaedt et al.1 introduced an algorithm to trigger the stimulation in phase with the voluntary swallowing to improve the airway closure and elevation speed of the larynx and hyoid. However, due to non-swallow related movements like speaking, chewing or head turning, stimulations might be unintentionally triggered. So far a switch was used to enable the BI/EMG-triggering of FES when the subject was ready to swallow, which is inconvenient for practical use. In this contribution, a range image camera system is introduced to obtain data of head, mouth, and jaw movements. This data is used to apply a second classification step to reduce the number of false stimulations. In experiments with healthy subjects, the amount of potential false stimulations could be reduced by 47% while 83% of swallowing intentions would have been correctely supported by FES.

  2. Effect of Bolus Viscosity on the Safety and Efficacy of Swallowing and the Kinematics of the Swallow Response in Patients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: White Paper by the European Society for Swallowing Disorders (ESSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Roger; Vilardell, Natàlia; Clavé, Pere; Speyer, Renée

    2016-04-01

    Fluid thickening is a well-established management strategy for oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD). However, the effects of thickening agents on the physiology of impaired swallow responses are not fully understood, and there is no agreement on the degree of bolus thickening. To review the literature and to produce a white paper of the European Society for Swallowing Disorders (ESSD) describing the evidence in the literature on the effect that bolus modification has upon the physiology, efficacy and safety of swallowing in adults with OD. A systematic search was performed using the electronic Pubmed and Embase databases. Articles in English available up to July 2015 were considered. The inclusion criteria swallowing studies on adults over 18 years of age; healthy people or patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia; bolus modification; effects of bolus modification on swallow safety (penetration/aspiration) and efficacy; and/or physiology and original articles written in English. The exclusion criteria consisted of oesophageal dysphagia and conference abstracts or presentations. The quality of the selected papers and the level of research evidence were assessed by standard quality assessments. At the end of the selection process, 33 articles were considered. The quality of all included studies was assessed using systematic, reproducible, and quantitative tools (Kmet and NHMRC) concluding that all the selected articles reached a valid level of evidence. The literature search gathered data from various sources, ranging from double-blind randomised control trials to systematic reviews focused on changes occurring in swallowing physiology caused by thickened fluids. Main results suggest that increasing bolus viscosity (a) results in increased safety of swallowing, (b) also results in increased amounts of oral and/or pharyngeal residue which may result in post-swallow airway invasion, (c) impacts the physiology with increased lingual pressure patterns, no major changes in impaired

  3. Achados da videoendoscopia da deglutição em adultos com disfagia orofaríngea neurogênica Findings of fiberoptic endoscopy of swallowing in adults with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Andrade dos Santos de Queiroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever os principais achados da videoendoscopia da deglutição em adultos com disfagia orofaríngea neurogênica. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo de 46 prontuários de pacientes com diagnóstico de disfagia orofaríngea neurogênica, atendidos no período de julho de 2004 a dezembro de 2007 no Ambulatório de Disfagia da Universidade de Fortaleza. A média de idade dos pacientes foi de 58,9 anos, variando entre 18 e 85 anos, sendo 51,1% (22/43 do gênero masculino e 48,9% (21/43 do gênero feminino. Os exames foram considerados alterados na presença de uma ou mais das seguintes manifestações disfágicas: escape precoce posterior, atraso na deglutição, estase em valéculas e/ou recessos piriformes, penetração laríngea e/ou aspiração traqueal. RESULTADOS: Os principais achados observados foram, em ordem decrescente de ocorrência: estase em valéculas após a ingestão da consistência pastosa grossa, atraso na deglutição durante a deglutição de alimentos nas consistências pastosa grossa e sólida, presença de estase em recessos piriformes após a deglutição da consistência pastosa fina, escape posterior de líquido, penetração laríngea e aspiração traqueal de líquidos antes da deglutição. CONCLUSÃO: As principais manifestações disfágicas observadas estiveram relacionadas às alterações das fases voluntárias da deglutição e ao aumento das consistências dos alimentos. A videoendoscopia da deglutição demonstrou ser um instrumento eficaz no diagnóstico das disfagias orofaríngeas.PURPOSE: To describe the main findings of fiberoptic endoscopy of swallowing in adults with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia. METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out using 46 medical records of patients with diagnosis of neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia, assisted in the period from July 2004 to December 2007 at the Dysphagia Ambulatory of the University of Fortaleza. The average age of the

  4. The influence of carbohydrate-electrolyte ingestion on soccer skill performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ajmol; Williams, Clyde; Nicholas, Ceri W; Foskett, Andrew

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the effect of ingesting a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHO-E), in subjects with reduced carbohydrate stores, during an intermittent shuttle running test (LIST) on soccer passing (LSPT) and shooting (LSST) performance. Sixteen healthy male university soccer players ingested either a 6.4% CHO-E or placebo (PLA) solution during 90 min of the LIST (5 mL x kg(-1) BM before and 2 mL x kg(-1) BM every 15 min of exercise), in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design, with each trial separated by at least 7 d. On the evening before the main trial (17:00 h), subjects performed the glycogen-reducing cycling exercise (approximately 80 min at 70% VO2max). They were then fed a low-carbohydrate evening meal and reported to the laboratory the following morning after a 10-h fast. Blood was collected at rest and after every 30 min of exercise; skill tests were performed before and after the LIST. The change in mean LSST performance from pre- to post-LIST was better in the CHO-E trial (11 +/- 45 vs -16 +/- 42%; P carbohydrate-electrolyte solution during exercise enabled subjects with compromised glycogen stores to better maintain skill and sprint performance than when ingesting fluid alone.

  5. Fixed drug eruption to ingested propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramien, Michele L; Pratt, Melanie D

    2012-01-01

    Fixed drug eruptions (FDEs) are a unique type of drug allergy in which skin lesions recur in the same location after each ingestion of the offending agent. More than 100 drugs have been implicated in causing FDEs. More recently, herbal medications and food additives have been implicated. Propolis is an important contact allergen, but has not previously been reported to cause FDE. We present the case of a patient with a 1-year history of a recurrent lesion on the shaft of his penis. He tested strongly positive to propolis and had been using a herbal supplement. A trial off this supplement was initiated, and his penile lesion cleared. The patient then rechallenged himself with his powder and developed the same reaction, biopsy-proven to be consistent with FDE. This case illustrates the utility of systemic (rechallenge) and topical (patch-testing) testing to identify the causative agent. It is interesting to note that our patient developed a reaction at the site of the patch test for propolis itself, rather than at the former reaction site. Our patient also illustrates the necessity of considering new causes for FDE when typical lesions are present.

  6. Ingestion of microplastic has limited impact on a marine larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaposi, Katrina L; Mos, Benjamin; Kelaher, Brendan P; Dworjanyn, Symon A

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern about the impacts of microplastics (Microplastics may be mistaken for food items and ingested by a wide variety of organisms. While the effects of ingesting microplastic have been explored for some adult organisms, there is poor understanding of the effects of microplastic ingestion on marine larvae. Here, we investigated the ingestion of polyethylene microspheres by larvae of the sea urchin, Tripneustes gratilla. Ingestion rates scaled with the concentration of microspheres. Ingestion rates were, however, reduced by biological fouling of microplastic and in the presence of phytoplankton food. T. gratilla larvae were able to egest microspheres from their stomach within hours of ingestion. A microsphere concentration far exceeding those recorded in the marine environment had a small nondose dependent effect on larval growth, but there was no significant effect on survival. In contrast, environmentally realistic concentrations appeared to have little effect. Overall, these results suggest that current levels of microplastic pollution in the oceans only pose a limited threat to T. gratilla and other marine invertebrate larvae, but further research is required on a broad range of species, trophic levels, and polymer types.

  7. Pediatric ingestions of house hold products containing ethanol: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayar, Praveen; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2013-03-01

    Alcohol is present in a number of household items that are readily accessible to children. Ingestion of these household products containing alcohol can lead to significant health risks. To identify reported cases of ingestions of common household items that have led to ethanol intoxication, poisoning, or death in children up to the age of 18 years. The OVID MEDLINE database from 1948 to March 2011, Embase from 1980 to March 2011, and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) from 1982 to February 2011 were searched for articles with the following key terms: alcohols(ethanol or ethyl alcohol) and ingest*(ingestion) or intoxic*(intoxication) or poisoning* or death. The search was limited to children (0-18 years). All articles that reported ingestion of household products that contained ethanol were included in the analysis. Results. Many household products, particularly mouthwashes, hand sanitizers, and cosmetics contain quantities of ethanol that are significant enough to induce intoxication and hypoglycemia. There were 17 publications directly reporting on children with alcohol intoxication from household products. Serious adverse events included hypoglycemia, seizures, and death. Child-resistant closures appear to have reduced the incidence of ingestion of ethanol-based products, including mouthwashes, and may be applicable to other products such as hand sanitizers. Ingestion of household substances containing alcohol continues to be a health care problem. Legislature to reduce alcohol content in household products and public education should be instituted to prevent poisonings in children.

  8. Ingestion of microplastics by commercial fish off the Portuguese coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Diogo; Sobral, Paula; Ferreira, Joana Lia; Pereira, Tânia

    2015-12-15

    The digestive tract contents of 263 individuals from 26 species of commercial fish were examined for microplastics. These were found in 17 species, corresponding to 19.8% of the fish of which 32.7% had ingested more than one microplastic. Of all the fish that ingested microplastics, 63.5% was benthic and 36.5% pelagic species. A total of 73 microplastics were recorded, 48 (65.8%) being fibres and 25 (34.2%) being fragments. Polymers were polypropylene, polyethylene, alkyd resin, rayon, polyester, nylon and acrylic. The mean of ingested microplastics was 0.27 ± 0.63 per fish, (n=263). Pelagic fish ingested more particles and benthic fish ingested more fibres, but no significant differences were found. Fish with the highest number of microplastics were from the mouth of the Tagus river. Scomber japonicus registered the highest mean of ingested microplastics, suggesting its potential as indicator species to monitor and investigate trends in ingested litter, in the MSFD marine regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-paced exercise performance in the heat after pre-exercise cold-fluid ingestion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Byrne, Christopher; Owen, Craig; Cosnefroy, Aurélien; Lee, Jason Kai Wei

    2011-01-01

    ... demonstrated. To confirm the effectiveness of pre-exercise ingestion of cold fluid without fluid ingestion during exercise on pre-exercise core temperature and to determine whether pre-exercise ingestion of cold...

  10. Longitudinal study on a rehabilitative model for correction of atypical swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuca, M R; Pasini, M; Pagano, A; Mummolo, S; Vanni, A

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study is to analyse the prevalence of anomalous function of the orofacial muscles and their aetiological factors in a small sample of paediatric patients, to evaluate the correlation between anomalous functions of the orofacial muscles and malocclusions, and finally to verify the effects of a myofunctional protocol, composed of a series of exercises aimed at correcting the anomalous function and position of the tongue. The protocol that has been used in this research is a re-elaboration of the diagnostic and therapeutic methods set by two authors, Daniel Garliner and Aurelio Levrini. A group of 57 children (aged 5 to 13, mean age 8.2) with atypical swallowing diagnosis, has been treated for almost 3 years. Physiologic swallowing was achieved in 47% of the children treated. The results show the benefits of the myofunctional therapy in the treatment of children with abnormal swallowing.

  11. Anatomy and Physiology of Feeding and Swallowing – Normal and Abnormal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Koichiro; Palmer, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Eating and swallowing are complex behaviors involving volitional and reflexive activities of more than 30 nerves and muscles. They have two crucial biological features: food passage from the oral cavity to stomach and airway protection. The swallowing process is commonly divided into oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal stages according to the location of the bolus. The movement of the food in the oral cavity and to the oropharynx differs between eating solid food and drinking liquid. Dysphagia can result from a wide variety of functional or structural deficits of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx or esophagus. The goal of dysphagia rehabilitation is to identify and treat abnormalities of feeding and swallowing while maintaining safe and efficient alimentation and hydration. PMID:18940636

  12. Oxycodone Ingestion Patterns in Acute Fracture Pain With Digital Pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Peter R; Carreiro, Stephanie; Innes, Brendan J; Chapman, Brittany; Schreiber, Kristin L; Edwards, Robert R; Carrico, Adam W; Boyer, Edward W

    2017-12-01

    Opioid analgesics are commonly prescribed on an as-needed (PRN) basis for acute painful conditions. Uncertainty of how patients actually take PRN opioids, coupled with a desire to completely cover pain, leads to variable and overly generous opioid prescribing practices, resulting in a surplus of opioids. This opioid surplus becomes a source for diversion and nonmedical opioid use. Understanding patterns of actual opioid ingestion after acute painful conditions can help clinicians counsel patients on safe opioid use, and allow timely recognition and intervention when escalating opioid self-dosing occurs, to prevent tolerance and addiction. We used a novel oxycodone digital pill system (ingestible biosensor within a standard gelatin capsule combined with 5-mg oxycodone) that when ingested, is activated by the chloride ion gradient in the stomach thereby emitting a radiofrequency signal captured by a wearable reader. The reader relays ingestion data to a cloud-based server that displays ingestion events to the study team. We deployed the oxycodone digital pill among opioid-naive individuals discharged from the emergency department with acute fracture pain. Participants were trained on digital pill operation and discharged with twenty-one 5-mg oxycodone digital pills. They were instructed to take digital pills PRN for pain on discharge. We conducted a brief interview 7 days after study enrollment, at which point participants returned the digital pill system. We identified oxycodone ingestion events in real time by data from the digital pill system and performed pill counts at the return visit to validate digital pill reporting of medication ingestion. In this study, 26 individuals were approached; 16 enrolled with 15 completing the study. Participants ingested a median of 6 (3-9.5) oxycodone digital pills over the course of 7 days, with 82% of the oxycodone dose ingested in the first 3 days. In individuals who required operative repair, 86% (N = 6) continued to ingest

  13. Ingestive behaviour and physiology of the medicinal leech

    OpenAIRE

    Lent, C. M.; Fliegner, K. H.; Freedman, E.; Dickinson, M H

    1988-01-01

    Ingestion lasts 25 min in Hirudo medicinalis and is characterized by pharyngeal peristalsis which fills the crop. This peristalsis has an initial rate of 2.4 Hz which decays smoothly to 1.2 Hz at termination of ingestion. During ingestion, the leech body wall undergoes peristalsis which appears to aid in filling the crop diverticula. Body peristalsis begins at a rate of 10 min^(-1) and decreases linearly to 2 min^(-1) at termination. The body also undergoes dorsoventral flexions when blood fl...

