WorldWideScience

Sample records for svom space-based multi-band

  1. Testing and modelling of the SVOM MXT narrow field lobster-eye telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Charlotte; Pearson, James; Willingale, Richard; Sykes, John; Drumm, Paul; Houghton, Paul; Bicknell, Chris; Osborne, Julian; Martindale, Adrian; O'Brien, Paul; Fairbend, Ray; Schyns, Emile; Petit, Sylvain; Roudot, Romain; Mercier, Karine; Le Duigou, Jean-Michel; Gotz, Diego

    2017-08-01

    The Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor (SVOM) is a French-Chinese space mission to be launched in 2021 with the goal of studying gamma-ray bursts, the most powerful stellar explosions in the Universe. The Microchannel X-ray Telescope (MXT) on-board SVOM, is an X-ray focusing telescope with a detector-limited field of view of ˜1 square° , working in the 0.2-10 keV energy band. The MXT is a narrow-field-optimised lobster eye telescope, designed to promptly detect and accurately locate gamma-ray bursts afterglows. The breadboard MXT optic comprises of an array of square pore micro pore optics (MPOs) which are slumped to a spherical radius of 2 m giving a focal length of 1 m and an intrinsic field of view of ˜6° . We present details of the baseline design and results from the ongoing X-ray tests of the breadboard and structural thermal model MPOs performed at the University of Leicester and at Panter. In addition, we present details of modelling and analysis which reveals the factors that limit the angular resolution, characteristics of the point spread function and the efficiency and collecting area of the currently available MPOs.

  2. Overview of the SVOM Gamma-Ray Burst mission under development with a focus on its Trigger system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanne, Stephane

    2017-08-01

    The SVOM mission (Space-based Variable Objects Monitor) is a Chinese-French satellite mission under development, devoted to collecting a complete sample of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) observed at multi-wavelengths with a high fraction of redshift determinations. In January 2017 the mission entered Phase C, starting officially construction, and the launch is foreseen in 2021. The SVOM satellite is equipped with 4 instruments, 2 of which cover the prompt GRB phase. The ECLAIRs coded-mask imager surveys a 2-sr large portion of the sky in the 4-150 keV energy range, well suited for the detection of X-ray rich and highly redshifted GRBs. The ECLAIRs trigger system continuously searches for GRBs using two algorithms, a count-rate trigger for short time scales and an image trigger for long time scales. In case of a localized new GRB candidate or a bright outburst of a known source, it promptly requests a satellite slew and sends an alert to ground. The onboard GRM (Gamma-Ray Monitor) extends the prompt energy coverage up to 5 MeV. After slew, 2 more onboard instruments study the GRB afterglow and refine the GRB localization: the MXT (Multi-pore optics X-ray Telescope) and the VT (Visible Telescope). Two types of ground telescopes are dedicated to SVOM. The GFTs (Ground Follow-up Telescopes) repoint autonomously to GRB alerts, refine their localization and provide photometric redshift. The SVOM observing strategy with roughly antisolar pointing combined with Galactic plane avoidance, ensures that most GRBs are quickly visible by the GFTs and large spectroscopic telescopes. The GWAC (Ground Wide Angle Camera) will observe the sky simultaneously with ECLAIRs to detect prompt optical GRB emissions. Today part of the GWAC is already operational. The SVOM GRB program is complemented by pre-planned target observations and ground-commanded targets of opportunity, e.g. to search for electromagnetic counterparts of gravity-wave events. On behalf of the SVOM and ECLAIRs teams, this

  3. Multi-band slow light metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Meng, Fan-Yi; Fu, Jia-Hui; Wu, Qun; Hua, Jun

    2012-02-13

    In this paper, a multi-band slow light metamaterial is presented and investigated. The metamaterial unit cell is composed of three cut wires of different sizes and parallel to each other. Two transparency windows induced by two-two overlaps of absorption bands of three cut wires are observed. The multi-band transmission characteristics and the slow light properties of metamaterial are verified by numerical simulation, which is in a good agreement with theoretical predictions. The impacts of structure parameters on transparency windows are also investigated. Simulation results show the spectral properties can be tuned by adjusting structure parameters of metamaterial. The equivalent circuit model and the synthesis method of the multi-band slow light metamaterial are presented. It is seen from simulation results that the synthesis method accurately predicts the center frequency of the multi-band metamaterial, which opens a door to a quick and accurate construction for multi-band slow light metamaterial.

  4. Multi-band terahertz metasurface absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuying; Wang, Qingmin; Dong, Guoyan; Hao, Yanan; Lei, Ming; Bi, Ke

    2017-12-01

    A terahertz metasurface perfect absorber with multi-band performance is demonstrated. The absorber is composed of a ground plane and four split-ring resonators (SRRs) with different dimensions, separated by a dielectric spacer. The numerical simulation results illustrate that the proposed absorber has four distinct absorption peaks at resonance frequencies of 4.24, 5.66, 7.22, and 8.97 THz, with absorption rates of 96.8%, 99.3%, 97.3%, and 99.9%, respectively. Moreover, the corresponding full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values are about 0.27, 0.35, 0.32, and 0.42 THz, respectively, which are much broader than those of previously reported absorbers. Besides, the calculated magnetic field distributions allow us to understand the absorption mechanism in detail. The effects of incident angle and azimuthal angle on the absorber are also investigated. The results show that the proposed absorber is partially sensitive to the incident angle, which makes this design promising for practical applications in terahertz imagers and detectors.

  5. Multi-band, highly absorbing, microwave metamaterial structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollatou, T. M.; Dimitriadis, A. I.; Assimonis, S. D.; Kantartzis, N. V.; Antonopoulos, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    A further example of multi-band absorption using ultra-thin, polarization-insensitive, wide-angled metamaterial absorbers that operate in multi-frequency bands within the microwave regime is presented in this work. The basic structure geometry is utilised to create multi-band highly absorbing structures by incorporating the scalability property of the metamaterials. Simulation results verify the structure's ability for high absorption. The multi-band absorbers are promising candidates as absorbing elements in scientific and technical applications because of its multi-band absorption, polarization insensitivity, and wide-angle response. Finally, the current distributions for those structures are presented to gain a better insight into the physics behind the multiple absorption mechanism.

  6. Multi-band metamaterial absorber using cave-cross resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y. Z.; Nie, Y.; Gong, R. Z.; Yang, H. L.

    2011-12-01

    Multi-band metamaterial absorber (MA) was proposed at the microwave frequency ranges, which were composed of cave-cross resonator (CCR) with different geometric dimensions, dielectric substrate and continuous metal film. Microwave experiments demonstrated the maximum absorptivity of single CCR structure to be about 99% around 9 GHz. Numerical simulations confirm that the MA could achieve very high absorptivity at wide angles of incidence for both transverse electric (TE) wave and transverse magnetic (TM) wave. Importantly, numerical simulations demonstrate that the MA could achieve perfect multi-band absorption by assembling the multi-CCR structure with different geometric parameters in a coplanar.

  7. Multi-Band Spectral Properties of Fermi Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Galaxies: active; BL Lacertae objects; general; gamma rays; observations. Abstract. The multi-band data covering optical, X-ray and -ray energy regions of 130 Fermi blazars in the First LAT AGN Catalog (1LAC) were collected to investigate the broadband spectral properties. The composite spectral indices show that ...

  8. Multi-band Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. This talk focuses on the various aspects we learnt from multi- band observations of GRBs both, before and during the afterglow era. A statistical analysis to estimate the probable redshifts of host galaxies using the luminosity function of GRBs compatible with both the afterglow redshift data as well as the overall ...

  9. Material classification based on multi-band polarimetric images fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongqiang; Pan, Quan; Zhang, Hongcai

    2006-05-01

    Polarization imparted by surface reflections contains unique and discriminatory signatures which may augment spectral target-detection techniques. With the development of multi-band polarization imaging technology, it is becoming more and more important on how to integrate polarimetric, spatial and spectral information to improve target discrimination. In this study, investigations were performed on combining multi-band polarimetric images through false color mapping and wavelet integrated image fusion method. The objective of this effort was to extend the investigation of the use of polarized light to target detection and material classification. As there is great variation in polarization in and between each of the bandpasses, and this variation is comparable to the magnitude of the variation intensity. At the same time, the contrast in polarization is greater than for intensity, and that polarization contrast increases as intensity contrast decreases. It is also pointed out that chromaticity can be used to make targets stand out more clearly against background, and material can be divided into conductor and nonconductor through polarization information. So, through false color mapping, the difference part of polarimetric information between each of the bandpasses and common part of polarimetric information in each of the bandpasses are combined, in the resulting image the conductor and nonconductor are assigned different color. Then panchromatic polarimetric images are fused with resulting image through wavelet decomposition, the final fused image have more detail information and more easy identification. This study demonstrated, using digital image data collected by imaging spectropolarimeter, multi-band imaging polarimetry is likely to provide an advantage in target detection and material classification.

  10. Teletraffic performance Analysis of Multi-band Overlaid WCDMA Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hua; Iversen, Villy Bæk

    2007-01-01

    Wide-band Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) systems are considered to be among the best alternatives for Universal Mobile Telecommunication System (UMTS). In future deployment of WCDMA systems, spectrum overlay among sub-bands with different bandwidth is necessary to support various kinds...... of services. In this paper, we present a novel approach for evaluating the teletraffic performance of multi-band overlaid WCDMA systems in terms of time, call, and traffic blocking probabilities of each service class. We convert the radio model into a circuit switched network by introducing the concept...

  11. Multi-band CRLH unit cell -loaded patch antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Henawy, Sally I.; Omar, Ahmed A.; Safwat, Amr M. E.; El-Hennawy, Hadia S.

    2017-01-01

    A multi-band patch antenna loaded with composite right-/left-handed (CRLH) unit cell is presented in this paper. It operates at three bands, which are not harmonically related, covering several communication standards. The first and third bands have patch-like radiation pattern, and the second band has monopole-like radiation pattern. These bands can be controlled by varying the patch size and unit cell element values. The performance was analyzed using both electromagnetic and circuit simulations; furthermore, measurements were taken and all were in good agreement.

  12. A Self-Calibrating Multi-Band Region Growing Approach to Segmentation of Single and Multi-Band Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paglieroni, D W

    2002-12-20

    Image segmentation transforms pixel-level information from raw images to a higher level of abstraction in which related pixels are grouped into disjoint spatial regions. Such regions typically correspond to natural or man-made objects or structures, natural variations in land cover, etc. For many image interpretation tasks (such as land use assessment, automatic target cueing, defining relationships between objects, etc.), segmentation can be an important early step. Remotely sensed images (e.g., multi-spectral and hyperspectral images) often contain many spectral bands (i.e., multiple layers of 2D images). Multi-band images are important because they contain more information than single-band images. Objects or natural variations that are readily apparent in certain spectral bands may be invisible in 2D broadband images. In this paper, the classical region growing approach to image segmentation is generalized from single to multi-band images. While it is widely recognized that the quality of image segmentation is affected by which segmentation algorithm is used, this paper shows that algorithm parameter values can have an even more profound effect. A novel self-calibration framework is developed for automatically selecting parameter values that produce segmentations that most closely resemble a calibration edge map (derived separately using a simple edge detector). Although the framework is generic in the sense that it can imbed any core segmentation algorithm, this paper only demonstrates self-calibration with multi-band region growing. The framework is applied to a variety of AVIRIS image blocks at different spectral resolutions, in an effort to assess the impact of spectral resolution on segmentation quality. The image segmentations are assessed quantitatively, and it is shown that segmentation quality does not generally appear to be highly correlated with spectral resolution.

  13. Multi - band Persistent Scatterer Interferometry data integration for landslide analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Silvia; Mateos, Rosa; Mora, Oscar; García, Inma; Sánchez, Ciscu; Sanabria, Margarita; López, Maite; Mulas, Joaquin; Hernández, Mario; Herrera, Gerardo

    2013-04-01

    We present a methodology to perform a geomorphological assessment of ground movements over wide areas, by improving Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) analysis for landslide studies. The procedure relies on the integrated use of multi-band EO data acquired by different satellite sensors in different time intervals, to provide a detailed investigation of ground displacements. The methodology, throughout the cross-comparison and integration of PS data in different microwave bands (ALOS in L-band, ERS1/2 and ENVISAT in C-band, COSMOSKY-MED in X-band), is applied on the Tramontana Range in the northwestern part of Mallorca island (Spain), extensively affected by mass movements across time, especially during the last years. We increase the confidence degree of the available interferometric data and we homogenize all PS targets by implementing and classifying them through common criteria. Therefore, PSI results are combined with geo-thematic data and pre-existing landslide inventories of the study area, in order to improve the landslide database, providing additional information on the detected ground displacements. The results of this methodology are used to elaborate landslide activity maps, permitting to jointly exploit heterogeneous PS data for analyzing landslides at regional scale. Moreover, from a geomorphological perspective, the proposed approach exploits the implemented PS data to achieve a reliable spatial analysis of movement rates, whatever referred to certain landslide phenomena or to other natural processes, in order to perform ground motion activity maps within a wide area.

  14. The x-/gamma-ray camera ECLAIRs for the gamma-ray burst mission SVOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, O.; Nasser, G.; Atteia, J.-.; Cordier, B.; Mandrou, P.; Barret, D.; Triou, H.; Pons, R.; Amoros, C.; Bordon, S.; Gevin, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Götz, D.; Gros, A.; Houret, B.; Lachaud, C.; Lacombe, K.; Marty, W.; Mercier, K.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Schanne, S.; Waegebaert, V.

    2014-07-01

    We present ECLAIRs, the Gamma-ray burst (GRB) trigger camera to fly on-board the Chinese-French mission SVOM. ECLAIRs is a wide-field (~ 2 sr) coded mask camera with a mask transparency of 40% and a 1024 cm2 detection plane coupled to a data processing unit, so-called UGTS, which is in charge of locating GRBs in near real time thanks to image and rate triggers. We present the instrument science requirements and how the design of ECLAIRs has been optimized to increase its sensitivity to high-redshift GRBs and low-luminosity GRBs in the local Universe, by having a low-energy threshold of 4 keV. The total spectral coverage ranges from 4 to 150 keV. ECLAIRs is expected to detect ~ 200 GRBs of all types during the nominal 3 year mission lifetime. To reach a 4 keV low-energy threshold, the ECLAIRs detection plane is paved with 6400 4 × 4 mm2 and 1 mm-thick Schottky CdTe detectors. The detectors are grouped by 32, in 8×4 matrices read by a low-noise ASIC, forming elementary modules called XRDPIX. In this paper, we also present our current efforts to investigate the performance of these modules with their front-end electronics when illuminated by charged particles and/or photons using radioactive sources. All measurements are made in different instrument configurations in vacuum and with a nominal in-flight detector temperature of -20°C. This work will enable us to choose the in-flight configuration that will make the best compromise between the science performance and the in-flight operability of ECLAIRs. We will show some highlights of this work.

  15. MATLAB simulation software used for the PhD thesis "Acquisition of Multi-Band Signals via Compressed Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    MATLAB simulation software used for the PhD thesis "Acquisition of Multi-Band Signals via Compressed Sensing......MATLAB simulation software used for the PhD thesis "Acquisition of Multi-Band Signals via Compressed Sensing...

  16. High efficiency switching power amplifiers for multi-band radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Jarred; Wells, Justin; Mendez, Sal; Wurth, Tim

    2012-06-01

    The reduction of size, weight, power, and cost (SWaP-C) of radio frequency (RF) components is becoming increasingly important to meet industry requirements. In meeting the SWaP-C objectives, RF components will be required to be smaller and more power efficient than the current state- of- the- art while sustaining high performance functionality. In compliance with SWaP-C and high performance functionality is a High Efficiency Switching Power Amplifier. This study focuses on the more efficient breed of switching power amplifiers (PAs), particularly the Class F PA with new techniques to operate broadband on multiple radar bands. Efficiencies in the range of 60% to 80% for Class F PAs have been reported in literature; however, this efficiency is only attainable over narrow bandwidths on the order of 10%. Several innovative techniques have been identified to increase the efficiency and operational bandwidth of RF power amplifiers (PAs) for radar applications. The amplifier design also incorporates fast turn on and turn off circuits to achieve switching times of less than one microsecond (μs). This enables the PA to be switched off during the receive period to prevent self-generated noise from corrupting the received signal. Also, high-power transmit and receive (T/R) switches at the antenna feed can be eliminated. A wideband PA enables the design of a multi-band radar, reducing the number of components needed for operation in the L and X bands. A high efficiency PA is also key to reducing battery size and cooling requirements in radar applications.

  17. A Multi-Band Photonic Phased Array Antenna for High-Data Rate Communication Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Multi-band phased array antenna (PAA) can reduce the number of antennas on shipboard platforms while offering significantly improved performance. In order to steer...

  18. A Multi-band Photonic Phased Array Antenna for High-Date Rate Communication Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Multi-band phased array antenna (PAA) can reduce the number of antennas on shipboard platforms while offering significantly improved performance. In order to steer...

  19. Fair comparison of complexity between a multi-band CAP and DMT for data center interconnects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J L; Sanchez, C; Giacoumidis, E

    2017-10-01

    We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first known detailed analysis and fair comparison of complexity of a 56 Gb/s multi-band carrierless amplitude and phase (CAP) and discrete multi-tone (DMT) over 80 km dispersion compensation fiber-free single-mode fiber links based on intensity modulation and direct detection for data center interconnects. We show that the matched finite impulse response filters and inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT)/FFT take the majority of the complexity of the multi-band CAP and DMT, respectively. The choice of the multi-band CAP sub-band count and the DMT IFFT/FFT size makes significant impact on the system complexity or performance, and trade-off must be considered.

  20. Multi-band transmission color filters for multi-color white LEDs based visible light communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qixia; Zhu, Zhendong; Gu, Huarong; Chen, Mengzhu; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2017-11-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based visible light communication (VLC) can provide license-free bands, high data rates, and high security levels, which is a promising technique that will be extensively applied in future. Multi-band transmission color filters with enough peak transmittance and suitable bandwidth play a pivotal role for boosting signal-noise-ratio in VLC systems. In this paper, multi-band transmission color filters with bandwidth of dozens nanometers are designed by a simple analytical method. Experiment results of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) tri-band color filters demonstrate the effectiveness of the multi-band transmission color filters and the corresponding analytical method.

  1. A design of metamaterial multi-band bowtie antenna based on omega-shaped resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, Mondher; Salhi, Ridha; Choubani, Fethi

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new design of a multi-band bowtie antenna based on omega-shaped resonator (OSR). This proposed structure, designed to operate at multi-band frequency range, consists of coplanar bowtie antenna in the top layer and an array of OSRs in the bottom layer of the structure. The antenna structure with dimensions of 42× {13.3} mm^2 is printed on a FR4 epoxy dielectric and is fabricated to validate our prototype. The measured reflection coefficient of the proposed prototype shows that the antenna operates at a multi-band frequency range namely 4.06, 7.4, and 10.78 GHz with return loss equal to -14, -38, and -34 dB, respectively. These are in good agreement with the simulation. In addition, a comparison of the measured and the simulated radiation pattern is provided and discussed. They show a good consistency.

  2. Single and multi-band electromagnetic induced transparency-like metamaterials with coupled split ring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, Fulya; Akaoglu, Baris

    2017-08-01

    We present a metamaterial configuration exhibiting single and multi-band electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT)-like properties. The unit cell of the single band EIT-like metamaterial consists of a multi-split ring resonator surrounded by a split ring resonator. The multi-split ring resonator acts as a quasi-dark or dark resonator, depending on the polarization of the incident wave, and the split ring resonator serves as the bright resonator. Combination of these two resonators results in a single band EIT-like transmission inside the stop band. EIT-like transmission phenomenon is also clearly observed in the measured transmission spectrum at almost the same frequencies for vertical and horizontal polarized waves, and the numerical results are verified for normal incidence. Moreover, multi-band transmission windows are created within a wide band by combining the two slightly different single band EIT-like metamaterial unit cells that exhibit two different coupling strengths inside a supercell configuration. Group indices as high as 123 for single band and 488 for tri-band transmission, accompanying with high transmission rates (over 80%), are achieved, rendering the metamaterial very suitable for multi-band slow light applications. It is shown that the group delay of the propagating wave can be increased and dynamically controlled by changing the polarization angle. Multi-band EIT-like transmission is also verified experimentally, and a good agreement with simulations is obtained. The proposed novel methodology for obtaining multi-band EIT, which takes advantage of a supercell configuration by hosting slightly different configured unit cells, can be utilized for easily formation and manipulation of multi-band transmission windows inside a stop band.

  3. Multi-Mode, Multi-Band Active-RC Filterand Tuning Circuits for SDR Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kang-Yoon

    2010-01-01

    The CMOS multi-mode, multi-band low-pass filter and complex baseband filter are presented. Capacitors and resistors were shared to minimize the area. Proposed two-step tuning method can reduce the number of switches and thus, can reduce the noise and the area.

  4. A Multi-Band Uncertainty Set Based Robust SCUC With Spatial and Temporal Budget Constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Chenxi; Wu, Lei; Wu, Hongyu

    2016-11-01

    The dramatic increase of renewable energy resources in recent years, together with the long-existing load forecast errors and increasingly involved price sensitive demands, has introduced significant uncertainties into power systems operation. In order to guarantee the operational security of power systems with such uncertainties, robust optimization has been extensively studied in security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) problems, for immunizing the system against worst uncertainty realizations. However, traditional robust SCUC models with single-band uncertainty sets may yield over-conservative solutions in most cases. This paper proposes a multi-band robust model to accurately formulate various uncertainties with higher resolution. By properly tuning band intervals and weight coefficients of individual bands, the proposed multi-band robust model can rigorously and realistically reflect spatial/temporal relationships and asymmetric characteristics of various uncertainties, and in turn could effectively leverage the tradeoff between robustness and economics of robust SCUC solutions. The proposed multi-band robust SCUC model is solved by Benders decomposition (BD) and outer approximation (OA), while taking the advantage of integral property of the proposed multi-band uncertainty set. In addition, several accelerating techniques are developed for enhancing the computational performance and the convergence speed. Numerical studies on a 6-bus system and the modified IEEE 118-bus system verify the effectiveness of the proposed robust SCUC approach for enhancing uncertainty modeling capabilities and mitigating conservativeness of the robust SCUC solution.

  5. Evaluation and Analysis of a Multi-Band Transceiver for Next Generation Telemetry Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Eng., Samuel Berhanu, and Willie L. Thompson II, D.Eng Morgan State University, The Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. School of Engineering Center of...and Instrumentation (PEO STRI ) contract for W900KK-12-C-0048 for Multi-Band, Multi-Mode Software Defined Radio (MBMM SDR). I. Introduction All

  6. Development of a 32-detector CdTe matrix for the SVOM ECLAIRs X/Gamma camera: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, K.; Nasser, G.; Amoros, C.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barret, D.; Billot, M.; Cordier, B.; Gevin, O.; Godet, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Houret, B.; Landé, J.; Lugiez, F.; Mandrou, P.; Martin, J.-A.; Marty, W.; Mercier, K.; Pons, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Waegebaert, V.

    2013-12-01

    ECLAIRs, a 2D coded-mask imaging telescope on the Sino-French SVOM space mission, will detect and locate gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) between 4 and 150 keV. The detector array is an assembly of 6400 Schottky CdTe detectors of size 4×4×1 mm3, biased from -100 V to -600 V and operated at -20 °C to minimize the leakage current and maximize the polarization time. The remarkable low-energy threshold is achieved through various steps: an extensive detectors selection, a low-noise 32 channels ASIC study, and the design of an innovative detection module called XRDPIX formed by a thick film ceramic holding 32 detectors, a high voltage grid and an HTCC substrate housing the ASIC within a hermetic cavity. In this paper, we describe the XRDPIX module and explain the results of first tests to measure the linearity and compare the sources of noise, such as leakage currents and the Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) measured on ASIC Ceramics. We confront these values with the energy threshold and spectral resolution made with dedicated test benches. Finally, we present the superposition of 32 calibrated spectra of one XRDPIX module, showing the excellent homogeneity of the 32 detectors and the achievement of a detection threshold at 4 keV over the entire module.

  7. Multi-band polarization independent cylindrical metamaterial absorber and sensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, Furkan; Karaaslan, Muharrem; Colak, Sule; Tetik, Erkan; Akgol, Oguzhan; Altıntas, Olcay; Sabah, Cumali

    2016-03-01

    A multi-band perfect metamaterial absorber (MA) based on a cylindrical waveguide with polarization independency is numerically presented and investigated in detail. The proposed absorber has a very simple configuration, and it operates at flexible frequency ranges within the microwave frequency regime by simply tuning the dimensions of the structure. The maximum absorption values are obtained as 99.9%, 97.5%, 85.8%, 68.2% and 40.2% at the frequencies of 1.34 GHz, 2.15 GHz, 3.2 GHz, 4.31 GHz and 5.41 GHz, respectively. The numerical studies verify that the proposed model can provide multi-band perfect absorptions at wide polarization and incident angles due to its rotational symmetry feature. We have also realized sensor and parametric study applications in order to show additional features of the suggested model. The suggested MA enables myriad potential applications in medical technologies, sensors and in defense industry etc.

  8. Simple Front-End Concept for the Complex Challenges of Multi-Band Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buskgaard, Emil Feldborg; Tatomirescu, Alexandru; Barrio, Samantha Caporal Del

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new architecture for mobile phone front-ends that dramatically reduces the complexity of multi-band smart phones. Traditional smart phone front-ends consist of many parallel transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) chains each dedicated to a single band. The proposed architecture simp...... bands realistic. Current 5G investigations show that the advantages of flexible front-ends will be even bigger as technology moves toward software defined radio. \\end{abstract}...

  9. System Framework for a Multi-Band, Multi-Mode Software Defined Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 U.S. ARMY PEO STRI Acquisition Center 1 0 0 Email to: kaitlin.lockett@us.army.mil Attn: Kaitlin F. Lockett 12350...School of Engineering Center of Excellence for Tactical & Advanced Communication Technologies ABSTRACT This paper describes a system framework... STRI ) contract for W900KK-12-C-0048 for Multi-Band, Multi-Mode Software Defined Radio (MBMM SDR). Release Number: 412-TW- PA-14110. 9

  10. Integrated Instantaneous Frequency Measurement Subsystem Based on Multi-Band-Stop Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, B. G. M. de; Melo, M. T. de; Llamas-Garro, Ignacio; Espinosa-Espinosa, Moisés; de Oliveira, M.R.T.; de Oliveira, E.M.F.

    2014-01-01

    A 4-bit instantaneous frequency measurement (IFM) subsystem operating in the 1.5–4.66 GHz frequency band has been developed based on multi-band-stop filters. The design instantaneously detects the incoming signal which is then associated to one of the 16 sub-bands. Design, simulation and measurement of the device are presented in this paper, where a good agreement between simulations and measurements was obtained.

  11. Multi-band metamaterial absorber with arbitrary polarization and wide-incident angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Hu, Chuandeng; Wu, Xiaoxiao; Xia, Zengzilu; Wen, Weijia

    2017-10-01

    We propose a multi-band metamaterial perfect absorber with a deep-subwavelength thickness and near-unity absorption coefficient at microwave frequencies. This planar metamaterial is composed of periodically arranged concentric metallic rings and a continuous metallic ground plate separated by one or two lossy dielectric layers. The origin of the induced multi-band perfect absorption is attributed to the multiple impedance-matching to free space and can be achieved through tuning the effective constitutive relations by interactions of several electromagnetic resonances. Numerical simulations reveal the electric field and surface current distributions at each absorption peak, and further analysis indicates that the absorption mainly arises from the dielectric loss. Moreover, the absorption could be enhanced and broaden by overlapping the modes of different rings. The absorption is identical for arbitrary polarizations due to the rotational symmetry of the subwavelength unit. It also remains over 90% energy absorption for a wide angle of incidence up to 45°, which is confirmed by the experiment. The designed multi-band absorber is also easy to manufacture by the mature printed circuit board technology, which is favorable for a wide variety of applications.

  12. New design of multi-band negative-index metamaterial and absorber at visible frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Boyi; Guo, Fan; Zou, Wenkang; Chen, Lin; Song, Kun; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2017-08-01

    A new negative-index metamaterial (NIM) structure is proposed by designing the metallic holes of traditional double-fishnet (DF) structures from uniform sizes to several different sizes. Numerical results demonstrate that the new metamaterial, as an improved variant of the DF structure, achieved a multi-band negative refractive index across a wide range of visible frequencies from 470 THz to 540 THz, which covers the red, orange, yellow, and green regions of the visible spectra. Meanwhile, a low-profile nanostrctured absorber was obtained when one side of the perforated metal layer of this multi-band NIM was substituted with a continuous metal film with the same thickness. The absorber showed the high absorption of more than 95% at multiple frequencies of 511, 520, 523, 525, and 527 THz. The behavior of multi-frequency response effectively broadened the working bandwidth. Finally, the physical mechanism of the multi-band operating characteristics of NIM and absorber was analyzed with the distributions of current intensity at different resonant frequencies.

  13. Satellite Surface Characterization from Non-resolved Multi-band Optical Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D.; Hamada, K.; Kelecy, T.; Kervin, P.

    2012-09-01

    Ground-based optical and radar sites routinely acquire resolved images of satellites. These resolved images provide the means to construct accurate wire-frame models of the observed body, as well as an understanding of its orientation as a function of time. Unfortunately, because such images are typically acquired at a single wavelength, this kind of analysis provides little or no information on the types of materials covering the satellite's various surfaces. Detailed surface material characterization generally requires multi-band radiometric and/or spectrometric measurements. Fortunately, many widely-available instruments provide such multi-band information (e.g., spectrographs and multi-channel photometers). However, these sensors typically measure the brightness of sunlight reflected from the entire satellite, with no spatial resolution at all. Because such whole-body measurements represent a summation of contributions from many reflecting surfaces, an "un-mixing" analysis process must be employed to characterize the reflectance of the satellite's sub-components. The objective of this presentation is to outline the theory required to retrieve satellite surface properties from temporal sequences of whole-body, multi-band brightness measurements, focusing on two newly-developed analysis methods. Both methods require the following as input: 1) a set of multi-band measurements of a satellite's reflected-sunlight brightness, 2) the satellite's wire-frame model, including each major sub-component capable of reflecting sunlight, 3) the satellite's attitude, specifying the orientation of all of the body's components at the time of each multi-band measurement. In addition, the first method requires laboratory-measured bi-directional reflection distribution functions (BRDFs) for a set of candidate materials covering the satellite's surfaces, and yields estimates of the fraction of each major satellite sub-component covered by each candidate material. The second method

  14. SPACE BASED INTERCEPTOR SCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. CANAVAN

    2001-02-01

    Space Based Interceptor (SBI) have ranges that are adequate to address rogue ICBMs. They are not overly sensitive to 30-60 s delay times. Current technologies would support boost phase intercept with about 150 interceptors. Higher acceleration and velocity could reduce than number by about a factor of 3 at the cost of heavier and more expensive Kinetic Kill Vehicles (KKVs). 6g SBI would reduce optimal constellation costs by about 35%; 8g SBI would reduce them another 20%. Interceptor ranges fall rapidly with theater missile range. Constellations increase significantly for ranges under 3,000 km, even with advanced interceptor technology. For distributed launches, these estimates recover earlier strategic scalings, which demonstrate the improved absentee ratio for larger or multiple launch areas. Constellations increase with the number of missiles and the number of interceptors launched at each. The economic estimates above suggest that two SBI per missile with a modest midcourse underlay is appropriate. The SBI KKV technology would appear to be common for space- and surface-based boost phase systems, and could have synergisms with improved midcourse intercept and discrimination systems. While advanced technology could be helpful in reducing costs, particularly for short range theater missiles, current technology appears adequate for pressing rogue ICBM, accidental, and unauthorized launches.

  15. Pattern-based compression of multi-band image data for landscape analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Wayne L; Patil, Ganapati P

    2006-01-01

    This book describes an integrated approach to using remotely sensed data in conjunction with geographic information systems for landscape analysis. Remotely sensed data are compressed into an analytical image-map that is compatible with the most popular geographic information systems as well as freeware viewers. The approach is most effective for landscapes that exhibit a pronounced mosaic pattern of land cover. The image maps are much more compact than the original remotely sensed data, which enhances utility on the internet. As value-added products, distribution of image-maps is not affected by copyrights on original multi-band image data.

  16. Leggett modes and multi-band superconductivity in Sr2RuO4

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wen; Scaffidi, Thomas; Sigrist, Manfred; Kallin, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Sr$_2$RuO$_4$ is a prototypical multi-band superconductor with three bands crossing the Fermi level. These bands exhibit distinct dimensional characteristics, with one quasi-2D $\\gamma$-band and two quasi-1D $\\alpha$- and $\\beta$-bands. This leads to the expectation that the superconductivity on the $\\gamma$-band may be only weakly Josephson-coupled to that on the other two bands. Based on an explicit microscopic weak coupling calculation appropriate for Sr$_2$RuO$_4$, we study the collective...

  17. Ultrathin multi-band planar metamaterial absorber based on standing wave resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Bing; Lai, Shumin; Zhang, Dao Hua; Teng, Jing-Hua

    2012-12-03

    We present a planar waveguide model and a mechanism based on standing wave resonances to interpret the unity absorptions of ultrathin planar metamaterial absorbers. The analytical model predicts that the available absorption peaks of the absorber are corresponding to the fundamental mode and only its odd harmonic modes of the standing wave. The model is in good agreement with numerical simulation and can explain the main features observed in typical ultrathin planar metamaterial absorbers. Based on this model, ultrathin planar metamaterial absorbers with multi-band absorptions at desired frequencies can be easily designed.

  18. Quasiclassical description of multi-band superconductors with two order parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moor, Andreas

    2014-05-19

    This Thesis deals with multi-band superconductors with two order parameters, i.e., the superconductivity and the spin-density wave, also touching on one-band superconductors with a charge-density wave, as well as with only the superconducting order parameter. Quasiclassical description of suchlike structures is developed and applied to investigation of various effects, inter alia, the Josephson and the proximity effects, the Knight shift, the Larkin-Ovchinnikov-Fulde-Ferrell-like state, and the interplay of the order parameters in coexistence regime. The applicability of the developed approach to pnictides is discussed.

  19. Space-based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Bryant, J.; Cruise, A. M.; Dixon, G.; Hoyland, D.; Smith, D.; Bogenstahl, J.; McNamara, P. W.; Gerndt, R.; Flatscher, R.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Hewitson, M.; Gerberding, O.; Barke, S.; Brause, N.; Bykov, I.; Danzmann, K.; Enggaard, A.; Gianolio, A.; Vendt Hansen, T.; Heinzel, G.; Hornstrup, A.; Jennrich, O.; Kullmann, J.; Møller-Pedersen, S.; Rasmussen, T.; Reiche, J.; Sodnik, Z.; Suess, M.; Armano, M.; Sumner, T.; Bender, P. L.; Akutsu, T.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The parallel session C5 on Space-Based Detectors gave a broad overview over the planned space missions related to gravitational wave detection. Overviews of the revolutionary science to be expected from LISA was given by Alberto Sesana and Sasha Buchman. The launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is planned for 2015. This mission and its payload "LISA Technology Package" will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical bench of LPF was presented by Christian Killow and the performance of the LPF optical metrology system by Paul McNamara. While LPF will not yet be sensitive to gravitational waves, it may nevertheless be used to explore fundamental physics questions, which was discussed by Michele Armano. Some parts of the LISA technology that are not going to be demonstrated by LPF, but under intensive development at the moment, were presented by Oliver Jennrich and Oliver Gerberding. Looking into the future, Japan is studying the design of a mid-frequency detector called DECIGO, which was discussed by Tomotada Akutsu. Using atom interferometry for gravitational wave detection has also been recently proposed, and it was critically reviewed by Peter Bender. In the nearer future, the launch of GRACE Follow-On (for Earth gravity observation) is scheduled for 2017, and it will include a Laser Ranging Interferometer as technology demonstrator. This will be the first inter-spacecraft laser interferometer and has many aspects in common with the LISA long arm, as discussed by Andrew Sutton.

  20. Ginzburg–Landau theory of mesoscopic multi-band Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeo, F.; De Luca, R., E-mail: rdeluca@unisa.it

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • We generalize, in the realm of the Ginzburg–Landau theory, the de Gennes matching-matrix method for the interface order parameters to describe the superconducting properties of multi-band mesoscopic Josephson junctions. • The results are in agreement with a microscopic treatment of nanobridge junctions. • Thermal stability of the nanobridge junction is discussed in connection with recent experiments on iron-based grain-boundary junctions. - Abstract: A Ginzburg–Landau theory for multi-band mesoscopic Josephson junctions has been developed. The theory, obtained by generalizing the de Gennes matching-matrix method for the interface order parameters, allows the study of the phase dynamics of various types of mesoscopic Josephson junctions. As a relevant application, we studied mesoscopic double-band junctions also in the presence of a superconducting nanobridge interstitial layer. The results are in agreement with a microscopic treatment of the same system. Furthermore, thermal stability of the nanobridge junction is discussed in connection with recent experiments on iron-based grain-boundary junctions.

  1. Constraining Kepler Eclipsing Binary Properties with Time-Series and Multi-band Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windemuth, Diana; Agol, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We perform simultaneous fits to time-series (Kepler) and multi-band (SDSS griz + 2MASS JHKs) photometry to constrain stellar and orbital parameters of eclipsing binaries (EBs) from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalogue. We infer the stellar parameters by comparing Padova stellar evolution models to the extinction-corrected multi-band photometric data, and use the results as inputs to a Keplerian orbit model for the lightcurves. This method yields a self-consistent analysis and jointly constrains properties of both stars (orbital elements e, ω, i, tpe, p + stellar parameters rA, rB, mA, mB, fB/fA, [Fe/H], age, and quadratic limb darkening coefficients uA1, uA2, uB1, uB2). We apply our coupled time-series photometry and SED model to a sub-sample of detached EBs with p = 10 - 40 d, to minimize the influence of tidal or Doppler effects. The results of this analysis will feed into our circumbinary planet search, wherein we apply barycentric corrections to the Kepler EB lightcurves to look for signals due to planetary companions.

  2. RRI-GBT MULTI-BAND RECEIVER: MOTIVATION, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maan, Yogesh; Deshpande, Avinash A.; Chandrashekar, Vinutha; Chennamangalam, Jayanth; Rao, K. B. Raghavendra; Somashekar, R.; Ezhilarasi, M. S.; Sujatha, S.; Kasturi, S.; Sandhya, P.; Duraichelvan, R.; Amiri, Shahram; Aswathappa, H. A.; Sarabagopalan, G.; Ananda, H. M. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore (India); Anderson, Gary; Bauserman, Jonah; Beaudet, Carla; Bloss, Marty [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV (United States); Barve, Indrajit V. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore (India); and others

    2013-01-15

    We report the design and development of a self-contained multi-band receiver (MBR) system, intended for use with a single large aperture to facilitate sensitive and high time-resolution observations simultaneously in 10 discrete frequency bands sampling a wide spectral span (100-1500 MHz) in a nearly log-periodic fashion. The development of this system was primarily motivated by need for tomographic studies of pulsar polar emission regions. Although the system design is optimized for the primary goal, it is also suited for several other interesting astronomical investigations. The system consists of a dual-polarization multi-band feed (with discrete responses corresponding to the 10 bands pre-selected as relatively radio frequency interference free), a common wide-band radio frequency front-end, and independent back-end receiver chains for the 10 individual sub-bands. The raw voltage time sequences corresponding to 16 MHz bandwidth each for the two linear polarization channels and the 10 bands are recorded at the Nyquist rate simultaneously. We present the preliminary results from the tests and pulsar observations carried out with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope using this receiver. The system performance implied by these results and possible improvements are also briefly discussed.

  3. Multi-bands photoconductive response in AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, G.; Rong, X.; Xu, F. J.; Tang, N. [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, X. Q., E-mail: wangshi@pku.edu.cn; Shen, B., E-mail: bshen@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Fu, K.; Zhang, B. S. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, 215123 Suzhou (China); Hashimoto, H.; Yoshikawa, A. [Center for SMART Green Innovation Research, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Ge, W. K. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-04-28

    Based on the optical transitions among the quantum-confined electronic states in the conduction band, we have fabricated multi-bands AlGaN/GaN quantum well infrared photodetectors. Crack-free AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with atomically sharp interfaces have been achieved by inserting an AlN interlayer, which releases most of the tensile strain in the MQWs grown on the GaN underlayer. With significant reduction of dark current by using thick AlGaN barriers, photoconductive responses are demonstrated due to intersubband transition in multiple regions with center wavelengths of 1.3, 2.3, and 4 μm, which shows potential applications on near infrared detection.

  4. Multi-band microwave metamaterial absorber based on coplanar Jerusalem crosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Dong; Liu, Ming-Hai; Hu, Xi-Wei; Kong, Ling-Hua; Cheng, Li-Li; Chen, Zhao-Quan

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the gap on the absorption performance of the conventional split ring resonator (SRR) absorber is investigated at microwave frequencies. Our simulated results reveal that the geometry of the square SRR can be equivalent to a Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator and its corresponding metamaterial absorber (MA) is changed to a JC absorber. The JC MA exhibits an experimental absorption peak of 99.1% at 8.72 GHz, which shows an excellent agreement with our simulated results. By simply assembling several JCs with slightly different geometric parameters next to each other into a unit cell, a perfect multi-band absorption can be effectively obtained. The experimental results show that the MA has four distinct and strong absorption peaks at 8.32 GHz, 9.8 GHz, 11.52 GHz and 13.24 GHz. Finally, the multi-reflection interference theory is introduced to interpret the absorption mechanism.

  5. Multi-band metamaterial absorber based on the arrangement of donut-type resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Woo; Tuong, Pham Van; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Ki Won; Jang, Won Ho; Choi, Eun Ha; Chen, Liang Yao; Lee, YoungPak

    2013-04-22

    We propose multi-band metamaterial absorbers at microwave frequencies. The design, the analysis, the fabrication, and the measurement of the absorbers working in multiple bands are presented. The numerical simulations and the experiments in the microwave anechoic chamber were performed. The metamaterial absorbers consist of an delicate arrangement of donut-shape resonators with different sizes and a metallic background plane, separated by a dielectric. The near-perfect absorptions of dual, triple and quad peaks are persistent with polarization independence, and the effect of angle of incidence for both TE and TM modes was also elucidated. It was also found that the multiple-reflection theory was not suitable for explaining the absorption mechanism of our investigated structures. The results of this study are promising for the practical applications.

  6. Adaptive low-rank channel estimation for multi-band OFDM ultra-wideband communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Chia-Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, an adaptive channel estimation scheme based on the reduced-rank (RR Wiener filtering (WF technique is proposed for multi-band (MB orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM ultra-wideband (UWB communication systems in multipath fading channels. This RR-WF-based algorithm employs an adaptive fuzzy-inference-controlled (FIC filter rank. Additionally, a comparative investigation into various channel estimation schemes is presented as well for MB-OFDM UWB communication systems. As a consequence, the FIC RR-WF channel estimation algorithm is capable of producing the bit-error-rate (BER performance similar to that of the full-rank WF channel estimator and superior than those of other interpolation-based channel estimation schemes.

  7. Radio frequency electromagnetic field compliance assessment of multi-band and MIMO equipped radio base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thors, Björn; Thielens, Arno; Fridén, Jonas; Colombi, Davide; Törnevik, Christer; Vermeeren, Günter; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, different methods for practical numerical radio frequency exposure compliance assessments of radio base station products were investigated. Both multi-band base station antennas and antennas designed for multiple input multiple output (MIMO) transmission schemes were considered. For the multi-band case, various standardized assessment methods were evaluated in terms of resulting compliance distance with respect to the reference levels and basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Both single frequency and multiple frequency (cumulative) compliance distances were determined using numerical simulations for a mobile communication base station antenna transmitting in four frequency bands between 800 and 2600 MHz. The assessments were conducted in terms of root-mean-squared electromagnetic fields, whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) and peak 10 g averaged SAR. In general, assessments based on peak field strengths were found to be less computationally intensive, but lead to larger compliance distances than spatial averaging of electromagnetic fields used in combination with localized SAR assessments. For adult exposure, the results indicated that even shorter compliance distances were obtained by using assessments based on localized and whole-body SAR. Numerical simulations, using base station products employing MIMO transmission schemes, were performed as well and were in agreement with reference measurements. The applicability of various field combination methods for correlated exposure was investigated, and best estimate methods were proposed. Our results showed that field combining methods generally considered as conservative could be used to efficiently assess compliance boundary dimensions of single- and dual-polarized multicolumn base station antennas with only minor increases in compliance distances. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. 56 Gb/s multi-band CAP for data center interconnects up to an 80 km SMF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Jinlong; Eiselt, Nicklas; Sanchez, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We present the first (to the best of our knowledge) experimental demonstration of a 56 Gb/s multi-band carrierless amplitude and phase modulation (CAP) signal transmission over an 80-km single-mode fiber link with zero overhead pre-FEC signal recovery and enhanced timing jitter tolerance for opti......We present the first (to the best of our knowledge) experimental demonstration of a 56 Gb/s multi-band carrierless amplitude and phase modulation (CAP) signal transmission over an 80-km single-mode fiber link with zero overhead pre-FEC signal recovery and enhanced timing jitter tolerance...

  9. Augmenting full colour-fused multi-band night vision imagery with synthetic imagery in real-time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Son, R. van; Dijk, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the design and first field trial results of an all-day all-weather enhanced and synthetic-fused multi-band colour night vision surveillance and observation system. The system augments a fused and dynamic three-band natural-colour night vision image with synthetic 3D imagery in real-time.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: KiDS-ESO-DR3 multi-band source catalog (de Jong+, 2017)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J. T. A.; Verdoes Kleijn, G. A.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Kuijken, K.; Sikkema, G.; Brescia, M.; Bilicki, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Amaro, V.; Begeman, K. G.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Buddelmeijer, H.; Cavuoti, S.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Helmich, E.; Huang, Z.; Irisarri, N.; La Barbera, F.; Longo, G.; McFarland, J. P.; Nakajima, R.; Paolillo, M.; Puddu, E.; Radovich, M.; Rifatto, A.; Tortora, C; Valentijn, E. A.; Vellucci, C.; Vriend, W-J.; Amon, A.; Blake, C.; Choi, A.; Fenech Conti, I.; Herbonnet, R.; Heymans, C.; Hoekstra, H.; Klaes, D.; Merten, J.; Miller, L.; Schneider, P.; Viola, M.

    2017-01-01

    KiDS-ESO-DR3 contains a multi-band source catalogue encompassing all publicly released tiles, a total of 440 survey tiles including the coadded images, weight maps, masks and source lists of 292 survey tiles of KiDS-ESO-DR3, adding to the 148 tiles released previously (50 in KiDS-ESO-DR1 and 98 in

  11. Interleaved diffusion-weighted EPI improved by adaptive partial-Fourier and multi-band multiplexed sensitivity-encoding reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Guhaniyogi, Shayan; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We report a series of techniques to reliably eliminate artifacts in interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) based diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Methods First, we integrate the previously reported multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE) algorithm with a new adaptive Homodyne partial-Fourier reconstruction algorithm, so that images reconstructed from interleaved partial-Fourier DWI data are free from artifacts even in the presence of either a) motion-induced k-space energy peak displacement, or b) susceptibility field gradient induced fast phase changes. Second, we generalize the previously reported single-band MUSE framework to multi-band MUSE, so that both through-plane and in-plane aliasing artifacts in multi-band multi-shot interleaved DWI data can be effectively eliminated. Results The new adaptive Homodyne-MUSE reconstruction algorithm reliably produces high-quality and high-resolution DWI, eliminating residual artifacts in images reconstructed with previously reported methods. Furthermore, the generalized MUSE algorithm is compatible with multi-band and high-throughput DWI. Conclusion The integration of the multi-band and adaptive Homodyne-MUSE algorithms significantly improves the spatial-resolution, image quality, and scan throughput of interleaved DWI. We expect that the reported reconstruction framework will play an important role in enabling high-resolution DWI for both neuroscience research and clinical uses. PMID:24925000

  12. 10Gb/s Ultra-Wideband Wireless Transmission Based on Multi-Band Carrierless Amplitude Phase Modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puerta Ramírez, Rafael; Rommel, Simon; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, for the first time, a record UWB transmission of 10Gb/s is experimentally demonstrated employing a multi-band approach of carrierless amplitude phase modulation (MultiCAP). The proposed solution complies with the restrictions on the effective radiated power established by both...

  13. Achieving a multi-band metamaterial perfect absorber via a hexagonal ring dielectric resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Yang; Wang, Jun; Du, Hong-Liang; Wang, Jia-Fu; Qu, Shao-Bo

    2015-06-01

    A multi-band absorber composed of high-permittivity hexagonal ring dielectric resonators and a metallic ground plate is designed in the microwave band. Near-unity absorptions around 9.785 GHz, 11.525 GHz, and 12.37 GHz are observed for this metamaterial absorber. The dielectric hexagonal ring resonator is made of microwave ceramics with high permittivity and low loss. The mechanism for the near-unity absorption is investigated via the dielectric resonator theory. It is found that the absorption results from electric and magnetic resonances where enhanced electromagnetic fields are excited inside the dielectric resonator. In addition, the resonance modes of the hexagonal resonator are similar to those of standard rectangle resonators and can be used for analyzing hexagonal absorbers. Our work provides a new research method as well as a solid foundation for designing and analyzing dielectric metamaterial absorbers with complex shapes. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61331005, 11204378, 11274389, 11304393, and 61302023), the Aviation Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 20132796018 and 20123196015), the Natural Science Foundation for Post-Doctoral Scientists of China (Grant Nos. 2013M532131 and 2013M532221), the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013JM6005), and the Special Funds for Authors of Annual Excellent Doctoral Degree Dissertations of China (Grant No. 201242).

  14. The design of common aperture and multi-band optical system based on day light telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Bo; Teng, Guoqi; Wang, Meng

    2017-02-01

    As the development of electro-optical weapon system, the technique of common path and multi-sensor are used popular, and becoming a trend. According to the requirement of miniaturization and lightweight for electro-optical stabilized sighting system, a day light telescope/television viewing-aim system/ laser ranger has been designed in this thesis, which has common aperture. Thus integration scheme of multi-band and common aperture has been adopted. A day light telescope has been presented, which magnification is 8, field of view is 6°, and distance of exit pupil is more than 20mm. For 1/3" CCD, television viewing-aim system which has 156mm focal length, has been completed. In addition, laser ranging system has been designed, with 10km raging distance. This paper outlines its principle which used day light telescope as optical reference of correcting the optical axis. Besides, by means of shared objective, reserved image with inverting prism and coating beam-splitting film on the inclined plane of the cube prism, the system has been applied to electro-optical weapon system, with high-resolution of imaging and high-precision ranging.

  15. A SiGe BiCMOS multi-band tuner for mobile TV applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xueqing, Hu; Zheng, Gong; Jinxin, Zhao; Lei, Wang; Peng, Yu; Yin, Shi

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the circuit design and measured performance of a multi-band tuner for mobile TV applications. The tuner RFIC is composed of a wideband front-end, an analog baseband, a full integrated fractional-N synthesizer and an I2C digital interface. To meet the stringent adjacent channel rejection (ACR) requirements of mobile TV standards while keeping low power consumption and low cost, direct conversion architecture with a local AGC scheme is adopted in this design. Eighth-order elliptic active-RC filters with large stop band attenuation and a sharp transition band are chosen as the channel select filter to further improve the ACR preference. The chip is fabricated in a 0.35-μm SiGe BiCMOS technology and occupies a silicon area of 5.5 mm2. It draws 50 mA current from a 3.0 V power supply. In CMMB application, it achieves a sensitivity of -97 dBm with 1/2 coding QPSK signal input and over 40 dB ACR.

  16. The simulation and analysis of infrared target multi-band characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lanfang; Zhou, Jinmei

    2014-09-01

    The infrared characteristic simulation of the target is the basis of true and false infrared target recognition. With the development of stealth technology, imaging features of the decoy in the detector are more and more close to the real target, so it is not easy to distinguish between the target and decoy by using information acquired from single-band infrared detector. Based on this, in the paper infrared imaging properties of the target in a number of bands are simulated and analyzed, followed by fusing the characteristic differences of multiple bands between true and false target for classification and recognition. First of all, we construct the geometrical model of target and decoy in a simple background, and then the model of infrared radiation is built. What is more, in accordance with laws of infrared radiation and other relevant laws, the characteristics of target and decoy under the condition of different bands are analyzed. Experimental results show that the proposed multi-band target simulation and analysis method can effectively identify the target and decoy in the same field of view.

  17. Independent polarization and multi-band THz absorber base on Jerusalem cross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arezoomand, Afsaneh Saee; Zarrabi, Ferdows B.; Heydari, Samaneh; Gandji, Navid P.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present the design and simulation of a single and multi-band perfect metamaterial absorber (MA) in the THz region base on Jerusalem cross (JC) and metamaterial load in unit cells. The structures consist of dual metallic layers for allowing near-perfect absorption with absorption peak of more than 99%. In this novel design, four-different shape of Jerusalem cross is presented and by adding L, U and W shape loaded to first structure, we tried to achieve a dual-band absorber. In addition, by good implementation of these loaded, we are able to control the absorption resonance at second resonance at 0.9, 0.7 and 0.85 THz respectively. In the other hand, we achieved a semi stable designing at first resonance between 0.53 and 0.58 THz. The proposed absorber has broadband polarization angle. The surface current modeled and proved the broadband polarization angle at prototype MA. The LC resonance of the metamaterial for Jerusalem cross and modified structures are extracting from equivalent circuit. As a result, proposed MA is useful for THz medical imaging and communication systems and the dual-band absorber has applications in many scientific and technological areas.

  18. Optical fabrication and metrology for a visible through thermal infrared multi-band imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magner, J. [Raytheon Optical Systems, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States); Henson, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The optical fabrication, metrology, and system wavefront testing of an off-axis three mirror anastigmatic telescope will be presented. The telescope is part of a multi-band imaging system which includes a single mechanically cooled focal plane with 15 spectral bands covering a wavelength range from 0.45 microns to 10.7 microns and an on board calibration subsystem. The imaging system is to be operated in a low earth orbit in a pushbroom scanning mode. The telescope has a 36 cm aperture, a 1.38 degree cross track by 1.82 degree along-track field of view (FOV), near diffraction limited performance in the visible, and strictly diffraction limited performance from 1.3 microns to 10.7 microns. The primary and the tertiary mirrors are general aspheres which have undergone 80% lightweighting. The secondary mirror is a hyperbola. The primary mirror was extremely difficult to fabricate and test due to its large departure from sphericity, fast f-number, and large off axis distance. The tertiary mirror has a small departure from sphericity and is only slightly off-axis, but it has a very fast f-number also. The surface wavefront measurements for the three mirrors after final figuring and lightweighting are 0.048 waves rms {at}0.6328 microns for the primary mirror and 0.025 waves rms {at}0.6328 microns for the secondary and tertiary mirrors. The telescope wavefront requirement at the center of the along-track FOV is 0.178 waves rms {at}0.6328 microns and at the edge of the along-track FOV is 0.677 waves rms {at} 0.6328 microns.

  19. Compact multi-band frequency reconfigurable planar monopole antenna for several wireless communication applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abou Al-Alaa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A compact reconfigurable multi-band monopole antenna is presented. To achieve frequency reconfigurability, a PIN diode is used. There are two states of switch. State 1: when the switch is OFF, the antenna operates at four bands: 2.45, 3, 3.69, and 5.5 GHz with impedance bandwidth of 9.95, 5.96, 12.57, and 10.76%, respectively. State 2: when a switch is ON, the antenna operates at 2.64, 3.67, 4.94, and 5.3 GHz with impedance bandwidth of 21.15, 11.76, 5.79, and 4.12%, respectively. Folded and meandered techniques are used for miniaturize antenna size. Antenna size is 15 mm × 37 mm × 0.8 mm and the radiator part is 15 mm × 9 mm × 0.8 mm. The proposed antenna is used in several applications such as Bluetooth (2400–2484 MHz, WLAN [802.11b/g/n (2.4–2.48 GHz, 802.11y (3.657–3.69 GHz, 802.11y (4.9 GHz, 802.11a/h/j/n (5.2 GHz], Wi-MAX (2.5–2.69 GHz, LTE (band 7, band 38, band 41, and band 43 and S-DMB (2605–2655 MHz. The antenna is analyzed using the transient solver of CST Microwave Studio. The proposed antenna was fabricated and tested. Measurements and simulations show good agreement.

  20. Multi-band algorithms for the estimation of chlorophyll concentration in the Chesapeake Bay

    KAUST Repository

    Gilerson, Alexander

    2015-10-14

    Standard blue-green ratio algorithms do not usually work well in turbid productive waters because of the contamination of the blue and green bands by CDOM absorption and scattering by non-algal particles. One of the alternative approaches is based on the two- or three band ratio algorithms in the red/NIR part of the spectrum, which require 665, 708, 753 nm bands (or similar) and which work well in various waters all over the world. The critical 708 nm band for these algorithms is not available on MODIS and VIIRS sensors, which limits applications of this approach. We report on another approach where a combination of the 745nm band with blue-green-red bands was the basis for the new algorithms. A multi-band algorithm which includes ratios Rrs(488)/Rrs(551)and Rrs(671)/Rrs(745) and two band algorithm based on Rrs671/Rrs745 ratio were developed with the main focus on the Chesapeake Bay (USA) waters. These algorithms were tested on the specially developed synthetic datasets, well representing the main relationships between water parameters in the Bay taken from the NASA NOMAD database and available literature, on the field data collected by our group during a 2013 campaign in the Bay, as well as NASA SeaBASS data from the other group and on matchups between satellite imagery and water parameters measured by the Chesapeake Bay program. Our results demonstrate that the coefficient of determination can be as high as R2 > 0.90 for the new algorithms in comparison with R2 = 0.6 for the standard OC3V algorithm on the same field dataset. Substantial improvement was also achieved by applying a similar approach (inclusion of Rrs(667)/Rrs(753) ratio) for MODIS matchups. Results for VIIRS are not yet conclusive. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: KiDS-ESO-DR3 multi-band source catalog (de Jong+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, J. T. A.; Verdoes Kleijn, G. A.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Kuijken, K.; Sikkema, G.; Brescia, M.; Bilicki, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Amaro, V.; Begeman, K. G.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Buddelmeijer, H.; Cavuoti, S.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Helmich, E.; Huang, Z.; Irisarri, N.; La Barbera, F.; Longo, G.; McFarland, J. P.; Nakajima, R.; Paolillo, M.; Puddu, E.; Radovich, M.; Rifatto, A.; Tortora, C; Valentijn, E. A.; Vellucci, C.; Vriend, W-J.; Amon, A.; Blake, C.; Choi, A.; Fenech, Conti I.; Herbonnet, R.; Heymans, C.; Hoekstra, H.; Klaes, D.; Merten, J.; Miller, L.; Schneider, P.; Viola, M.

