WorldWideScience

Sample records for svocs pesticides herbicides

  1. Pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherma, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This review is devoted to methods for the determination of residues of pesticides and some related industrial chemicals. Topics include: residue methods, sampling, chromatography, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, carbamate insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, pyrethrins, fumigants, and related chemicals. (MVL)

  2. Evaluation of six pesticides leaching indexes using field data of herbicide application in Casablanca Valley, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, M; Rojas, S; Gómez, P; Suárez, F; Muñoz, J F; Alister, C

    2007-01-01

    A field study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of six pesticide screening leaching indexes for herbicide movement. Adsorption, dissipation and soil movement were studied in a vineyard in a sandy loam soil during 2005 season. Simazine, diuron, pendimethalin, oxyfluorfen and flumioxazin were applied to bare soil at rates commonly used, and their soil concentrations throughout soil profile were determined at 0, 10, 20, 40 and 90 days after application (DAA). Herbicides were subjected to two pluviometric regimens, natural field condition and modified conditions (plus natural rainfall 180 mm). Leaching indexes utilized were: Briggs's Rf, Hamaker's Rf, LEACH, LPI, GUS and LIX. Simazine reached 120 cm, diuron 90 cm, flumioxazin 30 cm soil depth respectively. Pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen were retained up to 5 cm. None of the herbicides leaching was affected by rainfall regimen. Only flumioxazin field dissipation was clearly affected by pluviometric condition. The best representation of the herbicide soil depth movement and leaching below 15 cm soil depth were: Hamaker's Rf < Briggs's Rf < GUS < LPI, < LEACH < LIX. Field results showed a good correlation between herbicides K(d) and their soil depth movement and mass leached below 15 cm soil depth.

  3. Rationale for Selection of Pesticides, Herbicides, and Related Compounds from the Hanford SST/DST Waste Considered for Analysis in Support of the Regulatory DQO (Privatization)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemers, K.D.; Daling, P.; Meier, K.

    1999-01-04

    Regulated pesticides, herbicides, miticides, and fungicides were evaluated for their potential past and current use at the Hanford Site. The starting list of these compounds is based on regulatory analyte input lists discussed in the Regulatory DQO. Twelve pesticide, herbicide, miticide, and fungicide compounds are identified for analysis in the Hanford SST and DST waste in support of the Regulatory DQO. The compounds considered for additional analyses are non-detected, considered stable in the tank waste matrix, and of higher toxicity/carcinogenicity.

  4. Detection of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in surface water, soil, and groundwater in a chemical industrial park in Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Benhua; Li, Yuehua; Ma, Jianfeng; Huang, Linxian; Chen, Liang

    2016-01-01

    China is suffering from serious water and soil pollution, especially in the North China Plain. This work investigated semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in surface water, groundwater and soil within a chemical industrial park in Eastern China, for which the volatile organic compound (VOC) results have been previously reported. A total of 20 samples were collected from the field, and analyzed in the laboratory. A 100% detection frequency of SVOCs in samples from this chemical industrial park was observed (same as VOCs). Moreover, the detection frequency of 113 SVOCs in each sample reached 15.93, 12.39 and 20.35% for surface water, groundwater and soil, respectively. The most detected SVOCs in the park included N-containing SVOCs, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, organic pesticides and polychlorodiphenyls. The elevated detecting frequencies and concentration levels of SVOCs identified in the groundwater were attributed to the intensive chemical production activities in the park. In addition, the agricultural activities in the area might also have contributed to the SVOCs to the groundwater. The results of VOCs and SVOCs from this and previous studies suggest that the groundwater in this industrial park has been severely contaminated, and the contamination likely spreads beyond the park. Imminent hydrogeological assessments and remedial actions are warranted to eliminate the source and mitigate the potential plume expansion beyond the park boundary.

  5. Pesticide sorption by low organic carbon sediments: A sceening for seven herbicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lene; Lindhardt, Bo; Rosenberg, Per

    2000-01-01

    The sorption of seven pesticides in 10 Danish aquifer sediments has been studied. These sediments all have a total organic carbon (TOC) content below 1 g kg(-1), and include carbonate-bearing and carbonate-free Quatenary sand deposits and a Cretaceous chalk aquifer. Batch experiments were carried...... by the specific surface area (SSA) and TOC. The present results illustrate the importance of choosing sediments of different geological origin in order to describe the influence of sediment properties on pesticide sorption....

  6. Molecular classification of pesticides including persistent organic pollutants, phenylurea and sulphonylurea herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, Francisco; Castellano, Gloria

    2014-06-05

    Pesticide residues in wine were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Retentions are modelled by structure-property relationships. Bioplastic evolution is an evolutionary perspective conjugating effect of acquired characters and evolutionary indeterminacy-morphological determination-natural selection principles; its application to design co-ordination index barely improves correlations. Fractal dimensions and partition coefficient differentiate pesticides. Classification algorithms are based on information entropy and its production. Pesticides allow a structural classification by nonplanarity, and number of O, S, N and Cl atoms and cycles; different behaviours depend on number of cycles. The novelty of the approach is that the structural parameters are related to retentions. Classification algorithms are based on information entropy. When applying procedures to moderate-sized sets, excessive results appear compatible with data suffering a combinatorial explosion. However, equipartition conjecture selects criterion resulting from classification between hierarchical trees. Information entropy permits classifying compounds agreeing with principal component analyses. Periodic classification shows that pesticides in the same group present similar properties; those also in equal period, maximum resemblance. The advantage of the classification is to predict the retentions for molecules not included in the categorization. Classification extends to phenyl/sulphonylureas and the application will be to predict their retentions.

  7. Molecular Classification of Pesticides Including Persistent Organic Pollutants, Phenylurea and Sulphonylurea Herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Torrens

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pesticide residues in wine were analyzed by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Retentions are modelled by structure–property relationships. Bioplastic evolution is an evolutionary perspective conjugating effect of acquired characters and evolutionary indeterminacy–morphological determination–natural selection principles; its application to design co-ordination index barely improves correlations. Fractal dimensions and partition coefficient differentiate pesticides. Classification algorithms are based on information entropy and its production. Pesticides allow a structural classification by nonplanarity, and number of O, S, N and Cl atoms and cycles; different behaviours depend on number of cycles. The novelty of the approach is that the structural parameters are related to retentions. Classification algorithms are based on information entropy. When applying procedures to moderate-sized sets, excessive results appear compatible with data suffering a combinatorial explosion. However, equipartition conjecture selects criterion resulting from classification between hierarchical trees. Information entropy permits classifying compounds agreeing with principal component analyses. Periodic classification shows that pesticides in the same group present similar properties; those also in equal period, maximum resemblance. The advantage of the classification is to predict the retentions for molecules not included in the categorization. Classification extends to phenyl/sulphonylureas and the application will be to predict their retentions.

  8. Effects of three pesticides that differ in mode of action on the ecology of small indoor aquatic microcosms; an evaluation of the effects of the insecticide chlorpyrifos, the herbicide atrazine and the fungicide carbendazim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daam, M.A.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In the current study, the usefulness of an eight litre microcosm for the ecological risk assessment of pesticides is examined. Risk assessment studies were performed for three pesticides with different modes of action, viz. an insecticide (chlorpyrifos), fungicide (carbendazim) and herbicide

  9. Annual Herbicide Loadings

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Pesticides, Herbicides, Fungicides...etc, are used for a variety of purposes, including control of household, lawn, and garden pests; for control of mosquitoes and...

  10. SVOC exposure indoors: fresh look at dermal pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, W. W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This paper critically examines indoor exposure to semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) via dermal pathways. First, it demonstrates that - in central tendency - an SVOC's abundance on indoor surfaces and in handwipes can be predicted reasonably well from gas-phase concentrations, assumi...

  11. Uncertainties in monitoring of SVOCs in air caused by within-sampler degradation during active and passive air sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melymuk, Lisa; Bohlin-Nizzetto, Pernilla; Prokeš, Roman; Kukučka, Petr; Přibylová, Petra; Vojta, Šimon; Kohoutek, Jiří; Lammel, Gerhard; Klánová, Jana

    2017-10-01

    Degradation of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) occurs naturally in ambient air due to reactions with reactive trace gases (e.g., ozone, NOx). During air sampling there is also the possibility for degradation of SVOCs within the air sampler, leading to underestimates of ambient air concentrations. We investigated the possibility of this sampling artifact in commonly used active and passive air samplers for seven classes of SVOCs, including persistent organic pollutants (POPs) typically covered by air monitoring programs, as well as SVOCs of emerging concern. Two active air samplers were used, one equipped with an ozone denuder and one without, to compare relative differences in mass of collected compounds. Two sets of passive samplers were also deployed to determine the influence of degradation during longer deployment times in passive sampling. In active air samplers, comparison of the two sampling configurations suggested degradation of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with concentrations up to 2× higher in the denuder-equipped sampler, while halogenated POPs did not have clear evidence of degradation. In contrast, more polar, reactive compounds (e.g., organophosphate esters and current use pesticides) had evidence of losses in the sampler with denuder. This may be caused by the denuder itself, suggesting sampling bias for these compounds can be created when typical air sampling apparatuses are adapted to limit degradation. Passive air samplers recorded up to 4× higher concentrations when deployed for shorter consecutive sampling periods, suggesting that within-sampler degradation may also be relevant in passive air monitoring programs.

  12. Predicting SVOC Emissions into Air and Foods in Support of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The release of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from consumer articles may be a critical human exposure pathway. In addition, the migration of SVOCs from food packaging materials into foods may also be a dominant source of exposure for some chemicals. Here we describe recent efforts to characterize emission-related parameters for these exposure pathways to support prediction of aggregate exposures for thousands of chemicals For chemicals in consumer articles, Little et al. (2012) developed a screening-level indoor exposure prediction model which, for a given SVOC, principally depends on steady-state gas-phase concentrations (y0). We have developed a model that predicts y0 for SVOCs in consumer articles, allowing exposure predictions for 274 ToxCast chemicals. Published emissions data for 31 SVOCs found in flooring materials, provided a training set where both chemical-specific physicochemical properties, article specific formulation properties, and experimental design aspects were available as modeling descriptors. A linear regression yielded R2- and p- values of approximately 0.62 and 3.9E-05, respectively. A similar model was developed based upon physicochemical properties alone, since article information is often not available for a given SVOC or product. This latter model yielded R2 - and p- values of approximately 0.47 and 1.2E-10, respectively. Many SVOCs are also used as additives (e.g. plasticizers, antioxidants, lubricants) in plastic food pac

  13. SVOC partitioning between the gas phase and settled dust indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, W. W.

    2010-01-01

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are a major class of indoor pollutants. Understanding SVOC partitioning between the gas phase and settled dust is important for characterizing the fate of these species indoors and the pathways by which humans are exposed to them. Such knowledge also helps...... than a thousand buildings, mostly residences, in seven countries. In aggregate, measured median data are reported in these studies for 66 different SVOCs whose octanol-air partition coefficients (K-oa) span more than five orders of magnitude. We use these data to test a simple equilibrium model...

  14. Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dies. Top of Page How can pesticides be dangerous to humans? While some pesticides target pathways unique ... Oral Numbing Gels Methamphetamine_FAQ Mushrooms Plants Scorpions Snakes Spiders 2013 Forensic Course Faculty Hilton Baltimore Reservations ...

  15. Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... While some pesticides target pathways unique to insects, plants, bacteria, or fungi, other pesticides have a broad spectrum of activity. This means that they can have toxic effects in humans as well as in the ...

  16. Evaluation of various QuEChERS based methods for the analysis of herbicides and other commonly used pesticides in polished rice by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Lucía; Cesio, Verónica; Heinzen, Horacio; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2011-02-15

    Four different extraction and clean-up protocols based on the QuEChERS method were compared for the development of an optimized sample preparation procedure for the multiresidue analysis of 16 commonly applied herbicides in rice crops using LC-QqQ/MS. Additionally the methods were evaluated for the analysis of 26 insecticides and fungicides currently used in rice crops. The methods comprise, in general, the hydratation of the sample with water followed by the extraction with acetonitrile, phase separation with the addition of different salts and finally a clean-up step with various sorbents. Matrix effects were evaluated for the 4 studied methods using LC-QqQ/MS. Additionally LC-TOF/MS was used to compare the co-extractants obtained with the four assayed methodologies. Thirty-six pesticides presented good performance with recoveries in the range 70-120% and relative standard deviations below 20% using 7.5 g of milled polished rice and the buffered acetate QuEChERS method without clean-up at both fortification levels: 10 and 300 μg kg(-1). The other six pesticides presented low recovery rates, nevertheless all these analytes could be analyzed with at least one of the other three studied procedures. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The status of soil contamination by semivolatile organic chemicals (SVOCs) in China: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Quanying [College of Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)], E-mail: cai_quanying@yahoo.com; Mo Cehui [Department of Environmental Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)], E-mail: tchmo@jnu.edu.cn; Wu Qitang [College of Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Katsoyiannis, Athanasios [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP), Physical and Chemical Exposure Unit, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,), TP-281, Via E. Fermi 1, I-21020 (Italy)], E-mail: athanasios.katsogiannis@jrc.it; Zeng Qiaoyun [College of Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)

    2008-01-25

    This paper summarizes the published scientific data on the soil contamination by semivolatile organic chemicals (SVOCs) in China. Data has been found for more than 150 organic compounds which were grouped into six classes, namely, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and phthalic acid esters (PAEs). An overview of data collected from the literature is presented in this paper. The Chinese regulation and/or other maximum acceptable values for SVOCs were used for the characterization of soils. In general, the compounds that are mostly studied in Chinese soils are OCPs, PAHs and PCBs. According to the studies reviewed here, the most abundant compounds were PAEs and PAHs (up to 46 and 28 mg kg{sup -1} dry weight, respectively); PCBs and OCPs occurred generally at concentrations lower than 100 {mu}g kg{sup -1} dry weight. Nevertheless, quite high concentrations of PCDD/Fs, PCBs and PBDEs were observed in contaminated sites (e.g., the sites affected by electronic waste activities). The average concentrations of PAHs and OCPs in soils of North China were higher than those in South China. The principal component analysis demonstrated different distribution patterns for PAH, PCB and PCDD/F congeners and for the various sites/regions examined. The isomer ratios of DDTs and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) indicated different sources and residue levels in soils. Finally, this review has highlighted several areas where further research is considered necessary.

  18. Pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    Eddleston, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Over 300,000 people die each year from pesticide poisoning. Most result from self-poisoning by ingestion, rather than occupational or accidental exposures which are typically topical or inhalational. Severe pesticide poisoning is more common in the rural developing world where pesticides are widely used in smallholder agricultural practice and therefore freely available. Significant acute poisoning is much less common in industrialized countries and here it is the long-term effects of low-dos...

  19. Indoor Semi-volatile Organic Compounds (i-SVOC) Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    i-SVOC Version 1.0 is a general-purpose software application for dynamic modeling of the emission, transport, sorption, and distribution of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in indoor environments.

  20. Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... off the ground. Close outdoor trash bins and compost containers securely. Remove any standing water in the ... Karr CJ, Solomon GM, Brock-Utne AC. Health effects of common home, lawn, and garden pesticides. Pediatr ...

  1. Further advances in modeling transdermal uptake of SVOCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Glenn; Weschler, Charles J.; Bekö, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    To better simulate dermal uptake of SVOCs from air, we develop an enhanced transport model that includes skin surface lipids (SSL). As modeled, clothing can remove SSL by contact transfer and it can act as a source or sink for gas-phase transfer to and from SSL. Addition of SSL increases the over......To better simulate dermal uptake of SVOCs from air, we develop an enhanced transport model that includes skin surface lipids (SSL). As modeled, clothing can remove SSL by contact transfer and it can act as a source or sink for gas-phase transfer to and from SSL. Addition of SSL increases...... the overall resistance to uptake of SVOCs from air but also allows for more rapid release of SVOCs to sinks like clothing or clean air. We compare the model results to reported experimental uptake of di-ethyl phthalate (DEP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), normalized by exposed skin area and the phthalate...... air concentration during exposure (Weschler et al., 2015). Overall, the model predicts total uptake values that are consistent with those observed in the experiments. The model predicts a normalized mass uptake of DEP of 3.1 (µg/m2)/(µg/m3) whereas the experimental results range from 1.0 to 4.3 (µg/m2...

  2. SVOC emissions from diesel trucks operating on biodiesel fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study measured semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in particle matter (PM) emitted from three heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern after-treatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted as described by the George et al. VOC study also presented as part of this se...

  3. SPME-Based Ca-History Method for Measuring SVOC Diffusion Coefficients in Clothing Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianping; Liu, Ningrui; Zhang, Yinping

    2017-08-15

    Clothes play an important role in dermal exposure to indoor semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs). The diffusion coefficient of SVOCs in clothing material (Dm) is essential for estimating SVOC sorption by clothing material and subsequent dermal exposure to SVOCs. However, few studies have reported the measured Dm for clothing materials. In this paper, we present the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) based Ca-history method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first try to measure Dm with known relative standard deviation (RSD). A thin sealed chamber is formed by a circular ring and two pieces of flat SVOC source materials that are tightly covered by the targeted clothing materials. Dm is obtained by applying an SVOC mass transfer model in the chamber to the history of gas-phase SVOC concentrations (Ca) in the chamber measured by SPME. Dm's of three SVOCs, di-iso-butyl phthalate (DiBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), and tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), in a cotton T-shirt can be obtained within 16 days, with RSD less than 3%. This study should prove useful for measuring SVOC Dm in various sink materials. Further studies are expected to facilitate application of this method and investigate the effects of temperature, relative humidity, and clothing material on Dm.

  4. Simulating Effects of Forest Management Practices on Pesticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.C. Smith; W.G. Knisel; J.L. Michael; D.G. Neary

    1993-01-01

    The GLEAMS model pesticide component was modified to simulate up to 245 pesticides simultaneously, and the revised model was used to pesticide pesticide application windows for forest site preparation and pine release. Five herbicides were made for soils representing four hydrologic soil groups in four climatic regions of the southeastern United States. Five herbicides...

  5. Control of Pesticides 2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krongaard, T.; Petersen, K. K.; Christoffersen, C.

    Four different groups of products covered by the pesticide regulation were included in the 2004 analytical chemical authority control: 1) Herbicides containing bentazone, dicamba, dichlorprop-P, mecoprop-P, MCPA, foramsulfuron, iodosulfuron-methylsodium, rimsulfuron and triasulfuron. 2) Fungicides...

  6. The evolution of pollution profile and health risk assessment for three groups SVOCs pollutants along with Beijiang River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiao; An, Taicheng; Xiong, Jukun; Li, Guiying

    2017-12-01

    Three important groups of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organic chlorinated pesticides (OCPs) and phthalate esters (PAEs), were produced by various human activities and entered the water body. In this study, the pollution profiles of three species including 16 PAHs, 20 OCPs and 15 PAEs in water along the Beijiang River, China were investigated. The concentrations of Σ16PAHs in the dissolved and particulate phases were obtained as 69-1.5 × 102 ng L-1 and 2.3 × 103-8.6 × 104 ng g-1, respectively. The levels of Σ20OCPs were 23-66 ng L-1 (dissolved phase) and 19-1.7 × 103 ng g-1 (particulate phase). Nevertheless, higher levels of PAEs were found both in the dissolved and particulate phases due to abuse use of plastic products. Furthermore, non-cancer and cancer risks caused by these SVOCs through the ingestion absorption and dermal absorption were also assessed. There was no non-cancer risk existed through two kinds of exposure of them at current levels, whereas certain cancer risk existed through dermal absorption of PAHs in the particulate phase in some sampling sites. The results will show scientific insights into the evaluation of the status of combined pollution in river basins, and the determination of strategies for incident control and pollutant remediation.

  7. Herbicide-tolerant Transgenic Soybean over 15 Years of Cultivation: Pesticide Use, Weed Resistance, and Some Economic Issues. The Case of the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Bonny

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetically modified (GM herbicide-tolerant (HT crops have been largely adopted where they have been authorized. Nevertheless, they are fiercely criticized by some, notably because of the herbicide use associated with them. However, how much herbicide is applied to GMHT crops compared to conventional crops, and what impacts does the use of herbicide have? The paper first presents some factors explaining the predominance of GMHT crops. Then, trends in the use of herbicide for GM crops are studied in the case of the most widespread HT crop: HT soybean in the USA. The trends in the toxicity of herbicides applied to HT soybean are also addressed, as well as the appearance of glyphosate-resistant (GR weeds. Lastly, the paper examines the spread of GR weeds and its impact. How are farmers, weed scientists, and the industry coping with this development, and what are the prospects of glyphosate-tolerant crops given weed resistance? In conclusion, some issues of sustainability and innovation governance raised by genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops are discussed.

  8. Control of Pesticides 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krongaard, T.; Petersen, K. K.; Christoffersen, C.

    Three different groups of products covered by the pesticide regulation have been included in the 2000 analytical chemical authority control: 1) herbicides containing aclonifen, clopyralid, dicamba, quinoclamine, bromoxynil, ioxynil, simazine, and terbuthylazine. 2) Fungicides containing fenpropidin......, fluazinam, and kresoxim-methyl, and among insecticides containing fenazaquin. Thus, all the eighteen analysed samples of these pesticides complied with the accepted tolerances with respect to content of active ingredients set by the Danish regulation of pesticides. The only product containing buprofezin...

  9. Analysis of the dynamic interaction between SVOCs and airborne particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cong; Shi, Shanshan; Weschler, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    A proper quantitative understanding of the dynamic interaction between gas-phase semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and airborne particles is important for human exposure assessment and risk evaluation. Questions regarding how to properly address gas/particle interactions have introduced...... of aerosols) is negligible compared with the external one (from bulk air to aerosol surfaces) is presented. The analysis is applicable regardless of the phase state of particles (either liquid or amorphous semisolid/solid). It is found that for both porous and nonporous particles, the internal resistance can...... cause a two orders of magnitude error in the estimation of the gas-phase concentration and a factor of two error in the estimation of the particle-phase concentration. Copyright © American Association for Aerosol Research....

  10. Fate of herbicides in deep subsurface limestone and sandy aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janniche, Gry Sander

    Pesticider - herunder herbicider til bekæmpelse af ukrudt - udvaskes fra topjorden ned gennem den umættede zone og videre til grundvandet, som i mange lande benyttes som drikkevand - og dermed udgør nedsivende herbicider en trussel mod drikkevandskvaliteten. Viden om sorption og nedbrydning er af...

  11. Herbicide resistance and biodiversity: agronomic and environmental aspects of genetically modified herbicide-resistant plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Gesine; Eckerstorfer, Michael; Rastelli, Valentina; Reichenbecher, Wolfram; Restrepo-Vassalli, Sara; Ruohonen-Lehto, Marja; Saucy, Anne-Gabrielle Wuest; Mertens, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Farmland biodiversity is an important characteristic when assessing sustainability of agricultural practices and is of major international concern. Scientific data indicate that agricultural intensification and pesticide use are among the main drivers of biodiversity loss. The analysed data and experiences do not support statements that herbicide-resistant crops provide consistently better yields than conventional crops or reduce herbicide amounts. They rather show that the adoption of herbicide-resistant crops impacts agronomy, agricultural practice, and weed management and contributes to biodiversity loss in several ways: (i) many studies show that glyphosate-based herbicides, which were commonly regarded as less harmful, are toxic to a range of aquatic organisms and adversely affect the soil and intestinal microflora and plant disease resistance; the increased use of 2,4-D or dicamba, linked to new herbicide-resistant crops, causes special concerns. (ii) The adoption of herbicide-resistant crops has reduced crop rotation and favoured weed management that is solely based on the use of herbicides. (iii) Continuous herbicide resistance cropping and the intensive use of glyphosate over the last 20 years have led to the appearance of at least 34 glyphosate-resistant weed species worldwide. Although recommended for many years, farmers did not counter resistance development in weeds by integrated weed management, but continued to rely on herbicides as sole measure. Despite occurrence of widespread resistance in weeds to other herbicides, industry rather develops transgenic crops with additional herbicide resistance genes. (iv) Agricultural management based on broad-spectrum herbicides as in herbicide-resistant crops further decreases diversity and abundance of wild plants and impacts arthropod fauna and other farmland animals. Taken together, adverse impacts of herbicide-resistant crops on biodiversity, when widely adopted, should be expected and are indeed very hard

  12. Herbicide hormesis-can it be useful in crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The yield-enhancing effects of some pesticides may change the focus in their use in crop production, from crop protection to crop enhancement. While such beneficial uses of pesticides are specifically en vogue for fungicides and seed treatments, the use of herbicides for crop enhancement has not yet...

  13. Direct and Air-Mediated Transfer of Labeled SVOCs from Indoor Sources to Dust.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sukiene, Vilma; von Goetz, Natalie; Gerecke, Andreas C; Bakker, Martine I; Delmaar, Christiaan J E; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    Two small-scale field studies were conducted to investigate the transfer of substances from products into dust due to direct and air-mediated transfer. The project focused on semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), which are frequently found in and re-emitted from dust. For the field studies, four

  14. Desorption of SVOCs from Heated Surfaces in the Form of Ultrafine Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallace, Lance A.; Ott, Wayne R.; Weschler, Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    of the accumulation rate of SVOCs on surfaces were similar to those in studies of organic film buildup on indoor windows. Transfer of skin oils by touching the glass or foil surfaces, or after washing the glass surface with detergent and bare hands, was also observed, with measured particle production comparable...

  15. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  16. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  17. Control of Pesticides 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krongaard, T.; Petersen, K. K.; Christoffersen, C.