  14. Simulation of swallowing dysfunction and mechanical ventilation after a Montgomery T-tube insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, O; Malvè, M; Mena Tobar, A; Doblaré, M

    2015-01-01

    The Montgomery T-tube is used as a combined tracheal stent and airway after laryngotracheoplasty, to keep the lumen open and prevent mucosal laceration from scarring. It is valuable in the management of upper and mid-tracheal lesions, while invaluable in long and multisegmental stenting lesions. Numerical simulations based on real-patient-tracheal geometry, experimental tissue characterization, and previous numerical estimation of the physiological swallowing force are performed to estimate the consequences of Montgomery T-tube implantation on swallowing and assisted ventilation: structural analysis of swallowing is performed to evaluate patient swallowing capacity, and computational fluid dynamics simulation is carried out to analyze related mechanical ventilation. With an inserted Montgomery T-tube, vertical displacement (Z-axis) reaches 8.01 mm, whereas in the Y-axis, it reaches 6.63 mm. The maximal principal stress obtained during swallowing was 1.6 MPa surrounding the hole and in the upper contact with the tracheal wall. Fluid flow simulation of the mechanical ventilation revealed positive pressure for both inhalation and exhalation, being higher for inspiration. The muscular deflections, considerable during normal breathing, are nonphysiological, and this aspect results in a constant overload of the tracheal muscle. During swallowing, the trachea ascends producing a nonhomogeneous elongation. This movement can be compromised when prosthesis is inserted, which explains the high incidence of glottis close inefficiency. Fluid simulations showed that nonphysiological pressure is established inside the trachea due to mechanical ventilation. This may lead to an overload of the tracheal muscle, explaining several related problems as muscle thinning or decrease in contractile function.

  15. Adapting human videofluoroscopic swallow study methods to detect and characterize dysphagia in murine disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Teresa E; Braun, Sabrina M; Brooks, Ryan T; Harris, Rebecca A; Littrell, Loren L; Neff, Ryan M; Hinkel, Cameron J; Allen, Mitchell J; Ulsas, Mollie A

    2015-03-01

    This study adapted human videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) methods for use with murine disease models for the purpose of facilitating translational dysphagia research. Successful outcomes are dependent upon three critical components: test chambers that permit self-feeding while standing unrestrained in a confined space, recipes that mask the aversive taste/odor of commercially-available oral contrast agents, and a step-by-step test protocol that permits quantification of swallow physiology. Elimination of one or more of these components will have a detrimental impact on the study results. Moreover, the energy level capability of the fluoroscopy system will determine which swallow parameters can be investigated. Most research centers have high energy fluoroscopes designed for use with people and larger animals, which results in exceptionally poor image quality when testing mice and other small rodents. Despite this limitation, we have identified seven VFSS parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice when using a high energy fluoroscope in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol. We recently obtained a low energy fluoroscopy system with exceptionally high imaging resolution and magnification capabilities that was designed for use with mice and other small rodents. Preliminary work using this new system, in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol, has identified 13 swallow parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice, which is nearly double the number obtained using conventional (i.e., high energy) fluoroscopes. Identification of additional swallow parameters is expected as we optimize the capabilities of this new system. Results thus far demonstrate the utility of using a low energy fluoroscopy system to detect and quantify subtle changes in swallow physiology that may otherwise be overlooked when using high energy fluoroscopes to investigate murine disease models.

  16. MRI of the Swallow Tail Sign: A Useful Marker in the Diagnosis of Lewy Body Dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, S; Fällmar, D; Schwarz, S; Wahlund, L-O; van Westen, D; Hansson, O; Larsson, E-M; Haller, S

    2017-09-01

    There are, to date, no MR imaging diagnostic markers for Lewy body dementia. Nigrosome 1, containing dopaminergic cells, in the substantia nigra pars compacta is hyperintense on SWI and has been called the swallow tail sign, disappearing with Parkinson disease. We aimed to study the swallow tail sign and its clinical applicability in Lewy body dementia and hypothesized that the sign would be likewise applicable in Lewy body dementia. This was a retrospective cross-sectional multicenter study including 97 patients (mean age, 65 ± 10 years; 46% women), consisting of the following: controls (n = 21) and those with Lewy body dementia (n = 19), Alzheimer disease (n = 20), frontotemporal lobe dementia (n = 20), and mild cognitive impairment (n = 17). All patients underwent brain MR imaging, with susceptibility-weighted imaging at 1.5T (n = 46) and 3T (n = 51). The swallow tail sign was assessed independently by 2 neuroradiologists. Interrater agreement was moderate (κ = 0.4) between raters. An abnormal swallow tail sign was most common in Lewy body dementia (63%; 95% CI, 41%-85%; P Lewy body dementia with an odds ratio of 9 (95% CI, 3-28; P Lewy body dementia showed a sensitivity of 63%, a specificity of 79%, a negative predictive value of 89%, and an accuracy of 76%; values were higher on 3T compared with 1.5T. The usefulness of the swallow tail sign was rater-dependent with the highest sensitivity equaling 100%. The swallow tail sign has diagnostic potential in Lewy body dementia and may be a complement in the diagnostic work-up of this condition. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  17. Speech and swallowing following tongue cancer surgery and free flap reconstruction--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Lisetta; Samman, Nabil

    2013-06-01

    This was a systematic review of the current research on speech and swallowing outcomes and the factors affecting these outcomes after primary resection of tongue cancer and free flap reconstruction. A structured search in various electronic databases and relevant journals was performed. Retrieved articles were critically appraised in three rounds according to the level of evidence, the methodological quality, and the specific domain of speech and swallowing. A total of 21 articles were in the final review and the findings were categorized according to the area of tongue resection. For patients with resection and free flap reconstruction limited to either the oral tongue or the base of tongue (BOT), significant decline in speech and swallowing function was evident in the early postoperative phase, but the majority recovered close to preoperative level after 1 year. Poorer speech and swallowing outcomes were found following resections involving both oral and base of tongue (OBOT) regardless of the type of free flap reconstruction. Results overall were influenced by multiple factors including tumor size, area of resection, method of reconstruction and the use of adjuvant therapy. The use of free flaps in the immediate reconstruction of the tongue after tumor resection should aim at the maintenance of the mobility of the residual tongue and restoration of tongue bulk in order to optimize the recovery of speech and swallowing function. Future research in this field should employ standardized and reliable evaluation of speech and swallowing outcomes using multiple modalities in well-designed cohort studies with longer follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hybrid fuzzy logic committee neural networks for recognition of swallow acceleration signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A; Reddy, N P; Narayanan, J

    2001-02-01

    Biological signals are complex and often require intelligent systems for recognition of characteristic signals. In order to improve the reliability of the recognition or automated diagnostic systems, hybrid fuzzy logic committee neural networks were developed and the system was used for recognition of swallow acceleration signals from artifacts. Two sets of fuzzy logic-committee networks (FCN) each consisting of seven member networks were developed, trained and evaluated. The FCN-I was used to recognize dysphagic swallow from artifacts, and the second committee FCN-II was used to recognize normal swallow from artifacts. Several networks were trained and the best seven were recruited into each committee. Acceleration signals from the throat were bandpass filtered, and several parameters were extracted and fed to the fuzzy logic block of either FCN-I or FCN-II. The fuzzified membership values were fed to the committee of neural networks which provided the signal classification. A majority opinion of the member networks was used to arrive at the final decision. Evaluation results revealed that FCN correctly identified 16 out of 16 artifacts and 31 out of 33 dysphagic swallows. In two cases, the decision was ambiguous due to the lack of a majority opinion. FCN-II correctly identified 24 out of 24 normal swallows, and 28 out of 29 artifacts. In one case, the decision was ambiguous due to the lack of a majority opinion. The present hybrid intelligent system consisting of fuzzy logic and committee networks provides a reliable tool for recognition and classification of acceleration signals due to swallowing.

  19. A new subfascial approach in open thyroidectomy: efficacy for postoperative voice, sensory, and swallowing symptoms. A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seung Pil; Kim, Sung Hoon; Bae, Soo Youn; Lee, Se Kyung; Kim, Sangmin; Choi, Min-Young; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minkuk; Kil, Won Ho; Choe, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Han; Nam, Seok Jin; Kim, Jee Soo

    2013-11-01

    After open thyroidectomy, patients usually complain of voice, sensory, and swallowing symptoms. We approached the thyroid via the subfascial method to reduce these symptoms and compared postthyroidectomy symptoms with the conventional subplatysmal method. Eighty-six patients undergoing thyroidectomy were recruited and randomized into either a conventional subplatysmal approach group (subplatysmal, 42 patients) group or a subanterior fascia of strap muscle approach group (subfascial, 44 patients). Voice symptoms were assessed using the Voice Handicap Index questionnaire and acoustic voice analysis. Sensory alterations were evaluated by the light touch and pain touch methods. Swallowing symptoms were assessed using the Swallowing Impairment Score (SIS) questionnaire, barium swallowing time, and hyoid bone movement range. Each variable was measured preoperatively, and at 2 weeks and 3 months after thyroidectomy. In both groups, the subjective symptoms of voice, sensation, and swallowing were significantly worsened at 2 weeks after operation, but improved 3 months after operation. Patients in the subplatysmal group had worse SIS scores than patients in the subfascial group (p = 0.016) and delayed barium swallowing time 2 weeks after operation (p = 0.008 compared to preoperative level). In the cohort over 50 years of age, SIS score did not recover to preoperative levels in the subplatysmal group 3 months after operation (p = 0.005 compared to preoperative level). The subfascial approach may be an effective method for reducing postthyroidectomy swallowing symptoms based on swallowing impairment score, especially in patients over 50 years of age.

  20. Changes in Swallowing after Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Instrumentation: A Presurgical versus Postsurgical Videofluoroscopic Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muss, Lydia; Wilmskoetter, Janina; Richter, Kerstin; Fix, Constanze; Stanschus, Soenke; Pitzen, Tobias; Drumm, Joerg; Molfenter, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with anterior instrumentation on swallowing function and physiology as measured on videofluoroscopic swallowing studies. Method: We retrospectively analyzed both functional measures (penetration-aspiration, residue) and…

  1. Nitric Oxide and Histamine Signal Attempts to Swallow: A Component of Learning that Food Is Inedible in "Aplysia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzoff, Ayelet; Miller, Nimrod; Susswein, Abraham J.

    2010-01-01

    Memory that food is inedible in "Aplysia" arises from training requiring three contingent events. Nitric oxide (NO) and histamine are released by a neuron responding to one of these events, attempts to swallow food. Since NO release during training is necessary for subsequent memory and NO substitutes for attempts to swallow, it was suggested that…

  2. Muscle glycogen storage after different amounts of carbohydrate ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, J L; Lee, M C; Brozinick, J T; Reed, M J

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the rate of muscle glycogen storage could be enhanced during the initial 4-h period postexercise by substantially increasing the amount of the carbohydrate consumed. Eight subjects cycled for 2 h on three separate occasions to deplete their muscle glycogen stores. Immediately and 2 h after exercise they consumed either 0 (P), 1.5 (L), or 3.0 g glucose/kg body wt (H) from a 50% glucose polymer solution. Blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein before exercise, during exercise, and throughout recovery. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis immediately, 2 h, and 4 h after exercise. Blood glucose and insulin declined significantly during exercise in each of the three treatments. They remained below the preexercise concentrations during recovery in the P treatment but increased significantly above the preexercise concentrations during the L and H treatments. By the end of the 4 h-recovery period, blood glucose and insulin were still significantly above the preexercise concentrations in both treatments. Muscle glycogen storage was significantly increased above the basal rate (P, 0.5 mumol.g wet wt-1.h-1) after ingestion of either glucose polymer supplement. The rates of muscle glycogen storage, however, were not different between the L and H treatments during the first 2 h (L, 5.2 +/- 0.9 vs. H, 5.8 +/- 0.7 mumol.g wet wt-1.h-1) or the second 2 h of recovery (L, 4.0 +/- 0.9 vs. H, 4.5 +/- 0.6 mumol.g wet wt-1. h-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Swallowing and speech function after intraoral soft tissue reconstruction with lateral upper arm free flap and radial forearm free flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, I; Gellrich, N-C; Duker, J; Schön, R; Fakler, O; Smelzeisen, R; Honda, T; Satoru, O

    2003-06-01

    Swallowing, speech, and morbidity were assessed postoperatively in 25 patients, 18 of whom had had intraoral defects reconstructed by lateral upper arm free flaps (LUFF) and 7 by radial forearm free flaps (RFFF). Video fluoroscopy was used to assess swallowing, the Freiburger audiometric test to assess speech; and measurement of arm circumference to assess donor site morbidity. A questionnaire was used to evaluate swallowing, speech, and donor site morbidity subjectively. The degree of impairment in swallowing depended on the site of resection. Anterior and posterior resections affected swallowing more than lateral resections. Anterior resection and the use of LUFFs reduced intelligibility. There was no significant difference in impairment between LUFF and RFFF. We conclude that the LUFFs are superior to RFFFs because they can be closed primary and the incidence of donor site morbidity is slight.