    2017-04-01

    KiDS-ESO-DR3 contains a multi-band source catalogue encompassing all publicly released tiles, a total of 440 survey tiles including the coadded images, weight maps, masks and source lists of 292 survey tiles of KiDS-ESO-DR3, adding to the 148 tiles released previously (50 in KiDS-ESO-DR1 and 98 in KiDS-ESO-DR2). (1 data file).

  2. Design of a 0.18 {mu}m CMOS multi-band compatible low power GNSS receiver RF frontend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Bing; Zhuang Yiqi; Long Qiang; Jin Zhao; Li Zhenrong; Jin Gang, E-mail: waxmax@126.com [Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2011-03-15

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a fully integrated multi-band RF receiver frontend for GNSS applications on L-band. A single RF signal channel with a low-IF architecture is adopted for multi-band operation on the RF section, which mainly consists of a low noise amplifier (LNA), a down-converter, polyphase filters and summing circuits. An improved cascode source degenerated LNA with a multi-band shared off-chip matching network and band switches is implemented in the first amplifying stage. Also, a re-designed wideband double balance mixer is implemented in the down conversion stage, which provides better gain, noise figure and linearity performances. Using a TSMC 0.18 {mu}m 1P4M RF CMOS process, a compact 1.27 GHz/1.575 GHz dual-band GNSS frontend is realized in the proposed low-IF topology. The measurements exhibit the gains of 45 dB and 43 dB, and noise figures are controlled at 3.35 dB and 3.9 dB of the two frequency bands, respectively. The frontend model consumes about 11.8-13.5 mA current on a 1.8 V power supply. The core occupies 1.91 x 0.53 mm{sup 2} while the total die area with ESD is 2.45 x 2.36 mm{sup 2}. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  3. Design of a 0.18 μm CMOS multi-band compatible low power GNSS receiver RF frontend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Li; Yiqi, Zhuang; Qiang, Long; Zhao, Jin; Zhenrong, Li; Gang, Jin

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a fully integrated multi-band RF receiver frontend for GNSS applications on L-band. A single RF signal channel with a low-IF architecture is adopted for multi-band operation on the RF section, which mainly consists of a low noise amplifier (LNA), a down-converter, polyphase filters and summing circuits. An improved cascode source degenerated LNA with a multi-band shared off-chip matching network and band switches is implemented in the first amplifying stage. Also, a re-designed wideband double balance mixer is implemented in the down conversion stage, which provides better gain, noise figure and linearity performances. Using a TSMC 0.18 μm 1P4M RF CMOS process, a compact 1.27 GHz/1.575 GHz dual-band GNSS frontend is realized in the proposed low-IF topology. The measurements exhibit the gains of 45 dB and 43 dB, and noise figures are controlled at 3.35 dB and 3.9 dB of the two frequency bands, respectively. The frontend model consumes about 11.8-13.5 mA current on a 1.8 V power supply. The core occupies 1.91 × 0.53 mm2 while the total die area with ESD is 2.45 × 2.36 mm2.

  4. The Design and Analysis of a Novel Split-H-Shaped Metamaterial for Multi-Band Microwave Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikder Sunbeam Islam

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and analysis of a novel split-H-shaped metamaterial unit cell structure that is applicable in a multi-band frequency range and that exhibits negative permeability and permittivity in those frequency bands. In the basic design, the separate split-square resonators are joined by a metal link to form an H-shaped unit structure. Moreover, an analysis and a comparison of the 1 × 1 array and 2 × 2 array structures and the 1 × 1 and 2 × 2 unit cell configurations were performed. All of these configurations demonstrate multi-band operating frequencies (S-band, C-band, X-band and Ku-band with double-negative characteristics. The equivalent circuit model and measured result for each unit cell are presented to validate the resonant behavior. The commercially available finite-difference time-domain (FDTD-based simulation software, Computer Simulation Technology (CST Microwave Studio, was used to obtain the reflection and transmission parameters of each unit cell. This is a novel and promising design in the electromagnetic paradigm for its simplicity, scalability, double-negative characteristics and multi-band operation.

  5. Space based microlensing planet searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tisserand Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of extra-solar planets is arguably the most exciting development in astrophysics during the past 15 years, rivalled only by the detection of dark energy. Two projects unite the communities of exoplanet scientists and cosmologists: the proposed ESA M class mission EUCLID and the large space mission WFIRST, top ranked by the Astronomy 2010 Decadal Survey report. The later states that: “Space-based microlensing is the optimal approach to providing a true statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, over a range of likely semi-major axes”. They also add: “This census, combined with that made by the Kepler mission, will determine how common Earth-like planets are over a wide range of orbital parameters”. We will present a status report of the results obtained by microlensing on exoplanets and the new objectives of the next generation of ground based wide field imager networks. We will finally discuss the fantastic prospect offered by space based microlensing at the horizon 2020–2025.

  6. Simultaneous multi-band valley-protected topological edge states of shear vertical wave in two-dimensional phononic crystals with veins

    OpenAIRE

    Huo, Shao-yong; Chen, Jiu-jiu; Huang, Hong-bo; Huang, Guo-Liang

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of the concept of valley pseudospin to phononic crystals has made a remarkable topologically protected interface transport of sound, which opens a novel research area referred to as valley Hall topological insulators. Here, we demonstrate the simultaneous multi-band edge states of shear vertical waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals with veins. The multi-band edge states are topologically valley-protected and are obtained by simultaneously gapping multiple Dirac points a...

  7. Development of a 32-detector CdTe matrix for the SVOM ECLAIRs x/gamma camera: tests results of first flight models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, K.; Dezalay, J.-P.; Houret, B.; Amoros, C.; Atteia, J.-L.; Aubaret, K.; Billot, M.; Bordon, S.; Cordier, B.; Delaigue, S.; Galliano, M.; Gevin, O.; Godet, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Guillemot, Ph.; Limousin, O.; Mercier, K.; Nasser, G.; Pons, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Waegebaert, V.

    2016-07-01

    ECLAIRs, a 2-D coded-mask imaging camera on-board the Sino-French SVOM space mission, will detect and locate gamma-ray bursts in near real time in the 4 - 150 keV energy band in a large field of view. The design of ECLAIRs has been driven by the objective to reach an unprecedented low-energy threshold of 4 keV. The detection plane is an assembly of 6400 Schottky CdTe detectors of size 4x4x1 mm3, biased from -200V to -500V and operated at -20°C. The low-energy threshold is achieved thanks to an innovative hybrid module composed of a thick film ceramic holding 32 CdTe detectors ("Detectors Ceramics"), associated to an HTCC ceramic housing a low-noise 32-channel ASIC ("ASIC Ceramics"). We manage the coupling between Detectors Ceramics and ASIC Ceramics in order to achieve the best performance and ensure the uniformity of the detection plane. In this paper, we describe the complete hybrid XRDPIX, of which 50 flight models have been manufactured by the SAGEM company. Afterwards, we show test results obtained on Detectors Ceramics, on ASIC Ceramics and on the modules once assembled. Then, we compare and confront detectors leakage currents and ASIC ENC with the energy threshold values and FWHM measured on XRDPIX modules at the temperature of -20°C by using a calibrated radioactive source of 241Am. Finally, we study the homogeneity of the spectral properties of the 32-detector hybrid matrices and we conclude on general performance of more than 1000 detection channels which may reach the lowenergy threshold of 4 keV required for the future ECLAIRs space camera.

  8. A Survey of Star Clusters in the M31 South-West Field. UBVRI Photometry and Multi-Band Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Narbutis, D.; Vansevicius, V.; Kodaira, K.; Bridzius, A.; Stonkute, R.

    2008-01-01

    A new survey of star clusters in the South-West field of the M31 disk based on the high resolution Subaru Suprime-Cam observations is presented. The UBVRI aperture CCD photometry catalog of 285 objects (V < 20.5; 169 of them identified for the first time) is provided. Each object is supplemented with multi-band color maps presented in the electronic edition of the Astrophysical Journal Supplement. Seventy seven star cluster candidates from the catalog are located in the Hubble Space Telescope...

  9. 10Gb/s Ultra-Wideband Wireless Transmission Based on Multi-Band Carrierless Amplitude Phase Modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puerta Ramírez, Rafael; Rommel, Simon; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, for the first time, a record UWB transmission of 10Gb/s is experimentally demonstrated employing a multi-band approach of carrierless amplitude phase modulation (MultiCAP). The proposed solution complies with the restrictions on the effective radiated power established by both...... the United States Federal Communications Commission and the European Electronic Communications Committee, achieving a BER below the limit for a 7% overhead FEC of 3.8 · 10−3 up to respective wireless distances of 3.5m and 2m....

  10. Utilization of multi-band OFDM modulation to increase traffic rate of phosphor-LED wireless VLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Liu, Yen-Liang

    2015-01-26

    To increase the traffic rate in phosphor-LED visible light communication (VLC), a multi-band orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (OFDM) modulation is first proposed and demonstrated. In the measurement, we do not utilize optical blue filter to increase modulation bandwidth of phosphor-LED in the VLC system. In this proposed scheme, different bands of OFDM signals are applied to different LED chips in a LED lamp, this can avoid the power fading and nonlinearity issue by applying the same OFDM signal to all the LED chips in a LED lamp. Here, the maximum increase percentages of traffic rates are 41.1%, 17.8% and 17.8% under received illuminations of 200, 500 and 1000 Lux, respectively, when the proposed three-band OFDM modulation is used in the VLC system. In addition, the analysis and verification by experiments are also performed.

  11. The TRICLOBS Dynamic Multi-Band Image Data Set for the Development and Evaluation of Image Fusion Methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Toet

    Full Text Available The fusion and enhancement of multiband nighttime imagery for surveillance and navigation has been the subject of extensive research for over two decades. Despite the ongoing efforts in this area there is still only a small number of static multiband test images available for the development and evaluation of new image fusion and enhancement methods. Moreover, dynamic multiband imagery is also currently lacking. To fill this gap we present the TRICLOBS dynamic multi-band image data set containing sixteen registered visual (0.4-0.7μm, near-infrared (NIR, 0.7-1.0μm and long-wave infrared (LWIR, 8-14μm motion sequences. They represent different military and civilian surveillance scenarios registered in three different scenes. Scenes include (military and civilian people that are stationary, walking or running, or carrying various objects. Vehicles, foliage, and buildings or other man-made structures are also included in the scenes. This data set is primarily intended for the development and evaluation of image fusion, enhancement and color mapping algorithms for short-range surveillance applications. The imagery was collected during several field trials with our newly developed TRICLOBS (TRI-band Color Low-light OBServation all-day all-weather surveillance system. This system registers a scene in the Visual, NIR and LWIR part of the electromagnetic spectrum using three optically aligned sensors (two digital image intensifiers and an uncooled long-wave infrared microbolometer. The three sensor signals are mapped to three individual RGB color channels, digitized, and stored as uncompressed RGB (false color frames. The TRICLOBS data set enables the development and evaluation of (both static and dynamic image fusion, enhancement and color mapping algorithms. To allow the development of realistic color remapping procedures, the data set also contains color photographs of each of the three scenes. The color statistics derived from these photographs

  12. Interleaved EPI based fMRI improved by multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE) and simultaneous multi-band imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Gaur, Pooja; Chou, Ying-hui; Chu, Mei-Lan; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive and powerful imaging tool for detecting brain activities. The majority of fMRI studies are performed with single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) due to its high temporal resolution. Recent studies have demonstrated that, by increasing the spatial-resolution of fMRI, previously unidentified neuronal networks can be measured. However, it is challenging to improve the spatial resolution of conventional single-shot EPI based fMRI. Although multi-shot interleaved EPI is superior to single-shot EPI in terms of the improved spatial-resolution, reduced geometric distortions, and sharper point spread function (PSF), interleaved EPI based fMRI has two main limitations: 1) the imaging throughput is lower in interleaved EPI; 2) the magnitude and phase signal variations among EPI segments (due to physiological noise, subject motion, and B0 drift) are translated to significant in-plane aliasing artifact across the field of view (FOV). Here we report a method that integrates multiple approaches to address the technical limitations of interleaved EPI-based fMRI. Firstly, the multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE) post-processing algorithm is used to suppress in-plane aliasing artifacts resulting from time-domain signal instabilities during dynamic scans. Secondly, a simultaneous multi-band interleaved EPI pulse sequence, with a controlled aliasing scheme incorporated, is implemented to increase the imaging throughput. Thirdly, the MUSE algorithm is then generalized to accommodate fMRI data obtained with our multi-band interleaved EPI pulse sequence, suppressing both in-plane and through-plane aliasing artifacts. The blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal detectability and the scan throughput can be significantly improved for interleaved EPI-based fMRI. Our human fMRI data obtained from 3 Tesla systems demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed methods. It is expected that future fMRI studies requiring high

  13. Extended photoresponse and multi-band luminescence of ZnO/ZnSe core/shell nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qin; Cai, Hua; Hu, Zhigao; Duan, Zhihua; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-01-15

    Aligned ZnO/ZnSe core/shell nanorods (NRs) with type-II energy band alignment were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition of ZnSe on the surfaces of hydrothermally grown ZnO NRs. The obtained ZnO/ZnSe core/shell NRs are composed of wurtzite ZnO cores and zinc blende ZnSe shells. The bare ZnO NRs are capable of emitting strong ultraviolet (UV) near band edge (NBE) emission at 325-nm light excitation, while the ZnSe shells greatly suppress the emission from the ZnO cores. High-temperature processing results in an improvement in the structures of the ZnO cores and the ZnSe shells and significant changes in the optical properties of ZnO/ZnSe core/shell NRs. The fabricated ZnO/ZnSe core/shell NRs show optical properties corresponding to the two excitonic band gaps of wurtzite ZnO and zinc blende ZnSe and the effective band gap between the conduction band minimum of ZnO and the valence band maximum ZnSe. An extended photoresponse much wider than those of the constituting ZnO and ZnSe and a multi-band photoluminescence including the UV NBE emission of ZnO and the blue NBE emission of ZnSe are observed.

  14. Extended photoresponse and multi-band luminescence of ZnO/ZnSe core/shell nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Aligned ZnO/ZnSe core/shell nanorods (NRs) with type-II energy band alignment were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition of ZnSe on the surfaces of hydrothermally grown ZnO NRs. The obtained ZnO/ZnSe core/shell NRs are composed of wurtzite ZnO cores and zinc blende ZnSe shells. The bare ZnO NRs are capable of emitting strong ultraviolet (UV) near band edge (NBE) emission at 325-nm light excitation, while the ZnSe shells greatly suppress the emission from the ZnO cores. High-temperature processing results in an improvement in the structures of the ZnO cores and the ZnSe shells and significant changes in the optical properties of ZnO/ZnSe core/shell NRs. The fabricated ZnO/ZnSe core/shell NRs show optical properties corresponding to the two excitonic band gaps of wurtzite ZnO and zinc blende ZnSe and the effective band gap between the conduction band minimum of ZnO and the valence band maximum ZnSe. An extended photoresponse much wider than those of the constituting ZnO and ZnSe and a multi-band photoluminescence including the UV NBE emission of ZnO and the blue NBE emission of ZnSe are observed. PMID:24428949

  15. Multi-dimensional crest factor reduction and digital predistortion for multi-band radio-over-fiber links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Li, Jianqiang; Yin, Chunjing; Xu, Kun; Dai, Yitang; Yin, Feifei

    2014-08-25

    A multi-dimensional crest factor reduction (MD-CFR) technique is proposed to improve the performance and efficiency of multi-band radio-over-fiber (RoF) links. Cooperating with multi-dimensional digital predistortion (MD-DPD), MD-CFR increases the performance of both directly-modulated and externally-modulated RoF links, in terms of error vector magnitude (EVM) and adjacent channel power ratio (ACPR). For directly-modulated RoF link, more than 5 dB output ACPR reduction is obtained, output EVMs are reduced from 11.83% and 12.47% to 7.51% and 7.26% for two bands respectively, while only a slight improvement to 11.58% and 10.78% is obtained solely using MD-DPD. Similar results are achieved in externally-modulated RoF link. Given a threshold in EVM or ACPR, the RF power transmit efficiency is also further enhanced.

  16. Multi-band scattering of two atoms in a one-dimensional lattice with on-site interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Seth; Giannakeas, Panagiotis; Mehta, Nirav

    2017-04-01

    We examine a system of two-particles confined to a one-dimensional lattice described by a multi-band Hubbard model with on-site interactions. Asymptotically the two particles are relegated to remain in bands that are energetically accessible. However, when the particles occupy the same state, they can virtually scatter into bands that are energetically closed. We incorporate this virtual scattering by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for the reactance matrix (K-matrix) using a lattice Green's operator. The resulting formula for the K-matrix for open band scattering bears a striking similarity to that which arrises from channel closing formulas in standard multi-channel scattering theory. We then apply this formula for two-body scattering in the lowest and first excited bands within a two band approximation. Within this approximation, virtual scattering into closed bands can create scattering resonances in the presence of bound states attached to closed bands in analogy to Feshbach or confinement induced resonances. This work was partially funded by Grants from the NSF and a the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  17. Single-band and Dual-band Artificial Magnetic Conductor Ground Planes for Multi-band Dipole Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Two new designs of high impedance surface (HIS structure are presented, namely zigzag and slotted rectangular with I-shaped slot Artificial Magnetic Conductor (AMC. The zigzag AMC is designed based on the straight dipole AMC. The zigzag AMC is introduced to minimize the AMC size and to be suitable for UHF RFID applications. On the other hand, the slotted rectangular with I-shaped slot AMC is designed to operate at 0.92 GHz and 2.45 GHz. The slot is loaded in the main patch of the AMC to create the other resonant frequency. By using this technique the resonant frequency can be lowered, and hence reduce the size of the AMC. Both structures are designed using the same dielectric substrate that is Taconic TLC-32. The properties of the AMC are investigated such as the reflection phase, reflection magnitude and surface impedance. The designed AMCs then are used as a back plane for the printed multi-band dipole antenna. By introducing the AMC as a ground plane (GP for the printed dipole antenna, the gain of the dipole antenna is increased.

  18. Seismology and space-based geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tralli, David M.; Tajima, Fumiko

    1993-01-01

    The potential of space-based geodetic measurement of crustal deformation in the context of seismology is explored. The achievements of seismological source theory and data analyses, mechanical modeling of fault zone behavior, and advances in space-based geodesy are reviewed, with emphasis on realizable contributions of space-based geodetic measurements specifically to seismology. The fundamental relationships between crustal deformation associated with an earthquake and the geodetically observable data are summarized. The response and spatial and temporal resolution of the geodetic data necessary to understand deformation at various phases of the earthquake cycle is stressed. The use of VLBI, SLR, and GPS measurements for studying global geodynamics properties that can be investigated to some extent with seismic data is discussed. The potential contributions of continuously operating strain monitoring networks and globally distributed geodetic observatories to existing worldwide modern digital seismographic networks are evaluated in reference to mutually addressable problems in seismology, geophysics, and tectonics.

  19. Application of Multi-Band Signals to Suppress the Diffraction Lobes in MIMO Radar with Highly Directional Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Nefedov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When emitting the orthogonal signals the MIMO radar generally uses widely directional antennas of transmitting and receiving elements (sites. Principles of MIMO radar are generally applicable at highly directional antennas. For a small sites spacing and application of narrowly focused and synchronous scanning antenna provides new benefits for MIMO radar. These include an increase in the power potential, detection range and easy of synchronous radar zone scanning with equivalent narrow spatial beam.For MIMO radar with narrow radiation patterns it is typical to have a diffraction pattern within the equivalent scanning beam, consisting of a large number of intense grating lobes. The structure of the diffraction pattern and the width of the lobes depend on the inter-element distance (base and the coordinates of MIMO radar position. The angular width of the diffraction pattern is equal to the width of the identical patterns at positions. Removing the angular ambiguity will require special measures to reduce the level of the lateral lobes This paper is devoted to assessing the degree of side lobes reduction by the use of multi-band multi-frequency signals with non-overlapping groups of multi - frequency bands with two versions of the co-processing between the groups of frequency components - additive and multiplicative.It is shown for the embodiment of MIMO radar with 5- receiver and 5-transmitter positions and narrow beam patterns and 5-frequency signal in the band of 1.6 MHz that increasing initial frequency of spectrum up to 10% leads to the fact that diffraction maxima of the lobe for increasing frequencies coincide with minima in the diffraction pattern at the original frequency. This was the basis for using multi-band signals when suppressing the diffraction lobes in MIMO radar. The embodied MIMO radar with two-way 5-frequency signal and detuning initial frequencies 10% shows that the additive treatment gives diffraction of lobe suppression -3

  20. A novel design for low insertion loss, multi-band RF-MEMS switch with low pull-in voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Angira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new type of capacitive shunt RF-MEMS switch. In the proposed design, float metal concept is utilized to reduce the RF overlap area between the movable structure and central conductor of CPW for improving the insertion loss of the device. This has been achieved without affecting the down-state response. Further, float metal also makes the down-state behavior predictable in terms of resonant frequency. For reducing the pull-in voltage, the switch is implemented with cantilever type of structure on either side of the transmission line. This structure also has the capability to inductively tune the isolation optimum value to the different bands and thus can be used in the reconfigurable RF systems. The device shows an insertion loss less than 0.10 dB, a return loss below 36.80 dB up to 25 GHz as compared to 1.00 dB insertion, 7.67 dB return loss for the conventional switch. In the OFF state, proposed device shows two isolation peaks i.e. 48.80 dB at 4.5 GHz and 54.56 dB at 9.7 GHz, when either or both cantilevers are electro-statically actuated to the down-state position respectively. The conventional device has a single isolation peak in the X-band. In addition, improvement of around 3 times in the bandwidth has also been achieved. The designed switch can be used at device and sub-system level for the future multi-band communication applications.

  1. A multi-band semi-analytical algorithm for estimating chlorophyll-a concentration in the Yellow River Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Quan, Wenting; Cui, Tingwei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, two sample semi-analytical algorithms and one new unified multi-band semi-analytical algorithm (UMSA) for estimating chlorophyll-a (Chla) concentration were constructed by specifying optimal wavelengths. The three sample semi-analytical algorithms, including the three-band semi-analytical algorithm (TSA), four-band semi-analytical algorithm (FSA), and UMSA algorithm, were calibrated and validated by the dataset collected in the Yellow River Estuary between September 1 and 10, 2009. By comparing of the accuracy of assessment of TSA, FSA, and UMSA algorithms, it was found that the UMSA algorithm had a superior performance in comparison with the two other algorithms, TSA and FSA. Using the UMSA algorithm in retrieving Chla concentration in the Yellow River Estuary decreased by 25.54% NRMSE (normalized root mean square error) when compared with the FSA algorithm, and 29.66% NRMSE in comparison with the TSA algorithm. These are very significant improvements upon previous methods. Additionally, the study revealed that the TSA and FSA algorithms are merely more specific forms of the UMSA algorithm. Owing to the special form of the UMSA algorithm, if the same bands were used for both the TSA and UMSA algorithms or FSA and UMSA algorithms, the UMSA algorithm would theoretically produce superior results in comparison with the TSA and FSA algorithms. Thus, good results may also be produced if the UMSA algorithm were to be applied for predicting Chla concentration for datasets of Gitelson et al. (2008) and Le et al. (2009).

  2. Evaluation of Hyperspectral Multi-Band Indices to Estimate Chlorophyll-A Concentration Using Field Spectral Measurements and Satellite Data in Dianshan Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linna Li

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a concentration is considered as a key indicator of the eutrophic status of inland water bodies. Various algorithms have been developed for estimating Chl-a in order to improve the accuracy of predictive models. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of hyperspectral multi-band indices to estimate the Chl-a concentration in Dianshan Lake, which is the largest lake in Shanghai, an international metropolis of China. Based on field spectral measurements and in-situ Chl-a concentration collected on 7–8 September 2010, hyperspectral multi-band indices were calibrated to estimate the Chl-a concentration with optimal wavelengths selected by model tuning. A three-band index accounts for 87.36% (R2 = 0.8736 of the Chl-a variation. A four-band index, which adds a wavelength in the near infrared (NIR region, results in a higher R2 (0.8997 by removing the absorption and backscattering effects of suspended solids. To test the applicability of the proposed indices for routinely monitoring of Chl-a in inland lakes, simulated Hyperion and real HJ-1A satellite data were selected to estimate the Chl-a concentration. The results show that the explanatory powers of these satellite hyperspectral multi-band indices are relatively high with R2 = 0.8559, 0.8945, 0.7969, and 0.8241 for simulated Hyperion and real HJ-1A satellite data, respectively. All of the results provide strong evidence that hyperspectral multi-band indices are promising and applicable to estimate Chl-a in eutrophic inland lakes.

  3. Representations of space based on haptic input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidhoek, S.

    2005-01-01

    The present thesis focused on the representations of grasping space based on haptic input. We aimed at identifying their characteristics, and the underlying neurocognitive processes and mechanisms. To this end, we studied the systematic distortions in performance on several orientation perception

  4. Space-based monitoring of ground deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobakht Ersi, Fereydoun; Safari, Abdolreza; Gamse, Sonja

    2016-07-01

    Ground deformation monitoring is valuable to understanding of the behaviour of natural phenomena. Space-Based measurement systems such as Global Positioning System are useful tools for continuous monitoring of ground deformation. Ground deformation analysis based on space geodetic techniques have provided a new, more accurate, and reliable source of information for geodetic positioning which is used to detect deformations of the Ground surface. This type of studies using displacement fields derived from repeated measurments of space-based geodetic networks indicates how crucial role the space geodetic methods play in geodynamics. The main scope of this contribution is to monitor of ground deformation by obtained measurements from GPS sites. We present ground deformation analysis in three steps: a global congruency test on daily coordinates of permanent GPS stations to specify in which epochs deformations occur, the localization of the deformed GPS sites and the determination of deformations.

  5. Adaptive control of space based robot manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Michael W.; Wee, Liang-Boon

    1991-01-01

    For space based robots in which the base is free to move, motion planning and control is complicated by uncertainties in the inertial properties of the manipulator and its load. A new adaptive control method is presented for space based robots which achieves globally stable trajectory tracking in the presence of uncertainties in the inertial parameters of the system. A partition is made of the fifteen degree of freedom system dynamics into two parts: a nine degree of freedom invertible portion and a six degree of freedom noninvertible portion. The controller is then designed to achieve trajectory tracking of the invertible portion of the system. This portion consist of the manipulator joint positions and the orientation of the base. The motion of the noninvertible portion is bounded, but unpredictable. This portion consist of the position of the robot's base and the position of the reaction wheel.

  6. Toward a Space based Gravitational Wave Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2015-01-01

    A space-based GW observatory will produce spectacular science. The LISA mission concept: (a) Long history, (b) Very well-studied, including de-scopes, (c) NASAs Astrophysics Strategic Plan calls for a minority role in ESAs L3 mission opportunity. To that end, NASA is Participating in LPF and ST7 Developing appropriate technology for a LISA-like mission Preparing to seek an endorsement for L3 participation from the 2020 decadal review.

  7. 3D-MB-MUSE: A robust 3D multi-slab, multi-band and multi-shot reconstruction approach for ultrahigh resolution diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Iain P; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Petty, Christopher; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Song, Allen W

    2017-10-01

    Recent advances in achieving ultrahigh spatial resolution (e.g. sub-millimeter) diffusion MRI (dMRI) data have proven highly beneficial in characterizing tissue microstructures in organs such as the brain. However, the routine acquisition of in-vivo dMRI data at such high spatial resolutions has been largely prohibited by factors that include prolonged acquisition times, motion induced artifacts, and low SNR. To overcome these limitations, we present here a framework for acquiring and reconstructing 3D multi-slab, multi-band and interleaved multi-shot EPI data, termed 3D-MB-MUSE. Through multi-band excitations, the simultaneous acquisition of multiple 3D slabs enables whole brain dMRI volumes to be acquired in-vivo on a 3 T clinical MRI scanner at high spatial resolution within a reasonably short amount of time. Representing a true 3D model, 3D-MB-MUSE reconstructs an entire 3D multi-band, multi-shot dMRI slab at once while simultaneously accounting for coil sensitivity variations across the slab as well as motion induced artifacts commonly associated with both 3D and multi-shot diffusion imaging. Such a reconstruction fully preserves the SNR advantages of both 3D and multi-shot acquisitions in high resolution dMRI images by removing both motion and aliasing artifacts across multiple dimensions. By enabling ultrahigh resolution dMRI for routine use, the 3D-MB-MUSE framework presented here may prove highly valuable in both clinical and research applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Space Based Gravitational Wave Observatories (SGOs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories (SGOs) will enable the systematic study of the frequency band from 0.0001 - 1 Hz of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. ESA has selected The Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the L3 mission opportunity with a nominal launch date in 2034. This will be at a minimum 15 years after ground-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays announce their first detections and at least 18 years after the LISA Pathfinder Mission will have demonstrated key technologies in a dedicated space mission. It is therefore important to develop mission concepts that can take advantage of the momentum in the field and the investment in both technology development and a precision measurement community on a more near-term timescale than the L3 opportunity. This talk will discuss a mission concept based on the LISA baseline that resulted from a recent mission architecture study.

  9. Compact Multi-band Power Dividers Based on Stub Loaded Stepped-Impedance Resonators with Defected Microstrip Structure (SL-SIR-DMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Wei, Feng

    2017-09-01

    Based on conventional Wilkinson power divider, two compact multi-band equal power dividers (PDs) employing stub loaded stepped-impedance resonators with defected microstrip structure (SL-SIR-DMS) is proposed in this paper. The proposed SL-SIR-DMS is analyzed by even/odd mode method. It is found that different defected structures can lead to different frequency responses. In addition, by using DMS, tri-band and even quad-band responses can be easily achieved without increasing the resonator size. As verification, one tri-band equal PD and one quad-band one are fabricated. The predicted results on S parameters are compared with the measured ones and good agreement is found.

  10. Synchronization for space based ultra low frequency interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Raj; Rajan, R.T.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Boonstra, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there is a renewed interest in space based arrays for low frequency observations. Orbiting Low Frequency Antenna Array (OLFAR) is one such project which investigates the feasibility of a space based array of ≥ 10 satellites, observing the cosmos in the 0.3 - 30 MHz spectrum. The OLFAR

  11. Incentive and Architecture of Multi-Band Enabled Small Cell and UE for Up-/Down-Link and Control-/User-Plane Splitting for 5G Mobile Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rony Kumer; Aswakul, Chaodit

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-band enabled femtocell base station (FCBS) and user equipment (UE) architecture is proposed in a multi-tier network that consists of small cells, including femtocells and picocells deployed over the coverage of a macrocell for splitting uplink and downlink (UL/DL) as well as control-plane and user-plane (C-/U-plane) for 5G mobile networks. Since splitting is performed at the same FCBS, we define this architecture as the same base station based split architecture (SBSA). For multiple bands, we consider co-channel (CC) microwave and different frequency (DF) 60 GHz millimeter wave (mmWave) bands for FCBSs and UEs with respect to the microwave band used by their over-laid macrocell base station. All femtocells are assumed to be deployed in a 3-dimensional multi-storage building. For CC microwave band, cross-tier CC interference of femtocells with macrocell is avoided using almost blank subframe based enhanced inter-cell interference coordination techniques. The co-existence of CC microwave and DF mmWave bands for SBSA on the same FCBS and UE is first studied to show their performance disparities in terms of system capacity and spectral efficiency in order to provide incentives for employing multiple bands at the same FCBS and UE and identify a suitable band for routing decoupled UL/DL or C-/U-plane traffic. We then present a number of disruptive architectural design alternatives of multi-band enabled SBSA for 5G mobile networks for UL/DL and C-/U-plane splitting, including a disruptive and complete splitting of UL/DL and C-/U-plane as well as a combined UL/DL and C-/U-plane splitting, by exploiting dual connectivity on CC microwave and DF mmWave bands. The outperformances of SBSA in terms of system level capacity, average spectral efficiency, energy efficiency, and control-plane overhead traffic capacity in comparison with different base stations based split architecture (DBSA) are shown. Finally, a number of technical and business perspectives

  12. Ultra-Thin Multi-Band Polarization-Insensitive Microwave Metamaterial Absorber Based on Multiple-Order Responses Using a Single Resonator Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong Zhi; Cheng, Zheng Ze; Mao, Xue Song; Gong, Rong Zhou

    2017-10-27

    We design an ultra-thin multi-band polarization-insensitive metamaterial absorber (MMA) using a single circular sector resonator (CSR) structure in the microwave region. Simulated results show that the proposed MMA has three distinctive absorption peaks at 3.35 GHz, 8.65 GHz, and 12.44 GHz, with absorbance of 98.8%, 99.7%, and 98.3%, respectively, which agree well with an experiment. Simulated surface current distributions of the unit-cell structure reveal that the triple-band absorption mainly originates from multiple-harmonic magnetic resonance. The proposed triple-band MMA can remain at a high absorption level for all polarization of both transverse-electric (TE) and transverse-magnetic (TM) modes under normal incidence. Moreover, by further optimizing the geometric parameters of the CSRs, four-band and five-band MMAs can also be obtained. Thus, our design will have potential application in detection, sensing, and stealth technology.

  13. Ultra-Thin Multi-Band Polarization-Insensitive Microwave Metamaterial Absorber Based on Multiple-Order Responses Using a Single Resonator Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhi Cheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We design an ultra-thin multi-band polarization-insensitive metamaterial absorber (MMA using a single circular sector resonator (CSR structure in the microwave region. Simulated results show that the proposed MMA has three distinctive absorption peaks at 3.35 GHz, 8.65 GHz, and 12.44 GHz, with absorbance of 98.8%, 99.7%, and 98.3%, respectively, which agree well with an experiment. Simulated surface current distributions of the unit-cell structure reveal that the triple-band absorption mainly originates from multiple-harmonic magnetic resonance. The proposed triple-band MMA can remain at a high absorption level for all polarization of both transverse-electric (TE and transverse-magnetic (TM modes under normal incidence. Moreover, by further optimizing the geometric parameters of the CSRs, four-band and five-band MMAs can also be obtained. Thus, our design will have potential application in detection, sensing, and stealth technology.

  14. A Multi-Band Body-Worn Distributed Radio-Frequency Exposure Meter: Design, On-Body Calibration and Study of Body Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Reza; Thielens, Arno; Agneessens, Sam; Van Torre, Patrick; Van den Bossche, Matthias; Dongus, Stefan; Eeftens, Marloes; Huss, Anke; Vermeulen, Roel; de Seze, René; Mazet, Paul; Cardis, Elisabeth; Rogier, Hendrik; Röösli, Martin; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2018-01-18

    A multi-band Body-Worn Distributed exposure Meter (BWDM) calibrated for simultaneous measurement of the incident power density in 11 telecommunication frequency bands, is proposed. The BDWM consists of 22 textile antennas integrated in a garment and is calibrated on six human subjects in an anechoic chamber to assess its measurement uncertainty in terms of 68% confidence interval of the on-body antenna aperture. It is shown that by using multiple antennas in each frequency band, the uncertainty of the BWDM is 22 dB improved with respect to single nodes on the front and back of the torso and variations are decreased to maximum 8.8 dB. Moreover, deploying single antennas for different body morphologies results in a variation up to 9.3 dB, which is reduced to 3.6 dB using multiple antennas for six subjects with various body mass index values. The designed BWDM, has an improved uncertainty of up to 9.6 dB in comparison to commercially available personal exposure meters calibrated on body. As an application, an average incident power density in the range of 26.7-90.8 μW·m - 2 is measured in Ghent, Belgium. The measurements show that commercial personal exposure meters underestimate the actual exposure by a factor of up to 20.6.

  15. Experimental study of coexistence of multi-band OFDM-UWB and OFDM-baseband signals in long-reach PONs using directly modulated lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, José A P; Fonseca, Daniel; Cartaxo, Adolfo V T

    2011-11-07

    Transmission of coexisting Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM)-baseband (BB) and multi-band OFDM-ultra-wideband (UWB) signals along long-reach passive optical networks using directly modulated lasers (DML) is experimentally demonstrated.When optimized modulation indexes are used, bit error ratios not exceeding 5 × 10⁻⁴ can be achieved by all (OFDM-BB and three OFDM-UWB sub-bands) signals for a reach of 100 km of standard single-mode fiber (SSMF) and optical signal-to-noise ratios not lower than 25dB@0.1 nm. It is experimentally shown that, for the SSMF reach of 100km, the optimized performance of coexisting OFDM-BB and OFDM-UWB signals is mainly imposed by the combination of two effects: the SSMF dispersion-induced nonlinear distortion of the OFDM-UWB signals caused by the OFDM-BB and OFDM-UWB signals, and the further degradation of the OFDM-UWB signals with higher frequency, due to the reduced DML bandwidth.

  16. An expert systems application to space base data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Stephen M.

    1988-01-01

    The advent of space vehicles with their increased data requirements are reflected in the complexity of future telemetry systems. Space based operations with its immense operating costs will shift the burden of data processing and routine analysis from the space station to the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV). A research and development project is described which addresses the real time onboard data processing tasks associated with a space based vehicle, specifically focusing on an implementation of an expert system.

  17. Dual-polarization multi-band optical OFDM transmission and transceiver limitations for up to 500 Gb/s uncompensated long-haul links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoumidis, E; Jarajreh, M A; Sygletos, S; Le, S T; Farjady, F; Tsokanos, A; Hamié, A; Pincemin, E; Jaouën, Y; Ellis, A D; Doran, N J

    2014-05-05

    A number of critical issues for dual-polarization single- and multi-band optical orthogonal-frequency division multiplexing (DP-SB/MB-OFDM) signals are analyzed in dispersion compensation fiber (DCF)-free long-haul links. For the first time, different DP crosstalk removal techniques are compared, the maximum transmission-reach is investigated, and the impact of subcarrier number and high-level modulation formats are explored thoroughly. It is shown, for a bit-error-rate (BER) of 10(-3), 2000 km of quaternary phase-shift keying (QPSK) DP-MB-OFDM transmission is feasible. At high launched optical powers (LOP), maximum-likelihood decoding can extend the LOP of 40 Gb/s QPSK DP-SB-OFDM at 2000 km by 1.5 dB compared to zero-forcing. For a 100 Gb/s DP-MB-OFDM system, a high number of subcarriers contribute to improved BER but at the cost of digital signal processing computational complexity, whilst by adapting the cyclic prefix length the BER can be improved for a low number of subcarriers. In addition, when 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (16QAM) is employed the digital-to-analogue/analogue-to-digital converter (DAC/ADC) bandwidth is relaxed with a degraded BER; while the 'circular' 8QAM is slightly superior to its 'rectangular' form. Finally, the transmission of wavelength-division multiplexing DP-MB-OFDM and single-carrier DP-QPSK is experimentally compared for up to 500 Gb/s showing great potential and similar performance at 1000 km DCF-free G.652 line.

  18. National Coordination Office for Space-Based PNT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, M. E.

    2008-12-01

    In December 2004, President Bush issued the US Policy on space-based positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT), providing guidance on the management of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and other space- based PNT systems. The policy established the National Executive Committee (EXCOM) to advise and coordinate federal agencies on matters related to space-based PNT. Chaired jointly by the deputy secretaries of defense and transportation, the EXCOM includes equivalent level officials from the Departments of State, the Interior, Agriculture, Commerce, and Homeland Security, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A National Coordination Office (NCO) supports the EXCOM through an interagency staff. Since establishing the EXCOM and NCO in 2005, the organizations have quickly grown in influence and effectiveness, leading or managing many interagency initiatives including the development of a Five-Year National Space-Based PNT Plan, the Space-Based PNT Interference Detection and Mitigation (IDM) Plan, and other strategic documents. The NCO has also facilitated interagency coordination on numerous policy issues and on external communications intended to spread a consistent, positive US message about space-based PNT. Role of the NCO - The purpose of the EXCOM is to provide top-level guidance to US agencies regarding space-based PNT infrastructure. The president established it at the deputy secretary level to ensure its strategic recommendations effect real change in agency budgets. Recognizing such high-level officials could only meet every few months, the president directed the EXCOM to establish an NCO to carry out its day-to-day business, including overseeing the implementation of EXCOM action items across the member agencies. These range from the resolution of funding issues to the assessment of strategic policy options. They also include the completion of specific tasks and documents requested by the EXCOM co

  19. Relativity effects for space-based coherent lidar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudimetla, V. S. Rao

    1996-01-01

    An effort was initiated last year in the Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center to examine and incorporate, if necessary, the effects of relativity in the design of space-based lidar systems. A space-based lidar system, named AEOLUS, is under development at Marshall Space Flight Center and it will be used to accurately measure atmospheric wind profiles. Effects of relativity were also observed in the performance of space-based systems, for example in case of global positioning systems, and corrections were incorporated into the design of instruments. During the last summer, the effects of special relativity on the design of space-based lidar systems were studied in detail, by analyzing the problem of laser scattering off a fixed target when the source and a co-located receiver are moving on a spacecraft. Since the proposed lidar system uses a coherent detection system, errors even in the order of a few microradians must be corrected to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio. Previous analysis assumed that the ground is flat and the spacecraft is moving parallel to the ground, and developed analytical expressions for the location, direction and Doppler shift of the returning radiation. Because of the assumptions used in that analysis, only special relativity effects were involved. In this report, that analysis is extended to include general relativity and calculate its effects on the design.

  20. Design of a tunable multi-band differential LC VCO using 0.35 mu m SiGe BiCMOS technology for multi-standard wireless communication systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bakkaloğlu, Ahmet Kemal; Bakkaloglu, Ahmet Kemal; Ergintav, Arzu; Özeren, Emre; Ozeren, Emre; Tekin, İbrahim; Tekin, Ibrahim; Gürbüz, Yaşar; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, an integrated 2.2-5.7GHz multi-band differential LC VCO for multi-standard wireless communication systems was designed utilizing 0.35 mu m SiGe BiCMOS technology. The topology, which combines the switching inductors and capacitors together in the same circuit, is a novel approach for wideband VCOs. Based on the post-layout simulation results, the VCO can be tuned using a DC voltage of 0 to 3.3 V for 5 different frequency bands (2.27-2.51 GHz, 2.48-2.78 GHz, 3.22-3.53 GHz, 3.48-...

  1. Space-based gravitational wave detection with LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaddock, D A [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)], E-mail: Daniel.Shaddock@jpl.nasa.gov

    2008-06-07

    The laser interferometer space antenna will be the first space-based laser interferometric gravitational wave detector. This paper provides a brief introduction to the LISA mission and science goals, highlighting the differences from ground-based detectors. A tutorial of the LISA measurement concept is presented focusing on the LISA interferometry with a summary of laser frequency noise cancellation and clock noise removal schemes.

  2. MASS MEASUREMENTS OF ISOLATED OBJECTS FROM SPACE-BASED MICROLENSING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei; Novati, S. Calchi; Gould, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is very likely a brown dwarf (BD). Assuming that the source star l...... is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted....

  3. Key techniques for space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang; Xiong, Sheng-jun; Liu, Xiao-long; Han, Wei-hua

    2014-12-01

    In space, the absence of atmospheric turbulence, absorption, dispersion and aerosol factors on laser transmission. Therefore, space-based laser has important values in satellite communication, satellite attitude controlling, space debris clearing, and long distance energy transmission, etc. On the other hand, solar energy is a kind of clean and renewable resources, the average intensity of solar irradiation on the earth is 1353W/m2, and it is even higher in space. Therefore, the space-based solar pumped lasers has attracted much research in recent years, most research focuses on solar pumped solid state lasers and solar pumped fiber lasers. The two lasing principle is based on stimulated emission of the rare earth ions such as Nd, Yb, Cr. The rare earth ions absorb light only in narrow bands. This leads to inefficient absorption of the broad-band solar spectrum, and increases the system heating load, which make the system solar to laser power conversion efficiency very low. As a solar pumped semiconductor lasers could absorb all photons with energy greater than the bandgap. Thus, solar pumped semiconductor lasers could have considerably higher efficiencies than other solar pumped lasers. Besides, solar pumped semiconductor lasers has smaller volume chip, simpler structure and better heat dissipation, it can be mounted on a small satellite platform, can compose satellite array, which can greatly improve the output power of the system, and have flexible character. This paper summarizes the research progress of space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers, analyses of the key technologies based on several application areas, including the processing of semiconductor chip, the design of small and efficient solar condenser, and the cooling system of lasers, etc. We conclude that the solar pumped vertical cavity surface-emitting semiconductor lasers will have a wide application prospects in the space.

  4. Space-Based Gravitational-wave Mission Concept Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    The LISA Mission Concept has been under study for over two decades as a spacebased gravitational-wave detector capable of observing astrophysical sources in the 0.0001 to 1 Hz band. The concept has consistently received strong recommendations from various review panels based on the expected science, most recently from the US Astr02010 Decadal Review. Budget constraints have led both the US and European Space agencies to search for lower cost options. We report results from the US effort to explore the tradeoffs between mission cost and science return, and in particular a family of mission concepts referred to as SGO (Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory).

  5. Cleaning space debris with a space-based laser system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Shuangyan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High-energy pulsed laser radiation may be the most feasible means to mitigate the threat of collision of a space station or other valuable space assets with orbital debris in the size range of 1–10 cm. Under laser irradiation, part of the debris material is ablated and provides an impulse to the debris particle. Proper direction of the impulse vector either deflects the object trajectory or forces the debris on a trajectory through the upper atmosphere, where it burns up. Most research concentrates on ground-based laser systems but pays little attention to space-based laser systems. There are drawbacks of a ground-based laser system in cleaning space debris. Therefore the placement of a laser system in space is proposed and investigated. Under assumed conditions, the elimination process of space debris is analyzed. Several factors such as laser repetition frequency, relative movement between the laser and debris, and inclination of debris particles which may exercise influence to the elimination effects are discussed. A project of a space-based laser system is proposed according to the numerical results of a computer study. The proposed laser system can eliminate debris of 1–10 cm and succeed in protecting a space station.

  6. Concept for lightweight spaced-based deposition technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulton, Michael; Anders, Andre

    2006-02-28

    In this contribution we will describe a technology path to very high quality coatings fabricated in the vacuum of space. To accomplish the ambitious goals set out in NASA's Lunar-Mars proposal, advanced thin-film deposition technology will be required. The ability to deposit thin-film coatings in the vacuum of lunar-space could be extremely valuable for executing this new space mission. Developing lightweight space-based deposition technology (goal:<300 g, including power supply) will enable the future fabrication and repair of flexible large-area space antennae and fixed telescope mirrors for lunar-station observatories. Filtered Cathodic Arc (FCA) is a proven terrestrial energetic thin-film deposition technology that does not need any processing gas but is well suited for ultra-high vacuum operation. Recently, miniaturized cathodic arcs have already been developed and considered for space propulsion. It is proposed to combine miniaturized pulsed FCA technology and robotics to create a robust, enabling space-based deposition system for the fabrication, improvement, and repair of thin films, especially of silver and aluminum, on telescope mirrors and eventually on large area flexible substrates. Using miniature power supplies with inductive storage, the typical low-voltage supply systems used in space are adequate. It is shown that high-value, small area coatings are within the reach of existing technology, while medium and large area coatings are challenging in terms of lightweight technology and economics.

  7. Special Relativity Corrections for Space-Based Lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    RaoGudimetla, Venkata S.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The theory of special relativity is used to analyze some of the physical phenomena associated with space-based coherent Doppler lidars aimed at Earth and the atmosphere. Two important cases of diffuse scattering and retroreflection by lidar targets are treated. For the case of diffuse scattering, we show that for a coaligned transmitter and receiver on the moving satellite, there is no angle between transmitted and returned radiation. However, the ray that enters the receiver does not correspond to a retroreflected ray by the target. For the retroreflection case there is misalignment between the transmitted ray and the received ray. In addition, the Doppler shift in the frequency and the amount of tip for the receiver aperture when needed are calculated, The error in estimating wind because of the Doppler shift in the frequency due to special relativity effects is examined. The results are then applied to a proposed space-based pulsed coherent Doppler lidar at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for wind and aerosol backscatter measurements. The lidar uses an orbiting spacecraft with a pulsed laser source and measures the Doppler shift between the transmitted and the received frequencies to determine the atmospheric wind velocities. We show that the special relativity effects are small for the proposed system.

  8. Space-Based Information Infrastructure Architecture for Broadband Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kent M.; Inukai, Tom; Razdan, Rajendev; Lazeav, Yvonne M.

    1996-01-01

    This study addressed four tasks: (1) identify satellite-addressable information infrastructure markets; (2) perform network analysis for space-based information infrastructure; (3) develop conceptual architectures; and (4) economic assessment of architectures. The report concludes that satellites will have a major role in the national and global information infrastructure, requiring seamless integration between terrestrial and satellite networks. The proposed LEO, MEO, and GEO satellite systems have satellite characteristics that vary widely. They include delay, delay variations, poorer link quality and beam/satellite handover. The barriers against seamless interoperability between satellite and terrestrial networks are discussed. These barriers are the lack of compatible parameters, standards and protocols, which are presently being evaluated and reduced.

  9. Space-based surveillance: technology and system options for Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Robert

    1995-09-01

    In support of the Canadian Space Plan, the R&D branch of the Department of National Defence initiated a technical study to identify satellite system options that would improve the national surveillance network. Space-based infrared and visible-light sensors and real and synthetic-aperture radar systems were considered. This report summarizes the findings of the study, starting with a general discussion of surveillance requirements and a description of the 'case-study' approach used to formulate a surveillance concept. Applicable technolgoy is described, with emphasis on concepts that address specific surveillance deficiencies. Current fiscal realities and the high cost of space technology are addressed in a discussion of near-term options using data from commercial satellites, accessed through an improved dissemination network.

  10. Conceptual design of jewellery: a space-based aesthetics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzintzi Vaia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual design is a field that offers various aesthetic approaches to generation of nature-based product design concepts. Essentially, Conceptual Product Design (CPD uses similarities based on the geometrical forms and functionalities. Furthermore, the CAD-based freehand sketch is a primary conceptual tool in the early stages of the design process. The proposed Conceptual Product Design concept is dealing with jewelleries that are inspired from space. Specifically, a number of galaxy features, such as galaxy shapes, wormholes and graphical representation of planet magnetic field are used as inspirations. Those space-based design ideas at a conceptual level can lead to further opportunities for research and economic success of the jewellery industry. A number of illustrative case studies are presented and new opportunities can be derived for economic success.

  11. MEMS-Based Communications Systems for Space-Based Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLosSantos, Hector J.; Brunner, Robert A.; Lam, Juan F.; Hackett, Le Roy H.; Lohr, Ross F., Jr.; Larson, Lawrence E.; Loo, Robert Y.; Matloubian, Mehran; Tangonan, Gregory L.

    1995-01-01

    As user demand for higher capacity and flexibility in communications satellites increases, new ways to cope with the inherent limitations posed by the prohibitive mass and power consumption, needed to satisfy those requirements, are under investigation. Recent studies suggest that while new satellite architectures are necessary to enable multi-user, multi-data rate, multi-location satellite links, these new architectures will inevitably increase power consumption, and in turn, spacecraft mass, to such an extent that their successful implementation will demand novel lightweight/low power hardware approaches. In this paper, following a brief introduction to the fundamentals of communications satellites, we address the impact of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology, in particular micro-electro-mechanical (MEM) switches to mitigate the above mentioned problems and show that low-loss/wide bandwidth MEM switches will go a long way towards enabling higher capacity and flexibility space-based communications systems.

  12. Non-Topographic Space-Based Laser Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Purucker, Michael; Janches, Diego; Getty, Stephanie; Krainak, Michael A.; Stephen, Mark A.; Chen, Jeffrey R.; Li, Steve X.; hide

    2016-01-01

    In the past 20+ years, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has successfully developed and flown lidars for mapping of Mars, the Earth, Mercury and the Moon. As laser and electro-optics technologies expand and mature, more sophisticated instruments that once were thought to be too complicated for space are being considered and developed. We will present progress on several new, space-based laser instruments that are being developed at GSFC. These include lidars for remote sensing of carbon dioxide and methane on Earth for carbon cycle and global climate change; sodium resonance fluorescence lidar to measure environmental parameters of the middle and upper atmosphere on Earth and Mars and a wind lidar for Mars orbit; in situ laser instruments include remote and in-situ measurements of the magnetic fields; and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to study the diversity and structure of nonvolatile organics in solid samples on missions to outer planetary satellites and small bodies.

  13. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kiemle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN on a small satellite in polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1% over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol

  14. Design of a space-based infrared imaging interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael; Hope, Douglas; Romeo, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Present space-based optical imaging sensors are expensive. Launch costs are dictated by weight and size, and system design must take into account the low fault tolerance of a system that cannot be readily accessed once deployed. We describe the design and first prototype of the space-based infrared imaging interferometer (SIRII) that aims to mitigate several aspects of the cost challenge. SIRII is a six-element Fizeau interferometer intended to operate in the short-wave and midwave IR spectral regions over a 6×6 mrad field of view. The volume is smaller by a factor of three than a filled-aperture telescope with equivalent resolving power. The structure and primary optics are fabricated from light-weight space-qualified carbon fiber reinforced polymer; they are easy to replicate and inexpensive. The design is intended to permit one-time alignment during assembly, with no need for further adjustment once on orbit. A three-element prototype of the SIRII imager has been constructed with a unit telescope primary mirror diameter of 165 mm and edge-to-edge baseline of 540 mm. The optics, structure, and interferometric signal processing principles draw on experience developed in ground-based astronomical applications designed to yield the highest sensitivity and resolution with cost-effective optical solutions. The initial motivation for the development of SIRII was the long-term collection of technical intelligence from geosynchronous orbit, but the scalable nature of the design will likely make it suitable for a range of IR imaging scenarios.

  15. Analysing Leontiev Tube Capabilities in the Space-based Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Shchegolev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a review of publications dedicated to the gas-dynamic temperature stratification device (the Leontief tube and shows main factors affecting its efficiency. Describes an experimental installation, which is used to obtain data on the value of energy separation in the air to prove this device the operability.The assumption that there is an optimal relationship between the flow velocities in the subsonic and supersonic channels of the gas-dynamic temperature stratification device is experimentally confirmed.The paper conducts analysis of possible ways to raise the efficiency of power plants of various (including space basing, and shows that, currently, a mainstream of increasing efficiency of their operation is to complicate design solutions.A scheme of the closed gas-turbine space-based plant using a mixture of inert gases (helium-xenon one for operation is proposed. What differs it from the simplest variants is a lack of the cooler-radiator and integration into gas-dynamic temperature stratification device and heat compressor.Based on the equations of one-dimensional gas dynamics, it is shown that the total pressure restorability when removing heat in a thermal compressor determines operating capability of this scheme. The exploratory study of creating a heat compressor is performed, and it is shown that when operating on gases with a Prandtl number close to 1, the total pressure does not increase.The operating capability conditions of the heat compressor are operation on gases with a low value of the Prandtl number (helium-xenon mixture at high supersonic velocities and with a longitudinal pressure gradient available.It is shown that there is a region of the low values of the Prandtl number (Pr <0.3 for which, with the longitudinal pressure gradient available in the supersonic flows of a viscous gas, the total pressure can be restored.

  16. Space Based Ornithology: On the Wings of Migration and Biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The study of bird migration on a global scale is one of the compelling and challenging problems of modern biology with major implications for human health and conservation biology. Migration and conservation efforts cross national boundaries and are subject to numerous international agreements and treaties. Space based technology offers new opportunities to shed understanding on the distribution and migration of organisms on the planet and their sensitivity to human disturbances and environmental changes. Migration is an incredibly diverse and complex behavior. A broad outline of space based research must address three fundamental questions: (1) where could birds be, i.e. what is their fundamental niche constrained by their biophysical limits? (2) where do we actually find birds, i.e. what is their realizable niche as modified by local or regional abiotic and biotic factors, and (3) how do they get there (and how do we know?), that is what are their migration patterns and associated mechanisms? Our working hypothesis is that individual organism biophysical models of energy and water balance, driven by satellite measurements of spatio-temporal gradients in climate and habitat, will help us to explain the variability in avian species richness and distribution. Dynamic state variable modeling provides one tool for studying bird migration across multiple scales and can be linked to mechanistic models describing the time and energy budget states of migrating birds. Such models yield an understanding of how a migratory flyway and its component habitats function as a whole and link stop-over ecology with biological conservation and management. Further these models provide an ecological forecasting tool for science and application users to address what are the possible consequences of loss of wetlands, flooding, drought or other natural disasters such as hurricanes on avian biodiversity and bird migration.

  17. Special relativity effects for space-based coherent lidar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raogudimetla, V. S.

    1994-01-01

    There is a great need to develop a system that can measure accurately atmospheric wind profiles because an accurate data of wind profiles in the atmosphere constitutes single most input for reliable simulations of global climate numerical methods. Also such data helps us understand atmospheric circulation and climate dynamics better. Because of this need for accurate wind measurements, a space-based Laser Atmospheric Winds Sounder (LAWS) is being designed at MSFC to measure wind profiles in the lower atmosphere of the earth with an accuracy of 1 m/s at lower altitudes to 5m/s at higher altitudes. This system uses an orbiting spacecraft with a pulsed laser source and measures the Doppler shift between the transmitted and received frequencies to estimate the atmospheric wind velocities. If a significant return from the ground (sea) is possible, the spacecraft speed and height are estimated from it and these results and the Doppler shift are then used to estimate the wind velocities in the atmosphere. It is expected that at the proposed wavelengths, there will be enough backscatter from the aerosols but there may no be significant return from the ground. So a coherent (heterodyne) detection system is being proposed for signal processing because it can provide high signal to noise ratio and sensitivity and thus make the best use of low ground return. However, for a heterodyne detection scheme to provide the best results, it is important that the receiving aperture be aligned properly for the proposed wind sounder, this amounts to only a few microradians tolerance in alignment. It is suspected that the satellite motion relative to the ground may introduce errors in the order of a few microradians because of special relativity. Hence, the problem of laser scattering off a moving fixed target when the source and receiver are moving, which was not treated in the past in the literature, was analyzed in the following, using relativistic electrodynamics and applied to the

  18. 21St Century Atmospheric Forecasting for Space Based Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.; Craddock, M.; Kiley, H.; Mason, M.