    The analytical chemical authority control on pesticide products on the Danish market performed in 2001 is reported. Samples of selected groups of pesticides have been collected from the market and analysed to verify whether the actual contents of the respective active ingredients in the products...... comply with the label-claimed content. The tolerance of deviation from the label-claimed content of active ingredient is set by the Danish pesticide regulation. Three different groups of products covered by the pesticide regulation have been included in the 2001 analytical chemical authority control: 1....... Satisfactory results were found among herbicides containing pendimethalin and methabenzthiazuron, among fungicides containing azaconazole, tolylfluanid, propamocarb and cyprodinil, and among insecticides containing amitraz, phosalone and diflubenzuron. Thus, the twelve analysed samples of these pesticides...

  18. The impact of mass transfer limitations on size distributions of particle associated SVOCs in outdoor and indoor environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cong; Zhang, Yinping; Weschler, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) partition between the gas phase and airborne particles. The size distribution of particle-associated SVOCs impacts their fate in outdoor and indoor environments, as well as human exposure to these compounds and subsequent health risks. Allen et al. (1996......) previously proposed that the rate of mass transfer can impact polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) partitioning among different sized particles, especially for time scales relevant to urban aerosols. The present study quantitatively builds on this idea, presenting a model that incorporates dynamic SVOC....../particle interaction and applying this model to typical outdoor and indoor scenarios. The model indicates that the impact of mass transfer limitations on the size distribution of a particle-associated SVOC can be evaluated by the ratio of the time to achieve gas-particle equilibrium relative to the residence time...

  19. Using GC×GC-ToF-MS to characterise SVOC from diesel exhaust emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M. S.; Ramadhas, A. S.; Stark, C. P.; Liu, D.; Xu, H.; Harrison, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Despite intensive research over the last 20 years, a number of major research questions remain concerning the sources and properties of road traffic-generated particulate matter. There are major knowledge gaps concerning the composition of primary vehicle exhaust aerosol, and its contribution to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These uncertainties relate especially to the semi-volatile component of the particles. Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOC) are compounds which partition directly between the gas and aerosol phases under ambient conditions, and include compounds with saturation concentrations roughly between 0.1 and 104 μg m-3. The SVOC in engine exhaust are typically hydrocarbons in the C15-C35 range. They are largely uncharacterised, other than the n-alkanes, because they are unresolved by traditional gas chromatography and form a large hump in the chromatogram referred to as Unresolved Complex Mixture (UCM). In this study, samples were collected from the exhaust of a diesel engine with and without abatement devices fitted. Engine exhaust was diluted with air and collected using both filter and impaction (MOUDI), to resolve total mass and size resolved mass respectively. Particle size distribution was evaluated by sampling simultaneously with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). 2D Gas-Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass-Spectrometry (GC×GC-ToF-MS) was exploited to characterise and quantify the composition of SVOC from the exhaust emission. The SVOC was observed to contain predominantly n-alkanes, alkyl-cyclohexanes and aromatics; similar to both fresh lubricating oil and fuel. Preliminary results indicate that the contribution of diesel fuel to the exhaust SVOC composition is dominant at high speeds, and a more pronounced contribution from lubricating oil is observed at low speeds. Differences were also observed in the SVOC composition when using different fuel types, engine lubricants, starting temperatures and collecting samples with

  20. The impact of mass transfer limitations on size distributions of particle associated SVOCs in outdoor and indoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cong; Zhang, Yinping; Weschler, Charles J

    2014-11-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) partition between the gas phase and airborne particles. The size distribution of particle-associated SVOCs impacts their fate in outdoor and indoor environments, as well as human exposure to these compounds and subsequent health risks. Allen et al. (1996) previously proposed that the rate of mass transfer can impact polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) partitioning among different sized particles, especially for time scales relevant to urban aerosols. The present study quantitatively builds on this idea, presenting a model that incorporates dynamic SVOC/particle interaction and applying this model to typical outdoor and indoor scenarios. The model indicates that the impact of mass transfer limitations on the size distribution of a particle-associated SVOC can be evaluated by the ratio of the time to achieve gas-particle equilibrium relative to the residence time of particles. The higher this ratio, the greater the influence of mass transfer limitations on the size distribution of particle-associated SVOCs. The influence of such constraints is largest on the fraction of particle-associated SVOCs in the coarse mode (>2 μm). Predictions from the model have been found to be in reasonable agreement with size distributions measured for PAHs at roadside and suburban locations in Japan. The model also quantitatively explains shifts in the size distributions of particle associated SVOCs compared to those for particle mass, and the manner in which these shifts vary with temperature and an SVOC's molecular weight. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Control of Pesticides 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krongaard, Teddy; Petersen, Kitty Kastalag; Christoffersen, Christel

    The analytical chemical authority control of pesticide products on the Danish market in 2006 is described in this report. Samples of selected groups of pesticides have been collected from the market and analysed to verify whether the actual contents of the respective active ingredients in the pro......The analytical chemical authority control of pesticide products on the Danish market in 2006 is described in this report. Samples of selected groups of pesticides have been collected from the market and analysed to verify whether the actual contents of the respective active ingredients...... analytical chemical authority control: Herbicides containing metamitron, propaquizafop and haloxyfop-ethoxyethyl. Fungicides containing azoxystrobin, propiconazole, cyprodinil, picoxystrobin and fenpropidin. Insecticides containing pirimicarb. Plant growth regulators containing chlormequat chloride, mepiquat...

  2. Control of pesticides 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krongaard, T.; Petersen, K. K.; Christoffersen, C.

    Four different groups of products covered by the pesticide regulation were included in the 2003 analytical chemical authority control: 1) Herbicides containing clodinafop- propargyl, clomazone, fluroxypyr and glyphosate. 2) Fungicides containing bitertanol, fuberidazole, fenhexamid and pencycuron...... containing methoprene complied with the accepted tolerance limits with respect to the content of the active ingredient as specified in Danish Statutory Order on pesticides. None of the 44 examined samples contained OPEO, but 5 of the samples contained NPEO. Three of these five samples were produced before...

  3. Environmental impact of herbicide regimes used with genetically modified herbicide-resistant maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Yann; Cougnon, Mathias; Vergucht, Sofie; Bulcke, Robert; Haesaert, Geert; Steurbaut, Walter; Reheul, Dirk

    2008-12-01

    With the potential advent of genetically modified herbicide-resistant (GMHR) crops in the European Union, changes in patterns of herbicide use are predicted. Broad-spectrum, non-selective herbicides used with GMHR crops are expected to substitute for a set of currently used herbicides, which might alter the agro-environmental footprint from crop production. To test this hypothesis, the environmental impact of various herbicide regimes currently used with non-GMHR maize in Belgium was calculated and compared with that of possible herbicide regimes applied in GMHR maize. Impacts on human health and the environment were calculated through the pesticide occupational and environmental risk (POCER) indicator. Results showed that the environmental impact of herbicide regimes solely relying on the active ingredients glyphosate (GLY) or glufosinate-ammonium (GLU) is lower than that of herbicide regimes applied in non-GMHR maize. Due to the lower potential of GLY and GLU to contaminate ground water and their lower acute toxicity to aquatic organisms, the POCER exceedence factor values for the environment were reduced approximately by a sixth when GLY or GLU is used alone. However, the environmental impact of novel herbicide regimes tested may be underestimated due to the assumption that active ingredients used with GMHR maize would be used alone. Data retrieved from literature suggest that weed control efficacy is increased and resistance development delayed when GLY or GLU is used together with other herbicides in the GMHR system. Due to the partial instead of complete replacement of currently used herbicide regimes, the beneficial environmental impact of novel herbicide regimes might sometimes be reduced or counterbalanced. Despite the high weed control efficacy provided by the biotechnology-based weed management strategy, neither indirect harmful effects on farmland biodiversity through losses in food resources and shelter, nor shifts in weed communities have been

  4. Phytotoxicity of four photosystem II herbicides to tropical seagrasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florita Flores

    Full Text Available Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50 over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m ', indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect

  5. Phytotoxicity of four photosystem II herbicides to tropical seagrasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Florita; Collier, Catherine J; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII) herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50) over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m '), indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm ) corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect seagrass meadows of

  6. Herbicide Resistant Weed Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metribuzin and rimsulfuron are the only two herbicides registered for postemergence broadleaf weed control in potatoes, and represent the two classes of herbicides, triazines and ALS inhibitors, with the most reported cases of resistant weeds world wide. Other postemergence grass herbicides belongin...

  7. Using GLEAMS to Select Environmental Windows for Herbicide Application in Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.C. Smith; J.L. Michael; W.G. Koisel; D.G. Nealy

    1994-01-01

    Observed herbicide runoff and groundwater data from a pine-release herbicide application study near Gainesville, Florida were used to validate the GLEAMS model hydrology and pesticide component for forest application. The study revealed that model simulations agreed relatively well with the field data for the one-year study. Following validation, a modified version of...

  8. Phenoxyacetic acid herbicide exposure for women on Ontario farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Tye E; Ritter, Len

    2005-08-13

    Women living and working on farms would be expected to have higher exposure to pesticides than the general nonoccupationally exposed population. Urinary concentrations of the herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and (4-chloro-2-methyl) phenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) were measured in 125 women living on farms in Ontario where these herbicides had recently been used for the first time that growing season. The women collected a spot urine void prior to the start of herbicide handling by spouses, followed by 2 consecutive 24-h urine samples. The pesticide applicator provided questionnaire data on pesticides that were used on the farm. Approximately 80% of the women had no detectable level of either herbicide in their urine. Geometric mean urinary concentrations of 2,4-D and MCPA in the d-2 samples were 0.7 microg/L. The responses to the questions on herbicide use on the farm were compared with urinary levels of the herbicide and the sensitivity for MCPA was determined to be 95-100%; however, the false positive rate for exposure was 70%. For 2,4-D, the sensitivity and specificity were approximately 70%, with a false positive rate of 30%. A simple question on whether the herbicide was used recently can accurately identify people who are likely not exposed; however, further research is required to be able to more validly predict those individuals who are exposed. Based on our study, it was concluded that exposure estimates based on questionnaire data alone may be fraught with uncertainties, which may differ depending on the particular pesticide of interest.

  9. Integrated weed management (IWM): will it reduce herbicide use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, S R

    2010-01-01

    The Sustainable Use of Pesticides Directive (2009/128/EC), part of the EU Thematic Strategy for Pesticides, requires Integrated Pest Management (IPM) to be actively promoted. A key objective is to give greater priority to non-chemical methods of plant protection to reduce the impact of pesticides on human health and the environment. Integrated Weed Management (IWM) can be considered part of IPM, and many non-chemical methods are available. For example, a recent review of methods for control of Alopecurus myosuroides (black-grass) in winter wheat found the following mean annual levels of control: ploughing 67%; delayed drilling 37%; fallowing 70%; higher seed rates 30%; competitive cultivars 27%. In comparison with herbicides these efficacy levels are mediocre, and A. myosuroides would be classified as resistant (R) or moderately resistant (MR) to all these methods if the criteria used by the Chemicals Regulation Directorate in the UK for assigning ratings to herbicide efficacy were used. It is, therefore, not surprising that farmers are reluctant to embrace IWM and continue to place greater.reliance on herbicides as a more reliable and cost effective method of weed control. While non-chemical methods will not replace herbicides on most farms, reduced reliance on herbicides will be necessary both for practical (increasing resistance, lack of new herbicides) and political reasons (complying with EU legislation). Farmers will use nonchemical control methods when they have a major weed problem, and have no alternative, but they must be encouraged to adopt IWM at an earlier stage. Research into IWM must be relevant and practical, and not simply conducted as some sort of 'academic' exercise. More effective knowledge transfer is vital, and this is a challenge due to the decline in independent, state funded, advisory services in many European countries. The question arises; is it possible to achieve reductions in pesticide use by simply promoting non-chemical methods of

  10. Herbicide and plant growth regulator analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eash, D T; Bushway, R J

    2000-06-02

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a relatively new analytical technique that is just beginning to be employed in the area of pesticide residue analysis. With the development of more sensitive detectors and in conjunction with CE separation powers, it should be a well accepted technique for pesticide residue analysis in the future. This review describes CE methods that have been developed to analyze herbicides and grow regulators in water, soil and food.

  11. Effects of fuels, engine load and exhaust after-treatment on diesel engine SVOC emissions and development of SVOC profiles for receptor modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Bohac, Stanislav V.; Chernyak, Sergei M.; Batterman, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust emissions contain numerous semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) for which emission information is limited, especially for idling conditions, new fuels and the new after-treatment systems. This study investigates exhaust emissions of particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro-PAHs (NPAHs), and sterane and hopane petroleum biomarkers from a heavy-duty (6.4 L) diesel engine at various loads (idle, 600 and 900 kPa BMEP), with three types of fuel (ultra-low sulfur diesel or ULSD, Swedish low aromatic diesel, and neat soybean biodiesel), and with and without a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particulate filter (DPF). Swedish diesel and biodiesel reduced emissions of PM2.5, Σ15PAHs, Σ11NPAHs, Σ5Hopanes and Σ6Steranes, and biodiesel resulted in the larger reductions. However, idling emissions increased for benzo[k]fluoranthene (Swedish diesel), 5-nitroacenaphthene (biodiesel) and PM2.5 (biodiesel), a significant result given the attention to exposures from idling vehicles and the toxicity of high-molecular-weight PAHs and NPAHs. The DOC + DPF combination reduced PM2.5 and SVOC emissions during DPF loading (>99% reduction) and DPF regeneration (83–99%). The toxicity of diesel exhaust, in terms of the estimated carcinogenic risk, was greatly reduced using Swedish diesel, biodiesel fuels and the DOC + DPF. PAH profiles showed high abundances of three and four ring compounds as well as naphthalene; NPAH profiles were dominated by nitro-naphthalenes, 1-nitropyrene and 9-nitroanthracene. Both the emission rate and the composition of diesel exhaust depended strongly on fuel type, engine load and after-treatment system. The emissions data and chemical profiles presented are relevant to the development of emission inventories and exposure and risk assessments. PMID:25709535

  12. Relations between land use and organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, and semi-volatile organic compounds in streambed sediment and fish on the island of Oahu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasher, A M D; Wolff, R H

    2004-04-01

    Bed-sediment and/or fish samples were collected from 27 sites around the island of Oahu (representing urban, agricultural, mixed, and forested land use) to determine the occurrence and distribution of hydrophobic organic compounds including organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). Of the 28 organochlorine compounds analyzed in the fish, 14 were detected during this study. Nineteen of the 31 organochlorine compounds and 40 of the 65 SVOCs were detected in the sediment. Urban sites had the highest number of detections and tended to have the highest concentrations of pesticides. Chlordane compounds were the most frequently detected constituents at urban sites, followed by dieldrin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and DDT compounds. PAHs were the most frequently detected constituents in watersheds with mixed (urban and agricultural) land use. The only pesticides detected at agricultural sites were DDT and its degradation products, DDD and DDE. No pesticides or PCBs were detected at the forested sites, but a few ubiquitous SVOCs were found in sediments at some forested sites. In general, concentrations of the most frequently detected pesticides were higher in fish than in sediment. Following a trend that has been observed elsewhere in the nation, concentrations of most organochlorine pesticides and PCBs are decreasing in Hawaii.

  13. Distribution profile, health risk and elimination of model atmospheric SVOCs associated with a typical municipal garbage compressing station in Guangzhou, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guiying; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhengyong; An, Taicheng; Hu, Jianfang

    2013-09-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) air pollution caused by municipal garbage compressing process was investigated at a garbage compressing station (GCS). The most abundant contaminants were phthalate esters (PAEs), followed by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organic chlorinated pesticides (OCPs). ∑16PAHs concentrations ranged from 58.773 to 68.840 ng m-3 in gas and from 6.489 to 17.291 ng m-3 in particulate phase; ∑20OCPs ranged from 4.181 to 5.550 ng m-3 and from 0.823 to 2.443 ng m-3 in gas and particulate phase, respectively; ∑15PAEs ranged from 46.498 to 87.928 ng m-3 and from 414.765 to 763.009 ng m-3 in gas and particulate phase. Lung-cancer risk due to PAHs exposure was 1.13 × 10-4. Both non-cancer and cancer risk levels due to OCPs exposure were acceptable. Non-cancer hazard index of PAEs was 4.57 × 10-3, suggesting safety of workers as only exposure to PAEs at GCS. At pilot scale, 60.18% of PAHs, 70.89% of OCPs and 63.2% of PAEs were removed by an integrated biotrickling filter-photocatalytic reactor at their stable state, and health risk levels were reduced about 50%, demonstrating high removal capacity of integrated reactor.

  14. Role of clothing in both accelerating and impeding dermal absorption of airborne SVOCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Glenn C; Weschler, Charles J; Bekö, Gabriel; Koch, Holger M; Salthammer, Tunga; Schripp, Tobias; Toftum, Jørn; Clausen, Geo

    2016-01-01

    To assess the influence of clothing on dermal uptake of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), we measured uptake of selected airborne phthalates for an individual wearing clean clothes or air-exposed clothes and compared these results with dermal uptake for bare-skinned individuals under otherwise identical experimental conditions. Using a breathing hood to isolate dermal from inhalation uptake, we measured urinary metabolites of diethylphthalate (DEP) and di-n-butylphthalate (DnBP) from an individual exposed to known concentrations of these compounds for 6 h in an experimental chamber. The individual wore either clean (fresh) cotton clothes or cotton clothes that had been exposed to the same chamber air concentrations for 9 days. For a 6-h exposure, the net amounts of DEP and DnBP absorbed when wearing fresh clothes were, respectively, 0.017 and 0.007 μg/kg/(μg/m(3)); for exposed clothes the results were 0.178 and 0.261 μg/kg/(μg/m(3)), respectively (values normalized by air concentration and body mass). When compared against the average results for bare-skinned participants, clean clothes were protective, whereas exposed clothes increased dermal uptake for DEP and DnBP by factors of 3.3 and 6.5, respectively. Even for non-occupational environments, wearing clothing that has adsorbed/absorbed indoor air pollutants can increase dermal uptake of SVOCs by substantial amounts relative to bare skin.

  15. Enantioselective environmental toxicology of chiral pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Zhao, Meirong; Niu, Lili; Liu, Weiping

    2015-03-16

    The enantioselective environmental toxic effect of chiral pesticides is becoming more important. As the industry develops, increasing numbers of chiral insecticides and herbicides will be introduced into use, potentially posing toxic effects on nontarget living beings. Chiral pesticides, including herbicides such as acylanilides, phenoxypropanoic acids, and imidazolinones, and insecticides such as synthetic pyrethroids, organophosphates, and DDT often behave enantioselectively during agricultural use. These compounds also pose unpredictable enantioselective ecological threats to nontarget living beings and/or humans, affecting the food chain and entire ecosystems. Thus, to investigate the enantioselective toxic effects of chiral insecticides and herbicides is necessary during environmental protection. The environmental toxicology of chiral pesticides, especially the findings obtained from studies conducted in our laboratory during the past 10 years, is reviewed.

  16. Experimental studies of herbicide drift characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renne, D.S.; Wolf, M.A.

    1976-05-20

    A knowledge of the drift characteristics of herbicides and pesticides released from ground and aerial rigs is important in forestry and agricultural applications so that methods for minimizing damage to downwind systems sensitive to these chamicals can be developed. A field experiment was undertaken on the Hanford Reservation in eastern Washington State during 1975 to study techniques for maximizing herbicide applications from a spray airplane on the intended area and minimizing drift. Several early morning experiments comparing drift characteristics of a fixed with a test application for various nozzle systems and herbicide concentrations were made. The results of these experiments have shown that the initial drift and drift deposit components varied by only a factor of two or so, depending on the production of smaller droplets, as various techniques were used to put the herbicides down from the aircraft. Meteorological conditions become increasingly important at greater downwind distances from the source. Furthermore, drift reduction was most effective under conditions of high relative humidities and cool temperatures. At large distances from the source, ground level drift was higher on stable than on unstable days. Comments on methods for improving the experimental design, and applications of studies such as these to forestry will be made.

  17. Toxicity of three selected pesticides (Alachlor, Atrazine and Diuron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study aimed to evaluate acute toxicity tests for three selected herbicides: Alachlor, Atrazine and Diuron using turbot flatfish. Larvae were more sensitive than turbot embryos to all pesticides. Median lethal concentrations of the selected pesticides during a 48 h and 96 h exposure for turbot embryos and larvae ...

  18. Desorption of SVOCs from Heated Surfaces in the Form of Ultrafine Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallace, Lance A.; Ott, Wayne R.; Weschler, Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) produced by electric heating of stoves and metal cooking pans, absent food, have been hypothesized to be created from a surface film of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) sorbed from the surrounding air. This study tests that hypothesis by size-resolved measurements...... extending the lower range of the UFP studied from 10 to 2.3 nm, and including other surfaces (glass, aluminum, and porcelain). Heating glass Petri dishes or squares of aluminum foil to about 350-400 degrees C for 4-6 min removed all sorbed organic substances completely. Subsequent exposure of these "clean......" Petri dishes and foil squares to indoor air in two different residences for successively longer periods (1 h to 281 days), followed by heating the materials for 4-6 min, indicated a strong relationship of the number, size distribution, and mass of the UFP to the time exposed. Estimates...

  19. 76 FR 76674 - Receipt of Several Pesticide Petitions Filed for Residues of Pesticide Chemicals in or on Various...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... CFR part 180 for residues of the herbicide, fluthiacet-methyl, acetic acid [[2-chloro-4-fluoro-5... pesticide manufacturer. Potentially affected entities may include, but are not limited to: Crop production (NAICS code 111). Animal production (NAICS code 112). Food manufacturing (NAICS code 311). Pesticide...

  20. Pesticide Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  1. Pesticide Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    This site provides resources for an individual or company wanting to register a pesticide active ingredient or pesticide product in the United States. Features: a manual (blue book), other guidance, and coordinated lists of requirements by pesticide type.

  2. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates pesticides under the statutory authority of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). The registration requirements for antimicrobial pesticides differ somewhat from those of other pesticides. Find out more.

  3. Herbicide risk assessment during the Wheat Self-sufficiency Project in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deihimfard, Reza; Zand, Eskandar; Damghani, Abdolmajid Mahdavi; Soufizadeh, Saeid

    2007-10-01

    The present study describes the quantitative changes in herbicide use during the specific observation periods in the Wheat Self-sufficiency Project in Iran from 1994 to 2004 and the associated changes in herbicide risk, area and yield in this context. A risk index, the environmental impact quotient (EIQ), was used to estimate the environmental impacts (EIs) of herbicides applied to wheat agroecosystems. The results suggest that, during this period, the overall risk posed by the herbicides applied to wheat agroecosystems increased substantially, as evidenced by a 71% increase in herbicide usage (weight of pesticide applied) and a 62.2% increase in EI rating, in spite of an 8.2% decrease in overall EIQ rating and an 89.2% decrease in mean application rate. Furthermore, a 0.57% increase in the area and a 23.6% and 22.7% increase in irrigated and rainfed yields, respectively, were observed. The results also indicate that the EIQ(FUR) of two herbicides, dichlorprop-P/mecoprop-P/MCPA and difenzoquat, is much higher than that of other herbicides, and they could be qualified as high-risk herbicides. As a whole, an increase in herbicide usage (weight of pesticide applied) was an important factor on herbicide environmental impact boost. However, this increase has not led to a similar increase in wheat yield, which could be attributed in part to the negative impact of high herbicide consumption in wheat fields and subsequent threat to the long-term sustainability of these agroecosystems. Society of Chemical Industry

  4. 76 FR 27268 - Glyphosate; Pesticide Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Glyphosate; Pesticide Tolerance AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... glyphosate in or on corn, field, forage. Monsanto Company requested this tolerance under the Federal Food... tolerance for residues of the herbicide glyphosate, N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine, in or on corn, field...

  5. 78 FR 25396 - Glyphosate; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Glyphosate; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This regulation establishes tolerances for residues of glyphosate in or on... CFR 180.364 be amended by establishing tolerances for residues of the herbicide glyphosate N...

  6. 78 FR 60707 - Glyphosate; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Glyphosate; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... herbicide glyphosate in or on canola, seed at 20 parts per million (ppm) by changing the tolerance expression from the combined residues of glyphosate only, to the combined residues of glyphosate and N-acetyl...

  7. An identification of potential new herbicides for short rotation coppice (Task 4). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a project to identify potential new herbicides and their suitability for weed control in commercial short rotation coppice (SRC) crops, and to establish the safety of the crops. The arrangements for the use of 'off-label' pesticides, which are permitted for use on other crops, on SRC are discussed along with the importance of the use of laboratory pot trials and field trials. Several herbicides are proposed for larger scale field trials.

  8. Large-scale bioreactor production of the herbicide-degrading Aminobacter sp. strain MSH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Knudsen, Berith Elkær; Frkova, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    The Aminobacter sp. strain MSH1 has potential for pesticide bioremediation because it degrades the herbicide metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM). Production of the BAM-degrading bacterium using aerobic bioreactor fermentation was investigated. A mineral salt medium limited for carbon and with ......, large-scale production of herbicide-degrading Aminobacter was possible, bringing the use of this bacterium in bioaugmentation field remediation closer to reality....