  4. Prospective clinical study on long-term swallowing function and voice quality in advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy and preventive swallowing exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijenga, Sophie A C; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Hilgers, Frans J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2015-11-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for advanced head and neck cancer (HNC) is associated with substantial early and late side effects, most notably regarding swallowing function, but also regarding voice quality and quality of life (QoL). Despite increased awareness/knowledge on acute dysphagia in HNC survivors, long-term (i.e., beyond 5 years) prospectively collected data on objective and subjective treatment-induced functional outcomes (and their impact on QoL) still are scarce. The objective of this study was the assessment of long-term CCRT-induced results on swallowing function and voice quality in advanced HNC patients. The study was conducted as a randomized controlled trial on preventive swallowing rehabilitation (2006-2008) in a tertiary comprehensive HNC center with twenty-two disease-free and evaluable HNC patients as participants. Multidimensional assessment of functional sequels was performed with videofluoroscopy, mouth opening measurements, Functional Oral Intake Scale, acoustic voice parameters, and (study specific, SWAL-QoL, and VHI) questionnaires. Outcome measures at 6 years post-treatment were compared with results at baseline and at 2 years post-treatment. At a mean follow-up of 6.1 years most initial tumor-, and treatment-related problems remained similarly low to those observed after 2 years follow-up, except increased xerostomia (68%) and increased (mild) pain (32%). Acoustic voice analysis showed less voicedness, increased fundamental frequency, and more vocal effort for the tumors located below the hyoid bone (n = 12), without recovery to baseline values. Patients' subjective vocal function (VHI score) was good. Functional swallowing and voice problems at 6 years post-treatment are minimal in this patient cohort, originating from preventive and continued post-treatment rehabilitation programs.

  5. Acute renal failure in four Comrades Marathon runners ingesting the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the event's Chief Medical Officer (JB) by the head trauma unit physician at St Augustine's ... All 4 athletes reported that they ingested the same readily available anti-cramp electrolyte .... An electronic survey of 2010. Comrades Marathon ...

  6. The Report of Suicide by Ingestion of Lidocaine Topical Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Hassanian-Moghaddam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lidocaine is a local anesthetic and antiarrhythmic agent. There are reports on accidental and intentional cases of poisoning following injection of lidocaine while rare are the fatal cases realized after oral ingestion of lidocaine. Suicidal poisoning with lidocaine pharmaceutical formulations is rare since no pharmaceutical dosage forms for oral use are available except gels and sprays used as local anesthetics in dentistry. Cases: Three cases of suicidal poisoning by ingestion of the content of lidocaine topical spray are reported in the present study. The cases developed episodes of seizure requiring diazepam and other therapeutic modalities upon admission. Eventually, one of the cases expired. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first reported case of suicidal poisoning after ingestion of this formulation which highlights the fact that lidocaine topical spray formulation may be used for committing suicide. Ingestion of lidocaine present in topical spray can induce varying levels of toxicity that can even be fatal.

  7. Ingested metallic foreign body lodged in the appendix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Sarkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old child ingested a metallic screw 3 months prior to admission. At laparotomy, the foreign body was found to be lodged inside the vermiform appendix, and was removed by appendicectomy.

  8. Cow Dung Ingestion and Inhalation Dependence: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairkar, Praveen; Tiple, Prashant; Bang, Govind

    2009-01-01

    Although abuse of several unusual inhalants had been documented, addiction to cow dung fumes or their ashes has not been reported in medical literature as yet. We are reporting a case of cow dung dependence in ingestion and inhalational form.

  9. Prevalence and characteristics of plastic ingested by Hawaiian seabirds

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Production of plastic products and dumping of plastic garbage in the ocean have increased dramatically in the past 25 years. Plastic ingestion has not been reported...

  10. Influence of Sensor Ingestion Timing on Consistency of Temperature Measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodman, Daniel A; Kenefick, Robert W; Cadarette, Bruce S; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2009-01-01

    ... (ITS) to measure core body temperature have been demonstrated. However, the effect of elapsed time between ITS ingestion and Tint measurement has not been thoroughly studied. Methods: Eight volunteers...

  11. Ocular Dynamics of Bolus Ingestion of Eleis guineensis Sap (Palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elaeis guineensis), and is widely consumed among the various ethnic nationalities in Nigeria. The effect of bolus ingestion of 600ml, palm wine was undertaken so as to determine its ocular dynamics in healthy volunteers. Results showed that ...

  12. Relationship between swallow-specific quality of life and fiber-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing findings in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florie, Michelle; Baijens, Laura; Kremer, Bernd; Kross, Kenneth; Lacko, Martin; Verhees, Femke; Winkens, Bjorn

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between swallow-specific quality of life (QOL) using the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) and the swallowing function using a standardized fiber-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) protocol in patients with dysphagia with head and neck cancer. Sixty-three patients with dysphagia and head and neck cancer were enrolled in the study. Patients completed the MDADI questionnaire and underwent a standardized FEES examination. Ordinal FEES variables were measured. Descriptive statistics and 1-way analysis of variance tests were carried out. For all FEES variables, the observer agreement level was sufficient (kappa ≥0.7).These preliminary results show statistically significant mean differences of MDADI subscales between the ordinal scale levels for several FEES variables. The MDADI questionnaire can be used to assess the impact of dysphagia on the patients' health-related QOL. Despite clear trends, it remains unclear if the MDADI questionnaire can be used as an indicator for the severity of oropharyngeal dysphagia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1848-E1856, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Hyperoxaluria and Genitourinary Disorders in Children Ingesting Almond Milk Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Demetrius; Lieb, Jessica

    2015-11-01

    We describe 3 children presenting with hematuria, dysuria or kidney stones, and hyperoxaluria believed to be related to ingestion of excessive amounts of almond milk products. Our investigation of the oxalate content of several popular plant-based milk substitutes indicates that almond milk products are a particularly rich source of dietary oxalate. All genitourinary and urinary metabolic disturbances resolved after discontinuation of almond milk ingestion. Therefore, pediatricians should be aware of this potential link. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ingestion of Microplastics by Zooplankton in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desforges, Jean-Pierre W; Galbraith, Moira; Ross, Peter S

    2015-10-01

    Microplastics are increasingly recognized as being widespread in the world's oceans, but relatively little is known about ingestion by marine biota. In light of the potential for microplastic fibers and fragments to be taken up by small marine organisms, we examined plastic ingestion by two foundation species near the base of North Pacific marine food webs, the calanoid copepod Neocalanus cristatus and the euphausiid Euphausia pacifia. We developed an acid digestion method to assess plastic ingestion by individual zooplankton and detected microplastics in both species. Encounter rates resulting from ingestion were 1 particle/every 34 copepods and 1/every 17 euphausiids (euphausiids > copepods; p = 0.01). Consistent with differences in the size selection of food between these two zooplankton species, the ingested particle size was greater in euphausiids (816 ± 108 μm) than in copepods (556 ± 149 μm) (p = 0.014). The contribution of ingested microplastic fibres to total plastic decreased with distance from shore in euphausiids (r (2) = 70, p = 0.003), corresponding to patterns in our previous observations of microplastics in seawater samples from the same locations. This first evidence of microplastic ingestion by marine zooplankton indicate that species at lower trophic levels of the marine food web are mistaking plastic for food, which raises fundamental questions about potential risks to higher trophic level species. One concern is risk to salmon: We estimate that consumption of microplastic-containing zooplankton will lead to the ingestion of 2-7 microplastic particles/day by individual juvenile salmon in coastal British Columbia, and ≤91 microplastic particles/day in returning adults.

  15. Nutritional management in an elderly man with esophageal and gastric necrosis after caustic soda ingestion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rondanelli M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mariangela Rondanelli,1 Gabriella Peroni,1 Alessandra Miccono,2 Fabio Guerriero,3 Davide Guido,3,4 Simone Perna1 1Department of Public Health, Neuroscience, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Endocrinology and Nutrition Unit, University of Pavia, Azienda di Servizi alla Persona di Pavia, Pavia, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, 3Azienda di Servizi alla Persona di Pavia, 4Department of Public Health, Neuroscience, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology Unit, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Abstract: The ingestion of corrosive industrial chemical agents, such as caustic soda, that are mostly used for household cleaning, usually occurs accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Multiple protocols are based on documented success in preventing impending complications. In this study, we present a case of a 70-year-old man who swallowed caustic soda in a suicide attempt, causing a development of strong esophageal and gastric necrosis with subsequent gastrectomy and digiunostomy. Initially, the recommended nutritional approach was via percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy by a polymer and high-caloric formula, with an elevated content of soluble fiber. After 5 months, the medical team removed the percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy and the patient switched from enteral to oral nutrition. In this step, it was decided to introduce two oral, high-caloric supplements: an energy supplement in powder, based on maltodextrin, immediately soluble in foods or in hot/cold drinks and a high-energy and protein drink, enriched with arginine, vitamin C, zinc, and antioxidants. Oral administration (per os was well tolerated by consuming homogenized food mixed in water. After 1 month, the patient was discharged from the hospital and was able to eat a regular meal. Keywords: nutritional management, enteral nutrition, gastric necrosis, esophageal necrosis, nutritional

  16. Biogeochemical Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, Brad; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This lecture will introduce the concept of biogeochemical cycling. The roles of microbes in the cycling of nutrients, production and consumption of trace gases, and mineralization will be briefly introduced.

  17. Accidental ingestions of oral prescription drugs: a multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, B J; Rock, A R; Cohn, M S; Litovitz, T

    1989-07-01

    Accidental ingestion of oral prescription drugs by children under age five continues to be a public health problem. A telephone survey of 1,866 ingestion incidents reported to nine poison control centers was conducted in the spring of 1986. Accidental ingestion occurred most often with a two-year-old child (42 per cent) in their own home (82 per cent). Thirty-five per cent of the toxic drugs ingested at home belonged to someone other than the immediate family, most often a grandparent. Toxic drugs were more often out of their usual storage location and in non-child-resistant prescription packaging, a nonprescription container, or in no container. Twenty-two per cent of all child-resistant packages were non-functional. Overall, at least 61 per cent of all medications had no child-resistant barrier at the time of ingestion. Accessible storage locations such as the kitchen counter, table top, or top of a dresser or bedside table greatly increased the risk of accidental ingestion. These results suggest the need for effective child-resistant packaging that is easier for all adults to use.

  18. Biomecânica ultra-sonográfica da deglutição: estudo preliminar Sonographic evaluation of swallowing biomechanics: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthya da Silva Lynch

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar, por meio da ultra-sonografia, os parâmetros espaciais do complexo hiolaríngeo na dinâmica da deglutição e a associação entre idade e efeitos. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Neste estudo quantitativo e prospectivo foram incluídos 39 indivíduos sadios, de ambos os gêneros, na faixa etária de 20 a 70 anos (média, 45,56; desvio-padrão, 14,53. Avaliou-se a biomecânica da deglutição correspondente à medida da distância entre a porção superior do osso hióide e a borda superior da cartilagem tireóide, no momento de máxima elevação laríngea. As medidas foram realizadas com a ingestão de alimentos de consistências líquida e pastosa. RESULTADOS: A variação da distância da laringe ao hióide apresentou associação positiva com a idade, somente na deglutição de alimento pastoso, consistência na qual é solicitada maior atividade de propulsão lingual do que nos líquidos. CONCLUSÃO: É possível que o aumento da distância entre o hióide e a laringe, que representa menor elevação laríngea, na deglutição de pastosos, ocorra por efeito do envelhecimento, processo no qual se verifica diminuição de reservas funcionais, mesmo em indivíduos sadios. A ultra-sonografia pode detectar comportamentos relacionados a consistências alimentares, o que mostra sua possível potencialidade diagnóstica na avaliação da deglutição.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, by means of ultrasonography, the spatial parameters of the hyolaryngeal complex in the deglutition dynamics as well the correlation between age and effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present prospective and quantitative study included 39 healthy men and women in the age range between 20 and 70 years (mean, 45.56; standard deviation, 14.53. The swallowing biomechanics corresponding to the measurement of the distance between the upper portion of the hyoid bone and the upper rim of the thyroid cartilage at the moment of maximum laryngeal elevation was evaluated

  19. Body heat storage during physical activity is lower with hot fluid ingestion under conditions that permit full evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, A R; Lesperance, N C; Jay, O