    2016-09-01

    Many space based applications from imaging to communications are impacted by the atmosphere. Atmospheric impacts such as optical turbulence and clouds are the main drivers for these types of systems. For example, in space based optical communications, clouds will produce channel fades on the order of many hundreds of decibels (dB) thereby breaking the communication link. Optical turbulence can also produce fades but these can be compensated for by adaptive optics. The ability to forecast the current and future location and optical thickness of clouds for space to ground Electro Optical or optical communications is therefore critical in order to achieve a highly reliable system. We have developed an innovative method for producing such forecasts. These forecasts are intended to provide lead times on the order of several hours to days so that communication links can be transferred from a currently loudy ground location to another more desirable ground site. The system uses high resolution Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) along with a variational data assimilation (DA) scheme to improve the initial conditions and forecasts. DA is used to provide an improved estimate of the atmospheric state by combining meteorological observations with NWP products and their respective error statistics. Variational DA accomplishes this through the minimization of a prescribed cost function, whereby differences between the observations and analysis are damped according to their perceived error. The NWP model is a fully three-dimensional (3D) physics-based model of the atmosphere initialized with gridded atmospheric data obtained from a global scale model. The global model input data has a horizontal resolution of approximately 25km, which is insufficient for the desired atmospheric forecasts required at near 1km resolution. Therefore, a variational DA system is used to improve the quality and resolution of the initial conditions first prescribed by the global model. Data used by the

  19. Data Processing for the Space-Based Desis Hyperspectral Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, E.; Avbelj, J.; Alonso, K.; Bachmann, M.; Cerra, D.; Eckardt, A.; Gerasch, B.; Graham, L.; Günther, B.; Heiden, U.; Kerr, G.; Knodt, U.; Krutz, D.; Krawcyk, H.; Makarau, A.; Miller, R.; Müller, R.; Perkins, R.; Walter, I.

    2017-05-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) and Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE) have established a collaboration to develop and operate a new space-based hyperspectral sensor, the DLR Earth Sensing Imaging Spectrometer (DESIS). DESIS will provide spacebased hyperspectral data in the VNIR with high spectral resolution and near-global coverage. While TBE provides the platform and infrastructure for operation of the DESIS instrument on the International Space Station, DLR is responsible for providing the instrument and the processing software. The DESIS instrument is equipped with novel characteristics for an imaging spectrometer such high spectral resolution (2.55 nm), a mirror pointing unit or a CMOS sensor operated in rolling shutter mode. We present here an overview of the DESIS instrument and its processing chain, emphasizing the effect of the novel characteristics of DESIS in the data processing and final data products. Furthermore, we analyse in more detail the effect of the rolling shutter on the DESIS data and possible mitigation/correction strategies.

  20. Multi-mission modeling for space-based exoplanet imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savransky, Dmitry; Delacroix, Christian; Garrett, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    In addition to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope Coronagraphic Imager (WFIRST CGI), which is currently scheduled for launch in the mid 2020s, there is an extensive, ongoing design effort for next-generation, space-based, exoplanet imaging instrumentation. This work involves mission concepts such as the Large UV/ Optical/Infrared Surveyor (LUVOIR), the Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Misson (HabEx), and a starshade rendezvous mission for WFIRST, among others. While each of these efforts includes detailed mission analysis targeted at the specifics of each design, there is also interest in being able to analyze all such concepts in a unified way (to the extent that this is possible) and to draw specific comparisons between projected concept capabilities. Here, we discuss and compare two fundamental approaches to mission analysis, full mission simulation and depth of search analysis, in the specific context of simulating and comparing multiple different mission concepts. We present strategies for mission analysis at varying stages of concept definition, using WFIRST as a motivating example, and discuss useful metrics for cross-mission comparison, as well as strategies for evaluating these metrics.

  1. Space-Based Chemical Lasers in strategic defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildt, Dan

    1992-07-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) has made significant progress in developing Space-Based chemical Laser (SBL) technologies and in studying the SBLs global defense capability. In this mission, a constellation of several orbiting laser platforms provides continuous global defense by intercepting threatening missiles in their boost phase, including short range ballistic missiles (SRBMs). An optional smaller constellation provides defense against launches from the low and midlatitude regions. In addition, SBLs have utility in other important related missions such as surveillance, air defense and discrimination. The hardware necessary to build such a system has been developed to the point where it is mature and ready for demonstration in space. Advances have been made in each of the following major areas of the SBL: laser device; optics/beam control; beam pointing; ATP (acquisition, tracking and pointing); uncooled optics; and laser lethality. Integration of the key laser and beam control technologies is now occurring in the ground-based ALI experiment, and a space demonstration experiment, Star LITE, is in the planning and concept development phase.

  2. Future Photovoltaic Power Generation for Space-Based Power Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S.; Landis, G.; Raffaelle, R.; Hepp, A.

    2002-01-01

    A recent NASA program, Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT), investigated the technologies needed to provide cost-competitive ground baseload electrical power from space based solar energy conversion. This goal mandated low cost, light weight gigawatt (GW) power generation. Investment in solar power generation technologies would also benefit high power military, commercial and science missions. These missions are generally those involving solar electric propulsion, surface power systems to sustain an outpost or a permanent colony on the surface of the moon or mars, space based lasers or radar, or as large earth orbiting power stations which can serve as central utilities for other orbiting spacecraft, or as in the SERT program, potentially beaming power to the earth itself. This paper will discuss requirements for the two latter options, the current state of the art of space solar cells, and a variety of both evolving thin film cells as well as new technologies which may impact the future choice of space solar cells for a high power mission application. The space world has primarily transitioned to commercially available III-V (GaInP/GaAs/Ge) cells with 24-26% air mass zero (AMO) efficiencies. Research in the III-V multi-junction solar cells has focused on fabricating either lattice-mismatched materials with optimum stacking bandgaps or new lattice matched materials with optimum bandgaps. In the near term this will yield a 30% commercially available space cell and in the far term possibly a 40% cell. Cost reduction would be achieved if these cells could be grown on a silicon rather than a germanium substrate since the substrate is ~65% of the cell cost or, better yet, on a polyimide or possibly a ceramic substrate. An overview of multi-junction cell characteristics will be presented here. Thin film cells require substantially less material and have promised the advantage of large area, low cost manufacturing. However, space cell requirements

  3. Automated Detection of Small Bodies by Space Based Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidstrup, P. R.; Grillmayer, G.; Andersen, A. C.; Haack, H.; Jorgensen, J. L.

    The number of known comets and asteroids is increasing every year. Up till now this number is including approximately 250,000 of the largest minor planets, as they are usually referred. These discoveries are due to the Earth-based observation which has intensified over the previous decades. Additionally larger telescopes and arrays of telescopes are being used for exploring our Solar System. It is believed that all near- Earth and Main-Belt asteroids of diameters above 10 to 30 km have been discovered, leaving these groups of objects as observationally complete. However, the cataloguing of smaller bodies is incomplete as only a very small fraction of the expected number has been discovered. It is estimated that approximately 1010 main belt asteroids in the size range 1 m to 1 km are too faint to be observed using Earth-based telescopes. In order to observe these small bodies, space-based search must be initiated to remove atmospheric disturbances and to minimize the distance to the asteroids and thereby minimising the requirement for long camera integration times. A new method of space-based detection of moving non-stellar objects is currently being developed utilising the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) built for spacecraft attitude determination by Ørsted, Danish Technical University. The ASC serves as a backbone technology in the project as it is capable of fully automated distinction of known and unknown celestial objects. By only processing objects of particular interest, i.e. moving objects, it will be possible to discover small bodies with a minimum of ground control, with the ultimate ambition of a fully automated space search probe. Currently, the ASC is being mounted on the Flying Laptop satellite of the Institute of Space Systems, Universität Stuttgart. It will, after a launch into a low Earth polar orbit in 2008, test the detection method with the ASC equipment that already had significant in-flight experience. A future use of the ASC based automated

  4. Just in Time in Space or Space Based JIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanOrsdel, Kathleen G.

    1995-01-01

    Our satellite systems are mega-buck items. In today's cost conscious world, we need to reduce the overall costs of satellites if our space program is to survive. One way to accomplish this would be through on-orbit maintenance of parts on the orbiting craft. In order to accomplish maintenance at a low cost I advance the hypothesis of having parts and pieces (spares) waiting. Waiting in the sense of having something when you need it, or just-in-time. The JIT concept can actually be applied to space processes. Its definition has to be changed just enough to encompass the needs of space. Our space engineers tell us which parts and pieces the satellite systems might be needing once in orbit. These items are stored in space for the time of need and can be ready when they are needed -- or Space Based JIT. When a system has a problem, the repair facility is near by and through human or robotics intervention, it can be brought back into service. Through a JIT process, overall system costs could be reduced as standardization of parts is built into satellite systems to facilitate reduced numbers of parts being stored. Launch costs will be contained as fewer spare pieces need to be included in the launch vehicle and the space program will continue to thrive even in this era of reduced budgets. The concept of using an orbiting parts servicer and human or robotics maintenance/repair capabilities would extend satellite life-cycle and reduce system replacement launches. Reductions of this nature throughout the satellite program result in cost savings.

  5. Cost of Space-Based Laser Ballistic Missile Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, George; Spergel, David

    1986-03-01

    Orbiting platforms carrying infrared lasers have been proposed as weapons forming the first tier of a ballistic missile defense system under the President's Strategic Defense Initiative. As each laser platform can destroy a limited number of missiles, one of several methods of countering such a system is to increase the number of offensive missiles. Hence it is important to know whether the cost-exchange ratio, defined as the ratio of the cost to the defense of destroying a missile to the cost to the offense of deploying an additional missile, is greater or less than 1. Although the technology to be used in a ballistic missile defense system is still extremely uncertain, it is useful to examine methods for calculating the cost-exchange ratio. As an example, the cost of an orbiting infrared laser ballistic missile defense system employed against intercontinental ballistic missiles launched simultaneously from a small area is compared to the cost of additonal offensive missiles. If one adopts lower limits to the costs for the defense and upper limits to the costs for the offense, the cost-exchange ratio comes out substantially greater than 1. If these estimates are confirmed, such a ballistic missile defense system would be unable to maintain its effectiveness at less cost than it would take to proliferate the ballistic missiles necessary to overcome it and would therefore not satisfy the President's requirements for an effective strategic defense. Although the method is illustrated by applying it to a space-based infrared laser system, it should be straightforward to apply it to other proposed systems.

  6. UV lifetime demonstrator for space-based applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Michael; Puffenburger, Kent; Schum, Tom; Fitzpatrick, Fran; Litvinovitch, Slava; Jones, Darrell; Rudd, Joseph; Hovis, Floyd

    2016-05-01

    A long-lived UV laser is an enabling technology for a number of high-priority, space-based lidar instruments. These include next generation cloud and aerosol lidars that incorporates a UV channel, direct detection 3-D wind lidars, and ozone DIAL (differential absorption lidar) systems. In previous SBIR funded work we developed techniques for increasing the survivability of components in high power UV lasers and demonstrated improved operational lifetimes. In this Phase III ESTO funded effort we are designing and building a TRL (Technology Readiness Level) 6 demonstrator that will have increased output power and a space-qualifiable package that is mechanically robust and thermally-stable. For full space compatibility, thermal control will be through pure conductive cooling. Contamination control processes and optical coatings will be chosen that are compatible with lifetimes in excess of 1 billion shots. The 1064nm output will be frequency tripled to provide greater than 100 mJ pulses of 355 nm light at 150 Hz. The laser module build was completed in the third quarter of 2015 at which time a series of life tests were initiated. The first phase of the lifetime testing is a 532 nm only test that is expected to complete in April 2016. The 532 nm lifetest will be followed by a 4 month half power UV life test and then a four month full power UV life test. The lifetime tests will be followed by thermal/vacuum (TVAC) and vibration testing to demonstrate that the laser optics module design is at TRL 6.

  7. Cost of space-based laser ballistic missile defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, G; Spergel, D

    1986-03-21

    Orbiting platforms carrying infrared lasers have been proposed as weapons forming the first tier of a ballistic missile defense system under the President's Strategic Defense Initiative. As each laser platform can destroy a limited number of missiles, one of several methods of countering such a system is to increase the number of offensive missiles. Hence it is important to know whether the cost-exchange ratio, defined as the ratio of the cost to the defense of destroying a missile to the cost to the offense of deploying an additional missile, is greater or less than 1. Although the technology to be used in a ballistic missile defense system is still extremely uncertain, it is useful to examine methods for calculating the cost-exchange ratio. As an example, the cost of an orbiting infrared laser ballistic missile defense system employed against intercontinental ballistic missiles launched simultaneously from a small area is compared to the cost of additional offensive missiles. If one adopts lower limits to the costs for the defense and upper limits to the costs for the offense, the cost-exchange ratio comes out substantially greater than 1. If these estimates are confirmed, such a ballistic missile defense system would be unable to maintain its effectiveness at less cost than it would take to proliferate the ballistic missiles necessary to overcome it and would therefore not satisfy the President's requirements for an effective strategic defense. Although the method is illustrated by applying it to a space-based infrared laser system, it should be straightforward to apply it to other proposed systems.

  8. Validation Issues of a Space-based Methane Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemle, C.; Fix, A.; Ehret, G.; Flamant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Space-based lidar missions targeting greenhouse gases are expected to close observational gaps, e.g., over subarctic permafrost and tropical wetlands, where in-situ and passive remote sensing techniques have difficulties. In the frame of a joint climate monitoring initiative, a "Methane Remote Lidar Mission" (MERLIN) was proposed by the German and French space agencies DLR and CNES. MERLIN is now in Phase B, in which all mission components are planned in detail. Launch is foreseen in 2019. The instrument is an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar which, installed on a low earth orbit platform provided by CNES, uses the surface backscatter to measure the atmospheric methane column. The globally observed concentration gradients will primarily help inverse numerical models to better infer regional methane fluxes. The lidar signals are able to travel through optically thin cloud and aerosol layers without producing a bias, and MERLIN's small field of view, of order 100 m, is expected to provide observations in broken cloud environments, often encountered in the tropics. As IPDA is a novel technique, calibration and validation will be essential. It is foreseen to validate MERLIN by under-flying the satellite with another IPDA lidar, CHARM-F, and a passive remote sensor, both airborne. However, active and passive remote sensors have different, pressure and temperature dependent measurements sensitivities (weighting functions), different fields of view, and do not sample the total methane column on-board an aircraft. Furthermore, since the methane profile is not constant, its column depends on the height of the boundary layer and of the tropopause. We investigate the impact of these issues on the expected validation accuracy, and we examine whether the ground-based Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) may be useful for validation, too. Finally, validation opportunities are dependent on the location and size of cloud-free regions, since clouds with

  9. Space-based societal applications—Relevance in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaranarayana, A.; Varadarajan, C.; Hegde, V. S.

    2009-11-01

    (ISRO) is already a part of the International initiative called Satellite Aided Search and Rescue System. The programme to set up satellite-based Village Resource Centres (VRCs) across India, for providing a variety of services relevant to the rural communities, is also a unique societal application of space technology. The VRCs are envisaged as single window delivery mechanism for a variety of space-based products and services, such as tele-education; telemedicine; information on natural resources for planning and development at local level; interactive advisories on agriculture, fisheries, land and water resources management, livestock management, etc.; interactive vocational training towards alternative livelihood; e-governance; weather information; etc. This paper describes the various possibilities and potentials of Satcom and Remote Sensing technologies for societal applications. The initiatives taken by Indian Space Research Organisation in this direction are highlighted.

  10. The Use of Closed Cycle Coolers on Space Based Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, T. W.; Orlowska, A. H.

    1995-10-01

    Many proposed space based observations will rely on the use of closed cycle and passive cooling systems to provide the thermal environment for high sensitivity. The use of closed cycle mechanical coolers on space telescopes poses particular integration problems; some of these difficulties are discussed in this paper. One of the major problems envisaged is that of exported vibration. This problem, and that of the heat sinking required, can be alleviated by siting the compressors of the Stirling cycle precooler further from the displacer unit. The effect of the separation between the compressors and the displacer on the performance of the Stirling cycle precooler has been measured. Increasing the separation from 170 mm to 565 mm decreases the cooling power at 25 K from 220 mW to 180 mW. In most applications this would be acceptable. The pre-cooler provides cooling at a single point. In situations where refrigeration of extended objects (e.g. telescope mirrors) is required, some distribution method has to be found. A scheme for achieving this is presented together with preliminary calculations on such a system. Temperatures in the region of 2.5 to 4K are required to meet the requirements for long wavelength detectors. We have demonstrated how these temperatures can be achieved in a continuously operating closed cycle cooler that has been engineered for space applications. This cooler consists of a two-stage Stirling cycle precooling a closed cycle Joule-Thomson (JT) stage. Temperatures in the region of 4K are achieved by the use of helium-4 in the JT system. The lighter isotope of helium is used to obtain temperatures down to 2.5 K. Under no-load conditions the precooler reaches a base temperature of 11.3K. The JT system achieves 4.3 K with a 10 mW heat load and 2.5 K with a heat load of over 3 mW. The input power to the cooler is approximately 126 W. The temperature stability of the cooler at low temperatures is important to keep detector drift to a minimum. The

  11. A multi-mode multi-band RF receiver front-end for a TD-SCDMA/LTE/LTE-advanced in 0.18-μm CMOS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Guo; Haiying, Zhang

    2012-09-01

    A fully integrated multi-mode multi-band directed-conversion radio frequency (RF) receiver front-end for a TD-SCDMA/LTE/LTE-advanced is presented. The front-end employs direct-conversion design, and consists of two differential tunable low noise amplifiers (LNA), a quadrature mixer, and two intermediate frequency (IF) amplifiers. The two independent tunable LNAs are used to cover all the four frequency bands, achieving sufficient low noise and high gain performance with low power consumption. Switched capacitor arrays perform a resonant frequency point calibration for the LNAs. The two LNAs are combined at the driver stage of the mixer, which employs a folded double balanced Gilbert structure, and utilizes PMOS transistors as local oscillator (LO) switches to reduce flicker noise. The front-end has three gain modes to obtain a higher dynamic range. Frequency band selection and mode of configuration is realized by an on-chip serial peripheral interface (SPI) module. The front-end is fabricated in a TSMC 0.18-μm RF CMOS process and occupies an area of 1.3 mm2. The measured double-sideband (DSB) noise figure is below 3.5 dB and the conversion gain is over 43 dB at all of the frequency bands. The total current consumption is 31 mA from a 1.8-V supply.

  12. Non Radiation Hardened Microprocessors in Spaced Based Remote Sensing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoursey, Robert J.; Estes, Robert F.; Melton, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    The CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) mission is a comprehensive suite of active and passive sensors including a 20Hz 230mj Nd:YAG lidar, a visible wavelength Earth-looking camera and an imaging infrared radiometer. CALIPSO flies in formation with the Earth Observing System Post-Meridian (EOS PM) train, provides continuous, near-simultaneous measurements and is a planned 3 year mission. CALIPSO was launched into a 98 degree sun synchronous Earth orbit in April of 2006 to study clouds and aerosols and acquires over 5 gigabytes of data every 24 hours. The ground track of one CALIPSO orbit as well as high and low intensity South Atlantic Anomaly outlines is shown. CALIPSO passes through the SAA several times each day. Spaced based remote sensing systems that include multiple instruments and/or instruments such as lidar generate large volumes of data and require robust real-time hardware and software mechanisms and high throughput processors. Due to onboard storage restrictions and telemetry downlink limitations these systems must pre-process and reduce the data before sending it to the ground. This onboard processing and realtime requirement load may mean that newer more powerful processors are needed even though acceptable radiation-hardened versions have not yet been released. CALIPSO's single board computer payload controller processor is actually a set of four (4) voting non-radiation hardened COTS Power PC 603r's built on a single width VME card by General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems (GDAIS). Significant radiation concerns for CALIPSO and other Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites include the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), the north and south poles and strong solar events. Over much of South America and extending into the South Atlantic Ocean the Van Allen radiation belts dip to just 200-800km and spacecraft entering this area are subjected to high energy protons and experience higher than normal Single Event Upset

  13. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...... to lighting conditions. Results show that localisation accuracy of facial features is considerably increased using this appearance representation under normal and abnormal lighting and at multiple scales....

  14. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...... to lighting conditions. Results show that the localisation accuracy of facial features is considerably increased using this appearance representation under diffuse and directional lighting and at multiple scales....

  15. Topological transitions in multi-band superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Continentino, Mucio A., E-mail: mucio@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Deus, Fernanda, E-mail: fernanda@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Padilha, Igor T., E-mail: igorfis@ufam.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Campus Capital, 69077-070, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Caldas, Heron, E-mail: hcaldas@ufsj.edu.br [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João Del Rei, 36301-000, São João Del Rei, MG (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    The search for Majorana fermions has been concentrated in topological insulators or superconductors. In general, the existence of these modes requires the presence of spin–orbit interactions and of an external magnetic field. The former implies in having systems with broken inversion symmetry, while the latter breaks time reversal invariance. In a recent paper, we have shown that a two-band metal with an attractive inter-band interaction has non-trivial superconducting properties, if the k-dependent hybridization is anti-symmetric in the wave-vector. This is the case, if the crystalline potential mixes states with different parities as for orbitals with angular momentum l and l+1. In this paper we take into account the effect of an external magnetic field, not considered in the previous investigation, in a two-band metal and show how it modifies the topological properties of its superconducting state. We also discuss the conditions for the appearance of Majorana fermions in this system.

  16. Multi-Band Frequency Selective Surfaces: Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Atl information which is ctassifted according to Dutch regulations shalt be treated by the recipient in the same way as ctassified information of corr...esponding value in his own coutntry. No part of this information will be disclosed to any third party. tn case this report was drafted on...antennas using EBG substrates", Ph.D. dissertation, Departamento de Comunicaciones , Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia, Spain, 2006. [21

  17. Electro-Optic Laser Scanners for Space-Based Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this phase II SBIR is to design and build new non-mechanical, electro-optic (EO) laser scanners that will be suitable for space based laser ranging,...

  18. Microdischarge Array Flexible Light Source for High-Efficiency Irradiation of Spaced-Based Crops Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It is desirable to develop a high-efficiency lighting source for large-area irradiation of space-based crops. The key requirements for such a system include high...

  19. Orbit Selection and EKV Guidance for Space-Based ICBM Intercept

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aydin, Ahmet T

    2005-01-01

    .... This thesis investigates the requirements and limitations of the U.S. space-based ICBM defense against North Korea, Iran, and China by introducing an ICBM trajectory prediction, selecting an orbit for exo-atmospheric kill vehicles (EKV...

  20. Ultra-Low Noise Quad Photoreceiver for Space Based Laser Interferometric Gravity Wave Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravity wave detection using space-based long-baseline laser interferometric sensors imposes stringent noise requirements on the system components, including the...

  1. Compressed Sensing for Space-Based High-Definition Video Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space-based imaging sensors are important for NASA's mission in both performing scientific measurements and producing literature and documentary cinema. The recent...

  2. Autonomous Sub-Pixel Satellite Track Endpoint Determination for Space Based Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, L M

    2011-03-07

    An algorithm for determining satellite track endpoints with sub-pixel resolution in spaced-based images is presented. The algorithm allows for significant curvature in the imaged track due to rotation of the spacecraft capturing the image. The motivation behind the subpixel endpoint determination is first presented, followed by a description of the methodology used. Results from running the algorithm on real ground-based and simulated spaced-based images are shown to highlight its effectiveness.

  3. The Performance and Survivability of Dichromated Poly (Vinyl Alcohol) Holograms for Space Based Photonic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    ALCOHOL) HOLOGRAMS FOR SPACE BASED PHOTONIC APPLICATIONS Steven P. Hotaling, Rome Laboratory; Gurusamy Manivannan, Rupak Changkakoti, Roger A. Lessard...Hotaling, Rome Laboratory; Gurusamy lianivannan, WU - il Rupak Changkakoti, Roger A. Lessard, Quebec, Canada 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...alcohol) Holograms for Space Based Photonic Applications Steven P. HOTALING*, Gurusamy MANIVANNAN", Rupak CHANGKAKOTI*" and Roger A. LESSARD" * USAF

  4. A neuroanatomical model of space-based and object-centered processing in spatial neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzini, Elena; Schnider, Armin; Ptak, Radek

    2017-11-01

    Visual attention can be deployed in space-based or object-centered reference frames. Right-hemisphere damage may lead to distinct deficits of space- or object-based processing, and such dissociations are thought to underlie the heterogeneous nature of spatial neglect. Previous studies have suggested that object-centered processing deficits (such as in copying, reading or line bisection) result from damage to retro-rolandic regions while impaired spatial exploration reflects damage to more anterior regions. However, this evidence is based on small samples and heterogeneous tasks. Here, we tested a theoretical model of neglect that takes in account the space- and object-based processing and relates them to neuroanatomical predictors. One hundred and one right-hemisphere-damaged patients were examined with classic neuropsychological tests and structural brain imaging. Relations between neglect measures and damage to the temporal-parietal junction, intraparietal cortex, insula and middle frontal gyrus were examined with two structural equation models by assuming that object-centered processing (involved in line bisection and single-word reading) and space-based processing (involved in cancelation tasks) either represented a unique latent variable or two distinct variables. Of these two models the latter had better explanatory power. Damage to the intraparietal sulcus was a significant predictor of object-centered, but not space-based processing, while damage to the temporal-parietal junction predicted space-based, but not object-centered processing. Space-based processing and object-centered processing were strongly intercorrelated, indicating that they rely on similar, albeit partly dissociated processes. These findings indicate that object-centered and space-based deficits in neglect are partly independent and result from superior parietal and inferior parietal damage, respectively.

  5. An optimum organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary Space Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragusa, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify an optimum hypothetical organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary research and applications (R&A) Space Base manned by a mixed crew of technologists. Since such a facility does not presently exist, in situ empirical testing was not possible. Study activity was, therefore, concerned with the identification of a desired organizational structural model rather than the empirical testing of it. The essential finding of this research was that a four-level project type 'total matrix' model will optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of Space Base technologists.

  6. Nuclear reactor power as applied to a space-based radar mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Bloomfield, H.; Heller, J.

    1988-01-01

    A space-based radar mission and spacecraft are examined to determine system requirements for a 300 kWe space nuclear reactor power system. The spacecraft configuration and its orbit, launch vehicle, and propulsion are described. Mission profiles are addressed, and storage in assembly orbit is considered. Dynamics and attitude control and the problems of nuclear and thermal radiation are examined.

  7. Evaluating a Space-Based Indicator of Surface Ozone-NO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Xiaomeng; Fiore, Arlene M.; Murray, Lee T.; Valin, Lukas C.; Lamsal, Lok N.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Boersma, Folkert; Smedt, De Isabelle; Abad, Gonzalo Gonzalez; Chance, Kelly; Tonnesen, Gail S.

    2017-01-01

    Determining effective strategies for mitigating surface ozone (O3) pollution requires knowledge of the relative ambient concentrations of its precursors, NOx, and VOCs. The space-based tropospheric column ratio of formaldehyde to NO2 (FNR) has been used as an

  8. The RFI situation for a space-based low-frequency radio astronomy instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Boonstra, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Space based ultra-long wavelength radio astronomy has recently gained a lot of interest. Techniques to open the virtually unexplored frequency band below 30 MHz are becoming within reach at this moment. Due to the ionosphere and the radio interference (RFI) on Earth exploring this frequency band

  9. Space-based Ultra-long wavelength radio astronomy - an overview of today's initiatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Boonstra, Albert Jan; Baan, Willem

    2011-01-01

    Space based ultra-long wavelength radio astronomy has recently gained interest. The need for large effective apertures spread over long ranges implies that advanced technologies are required, which is in reach at this moment. This together with the unexplored frequency band below 30 MHz makes these

  10. A scale space based algorithm for automated segmentation of single shot tagged MRI of shearing deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprengers, Andre M. J.; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Moerman, Kevin M.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Lamerichs, Rolf M.; Stoker, Jaap

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a scale space based algorithm for automated segmentation of single-shot tagged images of modest SNR. Furthermore the algorithm was designed for analysis of discontinuous or shearing types of motion, i.e. segmentation of broken tag patterns. The proposed algorithm utilises

  11. Use case scenarios - space based receiver assessment : GPS Adjacent Band Compatibility Assessment Workshop VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-30

    This workshop presentation discusses space based receiver applications, NASA developed receivers, the TriG receiver, on-orbit assessment parameters, the TriG GNSS-RO antenna gain pattern, the GNSS-RO antenna beam Earth grazing coverage area, assessme...

  12. Space-based aperture array for ultra-long wavelength radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Raj Thilak; Boonstra, Albert-Jan; Bentum, Mark; Klein-Wolt, Marc; Belien, Frederik; Arts, Michel; Saks, Noah; van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    2016-02-01

    The past decade has seen the advent of various radio astronomy arrays, particularly for low-frequency observations below 100 MHz. These developments have been primarily driven by interesting and fundamental scientific questions, such as studying the dark ages and epoch of re-ionization, by detecting the highly red-shifted 21 cm line emission. However, Earth-based radio astronomy observations at frequencies below 30 MHz are severely restricted due to man-made interference, ionospheric distortion and almost complete non-transparency of the ionosphere below 10 MHz. Therefore, this narrow spectral band remains possibly the last unexplored frequency range in radio astronomy. A straightforward solution to study the universe at these frequencies is to deploy a space-based antenna array far away from Earths' ionosphere. In the past, such space-based radio astronomy studies were principally limited by technology and computing resources, however current processing and communication trends indicate otherwise. Furthermore, successful space-based missions which mapped the sky in this frequency regime, such as the lunar orbiter RAE-2, were restricted by very poor spatial resolution. Recently concluded studies, such as DARIS (Disturbuted Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy In Space) have shown the ready feasibility of a 9 satellite constellation using off the shelf components. The aim of this article is to discuss the current trends and technologies towards the feasibility of a space-based aperture array for astronomical observations in the Ultra-Long Wavelength (ULW) regime of greater than 10 m i.e., below 30 MHz. We briefly present the achievable science cases, and discuss the system design for selected scenarios such as extra-galactic surveys. An extensive discussion is presented on various sub-systems of the potential satellite array, such as radio astronomical antenna design, the on-board signal processing, communication architectures and joint space-time estimation of the

  13. State-space-based harmonic stability analysis for paralleled grid-connected inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yanbo; Wang, Xiongfei; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    model of paralleled grid-connected inverters is built. Finally, the state space-based stability analysis approach is developed to explain the harmonic resonance phenomenon. The eigenvalue traces associated with time delay and coupled grid impedance are obtained, which accounts for how the unstable...... inverter produces the harmonic resonance and leads to the instability of whole paralleled system. The proposed approach reveals the contributions of the grid impedance as well as the coupled effect on other grid-connected inverters under different grid conditions. Simulation and experimental results......This paper addresses a state-space-based harmonic stability analysis of paralleled grid-connected inverters system. A small signal model of individual inverter is developed, where LCL filter, the equivalent delay of control system, and current controller are modeled. Then, the overall small signal...

  14. The space exploration initiative. Operational efficiency panel space-basing technology requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Luis R.

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) space basing technology requirements sources; (2) orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) processing heritage; (3) ground processing progression to space processing; (4) technology requirements for space based OTV servicing and maintenance; (5) design and development schedule for OTV's and OTV accommodations/ support hardware; (6) cryogenic technology test program development; (7) cryogenic propellant transfer, storage, and reliquefaction management summary; (8) propellant transfer technology analysis and ground testing; (8) OTV propellant storage depot development critical scaling relationships; (9) flight experiment options; (10) OTV maintenance; (11) automated fault detection/ isolation and system checkout summary; (12) engine replacement; (13) alternative docking operation; (14) OTV/payload integration; and (15) technology criticality and capability assessment. This document is presented in viewgraph form.

  15. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jonathan R; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2013-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10-5 - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  16. Space-based laser active imaging simulation system based on HLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi; Sun, Huayan; Li, Yingchun

    2013-09-01

    This paper adopts the High Level Architecture to develop the space-based laser active imaging distribution simulation software system, and designs the system framework which contains three-step workflow including modeling, experimental and analysis. The paper puts forward the general needs of the simulation system first, then builds the simulation system architecture based on HLA and constructs 7 simulation federal members. The simulation system has the primary functions of space target scattering characteristic analysis, imaging simulation, image processing and target recognition, and system performance analysis and so on, and can support the whole simulation process. The results show that the distribution simulation system can meet the technical requirements of the space-based laser imaging simulation.

  17. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10^{-5} – 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  18. Flexible space-based robot modelling and real-time simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, J. J. M.; Dieleman, P.; Vanwoerkom, P. T. L. M.

    1989-11-01

    The Hermes Robot Arm (HERA) is a sophisticated space manipulator system which has to perform tasks ranging from berthing to tool operation in operational modes that range from fully automatic to purely manual. Development and qualification of such a space based manipulator must be supported by computer simulation facilities. A concise description of the HERA Simulation Facility Pilot (HSF-P) is given. It represents the first 'pilot' real-time simulation facility. Design concept, simulation models, and support tools are discussed.

  19. Path Planning for a Space-Based Manipulator System Based on Quantum Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengcang Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by considering a space-based, n-joint manipulator system as research object, a kinematic and a dynamic model are constructed and the system’s nonholonomic property is discussed. In light of the nonholonomic property unique to space-based systems, a path planning method is introduced to ensure that when an end-effector moves to the desired position, a floating base achieves the expected pose. The trajectories of the joints are first parameterized using sinusoidal polynomial functions, and cost functions are defined by the pose deviation of the base and the positional error of the end-effector. At this stage, the path planning problem is converted into a target optimization problem, where the target is a function of the joints. We then adopt a quantum genetic algorithm (QGA to solve this objective optimization problem to attain the optimized trajectories of the joints and then execute nonholonomic path planning. To test the proposed method, we carried out a simulation on a six-degree-of-freedom (DOF space-based manipulator system (SBMS. The results showed that, compared to traditional genetic optimization algorithms, the QGA converges more rapidly and has a more accurate output.

  20. Hyper-Spectral Communications, Networking and ATM as Foundation for Safe and Efficient Future Flight: Transcending Aviation Operational Limitations with Diverse and Secure Multi-Band, Multi-Mode, and mmWave Wireless Links: Project Overview, Aviation Communications and New Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matolak, David W.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) has recently solicited proposals and awarded funds for research and development to achieve and exceed the goals envisioned in the ARMD Strategic Implementation Plan (SIP). The Hyper-Spectral Communications and Networking for Air Traffic Management (ATM) (HSCNA) project is the only University Leadership Initiative (ULI) program to address communications and networking (and to a degree, navigation and surveillance). This paper will provide an overview of the HSCNA project, and specifically describe two of the project's technical challenges: comprehensive aviation communications and networking assessment, and proposed multi-band and multimode communications and networking. The primary goals will be described, as will be research and development aimed to achieve and exceed these goals. Some example initial results are also provided.

  1. OGLE-2016-BLG-0168 Binary Microlensing Event: Prediction and Confirmation of the Microlens Parallax Effect from Space-based Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, I.-G.; Yee, J. C.; Jung, Y. K. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Udalski, A.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Szymański, M. K.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4,00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Novati, S. Calchi [IPAC, Mail Code 100-22, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Han, C. [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of); Albrow, M. D. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020 (New Zealand); Gould, A. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Chung, S.-J.; Hwang, K.-H.; Ryu, Y.-H. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; KMTNet Group; Spitzer Team; and others

    2017-11-01

    The microlens parallax is a crucial observable for conclusively identifying the nature of lens systems in microlensing events containing or composed of faint (even dark) astronomical objects such as planets, neutron stars, brown dwarfs, and black holes. With the commencement of a new era of microlensing in collaboration with space-based observations, the microlens parallax can be routinely measured. In addition, space-based observations can provide opportunities to verify the microlens parallax measured from ground-only observations and to find a unique solution to the lensing light-curve analysis. Furthermore, since most space-based observations cannot cover the full light curves of lensing events, it is also necessary to verify the reliability of the information extracted from fragmentary space-based light curves. We conduct a test based on the microlensing event OGLE-2016-BLG-0168, created by a binary lens system consisting of almost equal mass M-dwarf stars, to demonstrate that it is possible to verify the microlens parallax and to resolve degeneracies using the space-based light curve even though the observations are fragmentary. Since space-based observatories will frequently produce fragmentary light curves due to their short observing windows, the methodology of this test will be useful for next-generation microlensing experiments that combine space-based and ground-based collaboration.

  2. Interdependent multi-layer networks: modeling and survivability analysis with applications to space-based networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castet, Jean-Francois; Saleh, Joseph H

    2013-01-01

    This article develops a novel approach and algorithmic tools for the modeling and survivability analysis of networks with heterogeneous nodes, and examines their application to space-based networks. Space-based networks (SBNs) allow the sharing of spacecraft on-orbit resources, such as data storage, processing, and downlink. Each spacecraft in the network can have different subsystem composition and functionality, thus resulting in node heterogeneity. Most traditional survivability analyses of networks assume node homogeneity and as a result, are not suited for the analysis of SBNs. This work proposes that heterogeneous networks can be modeled as interdependent multi-layer networks, which enables their survivability analysis. The multi-layer aspect captures the breakdown of the network according to common functionalities across the different nodes, and it allows the emergence of homogeneous sub-networks, while the interdependency aspect constrains the network to capture the physical characteristics of each node. Definitions of primitives of failure propagation are devised. Formal characterization of interdependent multi-layer networks, as well as algorithmic tools for the analysis of failure propagation across the network are developed and illustrated with space applications. The SBN applications considered consist of several networked spacecraft that can tap into each other's Command and Data Handling subsystem, in case of failure of its own, including the Telemetry, Tracking and Command, the Control Processor, and the Data Handling sub-subsystems. Various design insights are derived and discussed, and the capability to perform trade-space analysis with the proposed approach for various network characteristics is indicated. The select results here shown quantify the incremental survivability gains (with respect to a particular class of threats) of the SBN over the traditional monolith spacecraft. Failure of the connectivity between nodes is also examined, and the

  3. Interdependent multi-layer networks: modeling and survivability analysis with applications to space-based networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois Castet

    Full Text Available This article develops a novel approach and algorithmic tools for the modeling and survivability analysis of networks with heterogeneous nodes, and examines their application to space-based networks. Space-based networks (SBNs allow the sharing of spacecraft on-orbit resources, such as data storage, processing, and downlink. Each spacecraft in the network can have different subsystem composition and functionality, thus resulting in node heterogeneity. Most traditional survivability analyses of networks assume node homogeneity and as a result, are not suited for the analysis of SBNs. This work proposes that heterogeneous networks can be modeled as interdependent multi-layer networks, which enables their survivability analysis. The multi-layer aspect captures the breakdown of the network according to common functionalities across the different nodes, and it allows the emergence of homogeneous sub-networks, while the interdependency aspect constrains the network to capture the physical characteristics of each node. Definitions of primitives of failure propagation are devised. Formal characterization of interdependent multi-layer networks, as well as algorithmic tools for the analysis of failure propagation across the network are developed and illustrated with space applications. The SBN applications considered consist of several networked spacecraft that can tap into each other's Command and Data Handling subsystem, in case of failure of its own, including the Telemetry, Tracking and Command, the Control Processor, and the Data Handling sub-subsystems. Various design insights are derived and discussed, and the capability to perform trade-space analysis with the proposed approach for various network characteristics is indicated. The select results here shown quantify the incremental survivability gains (with respect to a particular class of threats of the SBN over the traditional monolith spacecraft. Failure of the connectivity between nodes is also

  4. Direct detection of hundreds of exoplanets with a space-based mid-infrared interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanz, S. P.; Kammerer, J.

    2017-09-01

    One of the long-term goals of exoplanet research is the (atmospheric) characterization of a sizeable sample of small, terrestrial planets in order to assess their potential habitability. In this context it is important to quantitatively assess the scientific return of various mission concepts in order to derive robust science requirements. While transit and secondary eclipse spectroscopy may provide data on a few systems, it seems questionable whether a larger planet sample can be investigated given that most planets do not transit in front of their host stars. Hence, direct detection methods may be required. Here we predict the exoplanet yield of a space-based mid-infrared nulling interferometer (akin to the Darwin mission concept) using a catalog of nearby stars and the planet occurrence rates found by NASA's Kepler mission. We find that a mission with the technical specifications of Darwin could detect >300 exoplanets (with radii between 0.5 and 6 Earth radii). Roughly 85 planets have radii between 0.5 and 1.75 Earth radii and equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 450 K and are prime targets for spectroscopic follow-up observations in the second phase of the mission investigating their potential habitability. Higher planet yields can be realized by further optimizing the observing strategy. We also compare the baseline planet yield of a space-based mid-infrared interferometer to that of a large space-based optical/IR telescope. We conclude that a Darwin-like mission concept should be put back on the long-term agenda of the exoplanet community and related space agencies.

  5. Testing Gravitational Physics with Space-based Gravitational-wave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave observations provide exceptional and unique opportunities for precision tests of gravitational physics, as predicted by general relativity (GR). Space-based gravitational wave measurements, with high signal-to-noise ratios and large numbers of observed events may provide the best-suited gravitational-wave observations for testing GR with unprecedented precision. These observations will be especially useful in testing the properties of gravitational waves and strong-field aspects of the theory which are less relevant in other observations. We review the proposed GR test based on observations of massive black hole mergers, extreme mass ratio inspirals, and galactic binary systems.

  6. Science with the space-based interferometer LISA. IV: Probing inflation with gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Nicola; Domcke, Valerie; Figueroa, Daniel G.; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Guzzetti, Maria Chiara; Liguori, Michele; Matarrese, Sabino; Peloso, Marco; Petiteau, Antoine; Ricciardone, Angelo; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the potential for the LISA space-based interferometer to detect the stochastic gravitational wave background produced from different mechanisms during inflation. Focusing on well-motivated scenarios, we study the resulting contributions from particle production during inflation, inflationary spectator fields with varying speed of sound, effective field theories of inflation with specific patterns of symmetry breaking and models leading to the formation of primordial black holes. The projected sensitivities of LISA are used in a model-independent way for various detector designs and configurations. We demonstrate that LISA is able to probe these well-motivated inflationary scenarios beyond the irreducible vacuum tensor modes expected from any inflationary background.

  7. Innovative Approaches to Space-Based Manufacturing and Rapid Prototyping of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to deploy large habitable structures, construct, and service exploration vehicles in low earth orbit will be an enabling capability for continued human exploration of the solar system. It is evident that advanced manufacturing methods to fabricate replacement parts and re-utilize launch vehicle structural mass by converting it to different uses will be necessary to minimize costs and allow flexibility to remote crews engaged in space travel. Recent conceptual developments and the combination of inter-related approaches to low-cost manufacturing of composite materials and structures are described in context leading to the possibility of on-orbit and space-based manufacturing.

  8. Progress and Prospects toward a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years there has been much activity in the effort to produce a space-based gravitational-wave observatory. These efforts have enriched the understanding of the scientific capabilities of such an observatory leading to broad recognition of its value as an astronomical instrument. At the same time, rapidly developing events in the US and Europe have lead to a more complicated outlook than the baseline Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) project plan of a few years ago. I will discuss recent progress and developments resulting from the European eLISA study and the SGO study in the US and prospects looking forward.

  9. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory (SGO) Mission Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey; McNamara, Paul; Jennrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The LISA Mission Concept has been under study for over two decades as a space-based gravitational-wave detector capable of observing astrophysical sources in the 0.0001 to 1 Hz band. The concept has consistently received strong recommendations from various review panels based on the expected science, most recently from the US Astr02010 Decadal Review. Budget constraints have led both the US and European Space agencies to search for lower cost options. We report results from the US effort to explore the tradeoffs between mission cost and science return.

  10. A scale space based algorithm for automated segmentation of single shot tagged MRI of shearing deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengers, Andre M J; Caan, Matthan W A; Moerman, Kevin M; Nederveen, Aart J; Lamerichs, Rolf M; Stoker, Jaap

    2013-04-01

    This study proposes a scale space based algorithm for automated segmentation of single-shot tagged images of modest SNR. Furthermore the algorithm was designed for analysis of discontinuous or shearing types of motion, i.e. segmentation of broken tag patterns. The proposed algorithm utilises non-linear scale space for automatic segmentation of single-shot tagged images. The algorithm's ability to automatically segment tagged shearing motion was evaluated in a numerical simulation and in vivo. A typical shearing deformation was simulated in a Shepp-Logan phantom allowing for quantitative evaluation of the algorithm's success rate as a function of both SNR and the amount of deformation. For a qualitative in vivo evaluation tagged images showing deformations in the calf muscles and eye movement in a healthy volunteer were acquired. Both the numerical simulation and the in vivo tagged data demonstrated the algorithm's ability for automated segmentation of single-shot tagged MR provided that SNR of the images is above 10 and the amount of deformation does not exceed the tag spacing. The latter constraint can be met by adjusting the tag delay or the tag spacing. The scale space based algorithm for automatic segmentation of single-shot tagged MR enables the application of tagged MR to complex (shearing) deformation and the processing of datasets with relatively low SNR.

  11. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J. T.; Bassan, M.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Carbone, L.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciani, G.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, A. M.; Danzmann, K.; de Deus Silva, M.; De Rosa, R.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Flatscher, R.; Freschi, M.; García Marín, A. F.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Guzmán, F.; Grado, A.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Grzymisch, J.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johann, U.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C. J.; Lobo, J. A.; Lloro, I.; Liu, L.; López-Zaragoza, J. P.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Polo, L.; Martino, J.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Madden, S.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Monsky, A.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Raïs, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Rozemeijer, H.; Rivas, F.; Russano, G.; Sanjuán, J.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Stanga, R.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J. I.; Trenkel, C.; Tröbs, M.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wand, V.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Warren, C.; Wass, P. J.; Wealthy, D.; Weber, W. J.; Wissel, L.; Wittchen, A.; Zambotti, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2 ±0.1 fm s-2/√{Hz } , or (0.54 ±0.01 ) ×10-15 g/√{Hz } , with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8 ±0.3 ) fm /√{Hz } , about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f ≤0.5 mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12 fm s-2/√{Hz } down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  12. CEOS Contributions to Informing Energy Management and Policy Decision Making Using Space-Based Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Earth observations are playing an increasingly significant role in informing decision making in the energy sector. In renewable energy applications, space-based observations now routinely augment sparse ground-based observations used as input for renewable energy resource assessment applications. As one of the nine Group on Earth Observations (GEO) societal benefit areas, the enhancement of management and policy decision making in the energy sector is receiving attention in activities conducted by the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). CEOS has become the "space arm" for the implementation of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) vision. It is directly supporting the space-based, near-term tasks articulated in the GEO three-year work plan. This paper describes a coordinated program of demonstration projects conducted by CEOS member agencies and partners to utilize Earth observations to enhance energy management end-user decision support systems. I discuss the importance of engagement with stakeholders and understanding their decision support needs in successfully increasing the uptake of Earth observation products for societal benefit. Several case studies are presented, demonstrating the importance of providing data sets in formats and units familiar and immediately usable by decision makers. These projects show the utility of Earth observations to enhance renewable energy resource assessment in the developing world, forecast space-weather impacts on the power grid, and improve energy efficiency in the built environment.

  13. Stellar activity and stellar pulsations in ground- and space-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunzen, E.; Bernhard, K.; Hümmerich, S.

    2018-01-01

    The research on variable stars has significantly benefited from the availability of long-term photometric time series data from ground- and space-based surveys. Precise and long-term stable data allow the investigation of variable stars with small amplitudes and long periods, and the research on multi-periodic objects has profited greatly from the availability of quasi-uninterrupted time series data from space-based mission. To illustrate this situation, we have chosen to present our efforts to investigate the photometric variability of magnetic chemically peculiar stars using data from six different survey sources (ASAS-3, CoRoT, KELT, Kepler, Kepler-K2 and SuperWASP). Due to their range of periods (0.5 days to several years) and photometric amplitudes (sub-mmag range to about 0.1 mag), these objects constitute a challenge to observers. Long-term instrumental stability and a sufficient phase coverage are needed to detect and investigate this kind of variability.

  14. Complexity-reduced implementations of complete and null-space-based linear discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gui-Fu; Zheng, Wenming

    2013-10-01

    Dimensionality reduction has become an important data preprocessing step in a lot of applications. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is one of the most well-known dimensionality reduction methods. However, the classical LDA cannot be used directly in the small sample size (SSS) problem where the within-class scatter matrix is singular. In the past, many generalized LDA methods has been reported to address the SSS problem. Among these methods, complete linear discriminant analysis (CLDA) and null-space-based LDA (NLDA) provide good performances. The existing implementations of CLDA are computationally expensive. In this paper, we propose a new and fast implementation of CLDA. Our proposed implementation of CLDA, which is the most efficient one, is equivalent to the existing implementations of CLDA in theory. Since CLDA is an extension of null-space-based LDA (NLDA), our implementation of CLDA also provides a fast implementation of NLDA. Experiments on some real-world data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed new CLDA and NLDA algorithms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Local, Regional, and Global Albedo Variations on Mars From Recent Space-Based Observations: Implications for Future Human Explorers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. F.; Wellington, D. F.

    2017-06-01

    We describe recent as well as historic albedo variations on Mars as observed by space-based telescopes, orbiters, and surface missions, and speculate that some regions might offer fewer dust-related problems for future human explorers than others.

  16. Irregular Polyomino-Shaped Subarrays for Space-Based Active Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Mailloux

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new results showing the application of polyomino-based subarrays to limited field of view and wideband, wide-angle scanning. This technology can reduce the number of phase controls in arrays used for limited sector coverage or the number of time delay devices for wideband radar or communications, and so can reduce the cost of space-based active arrays. We concentrate on the wideband application. Results are presented by comparing the gain and peak sidelobe results of irregular polyomino subarray-based arrays with those of rectangular subarrays. It is shown that using irregular polyomino subarrays can result in a major decrease in sidelobes while presenting, in most cases, only a few tenths of a dB gain reduction compared to rectangular subarrays.

  17. Space-based detection of space debris by photometric and polarimetric characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shuxia; Wang, Hu; Lu, Xiaoyun; Shen, Yang; Pan, Yue

    2017-10-01

    The number of space debris has been increasing dramatically in the last few years, and is expected to increase as much in the future. As the orbital debris population grows, the risk of collision between debris and other orbital objects also grows. Therefore, space debris detection is a particularly important task for space environment security, and then supports for space debris modeling, protection and mitigation. This paper aims to review space debris detection systematically and completely. Firstly, the research status of space debris detection at home and abroad is presented. Then, three kinds of optical observation methods of space debris are summarized. Finally, we propose a space-based detection scheme for space debris by photometric and polarimetric characteristics.

  18. Plans for a Next Generation Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Stebbins, Robin T.; Jennrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) is currently in the process of selecting a mission for the Cosmic Visions Program. A space-based gravitational wave observatory in the low-frequency band (0.0001 - 1 Hz) of the gravitational wave spectrum is one of the leading contenders. This low frequency band has a rich spectrum of astrophysical sources, and the LISA concept has been the key mission to cover this science for over twenty years. Tight budgets have recently forced ESA to consider a reformulation of the LISA mission concept that wi" allow the Cosmic Visions Program to proceed on schedule either with the US as a minority participant, or independently of the US altogether. We report on the status of these reformulation efforts.

  19. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  20. Space-based Networking Technology Developments in the Interplanetary Network Directorate Information Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Loren; Clement, B.; Gao, J.; Hutcherson, J.; Jennings, E.

    2006-01-01

    Described recent development of communications protocols, services, and associated tools targeted to reduce risk, reduce cost and increase efficiency of IND infrastructure and supported mission operations. Space-based networking technologies developed were: a) Provide differentiated quality of service (QoS) that will give precedence to traffic that users have selected as having the greatest importance and/or time-criticality; b) Improve the total value of information to users through the use of QoS prioritization techniques; c) Increase operational flexibility and improve command-response turnaround; d) Enable new class of networked and collaborative science missions; e) Simplify applications interfaces to communications services; and f) Reduce risk and cost from a common object model and automated scheduling and communications protocols. Technologies are described in three general areas: communications scheduling, middleware, and protocols. Additionally developed simulation environment, which provides comprehensive, quantitative understanding of the technologies performance within overall, evolving architecture, as well as ability to refine & optimize specific components.

  1. Development of the optical waveguide solar lighting system for space-based plant growing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T; Case, J A; Mankamyer, M

    1998-01-01

    This article summarizes the study on the Optical Waveguide (OW) Solar Lighting System for space-based plant growing. In the OW solar lighting system, solar radiation is collected by the concentrator, which transfers the concentrated solar radiation to the OW transmission line consisting of low-loss optical fibers. The OW line transmits the solar radiation to the plant growing units where the solar radiation from the optical fibers is defocused and directed to the plants for optimum intensity for plant growing. In this study, the laboratory OW solar lighting system was constructed and tested for plant growth. The OW system consists of: 1) tracking reflective concentrators; 2) the optical waveguide transmission line; and 3) the plant lighting device. Results of the performance tests and the plant growth tests of the OW solar lighting system showed that the OW system is a viable plant lighting system for growing plant in space.

  2. Large motion high cycle high speed optical fibers for space based applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stromberg, Peter G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tandon, Rajan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gibson, Cory S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reedlunn, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rasberry, Roger David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rohr, Garth David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Future remote sensing applications will require higher resolution and therefore higher data rates (up to perhaps 100 gigabits per second) while achieving lower mass and cost. A current limitation to the design space is high speed high bandwidth data does not cross movable gimbals because of cabling issues. This requires the detectors to be off gimbal. The ability to get data across the gimbal would open up efficiencies in designs where the detectors and the electronics can be placed anywhere on the system. Fiber optic cables provide light weight high speed high bandwidth connections. Current options are limited to 20,000 cycles as opposed to the 1,000,000 cycles needed for future space based applications. To extend this to the million+ regime, requires a thorough understanding of the failure mechanisms and the materials, proper selection of materials (e.g., glass and jacket material) allowable geometry changes to the cable, radiation hardness, etc.

  3. LISA Pathfinder: An important first step towards a space-based gravitational wave observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, James

    2017-08-01

    ESA's LISA Pathfinder mission was launched on Dec 3rd, 2015 and completed earlier this Summer. During this relatively short mission, Pathfinder at its two science payloads, Europe's LISA Technology Package and NASA's Disturbance Reduction System, demonstrated several techniques and technologies that enable development of a future space-based gravitational wave observatory. Most notably, Pathfinder demonstrated that the technique of drag-free flight could be utilized to place a test mass in near-perfect free-fall, with residual accelerations at the femto-g level in the milliHertz band. Additionally, technologies such as precision bonded optical structures for metrology, micropropulsion systems, and non-contact charge control, were successfully tested, retiring risk for LISA. In this talk, I will present an overview of Pathfinder's results to date and some perspective on how this success will be leveraged into realizing LISA.

  4. LISA Pathfinder and the road to space-based detection of gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, James

    2016-04-01

    The LISA Pathfinder spacecraft was launched on Dec 3rd, 2015 and began science operations in March 2016. Led by the European Space Agency with contributions from a number of European national agencies, universities, and NASA, LISA Pathfinder will demonstrate several key technologies and measurement technqiues for future space-based gravitational wave observatories. A successful LISA Pathfinder will retire much of the technical risk for such missions, which are the only proposed instruments capable of observing gravitational waves in the milliHertz band, a source-rich region expected to include singals from merging extragalactic massive black holes, capture of stellar-mass compact objects by massive black holes, and millions of individual close compact binaries in the Milky Way. I will present an overview of the LISA Pathfinder mission, it's current status, and the plans for operations and data analysis.

  5. Space-based Remote Sensing: A Tool for Studying Bird Migration Across Multiple Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The study of bird migration on a global scale is one of the compelling and challenging problems of modern biology with major implications for human health and conservation biology. Migration and conservation efforts cross national boundaries and are subject to numerous international agreements and treaties. Space based technology offers new opportunities to shed understanding on the distribution and migration of organisms on the planet and their sensitivity to human disturbances and environmental changes. Our working hypothesis is that individual organism biophysical models of energy and water balance, driven by satellite measurements of spatio-temporal gradients in climate and habitat, will help us to explain the variability in avian species richness and distribution. Further, these models provide an ecological forecasting tool for science and application users to visualize the possible consequences of loss of wetlands, flooding, or other natural disasters such as hurricanes on avian biodiversity and bird migration.

  6. Note: silicon carbide telescope dimensional stability for space-based gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán, J; Korytov, D; Mueller, G; Spannagel, R; Braxmaier, C; Preston, A; Livas, J

    2012-11-01

    Space-based gravitational wave detectors are conceived to detect gravitational waves in the low frequency range by measuring the distance between proof masses in spacecraft separated by millions of kilometers. One of the key elements is the telescope which has to have a dimensional stability better than 1 pm Hz(-1/2) at 3 mHz. In addition, the telescope structure must be light, strong, and stiff. For this reason a potential telescope structure consisting of a silicon carbide quadpod has been designed, constructed, and tested. We present dimensional stability results meeting the requirements at room temperature. Results at -60 °C are also shown although the requirements are not met due to temperature fluctuations in the setup.

  7. Optical In-Situ Monitor – A Step towards European Space-Based Debris Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzmann, J.; Ferreira, L.; Vives, G.; Métrailler, L.; Lièvre, N.; Flohrer, T.

    The aim of the ESA activity "Optical In-Situ Monitor“ is to design and test a breadboard of a space-based space debris camera and to develop and test its end-to-end processing chain. The corresponding future flight model shall be used for the detection of small-sized (down to 1 mm) space debris in LEO as well as larger objects in GEO. It is intended to be flown on a platform in sun-synchronous orbit near the terminator plane. The breadboard system will constitute a unique facility to perform realistic tests of the end-to-end chain for debris observations within a controlled environment. This E2E chain starts from signal generation via the scene generator, is followed by the acquisition of images via the breadboard instrument and finally performs the data processing until the astrometric and photometric reduction step. The paper provides details on requirements and design of the breadboard system.

  8. Architecture and System Engineering Development Study of Space-Based Satellite Networks for NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2003-01-01

    Traditional NASA missions, both near Earth and deep space, have been stovepipe in nature and point-to-point in architecture. Recently, NASA and others have conceptualized missions that required space-based networking. The notion of networks in space is a drastic shift in thinking and requires entirely new architectures, radio systems (antennas, modems, and media access), and possibly even new protocols. A full system engineering approach for some key mission architectures will occur that considers issues such as the science being performed, stationkeeping, antenna size, contact time, data rates, radio-link power requirements, media access techniques, and appropriate networking and transport protocols. This report highlights preliminary architecture concepts and key technologies that will be investigated.

  9. Advancement of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays For Space-based Laser Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, nathaniel R.; Baggott, Renee S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Space-based laser and lidar instruments play an important role in NASA s plans for meeting its objectives in both Earth Science and Space Exploration areas. Almost all the lidar instrument concepts being considered by NASA scientist utilize moderate to high power diode-pumped solid state lasers as their transmitter source. Perhaps the most critical component of any solid state laser system is its pump laser diode array which essentially dictates instrument efficiency, reliability and lifetime. For this reason, premature failures and rapid degradation of high power laser diode arrays that have been experienced by laser system designers are of major concern to NASA. This work addresses these reliability and lifetime issues by attempting to eliminate the causes of failures and developing methods for screening laser diode arrays and qualifying them for operation in space.