  9. [The first stage of toxicology evaluation and analysis of 1502 pesticide samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Li, Xianjun; Xie, Jing; Ling, Jianan; Shi, Nian

    2014-07-01

    To analyze the results of the first-stage toxicological evaluation of 1 502 pesticide samples. The classification of the 1 502 pesticide samples was analyzed, and the experimental results of the samples in different years were compared. Most of the 1 502 pesticide samples were insecticides, accounting for 52.5% of all, followed by bactericides and herbicides. In the 5 years, the proportion of biogenic insecticides showed a significant rising trend (χ² = 11.426, P pesticides was 65.8%; mixed pesticides accounted for 32.7%; original pesticides accounted for only 1.5%. From 2008 to 2012, most pesticides had low toxicity, regardless of the exposure route (via the mouth, skin, or respiratory tract). Acute oral and dermal toxicity tests showed that pesticides with moderate toxicity declined year by year (oral exposure χ² = 18.036, P pesticides with high toxicity. We did not detect any pesticide with extreme toxicity. Acute skin irritation and eye irritation test showed an upward trend in proportion of non-irritating pesticides (χ² = 77.110, P pesticides decreased significantly (χ² = 18.941, P pesticides was insecticide. Most samples were single pesticides, and there was a certain proportion of mixed pesticides. Novel pesticides such as bio-pesticides are the development tendency. The tested pesticides were mainly low-toxicity pesticides, with a certain proportion of medium- and high-toxicity pesticides. Personal protection should be strengthened during production and use of pesticides.

  10. Epigenetics and pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collotta, M; Bertazzi, P A; Bollati, V

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides, a wide class of environmental contaminants, may cause both acute and delayed health effects in exposed subjects. These effects can range from simple irritation of the skin and eyes to more severe effects such as affecting the nervous system, the reproductive system and cancer. The molecular mechanisms underlying such effects are still under investigation. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression that occur without a change in the DNA sequence. Several epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNA expression, can be triggered by environmental factors. We review current evidences indicating that epigenetic modifications may mediate pesticide effects on human health. In vitro, animal, and human investigations have identified several classes of pesticides that modify epigenetic marks, including endocrine disruptors, persistent organic pollutants, arsenic, several herbicides and insecticides. Several investigations have examined the effects of environmental exposures and epigenetic markers, and identified toxicants that modify epigenetic states. These modifications are similar to the ones found in pathological tissue samples. In spite of the current limitations, available evidence supports the concept that epigenetics holds substantial potential for furthering our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of pesticides health effects, as well as for predicting health-related risks due to conditions of environmental exposure and individual susceptibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) for Comparing Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniss, Andrew R; Coburn, Carl W

    2015-01-01

    Various indicators of pesticide environmental risk have been proposed, and one of the most widely known and used is the environmental impact quotient (EIQ). The EIQ has been criticized by others in the past, but it continues to be used regularly in the weed science literature. The EIQ is typically considered an improvement over simply comparing the amount of herbicides applied by weight. Herbicides are treated differently compared to other pesticide groups when calculating the EIQ, and therefore, it is important to understand how different risk factors affect the EIQ for herbicides. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the suitability of the EIQ as an environmental indicator for herbicides. Simulation analysis was conducted to quantify relative sensitivity of the EIQ to changes in risk factors, and actual herbicide EIQ values were used to quantify the impact of herbicide application rate on the EIQ Field Use Rating. Herbicide use rate was highly correlated with the EIQ Field Use Rating (Spearman's rho >0.96, P-value environmental impact.

  12. Implementation of pesticide applicator certification schools and continuing education workshops : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-11

    The Oklahoma Department of Transportations (ODOT) herbicide applicator training program consists of initial pesticide applicator training schools followed by independent Certification testing and then on-going yearly continuing education workshops...

  13. 78 FR 69666 - Notice of Receipt of Requests To Voluntarily Cancel Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ...-00087 DES Desmedipham. CA-040025 Riverdale Endurance Prodiamine. Herbicide. ME-030004 Glypro Glyphosate... continued use of the pesticide would pose an unreasonable adverse effect on the environment. The registrants...

  14. The herbicide glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, J; Barry, G; Kishore, G

    1989-03-01

    Glyphosate has broad spectrum herbicidal activity against a wide range of annual and perennial weeds. The environmental properties of this herbicide such as its soil immobility, rapid soil inactivation and soil biodegradation are outstanding. This herbicide is practically non-toxic to non-plant life forms such as aquatic and avian species, animals and man. Metabolism studies with pure bacterial cultures indicate that glyphosate is metabolized to either aminomethylphosphonate and glyoxylate or sarcosine and phosphate in most bacteria. The enzyme C-P lyase, which catalyzes the cleavage of the carbon-phosphorus bond of phosphonates including glyphosate, appears to be complex, containing multiple subunits. Mode of action studies have demonstrated that glyphosate kills plants by inhibiting the enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic compounds. The status of our understanding of these aspects of glyphosate is reviewed.

  15. Herbicide options for hardwood management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew W. Ezell; A. Brady Self

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbicides in hardwood management presents special problems in that many of the most effective herbicides are either designed to control hardwoods or the product is not labeled for such applications. Numerous studies involving herbicide application in hardwoods have been completed at Mississippi State University. This paper is a compilation of results from...

  16. Distribution of major herbicides in ground water of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbash, Jack E.; Thelin, Gail P.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Information on the concentrations and spatial distributions of pesticides and their transformation products, or degradates, in the hydrologic system is essential for managing pesticide use in both agricultural and nonagricultural settings to protect water resources. This report examines the occurrence of selected herbicides and their degradates in ground water, primarily on the basis of results from two large-scale, multistate investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey—the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program and the Midwest Pesticide Study (MWPS). The NAWQA pesticide data were derived from 2,227 sites (wells and springs) sampled in 20 major hydrologic basins across the United States from 1993 to 1995; the MWPS data were obtained from the sampling of 303 wells in a 12-state area of the northern midcontinent from 1991 to 1994. Data are presented for seven high-use herbicides: five of current interest to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for designing Pesticide Management Plans (atrazine, cyanazine, simazine, alachlor and metolachlor), a largely nonagricultural herbicide (prometon), and an agricultural herbicide first registered in 1994 for use in the United States (acetochlor).

  17. Role of clothing in both accelerating and impeding dermal absorption of airborne SVOCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Glenn C.; Weschler, Charles J.; Bekö, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    To assess the influence of clothing on dermal uptake of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), we measured uptake of selected airborne phthalates for an individual wearing clean clothes or air-exposed clothes and compared these results with dermal uptake for bare-skinned individuals under....... The individual wore either clean (fresh) cotton clothes or cotton clothes that had been exposed to the same chamber air concentrations for 9 days. For a 6-h exposure, the net amounts of DEP and DnBP absorbed when wearing fresh clothes were, respectively, 0.017 and 0.007 μg/kg/(μg/m3); for exposed clothes...... the results were 0.178 and 0.261 μg/kg/(μg/m3), respectively (values normalized by air concentration and body mass). When compared against the average results for bare-skinned participants, clean clothes were protective, whereas exposed clothes increased dermal uptake for DEP and DnBP by factors of 3.3 and 6...

  18. A review of pesticide policies and regulations for urban amenity areas in seven European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristoffersen, P.; Rask, A.M.; Grundy, A.; Franzen, I.; Kempenaar, C.; Raisio, J.; Schroeder, H.; Spijker, J.H.; Verschwele, A.; Zarina, L.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of the regulations of herbicide use for weed control in non-agricultural/urban amenity areas, including actual pesticide use, was carried out as a joint survey of seven European countries: Denmark, Finland, Germany, Latvia, the Netherlands, Sweden and United Kingdom. Herbicides

  19. Efficacy of Herbicides When Spray Solution Application Is Delayed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Eure

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Information is limited concerning the impact of delaying applications of pesticides after solution preparation on efficacy. Experiments were conducted to determine weed control when diclosulam, dimethenamid-P, flumioxazin, fomesafen, imazethapyr, pendimethalin, and S-metolachlor were applied preemergence the day of solution preparation or 3, 6, and 9 days after solution preparation. Herbicide solutions were applied on the same day regardless of when prepared. Control of broadleaf signalgrass, common lambsquarters, entireleaf morningglory, and Palmer amaranth by these herbicides was not reduced regardless of when herbicide solutions were prepared. Surprisingly entireleaf morningglory control by all herbicides increased when herbicide application was delayed by 9 days. In separate experiments, control of broadleaf signalgrass by clethodim, common ragweed by glyphosate and lactofen, entireleaf morningglory by lactofen, Italian rye grass by glyphosate and paraquat, and Palmer amaranth by atrazine, dicamba, glufosinate, glyphosate, imazethapyr, lactofen, and 2,4-D was affected more by increase in weed size due to delayed application than the time between solution preparation and application.

  20. Pesticides' influence on wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboni, Pierluigi; Cabras, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Wine quality strongly depends on the grape quality. To obtain high-quality wines, it is necessary to process healthy grapes at the correct ripeness stage and for this reason the farmer has to be especially careful in the prevention of parasite attacks on the grapevine. The most common fungal diseases affecting grape quality are downy and powdery mildew (Plasmopara viticola and Uncinula necator), and gray mold (Botrytis cinerea). On the other hand, the most dangerous insects are the grape moth (Lobesia botrana), vine mealybug (Planococcus ficus), and the citrus mealybug (Planococcus citri). Farmers fight grape diseases and insects applying pesticides that can be found at harvest time on grapes. The persistence of pesticides depends on the chemical characteristic of the active ingredients as well as on photodegradation, thermodegradation, codistillation, and enzymatic degradation. The pesticide residues on grapes can be transferred to the must and this can influence the selection and development of yeast strains. Moreover, yeasts can also influence the levels of the pesticides in the wine by reducing or adsorbing them on lees. During the fermentative process, yeasts can cause the disappearance of pesticide residues by degradation or absorption at the end of the fermentation when yeasts are deposited as lees. In this chapter, we reviewed the effect of commonly used herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides on yeasts. We also studied the effect of alcoholic and malolactic fermentation on pesticide residues. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. selective herbicide glyphosate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2016-05-04

    May 4, 2016 ... This study examined the phyto-toxic effects of a commonly named non-selective herbicide glyphosate. (Roundup™) on ... balance of onions (A. cepa) and similar plants and subsequent effect on human, the major end user. Key words: ..... potential role in the epidemiology of Iris yellow spot virus in an onion.

  2. Prediction of climate impacts on pesticide leaching to the aquatic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, Hans Joergen; Rosenbom, A.; van der Keur, P.; Kjaer, J.; Sonnenborg, T. [GEUS Danmark, Copenhagen (Denmark); Olesen, J.E. [Aarhus Univ., Tjele (Denmark); Nistrup Joergensen, L. [Aarhus Unv., Slagelse (Denmark); Boessing Christensen, O. [Danmarks Meteorologiske Institut (DMI), Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-10-01

    The report evaluates direct (precipitation, actual evapotranspiration and temperature) and indirect (crop rotations, crop management, and pesticide use) climatic change effects on pesticide-leaching to groundwater and the aquatic environment by use of MACRO and MIKE SHE model. The analysis is based on five model pesticides: low-dose herbicides, ordinary herbicides, strongly sorbing herbicides, fungicides and insecticides, and selected farm types (arable and dairy) for the variable saturated sandy soil (Jyndevad) and loamy soil (Faardrup). The evaluation has the aim at describing the implications of future climatic factors on pesticide leaching to groundwater as realistic as possible, based on realistic doses and parameters from MACRO setups from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme. (Author)

  3. Survival of adult Tiphia vernalis (Hymenoptera: Tiphiidae) after insecticide, fungicide, and herbicide exposure in laboratory bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jason B; Reding, Michael E; Moyseenko, James J; Klein, Michael G; Mannion, Catharine M; Bishop, Bert

    2006-04-01

    Tiphia vernalis Rohwer is a hymenopteran ectoparasitoid of Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica Newman, larvae. The adult wasps feed on nectar or honeydew between mid-April and late June. Adults may contact pesticides when landing on foliage or when females hunt for grubs in the soil. The lethal effect of nursery, turf, and landscape pesticides was determined by exposing wasps to treated foliage in the laboratory. Pesticides tested at labeled rates were the insecticides bifenthrin, carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, halofenozide, and imidacloprid; the herbicides oryzalin, pendimethalin, and a combination product with 2,4-D, dicamba, and mecoprop (multiherbicide); and the fungicides chlorothalonil and thiophanate-methyl. During 2001 and 2002, male and female T. vernalis were exposed to pesticides by using turf cores. For both years, bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, and imidacloprid treatments lowered adult survival relative to the control, but halofenozide had minimal effect on mortality of males and females. More males than females died after exposure to carbaryl treatments. Survival of females was not reduced by exposure to herbicides or fungicides. Females were apparently more tolerant of pesticides than males. Mortality of males in response to herbicides and fungicides was more variable than for females; in 2002 trials, male mortality was higher after exposure to multiherbicide, oryzalin, pendimethalin, and thiophanate-methyl than the control. The fungicide chlorothalonil did not increase mortality of males or females in either year. Sublethal effects were not evaluated. The study indicates the choice of pesticide may be important for conserving T. vernalis in nursery, landscape, and turf settings.

  4. Application of electrokinetic soil flushing to four herbicides: A comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, E Vieira; Souza, F; Saez, C; Cañizares, P; Lanza, M R V; Martinez-Huitle, C A; Rodrigo, M A

    2016-06-01

    In this work, four bench-scale plants containing soil spiked with four herbicides (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), oxyfluorfen, chlorsulfuron and atrazine) undergo treatment consisting of an electrokinetic soil flushing (EKSF). Results clearly demonstrate that efficiency of EKSF depends on the chemical characteristic of the pesticide used. The amount of pesticide collected in the anode well is more significant than that collected in the cathode wells, indicating that the electromigration is much more important than drainage by electro-osmotic flux for this application. After 15 d of treatment, the 2,4-D is the pesticide most efficiently removed (95% of removal), while chlorsulfuron is the pesticide more resilient to the treatment. Additionally, volatilization was found to be a process of the major significance in the application of electrokinetic techniques to soil polluted with herbicides and because of that it should always be taken into account in the future design of full-scale processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of sensitive parameters in the modeling of SVOCs reemission processes from soil to atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizeau, Vincent; Ciffroy, Philippe; Musson Genon, Luc; Roustan, Yelva

    2013-04-01

    Many studies have shown that semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are subject to Long-Range Atmospheric Transport (LRAT) and that such a transport may occur through a series of deposition-reemission events at the soil surface-air interface. This periodic movement of pollutants between soil and atmosphere is called the 'grasshopper effect'. Thus, it appears necessary to take into account the exchange between soil and atmosphere to properly simulate the fate of these pollutants at regional or global scale. The prediction of reemission from soils is however associated with large uncertainties, which can be schematically classified into three main sources : (i) natural variability, including nature of soil (organic matter content, porosity, water content) and meteorological conditions ; (ii) uncertainty about intrinsic properties of chemicals, like degradation rate or partitioning between environmental components, which govern the dynamics of chemicals in air and soils ; (iii) model structure, and particularly the discretization of soil compartment. Considering this background, a major challenge is to identify the most sensitive sources of uncertainty in modelling the reemission of chemicals from soils, in order to know where the priority has to be set for upgrading SVOC dispersion estimation. To answer this question, we studied a multi-layer soil model, including exchanges between soil and atmosphere. A sensitivity analysis was conducted by affecting probability density functions for each of model parameters. Four chemicals were selected (Benzo(a)Pyrene, PCB-28, Lindane and Hexachlorobenzene) because of their contrasted behaviors in soils, as expected by their partition and degradation properties. For this first exercise, simple emission scenarii were considered, i.e. a period of constant concentration in air (where realistic concentrations were estimated for each chemical from monitoring data provided by EMEP) followed by a zero-concentration in air. Although

  6. The potential benefits of herbicide regulation: a cautionary note for the Great Barrier Reef catchment area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A M; Lewis, S E; Brodie, J E; Benson, Ash

    2014-08-15

    Industry transitions away from traditional photosystem II inhibiting (PSII) herbicides towards an 'alternative' herbicide suite are now widely advocated as a key component of improved environmental outcomes for Australia's Great Barrier Reef and improved environmental stewardship on the part of the Queensland sugar industry. A systematic desktop risk analysis found that based on current farming practices, traditional PSII herbicides can pose significant environmental risks. Several of the 'alternatives' that can directly fill a specific pre-emergent ('soil residual') weed control function similar to regulated PSII herbicides also, however, presented a similar environmental risk profile, regardless of farming systems and bio-climatic zones being considered. Several alternatives with a pre-emergent residual function as well as alternative post-emergent (contact or 'knockdown') herbicides were, predicted to pose lower environmental risks than the regulated PSII herbicides to most trophic levels, although environmental risks could still be present. While several herbicides may well be viable alternatives in terms of weed control, they can still present equal or possibly higher risks to the environment. Imposing additional regulations (or even de-registrations) on particular herbicides could result in marginal, and possibly perverse environmental impacts in the long term, if usage shifts to alternative herbicides with similar risk profiles. Regardless of any regulatory efforts, improved environmental sustainability outcomes in pesticide practices within the Great Barrier Reef catchment area will hinge primarily on the continuing adoption of integrated, strategic pest management systems and technologies applied to both traditional and 'alternative' herbicides. One of the emerging policy challenges is ensuring the requisite technical and extension support for cane growers to ensure effective adoption of rapidly evolving farming system technologies, in a very dynamic and

  7. Herbicide application records

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains records of pesticide applications on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge) between 1995 and 2006.

  8. A new concept for reduction of diffuse contamination by simultaneous application of pesticide and pesticide-degrading microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onneby, Karin; Jonsson, Anders; Stenström, John

    2010-02-01

    Pesticide residues and their transformation products are frequently found in groundwater and surface waters. This study examined whether adding pesticide-degrading microorganisms simultaneously with the pesticide at application could significantly reduce diffuse contamination from pesticide use. Degradation of the phenoxyacetic acid herbicides MCPA (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid) and 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) was studied in soil microcosm experiments after simultaneous spraying of herbicide and herbicide-degrading bacteria on an agricultural soil and on a sand with low degradation potential. The latter represented pesticide use on non-agricultural soils poor in microbial activity. Degradation and possible loss of herbicidal effect were also tested in a system with plants and the amounts of bacteria needed to give satisfactory MCPA-degradation rate and the survival of degrading bacteria in formulated MCPA were determined. The results showed >80-99% degradation of 2,4-D and MCPA in soil within 1 day and >99% within 3 days after inoculation with 10(5)-10(7) herbicide-degrading bacteria g(-1) dry weight of soil. Enhanced degradation of MCPA was also obtained in the presence of winter wheat and white mustard without loss of the intended herbicidal effect on white mustard. The survival of an isolated MCPA-degrading Sphingomonas sp. in three realistic concentrations of formulated MCPA was very poor, showing that in practical applications direct contact between the microorganisms and the pesticide formulation must be precluded. The applicability and economic feasibility of the method and the information needed to obtain a useable product for field use are discussed.

  9. Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates pesticides used to protect crops and sets limits on the amount of pesticide remaining in or on foods in the U.S. The limits on pesticides on foods are called tolerances in the U.S. (maximum residue limits (MRLs) in many other countries).

  10. Microbial pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael L. McManus

    1991-01-01

    Interest in the use of microbial pesticides has intensified because of public concern about the safety of chemical pesticides and their impact in the environment. Characteristics of the five groups of entomopathogens that have potential as microbial pesticides are briefly discussed and an update is provided on research and development activities underway to enhance the...

  11. Micro-flow-injection analysis (μFIA) immunoassay of herbicide residue 2,6-dichlorobenzamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uthuppu, Basil; Heiskanen, Arto; Kofoed, Dan

    2015-01-01

    As a part of developing new systems for continuously monitoring the presence of pesticides in groundwater, a microfluidic amperometric immunosensor was developed for detecting the herbicide residue 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) in water. A competitive immunosorbent assay served as the sensing mecha...

  12. Biochar soil additions impacts herbicide fate: Importance of application timing and feedstock species

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Biochar (BC), solid biomass subjected to pyrolysis, can alter the fate of pesticides in soil. We investigated the effect of soil amendment with several biochars on the sorption, persistence, leaching and bioefficacy of the herbicides clomazone (CMZ) and bispyribac sodium (BYP). RESULTS:...

  13. Effects of herbicides on fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Keith R.; Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Volz, David

    2013-01-01

    have been observed in fish exposed to herbicides, these have either been observed at large concentrations that would be rarely found in surface waters inhabited by fish or, as in the case of behavior and olfaction, have not been linked to ecologically relevant responses on survival, growth, development......Herbicides are used to control weeds and are usually targeted to processes and target sites that are specific to plants. As a result, most herbicides are not acutely toxic to fish. Exceptions to this general rule are uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and some herbicides that interfere...... with cell division. Chronic and sublethal effects have been studied for some herbicides, but fewer data are available for these effects than for acute effects. The sublethal effects of herbicides that have been studied include reproduction, stress, olfaction, and behavior. Although some of these responses...

  14. Final Environmental Assessment Addressing Aerial Application of Herbicides at Joint Base Charleston-Weapons Station Charleston, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    biodiversity ), is favored over chemical control means. Pesticides and herbicides are currently applied only to the golf course located on the...2012c). Sulfometuron-methyl has a relatively short half-life in soils, ranging from 20 to 28 days and is broken down by microbes and chemical...by EA Addressing Aerial Application of Herbicides at JB CHS-WS Joint Base Charleston, South Carolina February 2013 4-7 microbes into natural

  15. Assessing the environmental impact of changes in pesticide use on transgenic crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Kuiper, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    Two main traits that have been introduced into genetically modified crops that are currently on the market, viz., herbicide and insect resistance, likely affect pesticide use on these crops. Various surveys have been carried out, such as those of the USDAERS and NCFAP, comparing the pesticide use on

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons - fate and long-range atmospheric transport studied using a global model, EMAC-SVOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Octaviani, Mega; Tost, Holger; Lammel, Gerhard

    2017-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are emitted by incomplete combustion from fossil fuel, vehicles, and biomass burning. They may persist in environmental compartments, pose a health hazard and may bio accumulate along food chains. The ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model had been used to simulate global tropospheric, stratospheric chemistry and climate. In this study, we improve the model to include simulations of the transport and fate of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC). The EMAC-SVOC model takes into account essential environmental processes including gas-particle partitioning, dry and wet deposition, chemical and bio-degradation, and volatilization from sea surface, soils, vegetation, and snow. The model was evaluated against observational data in the Arctic, mid-latitudes, and tropics, and further applied to study total environmental lifetime and long-range transport potential (LRTP) of PAHs. We selected four compounds for study, spanning a wide range of volatility, i.e., phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene. Several LRTP indicators were investigated, including the Arctic contamination potential, meridional spreading, and zonal and meridional fluxes to remote regions.

  18. Structural and functional effects of herbicides on non-target organisms in aquatic ecosystems with an emphasis on atrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, James; Kortekamp, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Herbicide use has increased dramatically around the world over the past 6 decades (Gianessi and Reigner, 2007). Few herbicides were in use in the 1950s. However, by 2001 approximately 1.14 billion kilograms of herbicides were applied globally for the control of undesireable vegetation in agricultural, silvicultural, lawncare, aquacultural, and irrigation/recreational water management activities (Kiely et al., 2004). Twenty-eight percent of the total mass of herbicides is applied in the United States, with the remaining 72 percent being applied elsewhere around the globe (Kiely et al., 2004). Herbicides represent 36% of global pesticide use, followed by insecticides (25%), fungicides (10%) and other chemical classes (Kiely et al., 2004). Agricultural production accounts for approximately 90% of herbicide use in the U.S. (Kiely et al., 2004). Gianessi and Reigner (2007) indicated that herbicides are routinely used on more than 90% of the area designated for large commercial crops including corn, soybeans, cotton, sugar beets, peanuts, and rice. Increased farm mechanization, technological advancements in production of inexpensive sources of inorganic nitrogen fertilizer (e.g., anhydrous ammonia), and conversion of forest, grassland, and wetland habitats to cropland has led to a tremendous increase in global food production over the past half-century. Herbicides have augmented advances in large-scale agricultural systems and have largely replaced mechanical and hand-weeding control mechanisms (Gianessi and Reigner, 2007). The wide-spread use of herbicides in agriculture has resulted in frequent chemical detections in surface and groundwaters (Gilliom, 2007). The majority of herbicides used are highly water soluble and are therefore prone to runoff from terrestrial environments. In additon, spray drift and atmospheric deposition can contribute to herbicide contamination of aquatic environments. Lastly, selected herbicides are deliberately applied to aquatic environments

  19. Applications of Metabonomics in Pesticide Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Metabonomic studies quantitatively measure the small molecule metabolites and their intermediates in the biological samples (serum, urine or tissue extracts) and have gained wide applications in many fields, especially in toxicology. Pesticides are extensively used around the world and pesticide toxicity has become a serious threat to human health. Metabonomic approach has been applied in many aspects of pesticide toxicology research such as eco-environmental toxicity studies, biomarker identification, and mechanism of toxicity studies. Both whole organism animal models and cell culture models are used for metabonomic studies on pesticide toxicology. In the literature, metabonomic analyses on the toxicity of over thirty common pesticides, including insecticides, herbicides and fungicides, have been carried out using magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry. The combined toxicity of pesticides or pesticide with heavy metals was also investigated with metabonomic approach. In this article, recent progresses made in applying metabonomic approach in pesticide toxicology are thoroughly reviewed and the challenges with application of this approach are also discussed.