    2012-10-01

    To assess whether, under conditions permitting full evaporation, body heat storage during physical activity measured by partitional calorimetry would be lower with warm relative to cold fluid ingestion because of a disproportionate increase in evaporative heat loss potential relative to internal heat transfer with the ingested fluid. Nine males cycled at 50% VO(2max) for 75 min at 23.6 ± 0.6 °C and 23 ± 11% RH while consuming water of either 1.5 °C, 10 °C, 37 °C or 50 °C in four 3.2 mL kg(-1) boluses. The water was administered 5 min before and 15, 30 and 45 min following the onset of exercise. No differences in metabolic heat production, sensible or respiratory heat losses (all P > 0.05) were observed between fluid temperatures. However, while the increased internal heat loss with cold fluid ingestion was paralleled by similar reductions in evaporative heat loss potential at the skin (E(sk) ) with 10 °C (P = 0.08) and 1.5 °C (P = 0.55) fluid, the increased heat load with warm (50 °C) fluid ingestion was accompanied by a significantly greater E(sk) (P = 0.04). The resultant calorimetric heat storage was lower with 50 °C water ingestion in comparison to 1.5 °C, 10 °C and 37 °C (all P heat storage derived conventionally using thermometry yielded higher values following 50 °C fluid ingestion compared to 1.5 °C (P = 0.025). Under conditions permitting full sweat evaporation, body heat storage is lower with warm water ingestion, likely because of disproportionate modulations in sweat output arising from warm-sensitive thermosensors in the esophagus/stomach. Local temperature changes of the rectum following fluid ingestion exacerbate the previously identified error of thermometric heat storage estimations. © 2012 The Authors Acta Physiologica © 2012 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  20. A Continent-Wide Migratory Divide in North American Breeding Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A Hobson

    Full Text Available Populations of most North American aerial insectivores have undergone steep population declines over the past 40 years but the relative importance of factors operating on breeding, wintering, or stopover sites remains unknown. We used archival light-level geolocators to track the phenology, movements and winter locations of barn swallows (Hirdundo rustica; n = 27 from populations across North America to determine their migratory connectivity. We identified an east-west continental migratory divide for barn swallows with birds from western regions (Washington State, USA (n = 8 and Saskatchewan, Canada (n = 5 traveling shorter distances to wintering areas ranging from Oregon to northern Colombia than eastern populations (Ontario (n = 3 and New Brunswick (n = 10, Canada which wintered in South America south of the Amazon basin. A single swallow from a stable population in Alabama shared a similar migration route to eastern barn swallows but wintered farther north in northeast Brazil indicating a potential leap frog pattern migratory among eastern birds. Six of 9 (67% birds from the two eastern populations and Alabama underwent a loop migration west of fall migration routes including around the Gulf of Mexico travelling a mean of 2,224 km and 722 km longer on spring migration, respectively. Longer migration distances, including the requirement to cross the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico and subsequent shorter sedentary wintering periods, may exacerbate declines for populations breeding in northeastern North America.

  1. Variability of NTCP prediction of swallowing organs at risk, due to variation in delineation guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gort, E.M.; Brouwer, C.L.; Lotz, H.T.; Steenbakkers, R.J.H.M.; Wopken, K.; Van Der Laan, H.P.; Langendijk, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: In daily practice, several different delineation guidelines can be used for the delineation of organs at risk that are involved in swallowing (SWOARs). Based on these delineation guidelines, predictive models have been developed for the different aspects of post treatment

  2. Predictive modelling for swallowing dysfunction after primary (chemo)radiation : Results of a prospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christianen, Miranda E M C; Schilstra, Cornelis; Beetz, Ivo; Muijs, C.T.; Chouvalova, Olga; Burlage, Fred R.; Doornaert, P.; Koken, P.W.; Leemans, C.R.; Rinkel, R.N.; de Bruijn, M.J.; de Bock, G.H.; Roodenburg, J.L.; van der Laan, B.F.; Slotman, B.J.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Langendijk, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this large multicentre prospective cohort study was to identify which dose volume histogram parameters and pre-treatment factors are most important to predict physician-rated and patient-rated radiation-induced swallowing dysfunction (RISD) in order to develop

  3. Predictive modelling for swallowing dysfunction after primary (chemo)radiation: Results of a prospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christianen, M.E.M.C.; Schilstra, C.; Beetz, I.; Muijs, C.T.; Chouvalova, O.; Burlage, F.R.; Doornaert, P.A.H.; Koken, P.W.; Leemans, C.R.; Rinkel, R.N.P.M.; de Bruijn, M.J.; de Bock, G.H.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.; van Laan, B.F.A.M.; Slotman, B.J.; de Leeuw, I.M.; Bijl, H.P.; Langendijk, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this large multicentre prospective cohort study was to identify which dose volume histogram parameters and pre-treatment factors are most important to predict physician-rated and patient-rated radiation-induced swallowing dysfunction (RISD) in order to develop

  4. Recent advances in laryngeal sensorimotor control for voice, speech and swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Christy L

    2004-06-01

    This article reviews advances in knowledge on laryngeal sensorimotor control affecting the assessment, understanding, and treatment of laryngeal motor control disorders in voice, speech, and swallowing. Three topics are covered: new knowledge on laryngeal innervation and central nervous system control from basic research studies, the role of laryngeal sensation in normal swallowing and dysphagia in patients, and new approaches to the restoration of laryngeal motor control after recurrent laryngeal nerve disorders. A significant advance this year was tracing the efferent pathways from the cortex to the brainstem in monkeys. This provided new information on subcortical and brainstem connections in the laryngeal efferent pathways. Laryngeal sensory feedback continued to receive attention, and the role of sensory feedback in the control of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing is now well established. Further developments in neuromotor monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy were seen, and a large case series recommended that these techniques become standard practice for surgery for thyroid benign recurrence or malignancy. Finally, the first tissue engineering papers in the field of vocal fold tissue and nerve restoration were published this year, beginning an exciting new approach to restoration of laryngeal motor control. Considerable attention has been given to laryngeal muscle physiology, denervation, and sensation in neurolaryngology. Relatively limited understanding is available regarding the central nervous system integrative control of laryngeal function for speech, respiration, and swallowing.

  5. Swallowing sounds in speech therapy practice: a critical analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, Juliana Lopes; Mangilli, Laura Davison; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Limongi, Suelly Cecilia Olivan; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate international scientific papers published on the subject of cervical auscultation and its use in speech therapy. The study involved a qualitative review of the literature spanning the last 10 years. Articles were selected from the PubMed database using the following keywords: cervical auscultation, swallowing and swallowing disorders. Research was included that was conducted on adult humans (over 18 years of age) and was written in English. Each citation retrieved from the database was analyzed independently by each of the study researchers to ascertain its relevance for inclusion in the study. The methodology involved formulating the research question, locating and selecting studies and critically evaluating the articles according to the precepts of the Cochrane Handbook. As a result, 35 studies were identified; 13 articles were analyzed because they allowed access to the full text and were related directly to the subject. We found that the studies were performed with groups of healthy subjects and subjects with different types of base pathology. Some studies compared the patterns found in the different groups. Some of the research sought to study the pattern of swallowing sounds with different factors - evaluator experience, the specificity and sensitivity of the method and how to improve the technique of cervical auscultation through the use of instruments other than the stethoscope. The conclusion of this critical analysis is that cervical auscultation is an important tool to be used in conjunction with other assessment methods in the routine clinical evaluation of swallowing.

  6. Swallows Rugby Football Club, South Africa: The story of a century ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Swallows Rugby Football Club, South Africa: The story of a century, 1911-2011. ... Limited secondary sources pertinent to the topic were accessed and analysed for the purpose of cross-referencing the emerging \\facts. from the interviews and primary sources. Content analysis was administered on the collected data; ...

  7. Occurrence of communication and swallowing problems in neurological disorders: analysis of forty patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Mansi Pankaj; Gore, Geeta Bharat

    2014-01-01

    Communication and swallowing problems are common as a result of neurological conditions like stroke, traumatic brain injury, neoplasms of the nervous systems, viral encephalitis, diseases affecting neuromuscular junction and neuro degenerative conditions. The most frequently encountered problems are dysarthria, aphasia, dysphagia and apraxia of speech. Although these disorders are mentioned in literature, very few studies describing the occurrence in different neurological conditions are available in Indian context. Hence, a need was felt to carry out such a study. A heterogenous group of forty patients with neurological conditions were assessed for presence of speech, language and swallowing problems. A percent analysis was carried out to determine the occurrence of aphasia, dysarthria and dysphagia in general, in specific diseases and also to describe type of aphasia and dysarthria according to the characteristics presented. It was seen that the most frequently occurring disorder was dysarthria (60%), followed by dysphagia (55%) and aphasia (18%). It was also noted that dysarthria and dysphagia co-existed in around 45% patients with neurological diseases. It can be concluded that speech, language and swallowing problems are frequent in individuals with neurological conditions. Speech language pathologist plays an important role as a member of the rehabilitation team in a neurological setup with respect to identifying these problems and initiating intervention at the earliest. Hence, it is necessary for speech language pathologist to be well versed with the features each disorder may present with in terms of communication and swallowing.

  8. Surface Electromyography for Speech and Swallowing Systems: Measurement, Analysis, and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Cara E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Applying surface electromyography (sEMG) to the study of voice, speech, and swallowing is becoming increasingly popular. An improved understanding of sEMG and building a consensus as to appropriate methodology will improve future research and clinical applications. Method: An updated review of the theory behind recording sEMG for the…

  9. Development of a system to monitor laryngeal movement during swallowing using a bend sensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Swallowing dysfunction (also known as dysphagia, which results in a deterioration of nutritional intake, slows rehabilitation and causes aspiration pneumonia, is very common following neurological impairments. Although videofluorographic (VF examination is widely used for detecting aspiration, an objective and non-invasive method for assessing swallowing function has yet to be established because of a lack of adequate devices and protocols. In this paper, a bend sensor whose resistance is altered by bending was introduced to monitor swallowing-related laryngeal movement. METHODS: Six healthy male volunteers were recruited in the present study. Specific time points on the signal waveform produced by the bend sensor were defined to describe laryngeal movement by differential analysis. Additionally, the physiological significance of the obtained waveform was confirmed by analyzing the sequential correlations between the signal waveform from the bend sensor and hyoid bone kinetics simultaneously recorded by VF. RESULTS: Seven time points were successfully defined on the signal waveform to reference laryngeal movement. Each time point was well correlated with certain VF events, with evidence of no significant time lags, and there were positive correlations between waveform time points and matched VF events. Furthermore, obvious similarities were noticed between the duration of each phase on the signal waveform and the duration of the matched hyoid bone activity. CONCLUSIONS: The present monitoring system using a bend sensor might be useful for observing the temporal aspects of laryngeal movement during swallowing, and it was well coordinated with hyoid bone movement.

  10. A study of brain networks associated with swallowing using graph-theoretical approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Luan

    Full Text Available Functional connectivity between brain regions during swallowing tasks is still not well understood. Understanding these complex interactions is of great interest from both a scientific and a clinical perspective. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was utilized to study brain functional networks during voluntary saliva swallowing in twenty-two adult healthy subjects (all females, [Formula: see text] years of age. To construct these functional connections, we computed mean partial correlation matrices over ninety brain regions for each participant. Two regions were determined to be functionally connected if their correlation was above a certain threshold. These correlation matrices were then analyzed using graph-theoretical approaches. In particular, we considered several network measures for the whole brain and for swallowing-related brain regions. The results have shown that significant pairwise functional connections were, mostly, either local and intra-hemispheric or symmetrically inter-hemispheric. Furthermore, we showed that all human brain functional network, although varying in some degree, had typical small-world properties as compared to regular networks and random networks. These properties allow information transfer within the network at a relatively high efficiency. Swallowing-related brain regions also had higher values for some of the network measures in comparison to when these measures were calculated for the whole brain. The current results warrant further investigation of graph-theoretical approaches as a potential tool for understanding the neural basis of dysphagia.

  11. Time budget of South African cliff swallows during breeding | Earlé ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of time by the South African cliff swallow was determined and use of energy calculated by using equations for predicting standard metabolic rate and the cost of flight. The highest daily energy expenditure was during the feeding of nestlings when 9,22 h were spent foraging. The cost of 127 kJ for building a nest is ...

  12. Swallowing and Dysphagia Rehabilitation: Translating Principles of Neural Plasticity into Clinically Oriented Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, JoAnne; Butler, Susan G.; Daniels, Stephanie K.; Gross, Roxann Diez; Langmore, Susan; Lazarus, Cathy L.; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; McCabe, Daniel; Musson, Nan; Rosenbek, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This review presents the state of swallowing rehabilitation science as it relates to evidence for neural plastic changes in the brain. The case is made for essential collaboration between clinical and basic scientists to expand the positive influences of dysphagia rehabilitation in synergy with growth in technology and knowledge. The…

  13. Barium versus Nonbarium Stimuli: Differences in Taste Intensity, Chemesthesis, and Swallowing Behavior in Healthy Adult Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Ahmed; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors examined the impact of barium on the perceived taste intensity of 7 different liquid tastant stimuli and the modulatory effect that these differences in perceived taste intensity have on swallowing behaviors. Method: Participants were 80 healthy women, stratified by age group (60) and genetic taste status…

  14. [Cine-MRI contribution to assess swallowing mechanism and oro-pharyngeal dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvet, F; Charpiot, A; Schultz, P; Riehm, S; Vetter, D; Veillon, F; Hémar, P; Debry, C

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the performance of Cine-MRI to assess swallowing in patients previously treated for head and neck cancer. 10 healthy control subjects and a cohort of 10 patients with 8 partial glossectomies, 1 total laryngectomy and 1 glossolaryngectomy underwent imaging from October 2005 to February 2007. The MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5 Tesla system (Siemens Avanto), with True-Fisp sequences (TR = 170 ms, TE = 1 ms, slice thickness = 10 mm) at a rate of 8 pictures per second, during dry swallowing. Results are relevant for real-time spatial resolution from lips to larynx and dynamic motions analyses of tongue, velum, posterior pharyngeal wall and larynx during dry swallowing. Oro-pharyngo-laryngeal occlusion deficiency induces aspiration in case of partial glossectomy. Total laryngectomy modifies tongue, velum and pharynx landmarks. Cine-MRI i) provides functional insight from the oral cavity to the larynx, ii) gives accurate informations about impairments due to the pathology and its treatment, iii) completes others investigations like fiberoptic endoscopy or transit time, iiii) allows a precise analysis of the muscular movements involved in the deficient swallowing mechanism, in order to optimize rehabilitative strategies and results.