  10. Impact of space-based instruments on magnetic star research: past and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, WW.; Neiner, C.; Wade, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic stars are observed at a large variety of spectral ranges, frequently with photometric and spectroscopic techniques and on time scales ranging from a 'snap shot' to years, sometimes using data sets which are continuous over many months. The outcome of such observations has been discussed during this conference and many examples have been presented, demonstrating the high scientific significance and gains in our knowledge that result from these observations. A key question that should be addressed is, what are the advantages and requirements of space based research of magnetic stars, particularly in relation to ground based observations? And what are the drawbacks? What are the hopes for the future? In the following, we intend to present an overview that addresses these questions.

  11. The CEOS Atmospheric Composition Constellation: Enhancing the Value of Space-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Richard; Zehner, Claus; Al-Saadi, Jay

    2015-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) coordinates civil space-borne observations of the Earth. Participating agencies strive to enhance international coordination and data exchange and to optimize societal benefit. In recent years, CEOS has collaborated closely with the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) in implementing the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS) space-based objectives. The goal of the CEOS Atmospheric Composition Constellation (ACC) is to collect and deliver data to improve monitoring, assessment and predictive capabilities for changes in the ozone layer, air quality and climate forcing associated with changes in the environment through coordination of existing and future international space assets. A project to coordinate and enhance the science value of a future constellation of geostationary sensors measuring parameters relevant to air quality supports the forthcoming European Sentinel-4, Korean GEMS, and US TEMPO missions. Recommendations have been developed for harmonization to mutually improve data quality and facilitate widespread use of the data products.

  12. Experimental evaluation of battery cells for space-based radar application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskell, Craig A.; Metcalfe, John R.

    1994-02-01

    A test program was conducted to characterize five space-quality nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery cells. A subset of those tests was also done on five commercial nickel-cadmium (NiCd) cells, for correlation to the characteristics of an Energy Storage Unit Simulator. The test program implemented the recommendations of a 1991 study, as reported to IECEC-92. The findings of the tests are summarized, and expected impacts on the performance of the electrical power system (EPS) of a large space-based radar (SBR) surveillance satellite are derived. The main characteristics examined and compared were terminal voltage (average and transient) and capacity through discharge, equivalent series resistance, derived inductance and capacitance, charge return efficiency, and inter-pulse charge effectiveness.

  13. Note: Silicon Carbide Telescope Dimensional Stability for Space-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuah, J.; Korytov, D.; Mueller, G.; Spannagel, R.; Braxmaier, C.; Preston, A.; Livas, J.

    2012-01-01

    Space-based gravitational wave detectors are conceived to detect gravitational waves in the low frequency range by measuring the distance between proof masses in spacecraft separated by millions of kilometers. One of the key elements is the telescope which has to have a dimensional stability better than 1 pm Hz(exp -1/2) at 3 mHz. In addition, the telescope structure must be light, strong, and stiff. For this reason a potential telescope structure consisting of a silicon carbide quadpod has been designed, constructed, and tested. We present dimensional stability results meeting the requirements at room temperature. Results at -60 C are also shown although the requirements are not met due to temperature fluctuations in the setup.

  14. Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Technology for Space Based Wind Measurements Including SPARCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    1999-01-01

    It has been over 30 years since coherent lidar systems first measured wind velocity, and over 20 years since the "ultimate application" of measuring Earth's winds from space was conceived. Coherent or heterodyne optical detection involves the combination (or mixing) of the returned optical field with a local oscillator (LO) laser's optical field on the optical detector. This detection technique yields the benefits of dramatically improved signal-to-noise ratios; insensitivity to detector noise, background light and multiply scattered light; reduction of the returned signal's dynamic range; and preservation of the optical signal spectrum for electronic and computer processing. (Note that lidar systems are also referred to as optical radar, laser radar, and LADAR systems.) Many individuals, agencies, and countries have pursued the goal of space-based wind measurements through technology development, experiments, field campaigns and studies.

  15. Final report on LDRD project 52722 : radiation hardened optoelectronic components for space-based applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargett, Terry W. (L& M Technologies, Inc.); Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Wrobel, Theodore Frank; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Karpen, Gary D.; Montano, Victoria A. (L& M Technologies, Inc.)

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project 'Radiation Hardened Optoelectronic Components for Space-Based Applications.' The aim of this LDRD has been to investigate the radiation hardness of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photodiodes by looking at both the effects of total dose and of single-event upsets on the electrical and optical characteristics of VCSELs and photodiodes. These investigations were intended to provide guidance for the eventual integration of radiation hardened VCSELs and photodiodes with rad-hard driver and receiver electronics from an external vendor for space applications. During this one-year project, we have fabricated GaAs-based VCSELs and photodiodes, investigated ionization-induced transient effects due to high-energy protons, and measured the degradation of performance from both high-energy protons and neutrons.

  16. Generation of a novel phase-space-based cylindrical dose kernel for IMRT optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J

    2012-05-01

    Improving dose calculation accuracy is crucial in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We have developed a method for generating a phase-space-based dose kernel for IMRT planning of lung cancer patients. Particle transport in the linear accelerator treatment head of a 21EX, 6 MV photon beam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was simulated using the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc code system. The phase space information was recorded under the secondary jaws. Each particle in the phase space file was associated with a beamlet whose index was calculated and saved in the particle's LATCH variable. The DOSXYZnrc code was modified to accumulate the energy deposited by each particle based on its beamlet index. Furthermore, the central axis of each beamlet was calculated from the orientation of all the particles in this beamlet. A cylinder was then defined around the central axis so that only the energy deposited within the cylinder was counted. A look-up table was established for each cylinder during the tallying process. The efficiency and accuracy of the cylindrical beamlet energy deposition approach was evaluated using a treatment plan developed on a simulated lung phantom. Profile and percentage depth doses computed in a water phantom for an open, square field size were within 1.5% of measurements. Dose optimized with the cylindrical dose kernel was found to be within 0.6% of that computed with the nontruncated 3D kernel. The cylindrical truncation reduced optimization time by approximately 80%. A method for generating a phase-space-based dose kernel, using a truncated cylinder for scoring dose, in beamlet-based optimization of lung treatment planning was developed and found to be in good agreement with the standard, nontruncated scoring approach. Compared to previous techniques, our method significantly reduces computational time and memory requirements, which may be useful for Monte-Carlo-based 4D IMRT or IMAT treatment planning.

  17. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M; Audley, H; Auger, G; Baird, J T; Bassan, M; Binetruy, P; Born, M; Bortoluzzi, D; Brandt, N; Caleno, M; Carbone, L; Cavalleri, A; Cesarini, A; Ciani, G; Congedo, G; Cruise, A M; Danzmann, K; de Deus Silva, M; De Rosa, R; Diaz-Aguiló, M; Di Fiore, L; Diepholz, I; Dixon, G; Dolesi, R; Dunbar, N; Ferraioli, L; Ferroni, V; Fichter, W; Fitzsimons, E D; Flatscher, R; Freschi, M; García Marín, A F; García Marirrodriga, C; Gerndt, R; Gesa, L; Gibert, F; Giardini, D; Giusteri, R; Guzmán, F; Grado, A; Grimani, C; Grynagier, A; Grzymisch, J; Harrison, I; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hollington, D; Hoyland, D; Hueller, M; Inchauspé, H; Jennrich, O; Jetzer, P; Johann, U; Johlander, B; Karnesis, N; Kaune, B; Korsakova, N; Killow, C J; Lobo, J A; Lloro, I; Liu, L; López-Zaragoza, J P; Maarschalkerweerd, R; Mance, D; Martín, V; Martin-Polo, L; Martino, J; Martin-Porqueras, F; Madden, S; Mateos, I; McNamara, P W; Mendes, J; Mendes, L; Monsky, A; Nicolodi, D; Nofrarias, M; Paczkowski, S; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Petiteau, A; Pivato, P; Plagnol, E; Prat, P; Ragnit, U; Raïs, B; Ramos-Castro, J; Reiche, J; Robertson, D I; Rozemeijer, H; Rivas, F; Russano, G; Sanjuán, J; Sarra, P; Schleicher, A; Shaul, D; Slutsky, J; Sopuerta, C F; Stanga, R; Steier, F; Sumner, T; Texier, D; Thorpe, J I; Trenkel, C; Tröbs, M; Tu, H B; Vetrugno, D; Vitale, S; Wand, V; Wanner, G; Ward, H; Warren, C; Wass, P J; Wealthy, D; Weber, W J; Wissel, L; Wittchen, A; Zambotti, A; Zanoni, C; Ziegler, T; Zweifel, P

    2016-06-10

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2±0.1  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz], or (0.54±0.01)×10^{-15}  g/sqrt[Hz], with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8±0.3)  fm/sqrt[Hz], about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f≤0.5  mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz] down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  18. Vulnerability assessment of a space based weapon platform electronics system exposed to a thermonuclear weapon detonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.L. [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Johnson, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The utilization of reconnaissance/surveillance satellite and weapon platform assets in space will subject the sensitive electronic equipment to a variety of natural and man-made radiation environments. These include Van Allen Belt protons and electrons; galactic and solar flare protons; neutrons, gamma rays, and X-rays from fission and fusion weapons; and directed neutral particle beams and lasers. Electronic equipment, including modem integrated circuits, may undergo permanent or transient changes of the electrical properties of the active components when exposed to these sources of radiation. This report summarizes the results of the Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding code system -- MASH v1.0 calculations designed to estimate the dose to the critical electronics components of an idealized spaced based weapon platform from neutron and gamma-ray radiation emanating from a thermonuclear weapon detonation. The MASH calculations modeled several source/platform geometry configurations, obtaining results for multiple distances and weapon detonation positions relative to the platform. For certain source/platform orientations, the results indicate vulnerabilities to the C{sup 3} bay critical components box to radiation damage from a nuclear weapon detonation. Neutron protection factors ranged from 0.7 to 3.4 for the three platform configurations analyzed, and gamma-ray protection factors ranged from approximately 1.5 to 9.8. The results further indicate the source has a direct line-of-sight to the critical components box for certain source/platform orientations, regardless of the number of interceptors present. The merits of utilizing the MASH code system for estimating dose and shielding factors for spaced based assets has been demonstrated. The geometry configuration studied here is greatly simplified compared to those that will be encountered in an actual design.

  19. The Potential of Spaced-based High-Energy Neutrino Measurements via the Airshower Cherenkov Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizmanic, John F.; Mitchell, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Future space-based experiments, such as (Orbiting Wide-angle Light Collectors (OWL) and JEM-EUSO, view large atmospheric and terrestrial neutrino targets. With energy thresholds slightly above 10(exp 19) eV for observing airshowers via air fluorescence, the potential for observing the cosmogenic neutrino flux associated with the GZK effect is limited. However, the forward Cherenkov signal associated with the airshower can be observed at much lower energies. A simulation was developed to determine the Cherenkov signal strength and spatial extent at low-Earth orbit for upward-moving airshowers. A model of tau neutrino interactions in the Earth was employed to determine the event rate of interactions that yielded a tau lepton which would induce an upward-moving airshower observable by a space-based instrument. The effect of neutrino attenuation by the Earth forces the viewing of the Earth's limb to observe the vT-induced Cherenkov airshower signal at above the OWL Cherenkov energy threshold of approximately 10(exp 16.5) eV for limb-viewed events. Furthermore, the neutrino attenuation limits the effective terrestrial neutrino target area to approximately 3 x 10(exp 5) square km at 10(exp 17) eV, for an orbit of 1000 km and an instrumental full Field-of-View of 45 deg. This translates into an observable cosmogenic neutrino event rate of approx. l/year based upon two different models of the cosmogenic neutrino flux, assuming neutrino oscillations and a 10% duty cycle for observation.

  20. Feasibility Study of Space Based Solar Power to Tethered Aerostat Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Stephen J.; Leete, Stephen J.; Jaffe, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of two-stage Space-Based Solar Power to Tethered Aerostat to Earth (SSP-TA) system architectures that offer significant advantages over conventional single stage space-to-earth architectures is being studied. There have been many proposals for the transmission of solar power collected in space to the surface of the earth so that solar energy could provide a major part of the electric power requirements on earth. There are, however, serious difficulties in implementing the single stage space-based solar power systems that have been previously studied. These difficulties arise due to: i) the cost of transporting the components needed for the extremely large microwave transmit beaming aperture into space orbit, ii) the even larger collection apertures required on earth, iii) the potential radiation hazard to personnel and equipment on earth, and iv) a lack of flexibility in location of the collection station on the earth. Two candidate system architectures are described here to overcome these difficulties. In both cases a two-stage space to tethered aerostat to earth transmission system (SSP-TA) is proposed. The use of high altitude tethered aerostats (or powered airships) avoids the effects of attenuation of EM energy propagating through the earth s lower atmosphere. This allows the use of beaming frequencies to be chosen from the range of high millimeter (THz) to near-infra-red (NIR) to the visible. This has the potential for: i) greatly reduced transportation costs to space, ii) much smaller receiver collection apertures and ground stations, iii) elimination of the potential radiation hazard to personnel and equipment on earth, and iv) ease in transportation and flexibility in location of the collection station on the earth. A preliminary comparison of system performance and efficiencies is presented.

  1. Space-based Observation System Simulation Experiments for the Global Water Cycle: Information Tradeoffs, Model Diagnostics, and Exascale Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    Global scale issues such as population growth, changing land-use, and climate change place our natural resources at the center of focus for a broad range of interdependent science, engineering, and policy problems. Our ability to mitigate and adapt to the accelerating rate of environmental change is critically dependent on our ability to observe and predict the natural, built, and social systems that define sustainability at the global scale. Despite the risks and challenges posed by global change, we are faced with critical risks to our ability to maintain and improve long term space-based observations of these changes. Despite consensus agreement on the critical importance of space-based Earth science, the fundamental challenge remains: How should we manage the severe tradeoffs and design challenges posed by maximizing the value of existing and proposed spaced-based Earth observation systems? Addressing this question requires transformative innovations in the design and management of spaced-based Earth observation systems that effectively take advantage of massively parallel computing architectures to enable the discovery and exploitation of critical mission tradeoffs using high-resolution space-based observation system simulation events (OSSEs) that simulate the global water cycle data that would result from sensing innovations and evaluates their merit with carefully constructed prediction and management benchmarks.

  2. Coupling between tsunamis and ionosphere: ground-based and space-based observation opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coisson, Pierdavide; Makela, Jonathan J.; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Astafyeva, Elvira; alam Kherani, Esfhan; Lognonne, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Large scale phenomena as tsunamis propagating through the ocean excite gravity waves that can reach ionospheric heights. The coupling between the ground/ocean and the atmosphere up to the ionosphere opens the possibility to observe in the upper atmosphere the effects of the propagation of tsunamis. During all recent major tsunami events ionospheric waves have been observed by ground GPS networks, satellite altimeters and, recently, also by an airglow imager. During the tsunami event of 11 March 2011 an all-sky camera in Hawaii observes the Internal Gravity Waves (IGW) during about one-and-a-half hours before the arrival of the, while it was crossing the Pacific Ocean in that region. Collocated ionospheric measurements were also done with GNSS sounding and Jason satellite. We present results of assessment studies of ground-based and space-based ionospheric remote sensing for tsunami propagation monitoring. We analyze the cases of airglow imager, Over-The-Horizon (OTH) radar, GPS, radio occultation and GNSS reflectometry. We describe modeling results of IGW excited by a realistic tsunami propagation model through the ocean near Hawaii. The model includes the propagation of the gravity wave in the atmosphere, the coupling between neutral and charged particles in the ionosphere and the production of the airglow emission at 630.0 nm. Synthetic all-sky images are calculated by integration of the emission along rays from the camera location to though the airglow layer. Additional ground-based observations could be provided by (OTH) radars, which operate in High Frequency (HF) band and can be used to monitor the bottomside ionosphere. Synthetic radar measurements computed using HF numerical ray-tracing confirm the possibility to detect IGW excited by tsunamis. The large coverage of OTH radar and its sensitivity to low-altitude plasma anomalies provides a wide range of observation. Additionally, we analyze the capabilities of space-based radio occultation and GNSS

  3. Coordinated Ground- and Space-based Multispectral Campaign to Study Equatorial Spread-F Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S. C.; Geddes, G.; Aryal, S.; Stephan, A. W.; Budzien, S. A.; Duggirala, P. R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Valladares, C.

    2016-12-01

    We present a concept for a multispectral campaign using coordinated data from state-of-the-art instruments aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and multiple ground-based spectrometers and digisondes deployed at low-latitudes to study the formation and development of Equatorial Spread-F (ESF). This extended observational campaign utilizes ultraviolet, visible, and radio measurements to develop a predictive capability for ESF and to study the coupling of the ionosphere-thermosphere (I-T) system during geomagnetically quiet and disturbed times. The ground-based instruments will be deployed in carefully chosen locations in the American and Indian sectors while the space-based data will provide global coverage spanning all local times and longitudes within ±51° geographic latitudes. The campaign, over an extended period covering a range of geophysical conditions, will provide the extensive data base necessary to address the important science questions. The space-based instrument suite consists of the Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) and the GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometry-Colocated (GROUP-C) instruments, scheduled to launch to the ISS in November 2016. LITES is a compact imaging spectrograph for remote sensing of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere from 60 to 140nm and GROUP-C has a nadir-viewing FUV photometer. The ground-based instruments to be deployed for this campaign are three high-resolution imaging spectrographs capable of continuous round-the-clock airglow observations: Multiwavelength Imaging Spectrograph using Echelle grating (MISE) in India and two High Throughput and Multi-slit Imaging Spectrographs (HiT&MIS) to be deployed in Colombia and Argentina, the Low-Latitude Ionosphere Sensor Network (LISN), and the Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory (GIRO) digisondes network. We present data from the ground-based instruments, initial results from the LITES and GROUP-C instruments on

  4. Security Analysis of DTN Architecture and Bundle Protocol Specification for Space-Based Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2009-01-01

    A Delay-Tolerant Network (DTN) Architecture (Request for Comment, RFC-4838) and Bundle Protocol Specification, RFC-5050, have been proposed for space and terrestrial networks. Additional security specifications have been provided via the Bundle Security Specification (currently a work in progress as an Internet Research Task Force internet-draft) and, for link-layer protocols applicable to Space networks, the Licklider Transport Protocol Security Extensions. This document provides a security analysis of the current DTN RFCs and proposed security related internet drafts with a focus on space-based communication networks, which is a rather restricted subset of DTN networks. Note, the original focus and motivation of DTN work was for the Interplanetary Internet . This document does not address general store-and-forward network overlays, just the current work being done by the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) and the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Space Internetworking Services Area (SIS) - DTN working group under the DTN and Bundle umbrellas. However, much of the analysis is relevant to general store-and-forward overlays.

  5. A situated reasoning architecture for space-based repair and replace tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Ben; Mcgrath, Debra; Sanborn, Jim

    1989-01-01

    Space-based robots need low level control for collision detection and avoidance, short-term load management, fine-grained motion, and other physical tasks. In addition, higher level control is required to focus strategic decision making as missions are assigned and carried out. Reasoning and control must be responsive to ongoing changes in the environment. Research aimed at bridging the gap between high level artificial intelligence (AI) planning techniques and task-level robot programming for telerobotic systems is described. Situated reasoning is incorporated into AI and Robotics systems in order to coordinate a robot's activity within its environment. An integrated system under development in a component maintenance domain is described. It is geared towards replacing worn and/or failed Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs) designed for use aboard NASA's Space Station Freedom based on the collection of components available at a given time. High level control reasons in component space in order to maximize the number operational component-cells over time, while the task-level controls sensors and effectors, detects collisions, and carries out pick and place tasks in physical space. Situated reasoning is used throughout the system to cope with component failures, imperfect information, and unexpected events.

  6. Space-Based Ornithology - Studying Bird Migration and Environmental Change in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.; Deppe, Jill L.

    2008-01-01

    Natural fluctuations in the availability of critical stopover sites coupled with anthropogenic destruction of wetlands, land-use change, and anticipated losses due to climate change present migratory birds with a formidable challenge. Space based technology in concert with bird migration modeling and geographical information analysis yields new opportunities to shed light on the distribution and movement of organisms on the planet and their sensitivity to human disturbances and environmental changes. At the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, we are creating ecological forecasting tools for science and application users to address the consequences of loss of wetlands, flooding, drought or other natural disasters such as hurricanes on avian biodiversity and bird migration. We use an individual-based bird biophysical migration model, driven by remotely sensed land surface data, climate and hydrologic data, and biological field observations to study migratory bird responses to environmental change in North America. Simulation allows us to study bird migration across multiple scales and can be linked to mechanistic processes describing the time and energy budget states of migrating birds. We illustrate our approach by simulating the spring migration of pectoral sandpipers from the Gulf of Mexico to Alaska. Mean stopover length and trajectory patterns are consistent with field observations.

  7. Nuclear reactor power for a space-based radar. SP-100 project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Harvey; Heller, Jack; Jaffe, Leonard; Beatty, Richard; Bhandari, Pradeep; Chow, Edwin; Deininger, William; Ewell, Richard; Fujita, Toshio; Grossman, Merlin

    1986-08-01

    A space-based radar mission and spacecraft, using a 300 kWe nuclear reactor power system, has been examined, with emphasis on aspects affecting the power system. The radar antenna is a horizontal planar array, 32 X 64 m. The orbit is at 61 deg, 1088 km. The mass of the antenna with support structure is 42,000 kg; of the nuclear reactor power system, 8,300 kg; of the whole spacecraft about 51,000 kg, necessitating multiple launches and orbital assembly. The assembly orbit is at 57 deg, 400 km, high enough to provide the orbital lifetime needed for orbital assembly. The selected scenario uses six Shuttle launches to bring the spacecraft and a Centaur G upper-stage vehicle to assembly orbit. After assembly, the Centaur places the spacecraft in operational orbit, where it is deployed on radio command, the power system started, and the spacecraft becomes operational. Electric propulsion is an alternative and allows deployment in assembly orbit, but introduces a question of nuclear safety.

  8. Nuclear reactor power for a space-based radar. SP-100 project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Harvey; Heller, Jack; Jaffe, Leonard; Beatty, Richard; Bhandari, Pradeep; Chow, Edwin; Deininger, William; Ewell, Richard; Fujita, Toshio; Grossman, Merlin

    1986-01-01

    A space-based radar mission and spacecraft, using a 300 kWe nuclear reactor power system, has been examined, with emphasis on aspects affecting the power system. The radar antenna is a horizontal planar array, 32 X 64 m. The orbit is at 61 deg, 1088 km. The mass of the antenna with support structure is 42,000 kg; of the nuclear reactor power system, 8,300 kg; of the whole spacecraft about 51,000 kg, necessitating multiple launches and orbital assembly. The assembly orbit is at 57 deg, 400 km, high enough to provide the orbital lifetime needed for orbital assembly. The selected scenario uses six Shuttle launches to bring the spacecraft and a Centaur G upper-stage vehicle to assembly orbit. After assembly, the Centaur places the spacecraft in operational orbit, where it is deployed on radio command, the power system started, and the spacecraft becomes operational. Electric propulsion is an alternative and allows deployment in assembly orbit, but introduces a question of nuclear safety.

  9. Modelling space-based integral-field spectrographs and their application to Type Ia supernova cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Hemant; Bonissent, Alain

    2017-04-01

    We present the parameterized simulation of an integral-field unit (IFU) slicer spectrograph and its applications in spectroscopic studies, namely, for probing dark energy with type Ia supernovae. The simulation suite is called the fast-slicer IFU simulator (FISim). The data flow of FISim realistically models the optics of the IFU along with the propagation effects, including cosmological, zodiacal, instrumentation and detector effects. FISim simulates the spectrum extraction by computing the error matrix on the extracted spectrum. The applications for Type Ia supernova spectroscopy are used to establish the efficacy of the simulator in exploring the wider parametric space, in order to optimize the science and mission requirements. The input spectral models utilize the observables such as the optical depth and velocity of the Si II absorption feature in the supernova spectrum as the measured parameters for various studies. Using FISim, we introduce a mechanism for preserving the complete state of a system, called the partial p/partial f matrix, which allows for compression, reconstruction and spectrum extraction, we introduce a novel and efficient method for spectrum extraction, called super-optimal spectrum extraction, and we conduct various studies such as the optimal point spread function, optimal resolution, parameter estimation, etc. We demonstrate that for space-based telescopes, the optimal resolution lies in the region near R ˜ 117 for read noise of 1 e- and 7 e- using a 400 km s-1 error threshold on the Si II velocity.

  10. Model-Driven Methodology for Rapid Deployment of Smart Spaces Based on Resource-Oriented Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredor, Iván; Bernardos, Ana M.; Iglesias, Josué; Casar, José R.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in electronics nowadays facilitate the design of smart spaces based on physical mash-ups of sensor and actuator devices. At the same time, software paradigms such as Internet of Things (IoT) and Web of Things (WoT) are motivating the creation of technology to support the development and deployment of web-enabled embedded sensor and actuator devices with two major objectives: (i) to integrate sensing and actuating functionalities into everyday objects, and (ii) to easily allow a diversity of devices to plug into the Internet. Currently, developers who are applying this Internet-oriented approach need to have solid understanding about specific platforms and web technologies. In order to alleviate this development process, this research proposes a Resource-Oriented and Ontology-Driven Development (ROOD) methodology based on the Model Driven Architecture (MDA). This methodology aims at enabling the development of smart spaces through a set of modeling tools and semantic technologies that support the definition of the smart space and the automatic generation of code at hardware level. ROOD feasibility is demonstrated by building an adaptive health monitoring service for a Smart Gym. PMID:23012544

  11. Color-Space-Based Visual-MIMO for V2X Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jai-Eun; Kim, Ji-Won; Park, Youngil; Kim, Ki-Doo

    2016-04-23

    In this paper, we analyze the applicability of color-space-based, color-independent visual-MIMO for V2X. We aim to achieve a visual-MIMO scheme that can maintain the original color and brightness while performing seamless communication. We consider two scenarios of GCM based visual-MIMO for V2X. One is a multipath transmission using visual-MIMO networking and the other is multi-node V2X communication. In the scenario of multipath transmission, we analyze the channel capacity numerically and we illustrate the significance of networking information such as distance, reference color (symbol), and multiplexing-diversity mode transitions. In addition, in the V2X scenario of multiple access, we may achieve the simultaneous multiple access communication without node interferences by dividing the communication area using image processing. Finally, through numerical simulation, we show the superior SER performance of the visual-MIMO scheme compared with LED-PD communication and show the numerical result of the GCM based visual-MIMO channel capacity versus distance.

  12. Design of a stabilized, compact gimbal for space-based free space optical communications (FSOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, A.; Shubert, P.; McNally, J.; Jacka, N.; Pierson, R.

    2017-02-01

    Data transmits via optical communications through fibers at 10's of Terabits per second. Given the recent rapid explosion for bandwidth and competing demand for radio frequency (RF) spectrum allocations among differing interests, the need for space-based free space optical communications (FSOC) systems is ever increasing. FSOC systems offer advantages of higher data rates, smaller size and weight, narrower beam divergence, and lower power than RF systems. Lightweight, small form factor, and high performance two-axis gimbals are of strong interest for satellite FSOC applications. Small gimbal and optical terminal designs are important for widespread implementation of optical communications systems; in particular, for satellite-to-satellite crosslinks where the advantages of more secure communications links (Lower Probability of Intercept (LPI)/Lower Probability of Detect (LPD)) are very important. We developed design concepts for a small gimbal focusing on the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) subsystems to establish their feasible implementation against the pointing stabilization, size, weight and power (SWaP), and performance challenges. The design drivers for the gimbal were weight, the elevation and azimuth field of regards, the form factor envelope (1U CubeSats), 100 μrad pointing accuracy, and 10 degrees per second slew capability. Innovations required in this development included a continuous fiber passed through an Azimuth Fiber Wrap and Elevation Fiber Wrap, overcoming typical mechanical and stress related limitations encountered with fiber optic cable wraps. In this presentation, we describe the configuration trades and design of such a gimbal.

  13. Combining Regional Monitoring Stations with Space-based Data to Determine the MEO Satellite Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Le

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The ground monitoring stations of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS are regional distribution and the number of these stations is small. The more global ground stations cannot be built in the short term. The ground regional monitoring stations are difficult to observe the global Medium Earth Orbit Satellite (MEO continuously, which leads to low precision of orbits in BDS real-time broadcast ephemeris. Based on the above problems, in view of real time satellite GNSS data of low earth orbit satellite can effectively make up the lack of regional monitoring stations in space overlay, a method is proposed that the GNSS receivers of LEO satellites used as high dynamic space-based monitoring stations combining with the data of the ground monitoring stations to calculate and forecast the MEO satellite orbits. The numeral results show that, using the data of seven regional monitoring stations add 1 to 3 LEO satellites, the precision of the MEO orbit determination can be increased by about 21%, 34% and 55% respectively. It also shows that, the ground regional monitoring stations combined with the data of LEO satellites can effectively improve the orbit precision of MEO satellite. It is suggested that using the data combined with ground stations and LEO satellites to improve the precision of broadcast ephemeris of MEO in BDS.

  14. Projected constraints on the dispersion of gravitational waves using advanced ground- and space-based interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samajdar, Anuradha; Arun, K. G.

    2017-11-01

    Certain alternative theories of gravity predict that gravitational waves will disperse as they travel from the source to the observer. The recent binary black hole observations by Advanced-LIGO have set limits on a modified dispersion relation from the constraints on their effects on gravitational-wave propagation. Using an identical modified dispersion, of the form E2=p2c2+A pαcα , where A denotes the magnitude of dispersion and E and p are the energy and momentum of the gravitational wave, we estimate the projected constraints on the modified dispersion from observations of compact binary mergers by third-generation ground-based detectors such as the Einstein Telescope and Cosmic Explorer as well as the space-based detector Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. We find that third-generation detectors would bound dispersion of gravitational waves much better than their second-generation counterparts. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, with its extremely good low-frequency sensitivity, would place stronger constraints than the ground-based detectors for α ≤1 , whereas for α >1 , the bounds are weaker. We also study the effect of the spins of the compact binary constituents on the bounds.

  15. Comparing laser interferometry and atom interferometry approaches to space-based gravitational-wave measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ira Thorpe, James; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul; Baker, John G.

    2012-07-01

    The science enabled by a space-based low-frequency gravitational-wave instrument is a high-priority objective of the international astronomy community. Mission concepts based on laser interferometry, such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), have been thoroughly studied and determined to be capable of delivering significant science returns. Ongoing developments in laboratory atom interferometry techniques have inspired new gravitational-wave mission concepts. We present a comparative analysis of LISA-like light interferometer systems and atom interferometer systems for gravitational-wave detection. Specific attention is paid to the sources of instrumental noise that are most important for light interferometer systems. We find that the response to laser frequency noise is identical in light interferometer and atom interferometer systems and that similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple-arm interferometers) must be employed to reach interesting gravitational wave sensitivities. Response to acceleration of the optical platforms is slightly different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but the acceleration noise requirements are similar. Based on this analysis, we find no clear advantage of the atom interferometry approach over traditional laser interferometry.

  16. NOTE: A technique for generating phase-space-based Monte Carlo beamlets in radiotherapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, K.; Popescu, I. A.; Zavgorodni, S.

    2008-09-01

    As radiotherapy treatment planning moves toward Monte Carlo (MC) based dose calculation methods, the MC beamlet is becoming an increasingly common optimization entity. At present, methods used to produce MC beamlets have utilized a particle source model (PSM) approach. In this work we outline the implementation of a phase-space-based approach to MC beamlet generation that is expected to provide greater accuracy in beamlet dose distributions. In this approach a standard BEAMnrc phase space is sorted and divided into beamlets with particles labeled using the inheritable particle history variable. This is achieved with the use of an efficient sorting algorithm, capable of sorting a phase space of any size into the required number of beamlets in only two passes. Sorting a phase space of five million particles can be achieved in less than 8 s on a single-core 2.2 GHz CPU. The beamlets can then be transported separately into a patient CT dataset, producing separate dose distributions (doselets). Methods for doselet normalization and conversion of dose to absolute units of Gy for use in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan optimization are also described.

  17. Spectroscopy of Kerr black holes with Earth- and space-based interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, Emanuele; Barausse, Enrico; Cardoso, Vitor; Belczynski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    We estimate the potential of present and future interferometric gravitational-wave detectors to test the Kerr nature of black holes through "gravitational spectroscopy," i.e. the measurement of multiple quasinormal mode frequencies from the remnant of a black hole merger. Using population synthesis models of the formation and evolution of stellar-mass black hole binaries, we find that Voyager-class interferometers will be necessary to perform these tests. Gravitational spectroscopy in the local Universe may become routine with the Einstein Telescope, but a 40-km facility like Cosmic Explorer is necessary to go beyond $z\\sim 3$. In contrast, eLISA-like detectors should carry out a few - or even hundreds - of these tests every year, depending on uncertainties in massive black hole formation models. Many space-based spectroscopical measurements will occur at high redshift, testing the strong gravity dynamics of Kerr black holes in domains where cosmological corrections to general relativity (if they occur in nat...

  18. Periodic orbits for space-based reflectors in the circular restricted three-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, F. J. T.; McInnes, C. R.; Winter, O. C.

    2017-05-01

    The use of space-based orbital reflectors to increase the total insolation of the Earth has been considered with potential applications in night-side illumination, electric power generation and climate engineering. Previous studies have demonstrated that families of displaced Earth-centered and artificial halo orbits may be generated using continuous propulsion, e.g. solar sails. In this work, a three-body analysis is performed by using the circular restricted three body problem, such that, the space mirror attitude reflects sunlight in the direction of Earth's center, increasing the total insolation. Using the Lindstedt-Poincaré and differential corrector methods, a family of halo orbits at artificial Sun-Earth L_2 points are found. It is shown that the third order approximation does not yield real solutions after the reflector acceleration exceeds 0.245 mm s^{-2}, i.e. the analytical expressions for the in- and out-of-plane amplitudes yield imaginary values. Thus, a larger solar reflector acceleration is required to obtain periodic orbits closer to the Earth. Derived using a two-body approach and applying the differential corrector method, a family of displaced periodic orbits close to the Earth are therefore found, with a solar reflector acceleration of 2.686 mm s^{-2}.

  19. Model-driven methodology for rapid deployment of smart spaces based on resource-oriented architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredor, Iván; Bernardos, Ana M; Iglesias, Josué; Casar, José R

    2012-01-01

    Advances in electronics nowadays facilitate the design of smart spaces based on physical mash-ups of sensor and actuator devices. At the same time, software paradigms such as Internet of Things (IoT) and Web of Things (WoT) are motivating the creation of technology to support the development and deployment of web-enabled embedded sensor and actuator devices with two major objectives: (i) to integrate sensing and actuating functionalities into everyday objects, and (ii) to easily allow a diversity of devices to plug into the Internet. Currently, developers who are applying this Internet-oriented approach need to have solid understanding about specific platforms and web technologies. In order to alleviate this development process, this research proposes a Resource-Oriented and Ontology-Driven Development (ROOD) methodology based on the Model Driven Architecture (MDA). This methodology aims at enabling the development of smart spaces through a set of modeling tools and semantic technologies that support the definition of the smart space and the automatic generation of code at hardware level. ROOD feasibility is demonstrated by building an adaptive health monitoring service for a Smart Gym.

  20. Model-Driven Methodology for Rapid Deployment of Smart Spaces Based on Resource-Oriented Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. Casar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in electronics nowadays facilitate the design of smart spaces based on physical mash-ups of sensor and actuator devices. At the same time, software paradigms such as Internet of Things (IoT and Web of Things (WoT are motivating the creation of technology to support the development and deployment of web-enabled embedded sensor and actuator devices with two major objectives: (i to integrate sensing and actuating functionalities into everyday objects, and (ii to easily allow a diversity of devices to plug into the Internet. Currently, developers who are applying this Internet-oriented approach need to have solid understanding about specific platforms and web technologies. In order to alleviate this development process, this research proposes a Resource-Oriented and Ontology-Driven Development (ROOD methodology based on the Model Driven Architecture (MDA. This methodology aims at enabling the development of smart spaces through a set of modeling tools and semantic technologies that support the definition of the smart space and the automatic generation of code at hardware level. ROOD feasibility is demonstrated by building an adaptive health monitoring service for a Smart Gym.

  1. Reference concepts for a space-based hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator, burst power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes reference concepts for a hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator power system that supplies power during battle engagement to a space-based, ballistic missile defense platform. All of the concepts are open''; that is, they exhaust hydrogen or a mixture of hydrogen and water vapor into space. We considered the situation where hydrogen is presumed to be free to the power system because it is also needed to cool the platform's weapon and the situation where hydrogen is not free and its mass must be added to that of the power system. We also considered the situation where water vapor is an acceptable exhaust and the situation where it is not. The combination of these two sets of situations required four different power generation systems, and this report describes each, suggests parameter values, and estimates masses for each of the four. These reference concepts are expected to serve as a baseline'' to which other types of power systems can be compared, and they are expected to help guide technology development efforts in that they suggest parameter value ranges that will lead to optimum system designs. 7 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Space-Based Astronomy: An Educator Guide with Activities for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Gregory L.

    2001-01-01

    If you go to the country, far from city lights, you can see about 3,000 stars on a clear night. If your eyes were bigger, you could see many more stars. With a pair of binoculars, an optical device that effectively enlarges the pupil of your eye by about 30 times, the number of stars you can see increases to the tens of thousands. With a medium-sized telescope with a light-collecting mirror 30 centimeters in diameter, you can see hundreds of thousands of stars. With a large observatory telescope, millions of stars become visible. This curriculum guide uses hands-on activities to help students and teachers understand the significance of space-based astronomy--astronomical observations made from outer space. It is not intended to serve as a curriculum. Instead, teachers should select activities from this guide that support and extend existing study. The guide contains few of the traditional activities found in many astronomy guides such as constellation studies, lunar phases, and planetary orbits. It tells, rather, the story of why it is important to observe celestial objects from outer space and how to study the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Teachers are encouraged to adapt these activities for the particular needs of their students. When selected activities from this guide are used in conjunction with traditional astronomy curricula, students benefit from a more complete experience.

  3. Autonomous shooting at middle size space debris objects from space-based APT laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambi, J. M.; García del Pino, M. L.

    2017-02-01

    This paper is motivated by the need of removing middle size space debris objects. It deals with the problem of increasing the pointing accuracy while shooting at these objects by means of autonomous space-based APT systems endowed with very narrow laser beams. It is shown that shooting at these objects with these systems is the one single ballistic problem that becomes singular in space. This means that the shooting direction that is to be implemented by any of these systems to reach an object at a given instant can only be hopefully implemented after the object has been previously reached. Thus, the problem becomes backwards recurrent with no end for any object-system configuration, except when the LOS direction remains constant for some period of time. It is also shown that the implementation of the point-ahead angles from the data acquired prior to the respective shootings is essential to keep accuracy. In fact, one single omission during the action may cause errors larger than the size of the objects. As a consequence, we find that there is only one way for an autonomous system to minimize the pointing errors: any shooting sequence to any of these objects must be started when the transverse component of the relative velocity of the object with respect to the system is zero (actually, as close to zero as possible).

  4. Micropropulsion Options for the TechSat21 Space-Based Radar Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlling, John H.; Spres, Ronald A.; Spanjers, Gregory G.

    1999-11-01

    An assessment of current micropropulsion concepts and their applicability to a new Air Force mission called TechSat21 is given. The goal of TechSat21 is to demonstrate the critical technologies for a formation-flying constellation of satellites that will perform space based radar. The propulsion system must accomplish an initial ascent, 10 year stationkeeping and drag makeup, and end-of-life deorbit. Major constraints on the propulsion system are total mass, minimum impulse bit, and contamination or other interference with the constellation. Due to its technical maturity, high performance, ease of integration, and potential for improved performance over the next couple of years, the recommended propulsion system is the conventional Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) for primary propulsion and the Micro-PPT for stationkeeping. A low-power Hall thruster (-200 W) for primary propulsion and Micro-PPT for stationkeeping is also a strong candidate. Electrodynamic tethers for the deorbits offer a means for further reducing the propulsion mass, albeit at the expense of increased developmental and integration costs. If significant developmental risk is acceptable, the Micro Field Ionization Thruster (MFIT) offers the lowest propulsion system mass, however it is not expected to be available in the timeframe required for the TechSat21 mission.

  5. Detectability of CO2 Flux Signals by a Space-Based Lidar Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, Dorit M.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Schaefer, Kevin; Doney, Scott; Michalak, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite observations of carbon dioxide (CO2) offer novel and distinctive opportunities for improving our quantitative understanding of the carbon cycle. Prospective observations include those from space-based lidar such as the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Here we explore the ability of such a mission to detect regional changes in CO2 fluxes. We investigate these using three prototypical case studies, namely the thawing of permafrost in the Northern High Latitudes, the shifting of fossil fuel emissions from Europe to China, and changes in the source-sink characteristics of the Southern Ocean. These three scenarios were used to design signal detection studies to investigate the ability to detect the unfolding of these scenarios compared to a baseline scenario. Results indicate that the ASCENDS mission could detect the types of signals investigated in this study, with the caveat that the study is based on some simplifying assumptions. The permafrost thawing flux perturbation is readily detectable at a high level of significance. The fossil fuel emission detectability is directly related to the strength of the signal and the level of measurement noise. For a nominal (lower) fossil fuel emission signal, only the idealized noise-free instrument test case produces a clearly detectable signal, while experiments with more realistic noise levels capture the signal only in the higher (exaggerated) signal case. For the Southern Ocean scenario, differences due to the natural variability in the ENSO climatic mode are primarily detectable as a zonal increase.

  6. Calocube—A highly segmented calorimeter for a space based experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Alessandro, R., E-mail: candi@fi.infn.it [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); INFN Firenze, via B. Rossi 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Adriani, O. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); INFN Firenze, via B. Rossi 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Agnesi, A. [University of Pavia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell' Informazione, Pavia (Italy); INFN Pavia, via A. Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Albergo, S. [University of Catania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Auditore, L. [University of Messina, Department of Physics, sal. Sperone 31, I-98166 Messina (Italy); INFN Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Basti, A. [University of Siena, Department of Physical Sciences, Earth and Environment, I-53100 Siena (Italy); INFN Pisa, via F. Buonarroti 2, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Berti, E. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); INFN Firenze, via B. Rossi 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Bigongiari, G. [University of Siena, Department of Physical Sciences, Earth and Environment, I-53100 Siena (Italy); INFN Pisa, via F. Buonarroti 2, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bonechi, L. [INFN Firenze, via B. Rossi 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Bonechi, S. [University of Siena, Department of Physical Sciences, Earth and Environment, I-53100 Siena (Italy); INFN Pisa, via F. Buonarroti 2, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bongi, M. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); INFN Firenze, via B. Rossi 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Bonvicini, V. [INFN Trieste, via Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2016-07-11

    Future research in High Energy Cosmic Ray Physics concerns fundamental questions on their origin, acceleration mechanism, and composition. Unambiguous measurements of the energy spectra and of the composition of cosmic rays at the “knee” region could provide some of the answers to the above questions. Only ground based observations, which rely on sophisticated models describing high energy interactions in the earth's atmosphere, have been possible so far due to the extremely low particle rates at these energies. A calorimeter based space experiment can provide not only flux measurements but also energy spectra and particle identification, especially when coupled to a dE/dx measuring detector, and thus overcome some of the limitations plaguing ground based experiments. For this to be possible very large acceptances are needed if enough statistic is to be collected in a reasonable time. This contrasts with the lightness and compactness requirements for space based experiments. A novel idea in calorimetry is discussed here which addresses these issues while limiting the mass and volume of the detector. In fact a small prototype is currently being built and tested with ions. In this paper the results obtained will be presented in light of the simulations performed.

  7. Color Image Evaluation for Small Space Based on FA and GEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problem that color image is difficult to quantify, this paper proposes an evaluation method of color image for small space based on factor analysis (FA and gene expression programming (GEP and constructs a correlation model between color image factors and comprehensive color image. The basic color samples of small space and color images are evaluated by semantic differential method (SD method, color image factors are selected via dimension reduction in FA, factor score function is established, and by combining the entropy weight method to determine each factor weights then the comprehensive color image score is calculated finally. The best fitting function between color image factors and comprehensive color image is obtained by GEP algorithm, which can predict the users’ color image values. A color image evaluation system for small space is developed based on this model. The color evaluation of a control room on AC frequency conversion rig is taken as an example, verifying the effectiveness of the proposed method. It also can assist the designers in other color designs and provide a fast evaluation tool for testing users’ color image.

  8. Gap interpolation by inpainting methods: Application to ground and space-based asteroseismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Sandrine; Mathur, Savita; García, Rafael A.; Ballot, Jérôme; Stello, Dennis; Sato, Kumiko

    2015-02-01

    In asteroseismology, the observed time series often suffers from incomplete time coverage due to gaps. The presence of periodic gaps may generate spurious peaks in the power spectrum that limit the analysis of the data. Various methods have been developed to deal with gaps in time series data. However, it is still important to improve these methods to be able to extract all the possible information contained in the data. In this paper, we propose a new approach to handling the problem, the so-called inpainting method. This technique, based on a prior condition of sparsity, enables the gaps in the data to be judiciously fill-in thereby preserving the asteroseismic signal as far as possible. The impact of the observational window function is reduced and the interpretation of the power spectrum simplified. This method is applied on both ground- and space-based data. It appears that the inpainting technique improves the detection and estimation of the oscillation modes. Additionally, it can be used to study very long time series of many stars because it is very fast to compute. For a time series of 50 days of CoRoT-like data, it allows a speed-up factor of 1000, if compared to methods with the same accuracy.

  9. Specific heat of Ca{sub 0.32}Na{sub 0.68}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals: unconventional s{sub ±} multi-band superconductivity with intermediate repulsive interband coupling and sizable attractive intraband couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drechsler, S.L.; Johnston, S.; Abdel-Hafiez, M.; Grinenko, V.; Harnagea, L.; Krupskaya, Y.; Bombor, D.; Wurmehl, S.; Hess, C.; Wolter, A.; Buechner, B. [IFW-Dresden (Germany); Rosner, H. [MPI CPfS-Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    We report a low-temperature specific heat study of single crystals of the heavily hole doped superconductor Ca{sub 0.32}Na{sub 0.68}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. This compound exhibits bulk superconductivity with a transition temperature T{sub c} ∼ 34 K, which is evident from the magnetization, transport, and specific heat measurements. The zero field data manifests a significant electronic specific heat in the normal state with a Sommerfeld coefficient γ ∼ 53 mJ/mol K{sup 2}. Using a multi-band Eliashberg analysis, we demonstrate that the dependence of the zero field specific heat in the superconducting state is well described by a three-band model with an unconventional s{sub ±} pairing symmetry and gap magnitudes Δ{sub i} of about 2.35, 7.48, and -7.50 meV. Our analysis indicates a non-negligible attractive intraband coupling,which contributes significantly to the relatively high value of T{sub c}. The Fermi surface averaged repulsive and attractive coupling strengths are of comparable size and outside the strong coupling limit frequently adopted for describing high-T{sub c} iron pnictide superconductors. We further infer a total mass renormalization of the order of five, including the effects of correlations and electron-boson interactions.

  10. Detection of Space-debris Using Space-Based Integrated Detection and Image Processing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzazy, M.; Justice, J.

    2014-09-01

    Detection and cataloguing of space-debris is paramount to satellite operations. Space debris vary in size from very small objects 10-4 m2 to large objects approximately > 1 m2. The detection of small debris using earth-based telescopes and detection systems present a great challenge; long integration time, and large blur due to atmospheric turbulence. Space-based detection systems are usually expensive and have limited image processing capabilities to detect and track space debris. In this paper we describe the development of a relatively inexpensive space-based integrated sensor/processor that allows the detection of objects as small as 10-4 m2 at 50 km range (equivalent to star magnitude 10). The sensor noise floor is equivalent to star magnitude 12. The sensor field of regard is 60°x120°. The elevation field of regard is covered by two 25 mega-pixel focal plane arrays, each with 4 cm aperture covering 30 degrees field of view. A gimbal is then used to scan the sensor in the azimuthal direction. The sensor frame rate to cover the full field of regard is 10 frames/sec. The FPA outputs are processed onboard to register the images, remove background stars, identify the debris, and determine their coordinate and sidereal motion relative to the camera frame of reference. Image registration: rotation and translation to sub-pixel level was achieved using Radon transformation and fast Fourier transform techniques. The image registration algorithm was optimized to run on an FPGA. Star background is then removed from the registered images and the location and sidereal motion of the debris are then determined. The image processing system uses stars with magnitudes between 5 and 7 along with a look-up table map of the sky to convert the debris coordinate system to an inertial coordinate system which is then transmitted to the ground. A high fidelity simulation model has been developed and used to guide and test the image processing algorithms. The high fidelity simulation

  11. Climatological lower thermosphere winds as seen by ground-based and space-based instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Forbes

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons are made between climatological dynamic fields obtained from ground-based (GB and space-based (SB instruments with a view towards identifying SB/GB intercalibration issues for TIMED and other future aeronomy satellite missions. SB measurements are made from the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS. The GB data originate from meteor radars at Obninsk, (55° N, 37° E, Shigaraki (35° N, 136° E and Jakarta (6° S, 107° E and MF spaced-antenna radars at Hawaii (22° N, 160° W, Christmas I. (2° N, 158° W and Adelaide (35° S, 138° E. We focus on monthly-mean prevailing, diurnal and semidiurnal wind components at 96km, averaged over the 1991-1999 period. We perform space-based (SB analyses for 90° longitude sectors including the GB sites, as well as for the zonal mean. Taking the monthly prevailing zonal winds from these stations as a whole, on average, SB zonal winds exceed GB determinations by ~63%, whereas meridional winds are in much better agreement. The origin of this discrepancy remains unknown, and should receive high priority in initial GB/SB comparisons during the TIMED mission. We perform detailed comparisons between monthly climatologies from Jakarta and the geographically conjugate sites of Shigaraki and Adelaide, including some analyses of interannual variations. SB prevailing, diurnal and semidiurnal tides exceed those measured over Jakarta by factors, on the average, of the order of 2.0, 1.6, 1.3, respectively, for the eastward wind, although much variability exists. For the meridional component, SB/GB ratios for the diurnal and semidiurnal tide are about 1.6 and 1.7. Prevailing and tidal amplitudes at Adelaide are significantly lower than SB values, whereas similar net differences do not occur at the conjugate Northern Hemisphere location of Shigaraki. Adelaide diurnal phases lag SB phases by several hours, but excellent agreement between the two data

  12. Determining the Capability Requirements for a Space-Based Optical Sensor to Determine the Trajectory of an Incoming Antisatellite Weapon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    System ( XSS -11), the Near-Field Infrared Experiment (NFIRE), and the Space-based Interceptor (SBI) programs. [12] China’s ASAT test of 11 January is the...pag., April 2007. URL http://www.agi.com. AGI online Web seminar. 7. Grant H. Stokes, Ramaswamy Sridharan David Harrison, Curt von Braun and Jayant

  13. Preparatory Research of Microbial Fuel Cells Capable of Using the Organic waste in the Space Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Liu, H.; Wang, J.; Kong, L.

    In order to explore the way to treat and use the organic waste in the space base we designed a single chamber microbial fuel cell Through studying its character we discussed the facts that influence the power The Microbial Fuel Cells MFC consists of two electrode groups on the opposite sides Bacteria present in the anaerobic activated sludge were used as biocatalyst and glucose was tested as substrate The prototype MFC generated electrical power maximum of 133mW m2 while removing up to 88 of Chemical oxygen demand COD in 91h Through analyzing the facts that influence the power we found that increase of the electrode area could make the voltage and the power increase and the power density increased as available volume per electrode area increased Power generation was proportional to COD of the influent wastewater within a range of 129-1124 mg L The hydraulic retention time had an effect on the power over a range of 3-36h The power density reached the maximum of 110 8 mW m2 when the hydraulic retention time was 15 5h When the MFC was operated in the same way with Sequencing Batch Reactor the power density reached the maximum quickly but 40 hours later it decreased as COD deceased Oppositely pH decreased quickly to the minimum within first few hours then increased Process that can generate electricity during domestic and industrial wastewater treatment may provide a new method to offset wastewater treatment plant operating costs making advanced wastewater treatment more affordable for developing and industrial countries

  14. Optimal Sunshade Configurations for Space-Based Geoengineering near the Sun-Earth L1 Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Joan-Pau; McInnes, Colin R

    2015-01-01

    Within the context of anthropogenic climate change, but also considering the Earth's natural climate variability, this paper explores the speculative possibility of large-scale active control of the Earth's radiative forcing. In particular, the paper revisits the concept of deploying a large sunshade or occulting disk at a static position near the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrange equilibrium point. Among the solar radiation management methods that have been proposed thus far, space-based concepts are generally seen as the least timely, albeit also as one of the most efficient. Large occulting structures could potentially offset all of the global mean temperature increase due to greenhouse gas emissions. This paper investigates optimal configurations of orbiting occulting disks that not only offset a global temperature increase, but also mitigate regional differences such as latitudinal and seasonal difference of monthly mean temperature. A globally resolved energy balance model is used to provide insights into the coupling between the motion of the occulting disks and the Earth's climate. This allows us to revise previous studies, but also, for the first time, to search for families of orbits that improve the efficiency of occulting disks at offsetting climate change on both global and regional scales. Although natural orbits exist near the L1 equilibrium point, their period does not match that required for geoengineering purposes, thus forced orbits were designed that require small changes to the disk attitude in order to control its motion. Finally, configurations of two occulting disks are presented which provide the same shading area as previously published studies, but achieve reductions of residual latitudinal and seasonal temperature changes.

  15. Space-based Swath-imaging Laser Altimeter for Cryospheric Topography and Surface Property Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, D. J.; Abshire, J. B.; Sun, X.; Dabney, P. W.; Shuman, C. A.; Seas, A. A.

    2006-12-01

    Over the past decade airborne laser swath mapping has provided unprecedented measurements of ice and land topography, and vegetation canopy three-dimensional structure. These data have enabled new approaches to studies of the Earth's cryosphere, biosphere, and land surface processes, including those related to natural hazards and water resources. Achieving laser altimeter swath mapping in Earth orbit would provide timely global access that enables greatly expanded utilization of this rapidly advancing remote sensing capability. First year activities of an ESTO-funded project directed toward this goal, Push-broom Laser Altimeter Demonstration for Space-based Cryospheric Topographic and Surface Property Mapping, provide a foundation for development of a prototype Swath-imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL). A high net electrical efficiency is key to achieving a swath mapping capability on orbit. An analysis of measurement efficiencies, considering three pulse modulation schemes, three wavelengths, and three receiver approaches, indicates that the combination of a micropulse transmitter and single photon detection offers the highest efficiency. Assessment of component readiness indicates that in the near-term fiber lasers, frequency doubled to 532 nm, and solid state Si APD detectors offer the best development path. Light penetration at visible wavelengths poses potential uncertainty in 532 nm laser ranging to snow and ice surfaces. However, new laboratory retro-reflection measurements of natural snow and ice samples with nanosecond precision documents that there is no appreciable range delay due to penetration, likely because volume scattering causes the retro-return from beneath the surface to be negligible compared to the direct surface backscatter. Depolarization measurements, using parallel and perpendicular receiver channels, will differentiate surface types, such as liquid and frozen water, based on the proportion of diffuse to specular

  16. Ground Optical Signal Processing Architecture for Contributing SSA Space Based Sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblick, D.; Klug, M.; Goldsmith, A.; Flewelling, B.; Jah, M.; Shanks, J.; Piña, R.

    2014-09-01

    The main objective of the DARPA program Orbit Outlook (O^2) is to improve the metric tracking and detection performance of the Space Situational Network (SSN) by adding a diverse low-cost network of contributing sensors to the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) mission. In order to accomplish this objective, not only must a sensor be in constant communication with a planning and scheduling system to process tasking requests, there must be an underlying framework to provide useful data products, such as angles only measurements. Existing optical signal processing implementations such as the Optical Processing Architecture at Lincoln (OPAL) are capable of converting mission data collections to angles only observations, but may be difficult for many users to obtain, support, and customize for low-cost missions and demonstration programs. The Ground Optical Signal Processing Architecture (GOSPA) will ingest raw imagery and telemetry data from a space based electro optical sensor and perform a background removal process to remove anomalous pixels, interpolate over bad pixels, and dominant temporal noise. After background removal, the streak end points and target centroids are located using a corner detection algorithm developed by Air Force Research Laboratory. These identified streak locations are then fused with the corresponding spacecraft telemetry data to determine the Right Ascension and Declination measurements with respect to time. To demonstrate the performance of GOSPA, non-rate tracking collections against a satellite in Geosynchronous Orbit are simulated from a visible optical imaging sensor in a polar Low Earth Orbit. Stars, noise and bad pixels are added to the simulated images based on look angles and sensor parameters. These collections are run through the GOSPA framework to provide angles- only measurements to the Air Force Research Laboratory Constrained Admissible Region Multiple Hypothesis Filter (CAR-MHF) in which an Initial Orbit Determination is

  17. Optical Telescope System-Level Design Considerations for a Space-Based Gravitational Wave Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Sankar, Shannon R.

    2016-01-01

    The study of the Universe through gravitational waves will yield a revolutionary new perspective on the Universe, which has been intensely studied using electromagnetic signals in many wavelength bands. A space-based gravitational wave observatory will enable access to a rich array of astrophysical sources in the measurement band from 0.1 to 100 mHz, and nicely complement observations from ground-based detectors as well as pulsar timing arrays by sampling a different range of compact object masses and astrophysical processes. The observatory measures gravitational radiation by precisely monitoring the tiny change in the proper distance between pairs of freely falling proof masses. These masses are separated by millions of kilometers and, using a laser heterodyne interferometric technique, the change in their proper separation is detected to approx. 10 pm over timescales of 1000 seconds, a fractional precision of better than one part in 10(exp 19). Optical telescopes are essential for the implementation of this precision displacement measurement. In this paper we describe some of the key system level design considerations for the telescope subsystem in a mission context. The reference mission for this purpose is taken to be the enhanced Laser Interferometry Space Antenna mission (eLISA), a strong candidate for the European Space Agency's Cosmic Visions L3 launch opportunity in 2034. We will review the flow-down of observatory level requirements to the telescope subsystem, particularly pertaining to the effects of telescope dimensional stability and scattered light suppression, two performance specifications which are somewhat different from the usual requirements for an image forming telescope.