  20. Herbicide-resistant weed management: focus on glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckie, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    This review focuses on proactive and reactive management of glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds. Glyphosate resistance in weeds has evolved under recurrent glyphosate usage, with little or no diversity in weed management practices. The main herbicide strategy for proactively or reactively managing GR weeds is to supplement glyphosate with herbicides of alternative modes of action and with soil-residual activity. These herbicides can be applied in sequences or mixtures. Proactive or reactive GR weed management can be aided by crop cultivars with alternative single or stacked herbicide-resistance traits, which will become increasingly available to growers in the future. Many growers with GR weeds continue to use glyphosate because of its economical broad-spectrum weed control. Government farm policies, pesticide regulatory policies and industry actions should encourage growers to adopt a more proactive approach to GR weed management by providing the best information and training on management practices, information on the benefits of proactive management and voluntary incentives, as appropriate. Results from recent surveys in the United States indicate that such a change in grower attitudes may be occurring because of enhanced awareness of the benefits of proactive management and the relative cost of the reactive management of GR weeds. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Computational study concerning the effect of some pesticides on the Proteus Mirabilis catalase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isvoran, Adriana

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of the effects of the herbicides nicosulfuron and chlorsulfuron and the fungicides difenoconazole and drazoxlone upon catalase produced by soil microorganism Proteus mirabilis is performed using the molecular docking technique. The interactions of pesticides with the enzymes are predicted using SwissDock and PatchDock docking tools. There are correlations for predicted binding energy values for enzyme-pesticide complexes obtained using the two docking tools, all the considered pesticides revealing favorable binding to the enzyme, but only the herbicides bind to the catalytic site. These results suggest the inhibitory potential of chlorsulfuron and nicosulfuron on the catalase activity in soil.

  2. Pesticides and pesticide degradation products in stormwater runoff: Sacramento River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, J.

    1996-01-01

    Pesticides in stormwater runoff, within the Sacramento River Basin, California, were assessed during a storm that occurred in January 1994. Two organophosphate insecticides (diazinon and methidathion), two carbamate pesticides (molinate and carbofuran), and one triazine herbicide (simazine) were detected. Organophosphate pesticide concentrations increased with the rising stage of the hydrographs; peak concentrations were measured near peak discharge. Diazinon oxon, a toxic degradation product of diazinon, made up approximately 1 to 3 percent of the diazinon load. The Feather River was the principal source of organophosphate pesticides to the Sacramento River during this storm. The concentrations of molinate and carbofuran, pesticides applied to rice fields during May and June, were relatively constant during and after the storm. Their presence in surface water was attributed to the flooding and subsequent drainage, as a management practice to degrade rice stubble prior to the next planting. A photodegradation product of molinate, 4-keto molinate, was in all samples where molinate was detected and made up approximately 50 percent of the total molinate load. Simazine, a herbicide used in orchards and to control weeds along the roadways, was detected in the storm runoff, but it was not possible to differentiate the two sources of that pesticide to the Sacramento River.

  3. Conséquences de l’utilisation des OGM sur l’usage des pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmency Henri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbicide-resistant and insect-resistant GM crops have been grown in order to save pesticide uses. Although the first years in the USA showed some benefit, further observations could be interpreted as a slow down in pesticide reduction together with the appearance of threats to the sustainability of the GM technology. On the one hand, alternate techniques were improved so as to use less pesticide. On the other hand, the appearance of herbicide-resistant weeds lead to the come-back of heavy herbicide weed control programs. However, the reduction in insecticides was sustained thanks to the setting up of the refuge strategy. The USA experience must be taken into account to design and evaluate the impact of the GM crops on the “green” policies to reduce the amount of pesticides used in Agriculture.

  4. Status of Some New Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.F. Mann; M.J. Haynes

    1978-01-01

    If herbicides are handled, applied, or disposed of improperly they may be injurious to humans, domestic animals, desirable plants, and pollinating insects, fish, or other wildlife, and may contaminate water supplies. Use herbicides only when needed and handle them with care. Follow the directions and heed all precautions on the container label. The use of trade, firm,...

  5. Herbicide practices in hardwood plantings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian D. Beheler; Charles H. Michler

    2013-01-01

    Control of competing vegetation is an important early cultural practice that can improve survival and vigor in hardwood tree plantings. The type of program used depends on landowner objectives, species of weeds present, equipment available, and types of herbicides available. Pre-planting planning can greatly increase effectiveness of an herbicide program for the first...

  6. Health effect of agricultural pesticide use in China: implications for the development of GM crops

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Zhang(Brookhaven National Lab); Ruifa Hu; Jikun Huang; Xusheng Huang; Guanming Shi; Yifan Li; Yanhong Yin; Zhaohui Chen

    2016-01-01

    It is notable that the adoption of GM glyphosate-tolerant crops increases glyphosate use but reduces non-glyphosate herbicide use; and adoption of GM insect-resistant crops significantly reduces insecticide use. While the health hazard of pesticide use has been well documented, little literature evaluates the health effects of different pesticides related to GM crops in an integrated framework. This study aims to associate the uses of different pesticides related to GM crops with the blood ch...

  7. Continuous exposure of pesticides in an aquifer changes microbial biomass, diversity and degradation potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, J. R.; Johnsen, K.; Aamand, J.

    2000-01-01

    We studied in situ effects of pesticide exposure on microbial degradation potential and community structure of aquifer sediments. Sediment samples pre-exposed to pesticides were significantly different to non-exposed control samples. Pre-exposed sediment showed an increased degradation potential...... towards phenoxyalcanoic acid herbicides as well as impact on microbial diversity was observed. Furthermore, bacterial biomass was changed, e.g. increased numbers of phenoxyalcanoic acid degraders in pesticide exposed sediment....

  8. [Acute poisoning by pesticides in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveau, P

    2016-07-01

    Acute pesticide poisoning in children is rare but potentially serious. Some clinical patterns (toxidromes) are suggestive of the drug class: cholinergic crisis for organophosphate or carbamate insecticides; neurological syndrome for rodenticides; digestive and respiratory syndrome for herbicides. Treatment is symptomatic and only a few patients are treated with an antidote: atropine and pralidoxime for organophosphate insecticides, vitamin K for anticoagulant rodenticides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Common Pesticides Used in Suicide Attempts Following the 2012 Paraquat Ban in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Won; Hwang, Il-Woong; Kim, Jae-Wook; Moon, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Park, Suyeon; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2015-10-01

    To determine the change in pesticides used during suicide attempts after the 2012 paraquat (PQ) ban, we evaluated the annual number of suicide attempts by pesticide ingestion between 2011 and 2014. We extracted demographic, clinical outcome, and pesticide class data from the medical records of 1,331 patients that attempted suicide by pesticide ingestion. Pesticides were sorted into 5 groups: herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, other pesticides, and combined pesticides. Each group was subdivided into various classes based on publications by the respective Resistance Action Committees. The chi-square test for trends was used to compare the annual incidence of categorical variables. The total number of suicide attempts decreased each year, from 399 in 2011 to 245 in 2014. Simultaneously, PQ ingestion decreased from 253 patients in 2011 to 60 in 2014. The proportion of PQ to pesticides also decreased from 63.4% in 2011 to 24.5% in 2014. Furthermore, the rate of decrease in the proportion of PQ to all herbicide categories increased by calendar year. In conclusion, there is a significant trend in increased annual number of suicides and proportion of suicides using glyphosates and glufosinates versus total herbicides. However, the number of suicide attempts using glyphosate and glufosinate is lower than that using PQ. The ratio of persons completing suicide to those attempting suicide after pesticide ingestion has decreased every year after the PQ ban.

  10. Contamination of boreholes water by 76 pesticides molecules in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user2

    76 residues of pesticides, especially insecticides, herbicides and fungicides, with accumulated contents which could average 0.350 or 350 ... cide residues of weed killers and fungicides were already detected in water reserves, ..... lithographic structure, its high content in organic matter and the depth of the underground ...

  11. Contamination of boreholes water by 76 pesticides molecules in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis campaign of underground water was done in 2010 on five boreholes water samples situated in agricultural cotton zone. The obtained results showed the presence of various active matters of at least 76 residues of pesticides, especially insecticides, herbicides and fungicides, with accumulated contents which could ...

  12. The exchange of SVOCs across the air-sea interface in Singapore's coastal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. He

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas are vulnerable to the accumulation of semivolatile organic compounds, such as PAHs, OCPs and PCBs from atmospheric inputs. Dry particulate and wet depositions, and air-water diffusive exchange in the Singapore's south coastal area, where most of chemical and oil refinery industries are situated in, were estimated. Based on a yearly dataset, the mean annual dry particulate deposition fluxes of ∑16-PAHs, ∑7 OCPs and ∑21 PCBs were 1328.8±961.1 μg m−2 y−1, 5421.4±3426.7 ng m−2 y−1 and 811.8±578.3 ng m−2 y−1, and the wet deposition of ∑16-PAHs and ∑7 OCPs were 6667.1±1745.2 and 115.4±98.3 μg m−2 y−1, respectively. Seasonal variation of atmospheric depositions was influenced by meteorological conditions. Air-water gas exchange fluxes were shown to be negative values for PAHs, HCHs and DDXs, indicating Singapore's south coast as a sink for the above-mentioned SVOCs. The relative contribution of each depositional process to the total atmospheric input was assessed by annual fluxes. The profile of dry particulate deposition, wet deposition and gas exchange fluxes seemed to be correlated with individual pollutant's properties such as molecular weight and Henry's law constant, etc. For the water column partitioning, the organic carbon-normalized partition coefficients between particulate and dissolved phases (KOC for both PAHs and OCPs were obtained. The relationships between KOC of PAHs and OCPs and their respective octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW were examined. In addition, both adsorption onto combustion-derived soot carbon and absorption into natural organic matter for PAHs in marine water column were investigated. Enrichment factors in the sea-surface microlayer (SML of the particulate phase were 1.2

  13. Organoclays as soil amendments to increase the efficacy and reduce the environmental impact of the herbicide fluometuron in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámiz, Beatriz; Celis, Rafael; Hermosín, María C; Cornejo, Juan

    2010-07-14

    The use of pesticides in agriculture has become a source of pollution of soil and water in the last decades. Extensive pesticide transport losses due to leaching and runoff produce nonpoint source contamination of soils and water. One of the soil processes that reduce pesticide transport losses is adsorption by soil particles; therefore, enhancement of pesticide retention by soil can be used as a strategy to attenuate the environmental impact of pesticides. In this work, organoclays were prepared by treating Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) and Arizona montmorillonite (SAz-1) with different organic cations and were assayed as soil amendments to enhance the retention and reduce the leaching losses of the herbicide fluometuron [N,N-dimethyl-N'-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] urea] in soils. Two agricultural soils from Southern Spain were selected for being high-risk scenarios of ground and surface water contamination. First, a batch adsorption study was conducted to identify organoclays with high affinity for fluometuron. Among the different organoclays assayed, spermine-treated Wyoming montmorillonite (SW-SPERM) displayed high and reversible adsorption of fluometuron and was selected as an amendment for subsequent persistence, leaching, and herbicidal activity experiments of fluometuron with unamended and amended soils. Amendment of the soils with SW-SPERM at rates of 1%, 2%, and 5% greatly enhanced fluometuron retention by the soils and retarded fluometuron leaching through soil columns. Incubation experiments revealed that the persistence of the herbicide in the amended soils was similar to that in unamended soils and that most of the herbicide was ultimately available for degradation. Bioassays demonstrated that the reduced leaching losses of fluometuron in soils amended with SW-SPERM may result in increased herbicide efficacy if heavy rainfall events occur shortly after herbicide application.

  14. Exposures of 129 Preschool Children to Organochlorines, Organophosphates, Pyrethroids, and Acid Herbicides at Their Homes and Daycares in North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha K. Morgan; Wilson, Nancy K.; Chuang, Jane C.

    2014-01-01

    Few data exist on the concurrent exposures of young children to past-use and current-use pesticides in their everyday environments. In this further analysis of study data, we quantified the potential exposures and intake doses of 129 preschool children, ages 20 to 66 months, to 16 pesticides (eight organochlorines, two organophosphates, three pyrethroids, and three acid herbicides). Environmental samples (soil, dust, outdoor air, and indoor air) and personal samples (hand wipes, solid food,...

  15. The removal of chlorophenoxy herbicides from drinking water by activated carbon adsorption and liquid core microcapsule perstraction

    OpenAIRE

    Engels, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Drinking water quality reports have highlighted a persistent trend in pesticide detection in the Republic of Ireland. One of the main concerns of the drinking water industry is that consistent pesticide removal rates do not occur despite the existence of activated carbon (AC) treatment regimes in most plants. The present work examines the removal of three chlorophenoxy herbicides (MCPA, 2,4-D and dichlorprop) from aqueous solutions by AC adsorption and a novel liquid-core microcapsule perstra...

  16. Controlled Release Formulations of Auxinic Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Witold J.; Siłowiecki, Andrzej.; Romanowska, Iwona; Glazek, Mariola; Bajor, Justyna; Cieciwa, Katarzyna; Rychter, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Controlled release formulations are applied extensively for the release of active ingredients such as plant protection agents and fertilizers in response to growing concern for ecological problems associated with increased use of plant protection chemicals required for intensive agricultural practices [1]. We synthesized oligomeric mixtures of (R,S)-3-hydroxy butyric acid chemically bonded with 2,4-D, Dicamba and MCPA herbicides (HBA) respectively, and determined their molecular structure and molecular weight dispersion by the size exclusion chromatography, proton magnetic resonance spectrometry and electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Further we carried out bioassays of herbicidal effectiveness of the HBA herbicides vs. series of dicotyledonous weeds and crop injury tests [2, 3, 4]. Field bioassays were accomplished according to the EPPO standards [5]. Groups of representative weeds (the development stages in the BCCH scale: 10 - 30) were selected as targets. Statistical variabilities were assessed by the Fisher LSD test for plants treated with the studied herbicides in form of HBA oligomers, the reference herbicides in form of dimethyl ammonium salts (DMA), and untreated plants. No statistically significant differences in the crop injuries caused by the HBA vs. the DMA reference formulation were observed. The effectiveness of the HBA herbicides was lower through the initial period (ca. 2 weeks) relative to the DMA salts, but a significant increase in the effectiveness of the HBA systems followed during the remaining fraction of each assay. After 6 weeks all observed efficiencies approached 100%. The death of weeds treated with the HBA herbicides was delayed when compared with the DMA reference herbicides. The delayed uptake observed for the HBA oligomers relative to the DMA salts was due to controlled release phenomena. In case of the DMA salts the total amount of active ingredients was available at the target site. By contrast, the amount of an active

  17. Microevolution of ALS inhibitor herbicide resistance in loose silky bentgrass (Apera spica-venti)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babineau, Marielle

    . The genetic mechanisms of herbicide resistance remain tentative in this species. Chemical control has become a less viable solution in view of multiple resistance and stricter legislation to reduce pesticide use. A better understanding of the evolutionary processes involved in the early development......, the ALS resistant biotypes have a fitness advantage over the susceptible biotype in time to germination and time to flowering and seed production growth stages. This study increased the understanding of the spatial, phenotypic, genetic and ecological processes and consequences in ALS herbicide resistance...

  18. Use of genetically modified crops and pesticides in Brazil: growing hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Eduardo Soares de Almeida

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetically modified (GM crops were officially authorized in Brazil in 2003. In this documentary study, we aimed to identify possible changes in the patterns of pesticide use after the adoption of this technology over a span of 13 years (2000 to 2012. The following variables were analyzed: Pesticide use (kg, Pesticide use per capita (kg/inhab, Pesticide and herbicide use per area (kg/ha and productivity (kg/ha. Contrary to the initial expectations of decreasing pesticide use following the adoption of GM crops, overall pesticide use in Brazil increased 1.6-fold between the years 2000 and 2012. During the same period, pesticide use for soybean increased 3-fold. This study shows that the adoption of GM crops in Brazil has led to an increase in pesticide use with possible increases in environmental and human exposure and associated negative impacts.

  19. Contribution of waste water treatment plants to pesticide toxicity in agriculture catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trong Dieu Hien; Scharmüller, Andreas; Kattwinkel, Mira; Kühne, Ralph; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2017-11-01

    Pesticide residues are frequently found in water bodies and may threaten freshwater ecosystems and biodiversity. In addition to runoff or leaching from treated agricultural fields, pesticides may enter streams via effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We compared the pesticide toxicity in terms of log maximum Toxic Unit (log mTU) of sampling sites in small agricultural streams of Germany with and without WWTPs in the upstream catchments. We found an approximately half log unit higher pesticide toxicity for sampling sites with WWTPs (p pesticide toxicity in streams with WWTPs. A few compounds (diuron, terbuthylazin, isoproturon, terbutryn and Metazachlor) dominated the herbicide toxicity. Pesticide toxicity was not correlated with upstream distance to WWTP (Spearman's rank correlation, rho = - 0.11, p > 0.05) suggesting that other context variables are more important to explain WWTP-driven pesticide toxicity. Our results suggest that WWTPs contribute to pesticide toxicity in German streams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Economic and policy issues of U.S. agricultural pesticide use trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Craig D; Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge

    2013-09-01

    This paper discusses U.S. agricultural pesticide use trends from 1964 to 2010 based on estimates developed from USDA surveys, and the influence of economic factors, agricultural policy, and pesticide regulation on aggregate quantities and mix of pesticides used. Synthetic organic pesticide use grew dramatically from the 1960s to the early 1980s, as farmers treated more and more acreage. Use then stabilized, with herbicides applied to about 95% of corn, cotton, and soybean acres, annually. Subsequently, major factors affecting trends were: (1) changes in crop acreage and other economic factors, (2) use of new pesticides that reduced per-acre application rates and/or met more rigorous health and environmental standards, and (3) adoption of genetically engineered insect-resistant and herbicide-tolerant crops. The use of pesticides and other control practices responded to economic factors such as input and output markets and agricultural policies. Changing societal values toward pesticide risks and benefits profoundly affected pesticide policy, influencing the pesticides available for use, but only indirectly affecting aggregate quantities used. While the current pesticide regulatory process might have economic inefficiencies, it might be consistent with policy preferences held by much of the public-to reduce pesticide hazards rather than minimize regulatory costs. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Evaluating non-equilibrum herbicides transport in undisturbed grassed buffer strips soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Cordon, M J; Yra, A; Pot, V; Benoit, P

    2003-01-01

    Possible contamination of water resources by applied pesticides (including insecticides and herbicides) is a problem currently. Grassed buffer strips have been considered to limit pesticide transfer to surface waters by reducing run-off and erosion. As reduction of run-off mainly involves infiltration in the grassed strip soils, possibility of groundwater contamination by rapid transfer of pesticides via the numerous root channels and macropores presents in grassed soils can not be excluded so far. The beneficial impact of high pesticide retention in the superficial horizons of these soils, related to their high organic matter content, could therefore be strongly reduced by the occurrence of preferential flows. Displacement studies on leaching of bromide (water tracer) and two herbicides, metribuzin (weakly adsorbed) and isoproturon (moderately adsorbed) were conducted in two undisturbed soil columns (length 30 cm, diameter 14 cm) collected from La Jaillière (Loire Atlantique, France) under non saturated conditions. The infiltration fluxes, delivered through a rainfall simulator, were 1.5 and 3 mm/h for one of the columns and 0.6, 1.5 and 3 mm/h for the second column. We obtained asymmetrical shapes of the breakthrough curves, with early breakthrough and increased tailing, qualitatively indicating the presence of preferential flow and confirming the risk of pesticide vertical transport through grassed strips superficial soil horizons. The results showed that leaching of both herbicides increased with the intensity of rainfall applied. This could be explained by a decrease of herbicides sorption due to a lower residence time in the soil.

  2. Pesticide runoff from greenhouse production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseth, Roger; Haarstad, Ketil

    2010-01-01

    A research has been undertaken studying pesticide residues in water from greenhouses and the use of soils and filter materials to reduce such losses. The pesticides detected in water samples collected downstream greenhouses include 9 fungicides, 5 herbicides and 4 insecticides. 10 compounds from flower and vegetable productions were frequently found to exceed environmental risk levels, and with a few exceptions the compounds were found in higher concentrations than those typically found in agricultural runoff. Some compounds were found in high concentrations (>1 microg/l) in undiluted runoff from greenhouses producing vegetables. Nutrient concentrations in the runoff were also sporadically very high, with phosphorous values varying between 0.85 and 7.4 mg P/l, and nitrogen values between 7.5 and 41.4 mg N/l. Undiluted runoff from the productions showed values of 60 mg P/l and 300 mg N/l. High values of pesticides correlated with high values of nutrients, especially P. Column experiments using a sandy agricultural soil and stock solutions of non-polar and slightly polar pesticides mixed with a complex binder and nutrients showed a significant reduction for nearly all of the compounds used, indicating that transport through soil will reduce the concentrations of the studied pesticides. The pesticide adsorption capacity of the filter materials pine bark, peat, Sphagnum moss, compost, oat straw, ferrous sand and clay soil were tested in batch and column experiments. Adsorption were studied contacting the filter materials with aqueous solutions containing greenhouse production pesticides. The batch experiments showed that pine bark and peat, both combining a high content of organic matter with a low ph, provided the highest adsorption for most of the tested pesticides. Sphagnum moss, compost and oat straw also showed high adsorption for most of the pesticides, while the mineral filters provided the lowest adsorption (30-55%). Further column experiments confirmed these

  3. Evaluation of the Pollution of surface waters in the basin of west Algeria by Organo chlorine and Organophosphorus pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjel, M.; Berkok, N.

    2009-07-01

    The pollutants are pesticides which cover a whole range of chemicals designed to protect plants from pests and destroy unwanted plants. There are a very large number of pesticides and we do here that some of the major families (organo chlorine insecticides, organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, phenylcyclohexyl, herbicides. (Author)

  4. Are herbicides a once in a century method of weed control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Adam S; Frisvold, George B

    2017-11-01

    The efficacy of any pesticide is an exhaustible resource that can be depleted over time. For decades, the dominant paradigm - that weed mobility is low relative to insect pests and pathogens, that there is an ample stream of new weed control technologies in the commercial pipeline, and that technology suppliers have sufficient economic incentives and market power to delay resistance - supported a laissez faire approach to herbicide resistance management. Earlier market data bolstered the belief that private incentives and voluntary actions were sufficient to manage resistance. Yet, there has been a steady growth in resistant weeds, while no new commercial herbicide modes of action (MOAs) have been discovered in 30 years. Industry has introduced new herbicide tolerant crops to increase the applicability of older MOAs. Yet, many weed species are already resistant to these compounds. Recent trends suggest a paradigm shift whereby herbicide resistance may impose greater costs to farmers, the environment, and taxpayers than earlier believed. In developed countries, herbicides have been the dominant method of weed control for half a century. Over the next half-century, will widespread resistance to multiple MOAs render herbicides obsolete for many major cropping systems? We suggest it would be prudent to consider the implications of such a low-probability, but high-cost development. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Emerging pesticide metabolites in groundwater and surface water as determined by the application of a multimethod for 150 pesticide metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reemtsma, Thorsten; Alder, Lutz; Banasiak, Ursula

    2013-10-01

    A recently developed multimethod for the determination of 150 pesticide metabolites was exemplarily applied to 58 samples of groundwater and surface water. 37 of these metabolites were detected in at least two samples with a concentration ≥0.025 μg/L. The detected metabolites were ranked according to their concentration and frequency of detection. Findings are clearly dominated by metabolites of chloroacetanilide herbicides, but metabolites of sulfonylurea and thiocarbamate herbicides and other herbicides (dichlobenil) together with metabolites of some fungicides (tolylfluanid, chlorothalonil, trifloxystrobin) were also prominent. A number of 17 of the ranked metabolites are denoted as emerging metabolites because no reports on their previous detection in groundwater or surface water were found. Most of them, however, were correctly predicted to occur in the summary reports of the European pesticide approval process. Median total concentrations of the analysed pesticide metabolites summed up to 0.62 μg/L in groundwater and 0.33 μg/L in surface waters. While the concentration of the individual metabolites is usually low (<0.1 μg/L) the diversity of metabolites found in one sample can be large; between two and six metabolites were detected most frequently (maximum of 12 metabolites). Runoff from urban surfaces was investigated in this study and also here previously undetected pesticide (biocide) metabolites were detected. The emerging pesticide metabolites detected in environmental water samples in this study require more extended monitoring. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pesticide Chemical Research in Toxicology: Lessons from Nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, John E; Durkin, Kathleen A

    2017-01-17

    Pesticide researchers are students of nature, and each new compound and mechanism turns a page in the ever-expanding encyclopedia of life. Pesticides are both probes to learn about life processes and tools for pest management to facilitate food production and enhance health. In contrast to some household and industrial chemicals, pesticides are assumed to be hazardous to health and the environment until proven otherwise. About a thousand current pesticides working by more than 100 different mechanisms have helped understand many processes and coupled events. Pesticide chemical research is a major source of toxicology information on new natural products, novel targets or modes of action, resistance mechanisms, xenobiotic metabolism, selective toxicity, safety evaluations, and recommendations for safe and effective pest management. Target binding site models help define the effect of substituent changes and predict modifications for enhanced potency and safety and circumvention of resistance. The contribution of pesticide chemical research in toxicology is illustrated here with two each of the newer or most important insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides. The insecticides are imidacloprid and chlorantraniliprole acting on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the ryanodine receptor Ca2+ channel, respectively. The herbicides are glyphosate that inhibits aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and mesotrione that prevents plastoquinone and carotenoid formation. The fungicides are azoxystrobin inhibiting the Qo site of the cytochrome bc1 complex and prothioconazole inhibiting the 14α-demethylase in ergosterol biosynthesis. The two target sites involved for each type of pesticide account for 27-40% of worldwide sales for all insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides. In each case, selection for resistance involving a single amino acid change in the binding site or detoxifying enzyme circumvents the pesticide chemists's structure optimization and guarantees survival of the

  7. Evaluation and guidelines for using polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers in double-dome chambers to assess semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in non-industrial indoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlin, Pernilla; Audy, Ondřej; Škrdlíková, Lenka; Kukučka, Petr; Vojta, Šimon; Přibylová, Petra; Prokeš, Roman; Čupr, Pavel; Klánová, Jana

    2014-11-01

    Indoor air pollution has been recognized as an important risk factor for human health, especially in areas where people tend to spend most of their time indoors. Many semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have primarily indoor sources and are present in orders of magnitude higher concentrations indoors than outdoors. Despite this, awareness of SVOCs in indoor air and assessment of the link between indoor concentrations and human health have lagged behind those of outdoor air. This is partially related to challenges associated with indoor sampling of SVOCs. Passive air samplers (PASs), which are widely accepted in established outdoor air monitoring networks, have been used to fill the knowledge gaps on indoor SVOCs distribution. However, their applicability for indoor environments and the assessment of human health risks lack sufficient experimental data. To address this issue, we performed an indoor calibration study of polyurethane foam (PUF) PAS deployed in a double-dome chamber, covering both legacy and new SVOC classes. PUF-PAS and a continuous low-volume active air sampler (AAS) were co-deployed for a calibration period of twelve weeks. Based on the results from this evaluation, PUF-PAS in a double-bowl chamber is recommended for indoor sampling and health risk assessment of gas phase SVOCs, including novel brominated flame retardants (nBFR) providing sufficient exposure time is applied. Data for particle associated SVOCs suffered from significant uncertainties caused by low level of detection and low precision in this study. A more open chamber design for indoor studies may allow for higher sampling rates (RS) and better performance for the particle associated SVOCs.