  15. Biomechanical events of swallowing are determined more by bolus consistency than by age or gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hendriks; Bert de Swart; Alexander Geurts; L. van den Engel-Hoek; B. Gorissen; E. Esser; I. Groot

    2012-01-01

    The biomechanics of swallowing saliva and substances of different consistencies were investigated in healthy children and adults. To this end, the duration and mean amplitude value (MAV) of surface electromyography (sEMG) of the submental muscle group (SMG) activity, the maximum anterior tongue

  16. Expiratory muscle strength training improves swallowing and respiratory outcomes in people with dysphagia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Marinda; McLaughlin, Emma; Shields, Nora

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the effects of expiratory muscle strength training on communication and swallowing outcomes in adults with acquired motor based communication and/or swallowing difficulties of any aetiology. A systematic review was conducted. Six databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SPEECHBYTE, AMED and PUBMED) were searched from inception until end of May 2016. Randomised and non-randomised controlled studies and pre-test/post-test studies published in English that investigated the effects of expiratory muscle strength training were included. Study quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. Data were analysed descriptively and effect sizes and associated 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Seven articles reporting data from five studies were included. Preliminary data suggests expiratory muscle strength training improved airway safety during swallowing in people with dysphagia and increased the strength of the expiratory muscles in all patient groups. There was little evidence to suggest changes in communication outcomes after expiratory muscle strength training. Speech-language pathologists might consider using expiratory muscle strength training to improve airway safety in adults with swallowing disorders.

  17. Quantitative Lingual, Pharyngeal and Laryngeal Ultrasonography in Swallowing Research: A Technical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Fishman, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    Because of its distinct advantage in radiation-free soft tissue imaging, ultrasonography has been widely used to study lingual, pharyngeal, hyoid, laryngeal, and even esophageal action during swallowing in individuals of all ages. Qualitative ultrasonographic observations have made considerable contributions to our understanding of deglutition.…

  18. Neurorehabilitation strategies for poststroke oropharyngeal dysphagia: from compensation to the recovery of swallowing function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabib, Christopher; Ortega, Omar; Kumru, Hatice; Palomeras, Ernest; Vilardell, Natalia; Alvarez-Berdugo, Daniel; Muriana, Desirée; Rofes, Laia; Terré, Rosa; Mearin, Fermín; Clavé, Pere

    2016-09-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is very prevalent among poststroke patients, causing severe complications but lacking specific neurorehabilitation treatment. This review covers advances in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and physiologically based neurorehabilitation strategies for poststroke OD. The pathophysiology of oropharyngeal biomechanics can be assessed by videofluoroscopy, as delayed laryngeal vestibule closure is closely associated with aspiration. Stroke may affect afferent or efferent neuronal circuits participating in deglutition. The integrity of oropharyngeal-cortical afferent pathways can be assessed by electroencephalography through sensory-evoked potentials by pharyngeal electrical stimulation, while corticopharyngeal efferent pathways can be characterized by electromyography through motor-evoked potentials by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Dysfunction in both cortico-mediated evoked responses is associated with delayed swallow response and aspiration. Studies have reported hemispherical asymmetry on motor control of swallowing and the relevance of impaired oropharyngeal sensitivity on aspiration. Advances in treatment include improvements in compensatory strategies but are mainly focused on (1) peripheral stimulation strategies and (2) central, noninvasive stimulation strategies with evidence of their clinical benefits. Characterization of poststroke OD is evolving from the assessment of impaired biomechanics to the sensorimotor integration processes involved in deglutition. Treatment is also changing from compensatory strategies to promoting brain plasticity, both to recover swallow function and to improve brain-related swallowing dysfunction. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Movie MRI at five frames a second for evaluation of speech and swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumada, Masanobu; Mori, Koichi; Nakajima, Yasoichi; Nozaki, Seiji

    2004-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging method that is widely used in the medical field. One of the limitations of MRI is its low time-resolution images of MRI are usually obtained as still images. Here we introduced a newly developed method of ``movie'' MRI with high time-resolution at five images a second. Its good application would include study and evaluation of speech and swallowing. Instrument: MRT-2001 XG with Software ver.5.5. (Toshiba). Coil: head QD coil for the tongue; CTL ARRY coil (3ch) for the neck, Imaging condition: sagital FFE2D; TR=2.8 ms TE=1.2 ms FA=10 deg Matrix=64×128 ST=10 mm NAQ=1 AV FOV=23×35 ; ROAFI; sequential acquisition. Maximum imaging length=51 s. A healthy Japanese male (Tokyo dialect speaker, 39 years). Task: Repetitive utterance of /tenten.../ and intentional swallowing of saliva. Results: In the task of /tenten..../, we could detect, in temporal order, velopharyngeal (VP) closure, opening of the tongue-palate (TP) closure, VP opening, TP closure, VP closure, and so on. In the swallowing task of saliva, we could detect movement of the tongue for conveying saliva to the pharynx, VP closure, backward movement of the tongue root, elevation and descent of the larynx in this temporal order. Our ``Movie MRI'' seemed promising for the noninvasive evaluation of speech and deglutition. Appropriate materials for swallowing evaluation will be presented.

  20. Peer-Mediated Procedures to Induce Swallowing and Food Acceptance in Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, R. Douglas; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A peer modeling procedure was shown to induce swallowing in a young child with dysphagia, and to increase food acceptance in a young child who consistently declined food. A peer-mediated procedure, consisting of rotated opportunities to consume food with a peer, increased consumption more than did modeling alone. (Author/JDD)

  1. Swallowing Mechanics Associated with Artificial Airways, Bolus Properties, and Penetration-Aspiration Status in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietsch, Angela M.; Rowley, Christopher B.; Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Pearson, William G., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Artificial airway procedures such as intubation and Sare common in the treatment of traumatic injuries, and bolus modifications may be implemented to help manage swallowing disorders. This study assessed artificial airway status, bolus properties (volume and viscosity), and the occurrence of laryngeal penetration and/or aspiration in…

  2. Functional results of speech and swallowing after oral microvascular free flap reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archontaki, Maria; Athanasiou, Athanasios; Stavrianos, Spyros D; Korkolis, Dimitris P; Faratzis, Gregory; Papadopoulou, Flora; Kokkalis, Georgios; Rapidis, Alexander D

    2010-11-01

    To study speech and swallowing in patients who underwent microvascular free flap reconstruction after major surgery of the oral cavity. Twenty patients, 17 men and 3 women, with a mean age of 58.5 years (range 27-79 years) were included in the study. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common malignancy. Swallowing assessment was performed through videofluoroscopy, using three consistencies of barium meal. The recorded swallows were assessed for the ability to hold the bolus during the oral phase, lip seal, tongue movement, residue in the floor of the mouth, laryngeal penetration and aspiration. Speech function regarding intelligibility and articulation was objectively assessed. Fifteen out of 20 patients (75%) had a good lip seal. Fourteen patients (73.6%) had adequate control of bolus, while in 89.4% the neotongue motility was satisfactory. Vallecular residue was noted in 25% of patients, laryngeal penetration in two (10%), while three patients (15%) continued to have significant aspiration, which necessitated continuous feeding through a gastrostomy. Postoperative speech intelligibility and articulation was satisfactory in 75 and 62.5% of the patients, respectively. Microvascular free flap reconstruction of major defects after oral resections rehabilitates the functions of swallowing and speech in acceptable levels, improving quality of life in these patients.

  3. Impact of Hypena opulenta on invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.) under different light environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale and black swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum and V. nigrum; Apocynaceae, subfamily Asclepiadoideae) are European viny milkweeds that have become invasive in many habitats in the northeastern U.S.A. and southeastern Canada. A defoliating moth from the Ukraine, Hypena opulenta (Christoph) (Lepid...

  4. Towards biological control of swallow-worts: the good, the bad and the ugly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Native from Eurasia, the ugly swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum rossicum and V. nigrum - Apocynaceae) invaded forested landscapes and prevent native plant regeneration in eastern North America. We first aimed to understand where do the invasive populations of both species come from, then we evaluated the ...

  5. Impact of Abrostola asclepiadis and plant competition on invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale and black swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum and V. nigrum; Apocynaceae, subfamily Asclepiadoideae) are perennial vines from Europe that have become invasive in various terrestrial habitats in the northeastern USA and southeastern Canada. A classical weed biological control program has been in...

  6. The Invasive Swallow-worts: What Do We Know About Their Biology and Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The swallow-worts [Vincetoxicum rossicum (Kleopow) Barbar. and V. nigrum (L.) Moench] are nonnative, perennial, herbaceous vines in the Apocynaceae that are invading natural areas in the northeastern U.S.A. and southeastern Canada. The species form dense monospecific stands across a wide range of mo...

  7. Instrumental and sensory quantification of oral coatings retained after swallowing semi-solid foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinz, J.F.; Huntjens, L.; Wijk, de R.A.

    2006-01-01

    After a mouthful of food has been swallowed, some food material is always retained in the mouth. With semi-solid foods this is in the form of a coating that adheres to the oral mucosa. The amount and location of this material may play an important role in food sensations. In this study two

  8. Swallowing performance in patients with head and neck cancer: a simple clinical test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Joanne M; McColl, Elaine; Carding, Paul N; Kelly, Charles; Wilson, Janet A

    2009-10-01

    Few simple clinical measures are available to monitor swallowing performance in head and neck cancer. Water swallow tests (WST) have been used as a part of clinical assessments in neurological dysphagia. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the utility of the 100 mL WST in head and neck cancer patients. The 100 mL WST was performed on 167 head and neck cancer patients. Measures were compared with respect to tumor site/stage, gender and age. The cohort was compared with published healthy controls. The test was quick to administer with excellent compliance. Patients had significantly poorer swallows than the published control group (mean reduction 1.6 mL/s). Function worsened with increased tumor stage and for patients with pharyngeal tumors. The 100 mL WST is an effective swallowing performance measure and is easily incorporated into a clinical examination. This paper provides benchmark data on the 100 mL WST for individuals with head and neck cancer.

  9. Nutritional management in an elderly man with esophageal and gastric necrosis after caustic soda ingestion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Peroni, Gabriella; Miccono, Alessandra; Guerriero, Fabio; Guido, Davide; Perna, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of corrosive industrial chemical agents, such as caustic soda, that are mostly used for household cleaning, usually occurs accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Multiple protocols are based on documented success in preventing impending complications. In this study, we present a case of a 70-year-old man who swallowed caustic soda in a suicide attempt, causing a development of strong esophageal and gastric necrosis with subsequent gastrectomy and digiunostomy. Initially, the recommended nutritional approach was via percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy by a polymer and high-caloric formula, with an elevated content of soluble fiber. After 5 months, the medical team removed the percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy and the patient switched from enteral to oral nutrition. In this step, it was decided to introduce two oral, high-caloric supplements: an energy supplement in powder, based on maltodextrin, immediately soluble in foods or in hot/cold drinks and a high-energy and protein drink, enriched with arginine, vitamin C, zinc, and antioxidants. Oral administration (per os) was well tolerated by consuming homogenized food mixed in water. After 1 month, the patient was discharged from the hospital and was able to eat a regular meal.

  10. Molybdenum deprivation, purine ingestion and an astrocyte-associated motor neurone syndrome in sheep: assumed clinical effects of inosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Ca

    2015-03-01

    An astrocyte-associated motor neurone syndrome was produced in molybdenum-deprived sheep fed xanthosine. Mo-deprived sheep fed inosine, adenosine or guanosine would be also expected to develop astrocyte-associated motor neurone syndromes, because all these purine nucleosides can act as neuromodulators and all depend on the Mo-associated enzyme xanthine oxidase-dehydrogenase for their catabolism. To investigate the relationship between inosine ingestion and low Mo concentration, eight sheep were fed lucerne chaff with a Mo value neurone syndrome was produced in three sheep 18-27 months later. It was characterised by diaphragmatic, laryngeal, lingual and pharyngeal muscle weakness. The diaphragmatic muscle weakness was the most severe and potentially lethal. These findings suggest that purinergic neuromodulation of respiration, vocalisation and swallowing is different to that of limb movement. The syndrome produced, and assumed to be caused by the treatment given, has not been reported in livestock. A similar syndrome is seen in human motor neurone disease, but not in equine motor neurone disease, and this is consistent with it being an upper, not a lower, motor neurone effect. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  11. [Digestive burns by simultaneous oral and rectal self-administration of ingestion sulphuric acid: an unusual mode of suicide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soro, Kountélé Gona; Attia, Koffi Alain; Coulibaly, Adama; Koffi, Gnangoran Marcelin; Yapo, Patrice; Ehua, Somian Francis; Miessan, Jean-Baptiste Kanga

    2008-01-01

    The authors report an unusual mode of suicide in two patients admitted to the Teaching Hospital of Yopougon. One 26-year-old woman swallowed sulphuric acid and then self-administered more of the same product rectally. She presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, bloody diarrhoea, without fever (T=37,9 degrees C). The abdomen did not appear to require surgery. Endoscopy showed erosive cesophagitis on day 5 (D5) and ulcerated bleeding inflammation of the entire colon and rectum on D26. She died on D30, during generalized convulsions. The second patient, a 31-year-old women, ingested sulphuric acid in the same way. She presented initially with diffuse abdominopelvic pains; clinical examination showed neither guarding nor contraction. Her temperature was 37,8 degrees C. Oesogastric endoscopy observed cesophagitis stage II B and III A and gastritis III A and III B. On D9, acute and generalized peritonitis was discovered, leading to surgical exploration. The patient died at the end of the operation. This unusual mode of suicide induces grave clinical presentations despite their apparent calm. The prognosis is worse because of the double localization of the lesions, the toxicity of the product, and the underestimation of its gravity.