  18. Development of a Multivariable Parametric Cost Analysis for Space-Based Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollinger, Courtnay

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 400 years, the telescope has proven to be a valuable tool in helping humankind understand the Universe around us. The images and data produced by telescopes have revolutionized planetary, solar, stellar, and galactic astronomy and have inspired a wide range of people, from the child who dreams about the images seen on NASA websites to the most highly trained scientist. Like all scientific endeavors, astronomical research must operate within the constraints imposed by budget limitations. Hence the importance of understanding cost: to find the balance between the dreams of scientists and the restrictions of the available budget. By logically analyzing the data we have collected for over thirty different telescopes from more than 200 different sources, statistical methods, such as plotting regressions and residuals, can be used to determine what drives the cost of telescopes to build and use a cost model for space-based telescopes. Previous cost models have focused their attention on ground-based telescopes due to limited data for space telescopes and the larger number and longer history of ground-based astronomy. Due to the increased availability of cost data from recent space-telescope construction, we have been able to produce and begin testing a comprehensive cost model for space telescopes, with guidance from the cost models for ground-based telescopes. By separating the variables that effect cost such as diameter, mass, wavelength, density, data rate, and number of instruments, we advance the goal to better understand the cost drivers of space telescopes.. The use of sophisticated mathematical techniques to improve the accuracy of cost models has the potential to help society make informed decisions about proposed scientific projects. An improved knowledge of cost will allow scientists to get the maximum value returned for the money given and create a harmony between the visions of scientists and the reality of a budget.

  19. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurement of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 microns. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the radiance signal or sensitivity to CO2 change near the surface is not significantly diminished even in the presence of aerosols and/or thin cirrus clouds in the atmosphere; (c) the modification of sunlight path length by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could lead to large systematic errors in the retrieval; therefore, ancillary aerosol/cirrus cloud data are important to reduce retrieval errors; (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, must be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  20. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurements of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 micron. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the effects of other interfering constituents, such as water vapor, aerosols and cirrus clouds, on the radiance are significant but the overall effects of the modification of light path length on total back-to-space radiance sensitivity to CO2 change are minor for general cases, which means that generally the total column CO2 can be derived in high precision from the ratio of the on-line center to off-line radiances; (c) together with CO2 gas absorption aerosol/cirrus cloud layer has differential scattering which may result in the modification of on-line to off-line radiance ratio which could lead a large bias in the total column CO2 retrieval. Approaches to correct such bias need further investigation. (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature, which is achievable from new atmospheric sounders in the near future; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, should be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  1. METHOD OF GROUP OBJECTS FORMING FOR SPACE-BASED REMOTE SENSING OF THE EARTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Grigoriev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. Research findings of the specific application of space-based optical-electronic and radar means for the Earth remote sensing are considered. The subject matter of the study is the current planning of objects survey on the underlying surface in order to increase the effectiveness of sensing system due to the rational use of its resources. Method. New concept of a group object, stochastic swath and stochastic length of the route is introduced. The overview of models for single, group objects and their parameters is given. The criterion for the existence of the group object based on two single objects is formulated. The method for group objects formation while current survey planning has been developed and its description is presented. The method comprises several processing stages for data about objects with the calculation of new parameters, the stochastic characteristics of space means and validates the spatial size of the object value of the stochastic swath and stochastic length of the route. The strict mathematical description of techniques for model creation of a group object based on data about a single object and onboard special complex facilities in difficult conditions of registration of spatial data is given. Main Results. The developed method is implemented on the basis of modern geographic information system in the form of a software tool layout with advanced tools of processing and analysis of spatial data in vector format. Experimental studies of the forming method for the group of objects were carried out on a different real object environment using the parameters of modern national systems of the Earth remote sensing detailed observation Canopus-B and Resurs-P. Practical Relevance. The proposed models and method are focused on practical implementation using vector spatial data models and modern geoinformation technologies. Practical value lies in the reduction in the amount of consumable resources by means of

  2. Laser diode absorption spectroscopy for accurate CO(2) line parameters at 2 microm: consequences for space-based DIAL measurements and potential biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Lilian; Marnas, Fabien; Gibert, Fabien; Bruneau, Didier; Grouiez, Bruno; Flamant, Pierre H; Durry, Georges; Dumelie, Nicolas; Parvitte, Bertrand; Zéninari, Virginie

    2009-10-10

    Space-based active sensing of CO(2) concentration is a very promising technique for the derivation of CO(2) surface fluxes. There is a need for accurate spectroscopic parameters to enable accurate space-based measurements to address global climatic issues. New spectroscopic measurements using laser diode absorption spectroscopy are presented for the preselected R30 CO(2) absorption line ((20(0)1)(III)space-based DIAL CO(2) mixing ratio measurements associated to spectroscopic parameter uncertainties are presented.

  3. Future space-based direct imaging platforms: high fidelity simulations and instrument testbed development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Eberhardt, Andrew; SAINT, VNC, LUVOIR

    2017-06-01

    nulling.The development of various VNC/SAINT subsystems and components will be presented along with detection performance analyses for several nearby systems assuming a range of space-based architectures spanning mulitple mission lifetimes.

  4. Space-based Observational Constraints for 1-D Plume Rise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maria Val; Kahn, Ralph A.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Paguam, Ronan; Wooster, Martin; Ichoku, Charles

    2012-01-01

    We use a space-based plume height climatology derived from observations made by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument aboard the NASA Terra satellite to evaluate the ability of a plume-rise model currently embedded in several atmospheric chemical transport models (CTMs) to produce accurate smoke injection heights. We initialize the plume-rise model with assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System and estimated fuel moisture content at the location and time of the MISR measurements. Fire properties that drive the plume-rise model are difficult to estimate and we test the model with four estimates for active fire area and four for total heat flux, obtained using empirical data and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) re radiative power (FRP) thermal anomalies available for each MISR plume. We show that the model is not able to reproduce the plume heights observed by MISR over the range of conditions studied (maximum r2 obtained in all configurations is 0.3). The model also fails to determine which plumes are in the free troposphere (according to MISR), key information needed for atmospheric models to simulate properly smoke dispersion. We conclude that embedding a plume-rise model using currently available re constraints in large-scale atmospheric studies remains a difficult proposition. However, we demonstrate the degree to which the fire dynamical heat flux (related to active fire area and sensible heat flux), and atmospheric stability structure influence plume rise, although other factors less well constrained (e.g., entrainment) may also be significant. Using atmospheric stability conditions, MODIS FRP, and MISR plume heights, we offer some constraints on the main physical factors that drive smoke plume rise. We find that smoke plumes reaching high altitudes are characterized by higher FRP and weaker atmospheric stability conditions than those at low altitude, which tend to remain confined

  5. Space-based observatories providing key data for climate change applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, J.; Juillet, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Sentinel-1 & 3 mission are part of the Copernicus program, previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security), whose overall objective is to support Europe's goals regarding sustainable development and global governance of the environment by providing timely and quality data, information, services and knowledge. This European Earth Observation program is led by the European Commission and the space infrastructure is developed under the European Space Agency leadership. Many services will be developed through the Copernicus program among different thematic areas. The climate change is one of this thematic area and the Sentinel-1 & 3 satellites will provide key space-based observations in this area. The Sentinel-1 mission is based on a constellation of 2 identical satellites each one embarking C-SAR Instrument and provides capability for continuous radar mapping of the Earth with enhanced revisit frequency, coverage, timeliness and reliability for operational services and applications requiring long time series. In particular, Sentinel 1 provides all-weather, day-and-night estimates of soil moisture, wind speed and direction, sea ice, continental ice sheets and glaciers. The Sentinel-3 mission will mainly be devoted to the provision of Ocean observation data in routine, long term (20 years of operations) and continuous fashion with a consistent quality and a very high level of availability. Among these data, very accurate surface temperatures and topography measurements will be provided and will constitute key indicators, once ingested in climate change models, for identifying climate drivers and expected climate impacts. The paper will briefly recall the satellite architectures, their main characteristics and performance. The inflight performance and key features of their images or data of the 3 satellites namely Sentinel 1A, 1B and 3A will be reviewed to demonstrate the quality and high scientific potential of the data as well as their

  6. The promise of multi-band gravitational wave astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sesana, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We show that the black hole binary (BHB) coalescence rates inferred from the advanced LIGO (aLIGO) detection of GW150914 imply an unexpectedly loud GW sky at milli-Hz frequencies accessible to the evolving Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA), with several outstanding consequences. First, up to thousands of BHB will be individually resolvable by eLISA; second, millions of non resolvable BHBs will build a confusion noise detectable with signal-to-noise ratio of few to hundreds; third -- and perhaps most importantly -- up to hundreds of BHBs individually resolvable by eLISA will coalesce in the aLIGO band within ten years. eLISA observations will tell aLIGO and all electromagnetic probes weeks in advance when and where these BHB coalescences are going to occur, with uncertainties of <10s and <1deg^2. This will allow the pre-pointing of telescopes to realize coincident GW and multi-wavelength electromagnetic observations of BHB mergers. Time coincidence is critical because prompt emission associated ...

  7. Multi-band characterization of the hot Jupiters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyano, M.; Almeida, L. A.; von Essen, C.

    2017-01-01

    We have carried out a campaign to characterize the hot Jupiters WASP-5b, WASP-44b and WASP-46b using multiband photometry collected at the Observatorio do Pico Dos Dias in Brazil. We have determined the planetary physical properties and new transit ephemerides for these systems. The new orbital...

  8. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS FOR QUASARS IN MULTI-BAND SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brescia, M.; Mercurio, A. [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte, via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G. [Department of Physics, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); D' Abrusco, R., E-mail: brescia@oacn.inaf.it [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) is a machine learning method that can be used to cope with regression and classification problems on complex and massive data sets. In this paper, we give a formal description of the method and present the results of its application to the evaluation of photometric redshifts for quasars. The data set used for the experiment was obtained by merging four different surveys (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX, UKIDSS, and WISE), thus covering a wide range of wavelengths from the UV to the mid-infrared. The method is able (1) to achieve a very high accuracy, (2) to drastically reduce the number of outliers and catastrophic objects, and (3) to discriminate among parameters (or features) on the basis of their significance, so that the number of features used for training and analysis can be optimized in order to reduce both the computational demands and the effects of degeneracy. The best experiment, which makes use of a selected combination of parameters drawn from the four surveys, leads, in terms of {Delta}z{sub norm} (i.e., (z{sub spec} - z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec})), to an average of {Delta}z{sub norm} = 0.004, a standard deviation of {sigma} = 0.069, and a median absolute deviation, MAD = 0.02, over the whole redshift range (i.e., z{sub spec} {<=} 3.6), defined by the four-survey cross-matched spectroscopic sample. The fraction of catastrophic outliers, i.e., of objects with photo-z deviating more than 2{sigma} from the spectroscopic value, is <3%, leading to {sigma} = 0.035 after their removal, over the same redshift range. The method is made available to the community through the DAMEWARE Web application.

  9. Multi-band Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... This talk focuses on the various aspects we learnt from multiband observations of GRBs both, before and during the afterglow era. A statistical analysis to estimate the probable redshifts of host galaxies using the luminosity function of GRBs compatible with both the afterglow redshift data as well as the ...

  10. Multi-band metamaterial absorber topology for infrared frequency regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Batuhan; Sabah, Cumali

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a new multiband metamaterial absorber design is proposed and the numerical characterization is carried out. The design is composed of three layers with differently sized quadruplets in which the interaction among them causes the multiband absorption response in the infrared frequency regime. In order to characterize the absorber and explain the multiband topology, some parametric studies with respect to the dimensions of the structure are carried out and the contributions of the quadruplets to the absorption spectrum are analyzed. According to the results, it is found that the proposed metamaterial absorber has five bands in the infrared frequency regime with the absorption levels of: 98.90%, 99.39%, 86.46%, 92.80% and 97.96%. Moreover, the polarization dependency of the structure is examined and it is found that the design operates well as a perfect absorber with polarization independency in the studied frequency range.

  11. Multi-Band Spectral Properties of Fermi Blazars Benzhong Dai ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Galaxies: active—BL Lacertae objects—general—gamma rays—observations. 1. Introduction. The First Fermi-LAT Catalogue (1LAC) of AGN, corresponding to 11 months of data collected in scientific operation mode, includes 709 AGNs, comprising 300 BL. Lacs, 296 FSRQs, 41 AGNs of other types and 72 AGNs of ...

  12. Multi-band implications of external-IC flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Stephan; Spanier, Felix

    2015-02-01

    Very fast variability on scales of minutes is regularly observed in Blazars. The assumption that these flares are emerging from the dominant emission zone of the very high energy (VHE) radiation within the jet challenges current acceleration and radiation models. In this work we use a spatially resolved and time dependent synchrotron-self-Compton (SSC) model that includes the full time dependence of Fermi-I acceleration. We use the (apparent) orphan γ -ray flare of Mrk501 during MJD 54952 and test various flare scenarios against the observed data. We find that a rapidly variable external radiation field can reproduce the high energy lightcurve best. However, the effect of the strong inverse Compton (IC) cooling on other bands and the X-ray observations are constraining the parameters to rather extreme ranges. Then again other scenarios would require parameters even more extreme or stronger physical constraints on the rise and decay of the source of the variability which might be in contradiction with constraints derived from the size of the black hole's ergosphere.

  13. Airborne Multi-Band SAR in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J. M.; Brozena, J. M.; Liang, R.; Ball, D.; Holt, B.; Thomson, J.

    2016-12-01

    As one component of the Office of Naval Research supported Sea State Departmental Research Initiative during October of 2015 the Naval Research Laboratory flew an ultrawide-band, low-frequency, polarimetric SAR over the southward advancing sea ice in Beaufort Sea. The flights were coordinated with the research team aboard the R/V Sikuliaq working near and in the advancing pack ice. The majority of the SAR data were collected with the L-Band sensor (1000-1500 MHz) from an altitude of 10,000', providing a useful swath 6 km wide with 75o and 25 o angles of incidence at the inner and outer edge of the swath respectively. Some data were also collected with the P-Band SAR (215-915 MHz). The extremely large bandwidths allowed for formation of image pixels as small as 30 cm, however, we selected 60 cm pixel size to reduce image speckle. The separate polarimetric images are calibrated to one pixel to allow for calculations such as polarimetric decompositions that require the images to be well aligned. Both frequencies are useful particularly for the detection of ridges and areas of deformed ice. There are advantages and disadvantages to airborne SAR imagery compared to satellites. The chief advantages being the enormous allowable bandwidth leading to very fine range resolution, and the ability to fly arbitrary trajectories on demand. The latter permits specific areas to be imaged at a given time with a specified illumination direction. An area can even be illuminated from all directions by flying a circular trajectory around the target area. This captures ice features that are sensitive to illumination direction such as cracks, sastrugi orientation, and ridges. The disadvantages include variation of intensity across the swath with range and incidence angle. In addition to the SAR data, we collected photogrammetric imagery from a DSS-439, scanning lidar from a Riegl Q560 and surface brightness temperatures from a KT-19. However, since all of these sensors are nadir pointing, and some restricted to relatively low-altitude, it was difficult to obtain data co-registered with the SAR. At this meeting we will present some initial results from the SAR imagery, including differentiation of young, thin, and older ice features, and comparisons with satellite SAR with L-band and C-band frequencies.

  14. On the feasibility of space-based radar ice sounding of the Antarctic ice sheet at P-band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Kusk, Anders; Corr, Hugh

    collaboration between seven organizations in Europe and North and South America [2]. The primary objective of this IceGrav campaign was to measure gravity in Queen Maud Land, but a secondary objective was to acquire P-band sounder data, benefitting from the large coverage offered by the Basler DC3 aircraft used......Space-based radio echo sounding (RES) of the continental ice sheets can potentially offer full coverage, uniform data quality and sampling. Ice sounding radars must operate at low frequencies in order to ensure low attenuation of the signal as it propagates down through the ice and back from base...... of the ice sheet. Typical frequencies of airborne radar ice sounders are between 60 MHz and 150 MHz. However, the lowest possible frequency for space-based radar ice sounders is 435 MHz. In 2004 the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) radio regulations allocated a 6 MHz band at 435 MHz (P...

  15. Applying the Tuple Space-Based Approach to the Simulation of the Caspases, an Essential Signalling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Cárdenas-García, Maura; González-Pérez, Pedro Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death plays a crucial role in development and homeostasis. This process is driven by mitochondrial permeabilization and activation of caspases. In this paper we adopt a tuple spaces-based modelling and simulation approach, and show how it can be applied to the simulation of this intracellular signalling pathway. Specifically, we are working to explore and to understand the complex interaction patterns of the caspases apoptotic and the mitochondrial role. As a first approximatio...

  16. Space base laser torque applied on LEO satellites of various geometries at satellite’s closest approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Khalifa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In light of using laser power in space applications, the motivation of this paper is to use a space based solar pumped laser to produce a torque on LEO satellites of various shapes. It is assumed that there is a space station that fires laser beam toward the satellite so the beam spreading due to diffraction is considered to be the dominant effect on the laser beam propagation. The laser torque is calculated at the point of closest approach between the space station and some sun synchronous low Earth orbit cubesats. The numerical application shows that space based laser torque has a significant contribution on the LEO cubesats. It has a maximum value in the order of 10−8 Nm which is comparable with the residual magnetic moment. However, it has a minimum value in the order 10−11 Nm which is comparable with the aerodynamic and gravity gradient torque. Consequently, space based laser torque can be used as an active attitude control system.

  17. Space-based pseudo-fixed latitude observation mode based on the characteristics of geosynchronous orbit belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun-peng; Chen, Lei; Huang, Jian-yu

    2017-08-01

    The US Lincoln Laboratory proved that space-based visible (SBV) observation is efficient to observe space objects, especially Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) objects. After that, SBV observation plays an important role in the space surveillance. In this paper, a novel space-based observation mode is designed to observe all the GEO objects in a relatively short time. A low earth orbit (LEO) satellite, especially a dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit satellite, is useful for space-based observation. Thus, the observation mode for GEO objects is based on a dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit satellite. It is found that the Pinch Point (PP) regions proposed by the US Lincoln Laboratory are spreading based on the analysis of the evolution principles of GEO objects. As the PP regions becoming more and more widely in the future, many strategies based on it may not be efficient any more. Hence, the key point of the space-based observation strategy design for GEO objects should be emphasized on the whole GEO belt as far as possible. The pseudo-fixed latitude observation mode is proposed in this paper based on the characteristics of GEO belt. Unlike classical space-based observation modes, pseudo-fixed latitude observation mode makes use of the one-dimensional attitude adjustment of the observation satellite. The pseudo-fixed latitude observation mode is more reliable and simple in engineering, compared with the gazing observation mode which needs to adjust the attitude from the two dimensions. It includes two types of attitude adjustment, i.e. daily and continuous attitude adjustment. Therefore, the pseudo-fixed latitude observation mode has two characteristics. In a day, the latitude of the observation region is fixed and the scanning region is about a rectangle, while the latitude of the observation region centre changes each day in a long term based on a daily strategy. The capabilities of a pseudo-fixed latitude observation instrument with a 98° dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit are

  18. A Web of Drones: A 2040 Strategy to Reduce the United States Dependance on Space Based Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-17

    www.saffm.hq.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-140310- 079.pdf (accessed 8 Feb 2015). 15 Gen Shelton address. 16 Nola Taylor Redd, “ Space Junk : Tracking & Removing...hearings-show-our-dependence-on-military- space -technology/2012/03/24/ gIQANVV8cS_story.html (accessed 8 Feb 2015). Redd, Nola Taylor. “ Space Junk : Tracking...AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY A WEB OF DRONES: A 2040 STRATEGY TO REDUCE THE UNITED STATES DEPENDANCE ON SPACE BASED CAPABILITIES by

  19. Simulating the exoplanet yield of a space-based mid-infrared interferometer based on Kepler statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Jens; Quanz, Sascha P.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: We predict the exoplanet yield of a space-based mid-infrared nulling interferometer using Monte Carlo simulations. We quantify the number and properties of detectable exoplanets and identify those target stars that have the highest or most complete detection rate. We investigate how changes in the underlying technical assumptions and uncertainties in the underlying planet population impact the scientific return. Methods: We simulated 2000 exoplanetary systems, based on planet occurrence statistics from Kepler with randomly orientated orbits and uniformly distributed albedos around each of 326 nearby (dworlds.

  20. Space base laser torque applied on LEO satellites of various geometries at satellite’s closest approach

    OpenAIRE

    Khalifa, N.S.

    2013-01-01

    In light of using laser power in space applications, the motivation of this paper is to use a space based solar pumped laser to produce a torque on LEO satellites of various shapes. It is assumed that there is a space station that fires laser beam toward the satellite so the beam spreading due to diffraction is considered to be the dominant effect on the laser beam propagation. The laser torque is calculated at the point of closest approach between the space station and some sun synchronous l...

  1. Feasibility study of a space-based high pulse energy 2  μm CO2 IPDA lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N; Refaat, Tamer F; Ismail, Syed; Davis, Kenneth J; Kawa, Stephan R; Menzies, Robert T; Petros, Mulugeta

    2017-08-10

    Sustained high-quality column carbon dioxide (CO2) atmospheric measurements from space are required to improve estimates of regional and continental-scale sources and sinks of CO2. Modeling of a space-based 2 μm, high pulse energy, triple-pulse, direct detection integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar was conducted to demonstrate CO2 measurement capability and to evaluate random and systematic errors. Parameters based on recent technology developments in the 2 μm laser and state-of-the-art HgCdTe (MCT) electron-initiated avalanche photodiode (e-APD) detection system were incorporated in this model. Strong absorption features of CO2 in the 2 μm region, which allows optimum lower tropospheric and near surface measurements, were used to project simultaneous measurements using two independent altitude-dependent weighting functions with the triple-pulse IPDA. Analysis of measurements over a variety of atmospheric and aerosol models using a variety of Earth's surface target and aerosol loading conditions were conducted. Water vapor (H2O) influences on CO2 measurements were assessed, including molecular interference, dry-air estimate, and line broadening. Projected performance shows a measurements related to column CO2 optical depth for the space-based IPDA using 10 s signal averaging over the Railroad Valley (RRV) reference surface under clear and thin cloud conditions.

  2. Integration losses and clutter-Doppler spread for a space based radar caused by ionospheric scintillation during a solar maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokole, Eric L.

    1991-07-01

    Estimates are obtained of the effect of worst-case, ionospheric scintillation on the combined, coherent-noncoherent, integration process and on the clutter-Doppler spread for a specific waveform and a space based radar in a 1030-km orbit. The experiments are representative of worst-case scintillation conditions. The results of these data, which correspond to a period of solar maximum, are compared to earlier results for a period of severe scintillation but minimal solar activity. The frequency-diverse waveform consists of bursts (coherent pulse trains) of 0.256-s duration at four distinct frequencies per look and six looks per dwell. The space based radar will suffer a combined integration loss not exceeding 2.54 dB, 0.70 dB, and 0.06 dB at VHF, UHF, and L band, respectively, for 95 percent of the time in worst-case conditions. In addition, the clutter Doppler spread that is induced by ionospheric scintillation is less than 4.90 Hz, 1.58 Hz, and 0.26 Hz at the same frequencies and under the same conditions as for 95 percent of the time.

  3. U.S.-Russian Cooperation in Science and Technology: A Case Study of the TOPAZ Space-Based Nuclear Reactor International Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard Dabrowski

    2013-01-01

    ....1 The advent of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) in the early 1980s rekindled interest and investment in thermionics to power a space-based ballistic missile defense system led by the United States Air Force...

  4. Global Earth Observation System of Systems: Characterizing Uncertainties of Space- based Measurements and Earth System Models Informing Decision Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, R. J.; Frederick, M.

    2006-05-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) framework identifies the benefits of systematically and scientifically networking the capacity of organizations and systems into solutions that benefit nine societal benefit areas. The U.S. Integrated Earth Observation System (IEOS), the U.S. contribution to the GEOSS, focuses on near-term, mid-term, and long-term opportunities to establish integrated system solutions based on capacities and capabilities of member agencies and affiliations. Scientists at NASA, NOAA, DOE, NSF and other U.S. agencies are evolving the predictive capacity of models of Earth processes based on space-based, airborne and surface-based instruments and their measurements. NASA research activities include advancing the power and accessibility of computational resources (i.e. Project Columbia) to enable robust science data analysis, modeling, and assimilation techniques to rapidly advance. The integration of the resulting observations and predictions into decision support tools require characterization of the accuracies of a range of input measurements includes temperature and humidity profiles, wind speed, ocean height, sea surface temperature, and atmospheric constituents that are measured globally by U.S. deployed spacecraft. These measurements are stored in many data formats on many different information systems with widely varying accessibility and have processes whose documentation ranges from extremely detailed to very minimal. Integrated and interdisciplinary modeling (enabled by the Earth System Model Framework) enable the types of ensemble analysis that are useful for decision processes associated with energy management, public health risk assessments, and optimizing transportation safety and efficiency. Interdisciplinary approaches challenge systems integrators (both scientists and engineers) to expand beyond the traditional boundaries of particular disciplines to develop, verify and validate, and ultimately benchmark the

  5. High-speed free-space based reconfigurable card-to-card optical interconnects with broadcast capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Lim, Christina; Skafidas, Efstratios; Alameh, Kamal

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a free-space based high-speed reconfigurable card-to-card optical interconnect architecture with broadcast capability, which is required for control functionalities and efficient parallel computing applications. Experimental results show that 10 Gb/s data can be broadcast to all receiving channels for up to 30 cm with a worst-case receiver sensitivity better than -12.20 dBm. In addition, arbitrary multicasting with the same architecture is also investigated. 10 Gb/s reconfigurable point-to-point link and multicast channels are simultaneously demonstrated with a measured receiver sensitivity power penalty of ~1.3 dB due to crosstalk.

  6. Post-Newtonian equations of motion for LEO debris objects and space-based acquisition, pointing and tracking laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambi, J. M.; García del Pino, M. L.; Gschwindl, J.; Weinmüller, E. B.

    2017-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of throwing middle-sized low Earth orbit debris objects into the atmosphere via laser ablation. The post-Newtonian equations here provided allow (hypothetical) space-based acquisition, pointing and tracking systems endowed with very narrow laser beams to reach the pointing accuracy presently prescribed. In fact, whatever the orbital elements of these objects may be, these equations will allow the operators to account for the corrections needed to balance the deviations of the line of sight directions due to the curvature of the paths the laser beams are to travel along. To minimize the respective corrections, the systems will have to perform initial positioning manoeuvres, and the shooting point-ahead angles will have to be adapted in real time. The enclosed numerical experiments suggest that neglecting these measures will cause fatal errors, due to differences in the actual locations of the objects comparable to their size.

  7. Mission and Instrument Design Trades for a Space-based Gravitational Wave Observatory to Maximize Science Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey; Baker, John; Stebbins, Robin; Thorpe, James; Larson, Shane; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    A space-based gravitational wave observatory is required to access the rich array of astrophysical sources expected at frequencies between 0.0001 and 0.1 Hz. The European Space Agency (ESA) chose the Gravitational Universe as the science theme of its L3 launch opportunity. A call for mission proposals will be released soon after the completion of the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission. LPF is scheduled to start science operations in March 2016, and finish by the end of the year, so an optimized mission concept is needed now. There are a number of possible design choices for both the instrument and the mission. One of the goals for a good mission design is to maximize the science return while minimizing risk and keeping costs low. This presentation will review some of the main design choices for a LISA-like laser interferometry mission and the impact of these choices on cost, risk, and science return.

  8. Real-time maneuver optimization of space-based robots in a dynamic environment: Theory and on-orbit experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamitoff, Gregory E.; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Katz, Jacob G.; Ulrich, Steve; Morrell, Benjamin J.; Gibbens, Peter W.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a real-time path-planning optimization approach to controlling the motion of space-based robots. The algorithm is capable of planning three dimensional trajectories for a robot to navigate within complex surroundings that include numerous static and dynamic obstacles, path constraints and performance limitations. The methodology employs a unique transformation that enables rapid generation of feasible solutions for complex geometries, making it suitable for application to real-time operations and dynamic environments. This strategy was implemented on the Synchronized Position Hold Engage Reorient Experimental Satellite (SPHERES) test-bed on the International Space Station (ISS), and experimental testing was conducted onboard the ISS during Expedition 17 by the first author. Lessons learned from the on-orbit tests were used to further refine the algorithm for future implementations.

  9. Development of a pyrolysis waste recovery model with designs, test plans, and applications for space-based habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Bobby J.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive literature searches revealed the numerous advantages of using pyrolysis as a means of recovering usable resources from inedible plant biomass, paper, plastics, other polymers, and human waste. A possible design of a pyrolysis reactor with test plans and applications for use on a space-based habitat are proposed. The proposed system will accommodate the wastes generated by a four-person crew while requiring solar energy as the only power source. Waste materials will be collected and stored during the 15-day lunar darkness periods. Resource recovery will occur during the daylight periods. Usable gases such as methane and hydrogen and a solid char will be produced while reducing the mass and volume of the waste to almost infinitely small levels. The system will be operated economically, safely, and in a non-polluting manner.

  10. Partial Ambiguity Resolution for Ground and Space-Based Applications in a GPS+Galileo scenario: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardo, A.; Li, B.; Teunissen, P. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Integer Ambiguity Resolution (IAR) is the key to fast and precise GNSS positioning. The proper diagnostic metric for successful IAR is provided by the ambiguity success rate being the probability of correct integer estimation. In this contribution we analyse the performance of different GPS+Galileo models in terms of number of epochs needed to reach a pre-determined success rate, for various ground and space-based applications. The simulation-based controlled model environment enables us to gain insight into the factors contributing to the ambiguity resolution strength of the different GPS+Galileo models. Different scenarios of modernized GPS+Galileo are studied, encompassing the long baseline ground case as well as the medium dynamics case (airplane) and the space-based Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) case. In our analyses of these models the capabilities of partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) are demonstrated and compared to the limitations of full ambiguity resolution (FAR). The results show that PAR is generally a more efficient way than FAR to reduce the time needed to achieve centimetre-level positioning precision. For long single baselines, PAR can achieve time reductions of fifty percent to achieve such precision levels, while for multiple baselines it even becomes more effective, reaching reductions up to eighty percent for four station networks. For a LEO, the rapidly changing observation geometry does not even allow FAR, while PAR is then still possible for both dual- and triple-frequency scenarios. With the triple-frequency GPS+Galileo model the availability of precise positioning improves by fifteen percent with respect to the dual-frequency scenario.

  11. Space-based detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    ) is planned for 2015. This mission and its payload “LISA Technology Package” will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical...

  12. Space-Based CO2 Active Optical Remote Sensing using 2-μm Triple-Pulse IPDA Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra; Refaat, Tamer; Ismail, Syed; Petros, Mulugeta

    2017-04-01

    Sustained high-quality column CO2 measurements from space are required to improve estimates of regional and global scale sources and sinks to attribute them to specific biogeochemical processes for improving models of carbon-climate interactions and to reduce uncertainties in projecting future change. Several studies show that space-borne CO2 measurements offer many advantages particularly over high altitudes, tropics and southern oceans. Current satellite-based sensing provides rapid CO2 monitoring with global-scale coverage and high spatial resolution. However, these sensors are based on passive remote sensing, which involves limitations such as full seasonal and high latitude coverage, poor sensitivity to the lower atmosphere, retrieval complexities and radiation path length uncertainties. CO2 active optical remote sensing is an alternative technique that has the potential to overcome these limitations. The need for space-based CO2 active optical remote sensing using the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been advocated by the Advanced Space Carbon and Climate Observation of Planet Earth (A-Scope) and Active Sensing of CO2 Emission over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) studies in Europe and the USA. Space-based IPDA systems can provide sustained, high precision and low-bias column CO2 in presence of thin clouds and aerosols while covering critical regions such as high latitude ecosystems, tropical ecosystems, southern ocean, managed ecosystems, urban and industrial systems and coastal systems. At NASA Langley Research Center, technology developments are in progress to provide high pulse energy 2-μm IPDA that enables optimum, lower troposphere weighted column CO2 measurements from space. This system provides simultaneous ranging; information on aerosol and cloud distributions; measurements over region of broken clouds; and reduces influences of surface complexities. Through the continual support from NASA Earth Science Technology Office

  13. Estimation of vegetation photosynthetic capacity from space-based measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence for terrestrial biosphere models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongguang; Guanter, Luis; Berry, Joseph A; Joiner, Joanna; van der Tol, Christiaan; Huete, Alfredo; Gitelson, Anatoly; Voigt, Maximilian; Köhler, Philipp

    2014-12-01

    Photosynthesis simulations by terrestrial biosphere models are usually based on the Farquhar's model, in which the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax ) is a key control parameter of photosynthetic capacity. Even though Vcmax is known to vary substantially in space and time in response to environmental controls, it is typically parameterized in models with tabulated values associated to plant functional types. Remote sensing can be used to produce a spatially continuous and temporally resolved view on photosynthetic efficiency, but traditional vegetation observations based on spectral reflectance lack a direct link to plant photochemical processes. Alternatively, recent space-borne measurements of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) can offer an observational constraint on photosynthesis simulations. Here, we show that top-of-canopy SIF measurements from space are sensitive to Vcmax at the ecosystem level, and present an approach to invert Vcmax from SIF data. We use the Soil-Canopy Observation of Photosynthesis and Energy (SCOPE) balance model to derive empirical relationships between seasonal Vcmax and SIF which are used to solve the inverse problem. We evaluate our Vcmax estimation method at six agricultural flux tower sites in the midwestern US using spaced-based SIF retrievals. Our Vcmax estimates agree well with literature values for corn and soybean plants (average values of 37 and 101 μmol m(-2)  s(-1) , respectively) and show plausible seasonal patterns. The effect of the updated seasonally varying Vcmax parameterization on simulated gross primary productivity (GPP) is tested by comparing to simulations with fixed Vcmax values. Validation against flux tower observations demonstrate that simulations of GPP and light use efficiency improve significantly when our time-resolved Vcmax estimates from SIF are used, with R(2) for GPP comparisons increasing from 0.85 to 0.93, and for light use efficiency from 0.44 to 0.83. Our results support the use of

  14. An optimum organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary space base. Ph.D. Thesis - Fla. State Univ., 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragusa, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An optimum hypothetical organizational structure was studied for a large earth-orbiting, multidisciplinary research and applications space base manned by a crew of technologists. Because such a facility does not presently exist, in situ empirical testing was not possible. Study activity was, therefore, concerned with the identification of a desired organizational structural model rather than with the empirical testing of the model. The essential finding of this research was that a four-level project type total matrix model will optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of space base technologists.

  15. Steps Toward a Large Space-Based UV/Optical Fizeau Interferometer: The GSFC Fizeau Interferometer Testbed (FIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, K. G.; Lyon, R. G.; Mazzuca, L. M.; Solyar, G.; Marzouk, J.; Mundy, L. G.; Armstrong, J. T.; Zhang, X.

    2002-12-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center is pursuing the development of space-based, long-baseline (>0.5km) UV-optical Fizeau imaging interferometers to enable the next major stride toward very high angular resolution astronomical observations. This effort includes the development and operation of the Fizeau Interferometry Testbed (FIT), in collaboration with the Naval Research Lab/NPOI, Univ. of MD, and Sigma Space Corporation. The FIT will be used to explore the principles of and requirements for the Stellar Imager (SI) mission concept (http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/ ~si) and other such Fizeau Interferometers/Sparse Aperture Telescope missions, leading in the end to the Planet Imager (PI), which is the ultimate goal of the current Origins Program. The primary goal of the FIT program is to demonstrate closed-loop control of mirrors (tip, tilt, piston, translation of array elements) and the overall system to keep the optical beams in phase and enable high quality imaging by a many-element (7-30) Fizeau Interferometric System. The FIT will also be used to assess various wavefront reconstruction and sensing and image reconstruction algorithms for utility and accuracy by application to real data generated by the Testbed. In this paper, we describe the design and goals of the system, provide a status report on its construction, and note our future plans. The FIT development is supported by NASA-ROSS/SARA grants to GSFC, UMD, and NRL and by internal GSFC R&D funds.

  16. A new method of testing space-based high-energy electron detectors with radioactive electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Y. [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Space Environment Exploration, Beijing (China); Shen, G.H., E-mail: shgh@nssc.ac.cn [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Space Environment Exploration, Beijing (China); Sun, Y., E-mail: sunying@nssc.ac.cn [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Space Environment Exploration, Beijing (China); Zhou, D.Z., E-mail: dazhuang.zhou@gmail.com [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Space Environment Exploration, Beijing (China); Zhang, X.X., E-mail: xxzhang@cma.gov.cn [National Center for Space Weather, Beijing (China); Li, J.W., E-mail: lijw@cma.gov.cn [National Center for Space Weather, Beijing (China); Huang, C., E-mail: huangc@cma.gov.cn [National Center for Space Weather, Beijing (China); Zhang, X.G., E-mail: zhangxg@nssc.ac.cn [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Space Environment Exploration, Beijing (China); Dong, Y.J., E-mail: dyj@nssc.ac.cn [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Space Environment Exploration, Beijing (China); Zhang, W.J., E-mail: zhangreatest@163.com [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Space Environment Exploration, Beijing (China); Zhang, B.Q., E-mail: zhangbinquan@nssc.ac.cn [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Space Environment Exploration, Beijing (China); Shi, C.Y., E-mail: scy@nssc.ac.cn [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Space Environment Exploration, Beijing (China)

    2016-05-01

    Space-based electron detectors are commonly tested using radioactive β-sources which emit a continuous spectrum without spectral lines. Therefore, the tests are often to be considered only qualitative. This paper introduces a method, which results in more than a qualitative test even when using a β-source. The basic idea is to use the simulated response function of the instrument to invert the measured spectrum and compare this inverted spectrum with a reference spectrum obtained from the same source. Here we have used Geant4 to simulate the instrument response function (IRF) and a 3.5 mm thick Li-drifted Si detector to obtain the reference {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Yi source spectrum to test and verify the geometric factors of the Omni-Direction Particle Detector (ODPD) on the Tiangong-1 (TG-1) and Tiangong-2 (TG-2) spacecraft. The TG spacecraft are experimental space laboratories and prototypes of the Chinese space station. The excellent agreement between the measured and reference spectra demonstrates that this test method can be used to quantitatively assess the quality of the instrument. Due to its simplicity, the method is faster and therefore more efficient than traditional full calibrations using an electron accelerator.

  17. IPv6 and IPsec Tests of a Space-Based Asset, the Cisco Router in Low Earth Orbit (CLEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William; Stewart, David; Wood, Lloyd; Jackson, Chris; Northam, James; Wilhelm, James

    2008-01-01

    This report documents the design of network infrastructure to support testing and demonstrating network-centric operations and command and control of space-based assets, using IPv6 and IPsec. These tests were performed using the Cisco router in Low Earth Orbit (CLEO), an experimental payload onboard the United Kingdom--Disaster Monitoring Constellation (UK-DMC) satellite built and operated by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL). On Thursday, 29 March 2007, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cisco Systems and SSTL performed the first configuration and demonstration of IPsec and IPv6 onboard a satellite in low Earth orbit. IPv6 is the next generation of the Internet Protocol (IP), designed to improve on the popular IPv4 that built the Internet, while IPsec is the protocol used to secure communication across IP networks. This demonstration was made possible in part by NASA s Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) and shows that new commercial technologies such as mobile networking, IPv6 and IPsec can be used for commercial, military and government space applications. This has direct application to NASA s Vision for Space Exploration. The success of CLEO has paved the way for new spacebased Internet technologies, such as the planned Internet Routing In Space (IRIS) payload at geostationary orbit, which will be a U.S. Department of Defense Joint Capability Technology Demonstration. This is a sanitized report for public distribution. All real addressing has been changed to psueco addressing.

  18. Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope (GEST): A Proposed Space-Based Microlensing Survey for Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, D.; Rhie, S. H.

    We present a conceptual design for a space based Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope (GEST) which will use the gravitational microlensing technique to detect extra solar planets with masses as low as that of Mars at all separations >~ 1 AU. The microlensing data would be collected by a diffraction limited, wide field imaging telescope of ~ 1.5m aperture equipped with a large array of red-optimized CCD detectors. Such a system would be able to monitor $\\sim 2\\times 10^8$ stars in $\\sim 6$ square degrees of the Galactic bulge at intervals of 20-30 minutes, and it would observe $\\sim 12000$ microlensing events in three bulge seasons. If planetary systems like our own are common, GEST should be able to detect $\\sim 5000$ planets over a 2.5 year lifetime. If gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn are rare, then GEST would detect $\\sim 1300$ planets in a 2.5 year mission if we assume that most planetary systems are dominated by planets of about Neptune's' mass. Such a mission would also discover $\\sim 100$ planets of an Earth mass or smaller if such planets are common. This is a factor of $\\sim 50$ better than the most ambitious ground based programs that have been proposed. GEST will also be sensitive to planets which have been separated from their parent stars.

  19. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Outer Planet In-Space Bases and Moon Bases for Resource Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as Helium 3 (3He) and deuterium can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and deuterium were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. The propulsion and transportation requirements for all of the major moons of Uranus and Neptune are presented. Analyses of orbital transfer vehicles (OTVs), landers, factories, and the issues with in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) low gravity processing factories are included. Preliminary observations are presented on near-optimal selections of moon base orbital locations, OTV power levels, and OTV and lander rendezvous points. Several artificial gravity in-space base designs and orbital sites at Uranus and Neptune and the OTV requirements to support them are also addressed.

  20. Seasonal dependence of northern high-latitude upper thermospheric winds : A quiet time climatological study based on ground-based and space-based measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhadly, Manbharat; Emmert, John; Drob, Douglas; Conde, Mark; Doornbos, E.N.; Shepherd, Gordon; Makela, Jonathan; Wu, Qian; Niciejewski, Rick; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the large-scale seasonal dependence of geomagnetically quiet time, northern high-latitude F region thermospheric winds by combining extensive observations from eight ground-based (optical remote sensing) and three space-based (optical remote sensing and in situ)

  1. Evaluating a Space-Based Indicator of Surface Ozone-NOx-VOC Sensitivity Over Midlatitude Source Regions and Application to Decadal Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining effective strategies for mitigating surface ozone (O3) pollution requires knowledge of the relative ambient concentrations of its precursors, NOx, and VOCs. The space-based tropospheric column ratio of formaldehyde to NO2 (FNR) has been used as an indicator to identif...

  2. Performance of a space-based wavelet compressor for plasma count data on the MMS Fast Plasma Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, A. C.; Smith, S. E.; Dorelli, J. C.; Gershman, D. J.; Yeh, P.; Schiff, C.; Avanov, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Data compression has been a staple of imaging instruments for years. Recently, plasma measurements have utilized compression with relatively low compression ratios. The Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on board the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission generates data roughly 100 times faster than previous plasma instruments, requiring a higher compression ratio to fit within the telemetry allocation. This study investigates the performance of a space-based compression standard employing a Discrete Wavelet Transform and a Bit Plane Encoder (DWT/BPE) in compressing FPI plasma count data. Data from the first 6 months of FPI operation are analyzed to explore the error modes evident in the data and how to adapt to them. While approximately half of the Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) maps had some level of loss, it was found that there is little effect on the plasma moments and that errors present in individual sky maps are typically minor. The majority of Dual Ion Spectrometer burst sky maps compressed in a lossless fashion, with no error introduced during compression. Because of induced compression error, the size limit for DES burst images has been increased for Phase 1B. Additionally, it was found that the floating point compression mode yielded better results when images have significant compression error, leading to floating point mode being used for the fast survey mode of operation for Phase 1B. Despite the suggested tweaks, it was found that wavelet-based compression, and a DWT/BPE algorithm in particular, is highly suitable to data compression for plasma measurement instruments and can be recommended for future missions.

  3. New Applications for Detecting Natural Hazards Using Ground and Space-Based GNSS-Derived Ionospheric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjathy, A.; Butala, M.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Wilson, B. D.; Iijima, B.; Akopian, V.; Mannucci, A.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and University of Southern California (USC) have jointly developed the Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM) to monitor space weather, study storm effects, and provide ionospheric calibration for various customers including NASA flight projects. JPL/USC GAIM is a physics-based 3D data assimilation model using 4DVAR and Kalman filter approaches to solve for ion and electron density states and other key ionospheric drivers. The JPL/USC GAIM technologies, now operating in real-time and post-processing modes, can routinely accept as input ground GPS TEC data from 1200+ sites including streaming and hourly GPS stations, occultation links from CHAMP, SAC-C, COSMIC and C/NOFS satellites, UV limb and nadir scans. In the presentation, first we will discuss recent advances in our assimilating ground-based GPS, C/NOFS and COSMIC occultation measurements using our GAIM system characterizing the ionosphere in 3D. We will elaborate on our improved space-based bias estimation techniques to generate high precision calibrated TEC measurements to be assimilated into GAIM. We will discuss the benefits of adding GLONASS measurements to our GIM and GAIM processing technologies. New and upcoming applications and first results will be shown for estimating very high precision TEC perturbations using real-time and post-processed GNSS observations from GEONET and IGS networks. We will demonstrate initial steps on how to integrate this GNSS ionosphere-based technology into a global tsunami warning system. Additional potential applications might include the remote sensing of ionospheric TEC perturbations generated by other natural hazards such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions and human-made events such as nuclear tests.

  4. A Novel Approach for Microgrid Protection Based upon Combined ANFIS and Hilbert Space-Based Power Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hadi Abdulwahid

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the use of distributed generation (DG has increased because of benefits such as increased reliability, reduced losses, improvement in the line capacity, and less environmental pollution. The protection of microgrids, which consist of generation sources, is one of the most crucial concerns of basic distribution operators. One of the key issues in this field is the protection of microgrids against permanent and temporary failures by improving the safety and reliability of the network. The traditional method has a number of disadvantages. The reliability and stability of a power system in a microgrid depend to a great extent on the efficiency of the protection scheme. The application of Artificial Intelligence approaches was introduced recently in the protection of distribution networks. The fault detection method depends on differential relay based on Hilbert Space-Based Power (HSBP theory to achieve fastest primary protection. It is backed up by a total harmonic distortion (THD detection method that takes over in case of a failure in the primary method. The backup protection would be completely independent of the main protection. This is rarely attained in practice. This paper proposes a new algorithm to improve protection performance by adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS. The protection can be obtained in a novel way based on this theory. An advantage of this algorithm is that the protection system operates in fewer than two cycles after the occurrence of the fault. Another advantage is that the error detection is not dependent on the selection of threshold values, and all types of internal fault can identify and show that the algorithm operates correctly for all types of faults while preventing unwanted tripping, even if the data were distorted by current transformer (CT saturation or by data mismatches. The simulation results show that the proposed circuit can identify the faulty phase in the microgrid quickly and

  5. Design and verification of focal plane assembly thermal control system of one space-based astronomy telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-gang; Fan, Xue-wu; Wang, Chen-jie; Wang, Ying-hao; Feng, Liang-jie; Du, Yun-fei; Ren, Guo-rui; Wang, Wei; Li, Chuang; Gao, Wei

    2015-10-01

    One space-based astronomy telescope will observe astronomy objects whose brightness should be lower than 23th magnitude. To ensure the telescope performance, very low system noise requirements need extreme low CCD operating temperature (lower than -65°C). Because the satellite will be launched in a low earth orbit, inevitable space external heat fluxes will result in a high radiator sink temperature (higher than -65°C). Only passive measures can't meet the focal plane cooling specification and active cooling technologies must be utilized. Based on detailed analysis on thermal environment of the telescope and thermal characteristics of focal plane assembly (FPA), active cooling system which is based on thermo-electric cooler (TEC) and heat rejection system (HRS) which is based on flexible heat pipe and radiator have been designed. Power consumption of TECs is dependent on the heat pumped requirements and its hot side temperature. Heat rejection capability of HRS is mainly dependent on the radiator size and temperature. To compromise TEC power consumption and the radiator size requirement, thermal design of FPA must be optimized. Parasitic heat loads on the detector is minimized to reduce the heat pumped demands of TECs and its power consumption. Thermal resistance of heat rejection system is minimized to reject the heat dissipation of TECs from the hot side to the radiator efficiently. The size and surface coating of radiator are optimized to compromise heat reject ion requirements and system constraints. Based on above work, transient thermal analysis of FPA is performed. FPA prototype model has been developed and thermal vacuum/balance test has been accomplished. From the test, temperature of key parts and working parameters of TECs in extreme cases have been acquired. Test results show that CCD can be controlled below -65°C and all parts worked well during the test. All of these verified the thermal design of FPA and some lessons will be presented in this

  6. The MOPITT instrument as a Prototype for Long-Term Space-Based Atmospheric Measurements in the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, James

    2016-07-01

    One of the major characteristics of the Anthropocene will be changes in all the Earth systems on many timescales. Changes that occur within a generation will be very significant for policy decisions and these will require measurements on corresponding timescales from space-based instruments, but these times are long compared to traditional satellite lifetimes. Whether by luck or by good design there are now a number of satellite missions that are recording data over long time periods. With a single instrument, decadal and longer time series of relevant atmospheric parameters have been achieved and the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument is one such instrument. Launched on 18th December 1999 on the Terra spacecraft, MOPITT has now completed more than 16 years of operation measuring carbon monoxide (CO) over the planet and the mission continues. It is entirely possible that these measurements will span two decades before completion. MOPITT therefore offers a case study of a very long single-instrument time series, albeit one with challenges because this longevity was not part of the original design criteria: The original design specified about a five year life and this has already been considerably exceeded. MOPITT does enable us to look at long term trends and intermittent phenomena over the planet for an extended period of tie encompassing an entire solar cycle and many cycles of El Niño and other quasi-periodic phenomena. This presentation will consider, with examples, some of the advantages and some of the problems of these long-term space measurements with an eye to the future and the needs of future generations. MOPITT was provided to NASA's Terra spacecraft by the Canadian Space Agency and was built by COMDEV of Cambridge, Ontario. Data processing is performed by the MOPITT team at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO. Instrument control is by the team at the University of Toronto.

  7. Feasibility Study of Space-based CO2 Remote Sensing Using Pulsed 2-micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, U. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Ismail, S.; Davis, K. J.; Kawa, S. R.; Menzies, R. T.; Petros, M.; Yu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is recognized as the most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. While CO2 concentration is rapidly increasing, understanding of the global carbon cycle remains a primary scientific challenge. This is mainly due to the lack of full characterization of CO2 sources and sinks. Quantifying the current global distribution of CO2 sources and sinks with sufficient accuracy and spatial resolution is a critical requirement for improving models of carbon-climate interactions and for attributing them to specific biogeochemical processes. This requires sustained atmospheric CO2 observations with high precision, and low bias for high accuracy, and spatial and temporal dense representation that cannot be fully realized with current CO2 observing systems, including existing satellite CO2 passive remote sensors. Progress in 2-micron instrument technologies, airborne testing, and system performance simulations indicates that the necessary lower tropospheric weighted CO2 measurements can be achieved from space using new high pulse energy 2-micron direct detection active remote sensing. Advantages of the CO2 active remote sensing include low bias measurements that are independent of sun light or Earth's radiation and day/night coverage over all latitudes and seasons. In addition, the direct detection system provides precise ranging with simultaneous measurement of aerosol and cloud distributions. The 2-micron active remote sensing offers strong CO2 absorption lines with optimum low tropospheric and near surface weighting. A feasibility study, including system optimization and sensitivity analysis of a space-based 2-micron pulsed IPDA lidar for CO2 measurement, is presented. This is based on the successful demonstration of the CO2 double-pulse IPDA lidar and the technology maturation of the triple-pulse IPDA lidar, currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center. Preliminary simulations indicate CO2 random measurement errors of 0.71, 0.35 and 0.13 ppm

  8. The COSPAR roadmap on Space-based observation and Integrated Earth System Science for 2016-2025

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellous, Jean-Louis

    2016-07-01

    space-based observing systems, further long-term requirements for observations and other data, technological advances and data challenges, and the importance of enhanced international cooperation.

  9. Rare-Earth Garnets and Perovskites for Space-Based ADR Cooling at High T and Low H

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, T. T.; Rowlett, B. A.; Ramirez, R. A.; Shirron, P. J.; Canavan, E. R.; DiPirro, M. J.; Panek, J. S.; Tuttle, J. G.; Shull, R. D.; Fry, R. A.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Future NASA satellite detector systems must be cooled to the 0.1 K temperature range to meet the stringent energy resolution and sensitivity requirements demanded by mid-term astronomy missions. The development of adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration (ADR) materials that can efficiently cool from the passive radiative cooling limit of approx. 30 K down to sub-Kelvin under low magnetic fields (H less than or equal to 3 T) would represent a significant improvement in space-based cooling technology. Governed by these engineering goals, our efforts have focused on quantifying the change in magnetic entropy of rare-earth garnets and perovskites. Various compositions within the gadolinium gallium iron garnet solid solution series (GGIG, Gd3Ga(5-x)Fe(x)O12, 0.00 less than or equal to X less than or equal to 5.00) and gadolinium aluminum perovskite (GAP, GdAlO3) have been synthesized via an organometallic complex approach and confirmed with powder x-ray diffraction. The magnetization of the GGIG and GAP materials has been measured as a function of composition (0.00 less than or equal to X less than or equal to 5.00), temperature (2 K less than or equal to T less than or equal to 30 K) and applied magnetic field (0 T less than or equal to H less than or equal to 3 T). The magnetic entropy change (DeltaS(sub mag)) between 0 T and 3 T was determined from the magnetization data. In the GGIG system, DeltaS(sub mag) was compositionally dependent; Fe(sup 3+) additions up to X less than or equal to 2.44 increased DeltaS(sub mag) at T > 5 K. For GAP, DeltaS(sub mag) was similar to that of GGIG, X = 0.00, both in terms of magnitude and temperature dependence at T > 10 K. However, the DeltaS(sub mag) of GAP at T < 10 K was less than the endmember GGIG composition, X = 0.00, and exhibited maximum approx. 5 K.

  10. TARGET/CRYOCHIL - THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS AND SUBSCALE MODELING OF SPACE-BASED ORBIT TRANSFER VEHICLE CRYOGENIC PROPELLANT RESUPPLY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelice, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    The resupply of the cryogenic propellants is an enabling technology for space-based transfer vehicles. As part of NASA Lewis's ongoing efforts in micro-gravity fluid management, thermodynamic analysis and subscale modeling techniques have been developed to support an on-orbit test bed for cryogenic fluid management technologies. These efforts have been incorporated into two FORTRAN programs, TARGET and CRYOCHIL. The TARGET code is used to determine the maximum temperature at which the filling of a given tank can be initiated and subsequently filled to a specified pressure and fill level without venting. The main process is the transfer of the energy stored in the thermal mass of the tank walls into the inflowing liquid. This process is modeled by examining the end state of the no-vent fill process. This state is assumed to be at thermal equilibrium between the tank and the fluid which is well mixed and saturated at the tank pressure. No specific assumptions are made as to the processes or the intermediate thermodynamic states during the filling. It is only assumed that the maximum tank pressure occurs at the final state. This assumption implies that, during the initial phases of the filling, the injected liquid must pass through the bulk vapor in such a way that it absorbs a sufficient amount of its superheat so that moderate tank pressures can be maintained. It is believed that this is an achievable design goal for liquid injection systems. TARGET can be run with any fluid for which the user has a properties data base. Currently it will only run for hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen since pressure-enthalpy data sets have been included for these fluids only. CRYOCHIL's primary function is to predict the optimum liquid charge to be injected for each of a series of charge-hold-vent chilldown cycles. This information can then be used with specified mass flow rates and valve response times to control a liquid injection system for tank chilldown operations. This will

  11. A Strategy for Short-Term Earthquake Forecasting Based on Combined Ground and Space-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafatos, M.; Papadopoulos, G. A.; Karastathis, V. K.; Minadakis, G.; Ouzounov, D.; Pulinets, S. A.; Tramutoli, V.; Tsinganos, K.

    2014-12-01

    No standard methodologies regarding the short-term (hours, days, few weeks) forecasting of earthquakes have been widely adopted so far. However, promising approaches from ground-based (e.g. foreshocks) and space-based (e.g. thermal anomalies) observations have been described. We propose to apply a multidisciplinary strategy by performing real-time experiments towards the identification of space-time windows having increased probability beyond chance for the occurrence of strong earthquakes (M>5.5). This is a new collaborative study which will continue the best practices achieved from other projects such as the EU-FP7 PRE-EARTHQUAKE and the ongoing ISSI project LAICa. The test region covers the entire Greece which is of the highest seismicity all over western Eurasia, while closer attention will be given to the Corinth Rift (Central Greece) which is an asymmetric half-graben of high seismicity opening rapidly with geodetic extension rates up to about 15mmyr-1. Ground-based observations will mainly include seismicity, magnetometers and radon measurements while space observations will include the ones that may provide thermal anomalies, GPS and TEC. The strategy will include the development of a system operating in real-time basis with strong tools and protocols for the collection, archiving and evaluation of the different types of data. The software part of the system may incorporate three basic interfaces implemented via open source technology: (1) The up-streaming software interface for the collection and archiving of data; (2) The backend real-time software interface incorporating all the available models; (3) The frontend WEBGIS software interface that will allow for data representation and mapping. The establishment of some certain rules for issuing non-public seismic alerts is needed. Therefore, in this paper we will also discuss the significance of the proposed work for the issues of earthquake forecasting/prediction statements and what critical new

  12. End-to-End Information System design at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. [data transmission between user and space-based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    In recognition of a pressing need of the 1980s to optimize the two-way flow of information between a ground-based user and a remote-space-based sensor, an end-to-end approach to the design of information systems has been adopted at the JPL. This paper reviews End-to-End Information System (EEIS) activity at the JPL, with attention given to the scope of the EEIS transfer function, and functional and physical elements of the EEIS. The relationship between the EEIS and the NASA End-to-End Data System program is discussed.

  13. Akatsuki (space based cloud-tracking) and TNG/HARPS-N (ground based Doppler velocimetry) coordinated wind measurements of cloud top Venus' atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, R.; Machado, P.; Peralta, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Widemann, T.; Harutyunyan, A.

    2017-09-01

    HARPS-N spectrograph was used for the first time to study the atmosphere's dynamics of a solar system body. We present zonal and meridional winds profiles of Venus' cloud top atmosphere, from coordinated observations using TNG/HARPS-N (Doppler velocimetry) and space-based Akatsuki (cloud tracking). The HARPS-N spectrograph provided unprecedented high quality spectra at Venus atmosphere, allowing us to retrieve wind velocities with an unmatched precision and spatial and temporal accuracy. The data will contribute to better constrain both zonal and meridional wind flow and detect and characterize mesoscale atmospheric waves on Venus' atmosphere.