  8. Pesticide Reevaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the process for periodically evaluating registered pesticides to ensure they meet current science standards for risk assessment, as required by the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act.

  9. Non-target effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on Common toad larvae (Bufo bufo, Amphibia) and associated algae are altered by temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Baier, Fabian; Gruber, Edith; Hein, Thomas; Bondar-Kunze, Elisabeth; Ivankovi?, Marina; Mentler, Axel; Br?hl, Carsten A.; Spangl, Bernhard; Zaller, Johann G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Glyphosate-based herbicides are the most widely used pesticides in agriculture, horticulture, municipalities and private gardens that can potentially contaminate nearby water bodies inhabited by amphibians and algae. Moreover, the development and diversity of these aquatic organisms could also be affected by human-induced climate change that might lead to more periods with extreme temperatures. However, to what extent non-target effects of these herbicides on amphibians or algae ar...

  10. Pesticide Worker Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protect people who work with pesticides and in pesticide-treated areas; educate medical personnel and the public about recognizing and treating pesticide-related illnesses; promote safe use of pesticides.

  11. Pesticide use and risk of end-stage renal disease among licensed pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebov, Jill F; Engel, Lawrence S; Richardson, David; Hogan, Susan L; Hoppin, Jane A; Sandler, Dale P

    2016-01-01

    Experimental studies suggest a relationship between pesticide exposure and renal impairment, but epidemiological evidence is limited. We evaluated the association between exposure to 39 specific pesticides and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) incidence in the Agricultural Health Study, a prospective cohort study of licensed pesticide applicators in Iowa and North Carolina. Via linkage to the US Renal Data System, we identified 320 ESRD cases diagnosed between enrolment (1993-1997) and December 2011 among 55 580 male licensed pesticide applicators. Participants provided information on use of pesticides via self-administered questionnaires. Lifetime pesticide use was defined as the product of duration and frequency of use and then modified by an intensity factor to account for differences in pesticide application practices. Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age and state, were used to estimate associations between ESRD and: (1) ordinal categories of intensity-weighted lifetime use of 39 pesticides, (2) poisoning and high-level pesticide exposures and (3) pesticide exposure resulting in a medical visit or hospitalisation. Positive exposure-response trends were observed for the herbicides alachlor, atrazine, metolachlor, paraquat, and pendimethalin, and the insecticide permethrin. More than one medical visit due to pesticide use (HR=2.13; 95% CI 1.17 to 3.89) and hospitalisation due to pesticide use (HR=3.05; 95% CI 1.67 to 5.58) were significantly associated with ESRD. Our findings support an association between ESRD and chronic exposure to specific pesticides, and suggest pesticide exposures resulting in medical visits may increase the risk of ESRD. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00352924. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Extraction and detection of pesticide residues from air filter inserts using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemanian, T.S.; Robins, W.H.; Lee, R.N.; Wright, B.W.

    1994-10-01

    Trace quantities of airborne herbicide residues were collected on adsorbent bed cartridges and were subsequently extracted from the adsorbent using supercritical carbon dioxide. An apparatus was constructed to facilitate the extraction and recovery of the desired analytes. The resulting extracts were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) or high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques. Results are presented for a series of analytes representative of common commercial pesticides or herbicides.

  13. Farm-scale evaluation of the impacts of transgenic cotton on biodiversity, pesticide use, and yield

    OpenAIRE

    Cattaneo, Manda G.; Yafuso, Christine; Schmidt, Chris; Huang, Cho-ying; Rahman, Magfurar; Olson, Carl; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Orr,Barron J.; Marsh, Stuart E.; Antilla, Larry; Dutilleul, Pierre; Carrière, Yves

    2006-01-01

    Higher yields and reduced pesticide impacts are needed to mitigate the effects of agricultural intensification. A 2-year farm-scale evaluation of 81 commercial fields in Arizona show that use of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton reduced insecticide use, whereas transgenic cotton with Bt protein and herbicide resistance (BtHr) did not affect herbicide use. Transgenic cotton had higher yield than nontransgenic cotton for any given number of insecticide applications. However, nontran...

  14. Chemoproteomic Profiling of Acetanilide Herbicides Reveals Their Role in Inhibiting Fatty Acid Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counihan, Jessica L; Duckering, Megan; Dalvie, Esha; Ku, Wan-Min; Bateman, Leslie A; Fisher, Karl J; Nomura, Daniel K

    2017-03-17

    Acetanilide herbicides are among the most widely used pesticides in the United States, but their toxicological potential and mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we have used chemoproteomic platforms to map proteome-wide cysteine reactivity of acetochlor (AC), the most widely used acetanilide herbicide, in vivo in mice. We show that AC directly reacts with >20 protein targets in vivo in mouse liver, including the catalytic cysteines of several thiolase enzymes involved in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. We show that the fatty acids that are not oxidized, due to impaired fatty acid oxidation, are instead diverted into other lipid pathways, resulting in heightened free fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesteryl esters, and other lipid species in the liver. Our findings show the utility of chemoproteomic approaches for identifying novel mechanisms of toxicity associated with environmental chemicals like acetanilide herbicides.

  15. Identification and ecotoxicity of degradation products of chloroacetamide herbicides from UV-treatment of water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souissi, Yasmine; Bouchonnet, Stéphane; Bourcier, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    waters. In this study the formation of degradation products from ultraviolet (UV) treatment of the three chloroacetamide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor and metolachlor and their biological effects were investigated. UV treatment is mainly used for disinfection in water and wastewater treatments. First...... photoproducts formed by UV-treatment until 90% of the original pesticide was converted was compared to the toxicity of chloroacetamides using the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, the crustacean Daphnia magna and the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri as test organisms. UV-treatment of alachlor......The widespread occurrence of chlorinated herbicides and their degradation products in the aquatic environment raises health and environmental concerns. As a consequence pesticides, and to a lesser degree their degradation products, are monitored by authorities both in surface waters and drinking...

  16. Strains of the soil fungus Mortierella show different degradation potentials for the phenylurea herbicide diuron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard-Jensen, Lea; Aamand, Jens; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2013-01-01

    Microbial pesticide degradation studies have until now mainly focused on bacteria, although fungi have also been shown to degrade pesticides. In this study we clarify the background for the ability of the common soil fungus Mortierella to degrade the phenylurea herbicide diuron. Diuron degradation....... Degradation of diuron was fastest in carbon and nitrogen rich media while suboptimal nutrient levels restricted degradation, making it unlikely that Mortierella utilize diuron as carbon or nitrogen sources. Degradation kinetics showed that diuron degradation was followed by formation of the metabolites 1...

  17. Pesticides and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of pesticides Disponible en español Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides have a specific purpose in society. Pesticides are ... aging populations may be more sensitive to the effects of pesticides than others. To reduce the risk of health problems from pesticides there are several things you ...

  18. Genetically engineered crops and pesticide use in U.S. maize and soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Edward D; Ciliberto, Federico; Hennessy, David A; Moschini, GianCarlo

    2016-08-01

    The widespread adoption of genetically engineered (GE) crops has clearly led to changes in pesticide use, but the nature and extent of these impacts remain open questions. We study this issue with a unique, large, and representative sample of plot-level choices made by U.S. maize and soybean farmers from 1998 to 2011. On average, adopters of GE glyphosate-tolerant (GT) soybeans used 28% (0.30 kg/ha) more herbicide than nonadopters, adopters of GT maize used 1.2% (0.03 kg/ha) less herbicide than nonadopters, and adopters of GE insect-resistant (IR) maize used 11.2% (0.013 kg/ha) less insecticide than nonadopters. When pesticides are weighted by the environmental impact quotient, however, we find that (relative to nonadopters) GE adopters used about the same amount of soybean herbicides, 9.8% less of maize herbicides, and 10.4% less of maize insecticides. In addition, the results indicate that the difference in pesticide use between GE and non-GE adopters has changed significantly over time. For both soybean and maize, GT adopters used increasingly more herbicides relative to nonadopters, whereas adopters of IR maize used increasingly less insecticides. The estimated pattern of change in herbicide use over time is consistent with the emergence of glyphosate weed resistance.

  19. Photostabilization of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides MCPA and Mecoprop by Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Cátia; Maia, Sílvia; Silva, Paulo; Garrido, Jorge; Borges, Fernanda; Garrido, E. Manuela

    2013-01-01

    New strategies to reduce the environmental and economic costs of pesticides use are currently under study. Microencapsulation has been used as a versatile tool for the production of controlled release agricultural formulations. In this study, the photochemical degradation of the herbicides MCPA and mecoprop has been investigated in different aqueous media such as ultrapure and river water under simulated solar irradiation. To explore the possibility of introducing cyclodextrins in the herbici...

  20. Biodegradation of glyphosate herbicide by Salinicoccus spp isolated from Qom Hoze-soltan lake, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Yaser Sharifi; Ahmad Ali Pourbabaei; Ali Javadi; Mohammad Hossein Abdolmohammadi; Mehri Saffari; Abbas Morovvati

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl Glycine) is an organophosphorus pesticide with dangerous effects on the environment. In this study, the biodegradation of glyphosate herbicide by halophilic bacteria isolated from Qom Hoze-Soltan Lake has been investigated. Methods: After sampling and bacterial isolation, native halophilic strains grown in the presence of glyphosate at a wavelength of 660 nm and also the disappearance of the glyphosate in the plates at a wavelength of 220 nm were d...

  1. Biochar Soil Additions Affect Herbicide Fate: Importance of Application Timing and Feedstock Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámiz, Beatriz; Velarde, Pilar; Spokas, Kurt A; Hermosín, M Carmen; Cox, Lucía

    2017-04-19

    Biochar (BC), solid biomass subjected to pyrolysis, can alter the fate of pesticides in soil. We investigated the effect of soil amendment with several biochars on the efficacy of two herbicides, clomazone (CMZ) and bispyribac sodium (BYP). To this aim, we evaluated CMZ and BYP sorption, persistence, and leaching in biochar-amended soil. Sorption of CMZ and BYP was greater in soil amended with BC produced at high temperature (700 °C). Significant sorption of the neutral CMZ herbicide also occurred in amended soil with BC prepared at low temperature (350 and 500 °C). For both herbicides, desorption possessed higher hysteretic behavior in soil amended with BC made at 700 °C (pyrolysis temperature). Dissipation of CMZ was enhanced after addition of BCs to soil, but no correlation between persistence and sorption was observed. Persistence of BYP was up to 3 times greater when BC made at 700 °C was added to soil. All BCs suppressed the leaching of CMZ and BYP as compared to the unamended soil. Amendment with 700 °C BC inhibited the action of CMZ against weeds, but 350 and 500 °C BCs had no such effect when added to soil. BYP activity was similar to that exhibited by unamended soil after the addition of 700 °C BC. From these results, biochar amendments can be a successful strategy to reduce the environmental impact of CMZ and BYP in soil. However, the phytotoxicity of soil-applied herbicides will depend on BC sorption characteristics and the pesticide's chemical properties, as well as the pesticide application timing (e.g., pre- or postemergence). According to our results, proper biochar screening with intended pesticides in light of the application mode (pre- or postemergence) is required prior to use to ensure adequate efficacy.

  2. The inhibition of myometrial contractions by chlorinated herbicides (atrazine and linuron), and their disruptive effect on the secretory functions of uterine and ovarian cells in cow, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Michał H; Mlynarczuk, Jaroslaw

    2017-10-01

    The effect of atrazine and linuron, the popular and widely used chlorinated herbicides, on both myometrial contractions and secretory functions of bovine uterus and ovaries in vitro, was investigated. The pesticides inhibited (Pcontractions, as well as the effect of OT on secretion of prostaglandins (PGs: PGF2α and PGE2) from endometrium. But only linuron inhibits the effect of OT on myometrial contractions. Neither of herbicides affected PGs secretion from myometrium and PGF2α from endometrium. Only the lowest dose of both tested compounds decreased PGE2 secretion from endometrium. The pesticides increased (Pcontractions in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. US EPA, Pesticide Product Label, BICEP HERBICIDE, 06/17 ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... r~ilr~n S;':U!'i!"f t"!('nj r)r ?I-''jt.t l.~ttory ~1,:'nJ~;r'r: ~TD~-~~TGV ~"rpnr~tion ~lJr ie;l] t.~} retl 1); \\'j ~:'on p • (t. ~1 (1 ~\\ l;- -. f} n ~'jcr-p ,1.r:.r. ~!crbir-i,l:. ...

  4. Effect of green manure amendment on herbicide pendimethalin on soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ching; Hsu, Fang-Yu; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2018-01-02

    Manure amendment in agricultural practice can have a large effect on herbicide dissipation because the period of manure plowing is close to the period of herbicide application. In addition, manure amendment is among the frequently encountered options in ameliorating pesticide pollution. In this research, the dissipation of the herbicide pendimethalin was examined after amendment with two common green manures, Lupinus luteus (L) or Cosmos bipinnatus (C), for 110 days in pH 5.2 and 7.7 soils (Sankengtzu [Sk] and Erhlin [Eh] soil, respectively). The microbial activity and ecology changes were examined by using Biolog EcoPlate and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). In Sk soil, the half-lives of pendimethalin with L, C, and blank treatment were 49.0, 54.9, and 62.2 days, respectively, whereas that in Eh soil they were 46.3, 52.6, and 34.8 days, respectively. Pendimethalin dissipated quickly in more neutral soil (Eh soil), but the addition of manure can only increase the dissipation rate in acidic soil (Sk soil), indicating that the amendment of manures exerted different effect in pendimethalin dissipation rates in different pH soils. The application of pendimethalin and/or manure altered the microbial community activity after 24 h of incubation. After 110 days, the microbial community activities in green manure-amended soil were more similar to that with blank than pendimethalin treatment in both types of soils. In comparison with treatment C, microbial communities were more similar between treatment L and blank, indicating the superior effect over pendimethalin on microbial communities when applying Lupinus luteus. The research showed that the application of herbicide pendimethalin changed soil microbial community, and the amendment of manures exerted different effect in pendimethalin dissipation rates in different pH soils. It is assumed that the change in dissipation rates was originated from the microbial community change after different manure

  5. Effects of pesticide formulations and active ingredients on the coelenterate Hydra attenuata (Pallas, 1766).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrio, Pablo M; Bulus Rossini, Gustavo D; Bonetto, Carlos A; Ronco, Alicia E

    2012-01-01

    Lethal effects of active ingredients and formulations of widely used soybean pesticides were assessed with the Hydra attenuata toxicity test. Studied pesticides were insecticides chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin, and herbicide glyphosate. Results indicate the following toxicity trend: chlorpyrifos > cypermethrin > glyphosate. Tested active ingredients of insecticides and respective formulations did not significantly differ between them. Glyphosate formulation exhibited higher toxicity at low concentrations (LC(1-10)) respect to active ingredient, reversing this behavior at higher concentrations (LC(50-90)). Comparing H. attenuata sensitivity with existent toxicity data for aquatic organisms indicates that this species is poorly sensitive to tested insecticides and highly sensitive to the herbicide.

  6. The significance of entry routes as point and non-point sources of pesticides in small streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Michael; Schulz, Ralf; Schäfer, Karin; Müller, Wolfgang; Mannheller, Wilfried; Liess, Matthias

    2002-02-01

    In an agricultural catchment area in Germany we analyzed water samples from five entry routes for 2 insecticides. 5 fungicides and 13 herbicides. The sewage plant outlet and the emergency overflow of a sewage sewer contained only herbicides. In each farmyard runoff we found on average 24 g pesticides during application period, presumably caused by cleaning the spraying equipment. In comparison, the field runoff and the rainwater sewer contained less load, but also insecticides, fungicides and herbicides. The sewage plant caused 65.9% of the total herbicide load, the sewage sewer 19.8% and the farmyard runoff 12.8%. The farmyards also caused 83.7% of total insecticide and 83.8% of fungicide load. The total load of all entry routes is correlated with the amount of pesticides applied in the catchment area and the Ko/w value for each pesticide (mult. regress. r2: 0.82; p<0.0001; n = 14). In stream A the sewage plant caused a slight but continuous contamination by herbicides with 82% of the total load found during low-water phases. In comparison, stream B had only farmyard runoff and non-point sources, which caused high peaks of herbicide and a contamination by insecticides. Consequently, high-water phases generated 70% of the total pesticide load.

  7. Sensor-based assessment of herbicide effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Streibig, Jens Carl; Rasmussen, Jesper; Andújar, D.

    2014-01-01

    Non-destructive assessment of herbicide effects may be able to support integrated weed management. To test whether effects of herbicides on canopy variables could be detected by sensors, two crops were used as models and treated with herbicides at BBCH 20 using a logarithmic sprayer. Twelve days ...

  8. Natural compounds with herbicidal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Montemurro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Research about phytotoxic activity of natural compounds could lead both to find new herbicidal active ingredients and to plan environmental friendly weed control strategies. Particularly, living organisms could be a source of compounds that are impossible, for their complexity, to synthesize artificially. More over, they could have alternative sites of action respect to the known chemical herbicides and, due to their origin, they should be more environmental safe. Many living organism, such as bacteria, fungi, insects, lichens and plants, are able to produce bioactive compounds. They generally are secondary metabolites or simply waste molecules. In this paper we make a review about these compounds, highlighting potential and constraints.

  9. Comparisons of Herbicide Treated and Cultivated Herbicide-Resistant Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Arnold Bruns

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Four glyphosate resistant corn (Zea mays L. hybrids, a glufosinate-ammonium resistant hybrid, and a conventional atrazine resistant hybrid gown at Stoneville, MS in 2005, 2006, and 2007 with furrow irrigation were treated with their respective herbicides and their growth, yield, and mycotoxin incidence were compared with untreated cultivated plots. Leaf area index (LAI and dry matter accumulation (DMA were collected on a weekly basis beginning at growth stage V3 and terminating at anthesis. Crop growth rates (CRGs and relative growth rates (RGRs were calculated. Plots were later harvested, yield and yield component data collected, and kernel samples analyzed for aflatoxin and fumonisin. Leaf area index, DMA, CRG, and RGR were not different among the herbicide treated plots and from those that were cultivated. Curves for LAI and DMA were similar to those previously reported. Aflatoxin and fumonisin were relatively low in all plots. Herbicide application or the lack thereof had no negative impact on the incidence of kernel contamination by these two mycotoxins. Herbicides, especially glyphosate on resistant hybrids, have no negative effects on corn yields or kernel quality in corn produced in a humid subtropical environment.

  10. Adsorption and degradation of four acidic herbicides in soils from southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Jaime; Kah, Melanie; Brown, Colin D

    2008-07-01

    Pesticide degradation and adsorption in soils are key processes determining whether pesticide use will have any impact on environmental quality. Pesticide degradation in soil generally results in a reduction in toxicity, but some pesticides have breakdown products that are more toxic than the parent compound. Adsorption to soil particles ensures that herbicide is retained in the place where its biological activity is expressed and also determines potential for transportation away from the site of action. Degradation and adsorption are complex processes, and shortcomings in understanding them still restrict the ability to predict the fate and behaviour of ionisable pesticides. This paper reports the sorption and degradation behaviour of four acidic pesticides in five soils from southern Spain. Results are used to investigate the influence of soil and pesticide properties on adsorption and degradation as well as the potential link between the two processes. Adsorption and degradation of four acidic pesticides were measured in four soils from Spain characterised by small organic matter (OM) contents (0.3-1.0%) and varying clay contents (3-66%). In general, sorption increased in the order dicamba soils were much larger than those in OM content, and therefore clay content was the main property determining the extent of herbicide adsorption for these soils. pH was negatively correlated with adsorption for all compounds apart from metsulfuron-methyl. A clear positive correlation was observed for degradation rate with clay and OM content (P degradation was found to be significantly correlated only with soil bioactivity (P soils were much larger than those in OM content, and therefore clay content was the main property determining the extent of herbicide adsorption for soils of this type. pH was negatively correlated with adsorption for all compounds apart from metsulfuron-methyl. The contrasting behaviour shown for these four acidic pesticides indicates that chemical

  11. Photostabilization of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides MCPA and Mecoprop by Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New strategies to reduce the environmental and economic costs of pesticides use are currently under study. Microencapsulation has been used as a versatile tool for the production of controlled release agricultural formulations. In this study, the photochemical degradation of the herbicides MCPA and mecoprop has been investigated in different aqueous media such as ultrapure and river water under simulated solar irradiation. To explore the possibility of introducing cyclodextrins in the herbicide formulations, the photodegradation study of the inclusion complexes of MCPA and mecoprop with (2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD was also performed. The half-lives of MCPA and mecoprop inclusion complexes were increased approximately by a factor of three related to the free molecules. Additionally, it has been shown that the photodegradation of MCPA and mecoprop is influenced by their structural features. The additional methyl group existing in mecoprop molecular structure has a positive influence on the stabilization of the radical intermediate formed in the first stage of photodegradation of both herbicides. The results found indicated that MCPA and mecoprop form inclusion complexes with HP-β-CD showing higher photostability compared to free herbicides indicating that HP-β-CD may serve as ingredient in these herbicide formulations.

  12. Biotechnology: herbicide-resistant crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are planted on about 80% of the land covered by transgenic crops. More than 90% of HR crios are glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, the others being resistant to glufosinate. The wide-scale adoption of HR crops, largely for economic reasons, has been the mos...

  13. Accumulation of pesticides in pacific chorus frogs (Pseudacris regilla) from California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Fellers, Gary M.; Kleeman, Patrick M.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides are receiving increasing attention as potential causes of amphibian declines, acting singly or in combination with other stressors, but limited information is available on the accumulation of current-use pesticides in tissue. The authors examined potential exposure and accumulation of currently used pesticides in pond-breeding frogs (Pseudacris regilla) collected from 7 high elevations sites in northern California. All sites sampled are located downwind of California's highly agricultural Central Valley and receive inputs of pesticides through precipitation and/or dry deposition. Whole frog tissue, water, and sediment were analyzed for more than 90 current-use pesticides and pesticide degradates using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Two fungicides, pyraclostrobin and tebuconazole, and one herbicide, simazine, were the most frequently detected pesticides in tissue samples. Median pesticide concentration ranged from 13 µg/kg to 235 µg/kg wet weight. Tebuconazole and pyraclostrobin were the only 2 compounds observed frequently in frog tissue and sediment. Significant spatial differences in tissue concentration were observed, which corresponded to pesticide use in the upwind counties. Data generated indicated that amphibians residing in remote locations are exposed to and capable of accumulating current-use pesticides. A comparison of P. regilla tissue concentrations with water and sediment data indicated that the frogs are accumulating pesticides and are potentially a more reliable indicator of exposure to this group of pesticides than either water or sediment.