  12. Global Analysis of Anthropogenic Debris Ingestion by Sea Turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuyler, Qamar; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Wilcox, Chris; Townsend, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Ingestion of marine debris can have lethal and sublethal effects on sea turtles and other wildlife. Although researchers have reported on ingestion of anthropogenic debris by marine turtles and implied incidences of debris ingestion have increased over time, there has not been a global synthesis of the phenomenon since 1985. Thus, we analyzed 37 studies published from 1985 to 2012 that report on data collected from before 1900 through 2011. Specifically, we investigated whether ingestion prevalence has changed over time, what types of debris are most commonly ingested, the geographic distribution of debris ingestion by marine turtles relative to global debris distribution, and which species and life-history stages are most likely to ingest debris. The probability of green (Chelonia mydas) and leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) ingesting debris increased significantly over time, and plastic was the most commonly ingested debris. Turtles in nearly all regions studied ingest debris, but the probability of ingestion was not related to modeled debris densities. Furthermore, smaller, oceanic-stage turtles were more likely to ingest debris than coastal foragers, whereas carnivorous species were less likely to ingest debris than herbivores or gelatinovores. Our results indicate oceanic leatherback turtles and green turtles are at the greatest risk of both lethal and sublethal effects from ingested marine debris. To reduce this risk, anthropogenic debris must be managed at a global level. Análisis Global de la Ingesta de Residuos Antropogénicos por Tortugas Marinas La ingesta de residuos marinos puede tener efectos letales y subletales sobre las tortugas marinas y otros animales. Aunque hay investigadores que han reportado la ingesta de residuos antropogénicos por tortugas marinas y la incidencia de la ingesta de residuos ha incrementado con el tiempo, no ha habido una síntesis global del fenómeno desde 1985. Por esto analizamos 37 estudios publicados, desde

  13. Effect of IQoro(R) training in hiatal hernia patients with misdirected swallowing and esophageal retention symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita; Franzén, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Misdirected swallowing can be triggered by esophageal retention and hiatal incompetence. The results show that oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) training improves misdirected swallowing, hoarseness, cough, esophageal retention, and globus symptoms in patients with hiatal hernia. The present study investigated whether muscle training with an IQS influences symptoms of misdirected swallowing and esophageal retention in patients with hiatal hernia. A total of 28 adult patients with hiatal hernia suffering from misdirected swallowing and esophageal retention symptoms for more than 1 year before entry to the study were evaluated before and after training with an IQS. The patients had to fill out a questionnaire regarding symptoms of misdirected swallowing, hoarseness, cough, esophageal retention, and suprasternal globus, which were scored from 0-3, and a VAS on the ability to swallow food. The effect of IQS traction on diaphragmatic hiatus (DH) pressure was recorded in 12 patients with hiatal hernia using high resolution manometry (HRM). Upon entry into the study, misdirected swallowing, globus sensation, and esophageal retention symptoms were present in all 28 patients, hoarseness in 79%, and cough in 86%. Significant improvement was found for all symptoms after oral IQS training (p < 0.001). Traction with an IQS resulted in a 65 mmHg increase in the mean HRM pressure of the DH.

  14. Coordination of sucking, swallowing, and breathing and oxygen saturation during early infant breast-feeding and bottle-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfield, Eugene C; Richardson, Michael J; Lee, Kimberly G; Margetts, Stacey

    2006-10-01

    This prospective study compared the coordination of sucking, swallowing, and breathing and its relationship to oxygen saturation in infants during breast-feeding and bottle-feeding. After 4 to 6 wk of exclusive breast-feeding, infants began bottle-feedings of expressed human milk using one of two systems: a soft-walled bottle and nipple (system 1, Playtex) or a hard-walled bottle and nipple (system 2, Avent). Infants' sucking, swallowing, breathing, and oxygenation were measured during breast-feeding and bottle-feeding, and coordination of these activities during breast-feeding and bottle-feeding were compared. During breast-feeding, swallowing occurred nonrandomly between breaths and did not interfere with breathing. The same distribution of swallowing occurred in infants fed with system 1, while swallowing occurred randomly in infants fed with system 2. Swallowing significantly increased during bottle-feeding among infants using system 2, but decreased among infants using system 1. Infants using system 2 also had a greater instability in the coordination of sucking, swallowing, and breathing and more perturbation of breathing. Oxygen saturation was significantly higher in infants fed with system 1 compared with system 2. These results suggest that the overall feeding pattern and oxygenation of system 1 are closer to the physiologic norm than system 2.

  15. Altered Cortical Swallowing Processing in Patients with Functional Dysphagia: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollbrink, Andreas; Warnecke, Tobias; Winkels, Martin; Pantev, Christo; Dziewas, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Objective Current neuroimaging research on functional disturbances provides growing evidence for objective neuronal correlates of allegedly psychogenic symptoms, thereby shifting the disease concept from a psychological towards a neurobiological model. Functional dysphagia is such a rare condition, whose pathogenetic mechanism is largely unknown. In the absence of any organic reason for a patient's persistent swallowing complaints, sensorimotor processing abnormalities involving central neural pathways constitute a potential etiology. Methods In this pilot study we measured cortical swallow-related activation in 5 patients diagnosed with functional dysphagia and a matched group of healthy subjects applying magnetoencephalography. Source localization of cortical activation was done with synthetic aperture magnetometry. To test for significant differences in cortical swallowing processing between groups, a non-parametric permutation test was afterwards performed on individual source localization maps. Results Swallowing task performance was comparable between groups. In relation to control subjects, in whom activation was symmetrically distributed in rostro-medial parts of the sensorimotor cortices of both hemispheres, patients showed prominent activation of the right insula, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and lateral premotor, motor as well as inferolateral parietal cortex. Furthermore, activation was markedly reduced in the left medial primary sensory cortex as well as right medial sensorimotor cortex and adjacent supplementary motor area (pdysphagia - a condition with assumed normal brain function - seems to be associated with distinctive changes of the swallow-related cortical activation pattern. Alterations may reflect exaggerated activation of a widely distributed vigilance, self-monitoring and salience rating network that interferes with down-stream deglutition sensorimotor control. PMID:24586948

  16. Cortical processing of swallowing in ALS patients with progressive dysphagia--a magnetoencephalographic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga K Teismann

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a rare disease causing degeneration of the upper and lower motor neuron. Involvement of the bulbar motor neurons often results in fast progressive dysphagia. While cortical compensation of dysphagia has been previously shown in stroke patients, this topic has not been addressed in patients suffering from ALS. In the present study, we investigated cortical activation during deglutition in two groups of ALS patients with either moderate or severe dysphagia. Whole-head MEG was employed on fourteen patients with sporadic ALS using a self-paced swallowing paradigm. Data were analyzed by means of time-frequency analysis and synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM. Group analysis of individual SAM data was performed using a permutation test. We found a reduction of cortical swallowing related activation in ALS patients compared to healthy controls. Additionally a disease-related shift of hemispheric lateralization was observed. While healthy subjects showed bilateral cortical activation, the right sensorimotor cortex was predominantly involved in ALS patients. Both effects were even stronger in the group of patients with severe dysphagia. Our results suggest that bilateral degeneration of the upper motor neuron in the primary motor areas also impairs further adjusted motor areas, which leads to a strong reduction of 'swallowing related' cortical activation. While both hemispheres are affected by the degeneration a relatively stronger activation is seen in the right hemisphere. This right hemispheric lateralization of volitional swallowing observed in this study may be the only sign of cortical plasticity in dysphagic ALS patients. It may demonstrate compensational mechanisms in the right hemisphere which is known to predominantly coordinate the pharyngeal phase of deglutition. These results add new aspects to our understanding of the pathophysiology of dysphagia in ALS patients and beyond. The compensational

  17. Cliff swallows Petrochelidon pyrrhonota as bioindicators of environmental mercury, Cache Creek Watershed, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothem, Roger L.; Trejo, Bonnie S.; Bauer, Marissa L.; Crayon, John J.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate mercury (Hg) and other element exposure in cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota), eggs were collected from 16 sites within the mining-impacted Cache Creek watershed, Colusa, Lake, and Yolo counties, California, USA, in 1997-1998. Nestlings were collected from seven sites in 1998. Geometric mean total Hg (THg) concentrations ranged from 0.013 to 0.208 ??g/g wet weight (ww) in cliff swallow eggs and from 0.047 to 0.347 ??g/g ww in nestlings. Mercury detected in eggs generally followed the spatial distribution of Hg in the watershed based on proximity to both anthropogenic and natural sources. Mean Hg concentrations in samples of eggs and nestlings collected from sites near Hg sources were up to five and seven times higher, respectively, than in samples from reference sites within the watershed. Concentrations of other detected elements, including aluminum, beryllium, boron, calcium, manganese, strontium, and vanadium, were more frequently elevated at sites near Hg sources. Overall, Hg concentrations in eggs from Cache Creek were lower than those reported in eggs of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) from highly contaminated locations in North America. Total Hg concentrations were lower in all Cache Creek egg samples than adverse effects levels established for other species. Total Hg concentrations in bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) and foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) collected from 10 of the study sites were both positively correlated with THg concentrations in cliff swallow eggs. Our data suggest that cliff swallows are reliable bioindicators of environmental Hg. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

  18. Spatiotemporal Patterns in Nest Box Occupancy by Tree Swallows Across North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Shutler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS suggest that populations of aerial insectivorous birds are declining, particularly in northeastern regions of the continent, and particularly since the mid-1980s. Species that use nest boxes, such as Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor, may provide researchers with large data sets that better reveal finer-scale geographical patterns in population trends. We analyzed trends in occupancy rates for ca. 40,000 Tree Swallow nest-box-years from 16 sites across North America. The earliest site has been studied intensively since 1969 and the latest site since 2004. Nest box occupancy rates declined significantly at five of six (83% sites east of -78° W longitude, whereas occupancy rates increased significantly at four of ten sites (40% west of -78° W longitude. Decreasing box occupancy trends from the northeast were broadly consistent with aspects of a previous analysis of BBS data for Tree Swallows, but our finding of instances of increases in other parts of the continent are novel. Several questions remain, particularly with respect to causes of these broad-scale geographic changes in population densities of Tree Swallows. The broad geographic patterns are consistent with a hypothesis of widespread changes in climate on wintering, migratory, or breeding areas that in turn may differentially affect populations of aerial insects, but other explanations are possible. It is also unclear whether these changes in occupancy rates reflect an increase or decrease in overall populations of Tree Swallows. Regardless, important conservation steps will be to unravel causes of changing populations of aerial insectivores in North America.

  19. Cortical Processing of Swallowing in ALS Patients with Progressive Dysphagia – A Magnetoencephalographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teismann, Inga K.; Warnecke, Tobias; Suntrup, Sonja; Steinsträter, Olaf; Kronenberg, Linda; Ringelstein, E. Bernd; Dengler, Reinhard; Petri, Susanne; Pantev, Christo; Dziewas, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rare disease causing degeneration of the upper and lower motor neuron. Involvement of the bulbar motor neurons often results in fast progressive dysphagia. While cortical compensation of dysphagia has been previously shown in stroke patients, this topic has not been addressed in patients suffering from ALS. In the present study, we investigated cortical activation during deglutition in two groups of ALS patients with either moderate or severe dysphagia. Whole-head MEG was employed on fourteen patients with sporadic ALS using a self-paced swallowing paradigm. Data were analyzed by means of time-frequency analysis and synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM). Group analysis of individual SAM data was performed using a permutation test. We found a reduction of cortical swallowing related activation in ALS patients compared to healthy controls. Additionally a disease-related shift of hemispheric lateralization was observed. While healthy subjects showed bilateral cortical activation, the right sensorimotor cortex was predominantly involved in ALS patients. Both effects were even stronger in the group of patients with severe dysphagia. Our results suggest that bilateral degeneration of the upper motor neuron in the primary motor areas also impairs further adjusted motor areas, which leads to a strong reduction of ‘swallowing related’ cortical activation. While both hemispheres are affected by the degeneration a relatively stronger activation is seen in the right hemisphere. This right hemispheric lateralization of volitional swallowing observed in this study may be the only sign of cortical plasticity in dysphagic ALS patients. It may demonstrate compensational mechanisms in the right hemisphere which is known to predominantly coordinate the pharyngeal phase of deglutition. These results add new aspects to our understanding of the pathophysiology of dysphagia in ALS patients and beyond. The compensational mechanisms observed

  20. Evaluation of Swallowing Functions in Patients with Sjögren's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyigör, Sibel; Sezgin, Baha; Karabulut, Gonca; Öztürk, Kerem; Göde, Sercan; Kirazlı, Tayfun

    2017-04-01

    Patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) manifest symptoms such as dry eyes, dry mouth, and dysphagia. This study aims to evaluate the swallowing functions of the patients with SS. 69 patients with SS (65 females, 4 males) and 40 healthy individuals (33 females, 7 males) were included as study and control groups, respectively. Mean ages were 52.86 and 48.25 years for study and control groups, respectively. Swallowing functions were evaluated by fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). All the patients underwent FEES and were given 3, 5, and 10 ml water, yogurt, and fish-shaped crackers twice, respectively. The presence of bolus control, residue, penetration, and aspiration were evaluated. Additionally, certain types of foods triggering the dysphagia, any difficulties in bolus control, need to clean the throat, sensation of having a lump in the throat, sensation of choking, and xerostomia were included in the questionnaire. The MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory were administered to patients. Considering the presence of residue with yogurt and fish cracker, there was a significant difference between groups (P  0.05). Regarding the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory, the average scores were 48.18 ± 13.21 and 87.6 ± 10.67 for study and control groups, respectively, and a statistically significant difference was detected (P < 0.05). Regarding the Beck Depression Inventory, the average scores were 11.83 ± 9.37 and 8.03 ± 6.84 for study and control groups, respectively (P < 0.05). SS affected the swallowing functions significantly. The presence of residue with yogurt and cracker was the most obvious finding, whereas penetration/aspiration was not clinically significant. Swallowing dysfunction reduced the quality of life in patients with SS.