  14. A Giant Leap Towards a Space-based Gravitational-Wave Observatory: LISA Pathfinder, the LISA Test Package, and ST7-DRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, James; McNamara, Paul; Ziemer, John; LPF Team, LTP Team, ST7-DRS Team

    2015-01-01

    The science case for a space-based gravitational wave instrument observing in the milliHertz band covers a wide area of topics in astrophysics and fundamental physics including galaxy formation and evolution, black hole growth, compact object demographics, gravitational physics, and cosmology. This strong science case is largely responsible for the high rankings received by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission in major reviews in both the US and Europe. A key element of the development of LISA is the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) technology demonstrator mission, which will launch in the coming year. Led by ESA and a consortium of European national agencies and with a minority contribution from NASA, LPF will demonstrate several key technologies for the LISA concept. LPF includes two scientific payloads: the European LISA Technology Package (LTP) and the NASA-provided ST7-DRS. The mission will place two test masses in drag-free flight and measure the relative acceleration between them. This measurement will validate a number of technologies that are critical to LISA-like gravitational wave instruments including sensing and control of the test masses, drag-free control laws, micro-Newton thrusters, and picometer-level laser metrology. We will present an overview of the LISA Pathfinder mission, the LTP and ST7-DRS payloads, and their expected impact on the larger effort to realize a space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  15. Secure, Network-Centric Operations of a Space-Based Asset: Cisco Router in Low Earth Orbit (CLEO) and Virtual Mission Operations Center (VMOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William; Stewart, Dave; Shell, Dan; Wood, Lloyd; Paulsen, Phil; Jackson, Chris; Hodgson, Dave; Notham, James; Bean, Neville; Miller, Eric

    2005-01-01

    This report documents the design of network infrastructure to support operations demonstrating the concept of network-centric operations and command and control of space-based assets. These demonstrations showcase major elements of the Transformal Communication Architecture (TCA), using Internet Protocol (IP) technology. These demonstrations also rely on IP technology to perform the functions outlined in the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Space Link Extension (SLE) document. A key element of these demonstrations was the ability to securely use networks and infrastructure owned and/or controlled by various parties. This is a sanitized technical report for public release. There is a companion report available to a limited audience. The companion report contains detailed networking addresses and other sensitive material and is available directly from William Ivancic at Glenn Research Center.

  16. Long-term monitoring of long-period seismicity and space-based SO2 observations at African lava lake volcanoes Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira (DR Congo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrière, Julien; Oth, Adrien; Theys, Nicolas; d'Oreye, Nicolas; Kervyn, François

    2017-06-01

    Magma ascent that may lead to an eruption is commonly accompanied by variations of long-period seismic activity and SO2 degassing. Space-based measurements of SO2 emission rates represent a rapidly emerging and highly convenient approach for volcano monitoring; however, combining these long-term remote sensing observations with seismic data is still rare and, in particular, the potential of such a multidisciplinary approach as volcano monitoring tool remains largely unexplored. Here shallow magmatic activity and magma migration patterns at the two closely located African volcanoes Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira are inferred from a nearly 3 years long SO2 emissions record and seismic observations between April 2014 and February 2017. The discrimination of magma movements into shallow plumbing systems allows for signs of volcanic unrest to be deciphered on a daily time scale, even with limited instrumentation on site.

  17. Ratioing methods for in-flight response calibration of space-based spectro-radiometers, operating in the solar spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobb, Dan

    2017-11-01

    One of the most significant problems for space-based spectro-radiometer systems, observing Earth from space in the solar spectral band (UV through short-wave IR), is in achievement of the required absolute radiometric accuracy. Classical methods, for example using one or more sun-illuminated diffusers as reflectance standards, do not generally provide methods for monitoring degradation of the in-flight reference after pre-flight characterisation. Ratioing methods have been proposed that provide monitoring of degradation of solar attenuators in flight, thus in principle allowing much higher confidence in absolute response calibration. Two example methods are described. It is shown that systems can be designed for relatively low size and without significant additions to the complexity of flight hardware.

  18. Variability of diurnal tide in the MLT region over Tirunelveli (8.7°N), India: Consistency between ground- and space-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dupinder; Gurubaran, S.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric tides propagating upward into the mesosphere-lower thermosphere region carry the variability from the lower atmosphere and influence the energy and momentum budgets of this region and above. A comprehensive understanding of these variabilities thus becomes important. In this work, we study the seasonal and interannual variabilities of the diurnal tides, in particular, the migrating DW1 (westward, wave number 1) tide and the nonmigrating DE3 (eastward, wave number 3) tide from two different platforms. Long-term observations from the MF radar at Tirunelveli (8.7°N, 77.8°E) constitute one data set. Temperature and wind data from Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry and TIMED Doppler Interferometer observations from the TIMED satellite mission constitute the other. Continuous radar observations yield long data records with high temporal resolution. Space-based observations, on the other hand, are relatively short but provide spatiotemporal information, the latter being useful in separating migrating and nonmigrating components. In this work, the consistency between the tidal signatures obtained from the ground- and space-based platforms is examined and subtle differences between the two data sets are brought out. One particular feature pertains to a possible solar cycle influence on the diurnal tide, a feature which is more prominently seen in radar observations, though restricted to a certain epoch of the solar cycle. A solar cycle dependence of the zonal mean densities observed in satellite data sets at similar altitudes appears to be a plausible source for the observed solar cycle signature in the diurnal tide, although the role of other agencies in modulating the diurnal tide activity in the solar cycle time periods cannot be ruled out.

  19. Evaluating a Space-Based Indicator of Surface Ozone-NOx-VOC Sensitivity Over Midlatitude Source Regions and Application to Decadal Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaomeng; Fiore, Arlene M.; Murray, Lee T.; Valin, Lukas C.; Lamsal, Lok N.; Duncan, Bryan; Folkert Boersma, K.; De Smedt, Isabelle; Abad, Gonzalo Gonzalez; Chance, Kelly; Tonnesen, Gail S.

    2017-10-01

    Determining effective strategies for mitigating surface ozone (O3) pollution requires knowledge of the relative ambient concentrations of its precursors, NOx, and VOCs. The space-based tropospheric column ratio of formaldehyde to NO2 (FNR) has been used as an indicator to identify NOx-limited versus NOx-saturated O3 formation regimes. Quantitative use of this indicator ratio is subject to three major uncertainties: (1) the split between NOx-limited and NOx-saturated conditions may shift in space and time, (2) the ratio of the vertically integrated column may not represent the near-surface environment, and (3) satellite products contain errors. We use the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model to evaluate the quantitative utility of FNR observed from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument over three northern midlatitude source regions. We find that FNR in the model surface layer is a robust predictor of the simulated near-surface O3 production regime. Extending this surface-based predictor to a column-based FNR requires accounting for differences in the HCHO and NO2 vertical profiles. We compare four combinations of two OMI HCHO and NO2 retrievals with modeled FNR. The spatial and temporal correlations between the modeled and satellite-derived FNR vary with the choice of NO2 product, while the mean offset depends on the choice of HCHO product. Space-based FNR indicates that the spring transition to NOx-limited regimes has shifted at least a month earlier over major cities (e.g., New York, London, and Seoul) between 2005 and 2015. This increase in NOx sensitivity implies that NOx emission controls will improve O3 air quality more now than it would have a decade ago.

  20. Low-noise InGaAs balanced p-i-n photoreceiver for space based remote sensing applications at 2 micron wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Abhay; Becker, Don; Datta, Shubhashish

    2008-08-01

    Greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane, can be remotely monitored through optical spectroscopy at ~2 micron wavelength. Space based LIDAR sensors have become increasingly effective for greenhouse gas detection to study global warming. The functionality of these LIDAR sensors can be enhanced to track global wind patterns and to monitor polar ice caps. Such space based applications require sensors with very low sensitivity in order to detect weak backscattered signals from an altitude of ~1000km. Coherent detection allows shot noise limited operation at such optical power levels. In this context, p-i-n photoreceivers are of specific interest due to their ability to handle large optical power, thereby enabling high coherent gain. Balanced detection further improves the system performance by cancelling common mode noise, such as laser relative intensity noise (RIN). We demonstrate a low-noise InGaAs balanced p-i-n photoreceiver at 2μm wavelength. The photoreceiver is comprised of a matched pair of p-i-n photodiodes having a responsivity of 1.34A/W that is coupled to transimpedance amplifier (TIA) having an RF gain of 24dB (transimpedance = 800Ω) and input equivalent noise of 19pA/√Hz at 300K. The photoreceiver demonstrates a 3dB bandwidth of 200MHz. Such bandwidth is suitable for LIDAR sensors having 20 to 30m resolution. The photoreceiver exhibits a common mode rejection ratio of 30dB and optical power handling of 3dBm per photodiode.

  1. Space-based RSS localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, Paul J.M.; Dil, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a device for localization of a node having an unknown position. More in particular, the present invention relates 5 to a method and a device in which a mobile blind node is used to determine the position of a fixed blind node within a localization area,

  2. Advanced Space-Based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-17

    concern. Sources of radiation in space include the trapped particles in the Van Allen belts and transient events such as solar events and galactic...visible laser (the ‘ probe ’ laser) to couple the top-most sublevel in the valence band of the quantum dot to the second sublevel in the conduction band...In this case, there will be a strong interband absorption associated with this probe laser. If a second IR light beam (the coupling light – which

  3. Advanced Space-Based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    reduction in the measured current. This field-effect behavior is exactly similar to that of a depletion-mode MOSFET . Lateral current should continue...decreasing in a roughly similar fashion below the measurement capability of the instrument (~ 1 pA). Finally, the VSD > 0 V trace in Fig. 5 shows a monotonic

  4. ERATOSTHENES: excellence research Centre for Earth surveillance and space-based monitoring of the environment, the EXCELSIOR Horizon 2020 teaming project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Kontoes, Haris; Schreier, Gunter; Ansmann, Albert; Komodromos, George; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Mamouri, Rodanthi; Michaelides, Silas; Nisantzi, Argyro; Papoutsa, Christiana; Neocleous, Kyriacos; Mettas, Christodoulos; Tzouvaras, Marios; Evagorou, Evagoras; Christofe, Andreas; Melillos, George; Papoutsis, Ioannis

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the strategy and vision to upgrade the existing ERATOSTHENES Research Centre (ERC) established within the Cyprus University of Technology (CUT) into a sustainable, viable and autonomous Centre of Excellence (CoE) for Earth Surveillance and Space-Based Monitoring of the Environment, which will provide the highest quality of related services on the National, European and International levels. EXCELSIOR is a Horizon 2020 Teaming project which addresses a specific challenge defined by the work program, namely, the reduction of substantial disparities in the European Union by supporting research and innovation activities and systems in low performing countries. It also aims at establishing long-term and strategic partnerships between the Teaming partners, thus reducing internal research and innovation disparities within European Research and Innovation landscape. The proposed CoE envisions the upgrading of the existing ERC into an inspiring environment for conducting basic and applied research and innovation in the areas of the integrated use of remote sensing and space-based techniques for monitoring the environment. Environment has been recognized by the Smart Specialization Strategy of Cyprus as the first horizontal priority for future growth of the island. The foreseen upgrade will regard the expansion of this vision to systematic monitoring of the environment using Earth Observation, space and ground based integrated technologies. Such an approach will lead to the systematic monitoring of all three domains of the Environment (Air, Land, Water). Five partners have united to upgrade the existing ERC into a CoE, with the common vision to become a world-class innovation, research and education centre, actively contributing to the European Research Area (ERA). More specifically, the Teaming project is a team effort between the Cyprus University of Technology (CUT, acting as the coordinator), the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), the

  5. Space-Based Near-Infrared CO2 Measurements: Testing the Orbiting Carbon Observatory Retrieval Algorithm and Validation Concept Using SCIAMACHY Observations over Park Falls, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, H.; Toon, G. C.; Sen, B.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Buchwitz, M.; deBeek, R.; Burrows, J. P.; Crisp, D.; Christi, M.; hide

    2006-01-01

    Space-based measurements of reflected sunlight in the near-infrared (NIR) region promise to yield accurate and precise observations of the global distribution of atmospheric CO2. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) is a future NASA mission, which will use this technique to measure the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of CO2 (XCO2) with the precision and accuracy needed to quantify CO2 sources and sinks on regional scales (approx.1000 x 1000 sq km and to characterize their variability on seasonal timescales. Here, we have used the OCO retrieval algorithm to retrieve XCO2 and surface pressure from space-based Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) measurements and from coincident ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements of the O2 A band at 0.76 mm and the 1.58 mm CO2 band for Park Falls,Wisconsin. Even after accounting for a systematic error in our representation of the O2 absorption cross sections, we still obtained a positive bias between SCIAMACHY and FTS XCO2 retrievals of approx.3.5%. Additionally, the retrieved surface pressures from SCIAMACHY systematically underestimate measurements of a calibrated pressure sensor at the FTS site. These findings lead us to speculate about inadequacies in the forward model of our retrieval algorithm. By assuming a 1% intensity offset in the O2 A band region for the SCIAMACHY XCO2 retrieval, we significantly improved the spectral fit and achieved better consistency between SCIAMACHY and FTS XCO2 retrievals. We compared the seasonal cycle of XCO2 at Park Falls from SCIAMACHY and FTS retrievals with calculations of the Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (MATCH/CASA) and found a good qualitative agreement but with MATCH/CASA underestimating the measured seasonal amplitude. Furthermore, since SCIAMACHY observations are similar in viewing geometry and spectral range to those of OCO, this study represents an important

  6. A multi-band shunt hybrid active filter with reduced sensor count

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hybrid active filter; harmonic extraction; multiple synchronous reference frames; power quality. Abstract. A Shunt Hybrid Active Filter (SHAF) is an attractive option for realizing low-cost harmonic compensation solutions. This paper ... This strategy is apt for harmonic filtering solutions where low cost is the exclusive priority.

  7. Multi-band multi-service sensing: metamaterials myth and reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2013-12-01

    Demands by the communications industry for greater bandwidth push the capability of conventional wireless technology. Part of the Radio Spectrum that is suitable for mobility is very limited. Higher frequency waves above 30 GHz tend to travel only a few miles or less and generally do not penetrate solid materials very well. Unmanned Aerial System applications require electronic scanning antenna capabilities, in challenging environmental conditions, over very large bandwidths. In addition to that, it is desirable to have as much reduction as possible in size, weight, power and cost. Metamaterials are recently being introduced by periodic repetition of some inclusions in a host medium, which may be described as effective media characterized by a set of equivalent constitutive parameters. Self-similarity in creating periodic structures is the basis of building volume or 2D holographic components. The latter does more than periodic repeats. Similar, but more advanced concepts (fractal in nature) are used to model phase screens used in modeling the atmospheric turbulence. Unfortunately, metamaterials (MTMs) are anisotropic (direction-dependent) and this makes their application limited in terms of use as antennas for mobile platforms. However, conceptually, controlled-anisotropy can be applied to make phased-arrays, beam-forming, and beam scanning. This issue then begs the question of cost comparison with conventional materials that can be found in nature, e.g., low-cost optics lenses, or conventional RF scanning antennas. As for lensing and fixed platform imaging, the story is very different, as super-lens is expected to be a byproduct. Nevertheless, even if metamaterials become readily available, the atmosphere around the globe cannot be replaced. Neither, broadband wireless connectivity to a mobile can be achieved via fiber optics. This paper, presents a Hybrid radio-frequency (RF) and Wireless Optical solution to provide adaptive sensing in an opportunistic fashion, with or without metamaterials. A byproduct of the latter will be broadband and reliable global connectivity.

  8. Adjustment of ocean color sensor calibration through multi-band statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Richard P; Werdell, P Jeremy

    2010-01-18

    The band-by-band vicarious calibration of on-orbit satellite ocean color instruments, such as SeaWiFS and MODIS, using ground-based measurements has significant residual uncertainties. This paper applies spectral shape and population statistics to tune the calibration of the blue bands against each other to allow examination of the interband calibration and potentially provide an analysis of calibration trends. This adjustment does not require simultaneous matches of ground and satellite observations. The method demonstrates the spectral stability of the SeaWiFS calibration and identifies a drift in the MODIS instrument onboard Aqua that falls within its current calibration uncertainties.

  9. Mass renormalization and unconventional pairing in multi-band Fe-based superconductors- a phenomenological approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drechsler, S.L.; Efremov, D.; Grinenko, V. [IFW-Dresden (Germany); Johnston, S. [Inst. of Quantum Matter, University of British Coulumbia, Vancouver (Canada); Rosner, H. [MPI-cPfS, Dresden, (Germany); Kikoin, K. [Tel Aviv University (Israel)

    2015-07-01

    Combining DFT calculations of the density of states and plasma frequencies with experimental thermodynamic, optical, ARPES, and dHvA data taken from the literature, we estimate both the high-energy (Coulomb, Hund's rule coupling) and the low-energy (el-boson coupling) electronic mass renormalization [H(L)EMR] for typical Fe-pnictides with T{sub c}<40 K, focusing on (K,Rb,Cs)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, (Ca,Na)122, (Ba,K)122, LiFeAs, and LaFeO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}As with and without As-vacancies. Using Eliashberg theory we show that these systems can NOT be described by a very strong el-boson coupling constant λ ≥ ∝ 2, being in conflict with the HEMR as seen by DMFT, ARPES and optics. Instead, an intermediate s{sub ±} coupling regime is realized, mainly based on interband spin fluctuations from one predominant pair of bands. For (Ca,Na)122, there is also a non-negligible intraband el-phonon/orbital fluctuation intraband contribution. The coexistence of magnetic As-vacancies and high-T{sub c}=28 K for LaFeO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}As{sub 1-δ} excludes an orbital fluctuation dominated s{sub ++} scenario at least for that system. In contrast, the line nodal BaFe{sub 2}(As,P){sub 2} near the quantum critical point is found as a superstrongly coupled system. The role of a pseudo-gap is briefly discussed for some of these systems.

  10. Accelerating gravitational wave parameter estimation with multi-band template interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinciguerra, Serena; Veitch, John; Mandel, Ilya

    2017-06-01

    Parameter estimation on gravitational wave signals from compact binary coalescence (CBC) requires the evaluation of computationally intensive waveform models, typically the bottleneck in the analysis. This cost will increase further as low frequency sensitivity in later second and third generation detectors motivates the use of longer waveforms. We describe a method for accelerating parameter estimation by exploiting the chirping behaviour of the signals to sample the waveform sparsely for portions where the full frequency resolution is not required. We demonstrate that the method can reproduce the original results with a waveform mismatch of  ⩽ 5× 10-7 , but with a waveform generation cost up to ∼50 times lower for computationally costly frequency-domain waveforms starting from below 8 Hz.

  11. Simultaneous multi-band channel sounding at mm-Wave frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Robert; Häfner, Stephan; Dupleich, Diego

    2016-01-01

    and verification of those novel technologies required an understanding of the propagation effects at mm-Wave which enabled by channel sounding measurements and analysis. Due to the variety of considered frequency bands and the necessity of spatial resolved measurements for e.g. testing of beamforming approaches......The vision of multi Gbit/s data rates in future mobile networks requires the change to millimeter wave (mm-Wave) frequencies for increasing bandwidth. As a consequence, new technologies have to be deployed to tackle the drawbacks of higher frequency bands, e.g. increased path loss. Development......, which comprises the microwave band at 10 GHz and the mm-Wave band at 30 GHz. Preliminary analysis results are presented....

  12. Determination of Precise Satellite Orbital Position Using Multi-Band GNSS Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Morton (U.S.) and her team conducted mountain -based RO (MRO) experiment. 15. SUBJECT TERMS GNSS, occultation, atmospheric, meteorological, microwave...frequency biases, and ionosphere TEC. The PI’s US collaborator Dr. Jade Morton and her team has conducted mountain -based RO (MRO) experiment. The...showing authors, title, journal , issue, pages, and date, for each category list the following: a) papers published in peer-reviewed journals

  13. Archeological treasures protection based on early forest wildfire multi-band imaging detection system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Gouverneur; S. Verstockt; E.J. Pauwels (Eric); J. Han (Jungong ); P.M. de Zeeuw (Paul); J. Vermeiren

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractVarious visible and infrared cameras have been tested for the early detection of wildfires to protect archeological treasures. This analysis was possible thanks to the EU Firesense project (FP7-244088). Although visible cameras are low cost and give good results during daytime for smoke

  14. Multi-band effective mass approximations advanced mathematical models and numerical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Koprucki, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses several mathematical models from the most relevant class of kp-Schrödinger systems. Both mathematical models and state-of-the-art numerical methods for adequately solving the arising systems of differential equations are presented. The operational principle of modern semiconductor nano structures, such as quantum wells, quantum wires or quantum dots, relies on quantum mechanical effects. The goal of numerical simulations using quantum mechanical models in the development of semiconductor nano structures is threefold: First they are needed for a deeper understanding of experimental data and of the operational principle. Secondly, they allow us to predict and optimize in advance the qualitative and quantitative properties of new devices in order to minimize the number of prototypes needed. Semiconductor nano structures are embedded as an active region in semiconductor devices. Thirdly and finally, the results of quantum mechanical simulations of semiconductor nano structures can be used wit...

  15. Classification of Battlespace Detonations from Temporally Resolved Multi-Band Imagery and Mid-Infrared Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    from Kuwaiti oil fires using a modeling approach," Atmos.Environ. 28 (13), 2175-2196 (1994). 13 Jeffery T. McQueen and Roland R. Draxler, "Evaluation...table. http://webbook.nist.gov/chemistry/form-ser.html. 18 October 2004. 36 Michael Hoke and Karen Doherty, “MODTRAN 4 Software,” http

  16. Less noise, more activation: multi band acquisition schemes for auditory fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Federico; Moerel, Michelle; Ugurbil, Kamil; Formisano, Elia; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To improve acquisition in fMRI studies of audition by using multiband (MB) gradient-echo echo planar imaging (GE-EPI). Methods Data were acquired at 3T (Siemens Skyra) with a 32-channel head coil. Functional responses were obtained by presenting stimuli (tones and natural sounds [voices, speech, music, tools, animal cries]) in silent gaps between image acquisitions. Two-fold slice acceleration (MB2) was compared to a standard GE-EPI (MB1). Coverage and sampling rate (TR=3s) were kept constant across acquisition schemes. The longer gap in MB2 scans was used to present: 1) sounds of the same length as in conventional GE-EPI (type1; 800 ms stimuli); 2) sounds of double the length (type 2; 1600 ms stimuli). Results Functional responses to all sounds (i.e. main effect) were stronger when acquired with slice acceleration (i.e. shorter acquisition time). The difference between voice and non-voice responses was greater in MB2 type1 acquisitions (i.e. same length sounds as GE-EPI but presented in a longer silent gap) than in standard GEEPI acquisitions (interaction effect). Conclusion Reducing the length of the scanner noise results in stronger functional responses. Longer “silent” periods (i.e. keeping the sound length the same as in standard acquisitions) result in stronger response to voice compared to non-voice stimuli. PMID:25105832

  17. Design Investigation of a Laminated Waveguide Fed Multi-Band DRA for Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Dwari, Santanu; Singh, Shailendra; Agrawal, N. K.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper a laminated waveguide fed DR Antenna is investigated. It can use for moderate power military applications. Cylindrical DRA is excited by two closely spaced asymmetric longitudinal slots on the broad wall of the laminated cavity are responsible for producing three different frequency bands. Parametric study of slots has been done with the help of commercial software ANSOFT HFSS. All the bands have sharp rejection. The final model of the antenna is simulated, fabricated and experimentally measured. Measured results are in quite accordant with design results. SIW feeding structures have small losses, moderate power handling capacity, low costs, compact sizes and can be seamlessly integrated with planar circuits. At all the bands 9.76 GHz, 10.53 GHz and 11.8 GHz resonant frequency, the antenna shows 56 MHz, 160 MHz, and 250 MHz impedance bandwidth (for VSWR<2) with 6 dB,6.2 dB and 6.8 dB gain respectively. Simulated and measured results reveal outstanding performance with a cross-polar level of 29 dB lower than that of the co-polar level at 9.76 GHz, the cross-polar level of 32 dB lower than that of the co-polar level at 10.53, GHz, and similarly cross-polar level of 30 dB lower than that of the co-polar level at 11.8 GHz.

  18. [Optimization analysis based on wavelength bandwidth for multi-band pyrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tai-ran; Cheng, Xiao-fang; Fan, Xue-liang; Ding, Jin-lei

    2005-10-01

    The present paper establishes the optimization criteria for achieving the optimum measurements in three-band pyrometry under the assumption of linear emissivity model and the sensor design with Gaussian distribution. By varying the FWHM of Gaussian distribution, the optimization analysis is investigated with the choice of the wavelength bandwidth in three-band pyrometry. For specific cases, the simulation results present the optimum bandwidth distribution. Therefore, the discussions in this paper will provide significant theoretical instructions for the design of radiation pyrometer.

  19. MULTI BAND INSAR ANALYSIS OF SUBSIDENCE DEVELOPMENT BASED ON THE LONG PERIOD TIME SERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Çomut

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The SAR Interferometry (InSAR application has shown great potential in monitoring of land terrain changes and in detection of land deformations such as subsidence. Longer time analysis can lead to understand longer trends and changes. Using different bands of SAR satellite (C- from ERS 1-2 and Envisat, L- from ALOS over the study area, we achieve knowledge of movements in long-term and evaluation of its dynamic changes within observed period of time. Results from InSAR processing fit with the position changes in vertical direction based on GPS network established over the basin as an effective geodetic network. Time series (StaMPS PS+SB of several points over Çumra County in eastern part of Konya City show a general trend of the deformation that is expected to be approximately between -13 to -17 mm/year. Northern part of Karaman is affected by faster subsidence, borders of the subsidence trough were identified from Envisat. Presenting InSAR results together with GIS information about locations and time of occurrence of sudden subsidence, urban/industrial growth in time and climate changes helps in better understanding of the situation. This way, the impact of natural and man-made changes will be shown for urban planning thanks to InSAR and GIS comparisons with hydrogeological modeling. In this study we present results of differential and multitemporal InSAR series using different bands and GIS conjunction associated with seasonal and temporal groundwater level changes in Konya Closed Basin.

  20. Cermet based metamaterials for multi band absorbers over NIR to LWIR frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Jitendra K.; Behera, Gangadhar; Agarwal, Amit K.; Ghosh, Amitava; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2017-06-01

    Cermets or ceramic-metals are known for their use in solar thermal technologies for their absorption across the solar band. Use of cermet layers in a metamaterial perfect absorber allows for flexible control of infra-red absorption over the short wave infra-red, to long wave infra-red bands, while keeping the visible/near infra-red absorption properties constant. We design multilayered metamaterials consisting of a conducting ground plane, a low metal volume fraction cermet/ZnS as dielectric spacer layers, and a top structured layer of an array of circular discs of metal/high volume metal fraction cermet that give rise to specified absorption bands in the near-infra-red (NIR) frequencies, as well as any specified band at SWIR-LWIR frequencies. Thus, a complete decoupling of the absorption at optical/NIR frequencies and the infra-red absorption behaviour of a structured metamaterial is demonstrated.

  1. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-BAND DETECTION OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES WITH MARKOVIAN MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, B.; Bonnarel, F.; Louys, M. [CDS, Observatoire Astronomique, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Perret, B.; Petremand, M.; Lavigne, F.; Collet, Ch. [LSIIT, Universite de Strasbourg, 7, Rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg (France); Van Driel, W. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Sabatini, S. [INAF/IASF-Roma, via Fosso de Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); MacArthur, L. A., E-mail: Bernd.Vollmer@astro.unistra.fr [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2013-02-01

    We present to the astronomical community an algorithm for the detection of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in images, called MARSIAA (MARkovian Software for Image Analysis in Astronomy), which is based on multi-scale Markovian modeling. MARSIAA can be applied simultaneously to different bands. It segments an image into a user-defined number of classes, according to their surface brightness and surroundings-typically, one or two classes contain the LSB structures. We have developed an algorithm, called DetectLSB, which allows the efficient identification of LSB galaxies from among the candidate sources selected by MARSIAA. The application of the method to two and three bands simultaneously was tested on simulated images. Based on our tests, we are confident that we can detect LSB galaxies down to a central surface brightness level of only 1.5 times the standard deviation from the mean pixel value in the image background. To assess the robustness of our method, the method was applied to a set of 18 B- and I-band images (covering 1.3 deg{sup 2} in total) of the Virgo Cluster to which Sabatini et al. previously applied a matched-filter dwarf LSB galaxy search algorithm. We have detected all 20 objects from the Sabatini et al. catalog which we could classify by eye as bona fide LSB galaxies. Our method has also detected four additional Virgo Cluster LSB galaxy candidates undetected by Sabatini et al. To further assess the completeness of the results of our method, both MARSIAA, SExtractor, and DetectLSB were applied to search for (1) mock Virgo LSB galaxies inserted into a set of deep Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) gri-band subimages and (2) Virgo LSB galaxies identified by eye in a full set of NGVS square degree gri images. MARSIAA/DetectLSB recovered {approx}20% more mock LSB galaxies and {approx}40% more LSB galaxies identified by eye than SExtractor/DetectLSB. With a 90% fraction of false positives from an entirely unsupervised pipeline, a completeness of 90% is reached for sources with r{sub e} > 3'' at a mean surface brightness level of {mu}{sub g} = 27.7 mag arcsec{sup -2} and a central surface brightness of {mu}{sup 0}{sub g} = 26.7 mag arcsec{sup -2}. About 10% of the false positives are artifacts, the rest being background galaxies. We have found our proposed Markovian LSB galaxy detection method to be complementary to the application of matched filters and an optimized use of SExtractor, and to have the following advantages: it is scale free, can be applied simultaneously to several bands, and is well adapted for crowded regions on the sky.

  2. Detection Method of Skin Region by Near-IR Spectrum Multi-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kato, Kunihito; Andoh, Michinori; Kojima, Shinichi

    Many active safety technologies for the driver support system are developing. Most of the traffic accidents are caused by driver's inattentive or drowsy. We are developing a driver support system that protects from traffic accidents by these causes. Our purpose is to detect the driver's face region by using a camera. A lot of face detection methods are proposed, but there is not a technique addressing every environment inside the car. For example, skin color segmentation can not detect the skin region in the night, because it has to light up the driver by bright light. In this paper, we propose a skin detection method by the unique reflection characteristics of the materials. Our method is very simple algorithm. We developed a skin detection system, and confirmed effectiveness by the evaluation experiment in indoor environment, and showed the effectiveness by a driving experiment in the night.

  3. Directed-assembled multi-band moiré plasmonic metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagavalli Yogeesh, Maruthi; Wu, Zilong; Li, Wei; Akinwande, Deji; Zheng, Yuebing

    With the large number of component sets and high rotational symmetry, plasmonic metamaterials with moiré patterns can support multiple plasmonic modes for multi-functional applications. Herein, we introduce moiré plasmonic metasurfaces using both gold and graphene, by a recently developed directed-assembled method known as moiré nanosphere lithography (MNSL). The graphene moiré metasurfaces show multiple and tunable resonance modes in the mid-infrared wavelength regime. The number and wavelength of the resonance modes can be tuned by controlling the moiré patterns, which can be easily achieved by changing the relative in-plane rotation angle during MNSL. Furthermore, we have designed a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) patch structure with a thin Au moiré metasurface layer and an optically thick Au layer separated by a dielectric spacer layer. Benefiting from the combination of moiré patterns and field enhancement from the MIM configuration, the moiré metasurface patch exhibits strong broadband absorption in the NIR ( 1.3 μm) and MIR ( 5 μm) range. The dual-band optical responses make moiré metasurface patch a multi-functional platform for surface-enhanced infrared spectroscopy, optical capture and patterning of bacteria, and photothermal denaturation of proteins.

  4. A multi-band shunt hybrid active filter with reduced sensor count

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A Shunt Hybrid Active Filter (SHAF) is an attractive option for realiz- ing low-cost harmonic compensation solutions. This paper proposes a SHAF with multiple harmonic compensation capability using a single Voltage Source Inverter and reduced sensor count. This strategy is apt for harmonic filtering solutions ...

  5. A Network of Multi-band Sensors for Radar Design, Deployment, and Diagnostics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Limitations on the design, monitoring and diagnosis of complex microwave systems due to insufficient models, the reality of imperfect physical conditions, and the...

  6. Modular Multi-Function Multi-Band Airborne Radio System (MFBARS). Volume II. Detailed Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    multipliers are summed, and the output can be described mathematically by: n y(k) E w(v) X (k-v) (A- 3) V𔃺 203 where k = integer denoting a time index so that...Laboratories, Inc., April 1978. (2) J.H. McClellan, T. W. Parks, and L. R. Rabiner, A Comuter Program for Designing Optimum FIR Linear Phase Digital

  7. FPGA implement method for two-dimensional integer wavelet transform in the space-based on-orbit image compression system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Tian, Yan; Meng, Xiangsheng; Liu, Tong

    2017-02-01

    The image obtained from space-based vision system has increasingly high frame frequency and resolution, and field of view is also growing. Due to the dramatic increase of data scale and the restriction of channel bandwidth between satellite and ground, on-orbit data compression becomes the core of on-satellite data processing. The paper analyzes the new generation static image compression standard JPEG2000 and the key two-dimensional (2D) discrete wavelet transform (DWT) technology. Then an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array)implement method for 2D integer wavelet transform is designed. It adopts the spatial combinative lifting algorithm (SCLA), which realizes the simultaneous transformation on rows and columns. On this basis, the paper realizes wavelet decomposition for images with a resolution of 6576*4384 (which is divided into 1024*1024) on the FPGA platform. In particular, the test platform is built in ISE14.7 simulation software, and the device model is xc5vfx100t. The design has passed the FPGA verification. In order to verify the correctness of the algorithm, the results are compared with that obtained by running matlab code. The experimental results show that the design is correct and the resource occupancy rate is low.

  8. Mechanical, Electromagnetic, and X-ray Shielding Characterization of a 3D Printable Tungsten-Polycarbonate Polymer Matrix Composite for Space-Based Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemelya, Corey M.; Rivera, Armando; Perez, Angel Torrado; Rocha, Carmen; Liang, Min; Yu, Xiaoju; Kief, Craig; Alexander, David; Stegeman, James; Xin, Hao; Wicker, Ryan B.; MacDonald, Eric; Roberson, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Material-extrusion three-dimensional (3D) printing has recently attracted much interest because of its process flexibility, rapid response to design alterations, and ability to create structures "on-the-go". For this reason, 3D printing has possible applications in rapid creation of space-based devices, for example cube satellites (CubeSat). This work focused on fabrication and characterization of tungsten-doped polycarbonate polymer matrix composites specifically designed for x-ray radiation-shielding applications. The polycarbonate-tungsten polymer composite obtained intentionally utilizes low loading levels to provide x-ray shielding while limiting effects on other properties of the material, for example weight, electromagnetic functionality, and mechanical strength. The fabrication process, from tungsten functionalization to filament extrusion and material characterization, is described, including printability, determination of x-ray attenuation, tensile strength, impact resistance, and gigahertz permittivity, and failure analysis. The proposed materials are uniquely advantageous when implemented in 3D printed structures, because even a small volume fraction of tungsten has been shown to substantially alter the properties of the resulting composite.

  9. Desert Dust Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, using Particle Properties Derived from Space-based Multi-angle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Fiebig, Marcus; Schladitz, Alexander; von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the SAhara Mineral dUst experiMent (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the sub-orbital aerosol measurements into the satellite's larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days for which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 to 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR's ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (a) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (b) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow, and (c) show an air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometers away.

  10. Desert Dust Aerosol Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, Using Particle Properties Derived from Space-Based Multi-Angle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Esselborn, Michael; Fiebig, Marcus; Heese, Birgit; Knippertz, Peter; Mueller, Detlef; hide

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the Sahara mineral dust experiment (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the suborbital aerosol measurements into the satellite s larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days during which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR s ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (1) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (2) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow and (3) show an aerosol air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometres away.

  11. Space-based imaging of nighttime medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances using FORMOSAT-2/ISUAL 630.0 nm airglow observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P. K.; Liu, J. Y.; Lin, C. H.; Chen, A. B.; Hsu, R. R.; Chen, C. H.; Huba, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of space-based imaging of nighttime medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) in 630.0 nm emission by Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightnings (ISUAL), on board FORMOSAT-2 satellite. The limb integrated measurements, after removing background, reveal multiple bands of intensity perturbation when projected to a horizontal plane corresponding to the altitude of peak emission, with distinct southwest to northeast orientation in the Southern Hemisphere. Simulations are carried out by artificially introducing MSTID fluctuations in model electron density to confirm if the MSTID could be identified in the ISUAL-viewing geometry. The ISUAL observations in year 2007 are further used to investigate the MSTID features as well as occurrence characteristics in the Southern Hemisphere, most of which are over the ocean where no ground-based observations are available. The preliminary statistics shows more MSTID occurrence in solstices with peak in June-July months. Majority of the MSTID perturbations have wavelength in the range 150-300 km, and the wavefronts are aligned at about 30°-50° from the east-west plane. The statistic results of the orientation of wavefronts indicate that Es layer instability might be important in the MSTID generation.

  12. Ion-Specific Nutrient Management in Closed Systems: The Necessity for Ion-Selective Sensors in Terrestrial and Space-Based Agriculture and Water Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamsey, Matthew; Graham, Thomas; Thompson, Cody; Berinstain, Alain; Scott, Alan; Dixon, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The ability to monitor and control plant nutrient ions in fertigation solutions, on an ion-specific basis, is critical to the future of controlled environment agriculture crop production, be it in traditional terrestrial settings (e.g., greenhouse crop production) or as a component of bioregenerative life support systems for long duration space exploration. Several technologies are currently available that can provide the required measurement of ion-specific activities in solution. The greenhouse sector has invested in research examining the potential of a number of these technologies to meet the industry's demanding requirements, and although no ideal solution yet exists for on-line measurement, growers do utilize technologies such as high-performance liquid chromatography to provide off-line measurements. An analogous situation exists on the International Space Station where, technological solutions are sought, but currently on-orbit water quality monitoring is considerably restricted. This paper examines the specific advantages that on-line ion-selective sensors could provide to plant production systems both terrestrially and when utilized in space-based biological life support systems and how similar technologies could be applied to nominal on-orbit water quality monitoring. A historical development and technical review of the various ion-selective monitoring technologies is provided. PMID:23201999

  13. Susceptibility mapping and estimation of rainfall threshold using space based input for assessment of landslide hazard in Guwahati city in North East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhusan, K.; Kundu, S. S.; Goswami, K.; Sudhakar, S.

    2014-11-01

    Slopes are the most common landforms in North Eastern Region (NER) of India and because of its relatively immature topography, active tectonics, and intense rainfall activities; the region is susceptible to landslide incidences. The scenario is further aggravated due to unscientific human activities leading to destabilization of slopes. Guwahati, the capital city of Assam also experiences similar hazardous situation especially during monsoon season thus demanding a systematic study towards landslide risk reduction. A systematic assessment of landslide hazard requires understanding of two components, "where" and "when" that landslides may occur. Presently no such system exists for Guwahati city due to lack of landslide inventory data, high resolution thematic maps, DEM, sparse rain gauge network, etc. The present study elucidates the potential of space-based inputs in addressing the problem in absence of field-based observing networks. First, Landslide susceptibility map in 1 : 10,000 scale was derived by integrating geospatial datasets interpreted from high resolution satellite data. Secondly, the rainfall threshold for dynamic triggering of landslide was estimated using rainfall estimates from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis. The 3B41RT data for 1 hourly rainfall estimates were used to make Intensity-Duration plot. Critical rainfall was estimated for every incidence by analysing cumulative rainfall leading to a landslide for total of 19 incidences and an empirical rainfall intensity-duration threshold for triggering shallow debris slides was developed (Intensity = 5.9 Duration-0.479).

  14. Ion-Specific Nutrient Management in Closed Systems: The Necessity for Ion-Selective Sensors in Terrestrial and Space-Based Agriculture and Water Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Berinstain

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to monitor and control plant nutrient ions in fertigation solutions, on an ion-specific basis, is critical to the future of controlled environment agriculture crop production, be it in traditional terrestrial settings (e.g., greenhouse crop production or as a component of bioregenerative life support systems for long duration space exploration. Several technologies are currently available that can provide the required measurement of ion-specific activities in solution. The greenhouse sector has invested in research examining the potential of a number of these technologies to meet the industry’s demanding requirements, and although no ideal solution yet exists for on-line measurement, growers do utilize technologies such as high-performance liquid chromatography to provide off-line measurements. An analogous situation exists on the International Space Station where, technological solutions are sought, but currently on-orbit water quality monitoring is considerably restricted. This paper examines the specific advantages that on-line ion-selective sensors could provide to plant production systems both terrestrially and when utilized in space-based biological life support systems and how similar technologies could be applied to nominal on-orbit water quality monitoring. A historical development and technical review of the various ion-selective monitoring technologies is provided.

  15. Stereoscopic Retrieval of Smoke Plume Heights and Motion from Space-Based Multi-Angle Imaging, Using the MISR INteractive eXplorer(MINX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David L.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2014-01-01

    Airborne particles desert dust, wildfire smoke, volcanic effluent, urban pollution affect Earth's climate as well as air quality and health. They are found in the atmosphere all over the planet, but vary immensely in amount and properties with season and location. Most aerosol particles are injected into the near-surface boundary layer, but some, especially wildfire smoke, desert dust and volcanic ash, can be injected higher into the atmosphere, where they can stay aloft longer, travel farther, produce larger climate effects, and possibly affect human and ecosystem health far downwind. So monitoring aerosol injection height globally can make important contributions to climate science and air quality studies. The Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) is a space borne instrument designed to study Earths clouds, aerosols, and surface. Since late February 2000 it has been retrieving aerosol particle amount and properties, as well as cloud height and wind data, globally, about once per week. The MINX visualization and analysis tool complements the operational MISR data products, enabling users to retrieve heights and winds locally for detailed studies of smoke plumes, at higher spatial resolution and with greater precision than the operational product and other space-based, passive remote sensing techniques. MINX software is being used to provide plume height statistics for climatological studies as well as to investigate the dynamics of individual plumes, and to provide parameterizations for climate modeling.

  16. An Analysis for the Use of Research and Education Networks and Commercial Network Vendors in Support of Space Based Mission Critical and Non-Critical Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Robert N.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, and in the past, dedicated communication circuits and "network services" with very stringent performance requirements are being used to support manned and unmanned mission critical ground operations at GSFC, JSC, MSFC, KSC and other NASA facilities. Because of the evolution of network technology, it is time to investigate using other approaches to providing mission services for space ground operations. The current NASA approach is not in keeping with the evolution of network technologies. In the past decade various research and education networks dedicated to scientific and educational endeavors have emerged, as well as commercial networking providers, that employ advanced networking technologies. These technologies have significantly changed networking in recent years. Significant advances in network routing techniques, various topologies and equipment have made commercial networks very stable and virtually error free. Advances in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing will provide tremendous amounts of bandwidth for the future. The question is: Do these networks, which are controlled and managed centrally, provide a level of service that equals the stringent NASA performance requirements. If they do, what are the implication(s) of using them for critical space based ground operations as they are, without adding high cost contractual performance requirements? A second question is the feasibility of applying the emerging grid technology in space operations. Is it feasible to develop a Space Operations Grid and/or a Space Science Grid? Since these network's connectivity is substantial, both nationally and internationally, development of these sorts of grids may be feasible. The concept of research and education networks has evolved to the international community as well. Currently there are international RENs connecting the US in Chicago to and from Europe, South America, Asia and the Pacific rim, Russia and Canada. And most countries in these areas have their

  17. Coupled Ground- and Space-Based Assessment of Regional Inundation Dynamics to Assess Impact of Local and Upstream Changes on Evaporation in Tropical Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schwerdtfeger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of human land use and climate change are known to be a threat for the health and proper functioning of tropical wetlands. They interfere with the seasonal flood pulse, which is seen as the most important driver for biodiversity and directly controls evaporation. In order to investigate the impact of local and upstream changes on wetlands, a regional assessment of evaporation is crucial but challenging in such often remote and poorly gauged ecosystems. Evaporation is the major water balance component of these wetlands and links the flood pulse with the ecosystem. It can therefore be seen as a proxy for their functioning. In the last decades, information from space became an important data source to assess remote wetland areas. Here, we developed a new approach to quantify regional evaporation driven by inundation dynamics as its dominant control. We used three water and vegetation indices (mNDWI (modified Normalized Difference Water Index, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and EVI (Enhanced Vegetation Index from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface reflectance products to assess regional inundation dynamics between the dry and wet seasons. Two years of continual in situ water level measurements at different locations in our study area, the Pantanal wetland of South America, provided the reference to evaluate our method. With process-based modeling that used the inundation dynamics to determine the water available for evaporation, we were able to estimate actual evaporation (AET on a regional scale. Relating AET to changes in discharge due to upstream flow modifications and on local precipitation over the last 13 years, we found that the Pantanal is more vulnerable to alternated inundation dynamics than to changes in local precipitation. We concluded that coupling ground- and space-based information in this remote wetland area is a valuable first step to investigate the status of the Pantanal

  18. An Integrated Analysis of Particulate Matter Episodes over Megacities using Multi-scale Modelling, Ground-based and Space-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, R.; Sokhi, R.; Chemel, C.; Fisher, B.

    2009-09-01

    Particulate Matter (or aerosol) Episodes have significant effect on atmospheric composition and air quality. High levels of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) concentrations are often observed over megacities. The cause of such episodes is not fully understood yet. In this study, we use the state-of-the-art CMAQ-WRF-SMOKE regional air quality modelling system to simulate the formation, evolution and dissipation of episodes over megacities and examine the dominant factors such as emission, meteorological and chemical processes. The simulations have been directly compared with ground-based and space-based observations. We analyses the chemical composition of the particulate matter (PM10 or PM2.5) concentrations over megacities such as London and Paris from model simulations and ground-based measurements. The model simulations of major aerosol species including sulphate, ammonium, nitrate, black carbon and organics have been evaluated with ground-based measurements. The new boundary conditions generated from a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem) are used to improve the CMAQ-WRF-SMOKE modelling results. In order to understand the emission, meteorological and chemical processes, the detailed emission sources and meteorological parameters simulated from WRF such as wind speed, pressure, and mixing height have been analyzed. The favourable meteorological conditions have been found to enhance the long range transport of air pollutants. We synergically retrieve particulate matter concentrations from the measurements of multiple satellite sensors such as the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiameter (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiameter (MISR). The global model (GEOS-Chem) and regional model (CMAQ) are used to constrain the aerosol profiles. In particular, we use backscatter profiles from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) measurements to explore the potential for

  19. Damage Detection and Identification of Finite Element Models Using State-Space Based Signal Processing a Summation of Work Completed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory February 1999 to April 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, G.C.

    2000-04-28

    Until recently, attempts to update Finite Element Models (FEM) of large structures based upon recording structural motions were mostly ad hoc, requiring a large amount of engineering experience and skill. Studies have been undertaken at LLNL to use state-space based signal processing techniques to locate the existence and type of model mismatches common in FEM. Two different methods (Gauss-Newton gradient search and extended Kalman filter) have been explored, and the progress made in each type of algorithm as well as the results from several simulated and one actual building model will be discussed. The algorithms will be examined in detail, and the computer programs written to implement the algorithms will be documented.

  20. Vortex molecule, fractional flux quanta, and interband phase difference soliton in multi-band superconductivity and multi-component superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Y; Shivagan, D D; Iyo, A; Shirage, P M [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology(AIST) Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568, Tsukuba (Japan); Crisan, A [Department of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Tokiwa, K; Watanabe, T [Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Terada, N, E-mail: y.tanaka@aist.go.j [Department of Nano Structures and Advanced Materials, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan)

    2009-03-01

    Variety of a vortex and lattice of vortex in two-component superconductivity are addressed. The balance between an energy gain of the magnetic energy forming the 'sub-unit flux quantum' and cost for inter-component Josephson interaction deforms an axisymmetric vortex into a non-axisymmetric one, which is a so-called vortex molecule. To deal with this situation, a crude formalism is introduced, in which London equation for magnetic field and a sine-Gordon equation for the inter-component Josephson interaction are separated. Giving an attention to the Josephson interaction, we introduce a 'quantum-phase domain'.

  1. WIYN open cluster study. LXII. Comparison of isochrone systems using deep multi-band photometry of M35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, B.; Frinchaboy, P. [Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Kinemuchi, K. [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Sarajedini, A. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Cohen, R., E-mail: b.a.thompson1@tcu.edu [Universidad de Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile)

    2014-11-01

    The current generation of stellar isochrone models exhibits non-negligible discrepancies due to variations in the input physics. The success of each model is determined by how well it fits the observations, and this paper aims to disentangle contributions from the various physical inputs. New deep, wide-field optical and near-infrared photometry (UBVRIJHK{sub S} ) of the cluster M35 is presented, against which several isochrone systems are compared: Padova, PARSEC, Dartmouth, and Y {sup 2}. Two different atmosphere models are applied to each isochrone: ATLAS9 and BT-Settl. For any isochrone set and atmosphere model, observed data are accurately reproduced for all stars more massive than 0.7 M {sub ☉}. For stars less massive than 0.7 M {sub ☉}, Padova and PARSEC isochrones consistently produce higher temperatures than observed. Dartmouth and Y{sup 2} isochrones with BT-Settl atmospheres reproduce optical data accurately; however, they appear too blue in IR colors. It is speculated that molecular contributions to stellar spectra in the near-infrared may not be fully explored, and that future study may reconcile these differences.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: KiDS-ESO-DR2 multi-band source catalog (de Jong+, 2015)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J. T. A.; Verdoes Kleijn, G. A.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Buddelmeijer, H.; Capaccioli, M.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Helmich, E.; Huang, Z.; Irisarri, N.; Kuijken, K.; La Barbera, F.; McFarland, J. P.; Napolitano, N. R.; Radovich, M.; Sikkema, G.; Valentijn, E. A.; Begeman, K. G.; Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; Choi, A.; Cordes, O.-M.; Covone, G.; Dall'Ora, M.; Hildebrandt, H.; Longo, G.; Nakajima, R.; Paolillo, M.; Puddu, E.; Rifatto, A.; Tortora, C.; van Uitert, E.; Buddendiek, A.; Harnois-Deraps, J.; Erben, T.; Eriksen, M. B.; Heymans, C.; Hoekstra, H.; Joachimi, B.; Kitching, T. D.; Klaes, D.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Koehlinger, F.; Roy, N.; Sifon, C.; Schneider, P.; Sutherland, W. J.; Viola, M.; Vriend, W.-J.

    2017-01-01

    KiDS data releases consist of ~1 square degree tiles that have been successfully observed in all four survey filters (u,g,r,i). The second data release (KiDS-ESO-DR2) was available in February 2015 and contains imaging data, masks and single-band source lists for all tiles observed in all four

  3. Extended photoresponse and multi-band luminescence of ZnO/ZnSe core/shell nanorods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Qin; Cai, Hua; Hu, Zhigao; Duan, Zhihua; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-01-01

    .... The bare ZnO NRs are capable of emitting strong ultraviolet (UV) near band edge (NBE) emission at 325-nm light excitation, while the ZnSe shells greatly suppress the emission from the ZnO cores...

  4. Investigation of aerosol particle size distributions in the San Diego Bay area by means of multi-band transmissometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.N. de; Eijk, A.M.J. van; Moerman, M.M.; Cohen, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of atmospheric aerosols along the line of sight of infrared and electro-optical sensors greatly determines the range performance of these devices. On the one hand the aerosol particles scatter background (including sun) radiance into the field of view of the sensor, on the other hand

  5. A Wireless Sensor Network for Growth Environment Measurement and Multi-Band Optical Sensing to Diagnose Tree Vigor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Kameoka

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We have tried to develop the guidance system for farmers to cultivate using various phenological indices. As the sensing part of this system, we deployed a new Wireless Sensor Network (WSN. This system uses the 920 MHz radio wave based on the Wireless Smart Utility Network that enables long-range wireless communication. In addition, the data acquired by the WSN were standardized for the advanced web service interoperability. By using these standardized data, we can create a web service that offers various kinds of phenological indices as secondary information to the farmers in the field. We have also established the field management system using thermal image, fluorescent and X-ray fluorescent methods, which enable the nondestructive, chemical-free, simple, and rapid measurement of fruits or trees. We can get the information about the transpiration of plants through a thermal image. The fluorescence sensor gives us information, such as nitrate balance index (NBI, that shows the nitrate balance inside the leaf, chlorophyll content, flavonol content and anthocyanin content. These methods allow one to quickly check the health of trees and find ways to improve the tree vigor of weak ones. Furthermore, the fluorescent x-ray sensor has the possibility to quantify the loss of minerals necessary for fruit growth.

  6. A Wireless Sensor Network for Growth Environment Measurement and Multi-Band Optical Sensing to Diagnose Tree Vigor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameoka, Shinichi; Isoda, Shuhei; Hashimoto, Atsushi; Ito, Ryoei; Miyamoto, Satoru; Wada, Genki; Watanabe, Naoki; Yamakami, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken; Kameoka, Takaharu

    2017-04-27

    We have tried to develop the guidance system for farmers to cultivate using various phenological indices. As the sensing part of this system, we deployed a new Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). This system uses the 920 MHz radio wave based on the Wireless Smart Utility Network that enables long-range wireless communication. In addition, the data acquired by the WSN were standardized for the advanced web service interoperability. By using these standardized data, we can create a web service that offers various kinds of phenological indices as secondary information to the farmers in the field. We have also established the field management system using thermal image, fluorescent and X-ray fluorescent methods, which enable the nondestructive, chemical-free, simple, and rapid measurement of fruits or trees. We can get the information about the transpiration of plants through a thermal image. The fluorescence sensor gives us information, such as nitrate balance index (NBI), that shows the nitrate balance inside the leaf, chlorophyll content, flavonol content and anthocyanin content. These methods allow one to quickly check the health of trees and find ways to improve the tree vigor of weak ones. Furthermore, the fluorescent x-ray sensor has the possibility to quantify the loss of minerals necessary for fruit growth.

  7. Exploring the Structure and Evolution of the Universe: Multi-Band Profiles of the Known Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    As summarized in this pamphlet, some of the far-reaching underlying issues to be addressed include: What is the origin of the universe and its destiny; Why is the universe lumpy; How did the known structures of the universe evolve; How do galaxies evolve; How do massive black holes grow; How did the elemental composition of the universe evolve; What is the structure and behavior of matter in the extreme; and Is Einstein's general relativity theory right.

  8. Twenty-Eight Orders of Parametric Resonance in a Microelectromechanical Device for Multi-band Vibration Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yu; Du, Sijun; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper contends to be the first to report the experimental observation of up to 28 orders of parametric resonance, which has thus far only been envisioned in the theoretical realm. While theory has long predicted the onset of n orders of parametric resonance, previously reported experimental observations have been limited up to about the first 5 orders. This is due to the rapid narrowing nature of the frequency bandwidth of the higher instability intervals, making practical accessibility increasingly more difficult. Here, the authors have experimentally confirmed up to 28 orders of parametric resonance in a micromachined membrane resonator when electrically undamped. While the implication of this finding spans across the vibration dynamics and transducer application spectrum, the particular significance of this work is to broaden the accumulative operational frequency bandwidth of vibration energy harvesting for enabling self-powered microsystems. Up to 5 orders were recorded when driven at 1.0 g of acceleration across a matched load of 70 kΩ. With a natural frequency of 980 Hz, the fundamental mode direct resonance had a −3 dB bandwidth of 55 Hz, in contrast to the 314 Hz for the first order parametric resonance; furthermore, the half power bands of all 5 orders accumulated to 478 Hz. PMID:27445205

  9. Multi-band radio over fiber system with all-optical halfwave rectification, transmission and frequency down-conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prince, Kamau; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel application of all-optical half-wave rectification in the transportation and delivery of multi-frequency radio-over fiber signals. System evaluation was performed of transmission over various optical fiber types and all-optical envelope detection was implemented to achieve...

  10. Space-Based Solar Power System Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    previously, a microwave receiving antenna, or rectenna , can be on the order of 10 kilometers in diameter. That by itself can have a major impact on...the surrounding environment. However, as stated in the 2007 Interim report by the National Security Space Office, microwave receiving rectennas ...than terrestrial solar systems because of greater coupling efficiency. This means that the area underneath the rectenna can continue to be

  11. Space-Based Blue-Green Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    C-)) J90187 A/cm2V wI1, ’)p td Itr n i f i in y v / 02 4.OA/cm 2 𔃾 10 -- 8- z p 4 - 2- 2% EFFICIENCY LINE 0 I I 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 J8855 PFN...Then the spectral •P lected is 3 BP F A B3 2VN FRM IE.O (A-2) I’ 2. S . .DA CE.(A-3) i:, A. , otian tm an i r, aciee 2nd edimtion, p. 29’j t H~b~ sloo

  12. Spaced-based search coil magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodarsky, George B.

    2016-12-01

    Search coil magnetometers are one of the primary tools used to study the magnetic component of low-frequency electromagnetic waves in space. Their relatively small size, mass, and power consumption, coupled with a good frequency range and sensitivity, make them ideal for spaceflight applications. The basic design of a search coil magnetometer consists of many thousands of turns of wire wound on a high permeability core. When a time-varying magnetic field passes through the coil, a time-varying voltage is induced due to Faraday's law of magnetic induction. The output of the coil is usually attached to a preamplifier, which amplifies the induced voltage and conditions the signal for transmission to the main electronics (usually a low-frequency radio receiver). Search coil magnetometers are usually used in conjunction with electric field antenna to measure electromagnetic plasma waves in the frequency range of a few hertz to a few tens of kilohertzs. Search coil magnetometers are used to determine the properties of waves, such as comparing the relative electric and magnetic field amplitudes of the waves, or to investigate wave propagation parameters, such as Poynting flux and wave normal vectors. On a spinning spacecraft, they are also sometimes used to determine the background magnetic field. This paper presents some of the basic design criteria of search coil magnetometers and discusses design characteristics of sensors flown on a number of spacecraft.

  13. Space Based Infrared System High (SBIRS High)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    SBIRS and Defense Support Program ( DSP ) operations at the Mission Control Station (MCS-2) at Buckley Air Force Base using a single software and hardware...2015. A formal test on December 10-18, 2015 proved the Block 10.3 system has the ability to control the full constellation (GEO/HEO and DSP ) of... processor , satellite data interface system, and contractor logistics support. Notes Block Buy (GEO 5-6) None Nuclear Costs Baseline (GEO 1-4, HEO 1-2, and

  14. Progress towards vertical transport study of proton-irradiated InAs/GaSb type-II strained-layer superlattice materials for space-based infrared detectors using magnetoresistance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Mitchell C.; Morath, Christian P.; Fahey, Stephen; Klein, Brianna; Cowan, Vincent M.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II strained-layer superlattice (T2SLS) materials are being considered for space-based infrared detector applications. However, an inadequate understanding of the role of carrier transport, specifically the vertical mobility, in the radiation tolerance of T2SLS detectors remains. Here, progress towards a vertical transport study of proton-irradiated, p-type InAs/GaSb T2SLS materials using magnetoresistance measurements is reported. Measurements in the growth direction of square mesas formed from InAs/GaSb superlattice material were performed using two distinct contact geometries in a Kelvin mode setup at variable magnetic fields, ranging from -9 T to 9 T, and temperatures, ranging from 5 K and 300 K. The results here suggested multi-carrier conduction and a field-dependent series resistance from the contact layer were present. The implications of these results and the plans for future magnetoresistance measurements on proton-irradiated T2SLS materials are discussed.