  14. Accumulation of pesticides in Pacific chorus frogs (Pseudacris regilla) from California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L; Fellers, Gary M; Kleeman, Patrick M; Kuivila, Kathryn M

    2013-09-01

    Pesticides are receiving increasing attention as potential causes of amphibian declines, acting singly or in combination with other stressors, but limited information is available on the accumulation of current-use pesticides in tissue. The authors examined potential exposure and accumulation of currently used pesticides in pond-breeding frogs (Pseudacris regilla) collected from 7 high elevations sites in northern California. All sites sampled are located downwind of California's highly agricultural Central Valley and receive inputs of pesticides through precipitation and/or dry deposition. Whole frog tissue, water, and sediment were analyzed for more than 90 current-use pesticides and pesticide degradates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two fungicides, pyraclostrobin and tebuconazole, and one herbicide, simazine, were the most frequently detected pesticides in tissue samples. Median pesticide concentration ranged from 13 µg/kg to 235 µg/kg wet weight. Tebuconazole and pyraclostrobin were the only 2 compounds observed frequently in frog tissue and sediment. Significant spatial differences in tissue concentration were observed, which corresponded to pesticide use in the upwind counties. Data generated indicated that amphibians residing in remote locations are exposed to and capable of accumulating current-use pesticides. A comparison of P. regilla tissue concentrations with water and sediment data indicated that the frogs are accumulating pesticides and are potentially a more reliable indicator of exposure to this group of pesticides than either water or sediment. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  15. Biodegradable herbicide delivery systems with slow diffusion in soil and UV protection properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevillard, Anne; Angellier-Coussy, Hélène; Guillard, Valérie; Bertrand, Cédric; Gontard, Nathalie; Gastaldi, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    New herbicidal formulations were designed by combining wheat gluten (WG), two montmorillonites (MMTs) (unmodified and organically modified) and a model pesticide (ethofumesate), and their performances were assessed through an integrative study conducted in soil using an experimental methodology with data modelling. All the WG formulations tested were effective in decreasing the apparent diffusivity of ethofumesate in soil in comparison with the non-formulated active substance. The slow-release effect was significantly more pronounced in the presence of the organically modified MMT, confirming the importance of sorption mechanisms to reduce ethofumesate diffusion. The bioassays undertaken on watercress to evaluate herbicidal antigerminating performances showed that all the WG formulations (with or without MMT) were more effective than both the commercial formulation and the non-formulated ethofumesate, whatever the concentration tested. To explain such results, it was proposed that WG formulations would enable ethofumesate to be more available and thus more effective in inhibiting seed germination, as they would be less prone to be leached by water transport due to watering and also less subject to photodegradation. The use of pesticide formulations based on wheat gluten and nanoclays appeared to be a promising strategy both to reduce the mobility of pesticides in soil and to protect UV-photosensitive pesticides from photodegradation. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Fungal degradation of pesticides - construction of microbial consortia for bioremediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard-Jensen, Lea

    in groundwater contamination. New technologies are therefore needed for cleaning up contaminated soil and water resources. This PhD was part of the project entitled Microbial Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Resources (MIRESOWA) where the overall aim is to develop new technologies for bioremediation...... of pesticide contaminated soil and water. The objectives of this PhD were to investigate fungal degradation of pesticides and following to construct microbial consortia for bioremediation. In Manuscript I the fungal degradation of the phenylurea herbicide diuron was studied. Isolates of soil fungi of the genus...

  17. The behaviour of 39 pesticides in surface waters as a function of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, P.D.; Larson, S.J.; Winterstein, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    A portion of applied pesticides runs off agricultural fields and is transported through surface waters. In this study, the behaviour of 39 pesticides is examined as a function of scale across 14 orders of magnitude from the field to the ocean. Data on pesticide loads in streams from two US Geological Survey programs were combined with literature data from field and watershed studies. The annual load as percent of use (LAPU) was quantified for each of the fields and watersheds and was used as the normalization factor across watersheds and compounds. The in-stream losses of each pesticide were estimated for a model stream with a 15 day travel time (similar in characteristics to the upper Mississippi River). These estimated in-stream losses agreed well with the observed changes in apparent LAPU values as a function of watershed area. In general, herbicides applied to the soil surface had the greatest LAPU values and minimal in-stream losses. Soil-incorporated herbicides had smaller LAPU values and substantial in-stream losses. Insecticides generally had LAPU values similar to the incorporated herbicides, but had more variation in their in-stream losses. On the basis of the LAPU values of the 39 pesticides as a function of watershed area, a generalized conceptual model of the movement of pesticides from the field to the ocean is suggested. The importance of considering both field runoff and in-stream losses is discussed in relation to interpreting monitoring data and making regulatory decisions.

  18. Reporting Pesticide Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticides incidents must be reported by pesticide registrants. Others, such as members of the public and environmental professionals, would like to report pesticide incidents. This website will facilitate such incident reporting.

  19. Endangered Species: Pesticide Restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our goal is to protect threatened and endangered species and their habitats, without placing unnecessary burden on agriculture and pesticide users. Pesticide limitations are developed to ensure safe use of pesticides in order to meet this goal.

  20. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Mercurio

    Full Text Available Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR. The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities. Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1 so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated

  1. Sources, occurrence and predicted aquatic impact of legacy and contemporary pesticides in streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Rasmussen, Jes J.; Kronvang, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We couple current findings of pesticides in surface and groundwater to the history of pesticide usage, focusing on the potential contribution of legacy pesticides to the predicted ecotoxicological impact on benthic macroinvertebrates in headwater streams. Results suggest that groundwater......, in addition to precipitation and surface runoff, is an important source of pesticides (particularly legacy herbicides) entering surface water. In addition to current-use active ingredients, legacy pesticides, metabolites and impurities are important for explaining the estimated total toxicity attributable...... to pesticides. Sediment-bound insecticides were identified as the primary source for predicted ecotoxicity. Our results support recent studies indicating that highly sorbing chemicals contribute and even drive impacts on aquatic ecosystems. They further indicate that groundwater contaminated by legacy...

  2. Environmental fate of fungicides and other current-use pesticides in a central California estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Orlando, James L.; Phillips, Bryn M.; Anderson, Brian S.; Siegler, Katie; Hunt, John W.; Hamilton, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The current study documents the fate of current-use pesticides in an agriculturally-dominated central California coastal estuary by focusing on the occurrence in water, sediment and tissue of resident aquatic organisms. Three fungicides (azoxystrobin, boscalid, and pyraclostrobin), one herbicide (propyzamide) and two organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) were detected frequently. Dissolved pesticide concentrations in the estuary corresponded to the timing of application while bed sediment pesticide concentrations correlated with the distance from potential sources. Fungicides and insecticides were detected frequently in fish and invertebrates collected near the mouth of the estuary and the contaminant profiles differed from the sediment and water collected. This is the first study to document the occurrence of many current-use pesticides, including fungicides, in tissue. Limited information is available on the uptake, accumulation and effects of current-use pesticides on non-target organisms. Additional data are needed to understand the impacts of pesticides, especially in small agriculturally-dominated estuaries.

  3. Pesticide Interactions: Mechanisms, Benefits, and Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, John E

    2017-06-14

    Interactions between pesticides at common molecular targets and detoxification systems often determine their effectiveness and safety. Compounds with the same mode of action or target are candidates for cross resistance and restrictions in their recommended uses. Discovery research is therefore focused on new mechanisms and modes of action. Interactions in detoxification systems also provide cross resistance and synergist and safener mechanisms illustrated with serine hydrolases and inhibitors, cytochrome P450 and insecticide synergists, and glutathione S-transferases and herbicide safeners. Secondary targets are also considered for inhibitors of serine hydrolases, aldehyde dehydrogenases, and transporters. Emphasis is given to the mechanistic aspects of interactions, not the incidence, which depends on potency, exposure, ratios, and timing. The benefits of pesticide interactions are the additional levels of chemical control to achieve desired organismal effects. The risks are the unpredictable interactions of complex interconnected biological systems. However, with care, two can be better than one.

  4. Multiresidue method for trace pesticide analysis in honeybee wax comb by GC-QqQ-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M D Gil; Duque, S Uclés; Fernández, A B Lozano; Sosa, A; Fernández-Alba, A R

    2017-01-15

    The aim of this analytical study is to develop an improved multi-residue methodology of high sensitivity and expanded scope for pesticide residue analysis in honeybee wax combs. The method was validated for 160 pesticide residues (including acaricides, insecticides, fungicides and herbicides) gas chromatography amenable and covering a wide variety of polarity and chemical structure. This method of analysis applied gas chromatography coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for the quantitative analysis of pesticide residues. The extraction procedure applied was based QuEChERs method allowing acceptable recoveries for most of the pesticides (98%), within the range 60-120% with an associated precision (RSD) wax comb samples randomly collected from different apiaries in Spain. A total of 32 pesticide residues (14 insecticides/acaricides, 10 insecticides, 6 fungicides and 2 herbicides) were detected in the samples. The highest pesticide concentrations were found for those with insecticide-acaricide activity like acrinathrin, chlorfenvinphos, coumaphos and fluvalinate-tau, some of them are mainly applied in apiculture for controlling the honeybee parasite Varroa destructor. The total load of pesticide residues ranged from 69 to 1000µgkg(-1) for 40% of the analysed samples, 22% contained pesticide residues in the ranges of 1000-2000µgkg(-1), 24% between 2000 and 5000µgkg(-1) and 14% of the samples contained residues between 5000 and 9557µgkg(-1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Estimates of herbicide use for the 20 most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of herbicide use for the 20 most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in Gianessi and Puffer (1991)....

  6. Occurrence of pesticides in groundwater underlying areas of high-density row-crop production in Alabama, 2009-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Heather L.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries, sampled a network of 15 wells for up to 167 pesticides and pesticide degradates from 2009 through 2013 in three areas of high-density row-crop agriculture in Alabama. Eighteen herbicides, 2 fungicides, and 9 degradates were detected in water from the sampled wells. The highest concentration of a detected pesticide was 4.49 micrograms per liter of bentazon in Baldwin County, Alabama, which was well below the lifetime health advisory level of 200 micrograms per liter. None of the measured pesticide concentrations exceeded a human-health benchmark. Insecticides were not detected.

  7. Apply Pesticides Correctly, A Guide for Commercial Applicators: Right-of-Way Pest Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    This guide contains basic information to meet specific standards for pesticide applicators. The text is concerned with the recognition of weeds and methods of their control in rights-of-way. Different types of application equipment both airborne and ground are discussed with precautions for the safe and effective use of herbicides. (CS)

  8. GIS-BASED RISK ASSESSMENT OF PESTICIDE DRIFT CASE STUDY: FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes the potential risk of herbicide drift and accidentally damaging neighboring crops or surrounding native vegetation. This study is the first to use the California Pesticide Use Reporting database within a mapping framework (known as a Geographic Information S...

  9. 75 FR 69073 - Notice of Receipt of Requests To Voluntarily Cancel Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    .../ Insecticide. 053883-00093 Glyphosate Technical Glyphosate. 053883-00190 Permethrin .5% Multi- Permethrin.... 072155-00016 Glyphosate 2% RTU Glyphosate- Herbicide. isopropylammonium. 072155-00017 Prodiamine 0.26... continued use of the pesticide would pose an unreasonable adverse effect on the environment. The registrants...

  10. The legacy of pesticide pollution: An overlooked factor in current risk assessments of freshwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jes J; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Cedergreen, Nina; McKnight, Ursula S; Kreuger, Jenny; Jacobsen, Dean; Kristensen, Esben A; Friberg, Nikolai

    2015-11-01

    We revealed a history of legacy pesticides in water and sediment samples from 19 small streams across an agricultural landscape. Dominant legacy compounds included organochlorine pesticides, such as DDT and lindane, the organophosphate chlorpyrifos and triazine herbicides such as terbutylazine and simazine which have long been banned in the EU. The highest concentrations of legacy pesticides were found in streams draining catchments with a large proportion of arable farmland suggesting that they originated from past agricultural applications. The sum of toxic units (SumTUD.magna) based on storm water samples from agriculturally impacted streams was significantly higher when legacy pesticides were included compared to when they were omitted. Legacy pesticides did not significantly change the predicted toxicity of water samples to algae or fish. However, pesticide concentrations in bed sediment and suspended sediment samples exceeded safety thresholds in 50% of the samples and the average contribution of legacy pesticides to the SumTUC.riparius was >90%. Our results suggest that legacy pesticides can be highly significant contributors to the current toxic exposure of stream biota, especially macroinvertebrate communities, and that those communities were primarily exposed to legacy pesticides via the sediment. Additionally, our results suggest that neglecting legacy pesticides in the risk assessment of pesticides in streams may severely underestimate the risk of ecological effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF DIMETHYLAMINE VAPORS EMISSION: HERBICIDE PRODUCTION PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorana Arsenijević

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The widely used herbicide, dimethylamine salt of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D-DMA, is usually prepared by mixing a dimethylamine (DMA aqueous solution with a solid 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D. The vapors of the both, reactants and products, are potentially hazardous for the environment. The contribution of DMA vapors in overall pollution from this process is most significant, concerning vapor pressures data of these pollutants. Therefore, the control of the air pollution in the manufacture and handling of methylamines is very important. Within this paper, the optimal air pollution control system in preparation of 2,4-D-DMA was developed for the pesticides manufacturing industry. This study employed the simple pollution prevention concept to reduce the emission of DMA vapors at the source. The investigations were performed on the pilot plant scale. To reduce the emission of DMA vapors, the effluent gases from the herbicide preparation zone were passed through the packed bed scrubber (water - scrubbing medium, and the catalytic reactor in sequence. The end result is a substantially improved air quality in the working area, as well as in the urbanized areas located near the chemical plant.

  12. Pesticide Science and Assessing Pesticide Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA protects human health and the environment by evaluating the risk associated with pesticides before allowing them to be used in the United States. Learn about the tools and processes used in risk assessment for pesticides.

  13. Reduced herbicide rates: present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudsk, Per

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Applying herbicides at rates lower than the label recommendation has been the rule rather than the exception in Denmark since the late 1980’s. Justifications for reducing herbicide rates can be 1 that the dominant weed species in the field are very susceptible to the herbicide, i.e. even reduced rates will result in maximum effects, 2 that the conditions at and around the time of application, e.g. growth stage of weeds, crop vigour and climatic condition are optimum promoting the activity of the herbicide and thus allows for the use of reduced herbicides rates, or 3 that less than maximum effects are accepted because the weed flora is not considered to have a significant effect on crop yield. “Crop Protection Online-Weed” (CPO-Weed is a web-based decision support system that was developed to support farmers in their choice of herbicide and herbicide rate. CPOWeed will, based on information on crop development and status and the composition of the weed flora, provide farmers with a list of herbicide solutions often recommending the use of reduced rates. The potential of CPO-Weed to reduced herbicide input has been proven in numerous validation trials. In recent years the use of reduced herbicide rates has been linked to the increasing number of cases of non-target resistance in outcrossing grass weed species like Alopecurus myosuroides and Lolium ssp. The underlying hypothesis is that the least susceptible individuals in the population will survive the use of reduced rates and that recombination will lead to a gradual increase in the resistance level in the weed population. This scenario is only valid if the use of reduced herbicide rates is prompted by acceptance of a lower effect but not if a high susceptibility of the weed species present in the field or optimum conditions are the reasons for reducing herbicide rates. This is an aspect that is often overlooked in the on-going discussion on herbicide rates and resistance. Large weed

  14. Reduced herbicide rates: present and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudsk, Per

    2014-01-01

    effects are accepted because the weed flora is not considered to have a significant effect on crop yield. “Crop Protection Online-Weed” (CPO-Weed) is a web-based decision support system that was developed to support farmers in their choice of herbicide and herbicide rate. CPOWeed will, based...... on information on crop development and status and the composition of the weed flora, provide farmers with a list of herbicide solutions often recommending the use of reduced rates. The potential of CPO-Weed to reduced herbicide input has been proven in numerous validation trials. In recent years the use...

  15. Unintended effects of the herbicides 2,4-D and dicamba on lady beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freydier, Laurène; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2016-08-01

    Weed resistance to glyphosate and development of new GM crops tolerant to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and dicamba is expected to lead to increased use of these herbicides in cropland. The lady beetle, Coleomegilla maculata is an important beneficial insect in cropland that is commonly used as an indicator species in safety evaluations of pesticides. Here, we examined the lethal and non-lethal effects of 2,4-D and dicamba active ingredients and commercial formulations to this lady beetle species, and tested for synergistic effects of the herbicides. Second instars of lady beetles were exposed to an experimental treatment, and their mortality, development, weight, sex ratio, fecundity, and mobility was evaluated. Using similar methods, a dose-response study was conducted on 2,4-D with and without dicamba. The commercial formulation of 2,4-D was highly lethal to lady beetle larvae; the LC90 of this herbicide was 13 % of the label rate. In this case, the "inactive" ingredients were a key driver of the toxicity. Dicamba active ingredient significantly increased lady beetle mortality and reduced their body weight. The commercial formulations of both herbicides reduced the proportion of males in the lady beetle population. The herbicides when used together did not act synergistically in their toxicity toward lady beetles versus when the chemistries were used independently. Our work shows that herbicide formulations can cause both lethal and sublethal effects on non-target, beneficial insects, and these effects are sometimes driven by the "inactive" ingredients. The field-level implications of shifts in weed management practices on insect management programs should receive further attention.

  16. [Study on usage of pesticides in various countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Miyako; Toda, Miou; Tanaka, Keiko; Sugita, Takiko; Sasaki, Shiho; Uneyama, Chikako; Morikawa, Kaoru

    2007-01-01

    Usage of pesticides in food items in export countries was studied, focusing items which Japan imports in large quantity. Japan has imported field crops such as wheat, corn and soy bean, and also grapefruit in large quantity on a weight base, mainly from United States, Australia and Canada. While, Japan has imported various kinds of vegetables in which China had the largest share. We collected usage data of pesticides for 44 food items of 17 countries of 2004. Pesticides which were used frequently (usage rank within top ten in each item/country) were dichlorvos, carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate (insecticides), mancozeb, carbendazim, thiophanate-methyl, chlorthalonil (fungicides), glyphosate, 2,4-D, paraquat, acetochlor (herbicides). Carbendazim, thiophanate-methyl, acetochlor and dichlorvos were mainly used in China. Dithiocarbamates are used frequently in various food items in various countries, and also frequently detected in monitoring in foreign countries. Some pesticides such as bisultap, monosultap, etaboxam and triazmate were used only in certain countries, and available information on toxicity or analytical method was very limited. Some of pesticides described above have not been analyzed in the pesticide residue monitoring in Japan before 2005,however, many of them are subjects of analysis for import food after 2006 with the enforcement of positivelist system for residues of pesticide and veterinary medicines in food in Japan.

  17. Pressurized liquid extraction technique for the analysis of pesticides, PCBs, PBDEs, OPEs, PAHs, alkanes, hopanes, and steranes in atmospheric particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adelaide E; Yoon, Subin; Sheesley, Rebecca J; Usenko, Sascha

    2015-10-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) of a wide range of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from atmospheric particulate matter. Approximately 130 SVOCs from eight compound classes were selected as molecular markers of (1) agricultural activity (30 current and historic-use pesticides), (2) industrial activity (18 PCBs), (3) consumer products and building materials (16 PBDEs, 11 OPEs), and (4) motor vehicle exhaust (22 PAHs, 16 alkanes, 9 hopanes, 8 steranes). Currently, there is no analytical method validated for the extraction of all eight compound classes in a single automated technique. The extraction efficiencies of varying solvents and solvent combinations at high temperatures and pressures were examined. Extracts were concentrated and analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The optimized PLE method utilized methylene chloride:acetone (2:1 v/v) at 100 °C with three (5 min) static cycles, flush volume of 80%, and a 100 s N2 purge. Spike and recovery experiments (n=7) provided average percent recoveries for pesticides, PCBs, PBDEs, OPEs, PAHs, alkanes, hopanes, and steranes of 88.8±4.0%, 86.9±2.6%, 83.8±2.9%, 101±6%, 90.3±6.1%, 74.4±8.8%, 104±8%, and 86.5±8.6%, respectively. The developed method was applied to atmospheric particulate matter samples collected in the greater Houston, TX metropolitan area. Ambient concentrations of eight classes of compounds (92 SVOCs) were reported in pg m(-3). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Herbicides - Detailed Conceptual Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction to the herbicides module, when to list herbicides as a candidate cause, ways to measure herbicides, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for herbicides, herbicides module references and literature reviews.

  19. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Herbicides - Simple Conceptual Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction to the herbicides module, when to list herbicides as a candidate cause, ways to measure herbicides, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for herbicides, herbicides module references and literature reviews.

  20. Characterization of human cytochrome P450 induction by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abass, Khaled; Lämsä, Virpi; Reponen, Petri; Küblbeck, Jenni; Honkakoski, Paavo; Mattila, Sampo; Pelkonen, Olavi; Hakkola, Jukka

    2012-03-29

    Pesticides are a large group of structurally diverse toxic chemicals. The toxicity may be modified by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activity. In the current study, we have investigated effects and mechanisms of 24 structurally varying pesticides on human CYP expression. Many pesticides were found to efficiently activate human pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Out of the 24 compounds tested, 14 increased PXR- and 15 CAR-mediated luciferase activities at least 2-fold. While PXR was predominantly activated by pyrethroids, CAR was, in addition to pyrethroids, well activated by organophosphates and several carbamates. Induction of CYP mRNAs and catalytic activities was studied in the metabolically competent, human derived HepaRG cell line. CYP3A4 mRNA was induced most powerfully by pyrethroids; 50 μM cypermethrin increased CYP3A4 mRNA 35-fold. CYP2B6 was induced fairly equally by organophosphate, carbamate and pyrethroid compounds. Induction of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 by these compound classes paralleled their effects on PXR and CAR. The urea herbicide diuron and the triazine herbicide atrazine induced CYP2B6 mRNA more than 10-fold, but did not activate CAR indicating that some pesticides may induce CYP2B6 via CAR-independent mechanisms. CYP catalyzed activities were induced much less than the corresponding mRNAs. At least in some cases, this is probably due to significant inhibition of CYP enzymes by the studied pesticides. Compared with human CAR activation and CYP2B6 expression, pesticides had much less effect on mouse CAR and CYP2B10 mRNA. Altogether, pesticides were found to be powerful human CYP inducers acting through both PXR and CAR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. No observable effect of a glyphosate-based herbicide on two top predators of temporal water bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Mikó, Zsanett; Hettyey, Attila

    2015-02-01

    It has been implied that the application of pesticides is involved in the world-wide decline of biodiversity, but little is known about the influence of these chemicals on key predators of temporary wetlands. The direct impacts were examined of a frequently applied glyphosate-based herbicide on larval Aeshna cyanea (Müller, 1764; Odonata, Insecta) and adult male Lissotriton vulgaris (Linnaeus, 1758; Caudata, Amphibia), 2 top predators of Central European ephemeral ponds. The effects of herbicide exposure were measured on survival, behavior, body mass change, and predatory activity in an outdoor mesocosm experiment lasting for 17 d. No significant effects of exposure were observed in either predator species. The results suggest that the herbicide has no immediate effect on the predators studied at environmentally relevant concentrations and that these predators can also fulfill their top-down regulatory role in contaminated ecosystems. © 2014 SETAC.

  2. Effects of currently used pesticides in assays for estrogenicity, androgenicity, and aromatase activity in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Vinggaard, Anne; Rasmussen, Thomas Høj

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-four pesticides were tested for interactions with the estrogen receptor (ER) and the androgen receptor (AR) in transactivation assays. Estrogen-like effects on MCF-7 cell proliferation and effects on CYP19 aromatase activity in human placental microsomes were also investigated. Pesticides...... to their frequent use in Danish greenhouses. In addition, the metabolite mercaptodimethur sulfoxide, the herbicide tribenuron-methyl, and the organochlorine dieldrin, were included. Several of the pesticides, dieldrin, endosulfan, methiocarb, and fenarimol, acted both as estrogen agonists and androgen antagonists...

  3. [THE SENSITIVITY OF PHYTOPATHOGENIC BACTERIA TO STREPTOMYCIN UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF PESTICIDES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buletsa, N M; Butsenko, L M; Pasichnyk, L A; Patyka, V P

    2015-01-01

    The results of the streptomycin sensitivity changes of phytopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas translucens bacteria under the action of pesticides are pre- sented. It is demonstrated that phytopathogenic strains show greater changes of strepto- mycin sensitivity compared to epiphytic Pantoea agglomerans strain under the pesticides influence. Granstar herbicide, Tviks and Alpha Super insecticides increase the number of streptomycin resistant cells of Xanthomonas translucens 3164, P syringae pv. syringae YKM B-1027 and P syringae pv. atrofaciens YKM B-1011. This fact indicates mutagenic action of these pesticides against researched phytopathogenic bacteria.