  1. Timing of caffeine ingestion alters postprandial metabolism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Sara Farhat; Obeid, Omar Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The association between caffeine intake and the risk for chronic diseases, namely type 2 diabetes, has not been consistent, and may be influenced by the timing of caffeine ingestion. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effect of caffeine administered in different scenarios of meal ingestion on postprandial glycemic and lipidemic status, concomitant with changes in body glycogen stores. Forty overnight-fasted rats were randomly divided into five groups (meal-ingested, caffeine-administered, post-caffeine meal-ingested, co-caffeine meal-ingested, post-meal caffeine-administered), and tube-fed the appropriate intervention, then sacrificed 2 h later. Livers and gastrocnemius muscles were analyzed for glycogen content; blood samples were analyzed for glucose, insulin, triglycerides, and non-esterified fatty acid concentrations. Postprandial plasma glucose concentrations were similar between groups, while significantly higher levels of insulin were witnessed following caffeine administration, irrespective of the timing of meal ingestion. Triglyceride concentrations were significantly lower in the caffeine-administered groups. Regarding glycogen status, although caffeine administration before meal ingestion reduced hepatic glycogen content, co- and post-meal caffeine administration failed to produce such an effect. Muscle glycogen content was not significantly affected by caffeine administration. Caffeine administration seems to decrease insulin sensitivity as indicated by the sustenance of glucose status despite the presence of high insulin levels. The lower triglyceride levels in the presence of caffeine support the theory of retarded postprandial triglyceride absorption. Caffeine seems to play a biphasic role in glucose metabolism, as indicated by its ability to variably influence hepatic glycogen status. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Stimulation of neutrophil FC-receptor-mediated ingestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gresham, H.; Blackburn, W.; Clement, L.; Volanakis, J.

    1986-03-05

    Neutrophils (PMN) treated with amphotericin B (AmB), chemotactic peptide (FMLP), phorbol ester (PMA), a low molecular weight (< 10,000 M/sub r/), heat-labile cytokine (CK), or media were incubated with sheep erythrocytes coated with IgG (EIgG) and ingestion assessed as a phagocytic index (PI=number of EIgG ingested/100 PMN). PMN incubated with media bound but did not ingest EIgG (PI=35) as efficiently as PMN stimulated with the following reagents: 4..mu..M AmB (PI=150), 10/sup -9/M FMLP (PI=135), 5ng/ml PMA (PI=310), and CK (PI=350). PMN treated with .25% butanol bound but did not ingest EIgG even after stimulation by the above agents. Monoclonal anti-PMN Fc receptor (3G8) treatment of non-stimulated and stimulated PMN inhibited both attachment and ingestion of EIgG. 1C2, a monoclonal antibody which precipitates a 54,000 M/sub r/ protein from PMN, had no effect on EIgG attachment or ingestion by non-stimulated PMN, yet inhibited EIgG ingestion but not attachment by PMN stimulated with CK (PI=40), AmB (PI=35), and FMLP (PI=60), but not PMA (PI=280). These data indicate that phagocytosis mediated by 3G8-positive Fc receptors may be inhibited by agents which decrease membrane fluidity (e.g. butanol) and may be enhanced by agents which require the molecule recognized by 1C2 (AmB, FMLP, and CK) and an agent which does not (PMA).

  3. The effect of acute taurine ingestion on endurance performance and metabolism in well-trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Jane A; Spriet, Lawrence L; Stellingwerff, Trent

    2010-08-01

    This study examined whether acute taurine (T) ingestion before prolonged cycling would improve time-trial (TT) performance and alter whole-body fuel utilization compared with a control (CON) trial and a placebo (PL) trial in which participants were told they received taurine but did not. Eleven endurance-trained male cyclists (27.2 ± 1.5 yr, 74.3 ± 2.3 kg, 59.9 ± 2.3 ml · kg⁻¹ · min⁻¹; M ± SEM) completed 3 trials in a randomized, crossover, blinded design in which they consumed a noncaloric sweetened beverage with either 1.66 g of T or nothing added (CON, PL) 1 hr before exercise. Participants then cycled at 66.5% ± 1.9% VO(2max) for 90 min followed immediately by a TT (doing 5 kJ of work/kg body mass as fast as possible). Data on fluid administration, expired gas, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion were collected at 15-min intervals during the 90-min cycling ride, but there were no differences recorded between trials. There was no difference in TT performance between any of the 3 trials (1,500 ± 87 s). Average carbohydrate (T 2.73 ± 0.21, CON 2.88 ± 0.19, PL 2.89 ± 0.20 g/min) and fat (T 0.45 ± 0.05, CON 0.39 ± 0.04, PL 0.39 ± 0.05 g/min) oxidation rates were unaffected by T supplementation. T ingestion resulted in a 16% increase (5 g, ~84 kJ; p < .05) in total fat oxidation over the 90-min exercise period compared with CON and PL. The acute ingestion of 1.66 g of T before exercise did not enhance TT performance but did result in a small but significant increase in fat oxidation during submaximal cycling in endurance-trained cyclists.

  4. Effects of Strengthening Exercises on Swallowing Musculature and Function in Senior Healthy Subjects: a Prospective Effectiveness and Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijenga, S A C; van der Molen, L; Stuiver, M M; Teertstra, H J; Hilgers, F J M; van den Brekel, M W M

    2015-08-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients may develop dysphagia due to muscle atrophy and fibrosis following chemoradiotherapy. Strengthening of the swallowing muscles through therapeutic exercise is potentially effective for improving swallowing function. We hypothesize that a customized Swallow Exercise Aid (SEA), developed for isometric and isokinetic strengthening exercises (against resistance), can help to functionally strengthen the suprahyoid musculature, which in turn can improve swallowing function. An effectiveness/feasibility study was carried out with ten senior healthy volunteers, who performed exercises 3 times per day for 6 weeks. Exercises included chin tuck against resistance (CTAR), jaw opening against resistance (JOAR), and effortful swallow exercises with the SEA. Multidimensional assessment consisted of measurements of maximum chin tuck and jaw opening strength, maximum tongue strength/endurance, suprahyoid muscle volume, hyoid bone displacement, swallowing transport times, occurrence of laryngeal penetration/aspiration and/or contrast residue, maximum mouth opening, feasibility/compliance (questionnaires), and subjective swallowing complaints (SWAL-QOL). After 6-weeks exercise, mean chin tuck strength, jaw opening strength, anterior tongue strength, suprahyoid muscle volume, and maximum mouth opening significantly increased (p < .05). Feasibility and compliance (median 86 %, range 48-100 %) of the SEA exercises were good. This prospective effectiveness/feasibility study on the effects of CTAR/JOAR isometric and isokinetic strengthening exercises on swallowing musculature and function shows that senior healthy subjects are able to significantly increase swallowing muscle strength and volume after a 6-week training period. These positive results warrant further investigation of effectiveness and feasibility of these SEA exercises in HNC patients with dysphagia.

  5. 'Pharyngocise': Randomized Controlled Trial of Preventative Exercises to Maintain Muscle Structure and Swallowing Function During Head-and-Neck Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnaby-Mann, Giselle, E-mail: gmann@phhp.ufl.edu [Department of Behavioral Science and Community Health, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Crary, Michael A. [Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Schmalfuss, Ilona [Department of Radiology, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL (Georgia); Amdur, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is common. The present randomized clinical trial studied the effectiveness of preventative behavioral intervention for dysphagia compared with the 'usual care.' Methods and Materials: A total of 58 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy were randomly assigned to usual care, sham swallowing intervention, or active swallowing exercises (pharyngocise). The intervention arms were treated daily during chemoradiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was muscle size and composition (determined by T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging). The secondary outcomes included functional swallowing ability, dietary intake, chemosensory function, salivation, nutritional status, and the occurrence of dysphagia-related complications. Results: The swallowing musculature (genioglossus, hyoglossuss, and mylohyoid) demonstrated less structural deterioration in the active treatment arm. The functional swallowing, mouth opening, chemosensory acuity, and salivation rate deteriorated less in the pharyngocise group. Conclusion: Patients completing a program of swallowing exercises during cancer treatment demonstrated superior muscle maintenance and functional swallowing ability.

  6. Effects of carbonated liquid on swallowing dysfunction in dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson’s disease dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson V

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Victoria Larsson,1 Gustav Torisson,1,2 Margareta Bülow,3 Elisabet Londos1 1Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, 3Diagnostic Centre of Imaging and Functional Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden Background: Swallowing dysfunction is an increasingly recognized problem in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB and Parkinson’s disease dementia (PDD, which can result in aspiration pneumonia and death. Few studies have examined potential ways of improving swallowing function in this fragile patient group. The aim of this study was to evaluate swallowing dysfunction and carbonated liquid using videofluoroscopy in DLB and PDD patients. Methods: A total of 48 patients with DLB and PDD were referred for a clinical examination with videofluoroscopy. Descriptive overall assessments were provided at the time of the examination regarding swallowing function and the effects of different modifications, including carbonated thin liquid (CTL. Additionally, a repeated measures quantitative retrospective analysis has been performed comparing 1 thin liquids; 2 thickened liquids and 3 CTLs, with regard to the quantitative variables 1 pharyngeal transit time (PTT; 2 pharyngeal retention and 3 tracheal penetration. Results: In all, 40/48 (83% of the patients had a swallowing dysfunction, which was confirmed on videofluoroscopy, with 34/40 (85% patients having a pharyngeal-type dysfunction. A total of 14/40 (35% patients with an objective swallowing impairment did not have any subjective swallowing symptoms. Out of the patients with swallowing dysfunction, 87% had an overall improved swallowing function with carbonated liquid. PTT for carbonated liquid (median 633 ms, interquartile range [IQR] 516–786 ms was quicker than for thin liquid (760 ms, IQR 613–940 ms, P=0.014 and thickened liquid (880.0 ms, IQR 600–1,500 ms, P<0.001. No significant effect

  7. Late swallowing dysfunction and dysphagia after radiotherapy for pharynx cancer: frequency, intensity and correlation with dose and volume parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Lambertsen, Karin; Grau, Cai

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Dysphagia and swallowing problems are common in pharynx cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Dysfunction of the upper aerodigestive tract may lead to reduced quality of life, malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. The aim of the current study was to describe swallowing...... examined with EORTC quality of life questionnaires and functional endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Organs at risk were delineated on planning CT scans, available for 25 patients. RESULTS: Eighty-three percent of patients had some degree of dysphagia. Reduced sensitivity was observed in 94%, residues...

  8. Effects of age and viscosity on food transport and breathing-swallowing coordination during eating of two-phase food in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Matsuo, Koichiro; Izawa, Masayuki; Yamada, Shizuru; Masuda, Yuji; Ogasawara, Tadashi

    2017-11-01

    When eating food that contains both liquid and solid phases, the liquid component frequently enters the hypopharynx before swallowing and can increase the risk of aspiration. Thus, we examined whether the initial viscosity of mixed consistency food could alter pre-swallow food transport and breathing-swallowing coordination in older adults. Fiberoptic endoscopy was recorded while 18 healthy young adults and 19 older adults ate 5 g of steamed rice combined with 3 mL of blue-dye water. Liquid viscosity was set at three levels by the addition of a thickening agent (0 wt%, thin; 2 wt%, thicker; 4 wt%, higher-viscosity, respectively). We measured the timing of swallow initiation and its corresponding respiratory phase for each participant. For thin mixed consistency food, whereas the timing of swallow initiation was comparable between young and older participants, swallowing was initiated during inspiration significantly more often in older participants (31.6 %) than in young participants (5.6 %). In contrast, the timing of swallow initiation was delayed in older participants for thicker and higher-viscosity foods, although swallowing was commonly initiated during expiration in both groups. In older adults, we observed that swallow initiation function was preserved for thin mixed consistency samples, but breathing-swallowing coupling was diminished. For higher-viscosity foods, swallow initiation was delayed in this group, but breathing-swallowing coordination was not disturbed, probably as a result of the slow bolus flow into the hypopharynx. Thus, it appears the initial viscosity of mixed consistency food profoundly affects food transport before swallowing as well as breathing-swallowing coordination in nursing home residents. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2171-2177. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Ingested foreign bodies in children: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Accidental foreign body ingestion and impaction of food bolus present as an emergency. Pediatric population is the most vulnerable. Since the act may go unnoticed, the child may present late. However, most foreign bodies pass spontaneously in the stools. Case Capsule: Two children were brought with history of battery ingestion. In one case, an emergency gastro intestinal endoscopy had to be done for the foreign body removal which was made up of corroded battery. In the other case, no interventation was undertaken & an uncorroded battery passed per anum along with stools after 15 days of ingestion. Conclusion: Decision regarding immediate intervention or conservative approach will require consideration of the level of lodgement & type of foreign body. Prevention is possible if parents/ guardians exercise control on their wards & are aware of implications of such an event.