  15. First observations of tropospheric δD data observed by ground- and space-based remote sensing and surface in-situ measurement techniques at MUSICA's principle reference station (Izaña Observatory, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Yenny; Schneider, Matthias; Christner, Emanuel; Rodríguez, Omaira E.; Sepúlveda, Eliezer; Dyroff, Christoph; Wiegele, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    The main goal of the project MUSICA (Multiplatform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water) is the generation of a quasi global tropospheric water vapor isototopologue dataset of a good and well-documented quality. Therefore, new ground- and space-based remote sensing observations (NDACC-FTIR and IASI/METOP) are combined with in-situ measurements. This work presents the first comparison between in-situ and remote sensing observations made at the Izaña Atmospheric Research Centre (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain). The in-situ measurements are made by a Picarro L2120-i water vapor isotopologue analyzer. At Izaña the in-situ data are affected by local small-scale mixing processes: during daylight, the thermally buoyant upslope flow prompts the mixing between the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) and the low Free Troposphere (FT). However, the remote sensors detect δD values averaged over altitudes that are more representative for the free troposphere. This difference has to be considered for the comparison. In general, a good agreement between the MUSICA remote sensing and the in situ H2O-versus-δD plots is found, which demonstrates that the MUSICA δD remote sensing products add scientifically valuable information to the H2O data.

  16. A Software-Defined GNSS Reflectometry Recording Receiver with Wide-Bandwidth, Multi-Band Capability and Digital Beam-Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serni Ribó

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the Software PARIS Interferometric Receiver (SPIR, a high-speed GNSS reflectometry recording receiver which has been designed and implemented with the primary goal of demonstrating the synoptic capabilities of the interferometric technique in GNSS Reflectrometry. Thanks to the use of large bandwidth GNSS signals, this technique is advantageous in comparison to the so-called clean-replica processing, when sea surface altimetric applications are pursued. The SPIR receiver down-converts, samples, and records the GNSS signals acquired by the sixteen elements of two antenna arrays. It can operate at any of the common GNSS L1, L2, or L5 bands. Digital beam-forming and signal processing is performed off-line by its dedicated signal processor, so that the GNSS reflectometry can be applied to different transmitting satellites using the same set of recorded signals. Alternatively, different processing techniques can be compared by applying them to exactly the same signals. This article focuses on the SPIR instrument hardware and software, as well as the remote sensing observables that can be obtained using this equipment.

  17. Full Phase Multi-Band Study of Eclipsing Binaries 1SWASP J061850.43+220511.9 and 2MASSJ07095549+3643564

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terheide, Rachel; Zhang, Liyun; Han, Xianming; Lu, Hongpeng

    2018-01-01

    We present full-phase VRI-band light curves for eclipsing binary 1SWASP J061850.43+220511.9, and full-phase BVRI-band light curves for eclipsing binary 2MASS J07095549+3643564. The observations were conducted using the 0.94-m Holcomb Observatory telescope located on Butler University Campus in Indianapolis, Indiana, and the 0.6-m SARA telescope located at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. We obtained key system parameters for both eclipsing binaries. For 1SWASP J061850.43+220511.9, the period is 0.21482 ±0.00053 days compared to 0.21439 days from an older study (Lohr et. al), the system mass ratio is found as 2.50 and the system is classified as EW type. Similarly, for 2MASS J07095549+3643564, we obtained a linear ephemeris and a physical model for the first time. We found its period to be 0.22297 ±0.00032 days, as compared to 0.446092 days and 0.11152 days from previous research (Drake et. al 2014, Hartman et. al 2011). 2MASS J07095549+3643564 is classified as a W Uma type eclipsing binary.

  18. Long-Term Multi-Band and Polarimetric View of Mkn 421: Motivations for an Integrated Open-Data Platform for Blazar Optical Polarimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulisses Barres de Almeida

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, by making use of the large software and database resources made available through online facilities such as the ASI Science Data Center (ASDC, we present a novel approach to the modelling of blazar emission whereby the multi-epoch SED for Mkn 421 is modelled considering, in a self-consistent way, the temporal lags between bands (both in short and long-timescales. These are obtained via a detailed cross-correlation analysis, spanning data from radio to VHE gamma-rays from 2008 to 2015. In addition to that, long-term optical polarisation data is used to aid and complement our physical interpretation of the state and evolution of the source. Blazar studies constitute a clear example that astrophysics is becoming increasingly dominated by “big data”. Specific questions, such as the interpretation of polarimetric information—namely the evolution of the polarisation degree (PD and specially the polarisation angle (PA of a source—are very sensitive to the density of data coverage. Improving data accessibility and integration, in order to respond to these necessities, is thus extremely important and has a potentially large impact for blazar science. For this reason, we present also the project to create an open-access database for optical polarimetry, aiming to circumvent the issues raised above, by integrating long-term optical polarisation information on a number sources from several observatories and data providers in a consistent way. The platform, to be launched by the end of 2017 is built as part of the Brazilian Science Data Center (BSDC, a project hosted at CBPF, in Rio de Janeiro, and developed with the support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI and ICRANet. The BSDC is Virtual Observatory-compliant and is built in line with “Open Universe”, a global space science open-data initiative to be launched in November under the auspices of the United Nations.

  19. Gd3+ spin-lattice relaxation via multi-band conduction electrons in Y(1-x)Gd(x)In3: an electron spin resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Baez, M; Iwamoto, W; Magnavita, E T; Osorio-Guillén, J M; Ribeiro, R A; Avila, M A; Rettori, C

    2014-04-30

    Interest in the electronic structure of the intermetallic compound YIn3 has been renewed with the recent discovery of superconductivity at T ∼ 1 K, which may be filamentary in nature. In this work we perform electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments on Gd(3+) doped YIn3 (Y1-xGdxIn3; 0.001 ⪅ x ⩽̸ 0.08), showing that the spin-lattice relaxation of the Gd(3+) ions, due to the exchange interaction between the Gd(3+) localized magnetic moment and the conduction electrons (ce), is processed via the presence of s-, p- and d-type ce at the YIn3 Fermi level. These findings are revealed by the Gd(3+) concentration dependence of the Korringa-like relaxation rate d(ΔH)/dT and g-shift (Δg = g - 1.993), that display bottleneck relaxation behavior for the s-electrons and unbottleneck behavior for the p- and d-electrons. The Korringa-like relaxation rates vary from 22(2) Oe/K for x ⪅ 0.001 to 8(2) Oe/K for x = 0.08 and the g-shift values change, respectively, from a positive Δg = +0.047(10) to a negative Δg = -0.008(4). Analysis in terms of a three-band ce model allows the extraction of the corresponding exchange interaction parameters Jfs, Jfp and Jfd.

  20. Non-uniform sampling and reconstruction of multi-band signals and its application in wideband spectrum sensing of cognitive radio

    CERN Document Server

    Rashidi, Moslem

    2010-01-01

    Sampling theories lie at the heart of signal processing devices and communication systems. To accommodate high operating rates while retaining low computational cost, efficient analog-to digital (ADC) converters must be developed. Many of limitations encountered in current converters are due to a traditional assumption that the sampling state needs to acquire the data at the Nyquist rate, corresponding to twice the signal bandwidth. In this thesis a method of sampling far below the Nyquist rate for sparse spectrum multiband signals is investigated. The method is called periodic non-uniform sampling, and it is useful in a variety of applications such as data converters, sensor array imaging and image compression. Firstly, a model for the sampling system in the frequency domain is prepared. It relates the Fourier transform of observed compressed samples with the unknown spectrum of the signal. Next, the reconstruction process based on the topic of compressed sensing is provided. We show that the sampling parame...

  1. Autonomous vision in space, based on Advanced Stellar Compass platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Eisenman, Allan R.; Liebe, Carl Christian

    1996-01-01

    The Ørsted Star Imager, comprises the functionality of an Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC). I.e. it is able to, autonomously solve "the lost in space" attitude problem, as well as determine the attitude with high precision in the matter of seconds. The autonomy makes for a high capability for error...

  2. Vision in space, based on the advanced stellar compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebe, Carl Christian; Jørgensen, John Leif; Eisenman, Allan R.

    1996-01-01

    A wide variety of Space-missions could benefit from advanced onboard image-analysis. With missions to other planets or asteroids as good examples (genotypes). With reference to the Oersted Advanced Stellar Compass, this paper describes possible onboard imageanalysis tasks. As the instrument tracks...

  3. Evolving Army Needs for Space-Based Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    AL. During the 1960s through the 1980s, Army space-related efforts emphasized this anti-ballistic missile mission with programs such as Sentinel ...also to look System Description & Mission Highlights Cost Goals SMDC Nanosatellite Program ( SNaP ) • Functionally effective data/ communication

  4. Space-Based Detection of Sinkhole Activity in Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver-Cabrera, T.; Kruse, S.; Wdowinski, S.

    2015-12-01

    Central Florida's thick carbonate deposits and hydrological conditions have made the area prone to sinkhole development. Sinkhole collapse is a major geologic hazard in central Florida threatening human life and causing substantial damage to property. According to the Florida Senate report in 2010, between 2006-2010 total insurance claims due to sinkhole activity were around $200 million per year. Detecting sinkhole deformation before a collapse is a very difficult task, due to small or sometimes unnoticeable surface changes. Most techniques used to monitor sinkholes provide very localized information and cannot be implemented to study broad areas. This is the case of central Florida, where the active zone spans over hundreds of square-kilometers. In this study we use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations acquired over several locations in central Florida to detect possible pre-collapse deformation. The study areas were selected because they have shown suspicious sinkhole behavior. One of the sites collapsed on March 2013 destroying a property and killing a man. To generate the InSAR results we use six datasets acquired by the TerraSAR-X and Cosmo-SkyMed satellites with various acquisition modes reflecting pixel resolutions between 25cm and 2m. Preliminary InSAR results show good coherence over constructed areas and low coherence in vegetated zones, justifying our analysis that focuses on the man-made structures. After full datasets will be acquired, a Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) time series analysis will be performed for detecting localized deformation at spatial scale of 1-5 meters. The project results will be verified using Ground Penetrating Radar.

  5. Investigating a New Approach to Space-Based Information Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    BER   Bit  Error  Rate   CBR   Constant  Bit  Rate   CDMA   Code  Division  Multiple  Access   CENETIX   Center...Hosted Constellation Examining the coefficient of variation displayed in Figure 58, the standard deviation of the sample divided by the average value of...CLASSIFICATION OF ABSTRACT Unclassified 20. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU NSN 7540–01–280–5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8–98) Prescribed by ANSI Std.

  6. Associative conceptual space-based information retrieval systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); J.H. van den Berg (Jan)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractIn this `Information Era' with the availability of large collections of books, articles, journals, CD-ROMs, video films and so on, there exists an increasing need for intelligent information retrieval systems that enable users to find the information desired easily. Many attempts have

  7. Alternative approaches to space-based power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Satellite Power Stations (SPS) would generate electrical power in space for terrestrial use. Their geosynchronous orbit location permits continuous microwave power transmission to ground receiving antenna farms. Eight approaches to the generation of the electrical power to be transmitted were investigated. Configurations implementing these approaches were developed through an optimization process intended to yield the lowest cost for each. A complete program was baselined for each approach, identifying required production rates, quantities of launches, required facilities, etc. Each program was costed, including the associated launches, orbital assembly, and maintenance operations. The required electric power charges to amortize these costs were calculated. They range from 26 to 82 mills/kWh (ground busbar).

  8. Benefits of a Space-Based Group System Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Relay Satellite TRL Technology Readiness Level TT&C Telemetry, Tracking, and Control UFO UHF Follow-On xv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to...replacement with more advanced systems. An example of this addition was adding UHF Follow-On ( UFO ) satellite F11, as a gap filler between the UFO

  9. Possible Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gravitational waves was established by the discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR 1913+16 by Hulse and Taylor in 1974, for which they were awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize. However, it is the exploitation of these gravitational waves for the extraction of the astrophysical parameters of the sources that will open the first new astronomical window since the development of gamma ray telescopes in the 1970's and enable a new era of discovery and understanding of the Universe. Direct detection is expected in at least two frequency bands from the ground before the end of the decade with Advanced LIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays. However, many of the most exciting sources will be continuously observable in the band from 0.1-100 mHz, accessible only from space due to seismic noise and gravity gradients in that band that disturb groundbased observatories. This talk will discuss a possible mission concept developed from the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) reference mission but updated to reduce risk and cost.

  10. Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogie, Keith; Crisuolo, Ed; Parise, Ron

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will describe the design, development, and testing of a system to collect telemetry, format it into UDP/IP packets, and deliver it to a ground test range using standard IP technologies over a TDRSS link. This presentation will discuss the goal of the STARS IP Formatter along with the overall design. It will also present performance results of the current version of the IP formatter. Finally, it will discuss key issues for supporting constant rate telemetry data delivery when using standard components such as PCI/104 processors, the Linux operating system, Internet Protocols, and synchronous serial interfaces.

  11. Space-based solar power generation: staged scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, P.E. [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Davidson, F.P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Macro-Engineering Research Group, Cambridge, MA (United States); Csigi, K.I. [ERIC International, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Despite forecasts of increased global energy demand and warnings of environmental degradation associated with fossil fuel use, the idea of solar power satellites (SPS) generating power for microwave transmission to the Earth`s surface, has met widespread opposition or simply apathy. The authors urge a staged approach to the ultimate goal of developing SPS technology and infrastructure to meet global energy forecasts. The ``terracing`` idea means that technologies applicable to SPS will be developed to meet existing or planned projects to known scientific and economic value. A forty year growth plan for the ``terraced`` evolution of the solar power satellite is set out to illustrate this idea. (UK)

  12. Automation and Robotics for Space-Based Systems, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert L., II (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this in-house workshop was to assess the state-of-the-art of automation and robotics for space operations from an LaRC perspective and to identify areas of opportunity for future research. Over half of the presentations came from the Automation Technology Branch, covering telerobotic control, extravehicular activity (EVA) and intra-vehicular activity (IVA) robotics, hand controllers for teleoperation, sensors, neural networks, and automated structural assembly, all applied to space missions. Other talks covered the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) active damping augmentation, space crane work, modeling, simulation, and control of large, flexible space manipulators, and virtual passive controller designs for space robots.

  13. Optical/Infrared Signatures for Space-Based Remote Sensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Picard, R. H; Dewan, E. M; Winick, J. R; O'Neil, R. R

    2007-01-01

    ... (mesosphere and thermosphere) in terms of the structure of the underlying medium. Advances in non-LTE radiative transfer and atmospheric waves and localized excitations are detailed, as well as analysis and modeling of the databases resulting from two groundbreaking space infrared experiments, DoD MSX/SPIRIT III and NASA TIMED/SABER.

  14. The application of intelligent process control to space based systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, G. Steve

    1990-01-01

    The application of Artificial Intelligence to electronic and process control can help attain the autonomy and safety requirements of manned space systems. An overview of documented applications within various industries is presented. The development process is discussed along with associated issues for implementing an intelligence process control system.

  15. Simulations of Ground and Space-Based Oxygen Atom Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, T. K.; Cline, J. A.; Braunstein, M.

    2002-01-01

    Fast, pulsed atomic oxygen sources are a key tool in ground-based investigations of spacecraft contamination and surface erosion effects. These technically challenging ground-based studies provide a before and after picture of materials under low-earth-orbit (LEO) conditions. It would be of great interest to track in real time the pulsed flux from the source to the surface sample target and beyond in order to characterize the population of atoms and molecules that actually impact the surface and those that make it downstream to any coincident detectors. We have performed simulations in order to provide such detailed descriptions of these ground-based measurements and to provide an assessment of their correspondence to the actual LEO environment. Where possible we also make comparisons to measured fluxes and erosion yields. To perform the calculations we use a detailed description of a measurement beam and surface geometry based on the W, pulsed apparatus at Montana State University. In this system, a short pulse (on the order of 10 microseconds) of an O/O2 beam impacts a flat sample about 40 cm downstream and slightly displaced &om the beam s central axis. Past this target, at the end of the beam axis is a quadrupole mass spectrometer that measures the relative in situ flux of 0102 to give an overall normalized erosion yield. In our simulations we use the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, and track individual atoms within the atomic oxygen pulse. DSMC techniques are typically used to model rarefied (few collision) gas-flows which occur at altitudes above approximately 110 kilometers. These techniques are well suited for the conditions here, and multi-collision effects that can only be treated by this or a similar technique are included. This simulation includes collisions with the surface and among gas atoms that have scattered from the surface. The simulation also includes descriptions of the velocity spread and spatial profiles of the O/O2 beam obtained from separate measurements. These computations use basic engineering models for the gas-gas and gas-surface scattering and focus on the influence of multi-collision effects. These simulations characterize many important quantities of interest including the actual flux of atoms that reach the surface, the energy distribution of this flux, as well as the direction of the velocity of the flux that strikes the surface. These quantities are important in characterizing the conditions which give rise to measured surface erosion. The calculations also yield time- snapshots of the pulse as it impacts and flows around the surface. These snapshots reveal the local environment of gas near the surface for the duration of the pulse. We are also able to compute the flux of molecules that travel downstream and reach the spectrometer, and we characterize their velocity distribution. The number of atoms that reach the spectrometer can in fact be influenced by the presence of the surface due to gas-gas collisions from atoms scattered h m the surface, and it will generally be less than that with the surface absent. This amounts to an overall normalization factor in computing erosion yields. We discuss these quantities and their relationship to the gas-surf$ce interaction parameters. We have also performed similar calculations corresponding to conditions (number densities, temperatures, and velocities) of low-earth orbit. The steady-state nature and lower overall flux of the actual space environment give rise to differences in the nature of the gas-impacts on the surface from those of the ground-based measurements using a pulsed source.

  16. Computer Simulation of a Space-Based Infrared Surveillance Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-07

    an axis assume that the center of rotation is viewed from the + axis direction. Thus, the usual mathematical definicion of a positive rotation...happen to fall inside the acceptable region is variable , the sum of their contributions is normalized as follows: E Signal(m) * Blur(m) r- ...pixels E...subblock mean, so the result is an indication of which parts of the scene contain the most variable structure, hence should be the strongest sources of

  17. Space-Based Sensorweb Monitoring of Wildfires in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Mclaren, David; Davies, Ashley; Tran, Daniel; Tanpipat, Veerachai; Akaakara, Siri; Ratanasuwan, Anuchit; Mandl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe efforts to apply sensorweb technologies to the monitoring of forest fires in Thailand. In this approach, satellite data and ground reports are assimilated to assess the current state of the forest system in terms of forest fire risk, active fires, and likely progression of fires and smoke plumes. This current and projected assessment can then be used to actively direct sensors and assets to best acquire further information. This process operates continually with new data updating models of fire activity leading to further sensing and updating of models. As the fire activity is tracked, products such as active fire maps, burn scar severity maps, and alerts are automatically delivered to relevant parties.We describe the current state of the Thailand Fire Sensorweb which utilizes the MODIS-based FIRMS system to track active fires and trigger Earth Observing One / Advanced Land Imager to acquire imagery and produce active fire maps, burn scar severity maps, and alerts. We describe ongoing work to integrate additional sensor sources and generate additional products.

  18. Laser metrology for ultra-stable space-based coronagraphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Joel A.; Azizi, Alireza; Zhao, Feng; Zareh, Shannon Kian G.; Rao, Shanti R.; Jewell, Jeffrey B.; Moore, Dustin

    2017-09-01

    Sensing starlight rejected from a coronagraph is essential in stabilizing the telescope pointing and wavefront drift, but performance is degraded for dim stars. Laser Metrology (MET) provides a different, complementary sensing method, one that can be used to measure changes in the alignment of the optics at high bandwidth, independent of the magnitude of the host star. Laser metrology measures changes in the separation of optical fiducial pairs, which can be separated by many meters. The principle of operations is similar to the laser metrology system used in LISA-Pathfinder to measure the in-orbit displacement between two test masses to a precision of 10 picometers. In closed loop with actuators, MET actively maintains rigid body alignment of the front-end optics, thereby eliminating the dominant source of wavefront drift. Because MET is not photon starved, it can operate at high bandwidth and feed-forward secondary-mirror jitter to a fast-steering mirror, correcting line-of-sight errors. In the case of a segmented, active primary mirror, MET provides six degrees of freedom sensing, replacing edge sensors. MET maintains wavefront control even during attitude maneuvers, such as slews between target stars, thereby avoiding the need to repeat time-consuming speckle suppression. These features can significantly improve the performance and observational efficiency of future large-aperture space telescopes equipped with internal coronagraphs. We evaluate MET trusses for various proposed monolithic and segmented spacebased coronagraphs and present the performance requirements necessary to maintain contrast drift below 10-11.

  19. Mercury Atomic Frequency Standards for Space Based Navigation and Timekeeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Burt, E. A.; Chung, S.; Hamell, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Tucker, B.; Cash, P.; Lutwak, R.

    2012-01-01

    A low power Mercury Atomic Frequency Standard (MAFS) has been developed and demonstrated on the path towards future space clock applications. A self contained mercury ion breadboard clock: emulating flight clock interfaces, steering a USO local oscillator, and consuming approx 40 Watts has been operating at JPL for more than a year. This complete, modular ion clock instrument demonstrates that key GNSS size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements can be achieved while still maintaining short and long term performance demonstrated in previous ground ion clocks. The MAFS breadboard serves as a flexible platform for optimizing further space clock development and guides engineering model design trades towards fabrication of an ion clock for space flight.

  20. Application of parallel distributed processing to space based systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, J. R.; Heffelfinger, H. L.

    1987-01-01

    The concept of using Parallel Distributed Processing (PDP) to enhance automated experiment monitoring and control is explored. Recent very large scale integration (VLSI) advances have made such applications an achievable goal. The PDP machine has demonstrated the ability to automatically organize stored information, handle unfamiliar and contradictory input data and perform the actions necessary. The PDP machine has demonstrated that it can perform inference and knowledge operations with greater speed and flexibility and at lower cost than traditional architectures. In applications where the rule set governing an expert system's decisions is difficult to formulate, PDP can be used to extract rules by associating the information an expert receives with the actions taken.

  1. Numerical Relativity for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    In the next decade, gravitational wave instruments in space may provide high-precision measurements of gravitational-wave signals from strong sources, such as black holes. Currently variations on the original Laser Interferometer Space Antenna mission concepts are under study in the hope of reducing costs. Even the observations of a reduced instrument may place strong demands on numerical relativity capabilities. Possible advances in the coming years may fuel a new generation of codes ready to confront these challenges.

  2. Design Analysis of a Space Based Chromotomographic Hyperspectral Imaging Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    generally nadir pointing and not able to slew to point at the sun and moon because of mechanical and ISS shadowing limitations. With CTEx nadir...breadboards. The tabletop of the ADRS series has a labyrinth seal that protects the bearings and encoder from contamination. An optional shaft end... THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION

  3. Creating synergy between ground and space-based precipitation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, J. J.; Hong, Y.; Petersen, W. A.; Howard, K.; Flamig, Z.; Wen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    As the successor of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite launched in 1997, the multi-national Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, to be launched in 2013, will provide next-generation global precipitation estimates from space within a unified framework. On the ground, several countries worldwide are in the throes of expanding their weather radar networks with gap-filling radars and upgrading them to include polarimetric capabilities. While significant improvements in precipitation estimation capabilities have been realized from space- and ground-based platforms separately, little effort has been focused on aligning these communities for synergistic, joint development of algorithms. In this study, we demonstrate the integration of real-time rainfall products from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) into the National Severe Storms Laboratory’s (NSSL) National Mosaic and QPE (NMQ/Q2; http://nmq.ou.edu) system. The NMQ system enables a CONUS-wide comparison of TRMM products to NEXRAD-based Q2 rainfall products. Moreover, NMQ’s ground validation software ingests and quality controls data from all automatic-reporting rain gauge networks throughout the US and provides robust graphical and statistical validation tools, accessible by anyone with internet access. This system will readily incorporate future products from GPM as well as those from the dual-polarization upgrade to the NEXRAD network. While initial efforts are on the intercomparison of rainfall products, we envision this system will ultimately promote the development of precipitation algorithms that capitalize on the strengths of spatiotemporal and error characteristics of space and ground remote-sensing data. An example algorithm is presented where the vertical structure of precipitating systems over complex terrain is more completely resolved using combined information from NMQ and TRMM precipitation radar (PR), leading to more accurate surface rainfall estimates.

  4. Enhancing Arctic Surveillance With Space-Based Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    information about maritime disasters. There are numerous science applications as well for SARs. RADARSAT-2 has been used for hydrology, cartography...the Arctic Circle. Given the level of maritime surface area within the Arctic Circle and the applicability of SAR sensors to detecting and...coverage from ad-hoc constellations in Rideshare Orbits. Presented at the 26th Annual Conference on Small Satellites Pasadena, CA. Retrieved from

  5. State-space based modeling for imaging system identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Hixson, Jonathan G.

    2017-05-01

    State-space (SS) based modeling for imaging electro-optical (EO) systems representing various states facilitates a method for system estimation. Traditionally linear shift-invariant (LSI) systems are modeled using Fourier analysis (FA). However, models based on FA may not have a clear insight too the instability reasons, whereas SS based models with system poles and zeros have a clear insight to the system stability information. In this paper, we introduce three methods to estimate system parameters for LSI EO imaging systems using SS based modeling. These methods include batch processing version of least squares (LS) estimation, recursive version of LS estimation, and sliding window LS estimation. The accuracy of the developed methods was tested using input and output signals of simulated LSI systems. First, LSI systems with various system parameters (poles and zeros) were simulated, which were then used to generate output signals for a set of random input signals, with each input signal value representing the average of an image. Then, these input and output signals were used to estimate systems employing SS and FA based modeling. Further, the estimated systems were used to generate output signals for a new set of input signals. For any given input signal, output signals generated by both systems were compared for similarities and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Results show that SS based models generate output signals that have higher SNR values. In addition, developed methods were tested against the simulated data and results show promise for development of models for estimating more complicated systems (e.g., non-linear system).

  6. Parametric Reliability of Space-Based Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    0.02 +kt1 = -0.11 kt1l = 0 kt2 = 0.022 ute = -1.5 + ua1 = 4.31e-009 ub1 = 7.61e...ute = -1.5 + ua1 = 4.31e-009 ub1 = 7.61e-018 uc1 = -5.6e-011 prt = 0 +at = 33000 +fnoimod = 1...57 + ua1 = 4.31e-009 ub1 = 7.61e-018 uc1 = -5.6e-011 prt = 0 +at = 33000 +fnoimod = 1

  7. Space-Based Observations of Satellites From the MOST Microsatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    erreurs semblent en grande partie attribuables aux incertitudes liées à la synchronisation, lesquelles sont inhérentes au microsatellite MOST. Les...conçu pour produire des images de satellites et encore moins pour suivre des satellites. On explique la plus grande partie de cette incertitude par

  8. Cleaning space debris with a space-based laser system

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Shuangyan; Jin, Xing; Hao, Chang

    2014-01-01

    High-energy pulsed laser radiation may be the most feasible means to mitigate the threat of collision of a space station or other valuable space assets with orbital debris in the size range of 1–10 cm. Under laser irradiation, part of the debris material is ablated and provides an impulse to the debris particle. Proper direction of the impulse vector either deflects the object trajectory or forces the debris on a trajectory through the upper atmosphere, where it burns up. Most research concen...

  9. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-31

    phase formed during ceraming was identified by x-ray diffraction as either P-quartz solid solution (LAS phase) or P- spodumene solid solution...phase is not stable at temperatures above 975-1000°C, however, and transforms to P- spodumene solid solution [20]. Therefore, SP963/HMU composites...which were crystallized at 11350 C, contained P- spodumene solid solution. B. Mechanical Properties Three-point flexural strengths of as-pressed and

  10. Space-Based Counterforce in the Second Nuclear Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    shooters in the same vehicle and basing the vehicle in orbits directly above a target area at distances of perhaps only hundreds of miles using hypersonic ...does not believe that either escalation dominance or nuclear pulse propulsion are particularly bizarre concepts, to convince the public to embrace...the detonation of small atomic devices in the atmosphere and space for purposes of propulsion . Many of these propositions at first glance may seem

  11. Legislative Environmental Impact Statement. M-X Closely Spaced Basing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-18

    away from the resident of the participants, excluding such activities as urban recreation and 3 organized sports . Paleo-Indians earliest documented...Utilization Center, Olympia: Washington State Energy Office and Oregon Institute of Technology. Borchert, W. B., 1976. "Geohydrology of the Albin and La

  12. High-resolution spatial patterns of Soil Organic Carbon content derived from low-altitude aerial multi-band imagery on the Broadbalk Wheat Experiment at Rothamsted,UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldana Jague, Emilien; Goulding, Keith; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    for monitoring SOC contents in agricultural soils. Remote sensing methods based on multi-spectral images may help map SOC variation in surface soils. Recently, the costs of both Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and multi-spectral cameras have dropped dramatically, opening up the possibility for more widespread...... using a UAV-platform (Octocopter) at an altitude of 120m. The different images obtained were corrected for vignetting, noise and geometric deformation then stitched and georeferenced; the radiance was converted for reflectance with white calibration panels. Also, the vegetation effect (a cover mean...

  13. Measurement of fine particulate matter nonvolatile and semi-volatile organic material with the Sunset Laboratory Carbon Aerosol Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Brett D; Kleinman, Michael; Eatough, Norman L; Eatough, Delbert J; Cary, Robert A; Hopke, Philip K; Wilson, William E

    2008-01-01

    Semi-volatile organic material (SVOM) in fine particles is not reliably measured with conventional semicontinuous carbon monitors because SVOM is lost from the collection media during sample collection. We have modified a Sunset Laboratory Carbon Aerosol Monitor to allow for the determination of SVOM. In a conventional Sunset monitor, gas-phase organic compounds are removed in the sampled airstream by a diffusion denuder employing charcoal-impregnated cellulose filter (CIF) surfaces. Subsequently, particles are collected on a quartz filter and the instrument then determines both the organic carbon and elemental carbon fractions of the aerosol using a thermal/optical method. However, some of the SVOM is lost from the filter during collection, and therefore is not determined. Because the interfering gas-phase organic compounds are removed before aerosol collection, the SVOM can be determined by filtering the particles at the instrument inlet and then replacing the quartz filter in the monitor with a charcoal-impregnated glass fiber filter (CIG), which retains the SVOM lost from particles collected on the inlet filter. The resulting collected SVOM is then determined in the analysis step by measurement of the carbonaceous material thermally evolved from the CIG filter. This concept was tested during field studies in February 2003 in Lindon, UT, and in July 2003 in Rubidoux, CA. The results obtained were validated by comparison with Particle Concentrator-Brigham Young University Organic Sampling System (PC-BOSS) results. The sum of nonvolatile organic material determined with a conventional Sunset monitor and SVOM determined with the modified Sunset monitor agree with the PC-BOSS results. Linear regression analysis of total carbon concentrations determined by the PC-BOSS and the Sunset resulted in a zero-intercept slope of 0.99 +/- 0.02 (R2 = 0.92) and a precision of sigma = +/- 1.5 microg C/m3 (8%).

  14. SpaceCRAF: A Civil Reserve Air Fleet for Space-Based Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    harsher scrutiny. The gusher has been turned off, and will stay off for a good period of time . . . . it‟s a simple matter of math .”1 Echoing these...in some cases might include a basketball tournament or the Super Bowl. The commercial carriers would continue to operate and maintain the spacecraft

  15. Eyjafjallajokull Volcano Plume Particle-Type Characterization from Space-Based Multi-angle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Limbacher, James

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Research Aerosol algorithm makes it possible to study individual aerosol plumes in considerable detail. From the MISR data for two optically thick, near-source plumes from the spring 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallaj kull volcano, we map aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients and changing aerosol particle types with this algorithm; several days downwind, we identify the occurrence of volcanic ash particles and retrieve AOD, demonstrating the extent and the limits of ash detection and mapping capability with the multi-angle, multi-spectral imaging data. Retrieved volcanic plume AOD and particle microphysical properties are distinct from background values near-source, as well as for overwater cases several days downwind. The results also provide some indication that as they evolve, plume particles brighten, and average particle size decreases. Such detailed mapping offers context for suborbital plume observations having much more limited sampling. The MISR Standard aerosol product identified similar trends in plume properties as the Research algorithm, though with much smaller differences compared to background, and it does not resolve plume structure. Better optical analogs of non-spherical volcanic ash, and coincident suborbital data to validate the satellite retrieval results, are the factors most important for further advancing the remote sensing of volcanic ash plumes from space.

  16. Single Frequency Lasers for Space-Based Wind and Aerosol Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR will develop single frequency cw laser technology for 2um lidar and UV interferometer locking control critical to NASA missions that will measure...

  17. Reproducing kernel Hilbert space based estimation of systems of ordinary differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, Javier; Vujacic, Ivan; Wit, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Non-linear systems of differential equations have attracted the interest in fields like system biology, ecology or biochemistry, due to their flexibility and their ability to describe dynamical systems. Despite the importance of such models in many branches of science they have not been the focus of

  18. Mission Analysis and Design for Space Based Inter-Satellite Laser Power Beaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    20]. Finally, as shown in Figure 2.1, 1891 saw Nikola Tesla file for U.S. Patent No. 454,622 “System of Electric Lighting”. At the World Columbian...Laser-Beamer Power . Tech- nical Report 2014/34883, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, February 1993. 14. Aldrich, Lisa J. Nikola Tesla and the Taming of... Tesla , Nikola . “The Transmission of Electrical Energy without Wires,” Electrical World and Engineer (March 1904). 33. Tribble, Alan C. The Space

  19. Superconducting Magnetic Bearings for Space-Based Flywheel Energy Storage Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Balcones Technologies, LLC proposes to adapt technologies developed by and resident in The University of Texas at Austin Center for Electromechanics (CEM) in the...

  20. Policy for Robust Space-based Earth Science, Technology and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly Elizabeth; Escobar, Vanessa Marie; Aschbacher, Josef; Milagro-Pérez, Maria Pilar; Doorn, Bradley; Macauley, Molly K.; Friedl, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing technology has contributed to the transformation of multiple earth science domains, putting space observations at the forefront of innovation in earth science. With new satellite missions being launched every year, new types of earth science data are being incorporated into science models and decision-making systems in a broad array of organizations. Policy guidance can influence the degree to which user needs influence mission design and when, and ensure that satellite missions serve both the scientific and user communities without becoming unfocused and overly expensive. By considering the needs of the user community early on in the mission-design process, agencies can ensure that satellites meet the needs of multiple constituencies. This paper describes the mission development process in NASA and ESA and compares and contrasts the successes and challenges faced by these agencies as they try to balance science and applications within their missions.

  1. Ocean, Land and Meteorology Studies Using Space-Based Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu,Yongxiang

    2009-01-01

    CALIPSO's main mission objective is studying the climate impact of clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere. CALIPSO also collects information about other components of the Earth's ecosystem, such as oceans and land. This paper introduces the physics concepts and presents preliminary results for the valueadded CALIPSO Earth system science products. These include ocean surface wind speeds, column atmospheric optical depths, ocean subsurface backscatter, land surface elevations, atmospheric temperature profiles, and A-train data fusion products.

  2. Space-Based Sensor Web for Earth Science Applications: An Integrated Architecture for Providing Societal Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid; Talabac, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    There is a significant interest in the Earth Science research and user remote sensing community to substantially increase the number of useful observations relative to the current frequency of collection. The obvious reason for such a push is to improve the temporal, spectral, and spatial coverage of the area(s) under investigation. However, there is little analysis available in terms of the benefits, costs and the optimal set of sensors needed to make the necessary observations. Classic observing system solutions may no longer be applicable because of their point design philosophy. Instead, a new intelligent data collection system paradigm employing both reactive and proactive measurement strategies with adaptability to the dynamics of the phenomena should be developed. This is a complex problem that should be carefully studied and balanced across various boundaries including: science, modeling, applications, and technology. Modeling plays a crucial role in making useful predictions about naturally occurring or human-induced phenomena In particular, modeling can serve to mitigate the potentially deleterious impacts a phenomenon may have on human life, property, and the economy. This is especially significant when one is interested in learning about the dynamics of, for example, the spread of forest fires, regional to large-scale air quality issues, the spread of the harmful invasive species, or the atmospheric transport of volcanic plumes and ash. This paper identifies and examines these challenging issues and presents architectural alternatives for an integrated sensor web to provide observing scenarios driving the requisite dynamic spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics to address these key application areas. A special emphasis is placed on the observing systems and its operational aspects in serving the multiple users and stakeholders in providing societal benefits. We also address how such systems will take advantage of technological advancement in small spacecraft and emerging information technologies, and how sensor web options may be realized and made affordable. Specialized detector subsystems and precision flying techniques may still require substantial innovation, development time and cost: we have presented the considerations for these issues. Finally, data and information gathering and compression techniques are also briefly described.

  3. S@tMax—A space-based system enabling mobile IP applications in vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcioni, Marco; Daehler, Erik; Mueller, Robert P.; van der Meulen, Wencke

    2009-06-01

    As personal mobility increases, people spend more time in their vehicles. Furthermore, a large segment of today's workforce is part of a growing mobile service industry. This mobile society creates opportunities to increase productivity which do not yet exist. Today's commuting time could be better utilized and mobile business transactions could be more efficiently conducted, by integrating mobile IP wireless services in vehicles. By means of a direct to mobile user Internet access, and total IP services, integrated into automobiles, S@tMax services can empower the mobile business movement therefore improving productivity. This paper presents a commercial system architecture that will deliver an optimized solution for direct to mobile user Internet access, through an integration of a ground based network infrastructure, use of existing communications satellites and the development of a proprietary satellite system. As a result of a detailed systems engineering process, the architectures of the space, ground and infrastructures segments will be presented. Furthermore, the benefits of on-orbit servicing were examined in the S@tMax context. The approach proposed is considered as an important step towards enforcing main roadway IP coverage in the US, for near-continuous communications and services.

  4. A space-based combined thermophotovoltaic electric generator and gas laser solar energy conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesil, Oktay

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a spaceborne energy conversion system consisting of a thermophotovoltaic electric generator and a gas laser. As a power source for the converson, the system utilizes an intermediate blackbody cavity heated to a temperature of 2000-2400 K by concentrated solar radiation. A double-layer solar cell of GaAs and Si forms a cylindrical surface concentric to this blackbody cavity, receiving the blackbody radiation and converting it into electricity with cell conversion efficiency of 50 percent or more. If the blackbody cavity encloses a laser medium, the blackbody radiation can also be used to simultaneously pump a lasing gas. The feasibility of blackbody optical pumping at 4.3 microns in a CO2-He gas mixture was experimentally demonstrated.

  5. Technology Prioritized for HA/DR: A Space Based ISR Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    land surface heights, this includes seismic disturbances, tectonic plate movements , and recently relevant, the mass balance of polar ice caps. As...level of fidelity it can bring to current applications. The ability to identify disturbed earth from IEDs, equipment movement , or even subsidence due to...portend a larger movement in the commercial imagery industry, and through the interrelationship between the commercial and military sectors, will affect

  6. Design and Characterization of a Space Based Chromotomographic Hyperspectral Imaging Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Valve HPU Hydraulic Power Unit HV Hand Valve ICU Instrument Computer Unit PI Pressure Indicator PPE Personal Protective Equipment RCL Red Crew...Members shall notify the TC of any leaks from HPU , hydraulic system, or pneumatic system pipe or tubing connections. TOP SCTEx 0002 Rev 0 110112

  7. Dynamics and Control of Tethered Satellite Formations for the Purpose of Space-Based Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    System . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 PMG Plasma Motor Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 NRO National Reconnaissance Office...numerical in nature, Misra took a more analytical approach in this work and examined the stability of the four equilibrium configurations. The vertical...quadrant 2), with the intent to transition over to a discretized lumped mass approach (quadrant 4a) similar to Tragesser and Tuncay. In their

  8. Comparison of Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers as Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.

  9. Multiple Shells Around Wolf-Rayet Stars: Space Based Astrometric Observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Anthony P.

    1995-01-01

    The completion of a complementary optical emission-line survey of the nebulae associated with Wolf-Rayet stars in the southern sky is reported, along with the completion of a survey the large-scale environments of Wolf-Rayet stars using IRAS Skyflux data. HIRES IRAS maps in the four IRAS wavebands for appoximately half of all galactic Wolf-Rayet stars are created.

  10. Analyzing Space-Based Interferometric Measurements of Stars and Network Measurements of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, L. G.

    1998-01-01

    Since the announcement of the discovery of sources of bursts of gamma-ray radiation in 1973, hundreds more reports of such bursts have now been published. Numerous artificial satellites have been equipped with gamma-ray detectors including the very successful Compton Gamma Ray Observatory BATSE instrument. Unfortunately, we have made no progress in identifying the source(s) of this high energy radiation. We suspected that this was a consequence of the method used to define gamma-ray burst source "error boxes." An alternative procedure to compute gamma-ray burst source positions, with a purely physical underpinning, was proposed in 1988 by Taff. Since then we have also made significant progress in understanding the analytical nature of the triangulation problem and in computing actual gamma-ray burst positions and their corresponding error boxes. For the former, we can now mathematically illustrate the crucial role of the area occupied by the detectors, while for the latter, the Atteia et al. (1987) catalog has been completely re-reduced. There are very few discrepancies in locations between our results and those of the customary "time difference of arrival" procedure. Thus, we have numerically demonstrated that the end result, for the positions, of these two very different-looking procedures is the same. Finally, for the first time, we provide a sample of realistic "error boxes" whose non-simple shapes vividly portray the difficulty of burst source localization.

  11. Global Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) from Space Based AIS Ship Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwehr, K. D.; Foulkes, J. A.; Lorenzini, D.; Kanawati, M.

    2011-12-01

    All nations need to be developing long term integrated strategies for how to use and preserve our natural resources. As a part of these strategies, we must evalutate how communities of users react to changes in rules and regulations of ocean use. Global characterization of the vessel traffic on our Earth's oceans is essential to understanding the existing uses to develop international Coast and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP). Ship traffic within 100-200km is beginning to be effectively covered in low latitudes by ground based receivers collecting position reports from the maritime Automatic Identification System (AIS). Unfortunately, remote islands, high latitudes, and open ocean Marine Protected Areas (MPA) are not covered by these ground systems. Deploying enough autonomous airborne (UAV) and surface (USV) vessels and buoys to provide adequate coverage is a difficult task. While the individual device costs are plummeting, a large fleet of AIS receivers is expensive to maintain. The global AIS coverage from SpaceQuest's low Earth orbit satellite receivers combined with the visualization and data storage infrastructure of Google (e.g. Maps, Earth, and Fusion Tables) provide a platform that enables researchers and resource managers to begin answer the question of how ocean resources are being utilized. Near real-time vessel traffic data will allow managers of marine resources to understand how changes to education, enforcement, rules, and regulations alter usage and compliance patterns. We will demonstrate the potential for this system using a sample SpaceQuest data set processed with libais which stores the results in a Fusion Table. From there, the data is imported to PyKML and visualized in Google Earth with a custom gx:Track visualization utilizing KML's extended data functionality to facilitate ship track interrogation. Analysts can then annotate and discuss vessel tracks in Fusion Tables.

  12. Preparations for Integrating Space-Based Total Lightning Observations into Forecast Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Fuell, Kevin K.; Molthan, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has been a leader in collaborating with the United States National Weather Service (NWS) offices to integrate ground-based total lightning (intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground) observations into the real-time operational environment. For much of these collaborations, the emphasis has been on training, dissemination of data to the NWS AWIPS system, and focusing on the utility of these data in the warning decision support process. A shift away from this paradigm has occurred more recently for several reasons. For one, SPoRT's collaborations have expanded to new partners, including emergency managers and the aviation community. Additionally, and most importantly, is the impending launch of the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). This has led to collaborative efforts to focus on additional forecast needs, new data displays, develop training for GLM uses based on the lessons learned from ground-based lightning mapping arrays, and ways to better relate total lightning data to other meteorological parameters. This presentation will focus on these efforts to prepare the operational end user community for GLM with an eye towards sharing lessons learned as EUMETSAT prepares for the Meteosat Third Generation Lightning Imager. This will focus on both software and training needs. In particular, SPoRT has worked closely with the Meteorological Development Laboratory to create the total lightning tracking tool. This software allows for NWS forecasters to manually track storms of interest and display a time series trend of observations. This tool also has been expanded to work on any gridded data set allowing for easy visual comparisons of multiple parameters in addition to total lightning. A new web display has been developed for the ground-based observations that can be easily extended to satellite observations. This paves the way for new collaborations outside of the NWS, both domestically and internationally, as the web display will be functional on PCs and mobile devices. Furthermore, SPoRT has helped developed the software plug-in to visualize GLM data. Examples using the official GLM proxy product will be used to provide a glimpse as to what real-time GLM and likely MTG-LI data will be in the near future.

  13. Supplemental Information on a Conceptual Design of a Space-Based Multimegawatt MHD Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    1270 Aa Specified by URSO Dallvarobla Itam TASK 2 E F C H J K X •Uniform Reporting Syatam for Centraotora UHD880106-12C Figure 5-3. 14...Analytical Studies Draft Final Technical Report As Specified by URSO 1270 •Uniform Reporting System for Contractors UHD830106-12C Figure 5-3. WBS and

  14. The metrics of visual and haptic space based on parallelity judgements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, Raymond H.; Kappers, Astrid M L; Koenderink, Jan J.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that the visually perceived positions of objects, in short visual space, are distorted with respect to the physical positions. On the basis of the observation that equidistance-alleys lie outside parallel-alleys, Luneburg (Mathematical Analysis of Binocular Vision, Princeton

  15. Re: Using Space-Based Investigations to Inform Cancer Research on Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Becker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the Universe, four main forces are effective. These are weak nuclear force, strong nuclear force, electromagnetic force and gravitational force. Gravity is the attractive force between all matter. In space, the force of gravity is diminished, resulting in microgravity. Currently, there are various studies about microgravity and its effect on biological functions in the literature. In this review, the authors reported effects of microgravity on cancer culture studies. In these studies, some devices are used such as rotating wall vessel (RWV bioreactor, clinostat, random positioning machine (RPM (3D clinostat, and magnetic levitation. These 3D cell culture studies are focused on oncology. We can find some studies that especially focused on culture or co-culture of prostate cancer in the microgravity conditions. These authors suggested that effects of microgravity on the oncological cultures in the space station (10-4 and 10-6 g were immune cell changes, alterations in gene expression, effects on cell signaling, effects on apoptosis, cytoskeletal changes, and alterations in cell shape. Microgravity environment of space includes lack of sedimentation, reduced fluid shear, cellular co-location and 3D multicellular growth. Microencapsulation technology was developed in like these conditions using a xenograft model of prostate cancer. Space presents an unlimited horizon for discovery. Microgravity can further our understanding of the fundamental role of gravity in cancer cell growth and function. These studies will expand our knowledge necessary for improving treatment options and exploring the etiopathogenesis of cancer.

  16. Estimation of the temperature spatial variability in confined spaces based on thermal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustyn Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries the salaries of office workers are several times higher than the total cost of maintaining and operating the building. Therefore even a small improvement in human work productivity and performance as a result of enhancing the quality of their work environment may lead to a meaningful economic benefits. The air temperature is the most commonly used indicator in assessing the indoor environment quality. What is more, it is well known that thermal comfort has the biggest impact on employees performance and their ability to work efficiently. In majority of office buildings, indoor temperature is managed by heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC appliances. However the way how they are currently managed and controlled leads to the nonhomogeneous distribution of temperature in certain space. An approach to determining the spatial variability of temperature in confined spaces was introduced based on thermal imaging temperature measurements. The conducted research and obtained results enabled positive verification of the method and creation of surface plot illustrating the temperature variability.

  17. The All Seeing Eye: Space-Based Persistent Surveillance in 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    times. The concepts of placing an Earth observing satellite in GEO have been proven by both the Defense Satellite Program ( DSP ) missile warning...the day after launch. This companion satellite proceeded to fly around the orbital vehicle, taking pictures and sending them to the ground for 100...failed missile warning satellite.32 Like the Chinese companion satellite, these inspection satellites are employing rendezvous operations that would

  18. The Challenges in Gravitational Wave Astronomy for Space-Based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Edward K.

    The GW universe contains a wealth of sources which, with the proper treatment, will open up the universe as never before. By observing massive black hole binaries to high redshifts, we should begin to explore the formation process of seed black holes and track galactic evolution to the present day. Observations of extreme mass ratio inspirals will allow us to explore galactic centers in the local universe, as well as providing tests of General Relativity and constraining the value of Hubble's constant. The detection of compact binaries in our own galaxy may allow us to model stellar evolution in the Milky Way. Finally, the detection of cosmic (super)strings and a stochastic background would help us constrain cosmological models. However, all of this depends on our ability to not only resolve sources and carry out parameter estimation, but also on our ability to define an optimal data analysis strategy. In this presentation I will examine the challenges that lie ahead in GW astronomy for the ESA L3 Cosmic Vision mission, eLISA.

  19. High Quantum Efficiency Type II SLS FPAs for Space-Based Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposes to develop high quantum efficiency (QE) and low dark current infrared epitaxy materials based on Type II Strained Layer Superlattice (SLS)...

  20. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Hydrogen Sensors and Systems. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Sensor systems research was focused on hydrogen leak detection and smart sensors with adaptive feedback control for fuel cells. The goal was to integrate multifunction smart sensors, low-power high-efficiency wireless circuits, energy harvesting devices, and power management circuits in one module. Activities were focused on testing and demonstrating sensors in a realistic environment while also bringing them closer to production and commercial viability for eventual use in the actual operating environment.

  1. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Transport. Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Hydrogen storage and in-space hydrogen transport research focused on developing and verifying design concepts for efficient, safe, lightweight liquid hydrogen cryogenic storage systems. Research into hydrogen production had a specific goal of further advancing proton conducting membrane technology in the laboratory at a larger scale. System and process trade studies evaluated the proton conducting membrane technology, specifically, scale-up issues.

  2. Space-based spectro-directional measurements for the improved estimation of ecosystem variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneubühler, M.; Koetz, B.; Huber, S.; Zimmerman, N.E.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, four unique information sources of the Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) onboard the Project for On-Board Autonomy (PROBA-1) are exploited, namely, the spectral, directional, spatial, and temporal dimensions. Based on the results of three case studies in

  3. An Application of Space-Based Gas Mixtures for Joule-Thompson Cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, V. T.; Yevdokimova, O. V.; Lobko, M. P.; Yakuba, V. V.

    An extension of deepspace research, specifically, the work done on Alpha program, will inevitably require new and different cryostating systems. The primary differences will be in the areas of cooling power and temperature. One variant which can be used with J-T cryocoolers is the application of diverse gas mixtures which can work over a large temperature range. We have found that the J-T cycle is an efficient application of mixed gas working fluids, being very similar to a vapor-compression cycle utilized in household refrigerants. The simplicity and viability of a J-T design and the associated minimal heat losses compensate for theoretical efficiency ratio of Stirling-type machines. Simultaneously, the J-T machines are never restricted in terms of output power and contain no moving parts in the cold zone resulting in minimal vibration during operation. The effective cooling of these systems allows parallel cooling of multiple objects. Finally in long-life system designs these cryocooler systems are feasibly coupled with phase-transition thermal storage accumulators. The application of such J-T systems is especially efficient under space conditions, due to the fact that there is an option to use at low temperatures a radiation release unit for the outlet of compression heat and for preliminary cooling of the system. This is not possible for terrestrial applications. Particularly, obtaining the -10 to 100 (C temperature range is feasible through the use of low As/(( - coefficient coatings; shade screens; or radiator unit orientations. Computational and experimental research has provided us high efficiency gas-mixture J-T cryocooler results between 60 to 100K cooling temperatures. We have actual space systems which were tested and operated for 80-90 K with efficiencies of 20 to 25 W/W. The authors of this research have studied various gas mixtures as candidates for use with simple J-T single contour J-T systems. We have seen resultant reduction of energy consumption by 2-3 times and decreases in temperatures from the 30-60( C range to -10 to 10( C range. We have also seen a dramatic reduction in the working pressure and the P/P pressure ratios within the cycle. We have gradually evolved into the application of simpler and more reliable working mixtures and employed more reliable single-stage compressors. In addition, the use of J-T contour gas mixtures for pre-cooling down to 35-40 K temperatures results in higher efficiency 2-stage J-T cryocoolers with similar overall results to the single stage systems.

  4. Space-Based Detection of Missing Sulfur Dioxide Sources of Global Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, Chris A.; Fioletov, Vitali; Shephard, Mark W.; Krotkov, Nick; Li, Can; Martin, Randall V.; Moran, Michael D.; Joiner, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide is designated a criteria air contaminant (or equivalent) by virtually all developed nations. When released into the atmosphere, sulfur dioxide forms sulfuric acid and fine particulate matter, secondary pollutants that have significant adverse effects on human health, the environment and the economy. The conventional, bottom-up emissions inventories used to assess impacts, however, are often incomplete or outdated, particularly for developing nations that lack comprehensive emission reporting requirements and infrastructure. Here we present a satellite-based, global emission inventory for SO2 that is derived through a simultaneous detection, mapping and emission-quantifying procedure, and thereby independent of conventional information sources. We find that of the 500 or so large sources in our inventory, nearly 40 are not captured in leading conventional inventories. These missing sources are scattered throughout the developing world-over a third are clustered around the Persian Gulf-and add up to 7 to 14 Tg of SO2 yr(exp -1), or roughly 6-12% of the global anthropogenic source. Our estimates of national total emissions are generally in line with conventional numbers, but for some regions, and for SO2 emissions from volcanoes, discrepancies can be as large as a factor of three or more. We anticipate that our inventory will help eliminate gaps in bottom-up inventories, independent of geopolitical borders and source types.

  5. Fabrication of Thin Film CIGS Solar Cells for Space-Based Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyenhagen, Joel P.; Marciniak, M. A.; Lott, J. A.; Yeo, Y. K.; Kapur, V. K.; Senft, D. C.

    2003-03-01

    An innovative process developed by International Solar Electric Technology (ISET) was used to fabricate CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells on glass substrates. Key to the patented ISET process is the CIGS layer that is deposited in the form of a precursor metal oxide ink over Mo-coated glass. Solar cells of 0.084 cm2 were fabricated and measured under AM1.5 Global conditions with efficiencies up to 9.2between each process step using optical, electrical, and x-ray fluorescence techniques to improve process control. Variations in the reduction and selenization processes are measured on the completed solar cells using photoluminescence and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These results can improve the fabrication process to lower the production costs and realize U.S. Air Force spacecraft needs of larger power budgets with reduced system and launch costs.

  6. Space-based Solar Power: Possible Defense Applications and Opportunities for NRL Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-23

    as the Unit Operations Center ( UOC ) – the generator provided is 20 kW and consumes approximately half of a small trailer (the other half is occupied...by an 8-ton environmental control unit and tent). The UOC is appropriately sized for use in an FOB and yet provides power only for itself. One...powering the UOC , as was suggested by the prime vendor, it is inadequate for any larger installation. Currently, we use sets of semipermanent

  7. High Quantum Efficiency Type II SLS FPAs for Space-Based Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR proposes to develop high quantum efficiency (QE) and low dark current infrared epitaxy materials based on Type II Strained Layer Superlattice...

  8. DWDM-PON at 25 GHz channel spacing based on ASE injection seeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Young; Moon, Sang-Rok; Yoo, Sang-Hwa; Lee, Chang-Hee

    2012-12-10

    We demonstrate a 25 GHz-channel-spaced DWDM-PON based on ASE injection seeding. A 60 km transmission at 1.25 Gb/s per channel is available with a 2nd generation FEC. The major limiting factor is the optical back reflection induced penalty. Thus a high gain reflective modulator and/or relocation of the seed light increase the transmission length. We demonstrated 90 km transmission with relocated seed light to remote node.

  9. Ground- and space-based normal mode modeling of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, M.; Clévédé, E.; Lognonne, P.; Rolland, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    On March 11th 2011 at 05:47 UT our planet has been excited by a major earthquake (Mw=9.1) near the east cost of Honshu (Japan). Our work presented here considers the mathematical modeling and geophysical interpretation of the recorded seismic data. Normal modes are the Earth's standing waves and give a great insight into our planet. Furthermore most studies are considering the displacement field caused by an earthquake and thus operate in the time-domain totally ignoring frequency ranges. However the analysis of a body's normal modes allow conclusions about its structure, material and boundary conditions. As a consequence we would like to give a spectral analysis of the normal mode response to the event stated above combining three different approaches. The first is a rather classical one modeling a seismogram and spectral representation using F-NET waveform data from the seismic network of the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). Next we want to change from ground movement to atmospheric disturbances caused by the temporal change of mass distribution affecting the solid Earth. For this we analyzed ionospheric GPS data and elaborated an algorithm allowing to take the satellite's movement during the recording into account. This allows us to get a time series of the vertical TEC (total electron content) above any desired point on the Earth given by its spherical surface coordinates. The third and most experimental approach is to look at geodetic data from ESA's GOCE mission. As seismic wave propagation means redistribution of the Earth's mass this gives an insight into the possibility of earthquake detection from space. Combining all these approaches we have a three-level seismic representation (ground, atmosphere, space) using all possible advantages of the different procedures in order to harness the Earth's response to a seismic event in both, the time and frequency domain providing a better understanding of our planet's behavior in dependence of its interior constitution.

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Transmission Control Protocol Improvement Techniques over Space-Based Transmission Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lawson, Joseph M

    2006-01-01

    ... justification for the implementation of a given enhancement technique. The research questions were answered through model and simulation of a satellite transmission system via a Linux-based network topology...

  11. Interpreting space-based trends in carbon monoxide with multiple models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Strode

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We use a series of chemical transport model and chemistry climate model simulations to investigate the observed negative trends in MOPITT CO over several regions of the world, and to examine the consistency of time-dependent emission inventories with observations. We find that simulations driven by the MACCity inventory, used for the Chemistry Climate Modeling Initiative (CCMI, reproduce the negative trends in the CO column observed by MOPITT for 2000–2010 over the eastern United States and Europe. However, the simulations have positive trends over eastern China, in contrast to the negative trends observed by MOPITT. The model bias in CO, after applying MOPITT averaging kernels, contributes to the model–observation discrepancy in the trend over eastern China. This demonstrates that biases in a model's average concentrations can influence the interpretation of the temporal trend compared to satellite observations. The total ozone column plays a role in determining the simulated tropospheric CO trends. A large positive anomaly in the simulated total ozone column in 2010 leads to a negative anomaly in OH and hence a positive anomaly in CO, contributing to the positive trend in simulated CO. These results demonstrate that accurately simulating variability in the ozone column is important for simulating and interpreting trends in CO.