  4. Long-term impact of pesticides use on vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Pierre; Poulenard, Jérôme; Fanget, Bernard; Reyss, Jean-Louis; Develle, Anne-Lise; Ployon, Estelle; Wilhelm, Bruno; Naffrechoux, Emmanuel; Dorioz, Jean-Marcel; Montuelle, Bernard; Arnaud, Fabien

    2014-05-01

    Worldwide increase of pesticides uses in agriculture has been growing over the past decades but their long-term fate and effects on environment and ecosystem are poorly understood. Here, we present a retro-observation approach based on lake sediment record to monitor micropollutants and to evaluate the long term impact of pesticides treatments on a vineyard catchment in Savoie (France). In this study, we combined sedimentological and geochemical analyses to reconstruct the recent history of wine practices. The sediment sequence chronology, based on short-live radionuclides (210Pb/137Cs), provides a well constrain continuous age-depth relationship covering to the last century. Over this period, we reconstruct the succession of fungicides, insecticides and herbicides in relation to the appearance of new chemical substances and the banning of old ones. The first use of fungicide began at the end of the 19th century with the Bordeaux mixture (Cu). After the World War II, we observed an intensification of fungicides treatment against mildew, powdery mildew, Botrytis fungi and black rot with specific molecules succession. Insecticides used in vineyard treatment against tetranychid and eriophyid mites were observed since 1940 with a main increase in 1970. Dicofol, Bromopropylate, Bifenthrin succeed to DDT banning in 1972, but a secondary source of DDT appeared at the early of 90's. The first herbicides use was observed between 1960 and 1970 with the presence of Triazine metabolite (pre-emergence herbicide) and high value of AMPA (Glyphosate metabolite, Roundup®), used as post-emergence herbicide, were found since 1990. Two sedimentation rate increases in 1973 and 1994 could be directly assigned to wine practices. In early 70's, heavy farm machinery associated to the first application of pre-emergence herbicide, induced a first increase of soil erosion. In early 90's, post-emergence herbicide (Roundup®) treatment had a stronger impact on soil erosion with a huge

  5. Are pesticide residues in honey related to oilseed rape treatments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karise, Reet; Raimets, Risto; Bartkevics, Vadims; Pugajeva, Iveta; Pihlik, Priit; Keres, Indrek; Williams, Ingrid H; Viinalass, Haldja; Mänd, Marika

    2017-12-01

    Pesticide treatments before and during the flowering of honey bee forage crops may lead to residues in honey. In northern regions oilseed rape belongs to the main forage crops that is mostly cultivated by means of intensive agriculture, including several pesticide treatments. However, in addition to the focal forage crops, pesticides from non-forage crops can spread to wild flowers around fields, and thus the residues in honey would reflect the whole range of pesticides used in the agricultural landscape. The aim of our study was to clarify which currently used pesticides are present in honey gathered from heterogeneous agricultural landscapes after the end of flowering of oilseed crops. Honey samples (N = 33) were collected from beehives of Estonia during 2013 and 2014, and analysed for residues of 47 currently used agricultural pesticides using the multiresidue method with HPLC-MS/MS and GC-MS and a single residue method for glyphosate, aminopyralid and clopyralid. Residues of eight different active ingredients with representatives from all three basic pesticide classes were determined. Although no correlation was detected between the cumulative amount of pesticide residues and percent of oilseed crops in the foraging territory, most of the residues are those allowed for oilseed rape treatments. Among all pesticides, herbicide residues prevailed in 2013 but not in 2014. Despite the relatively small agricultural impact of Estonia, the detected levels of pesticide residues sometimes exceeded maximum residue level; however, these concentrations do not pose a health risk to consumers, also acute toxicity to honey bees would be very unlikely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pesticide exposures and respiratory health in general populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ming; Beach, Jeremy; Martin, Jonathan W; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2017-01-01

    Human exposures to pesticides can occur in the workplace, in the household and through the ambient environment. While several articles have reviewed the impact of pesticide exposures on human respiratory health in occupational settings, to the best of our knowledge, this article is the first one to review published studies on the association between pesticide exposures and human respiratory health in the general populations. In this article, we critically reviewed evidences up to date studying the associations between non-occupational pesticide exposures and respiratory health in general populations. This article also highlighted questions arising from these studies, including our recent analyses using the data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), for future research. We found few studies have addressed the impact of environmental pesticide exposures on respiratory health, especially on lung function, in general populations. In the studies using the data from CHMS Cycle 1, exposures to OP insecticides, pyrethroid insecticides, and the organochlorine pesticide DDT were associated with impaired lung function in the Canadian general population, but no significant associations were observed for the herbicide 2,4-D. Future research should focus on the potential age-specific and pesticide-specific effect on respiratory health in the general population, and repeated longitudinal study design is critical for assessing the temporal variations in pesticide exposures. Research findings from current studies of non-occupational pesticide exposures and their health impact in general population will help to improve the role of regulatory policies in mitigating pesticide-related public health problems, and thereafter providing greater benefit to the general population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Scientists Probe Pesticide Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes discussions of a symposium on pesticide environmental dynamics with emphases upon pesticide transport processes, environmental reactions, and partitioning in air, soil, water and living organisms. Indicates that the goal is to attain knowledge enough to predict pesticide behavior and describe pesticide distribution with models and…

  8. The impact of altered herbicide residues in transgenic herbicide-resistant crops on standard setting for herbicide residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Unsworth, J.B.; Harris, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The global area covered with transgenic (genetically modified) crops has rapidly increased since their introduction in the mid-1990s. Most of these crops have been rendered herbicide resistant, for which it can be envisaged that the modification has an impact on the profile and level of herbicide

  9. Effects of chlorophenoxy herbicides and their main transformation products on DNA damage and acetylcholinesterase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfeito, Sofia; Silva, Tiago; Garrido, Jorge; Andrade, Paula B; Sottomayor, M J; Borges, Fernanda; Garrido, E Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pesticide transformation products (TPs) are increasingly being detected among different environmental compartments, including groundwater and surface water. However, there is no sufficient experimental data on their toxicological potential to assess the risk associated with TPs, even if their occurrence is known. In this study, the interaction of chlorophenoxy herbicides (MCPA, mecoprop, 2,4-D and dichlorprop) and their main transformation products with calf thymus DNA by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy has been assessed. Additionally, the toxicity of the chlorophenoxy herbicides and TPs was also assessed evaluating the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. On the basis of the results found, it seems that AChE is not the main target of chlorophenoxy herbicides and their TPs. However, the results found showed that the transformation products displayed a higher inhibitory activity when compared with the parent herbicides. The results obtained in the DNA interaction studies showed, in general, a slight effect on the stability of the double helix. However, the data found for 4-chloro-2-methyl-6-nitrophenol suggest that this transformation product can interact with DNA through a noncovalent mode.

  10. Biodegradation of glyphosate herbicide by Salinicoccus spp isolated from Qom Hoze-soltan lake, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Sharifi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl Glycine is an organophosphorus pesticide with dangerous effects on the environment. In this study, the biodegradation of glyphosate herbicide by halophilic bacteria isolated from Qom Hoze-Soltan Lake has been investigated. Methods: After sampling and bacterial isolation, native halophilic strains grown in the presence of glyphosate at a wavelength of 660 nm and also the disappearance of the glyphosate in the plates at a wavelength of 220 nm were determined and the dominant bacteria were isolated. Biochemical, molecular (according to the 16S rRNA sequence, antibiotic, and the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC test was performed for the dominant bacteria. Analysis of the remaining glyphosate herbicide was performed by HPLC analysis after derivation with FMOC-Cl. Results: According to the results of the biochemical, antibiotic and molecular 16S rRNA tests, the native halophilic isolates with the ability to biodegrade glyphosate were gram positive cocci very similar to Salinicoccusspp. The results of HPLC showed that Salinicoccusspp is able to biodegrade glyphosate herbicide. Conclusion: The native bacteria in Qom Hoze-soltanlake, Iran can be used for biodegradation of glyphosate herbicide.

  11. Effect of some adjuvants application on enhancing sulfosulfuron herbicide performance on Phalaris minor- Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdizadeh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays environmental pollution by pesticides application is a major concern for health. Efficiency of many herbicides can be increased by adding adjuvants to the spray solution. Therefore greenhouse study was conducted during 2014 to determine the efficacy of three adjuvants (Citogate, Castor oil and Canola oil at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2 (%v/v with 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 g a.i\\ha of sulfosulfuron herbicide on littleseed canary grass. Results showed that the adjuvants enhanced the efficacy of sulfosulfuron in decreasing the dry weights of littleseed canary grass. Performance of herbicide was increased with enhancing its concentrations. Measured ED50 and ED90 concentrations of sulfosulfuron in control were 16.74 and 32.22 g a.i\\ha, respectively. Whereas the values for Citogate 0.2 (%v\\v, was 5.86 and 13.34 g a.i\\ha, respectively. The addition of Citogate and Castor oil had the highest and lowest effect on sulfosulfuron efficacy against Littleseed canary grass. In conclusion, the study revealed that Citogate concentrations had powerful effects on herbicide efficacy followed by Canola oil.

  12. Pesticides are Associated with Allergic and Non-Allergic Wheeze among Male Farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppin, Jane A; Umbach, David M; Long, Stuart; London, Stephanie J; Henneberger, Paul K; Blair, Aaron; Alavanja, Michael; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Sandler, Dale P

    2017-04-01

    Growing evidence suggests that pesticide use may contribute to respiratory symptoms. We evaluated the association of currently used pesticides with allergic and non-allergic wheeze among male farmers. Using the 2005-2010 interview data of the Agricultural Health Study, a prospective study of farmers in North Carolina and Iowa, we evaluated the association between allergic and non-allergic wheeze and self-reported use of 78 specific pesticides, reported by ≥ 1% of the 22,134 men interviewed. We used polytomous regression models adjusted for age, BMI, state, smoking, and current asthma, as well as for days applying pesticides and days driving diesel tractors. We defined allergic wheeze as reporting both wheeze and doctor-diagnosed hay fever ( n = 1,310, 6%) and non-allergic wheeze as reporting wheeze but not hay fever ( n = 3,939, 18%); men without wheeze were the referent. In models evaluating current use of specific pesticides, 19 pesticides were significantly associated ( p pesticides with non-allergic wheeze (19 positive, 2 negative); 11 pesticides were associated with both. Seven pesticides (herbicides: 2,4-D and simazine; insecticides: carbaryl, dimethoate, disulfoton, and zeta-cypermethrin; and fungicide pyraclostrobin) had significantly different associations for allergic and non-allergic wheeze. In exposure-response models with up to five exposure categories, we saw evidence of an exposure-response relationship for several pesticides including the commonly used herbicides 2,4-D and glyphosate, the insecticides permethrin and carbaryl, and the rodenticide warfarin. These results for farmers implicate several pesticides that are commonly used in agricultural and residential settings with adverse respiratory effects.

  13. Non-target effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on Common toad larvae (Bufo bufo, Amphibia) and associated algae are altered by temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Fabian; Gruber, Edith; Bondar-Kunze, Elisabeth; Ivanković, Marina; Mentler, Axel; Brühl, Carsten A.; Spangl, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background Glyphosate-based herbicides are the most widely used pesticides in agriculture, horticulture, municipalities and private gardens that can potentially contaminate nearby water bodies inhabited by amphibians and algae. Moreover, the development and diversity of these aquatic organisms could also be affected by human-induced climate change that might lead to more periods with extreme temperatures. However, to what extent non-target effects of these herbicides on amphibians or algae are altered by varying temperature is not well known. Methods We studied effects of five concentrations of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulation Roundup PowerFlex (0, 1.5, 3, 4 mg acid equivalent glyphosate L−1 as a one time addition and a pulse treatment of totally 4 mg a.e. glyphosate L−1) on larval development of Common toads (Bufo bufo, L.; Amphibia: Anura) and associated algae communities under two temperature regimes (15 vs. 20 °C). Results Herbicide contamination reduced tail growth (−8%), induced the occurrence of tail deformations (i.e. lacerated or crooked tails) and reduced algae diversity (−6%). Higher water temperature increased tadpole growth (tail and body length (tl/bl) +66%, length-to-width ratio +4%) and decreased algae diversity (−21%). No clear relation between herbicide concentrations and tadpole growth or algae density or diversity was observed. Interactive effects of herbicides and temperature affected growth parameters, tail deformation and tadpole mortality indicating that the herbicide effects are temperature-dependent. Remarkably, herbicide-temperature interactions resulted in deformed tails in 34% of all herbicide treated tadpoles at 15 °C whereas no tail deformations were observed for the herbicide-free control at 15 °C or any tadpole at 20 °C; herbicide-induced mortality was higher at 15 °C but lower at 20 °C. Discussion These herbicide- and temperature-induced changes may have decided effects on ecological interactions in

  14. Non-target effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on Common toad larvae (Bufo bufo, Amphibia and associated algae are altered by temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Baier

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Glyphosate-based herbicides are the most widely used pesticides in agriculture, horticulture, municipalities and private gardens that can potentially contaminate nearby water bodies inhabited by amphibians and algae. Moreover, the development and diversity of these aquatic organisms could also be affected by human-induced climate change that might lead to more periods with extreme temperatures. However, to what extent non-target effects of these herbicides on amphibians or algae are altered by varying temperature is not well known. Methods We studied effects of five concentrations of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulation Roundup PowerFlex (0, 1.5, 3, 4 mg acid equivalent glyphosate L−1 as a one time addition and a pulse treatment of totally 4 mg a.e. glyphosate L−1 on larval development of Common toads (Bufo bufo, L.; Amphibia: Anura and associated algae communities under two temperature regimes (15 vs. 20 °C. Results Herbicide contamination reduced tail growth (−8%, induced the occurrence of tail deformations (i.e. lacerated or crooked tails and reduced algae diversity (−6%. Higher water temperature increased tadpole growth (tail and body length (tl/bl +66%, length-to-width ratio +4% and decreased algae diversity (−21%. No clear relation between herbicide concentrations and tadpole growth or algae density or diversity was observed. Interactive effects of herbicides and temperature affected growth parameters, tail deformation and tadpole mortality indicating that the herbicide effects are temperature-dependent. Remarkably, herbicide-temperature interactions resulted in deformed tails in 34% of all herbicide treated tadpoles at 15 °C whereas no tail deformations were observed for the herbicide-free control at 15 °C or any tadpole at 20 °C; herbicide-induced mortality was higher at 15 °C but lower at 20 °C. Discussion These herbicide- and temperature-induced changes may have decided effects on ecological

  15. Non-target effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on Common toad larvae (Bufo bufo, Amphibia) and associated algae are altered by temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Fabian; Gruber, Edith; Hein, Thomas; Bondar-Kunze, Elisabeth; Ivanković, Marina; Mentler, Axel; Brühl, Carsten A; Spangl, Bernhard; Zaller, Johann G

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are the most widely used pesticides in agriculture, horticulture, municipalities and private gardens that can potentially contaminate nearby water bodies inhabited by amphibians and algae. Moreover, the development and diversity of these aquatic organisms could also be affected by human-induced climate change that might lead to more periods with extreme temperatures. However, to what extent non-target effects of these herbicides on amphibians or algae are altered by varying temperature is not well known. We studied effects of five concentrations of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulation Roundup PowerFlex (0, 1.5, 3, 4 mg acid equivalent glyphosate L -1 as a one time addition and a pulse treatment of totally 4 mg a.e. glyphosate L -1 ) on larval development of Common toads ( Bufo bufo , L.; Amphibia: Anura) and associated algae communities under two temperature regimes (15 vs. 20 °C). Herbicide contamination reduced tail growth (-8%), induced the occurrence of tail deformations (i.e. lacerated or crooked tails) and reduced algae diversity (-6%). Higher water temperature increased tadpole growth (tail and body length (tl/bl) +66%, length-to-width ratio +4%) and decreased algae diversity (-21%). No clear relation between herbicide concentrations and tadpole growth or algae density or diversity was observed. Interactive effects of herbicides and temperature affected growth parameters, tail deformation and tadpole mortality indicating that the herbicide effects are temperature-dependent. Remarkably, herbicide-temperature interactions resulted in deformed tails in 34% of all herbicide treated tadpoles at 15 °C whereas no tail deformations were observed for the herbicide-free control at 15 °C or any tadpole at 20 °C; herbicide-induced mortality was higher at 15 °C but lower at 20 °C. These herbicide- and temperature-induced changes may have decided effects on ecological interactions in freshwater ecosystems. Although no clear dose

  16. Tillage and herbicide reduction mitigate the gap between conventional and organic farming effects on foraging activity of insectivorous bats

    OpenAIRE

    Barré, Kévin; Le Viol, Isabelle; Julliard, Romain; Chiron, François; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2018-01-01

    International audience; The increased use of pesticides and tillage intensification is known to negatively affect biodiversity. Changes in these agricultural practices such as herbicide and tillage reduction have variable effects among taxa, especially at the top of the trophic network including insectivorous bats. Very few studies compared the effects of agricultural practices on such taxa, and overall, only as a comparison of conventional versus organic farming without accurately accounting...

  17. Comportamento do herbicida hexazinone em área de recarga do aqüífero Guarani cultivada com cana-de-açúcar The behavior of hexazinone herbicide in recharge zone of Guarani aquifer with sugarcane cultivated area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia C. N. Queiroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available São Paulo state (Brazil has an important area of sugarcane production, mainly for obtaining alcohol and sugar, where there is an intensive use of pesticides. An important recharge zone of Guarani aquifer, with supplies water for the local population, is located at Ribeirão Preto city, so the local behavior of pesticides must be investigated. The GUS index was obtained by using the paramenters Koc and half-life for hezazinone herbicide, determinated in representative soil of this region. This study has demonstrated that there is potential risks of hexazinone leaching to ground water, indicating that this herbicide must be monitored in ground water.

  18. Standardize or Diversify Experimental Conditions in Ecotoxicology? A Case Study on Herbicide Toxicity to Larvae of Two Anuran Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Hettyey, Attila

    2017-11-01

    Despite a steeply increasing number of ecotoxicological studies on the effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms, studies assessing the adequacy and reliability of different experimental approaches have remained scarce. We scrutinized effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on larvae of two European anuran amphibians by estimating species-specific LC50 values, assessing how an additional stress factor may influence outcomes, and investigating whether replicate experiments yielded qualitatively the same results. We exposed Rana dalmatina and Bufo bufo tadpoles to two predator treatments (no predator vs. predator chemical cues) combined with varying herbicide concentrations, repeated the experiment with a subset of the experimental treatments and partly with slight modifications 1 week later and assessed survival. Our results indicated that the herbicide was moderately toxic to tadpoles. The presence of predator chemical cues did not affect the lethality of the herbicide in either species. The estimated sensitivity of R. dalmatina tadpoles varied considerably across experiments, whereas in case of B. bufo LC50 values remained very similar. Our results suggest that differences in the experimental setup may often have no influence on the measured effects of pesticides, whereas replicated experiments can deliver widely differing results in other cases, perhaps depending on the studied species, the population origin of the tested individuals, or the test conditions. This draws attention to the suggestion that strict standardization may not deliver widely applicable insights into the toxicity of contaminants and, instead, intentionally introducing variation into the design of ecotoxicological experiments and replicating entire experiments may prove highly beneficial.

  19. Presence of the β-triketone herbicide tefuryltrione in drinking water sources and its degradation product in drinking waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Motoyuki; Asami, Mari; Matsui, Yoshihiko

    2017-07-01

    Triketone herbicides are becoming popular because of their herbicidal activity against sulfonylurea-resistant weeds. Among these herbicides, tefuryltrione (TFT) is the first registered herbicide for rice farming, and recently its distribution has grown dramatically. In this study, we developed analytical methods for TFT and its degradation product 2-chloro-4-methylsulfonyl-3-[(tetrahydrofuran-2-yl-methoxy) methyl] benzoic acid (CMTBA). TFT was found frequently in surface waters in rice production areas at concentrations as high as 1.9 μg/L. The maximum observed concentration was lower than but close to 2 μg/L, which is the Japanese reference concentration of ambient water quality for pesticides. However, TFT was not found in any drinking waters even though the source waters were purified by conventional coagulation and filtration processes; this was due to chlorination, which transforms TFT to CMTBA. The conversion rate of TFT to CMBA on chlorination was almost 100%, and CMTBA was stable in the presence of chlorine. Moreover, CMTBA was found in drinking waters sampled from household water taps at a similar concentration to that of TFT in the source water of the water purification plant. Although the acceptable daily intake and the reference concentration of CMTBA are unknown, the highest concentration in drinking water exceeded 0.1 μg/L, which is the maximum allowable concentration for any individual pesticide and its relevant metabolites in the European Union Drinking Directive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Health effect of agricultural pesticide use in China: implications for the development of GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Hu, Ruifa; Huang, Jikun; Huang, Xusheng; Shi, Guanming; Li, Yifan; Yin, Yanhong; Chen, Zhaohui

    2016-10-10

    It is notable that the adoption of GM glyphosate-tolerant crops increases glyphosate use but reduces non-glyphosate herbicide use; and adoption of GM insect-resistant crops significantly reduces insecticide use. While the health hazard of pesticide use has been well documented, little literature evaluates the health effects of different pesticides related to GM crops in an integrated framework. This study aims to associate the uses of different pesticides related to GM crops with the blood chemistry panel and peripheral nerve conduction of Chinese farmers. Pesticides used by farmers were recorded and classified as glyphosate, non-glyphosate herbicides, chemical lepidopteran insecticides, biological lepidopteran insecticides, non-lepidopteran insecticides and fungicides. The multivariate regression results show that none of the examined 35 health indicators was associated with glyphosate use, while the use of non-glyphosate herbicides was likely to induce renal dysfunction and decrease of serum folic acid. The use of chemical lepidopteran insecticides might be associated with hepatic dysfunction, serum glucose elevation, inflammation and even severe nerve damage. In this context, if GM crops are adopted, the alterations in pesticide use may benefit farmer health in China and globe, which has positive implications for the development of GM crops.

  1. Long-term relationships among pesticide applications, mobility, and soil erosion in a vineyard watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Pierre; Poulenard, Jérôme; Fanget, Bernard; Reyss, Jean-Louis; Develle, Anne-Lise; Wilhelm, Bruno; Ployon, Estelle; Pignol, Cécile; Naffrechoux, Emmanuel; Dorioz, Jean-Marcel; Montuelle, Bernard; Arnaud, Fabien

    2014-11-04

    Agricultural pesticide use has increased worldwide during the last several decades, but the long-term fate, storage, and transfer dynamics of pesticides in a changing environment are poorly understood. Many pesticides have been progressively banned, but in numerous cases, these molecules are stable and may persist in soils, sediments, and ice. Many studies have addressed the question of their possible remobilization as a result of global change. In this article, we present a retro-observation approach based on lake sediment records to monitor micropollutants and to evaluate the long-term succession and diffuse transfer of herbicides, fungicides, and insecticide treatments in a vineyard catchment in France. The sediment allows for a reliable reconstruction of past pesticide use through time, validated by the historical introduction, use, and banning of these organic and inorganic pesticides in local vineyards. Our results also revealed how changes in these practices affect storage conditions and, consequently, the pesticides' transfer dynamics. For example, the use of postemergence herbicides (glyphosate), which induce an increase in soil erosion, led to a release of a banned remnant pesticide (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, DDT), which had been previously stored in vineyard soil, back into the environment. Management strategies of ecotoxicological risk would be well served by recognition of the diversity of compounds stored in various environmental sinks, such as agriculture soil, and their capability to become sources when environmental conditions change.

  2. Long-term relationships among pesticide applications, mobility, and soil erosion in a vineyard watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Pierre; Poulenard, Jérôme; Fanget, Bernard; Reyss, Jean-Louis; Develle, Anne-Lise; Wilhelm, Bruno; Ployon, Estelle; Pignol, Cécile; Naffrechoux, Emmanuel; Dorioz, Jean-Marcel; Montuelle, Bernard; Arnaud, Fabien

    2014-11-01

    Agricultural pesticide use has increased worldwide during the last several decades, but the long-term fate, storage, and transfer dynamics of pesticides in a changing environment are poorly understood. Many pesticides have been progressively banned, but in numerous cases, these molecules are stable and may persist in soils, sediments, and ice. Many studies have addressed the question of their possible remobilization as a result of global change. In this article, we present a retro-observation approach based on lake sediment records to monitor micropollutants and to evaluate the long-term succession and diffuse transfer of herbicides, fungicides, and insecticide treatments in a vineyard catchment in France. The sediment allows for a reliable reconstruction of past pesticide use through time, validated by the historical introduction, use, and banning of these organic and inorganic pesticides in local vineyards. Our results also revealed how changes in these practices affect storage conditions and, consequently, the pesticides' transfer dynamics. For example, the use of postemergence herbicides (glyphosate), which induce an increase in soil erosion, led to a release of a banned remnant pesticide (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, DDT), which had been previously stored in vineyard soil, back into the environment. Management strategies of ecotoxicological risk would be well served by recognition of the diversity of compounds stored in various environmental sinks, such as agriculture soil, and their capability to become sources when environmental conditions change.

  3. Urinary Concentrations of Insecticide and Herbicide Metabolites among Pregnant Women in Rural Ghana: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair J. Wylie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Use of pesticides by households in rural Ghana is common for residential pest control, agricultural use, and for the reduction of vectors carrying disease. However, few data are available about exposure to pesticides among this population. Our objective was to quantify urinary concentrations of metabolites of organophosphate (OP, pyrethroid, and select herbicides during pregnancy, and to explore exposure determinants. In 2014, 17 pregnant women from rural Ghana were surveyed about household pesticide use and provided weekly first morning urine voids during three visits (n = 51 samples. A total of 90.1% (46/51 of samples had detectable OP metabolites [geometric mean, GM (95% CI: 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol 0.54 µg/L (0.36–0.81, para-nitrophenol 0.71 µg/L (0.51–1.00], 75.5% (37/49 had detectable pyrethroid metabolites [GM: 3-phenoxybenzoic acid 0.23 µg/L (0.17, 0.32], and 70.5% (36/51 had detectable 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid levels, a herbicide [GM: 0.46 µg/L (0.29–0.73]. Concentrations of para-nitrophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in Ghanaian pregnant women appear higher when compared to nonpregnant reproductive-aged women in a reference U.S. population. Larger studies are necessary to more fully explore predictors of exposure in this population.

  4. The use of herbicides in hardwood forestery

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Miller

    1987-01-01

    Herbicides can play an important role in hardwood management by providing foresters and landowners with a means to eliminate undesirable stand components. Although herbicide technology for hardwood management still needs much development, some methods are available and MU be used to enhance the value of the stand. With an emphasis on safety, detailed information about...

  5. Response of Saw Palmetto to Three Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Michael; D.G. Neary

    1985-01-01

    Saw palmetto [Serona repens (Bartram) Small] can be controlled with herbicides. Garion® 4E1/2 and Brush Killer® 800 were evaluated for effectiveness againest saw palmetto when they were applied at three rates in April, June, and August. Oust® was tested at three rates in April only. Herbicides were not effective with April...

  6. Post-emergence herbicides useful in calendula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easy and effective weed control is required by growers who are considering new industrial crops. Post-emergence herbicides typically are the products of choice by today’s growers. Unfortunately, post-emergence herbicides with proven safety margins are not known for calendula (Calendula officinalis),...

  7. Control of Butterfly Bush with Postemergence Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii) is classified as invasive in several parts of the United States. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of four herbicides and two application methods on postemergence butterfly bush control. The four herbicides included: Roundup (glyphosate)...