  10. Paradoxical hypomagnesemia caused by excessive ingestion of magnesium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo Suk, Oh

    2008-09-01

    Excessive ingestion of magnesium may lead to hypermagnesemia even without kidney dysfunction. Several cases of development of hypermagnesemia after overdose of magnesium hydroxide have been reported. Although magnesium hydroxide is widely used as laxative, its overdose may induce diarrhea, which is followed by excessive magnesium loss. I report a case of paradoxical hypomagnesemia developed after excessive ingestion of magnesium hydroxide. A 39-year-old woman was presented to the emergency department complaining of severe watery diarrhea and carpopedal spasm after ingesting a handful of magnesium hydroxide tablets. The laboratory tests detected hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, and normokalemia. Calcium gluconate was given to the patient, but her symptom did not improve shortly. The symptom disappeared spontaneously 2 days after the watery diarrhea subsided. This case shows that overdose of magnesium hydroxide, which leads to massive diarrhea, might induce hypomagnesemia unexpectedly. This case also suggests that it should be treated, as well as typical magnesium deficiency.

  11. Glucose ingestion during endurance training does not alter adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Fischer, Christian P; Plomgaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    extensor training. They trained one leg while ingesting a 6% glucose solution (Glc) and ingested a sweetened placebo while training the other leg (Plc). The subjects trained their respective legs 2 h at a time on alternate days 5 days a week. Endurance training increased peak power (P(max)) and time...... to fatigue at 70% of P(max) approximately 14% and approximately 30%, respectively. CS and beta-HAD activity increased and glycogen content was greater after training, but there were no differences between Glc and Plc. After training the rate of oxidation of palmitate (R(ox)) and the % of rate...... of disappearance that was oxidized (%R(dox)) changed. %R(dox) was on average 16.4% greater during exercise after training whereas, after exercise %R(dox) was 30.4% lower. R(ox) followed the same pattern. However, none of these parameters were different between Glc and Plc. We conclude that glucose ingestion during...

  12. Cerebral arterial gas embolism, ingestion of hydrogen peroxide and flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joob, Beuy; Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2017-03-01

    We read with interest the recent report by Smedley et al. on an interesting case of cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) after pre-flight ingestion of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). The authors discuss the safety of aero-medical transfer following H₂O₂ ingestion. We agree with the possible problems but the concern on the other side of the coin needs to be mentioned; can transfer be delayed is the big question? Indeed, as reported by others, ingestion of even a small amount of concentrated H₂O₂ can result in CAGE. Hence, whether aero-medical transfer proceeds or not, severe, life-threatening embolism can occur. Since it was reported that "complete neurologic recovery occurred quickly with hyperbaric therapy", this supports the contention that the fastest transfer of the patient for hyperbaric treatment should be the primary focus.

  13. Ingestion of branched-chain amino acids and tryptophan during sustained exercise in man: failure to affect performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Raaymakers, J S; Saris, W H

    1995-01-01

    1. An increased uptake of tryptophan in the brain may increase serotoninergic activity and recently has been suggested to be a cause of fatigue during prolonged exercise. The present study, therefore, investigates whether ingestion of tryptophan or the competing branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs......) affect performance. Ten endurance-trained male athletes were studied during cycle exercise at 70-75% maximal power output, while ingesting, ad random and double-blind, drinks that contained 6% sucrose (control) or 6% sucrose supplemented with (1) tryptophan (3 g l-1), (2) a low dose of BCAA (6 g l-1...... or that manipulation of serotoninergic activity functionally does not contribute to mechanisms of fatigue....

  14. Planktonic hydroids on Georges Bank: ingestion and selection by predatory fishes1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avent, Sean R.; Bollens, Stephen M.; Butler, Mari; Horgan, Erich; Rountree, Rodney

    Planktonic colonial hydroids ( Clytia gracilis) recently have been found to be abundant, but patchily distributed in time and space, on Georges Bank, northwest Atlantic Ocean. However, the processes regulating the occurrence of these hydroid colonies (i.e., seasonality, growth, advection, diffusion, sinking, and predation) are not well understood. The objective of this study was to identify and quantify the potential role of predation by fish upon the unattached hydroids. The two components of this study were (i) analyses of historical fish trawl surveys and stomach contents data collected in the coastal northwest Atlantic Ocean (including Georges Bank), and (ii) laboratory experiments testing for the presence of selective feeding by juvenile cod ( Gadus morhua) on hydroids relative to two co-occurring planktonic copepods ( Calanus finmarchicus and Centropages hamatus). We found that 32 and 11 species of fish ingested hydroids in the coastal northwest Atlantic Ocean and Georges Bank, respectively, during 1973-1990. However, hydroids were rarely an important part of the diet of these fishes. The most important predator of these cnidarians on Georges Bank was winter flounder, with 28.0% of its population having ingested hydroids, with a mean % (by weight) of hydroids in the diet of 4.1%, during 1973-80. Laboratory experiments indicated juvenile cod ingested planktonic hydroids, but overwhelmingly preferred either of the two copepods as prey. While field and laboratory results indicated that a wide variety of fishes feed on hydroids, we concluded that emergences and disappearances of planktonic hydroids on Georges Bank are not greatly impacted by fish predation. Other factors, in particular physical processes (i.e., advection, diffusion, and sinking), seasonal cycles of activity and inactivity, and predation by invertebrates, should be examined.

  15. Excessive anterior cervical muscle tone affects hyoid bone kinetics during swallowing in healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamazaki Y

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Yasuhiro Yamazaki, Haruka Tohara, Koji Hara, Ayako Nakane, Yoko Wakasugi, Kohei Yamaguchi, Shunsuke Minakuchi Department of Gerodontology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: This study aimed to determine whether excessive neck muscle tone affects hyoid bone kinetics during swallowing using videofluorography (VF in an unnatural posture in healthy individuals. Subjects and methods: Subjects were 28 healthy adults (12 men, 16 women; mean age, 39.75±9.50 years without any history or present complaints of swallowing disorders. We first established the participant’s posture a reclining wheelchair that was adjusted to a 30-degree angle with the headrest (without excessive neck muscle tone or without headrest (with excessive neck muscle tone, used an electromyogram above the mylohyoid muscle to represent the suprahyoid muscles and above the sternohyoid muscle to represent the infrahyoid muscles to confirm neck muscle tone, and then conducted VF of swallowing measurements. Videofluorographic images were obtained when 5 mL of 50% (w/v barium sulfate was being swallowed, and hyoid bone coordinate (the resting position and the elevated position, extent of horizontal and vertical hyoid bone elevation, as well as duration and velocity of hyoid bone elevation were evaluated (x-axis and y-axis coordinates for the resting position of hyoid bone are referred to as Xr and Yr, respectively; those for the elevated hyoid bone position induced during swallowing are referred to as Xs and Ys, respectively. Results: In the resting position of the hyoid bone, the Yr coordinates in those with excessive neck muscle tone were significantly lower than in those without excessive neck muscle tone. Vertical hyoid bone elevation and hyoid bone elevation velocity were significantly higher with excessive neck muscle tone than without excessive neck muscle tone, whereas horizontal elevation showed no significant differences. Conclusion: Our findings

  16. Uncertainty analysis of doses from ingestion of plutonium and americium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncher, M; Harrison, J D

    2012-02-01

    Uncertainty analyses have been performed on the biokinetic model for americium currently used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and the model for plutonium recently derived by Leggett, considering acute intakes by ingestion by adult members of the public. The analyses calculated distributions of doses per unit intake. Those parameters having the greatest impact on prospective doses were identified by sensitivity analysis; the most important were the fraction absorbed from the alimentary tract, f(1), and rates of uptake from blood to bone surfaces. Probability distributions were selected based on the observed distribution of plutonium and americium in human subjects where possible; the distributions for f(1) reflected uncertainty on the average value of this parameter for non-specified plutonium and americium compounds ingested by adult members of the public. The calculated distributions of effective doses for ingested (239)Pu and (241)Am were well described by log-normal distributions, with doses varying by around a factor of 3 above and below the central values; the distributions contain the current ICRP Publication 67 dose coefficients for ingestion of (239)Pu and (241)Am by adult members of the public. Uncertainty on f(1) values had the greatest impact on doses, particularly effective dose. It is concluded that: (1) more precise data on f(1) values would have a greater effect in reducing uncertainties on doses from ingested (239)Pu and (241)Am, than reducing uncertainty on other model parameter values and (2) the results support the dose coefficients (Sv Bq(-1) intake) derived by ICRP for ingestion of (239)Pu and (241)Am by adult members of the public.

  17. Microplastics ingestion by a common tropical freshwater fishing resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Cavalcanti, Jacqueline Santos; Silva, José Diego B; França, Elton José de; Araújo, Maria Christina Barbosa de; Gusmão, Felipe

    2017-02-01

    Microplastics pollution is widespread in marine ecosystems and a major threat to biodiversity. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the impacts of microplastics in freshwater environments and biota is still very limited. The interaction of microplastics with freshwater organisms and the risks associated with the human consumption of organisms that ingested microplastics remain major knowledge gaps. In this study, we assessed the ingestion of microplastics by Hoplosternum littorale, a common freshwater fish heavily consumed by humans in semi-arid regions of South America. We assessed the abundance and diversity of both plastic debris and other food items found in the gut of fishes caught by local fishermen. We observed that 83% of the fish had plastic debris inside the gut, the highest frequency reported for a fish species so far. Most of the plastic debris (88.6%) recovered from the guts of fish were microplastics (microplastics at the urbanized sections of the river, and that the ingestion of microplastics was negatively correlated with the diversity of other food items in the gut of individual fish. Nevertheless, microplastics ingestion appears to have a limited impact on H. littorale, and the consequences of human consumption of this fish were not assessed. Our results suggest freshwater biota are vulnerable to microplastics pollution and that urbanization is a major factor contributing to the pollution of freshwater environments with microplastics. We suggest the gut content of fish could be used as a tool for the qualitative assessment of microplastics pollution in freshwater ecosystems. Further research is needed to determine the processes responsible for the high incidence of microplastics ingestion by H. littorale, and to evaluate the risk posed to humans by the consumption of freshwater fish that ingested microplastics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Whole fentanyl patch ingestion: a multi-center case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrvos, Rita; Feuchter, Alexander C; Katz, Kenneth D; Duback-Morris, Lynn F; Brooks, Daniel E; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2012-05-01

    Fentanyl is a potent synthetic opioid with large abuse potential. A common preparation of fentanyl is a sustained-release transdermal patch. To our knowledge, there are only two published case reports of whole patch ingestion. A case series of 76 patients with a history of whole patch ingestion is reported. To characterize whole fentanyl patch ingestion to develop a clinical guideline for management. This was a retrospective review of all patients who ingested intact fentanyl patches as reported to three regional poison information centers (RPIC) from 2000 to 2008. The three RPIC medical record databases were queried for all exposures with a substance code matching the Micromedex® (Thomson Reuters, New York, NY) fentanyl product codes. Collected data included: age, gender, reason for the exposure, number of patches ingested, dose (μg/h), symptoms, symptom onset and duration, treatment hospital flow (level of care), and outcome. A total of 76 patients met the inclusion criteria. Two patients had both time of onset and symptom duration documented. In both patients, the signs and symptoms developed within 2 h of the exposure, and the patients were asymptomatic at 6½ and 9 h, respectively. Fifty-eight (78.3%) patients were admitted. Of those patients who were admitted, 56 (96.5%) were admitted to a critical care unit. Fourteen patients required intubation, and naloxone infusions were documented in eight cases. Ingestion of whole fentanyl patches may lead to prolonged and significant toxicity based on these poison center data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fatal poisoning from ingestion of Datura stramonium seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumba, Vassiliki A; Mitselou, Antigony; Vougiouklakis, Theodore

    2004-04-01

    A 19-y old male who intentionally ingested an unknown quantity of Datura stramonium seeds to experience its hallucinogenic effects was found dead. Hyoscyamine and scopolamine were detected in postmortem blood and urine. Blood concentrations of hyoscyamine and scopolamine were 1.1 and 0.2 microg/mL, respectively; in urine only hyoscyamine at 14.2 microg/mL was found. This fatality presents the highest blood concentrations ever reported and confirms that death was due to Datura Stramonium seed ingestion.

  20. Variegate porphyria and heavy metal poisoning from ingestion of "moonshine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, G S; Davis, L

    1983-08-01

    A patient with cavitary tuberculosis, hepatic cirrhosis, bullous skin lesions over sun-exposed surfaces, disorientation, and a chronic, as well as recent, history of illicit alcohol consumption was found to have acute variegate porphyria by characteristic fecal and urinary porphyrin studies. Elevated levels of lead and arsenic were found in serum and urine without evidence of heavy metal storage in hair and liver. We suspect that the variegate porphyria was precipitated by the ingestion of heavy metals contained in illicit alcohol. In a patient with disorientation, bullous skin lesions, and a history of illicit alcohol ingestion, one must consider heavy metal intoxication and secondary porphyrin abnormalities.