  12. Impact of the Ionosphere on an L-band Space Based Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Elaine; Chan, Samuel F.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Chen, Curtis W.; Martin, Jan M.; Michel, Thierry R.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Pi, Xiaoqing; Rosen, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    We have quantified the impact that the ionosphere would have on a L-band interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission using a combination of simulation, modeling, Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected during the last solar maximum, and existing spaceborne SAR data. We conclude that, except for high latitude scintillation related effects, the ionosphere will not significantly impact the performance of an L-band InSAR mission in an appropriate orbit. We evaluated the strength of the ionospheric irregularities using GPS scintillation data collected at Fairbanks, Alaska and modeled the impact of these irregularities on azimuth resolution, azimuth displacement, peak sidelobe ratio (PSLR), and integrated sidelobe ratio (ISLR). Although we predict that less than 5% of auroral zone data would show scintillation related artifacts, certain sites imaged near the equinoxes could be effected up to 25% of the time because the frequency of occurrence of scintillation is a strong function of season and local time of day. Our examination of ionospheric artifacts observed in InSAR data has revealed that the artifacts occur primarily in the polar cap data, not auroral zone data as was previously thought.

  13. A possible space-based tsunami early warning system using observations of the tsunami ionospheric hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamogawa, Masashi; Orihara, Yoshiaki; Tsurudome, Chiaki; Tomida, Yuto; Kanaya, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Daiki; Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Ionospheric plasma disturbances after a large tsunami can be detected by measurement of the total electron content (TEC) between a Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite and its ground-based receivers. TEC depression lasting for a few minutes to tens of minutes termed as tsunami ionospheric hole (TIH) is formed above the tsunami source area. Here we describe the quantitative relationship between initial tsunami height and the TEC depression rate caused by a TIH from seven tsunamigenic earthquakes in Japan and Chile. We found that the percentage of TEC depression and initial tsunami height are correlated and the largest TEC depressions appear 10 to 20 minutes after the main shocks. Our findings imply that Ionospheric TEC measurement using the existing ground receiver networks could be used in an early warning system for near-field tsunamis that take more than 20 minutes to arrive in coastal areas. PMID:27905487

  14. Space-Based Solar Power: A Technical, Economic, and Operational Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Solar Power System: A Business Plan to Make Space So- lar Power a Reality,” A Multicultural Team Project for Master of Business Administration in...supplied by alternative energy sources; and, d) Con- straints imposed by ionospheric and biological effects .7 As we will see, these specific areas of...determine if the NRL can offer a unique, cost- effective , and efficient approach to supplying sig- nificant power on demand for Navy, Marine Corps, or other

  15. Simulation Studies for a Space-Based CO2 Lidar Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. R.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Collatz, G. J.; Sun, X.; Weaver, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    We report results of initial space mission simulation studies for a laser-based, atmospheric CO2 sounder, which are based on real-time carbon cycle process modelling and data analysis. The mission concept corresponds to the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences' Decadal Survey. As a pre-requisite for meaningful quantitative evaluation, we employ a CO2 model that has representative spatial and temporal gradients across a wide range of scales. In addition, a relatively complete description of the atmospheric and surface state is obtained from meteorological data assimilation and satellite measurements. We use radiative transfer calculations, an instrument model with representative errors and a simple retrieval approach to quantify errors in 'measured' CO2 distributions, which are a function of mission and instrument design specifications along with the atmospheric/surface state. Uncertainty estimates based on the current instrument design point indicate that a CO2 laser sounder can provide data consistent with ASCENDS requirements and will significantly enhance our ability to address carbon cycle science questions. Test of a dawn/dusk orbit deployment, however, shows that diurnal differences in CO2 column abundance, indicative of plant photosynthesis and respiration fluxes, will be difficult to detect

  16. Determination of Active Personal Space Based on Emotion when Interacting with a Service Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajal Chandra Banik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the determination of active personal space (APS for a service robot based on emotional status. This is required for human-robot interaction at ease. Here, APS means the active distance (relative distance during interaction and action between the robot and the human. APS is a function of emotion both in the human and in the robot. The other factors which are considered here are age, height, familiarity with robot, and relative motion between robot and human. According to these factors, the changes in APS are shown with graphs. During the experiments two robot emotions are considered: normal and angry. The causes of variation of APS based on the two modes are also explained.

  17. Determination of Active Personal Space Based on Emotion when Interacting with a Service Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Sajal Chandra Banik; Ashoke Kumar Sen Gupta; M. K. Habib; Mousumi, R. N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the determination of active personal space (APS) for a service robot based on emotional status. This is required for human-robot interaction at ease. Here, APS means the active distance (relative distance during interaction and action) between the robot and the human. APS is a function of emotion both in the human and in the robot. The other factors which are considered here are age, height, familiarity with robot, and relative motion between robot and human. According t...

  18. Stokes Space-Based Optical Modulation Format Recognition for Digital Coherent Receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Robert; Zibar, Darko; Caballero Jambrina, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    modulation formats is successfully demonstrated numerically and experimentally. The proposed method does not require training or a constellation diagram to operate, is insensitive to polarization mixing or frequency offset and can be implemented in any receiver capable of measuring Stokes parameters....

  19. Progress Towards a Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observatory Since 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2015-01-01

    Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA): Focus of all work since 1993; Unchanged since 1997; Project in Phase A since 2004; Extensive formulation work and products; Reviewed and recommended in many major reviews: AANM (NRC, 2001), TRIP (HQ, 2003), Connecting Quarks with the Cosmos (NRC, 2003), AETD (GSFC, 2005). Beyond Einstein Program: (NRC, 2007), NWNH (NRC, 2010): Second in large space projects after WFIRST. Recommended for a new start. Contingent on Lisa Pathfinder success and a roughly 50-50 European partnership.

  20. Space Based Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Contribution to Global Strike in 2035

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Grumman, Redondo Beach, CA are leveraging these advances. In February of 2011 the NRO launched a pathfinder in the minisatellite category. The total...Force 2035. Ottawa: Canadian Forces Aerospace Warfare Centre. Guerra, Lisa . NASA, Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. Space Systems Cost...Operationally Responsive Space A Report to Congressional Defense Committees, 17 April 2007, 3-4. 35 Lisa Guerra. NASA, Exploration Systems Mission

  1. ESA’s L3 mission: A space-based gravitational-wave observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Guido

    2016-04-01

    ESA selected the Gravitational Universe as the science theme for one of its future L-class missions. L3 will measure gravitational waves in the 10µHz to 100mHz window; probably the richest of all gravitational wave windows. Expected sources in this frequency band range from massive black hole mergers to extreme mass ratio inspirals to compact galactic binary systems.The L3 mission is expected to be based on the eLISA/LISA design which was submitted by the eLISA consortium as a notional mission concept. NASA started discussions with ESA how to join L3 and participates in ESA’s Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team. NASA is also in the process of setting up its own L3-Study team to look at potential US contributions to L3. This group will also act as the US partner for the eLISA consortium. In summary, the space component of the GW community has gained significant momentum over the last 12 months and a successful pathfinder mission and potential GW discoveries by Advanced LIGO and/or pulsar timing arrays should further strengthen the case for LISA.

  2. A possible space-based tsunami early warning system using observations of the tsunami ionospheric hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamogawa, Masashi; Orihara, Yoshiaki; Tsurudome, Chiaki; Tomida, Yuto; Kanaya, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Daiki; Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-12-01

    Ionospheric plasma disturbances after a large tsunami can be detected by measurement of the total electron content (TEC) between a Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite and its ground-based receivers. TEC depression lasting for a few minutes to tens of minutes termed as tsunami ionospheric hole (TIH) is formed above the tsunami source area. Here we describe the quantitative relationship between initial tsunami height and the TEC depression rate caused by a TIH from seven tsunamigenic earthquakes in Japan and Chile. We found that the percentage of TEC depression and initial tsunami height are correlated and the largest TEC depressions appear 10 to 20 minutes after the main shocks. Our findings imply that Ionospheric TEC measurement using the existing ground receiver networks could be used in an early warning system for near-field tsunamis that take more than 20 minutes to arrive in coastal areas.

  3. Self lubricating composites for medium temperatures in space based on polyimide SINTIMID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merstallinger, A.; Bieringer, H.; Kubinger, E.; Gaillard, L.; Brenner, J.; Mozdzen, G.

    2005-07-01

    The paper is surveying the results of an ESA-project on a polyimide composite named "SINTIMID". The main target was to find a self lubricating composite (SLC) which is suitable for missions to the inner solar system, where operating temperatures up to 300°C in vacuum are expected. The paper comprises a short introduction into the requirements derived from ECSS for SLC material intended for use in journal bearings working in space. It covers a brief description of new equipments for medium temperatures "vacuum tribometer" and "Journal Bearing Test rig". The presented results will cover mainly the friction and wear behaviour and component test performance. The influences of parameters like load, speed, atmosphere and temperature are discussed and compared to other already known materials, e.g. Vespel SP3. The verification procedure included three phases: a screening on several compositions with different fillers and combinations, a detailed friction test campaign on two best compositions (15M and 30M) and a final bush testing on only the best (15M=15w% MoS2). All material properties in relation to ECSS E30 were verified. No objections to the requirements were identified. Finally, a recommendation for design of bushes was set up on the results.

  4. The Solar Umbrella: A Low-cost Demonstration of Scalable Space Based Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Michael T.; Trease, Brian P.; Sherwood, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Within the past decade, the Space Solar Power (SSP) community has seen an influx of stakeholders willing to entertain the SSP prospect of potentially boundless, base-load solar energy. Interested parties affiliated with the Department of Defense (DoD), the private sector, and various international entities have all agreed that while the benefits of SSP are tremendous and potentially profitable, the risk associated with developing an efficient end to end SSP harvesting system is still very high. In an effort to reduce the implementation risk for future SSP architectures, this study proposes a system level design that is both low-cost and seeks to demonstrate the furthest transmission of wireless power to date. The overall concept is presented and each subsystem is explained in detail with best estimates of current implementable technologies. Basic cost models were constructed based on input from JPL subject matter experts and assume that the technology demonstration would be carried out by a federally funded entity. The main thrust of the architecture is to demonstrate that a usable amount of solar power can be safely and reliably transmitted from space to the Earth's surface; however, maximum power scalability limits and their cost implications are discussed.

  5. The Importance of UV/Visible Space-Based Telescopic Observations for Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J. T.

    2017-02-01

    First rate science has repeatedly resulted from HST observations of solar system objects. This overview of the science goals and outcomes of some of these programs will illustrate the importance of combined telescopic and in situ measurements.

  6. A Space-Based Generic Pattern for Self-Initiative Load Balancing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Eva; Sesum-Cavic, Vesna

    Load-Balancing is a significant problem in heterogeneous distributed systems. There exist many load balancing algorithms, however, most approaches are very problem specific oriented and a comparison is therefore complex. This paper proposes a generic architectural pattern for a load balancing framework that allows for the plugging of different load balancing algorithms, reaching from unintelligent to intelligent ones, to ease the selection of the best algorithm for a certain problem scenario. As in complex network environments there is no "one-fits-all solution", also the integration of several different algorithms shall be supported. The presented pattern assumes autonomous agents and decentralized control. It can be composed towards arbitrary network topologies, foresees exchangeable policies for load-balancing, and uses a black-board based communication mechanism to achieve high software architecture agility. The pattern has been implemented and first instantiations of it with three algorithms have been benchmarked.

  7. Space-Based Reconfigurable Software Defined Radio Test Bed Aboard International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Lux, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) recently launched a new software defined radio research test bed to the International Space Station. The test bed, sponsored by the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Office within NASA is referred to as the SCaN Testbed. The SCaN Testbed is a highly capable communications system, composed of three software defined radios, integrated into a flight system, and mounted to the truss of the International Space Station. Software defined radios offer the future promise of in-flight reconfigurability, autonomy, and eventually cognitive operation. The adoption of software defined radios offers space missions a new way to develop and operate space transceivers for communications and navigation. Reconfigurable or software defined radios with communications and navigation functions implemented in software or VHDL (Very High Speed Hardware Description Language) provide the capability to change the functionality of the radio during development or after launch. The ability to change the operating characteristics of a radio through software once deployed to space offers the flexibility to adapt to new science opportunities, recover from anomalies within the science payload or communication system, and potentially reduce development cost and risk by adapting generic space platforms to meet specific mission requirements. The software defined radios on the SCaN Testbed are each compliant to NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture. The STRS Architecture is an open, non-proprietary architecture that defines interfaces for the connections between radio components. It provides an operating environment to abstract the communication waveform application from the underlying platform specific hardware such as digital-to-analog converters, analog-to-digital converters, oscillators, RF attenuators, automatic gain control circuits, FPGAs, general-purpose processors, etc. and the interconnections among different radio components.

  8. State-space based analysis and forecasting of macroscopic road safety trends in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Constantinos; Yannis, George

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, macroscopic road safety trends in Greece are analyzed using state-space models and data for 52 years (1960-2011). Seemingly unrelated time series equations (SUTSE) models are developed first, followed by richer latent risk time-series (LRT) models. As reliable estimates of vehicle-kilometers are not available for Greece, the number of vehicles in circulation is used as a proxy to the exposure. Alternative considered models are presented and discussed, including diagnostics for the assessment of their model quality and recommendations for further enrichment of this model. Important interventions were incorporated in the models developed (1986 financial crisis, 1991 old-car exchange scheme, 1996 new road fatality definition) and found statistically significant. Furthermore, the forecasting results using data up to 2008 were compared with final actual data (2009-2011) indicating that the models perform properly, even in unusual situations, like the current strong financial crisis in Greece. Forecasting results up to 2020 are also presented and compared with the forecasts of a model that explicitly considers the currently on-going recession. Modeling the recession, and assuming that it will end by 2013, results in more reasonable estimates of risk and vehicle-kilometers for the 2020 horizon. This research demonstrates the benefits of using advanced state-space modeling techniques for modeling macroscopic road safety trends, such as allowing the explicit modeling of interventions. The challenges associated with the application of such state-of-the-art models for macroscopic phenomena, such as traffic fatalities in a region or country, are also highlighted. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that it is possible to apply such complex models using the relatively short time-series that are available in macroscopic road safety analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Calibration of the OLFAR space-based radio telescope using an alternating least squares approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Pieter Karel Anton; Meijerink, Arjan; Bentum, Marinus Jan

    2016-01-01

    Radio astronomy below 30 MHz has never been properly performed because the ionosphere inhibits this on Earth. The Orbiting Low-Frequency Antennas for Radio Astronomy (OLFAR) project aims to build a radio telescope consisting of 50 or more nano-satellites in space, forming a swarm-like array. The

  10. Flexible T/R Modules for Large-Aperture, Space-Based SAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SI2 Technologies, Inc (SI2) proposes to develop membrane compatible transmit/receive (T/R) modules for flexible, space-deployable synthetic aperture radar (SAR)...

  11. Optical Correction Of Space-Based Telescopes Using A Deformable Mirror System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    ULE glass has excellent optical qualities, its high-areal density of 180 kg/m2 makes it exceptionally heavy [7]. The weight also makes increasing the...can be seen that with each additional quarter degree off nadir, the RMS value before correction more than doubled . This is significant because the

  12. High energy, single frequency, tunable laser source operating in burst mode for space based lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Alberto; Mondello, Alessia; Sapia, Adalberto; D'Ottavi, Alessandro; Brotini, Mauro; Gironi, Gianna; Suetta, Enrico

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes energetic, spatial, temporal and spectral characterization measurements of the Engineering Qualification Model (EQM) of the Laser Transmitter Assembly (TXA) used in the ALADIN instrument currently under development for the ESA ADM-AEOLUS mission (EADS Astrium as prime contractor for the satellite and the instrument). The EQM is equivalent to the Flight Model, with the exception of some engineering grade components. The Laser Transmitter Assembly, based on a diode pumped tripled Nd:YAG laser, is used to generate laser pulses at a nominal wavelength of 355 nm. This laser is operated in burst mode, with a pulse repetition cycle of 100 Hz during bursts. It is capable to operate in Single Longitudinal Mode and to be tuned over 25 GHz range. An internal "network" of sensors has been implemented inside the laser architecture to allow "in flight" monitoring of transmitter. Energy in excess of 100 mJ, with a spatial beam quality factor (M2) lower than 3, a spectral linewidth less than 50 MHz with a frequency stability better than 4 MHz on short term period have been measured on the EQM. Most of the obtained results are well within the expected values and match the Instrument requirements. They constitute an important achievement, showing the absence of major critical areas in terms of performance and the capability to obtain them in a rugged and compact structure suitable for space applications. The EQM will be submitted in the near future to an Environmental test campaign.

  13. Ground Optical Signal Processing Architecture for Contributing Space-Based SSA Sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    from the 2000 ASTM Standard Extraterrestrial Spectrum). d2 is the distance from the target to the sensor. θ2 is the angle between the two vectors...simulate a day in the life of an OrbitOutlook scenario and assess the IOD performance of a sensor system and it’s CONOPS of looking at a GEO object from

  14. Multi-mode optical fibers for connecting space-based spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W. T.; Lindenmisth, C. A.; Bender, S.; Miller, E. A.; Motts, E.; Ott, M.; LaRocca, F.; Thomes, J.

    2017-11-01

    Laser spectral analysis systems are increasingly being considered for in situ analysis of the atomic and molecular composition of selected rock and soil samples on other planets [1][2][3]. Both Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy are used to identify the constituents of soil and rock samples in situ. LIBS instruments use a high peak-power laser to ablate a minute area of the surface of a sample. The resulting plasma is observed with an optical head, which collects the emitted light for analysis by one or more spectrometers. By identifying the ion emission lines observed in the plasma, the constituent elements and their abundance can be deduced. In Raman spectroscopy, laser photons incident on the sample surface are scattered and experience a Raman shift, exchanging small amounts of energy with the molecules scattering the light. By observing the spectrum of the scattered light, it is possible to determine the molecular composition of the sample. For both types of instruments, there are advantages to physically separating the light collecting optics from the spectroscopy optics. The light collection system will often have articulating or rotating elements to facilitate the interrogation of multiple samples with minimum expenditure of energy and motion. As such, the optical head is often placed on a boom or an appendage allowing it to be pointed in different directions or easily positioned in different locations. By contrast, the spectrometry portion of the instrument is often well-served by placing it in a more static location. The detectors often operate more consistently in a thermally-controlled environment. Placing them deep within the spacecraft structure also provides some shielding from ionizing radiation, extending the instrument's useful life. Finally, the spectrometry portion of the instrument often contains significant mass, such that keeping it off of the moving portion of the platform, allowing that portion to be significantly smaller, less massive and less robust. Large core multi-mode optical fibers are often used to accommodate the optical connection of the two separated portions of such instrumentation. In some cases, significant throughput efficiency improvement can be realized by judiciously orienting the strands of multi-fiber cable, close-bunching them to accommodate a tight focus of the optical system on the optical side of the connection, and splaying them out linearly along a spectrometer slit on the other end. For such instrumentation to work effectively in identifying elements and molecules, and especially to produce accurate quantitative results, the spectral throughput of the optical fiber connection must be consistent over varying temperatures, over the range of motion of the optical head (and it's implied optical cable stresses), and over angle-aperture invariant of the total system. While the first two of these conditions have been demonstrated[4], spectral observations of the latter present a cause for concern, and may have an impact on future design of fiber-connected LIBS and Raman spectroscopy instruments. In short, we have observed that the shape of the spectral efficiency curve of a large multi-mode core optical fiber changes as a function of input angle.

  15. Ground and Space-based Imaging of the IGM with CWI, FIREBALL, and ISTOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher

    I discuss several experimental projects underway or proposed designed to discover and map emission from the IGM. The Cosmic Web Imager (CWI) is a ground-based high resolution spectrometer designed to detect low surface brightness emission from redshifted Lyman alpha, OVI and CIV at Palomar and Keck Observatories, over 2 1.0 range in the UV balloon window at 2000 Angstroms. ISTOS (Imaging Spectroscopic Telescope for Origins Surveys) is a proposed SMEX mission to discover and map baryons in the IGM from 0.05 < z < 2 over the 1250-2800 Angstrom range. All three experiments are integral field spectrometers designed to detect low surface brightness emission and reject point and diffuse foregrounds, and all have sensitives required to detect IGM and Circum-Galactic Medium emission at levels predicted by three independent cosmological simulations.

  16. High Power Electro-Optic Modulator for Space-Based Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ADVR, Inc. proposes the development of a fiber coupled, high power, electro-optically controlled, space qualified, phase modulator for the NASA Laser Interferometer...

  17. CRBLASTER: A Fast Parallel-Processing Program for Cosmic Ray Rejection in Space-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mighell, K.

    Many astronomical image analysis tasks are based on algorithms that can be described as being embarrassingly parallel - where the analysis of one subimage generally does not affect the analysis of another subimage. Yet few parallel-processing astrophysical image-analysis programs exist that can easily take full advantage of today's fast multi-core servers costing a few thousands of dollars. One reason for the shortage of state-of-the-art parallel processing astrophysical image-analysis codes is that the writing of parallel codes has been perceived to be difficult. I describe a new fast parallel-processing image-analysis program called CRBLASTER which does cosmic ray rejection using van Dokkum's L.A.Cosmic algorithm. CRBLASTER is written in C using the industry standard Message Passing Interface library. Processing a single 800 x 800 Hubble Space Telescope Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) image takes 1.9 seconds using 4 processors on an Apple Xserve with two dual-core 3.0-GHz Intel Xeons; the efficiency of the program running with the 4 cores is 82%. The code has been designed to be used as a software framework for the easy development of parallel-processing image-analysis programs using embarrassing parallel algorithms; all that needs to be done is to replace the core image processing task (in this case the C function that performs the L.A.Cosmic algorithm) with an alternative image analysis task based on a single processor algorithm. I describe the design and implementation of the program and then discuss how it could possibly be used to quickly do time-critical analysis applications such as those involved with space surveillance or do complex calibration tasks as part of the pipeline processing of images from large focal plane arrays.

  18. An assessment of radiation damage in space-based germanium detectors due to solar proton events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owens, Alan; Brandenburg, S.; Buis, E. -J.; Kliewiet, H.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Peacock, A.; Quarati, F.; Quirin, P.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation effects caused by solar proton events will be a common problem for many types of sensors on missions to the inner solar system because of the long cruise phases coupled with the inverse square scaling of solar particle events. As part of a study in support of the BepiColombo mission to

  19. Combining Space-Based and In-Situ Measurements to Track Flooding in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Mclaren, David; Tran, Daniel; Tanpipat, Veerachai; Chitradon, Royal; Boonya-aaroonnet, Surajate; Thanapakpawin, Porranee; Khunboa, Chatchai; Leelapatra, Watis; hide

    2011-01-01

    We describe efforts to integrate in-situ sensing, space-borne sensing, hydrological modeling, active control of sensing, and automatic data product generation to enhance monitoring and management of flooding. In our approach, broad coverage sensors and missions such as MODIS, TRMM, and weather satellite information and in-situ weather and river gauging information are all inputs to track flooding via river basin and sub-basin hydrological models. While these inputs can provide significant information as to the major flooding, targetable space measurements can provide better spatial resolution measurements of flooding extent. In order to leverage such assets we automatically task observations in response to automated analysis indications of major flooding. These new measurements are automatically processed and assimilated with the other flooding data. We describe our ongoing efforts to deploy this system to track major flooding events in Thailand.

  20. Laser Transmitter for Space-Based Atmospheric and Oceanographic Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to the need for higher performance, Fibertek has developed a new generation of solid-state lasers capable of meeting the requirements for higher...

  1. Ultra-Low Noise Quad Photoreceiver for Space Based Laser Interferometric Gravity Wave Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design and develop 2x2 quad p-i-n InGaAs Photoreceivers having the following characteristics: (a) Active area diameter 0.75 mm; (b) Wavelength coverage...

  2. Advanced space-based InSAR risk analysis of planned and existing transportation infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-21

    The purpose of this document is to summarize activities by Stanford University and : MDA Geospatial Services Inc. (MDA) to estimate surface deformation and associated : risk to transportation infrastructure using SAR Interferometric methods for the :...

  3. Estimation of the temperature spatial variability in confined spaces based on thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyn, Grzegorz; Jurasz, Jakub; Jurczyk, Krzysztof; Korbiel, Tomasz; Mikulik, Jerzy; Pawlik, Marcin; Rumin, Rafał

    2017-11-01

    In developed countries the salaries of office workers are several times higher than the total cost of maintaining and operating the building. Therefore even a small improvement in human work productivity and performance as a result of enhancing the quality of their work environment may lead to a meaningful economic benefits. The air temperature is the most commonly used indicator in assessing the indoor environment quality. What is more, it is well known that thermal comfort has the biggest impact on employees performance and their ability to work efficiently. In majority of office buildings, indoor temperature is managed by heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) appliances. However the way how they are currently managed and controlled leads to the nonhomogeneous distribution of temperature in certain space. An approach to determining the spatial variability of temperature in confined spaces was introduced based on thermal imaging temperature measurements. The conducted research and obtained results enabled positive verification of the method and creation of surface plot illustrating the temperature variability.

  4. Global inorganic nitrogen dry deposition inferred from ground- and space-based measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanlong; Yu, Guirui; Gao, Yanni; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Jiao, Cuicui; Zuo, Yao

    2016-01-27

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) dry deposition is an important component in total N deposition. However, uncertainty exists in the assessment of global dry deposition. Here, we develop empirical models for estimating ground N concentrations using NO2 satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and ground measurements from 555 monitoring sites. Global patterns and trends in the fluxes of NO2, HNO3, NH4(+), and NO3(-) were assessed for 2005-2014. Moreover, we estimated global NH3 dry deposition directly using data from 267 monitoring sites. Our results showed that East Asia, the United States, and Europe were important regions of N deposition, and the total annual amount of global inorganic N deposition was 34.26 Tg N. The dry deposition fluxes were low in Africa and South America, but because of their large area, the total amounts in these regions were comparable to those in Europe and North America. In the past decade, the western United States and Eurasia, particularly eastern China, experienced the largest increases in dry deposition, whereas the eastern United States, Western Europe, and Japan experienced clear decreases through control of NOx and NH3 emissions. These findings provide a scientific background for policy-makers and future research into global changes.

  5. Ground and Space-Based Measurement of Rocket Engine Burns in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Bhatt, A.; Boyd, I. D.; Burt, J. M.; Caton, R. G.; Coster, A.; Erickson, P. J.; Huba, J. D.; hide

    2013-01-01

    On-orbit firings of both liquid and solid rocket motors provide localized disturbances to the plasma in the upper atmosphere. Large amounts of energy are deposited to ionosphere in the form of expanding exhaust vapors which change the composition and flow velocity. Charge exchange between the neutral exhaust molecules and the background ions (mainly O+) yields energetic ion beams. The rapidly moving pickup ions excite plasma instabilities and yield optical emissions after dissociative recombination with ambient electrons. Line-of-sight techniques for remote measurements rocket burn effects include direct observation of plume optical emissions with ground and satellite cameras, and plume scatter with UHF and higher frequency radars. Long range detection with HF radars is possible if the burns occur in the dense part of the ionosphere. The exhaust vapors initiate plasma turbulence in the ionosphere that can scatter HF radar waves launched from ground transmitters. Solid rocket motors provide particulates that become charged in the ionosphere and may excite dusty plasma instabilities. Hypersonic exhaust flow impacting the ionospheric plasma launches a low-frequency, electromagnetic pulse that is detectable using satellites with electric field booms. If the exhaust cloud itself passes over a satellite, in situ detectors measure increased ion-acoustic wave turbulence, enhanced neutral and plasma densities, elevated ion temperatures, and magnetic field perturbations. All of these techniques can be used for long range observations of plumes in the ionosphere. To demonstrate such long range measurements, several experiments were conducted by the Naval Research Laboratory including the Charged Aerosol Release Experiment, the Shuttle Ionospheric Modification with Pulsed Localized Exhaust experiments, and the Shuttle Exhaust Ionospheric Turbulence Experiments.

  6. How Cities Breathe: Ground-Referenced, Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging Precursor Measurements To Space-Based Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Ira; Tratt, David; Quattrochi, Dale; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John

    2013-01-01

    Methane's (CH4) large global warming potential (Shindell et al., 2012) and likely increasing future emissions due to global warming feedbacks emphasize its importance to anthropogenic greenhouse warming (IPCC, 2007). Furthermore, CH4 regulation has far greater near-term climate change mitigation potential versus carbon dioxide CO2, the other major anthropogenic Greenhouse Gas (GHG) (Shindell et al., 2009). Uncertainties in CH4 budgets arise from the poor state of knowledge of CH4 sources - in part from a lack of sufficiently accurate assessments of the temporal and spatial emissions and controlling factors of highly variable anthropogenic and natural CH4 surface fluxes (IPCC, 2007) and the lack of global-scale (satellite) data at sufficiently high spatial resolution to resolve sources. Many important methane (and other trace gases) sources arise from urban and mega-urban landscapes where anthropogenic activities are centered - most of humanity lives in urban areas. Studying these complex landscape tapestries is challenged by a wide and varied range of activities at small spatial scale, and difficulty in obtaining up-to-date landuse data in the developed world - a key desire of policy makers towards development of effective regulations. In the developing world, challenges are multiplied with additional political access challenges. As high spatial resolution satellite and airborne data has become available, activity mapping applications have blossomed - i.e., Google maps; however, tap a minute fraction of remote sensing capabilities due to limited (three band) spectral information. Next generation approaches that incorporate high spatial resolution hyperspectral and ultraspectral data will allow detangling of the highly heterogeneous usage megacity patterns by providing diagnostic identification of chemical composition from solids (refs) to gases (refs). To properly enable these next generation technologies for megacity include atmospheric radiative transfer modeling the complex and often aerosol laden, humid, urban microclimates, atmospheric transport and profile monitoring, spatial resolution, temporal cycles (diurnal and seasonal which involve interactions with the surrounding environment diurnal and seasonal cycles) and representative measurement approaches given traffic realities. Promising approaches incorporate contemporaneous airborne remote sensing and in situ measurements, nocturnal surface surveys, with ground station measurement

  7. Space Based Measurements for Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide: a New Tool for Monitoring Our Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, David

    2015-01-01

    Fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, and other human activities are now adding almost 40 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere each year. Interestingly, as these emissions have increased over time, natural "sinks" in land biosphere and oceans have absorbed roughly half of this CO2, reducing the rate of atmospheric buildup by a half. Measurements of the increasing acidity (pH) of seawater indicate that the ocean absorbs one quarter of this CO2. Another quarter is apparently being absorbed by the land biosphere, but the identity and location of these natural land CO2 "sinks" are still unknown. The existing ground-based greenhouse gas monitoring network provides an accurate record of the atmospheric buildup, but still does not have the spatial resolution or coverage needed to identify or quantify CO2 sources and sinks.

  8. Strategies for Fault-Tolerant, Space-Based Computing: Lessons Learned from the ARGOS Testbed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levellette, M. N; Wood, K. S; Wood, D. L; Beall, J. H; Shirvani, P. P; Oh, N; McCluskey, E. J

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Space Computing and Autonomy Testbed on the ARGOS Satellite provides the first direct, on orbit comparison of a modern radiation hardened 32 bit processor with a similar COTS processor...

  9. Medium Brigade 2003: Can Space-Based Communications Ensure Information Dominance?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Viall, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    .... The army's reaction to changes in the national security environment and increased technology as outlined in Joint Vision 2010 has been to pursue digitization of the force and develop a new, Medium...

  10. The JPSS CrIS Instrument and the Evolution of Space-Based Infrared Sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glumb, Ronald; Suwinski, Lawrence; Wells, Steven; Glumb, Anna; Malloy, Rebecca; Colton, Marie

    2018-01-01

    This paper will summarize the development of infrared sounders since the 1970s, describe the technological hurdles that were overcome to provide ever-increasing performance capabilities, and highlight the radiometric performance of the CrIS instrument on JPSS-1 (CrIS-JPSS1). This includes details of the CrIS-JPSS1 measured noise-equivalent spectral radiance (NEdN) performance, radiometric uncertainty performance utilizing a new and improved internal calibration target, short-term and long-term repeatability, spectral uncertainty, and spectral stability. In addition, the full-resolution operating modes for CrIS-JPSS1 will be reviewed, including a discussion of how these modes will be used during on-orbit characterization tests. We will provide a brief update of CrIS-SNPP on-obit performance and the production status of the CrIS instruments for JPSS-2 through JPSS-4. Current technological challenges will also be reviewed, including how ongoing research and development is enabling improvements to future sounders. The expanding usage of infrared sounding data will also be discussed, including demonstration of value via data assimilation, the roles of the public/private sector in communicating the importance of sounding data for long-term observations, and the long road to success from research to operational data products.

  11. A Note on Regional Development, Space-based Policies and Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Pellegrini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A fil rouge runs through the papers presented in this Issue of the Review: the idea that the tourist development is less and less related to the distinct touristic attractions of a region and more and more to the contest where the tourist attractions lie. Clearly, not every region is suitable for tourist and recreation mission. However, policy makers have several opportunities in order to find the appropriate strategic decisions in tourism planning and to obtain sustainable and smart growth. 

  12. High Power Electro-Optic Modulator for Space-Based Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I effort will establish the feasibility of developing a fiber coupled, high power, electro-optically controlled, space...

  13. Propagation of Social Emotion in Cyber Space Based on Cognitive Social Psychology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Xinzhi; Zhang, Hui

    .... The impact is illustrated as the induction of objective and objective information. At last, the cascade phenomena of emotion propagation in cyber space are explained with users' selective emotion expression...

  14. Digital acquisition and wavelength control of seed laser for space-based Lidar applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposes to establish the feasibility of using a space qualifiable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based digital controller to autonomously...

  15. History of Space-Based Infrared Astronomy and the Air Force Infrared Celestial Backgrounds Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-18

    the labyrinth baffle between the optics and focal plane. In total, the HI STAR/HI STAR South experiments had... shadow of the Earth from the setting Sun in the atmosphere, astronomers call it the girdle of Venus. The shadow would visibly climb during the time it...same pole star, δ And. The first experiment was entirely at night, whereas the timing of the second had the payload ascending from shadow

  16. The New High Ground: An Analysis of Space-Based Systems in the Information Revolution'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Olivia S.

    2002-09-01

    The Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA) was developed in 1989 by Andrew Marshall of the Office of Net Assessment in Washington. Based on Marshal Nikolai Ogarkov's doctrine of the Military-Technical Revolution, the RMA is defined as: A major change in the nature of warfare brought about by the innovative application of new technologies which, combined with dramatic changes in military doctrine, operations, and organizational concepts, fundamentally alters the character and conduct of military operations. Though no official definition exists, these requirements of technological innovation, new doctrine and operations concepts, and organizational change were used in the analysis of the 1991 Gulf War, resulting in the conclusion of the existence of a new RMA. Known as the Information Revolution, this RMA is centered on stealth technology, precision munitions, advanced sensors and increased communications, command, control, computer and intelligence (C4I). From these advancements, doctrinal development has taken place in both joint and service centered documents. These new doctrines have introduced the operational concepts of dominant maneuver, precision engagement, focused logistics and full-dimensional protection, culminating in the new core competency of full-spectrum dominance. Organizational changes to allow for the achievement of these new concepts consists of an increased focus on inter-service connectivity for joint operations and the mutation of the traditional military hierarchy into smaller, more mobile forces deployable for rapid reactions and tailored to the specific threat.

  17. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Fuel Cell Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Fuel cell research focused on proton exchange membranes (PEM), solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Specific technologies included aircraft fuel cell reformers, new and improved electrodes, electrolytes, interconnect, and seals, modeling of fuel cells including CFD coupled with impedance spectroscopy. Research was conducted on new materials and designs for fuel cells, along with using embedded sensors with power management electronics to improve the power density delivered by fuel cells. Fuel cell applications considered were in-space operations, aviation, and ground-based fuel cells such as; powering auxiliary power units (APUs) in aircraft; high power density, long duration power supplies for interplanetary missions (space science probes and planetary rovers); regenerative capabilities for high altitude aircraft; and power supplies for reusable launch vehicles.

  18. GaN/AlGaN Devices for Space-Based Defense Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bletzinger, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Report developed under SBIR contract for topic BMDO99-005. The objective of this effort was to design and develop GaN MODFETs with minimal semiconductor volume to minimize radiation damage, particularly due to neutron radiation...

  19. Space-based solar power conversion and delivery systems study. Volume 4: Energy conversion systems studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Solar cells and optical configurations for the SSPS were examined. In this task, three specific solar cell materials were examined: single crystal silicon, single crystal gallium arsenide, and polycrystalline cadmium sulfide. The comparison of the three different cells on the basis of a subsystem parametric cost per kW of SSPS-generated power at the terrestrial utility interface showed that gallium arsenide was the most promising solar cell material at high concentration ratios. The most promising solar cell material with no concentration, was dependent upon the particular combination of parameters representing cost, mass and performance that were chosen to represent each cell in this deterministic comparative analysis. The potential for mass production, based on the projections of the present state-of-the-art would tend to favor cadmium sulfide in lieu of single crystal silicon or gallium arsenide solar cells.

  20. High power pulsed fiber laser development for Co2 space based dial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canat, Guillaume; Le Gouët, Julien; Lombard, Laurent; Bresson, Alexandre; Goular, Didier; Dolfi-Bouteyre, Agnès.; Duzellier, Sophie; Boivin, Denis; Nilsson, Johan; Sahu, Jayata; Bordais, Sylvain

    2017-11-01

    High energy fiber lasers emitting around 1579nm is seen as a possible technology for the laser unit of a spaceborn CO2 DIAL system. We are developing an all fiber system with the following expected performances: pulse energy of 260μJ, pulse duration 150ns, beam quality M2 laser stability 200 kHz. One of our main concerns has been the radiation induced attenuation mitigation. Various fiber compositions have been investigated.

  1. Range-Doppler Mapping of Space-Based Targets Using the JRO 50 MHz Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesaraju, S.; Mathews, J. D.; Milla, M.; Vierinen, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO) two-dimensional square array radar system operating at 6-m wavelength was used to study the Moon and low Earth orbit satellites using the Range-Doppler inverse synthetic aperture radar technique also known as Delay-Doppler imaging. The radar data was collected on Oct 21, 2015. A circularly polarized coded pulse was transmitted from a quarter-array antenna segment during lunar transit over JRO. Dual-linear polarization receive systems were employed on two quarter-array segments and on two 1/64th array modules giving the longest possible baselines across the transit path. A Range-Doppler mapping technique that uses the rotational motion of the targets and an autofocusing motion and ionospheric delay compensation technique has been implemented to generate the two-dimensional maps of the point-target (Satellite) and range-spread target (Moon). A review of our technique and the maps obtained from these observations is presented herein. Range-Doppler maps of the Moon and satellites are instructive with regards to possible further improvement of the technique, especially regarding ionospheric compensation.

  2. Space-Based Solar Power As an Opportunity for Strategic Security: Phase 0 Architecture Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-10

    Tower  is 8,045 Tons; the Sear’s  Tower  222,500 tons;  the Empire State Building 365,000 – 392,000 tons, the largest of our supertankers is 650,000MT...clean energy and the  issues of CO2 emissions and global warming, he became a major investor in  Tesla  Motors, the new  electric car company

  3. Simulating Complex Satellites and a Space-Based Surveillance Sensor Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    computing power and time. The second way, which we are using here is to create simpler models of satellite bodies and use albedo -area calculations...The as a main body e albedo . Th which are ju ters for the AE inator. For th . We simulate code impleme residuals wou -shadowing v shadowing...sat vector The second projection the same o blue when when view The sensor beginning the hard ea e view of the de, so no modi ccepted passes n of

  4. Urgent and Compelling Need for Coastal and Inland Aquatic Ecosystem Research Using Space-Based Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, D. B.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Hestir, E.; Turpie, K. R.; Roberts, D. A.; Frouin, R.; Goodman, J.; Schaeffer, B. A.; Franz, B. A.; Humm, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal and inland waters and associated aquatic habitats, including wetlands, mangroves, submerged grasses, and coral reefs, are some of the most productive and diverse ecosystems on the planet. They provide services critical to human health, safety, and prosperity. Yet, they are highly vulnerable to changes in climate and other anthropogenic pressures. With a global population of over seven billion people and climbing, and a warming atmosphere driven by carbon dioxide now in excess of 400 ppb, these services are at risk of rapidly diminishing globally. We know little about how these ecosystems function. We need to characterize short-term changes in the functional biodiversity and biogeochemical cycles of these coastal and wetland ecosystems, from canopy to benthos, and trace these changes to their underlying environmental influences. This requires an observation-based approach that covers coastal and inland aquatic ecosystems in a repeated, synoptic manner. Space-borne sensing systems can provide this capability, supported by coordinated in situ calibration and product validation activities. The design requires high temporal resolution (weekly or better), medium spatial resolution (30 m pixels at nadir to complement Landsat-class sensors), and highly sensitive, ocean-color radiometric quality, high resolution spectroscopy with Visible and Short-Wave IR bands (order of 10 nm or better) to assess both atmospheric correction parameters and land vegetation composition. The strategy needs to include sunglint avoidance schemes, and methods to maximize signal to noise ratios and temporal coverage of aquatic areas. We describe such a system, and urge the U.S. to implement such an observing strategy in the short-term and sustain it for the benefit of humankind.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis and subscale modeling of space-based orbit transfer vehicle cryogenic propellant resupply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelice, David M.; Aydelott, John C.

    1987-01-01

    The resupply of the cryogenic propellants is an enabling technology for spacebased orbit transfer vehicles. As part of the NASA Lewis ongoing efforts in microgravity fluid management, thermodynamic analysis and subscale modeling techniques were developed to support an on-orbit test bed for cryogenic fluid management technologies. Analytical results have shown that subscale experimental modeling of liquid resupply can be used to validate analytical models when the appropriate target temperature is selected to relate the model to its prototype system. Further analyses were used to develop a thermodynamic model of the tank chilldown process which is required prior to the no-vent fill operation. These efforts were incorporated into two FORTRAN programs which were used to present preliminary analyticl results.

  6. Study of toluene stability for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) space-based power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Vance; Ragaller, Dana

    1988-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly, and endurance operation of a dynamic test loop, built to evaluate the thermal stability of a proposed Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) working fluid, is discussed. The test fluid, toluene, was circulated through a heater, simulated turbine, regenerator, condenser and pump to duplicate an actual ORC system. The maximum nominal fluid temperature, 750 F, was at the turbine simulator inlet. Samples of noncondensible gases and liquid toluene were taken periodically during the test. The samples were analyzed to identify the degradation products formed and the quantity of these products. From these data it was possible to determine the degradation rate of the working fluid and the generation rate of noncondensible gases. A further goal of this work was to relate the degradation observed in the dynamic operating loop to degradation obtained in isothermal capsule tests. This relationship was the basis for estimating the power loop degradation in the Space Station Organic Rankine Cycle system.

  7. The e-Beam Sustained Laser Technology for Space-based Doppler Wind Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. J.; Holman, W.; Robinson, R. J.; Schwarzenberger, P. M.; Smith, I. M.; Wallace, S.; Harris, M. R.; Willetts, D. V.; Kurzius, S. C.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of GEC Avionics activities relating to the Spaceborne Doppler Wind Lidar. In particular, the results of design studies into the use of an e-beam sustained CO2 laser for spaceborne applications, and experimental work on a test bed system are discussed.

  8. Space-based laser-powered orbital transfer vehicle (Project SLICK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A conceptual design study of a laser-powered orbital transfer vehicle (LOTV) is presented. The LOTV, nicknamed SLICK (Space Laser Interorbital Cargo Kite), will be utilized for the transfer of 16000 kg of cargo between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and either Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) or Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). This design concentrates primarily on the LEO/GEO scenario, which will have typical LEO-to-GEO trip time of 6 days and two return versions. One version uses an all propulsive return while the other utilizes a ballute aerobrake for the return trip. Furthermore, three return cargo options of 16000 kg, 5000 kg (standard option), and 1600 kg are considered for this scenario. The LEO/LLO scenario uses only a standard, aerobraked version. The basic concept behind the LOTV is that the power for the propulsion system is supplied by a source separate from the LOTV itself. For the LEO/GEO scenario the LOTV utilizes a direct solar-pumped iodide laser and possibly two relay stations, all orbiting at an altitude of one Earth radius and zero inclination. An additional nuclear-powered laser is placed on the Moon for the LEO/LLO scenario. The propulsion system of the LOTV consists of a single engine fueled with liquid hydrogen. The laser beam is captured and directed by a four mirror optical system through a window in the thrust chamber of the engine. There, seven plasmas are created to convert the laser beam energy into thermal energy at an efficiency of at least 50 percent. For the LEO/LLO scenario the laser propulsion is supplemented by LH2/LOX chemical thrusters.

  9. Analysis of a 10 megawatt space-based solar-pumped neodymium laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurweg, U. H.

    1984-01-01

    A ten megawatt solar-pumped continuous liquid laser system for space applications is examined. It is found that a single inflatable mirror of 434 m diameter used in conjunction with a conical secondary concentrator is sufficient to side pump a liquid neodymium lasant in an annular tube of 6 m length and 1 m outer and 0.8 m inner diameter. About one fourth of intercepted radiation converging on the laser tube is absorbed and one fifth of this radiation is effective in populating the upper levels. The liquid lasant is flowed through the annular laser cavity at 1.9 m/s and is cooled via a heat exchanger and a large radiator surface comparable in size to the concentrating mirror. The power density of incident light within the lasant of approximately 68 watt/cu cm required for cw operation is exceeded in the present annular configuration. Total system weight corresponds to 20,500 kg and is thus capable of being transported to near Earth orbit by a single shuttle flight.

  10. Evaluation of appropriate sensor specifications for space based ballistic missile detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Caroline; Stein, Karin; Wendelstein, Norbert

    2012-10-01

    The detection and tracking of ballistic missiles (BMs) during launch or cloud break using satellite based electro-optical (EO) sensors is a promising possibility for pre-instructing early warning and fire control radars. However, the successful detection of a BM is depending on the applied infrared (IR)-channel, as emission and reflection of threat and background vary in different spectral (IR-) bands and for different observation scenarios. In addition, the spatial resolution of the satellite based system also conditions the signal-to-clutter-ratio (SCR) and therefore the predictability of the flight path. Generally available satellite images provide data in spectral bands, which are suitable for remote sensing applications and earth surface observations. However, in the fields of BM early warning, these bands are not of interest making the simulation of background data essential. The paper focuses on the analysis of IR-bands suitable for missile detection by trading off the suppression of background signature against threat signal strength. This comprises a radiometric overview of the background radiation in different spectral bands for different climates and seasons as well as for various cloud types and covers. A brief investigation of the BM signature and its trajectory within a threat scenario is presented. Moreover, the influence on the SCR caused by different observation scenarios and varying spatial resolution are pointed out. The paper also introduces the software used for simulating natural background spectral radiance images, MATISSE ("Advanced Modeling of the Earth for Environment and Scenes Simulation") by ONERA [1].

  11. Prospects for Gaia and other planned space-based Galactic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.

    2006-08-01

    Gaia is an all sky astrometric and photometric survey mission which will observe all objects in the sky brighter than magnitude G=20 (V=20-22), some 10^ 9 stars. Gaia will achieve an astrometric accuracy of 12- 25 μas at G=15 (providing a distance accuracy of 1-2% at 1 kpc) and 100-300 μas at G=20 and will measure radial velocities to a precision of 1-10 km/s for brighter sources. To characterize all sources (which are detected in real time), each is observed via low dispersion integral field spectrophotometry. The data processing for Gaia is very complex (self-calibrating; heterogeneous data; little prior information; intrinsically iterative) and is being undertaken by a large consortium of institutes. Fully exploiting the resulting data products will likewise be a challenge: Gaia will be a first in combining photometric and 6D phase space information on such a large scale. The scientific potential is immense. For example, using the kinematics and 3D positions of large numbers of stars across the whole Galaxy we can map its large and small scale structures and thus from a chronology of its formation and evolution (e.g. merger history). Gaia will measure both the gravitational potential of the Galaxy and the stellar luminosity function, from which the distribution of dark matter can be accurately mapped on small scales (open clusters will significantly improve models of stellar structure and evolution, and the detection of tens of millions of binary systems will permit a calibration of the stellar Mass-Luminosity relation over a wide range of masses and to high accuracy. Gaia is a fully-funded ESA mission due for launch in late 2011. With a nominal mission of five years and 2-3 years planned for post-mission processing, the final catalogue will only be available in about 2020. As it is the only large scale, high-accuracy astrometry mission under construction, it will be a unique source for astronomical discovery. An even bigger impact will be achieved when Gaia's results are combined with those of other upcoming space- and ground-based surveys, and explored using advanced data mining and modelling techniques. accurately mapped on small scales (open clusters will significantly improve models of stellar structure and evolution. Gaia will discover and determine the orbits of thousands of asteroids and Near-Earth objects and will provide accurate tests of General Relativity. Beyond the Galaxy, Gaia will measure distances to the Galactic satellites, calibrate the distance ladder and provide a new astrometric reference frame. Gaia is a fully funded mission. The prime contractor, EADS Astrium, provides both the satellite and the scientific instruments. The data processing is the responsibility of the scientific community. This is a very significant challenge, involving numerous complex, iterative and interdependent tasks. Following several years of studies, the community efforts have been assembled into the pan-European Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) which will undertake all of the data processing. During this fringe session, short presentations will be given by members of the DPAC and Gaia Science Team (GST) covering the scientific objectives, satellite design, data processing, ground-based support data and plans for scientific follow-up. In the remainder of the session several GST and DPAC members will be available for discussions. For more information, see the Gaia website at http://www.rssd.esa.int/Gaia/

  12. A transit timing analysis with combined ground- and space-based photometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raetz St.

    2015-01-01

    The CoRoT satellite looks back on six years of high precision photometry of a very high number of stars. Thousands of transiting events are detected from which 27 were confirmed to be transiting planets so far. In my research I search and analyze TTVs in the CoRoT sample and combine the unprecedented precision of the light curves with ground-based follow-up photometry. Because CoRoT can observe transiting planets only for a maximum duration of 150 days the ground-based follow-up can help to refine the ephemeris. Here we present first examples.

  13. A Science-Driven Performance Specification Framework for Space-Based Neutral Hydrogen Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pober, Jonathan

    Experiments Observations of the highly-redshifted 21 cm hyperfine line of neutral hydrogen (HI) are one of the most promising probes for the future of cosmology. In principle, once the spin temperature of cosmic hydrogen decouples from the Cosmic Microwave Background at z ˜ 200, all neutral hydrogen at lower redshifts becomes visible through its hyperfine line emission. Observations at meter wavelength probe the state of HI in the intergalactic medium during the epoch of reionization, offering insight into the nature of the first stars and galaxies — a key component of NASA’s Cosmic Origins Program. By pushing observations to higher redshifts (and therefore longer wavelengths), the HI signal becomes the only measurable emission, as luminous objects have yet to form. Observations of these cosmic “dark ages” can offer unprecedented insight into the primordial spectrum of density perturbations and the very nature of inflation, answering questions at the heart of NASA’s Physics of the Cosmos Program. At these very low radio frequencies, however, the earth’s ionosphere becomes opaque — necessitating observations from space. NASA’s “Enduring Quests, Daring Visions” Astrophysics Roadmap recognized the great promise of these observations, and proposed the visionary Cosmic Dawn Mapper — an array of thousands of radio antennas on the far side of the moon — to conduct them. However, the major challenge to neutral hydrogen cosmology (at all redshifts) lies in the presence of bright foreground emission, which can dominate the HI signal by as much as eight orders of magnitude during the dark ages. The only method for extracting the cosmological signal relies on the spectral smoothness of the foregrounds; since each frequency of the HI signal probes a different redshift, the cosmological emission is essentially uncorrelated from frequency to frequency. The key challenge for designing an experiment lies in maintaining the spectral smoothness of the foregrounds. If the frequency response of the instrument introduces spectral structure (or at least, a residual that cannot be calibrated out at the necessary precision), it quickly becomes impossible to distinguish the cosmological signal from the foregrounds. This principle has guided the design of ground-based experiments like the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) and the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA). However, there still exists no unifying framework for turning this design philosophy into a robust, quantitative set of performance metrics and specifications. The goal of this proposal is to develop technology that can directly determine the impact of system design on the science deliverables: measurements of the HI power spectrum and, in turn, constraints on cosmological and astrophysical parameters. This technology will consist of a software suite for end-to-end simulation of the entire instrument and pipeline: encompassing aspects from antenna design, to sources of systematic errors like mutual coupling of elements and cross-talk, through to the analysis tools used. My research group has experience at the forefront of all these aspects of HI cosmology experiments; the work to be proposed here focuses on unifying our most advanced understanding of these issues into one framework. This is far from a trivial task, and requires end-to-end instrument simulations with a level of precision never before achieved with low-frequency radio astronomy instrumentation. However, this framework is absolutely necessary for designing any future mission (especially one in space). Science traceability is a fundamental component of mission design, and, at present, HI cosmology experiments cannot connect mission and instrument requirements and specifications directly to the science goals. The work we will propose is therefore mission enabling in the most basic sense: without it, one cannot define the metrics upon which an experiment can be judged.

  14. Domain Specific Language for Geant4 Parallelization for Space-based Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A major limiting factor in HPC growth is the requirement to parallelize codes to leverage emerging architectures, especially as single core performance has plateaued...

  15. Chemical Characterization and Thermal Stressing Studies of Perfluorohexane Fluids for Space-Based Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William A.; Hartman, Thomas G.; McQuillen, John

    2006-01-01

    Perfluorohexane (PFH), C6F14, is a perfluorocarbon fluid. Several PFH fluids with different isomer concentrations were evaluated for use in an upcoming NASA space experiment. Samples tested included two commercially obtained high-purity n-perfluorohexane (n-PFH) fluids and a technical grade mixture of C6F14 branched and linear isomers (FC-72(TradeMark)). These fluids were evaluated for exact chemical composition, impurity purity and high temperature degradation behavior (pyrolysis). Our investigation involved simulated thermal stressing studies of PFH fluids under conditions likely to occur in the event of an atmospheric breach within the International Space Station (ISS) and subsequent exposure of the vapors to the high temperature and catalyst present in its Trace Contaminant Control Subsystem (TCCS). Exposure to temperatures in the temperature range of 200-450 C in an inert or oxidizing atmosphere, with and without the presence of catalyst was investigated. The most aggressive conditions studied were exposure of PFH vapors to 450 C in air and in the presence of TCCS (palladium) catalyst. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography (GC) analyses were conducted on the perfluorohexane samples before and after pyrolysis. The FC-72 and n-PFH samples showed no significant degradation following pyrolysis even under the most aggressive study conditions. Some trace level impurities associated with the PFH samples such as linear perfluorocarbon monohydrides or monoiodides were destroyed by pyrolysis at the upper limit. Other trace level impurities such as olefinic or cycloolefinic perfluorocarbons were converted into oxidation products by pyrolysis. The purity of PFH following pyrolysis actually increased slightly as a consequence since these trace contaminants were effectively scrubbed from the samples. However, since the initial concentrations of the thermally-impacted impurities were so low, the net effect was trivial. A potential byproduct of exposure of perfluorohexane fluids to high temperatures is the production of perfluoroisobutene (PFiB), which is extremely toxic. An ultra-high sensitivity PFiB-specific analysis based on GC-MS with negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) detection was used to evaluate the samples following thermal stressing. The perfluorohexanes examined here under conditions reflective of the ISS TCCS environment showed no signs of PFiB production with an analytical detection limit of 10 part per billion (ppb v/v).

  16. Space-based remote imaging spectroscopy of the Aliso Canyon CH_4 superemitter

    OpenAIRE

    D. R. Thompson; A. K. Thorpe; C. Frankenberg; R. O. Green; R. Duren; Luis Guanter; Andre Hollstein; E. Middleton; L. Ong; S. Ungar

    2016-01-01

    The Aliso Canyon gas storage facility near Porter Ranch, California, produced a large accidental CH_4 release from October 2015 to February 2016. The Hyperion imaging spectrometer on board the EO-1 satellite successfully detected this event, achieving the first orbital attribution of CH_4 to a single anthropogenic superemitter. Hyperion measured shortwave infrared signatures of CH_4 near 2.3 μm at 0.01 μm spectral resolution and 30 m spatial resolution. It detected the plume on three overpass...

  17. Space-Based Remote Imaging Spectroscopy of the Aliso Canyon CH4 Superemitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. R.; Thorpe, A. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Green, R. O.; Duren, R.; Guanter, L.; Hollstein, A.; Middleton, E.; Ong, L.; Ungar, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Aliso Canyon gas storage facility near Porter Ranch, California, produced a large accidental CH4 release from October 2015 to February 2016. The Hyperion imaging spectrometer on board the EO-1 satellite successfully detected this event, achieving the first orbital attribution of CH4 to a single anthropogenic superemitter. Hyperion measured shortwave infrared signatures of CH4 near 2.3 microns at 0.01 micron spectral resolution and 30 meter spatial resolution. It detected the plume on three overpasses, mapping its magnitude and morphology. These orbital observations were consistent with measurements by airborne instruments. We evaluate Hyperion instrument performance, draw implications for future orbital instruments, and extrapolate the potential for a global survey of CH4 superemitters.

  18. Transitions Towards Operational Space-Based Ocean Observations: From Single Research Missions into Series and Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    globalisation has definitely advantages in terms of meeting temporal and spatial requirements provided that timely open access to data is guaranteed and... impacts of human activities. Ocean Salinity is a new community in satellite oceanography and therefore trailing with respect to transitioning into...Robinson, I., Casey, K., Vazquez, J., Armstrong, E.. Arino, O .. Gentcmann, C, May, D., Le Borgne, P., Piolle. J.-F.. Barton, I., Beggs. H , Poulter, D

  19. Flexible T/R Modules for Large-Aperture, Space-Based SAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a need for electronically-steerable, space-deployable SAR antenna arrays which impose minimal weight burden on the vehicles that place them into orbit. SAR...

  20. Ultra-high, resolution, modular optical angle encoder for space-based opto-mechanical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Holger; Beard, Paul; Mitchell, Donald; Thorburn, William

    1995-01-01

    A 27-bit optical encoder using a novel patent pending technology has been developed by the MicroE Development Center of BEI Sensors & Systems Company and tested by the Sensor Systems Group (SSG) Inc., in a positioning and stabilization mirror assembly (PSMA) designed and constructed under a grant from the Marshall Space Flight Center. Test results verified performance within the specifications of the PSMA.