  8. A cheminformatics review of auxins as herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quareshy, Mussa; Prusinska, Justyna; Li, Jun; Napier, Richard

    2017-09-06

    Herbicides are an important asset in ensuring food security, especially when faced with an ever-increasing demand on food production to feed the global population. The current selection of herbicides is increasingly encountering resistance in agricultural weeds they once targeted effectively. It is imperative that new compounds or more effective modes of action are discovered in order to overcome this resistance. This cheminformatics review looks at current herbicides and evaluates their physiochemical properties on a class-by-class basis. We focus in particular on the synthetic auxin herbicides, Herbicide Resistance Action Committee class O, analyzing these against herbicides more generally and for class-specific features such as mobility in plant vasculature. We summarise the physiochemical properties of all 24 compounds used commercially as auxins and relate these results to ongoing approaches to novel auxin discovery. We introduce an interactive, open source cheminformatics tool known as DataWarrior for herbicide discovery, complete with records for over 300 herbicidal compounds. We hope this tool helps researchers as part of a rational approach to not only auxin discovery but agrochemical discovery in general. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Evaluating herbicidal potential of sunflower against Parthenium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intex

    Recent developments in the weed science and allied aspects have involved several interdisciplinary approaches. In this context, indiscriminate use of herbicides for weed control has become a questionable subject, that besides controlling the weeds, the chemical herbicides are harmful in many ways to the soil, crops, other ...

  10. Biotechnology approaches to developing herbicide tolerance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of herbicides has revolutionized weed control in many crop production systems. However, with the increasing development of weed resistances to many popular selective herbicides, the need has arisen to rethink the application of chemical weed control. Approaches to maintain the efficiency of chemical weed ...

  11. New Technologies for Insect-Resistant and Herbicide-Tolerant Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Luca; Coppola, Gerardo; Zelasco, Samanta

    2016-01-01

    The advent of modern molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology has resulted in a dramatic increase in the number of insect-resistant (IR) and herbicide-tolerant (HT) plant varieties, with great economic benefits for farmers. Nevertheless, the high selection pressure generated by control strategies for weed and insect populations has led to the evolution of herbicide and pesticide resistance. In the short term, the development of new techniques or the improvement of existing ones will provide further instruments to counter the appearance of resistant weeds and insects and to reduce the use of agrochemicals. In this review, we examine some of the most promising new technologies for developing IR and HT plants, such as genome editing and antisense technologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical outcome of acute intoxication due to ingestion of auxin-like herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Seok; Seok, Su-Jin; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Park, Yoon-Hyung; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2011-11-01

    The human toxicity of synthetic auxin analogue herbicides has not been extensively studied. Clinical outcome was assessed from medical records of 17 patients who had intentionally ingested auxin pesticides with active ingredients like dicamba, triclopyr, MCPA or mecoprop. The patients were interviewed after discharge to follow outcome (interval 2 to 56 months). One patient who had ingested 500 mL of a mecoprop product died of hypotension and respiratory failure 36 hours after hospital admission. The other 16 patients recovered and were discharged by hospital day 28. After discharge, four patients died from causes not related to herbicide intoxication. In the 12 surviving patients, no long-term effects were reported. Human toxicity of synthetic auxins appears relatively benign with conservative treatment. However, when the amount ingested is above several hundred milliliters of commercial product, especially in combination of mecoprop with other intoxicants (e.g. alcohol), shock with respiratory failure may develop and lead to death.

  13. Simultaneous adsorption/desorption of quaternary ammonium herbicides by acid vineyard soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde Cid, Manuel; Paradelo Núñez, Remigio; Fernández Calviño, David; Nóvoa Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias Estévez, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Competitive adsorption and desorption of three quaternary ammonium herbicides (paraquat, diquat, and difenzoquat) have been studied in four sandy-loam acid vineyard soils from NW Spain and Portugal. The soils present organic matter contents between 3 and 48 g kg-1 and copper contents ranging from 25 to 107 mg kg-1. Adsorption has been studied under equilibrium conditions in batch experiments, and kinetics were studied in a stirred-flow chamber. Adsorption and desorption followed a Freundlich model and kinetics were well described by the pseudo-first-order model. The retention capacity for the pesticides by the four soils followed the sequence: paraquat > diquat > difenzoquat. The different adsorption capacities of each soil were not related to pH, clay or organic matter contents, as could be expected, but rather to soil copper content. The results show that competition with copper for adsorption sites is an important factor in quaternary ammonium herbicides retention in soils with these characteristics.

  14. Modelling the dissipation and leaching of two herbicides in decomposing mulch of crop residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Sohaib; Iqbal, Akhtar; Lafolie, François; Recous, Sylvie; Benoit, Pierre; Garnier, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    Conservation agricultural practices are increasingly adopted because of ecosystem services such as conservation of soil and water resources. These farming systems are characterized mainly by the presence of mulch made of residues of harvested or cover crops on soil surface. The mulch can intercept and retain applied pesticides depending on pesticide molecule and rainfall timing. The pesticide wash-off from mulch is considered a key process in pesticide fate and can have effects on degradation and transport processes. This work highlights a modelling approach to study the pesticide wash-off from mulch residues and their further transport in soil under two rainfall regimes. Transformation and leaching of two herbicides, s-metolachlor and glyphosate, was studied and simulated by Pastis-mulch model. A pesticide module describing pesticide degradation in mulch and soil was coupled to a transport model including a mulch module. The model was tested to simulate the pesticide dissipation, wash-off from mulch and further leaching in soil. Pesticide degradation parameters in mulch were estimated from incubation experiments with 14C-labelled molecules in small cylinders. The model was then tested using the data obtained through a soil column experiment (reconstructed soil cores :15 cm diameter x 35 cm depth), a mulch of Zea mais + Doliquos lablab and with two treatments varied by water regimes: i) frequent rain (temperate, twice a week) with week intensity (6 mm/hr); and ii) occasional rain (tropical, twice a month) with stronger intensity (20 mm/hr). Columns were incubated at 20 °C for 84 days to monitor soil water, C, N and pesticide dynamics. Model successfully simulated the experimental data of pesticide dissipation in mulch residues. Results showed that the rain regime affected more S-metolachlor than glyphosate behavior. The simulated results indicated also that the dynamics in mulch of the two molecules differed according to the rain treatment. Glyphosate showed a

  15. Amphibians, pesticides, and the amphibian chytrid fungus in restored wetlands in agricultural landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Rebecca A.; Pierce, Clay; Vandever, Mark; Muths, Erin L.; Smalling, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Information on interactions between pesticide exposure and disease prevalence in amphibian populations is limited, especially from field data. Exposure to certain herbicides and insecticides has the potential to decrease the immune response in frogs, which can potentially lead to increased abundance of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) zoospores on individuals and in the wetlands. In contrast, exposure to certain fungicides can decrease Bd abundance on frog skin. We examined the relationships between the abundance of Bd on the skin of individual Boreal Chorus Frogs (Pseudacris maculata) and the concentrations of pesticides in the water and in frog tissue at six agriculturally dominated wetlands in Iowa, USA. We collected frogs from each wetland, swabbed them for Bd, and analyzed their tissues for a suite of fungicides, herbicides, and insecticides. We collected surface water from the wetlands and we analyzed it for the same suite of pesticides. We observed no relationship between Bd zoospores on the skin of individual frogs and the concentrations of total pesticides, total herbicides/insecticides and total fungicides in frog tissue. Similarly, we observed no relationship between Bd zoospore abundance in water and the concentration of total pesticides or total herbicides in water. However, we observed a negative relationship between Bd zoospore abundance in water and neonicotinoid concentrations in surface water. Negative results are seldom reported but can be important contributors to a more complete understanding of the complex and potentially synergistic relationships between disease and pesticides. Data from field studies on these relationships are particularly scarce. As our laboratory understanding of these relationships expands, the need for field based, or applied, studies grow.

  16. Toxicity and removal of pesticides by selected aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olette, Rachel; Couderchet, Michel; Biagianti, Sylvie; Eullaffroy, Philippe

    2008-02-01

    Pesticides are being detected in water bodies on an increasingly frequent basis. The present study focused on the phytoremediation potential of selected aquatic plants to remove phytosanitary products from contaminated water. We investigated the uptake capacity of Lemna minor (L. minor), Elodea canadensis (E. canadensis) and Cabomba aquatica (C. aquatica) on three pesticides: copper sulphate (fungicide), flazasulfuron (herbicide) and dimethomorph (fungicide). Pesticide toxicity was evaluated by exposing plants to five concentrations (0-1 mg L(-1)) in culture media for 7d using chlorophyll fluorescence as a biomarker. The toxicity of the contaminants was the same for all the aquatic plants studied and occurred in this descending order of toxicity: flazasulfuron>copper>dimethomorph. We found that L. minor had the most efficient uptake capacity, followed by E. canadensis and then C. aquatica. The maximum removal rate (microg g(-1)fresh weight d(-1)) of copper, flazasulfuron and dimethomorph was 30, 27 and 11, respectively.

  17. Selectivity of pesticides used in rice crop on Telenomus podisi and Trichogramma pretiosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano de Bastos Pazini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Telenomus and Trichogramma species stand out as agents for the biological control in rice crops, and the main strategy for preserving them is the use of selective pesticides. This study aimed at evaluating the toxicity of pesticides used in irrigated rice crop on Telenomus podisi Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae and Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae. Adults of these parasitoids were exposed to dry residues of pesticides, in a completely randomized experiment, with 25 treatments (24 pesticides + control and four replications. The insecticides clorantraniliprole, flubendiamide and diflubenzuron and the biological insecticides based on Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae were harmless to T. podisi and T. pretiosum. The harmless herbicides were: 2.4-D amine, profoxydim, quinclorac, ethoxysulfuron and saflufenacil. The fungicide epoxiconazole + kresoxim-methyl was also harmless to these two biological control agents. Therefore, these pesticides are indicated for the integrated pest management, in flooded rice areas.

  18. Smallholder farmers’ knowledge, perception and practice in pesticide use in South Western Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikre Lemessa Ocho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are often used to manage pests and enhance agricultural productivity. However, pesticides have negative impacts on human and animal health as well as on the environment if not properly used and handled. Hence, this study aimed at assessing the knowledge, attitude and practices of smallholder farmers in agricultural pesticides utilization in three major cereal producing districts of Jimma zone, Ethiopia. For the study original data collected from 140 randomly selected farmers using a pre-tested structured questionnaire and key informant interviews with district level experts were used. The results showed that 98% of the sample households use pesticides; of which 45% purchase pesticides from open market. Furthermore, while the herbicide 2, 4-D was used by 57% of the households, 48% of the respondents did not know the type of pesticides they used. Only 30% read the instructions and less than 40% understand the signs on pesticide containers. Most households perceived that pesticides are useful; however, 98.5% of them witnessed its negative effects. Some health related discomforts reported include nausea, vomiting, headache, and skin irritation with the respective shares of 68%, 18%, 12% and 2%. Ninety five percent of the respondents believed that it is possible to minimize the negative effects of pesticides. But, 80% use normal clothes for spraying pesticides; 40% wash spray equipments in yard; 23% throw pesticide containers in open field and 32% reuse pesticide containers for other purposes. Findings of the study revealed that there is mismatch among knowledge, perception and practice of the farmers. Hence, it is important to carefully design pesticides supply chain and train farmers to create awareness about the careful use of pesticide, and disposal of the leftover and containers.

  19. Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program (PESP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    PESP is an EPA partnership program that works with the nation's pesticide-user community to promote IPM practices. Pesticide users can reduce the risks from pests and pesticides. Members include organizations and companies in the pesticide-user community.

  20. Pesticides: an update of human exposure and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    Pesticides are a family of compounds which have brought many benefits to mankind in the agricultural, industrial, and health areas, but their toxicities in both humans and animals have always been a concern. Regardless of acute poisonings which are common for some classes of pesticides like organophosphoruses, the association of chronic and sub-lethal exposure to pesticides with a prevalence of some persistent diseases is going to be a phenomenon to which global attention has been attracted. In this review, incidence of various malignant, neurodegenerative, respiratory, reproductive, developmental, and metabolic diseases in relation to different routes of human exposure to pesticides such as occupational, environmental, residential, parental, maternal, and paternal has been systematically criticized in different categories of pesticide toxicities like carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, pulmonotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity, and metabolic toxicity. A huge body of evidence exists on the possible role of pesticide exposures in the elevated incidence of human diseases such as cancers, Alzheimer, Parkinson, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, asthma, bronchitis, infertility, birth defects, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, diabetes, and obesity. Most of the disorders are induced by insecticides and herbicides most notably organophosphorus, organochlorines, phenoxyacetic acids, and triazine compounds.

  1. Degradation Processes of Pesticides Used in Potato Cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, M; Barchańska, H; Turek, M

    Potato is one of the most important crops, after maize, rice and wheat. Its global production is about 300 million tons per year and is constantly increasing. It grows in temperate climate and is used as a source of starch, food, and in breeding industry.Potato cultivation requires application of numerous agro-technical products, including pesticides, since it can be affected by insects, weeds, fungi, and viruses. In the European Union the most frequently used pesticides in potato cultivations check are: thiamethoxam, lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin (insecticides), rimsulfuron (herbicide) and metalaxyl (fungicide).Application of pesticides improves crop efficiency, however, as pesticides are not totally selective, it affects also non-target organisms. Moreover, the agrochemicals may accumulate in crops and, as a consequence, negatively influence the quality of food products and consumer health. Additional risks of plant protection products are related to their derivatives, that are created both in the environment (soil, water) and in plant organisms, since many of these compounds may exhibit toxic effects.This article is devoted to the degradation processes of pesticides used in potato crop protection. Attention is also paid to the toxicity of both parent compounds and their degradation products for living organisms, including humans. Information about the level of pesticide contamination in the environment (water, soil) and accumulation level in edible plants complement the current knowledge about the risks associated with widespread use of thiamethoxam, lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin, rimsulfuron and metalaxyl in potato cultivation.

  2. Direct and indirect effects of climate change on herbicide leaching--a regional scale assessment in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Karin; Jarvis, Nicholas; Lewan, Elisabet; Lindström, Bodil; Kreuger, Jenny; Kjellström, Erik; Moeys, Julien

    2015-05-01

    Climate change is not only likely to improve conditions for crop production in Sweden, but also to increase weed pressure and the need for herbicides. This study aimed at assessing and contrasting the direct and indirect effects of climate change on herbicide leaching to groundwater in a major crop production region in south-west Sweden with the help of the regional pesticide fate and transport model MACRO-SE. We simulated 37 out of the 41 herbicides that are currently approved for use in Sweden on eight major crop types for the 24 most common soil types in the region. The results were aggregated accounting for the fractional coverage of the crop and the area sprayed with a particular herbicide. For simulations of the future, we used projections of five different climate models as model driving data and assessed three different future scenarios: (A) only changes in climate, (B) changes in climate and land-use (altered crop distribution), and (C) changes in climate, land-use, and an increase in herbicide use. The model successfully distinguished between leachable and non-leachable compounds (88% correctly classified) in a qualitative comparison against regional-scale monitoring data. Leaching was dominated by only a few herbicides and crops under current climate and agronomic conditions. The model simulations suggest that the direct effects of an increase in temperature, which enhances degradation, and precipitation which promotes leaching, cancel each other at a regional scale, resulting in a slight decrease in leachate concentrations in a future climate. However, the area at risk of groundwater contamination doubled when indirect effects of changes in land-use and herbicide use, were considered. We therefore concluded that it is important to consider the indirect effects of climate change alongside the direct effects and that effective mitigation strategies and strict regulation are required to secure future (drinking) water resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B

  3. Occurrence of pesticides in groundwater and sediments and mineralogy of sediments and grain coatings underlying the Rutgers Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Upper Deerfield, New Jersey, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Meyer, Michael T.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Hladik, Michelle; Boehlke, Adam R.; Fishman, Neil S.; Battaglin, William A.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected from June through October 2007 from seven plots at the Rutgers Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Upper Deerfield, New Jersey, and analyzed for a suite of pesticides (including fungicides) and other physical and chemical parameters (including sediment mineralogy) by the U.S. Geological Survey. Plots were selected for inclusion in this study on the basis of the crops grown and the pesticides used. Forty-one pesticides were detected in 14 water samples; these include 5 fungicides, 13 herbicides, 1 insecticide, and 22 pesticide degradates. The following pesticides and pesticide degradates were detected in 50 percent or more of the groundwater samples: 1-amide-4-hydroxy-chorothalonil, alachlor sulfonic acid, metolachlor oxanilic acid, metolachlor sulfonic acid, metalaxyl, and simazine. Dissolved-pesticide concentrations ranged from below their instrumental limit of detection to 36 micrograms per liter (for metolachlor sulfonic acid, a degradate of the herbicide metolachlor). The total number of pesticides found in groundwater samples ranged from 0 to 29. Fourteen pesticides were detected in sediment samples from continuous cores collected within each of the seven sampled plots; these include 4 fungicides, 2 herbicides, and 7 pesticide degradates. Pesticide concentrations in sediment samples ranged from below their instrumental limit of detection to 34.2 nanograms per gram (for azoxystrobin). The total number of pesticides found in sediment samples ranged from 0 to 8. Quantitative whole-rock and grain-coating mineralogy of sediment samples were determined by x-ray diffraction. Whole-rock analysis indicated that sediments were predominantly composed of quartz. The materials coating the quartz grains were removed to allow quantification of the trace mineral phases present.

  4. Degradation of herbicides in shallow Danish aquifers - an integrated laboratory and field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Mills, M.; Aamand, J.

    2001-01-01

    Degradation of pesticides in aquifers has been evaluated based on a number of co-ordinated field and laboratory studies carried out in Danish aquifers. These studies included investigations of vertical and horizontal variability in degradation rates from the vadose zone to an aquifer, the effects...... of aerobic versus anaerobic conditions, and the importance of concentration on degradation kinetics for a selected range of herbicides. The studies were based on different experimental approaches ranging from simple batch experiments to column studies to field injection experiments and, where appropriate...

  5. Examining impacts of current-use pesticides in Southern Ontario using in situ exposures of the amphipod Hyalella azteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Adrienne J; Struger, John; Grapentine, Lee C; Palace, Vince P

    2016-05-01

    In situ exposures with Hyalella azteca were used to assess impacts of current-use pesticides in Southern Ontario, Canada. Exposures were conducted over 2 growing seasons within areas of high pesticide use: 1 site on Prudhomme Creek and 3 sites on Twenty Mile Creek. Three sites on Spencer Creek, an area of low pesticide use, were added in the second season. Surface water samples were collected every 2 wk to 3 wk and analyzed for a suite of pesticides. Hyalella were exposed in situ for 1 wk every 4 wk to 6 wk, and survival and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were measured. Pesticides in surface waters reflected seasonal use patterns: lower concentrations in spring and fall and higher concentrations during summer months. Organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos, azinphos methyl, diazinon) and acid herbicides (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid [2,4-D], mecoprop) were routinely detected in Prudhomme Creek, whereas neutral herbicides (atrazine, metolachlor) dominated the pesticide signature of Twenty Mile Creek. Spencer Creek contained fewer pesticides, which were measured at lower concentrations. In situ effects also followed seasonal patterns: higher survival and AChE activity in spring and fall, and lower survival and AChE activity during summer months. The highest toxicity was observed at Prudhomme Creek and was primarily associated with organophosphates. The present study demonstrated that current-use pesticides in Southern Ontario were linked to in situ effects and identified sites of concern requiring further investigation. © 2015 Crown in the Right of Canada.

  6. Managing the evolution of herbicide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jeffrey A; Tranel, Patrick J; Hager, Aaron G; Schutte, Brian; Wu, Chenxi; Chatham, Laura A; Davis, Adam S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and managing the evolutionary responses of pests and pathogens to control efforts is essential to human health and survival. Herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds undermine agricultural sustainability, productivity and profitability, yet the epidemiology of resistance evolution - particularly at landscape scales - is poorly understood. We studied glyphosate resistance in a major agricultural weed, Amaranthus tuberculatus (common waterhemp), using landscape, weed and management data from 105 central Illinois grain farms, including over 500 site-years of herbicide application records. Glyphosate-resistant (GR) A. tuberculatus occurrence was greatest in fields with frequent glyphosate applications, high annual rates of herbicide mechanism of action (MOA) turnover and few MOAs field(-1) year(-1) . Combining herbicide MOAs at the time of application by herbicide mixing reduced the likelihood of GR A. tuberculatus. These findings illustrate the importance of examining large-scale evolutionary processes at relevant spatial scales. Although measures such as herbicide mixing may delay GR or other HR weed traits, they are unlikely to prevent them. Long-term weed management will require truly diversified management practices that minimize selection for herbicide resistance traits. © 2015 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Prioritizing pesticide compounds for analytical methods development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Julia E.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Nowell, Lisa H.

    2012-01-01

    compounds are high priority as new analytes. The objective for analytical methods development is to design an integrated analytical strategy that includes as many of the Tier 1 pesticide compounds as possible in a relatively few, cost-effective methods. More than 60 percent of the Tier 1 compounds are high priority because they are anticipated to be present at concentrations approaching levels that could be of concern to human health or aquatic life in surface water or groundwater. An additional 17 percent of Tier 1 compounds were frequently detected in monitoring studies, but either were not measured at levels potentially relevant to humans or aquatic organisms, or do not have benchmarks available with which to compare concentrations. The remaining 21 percent are pesticide degradates that were included because their parent pesticides were in Tier 1. Tier 1 pesticide compounds for water span all major pesticide use groups and a diverse range of chemical classes, with herbicides and their degradates composing half of compounds. Many of the high priority pesticide compounds also are in several national regulatory programs for water, including those that are regulated in drinking water by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Safe Drinking Water Act and those that are on the latest Contaminant Candidate List. For sediment, a total of 175 pesticide compounds were classified as Tier 1 and, thus, are high priority for inclusion in analytical methods available for monitoring and studies. More than 60 percent of these compounds are included in some USGS analytical method; however, some are spread across several research methods that are expensive to perform, and monitoring data are not extensive for many compounds. The remaining Tier 1 compounds for sediment are high priority as new analytes. The objective for analytical methods development for sediment is to enhance an existing analytical method that currently includes nearly half of the pesticide compounds in Tier 1

  8. Pesticide use in the wheat-maize double cropping systems of the North China Plain: Assessment, field study, and implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brauns, Bentje; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Song, Xianfang

    2018-01-01

    studies focus on organic chlorinated pesticides (OCPs) like the isomers of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), which were banned in China in 1983. However, currently-used herbicides like 2,4-D and atrazine were detected in river water and groundwater in all samplings...

  9. Removal of paraquat pesticide from aqueous solutions using a novel adsorbent material based on polyacrylamide and methylcellulose hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research studied the characteristics of poly(acrylamide) and methylcellulose (PAAm-MC) hydrogels as a novel adsorbent material for removal of pesticide paraquat, from aqueous solution, with potential applications in curbing environmental risk from such herbicides. PAAm-MC hydrogels with differe...

  10. Pesticide Analytical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide manufacturers must develop and submit analytical methods for their pesticide products to support registration of their products under FIFRA. Learn about these methods as well as SOPs for testing of antimicrobial products against three organisms.

  11. Pesticide Product Label System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the...

  12. Pesticides and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticides and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to pesticides may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  13. Pesticide Labeling Questions & Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide manufacturers, applicators, state regulatory agencies, and other stakeholders raise questions or issues about pesticide labels. The questions on this page are those that apply to multiple products or address inconsistencies among product labels.

  14. Sensitivity analysis using a diffuse pollution hydrologic model to assess factors affecting pesticide concentrations in river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Koji; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Narita, Kentaro; Ohno, Koichi; Matsushita, Taku

    2010-01-01

    We quantitatively evaluated the factors that affect the concentrations of rice-farming pesticides (an herbicide and a fungicide) in river water by a sensitivity analysis using a diffuse pollution hydrologic model. Pesticide degradation and adsorption in paddy soil affected concentrations of the herbicide pretilachlor but did not affect concentrations of the fungicide isoprothiolane. We attributed this difference to the timing of pesticide application in relation to irrigation and drainage of the rice paddy fields. The herbicide was applied more than a month before water drainage of the fields and runoff was gradual over a long period of time, whereas the fungicide was applied shortly before drainage and runoff was rapid. However, the effects of degradability-in-water on the herbicide and fungicide concentrations were similar, with concentrations decreasing only when the rate constant of degradation in water was large. We also evaluated the effects of intermittent irrigation methods (irrigation/artificial drainage or irrigation/percolation) on pesticide concentrations in river water. The runoff of the fungicide, which is applied near or in the period of intermittent irrigation, notably decreased when the method of irrigation/artificial drainage was changed to irrigation/percolation. In a sensitivity analysis evaluating the synergy effect of degradation and adsorbability in soil, the degradation rate constant in soil greatly affected pesticide concentration when the adsorption coefficient was small but did not affect pesticide concentration when the adsorption coefficient was large. The pesticide concentration in the river water substantially decreased when either or both the degradation rate constant in soil and adsorption coefficient was large.

  15. Pesticides and food safety

    OpenAIRE

    Ötegen, Volkan Recai; Akbaba, Muhsin; Nazlıcan, Ersin; Kurt, Burak

    2017-01-01

    Besidesprevention of tropical diseases, pesticides are also used to make agriculturalactivities fertile. But pesticides are potentially harmful to our health andmay be toxic to the immune, reproductive and nervous systems. Afterapplication; pesticide residues consist depending on factors such as plantspecies, time of administration, how it applied. While pesticides make foodsupply sustainable, there are concerns about residues in food that peopleconsume. Therefore food safety concept introduc...

  16. Major Pesticides Are More Toxic to Human Cells Than Their Declared Active Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Mesnage

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are used throughout the world as mixtures called formulations. They contain adjuvants, which are often kept confidential and are called inerts by the manufacturing companies, plus a declared active principle, which is usually tested alone. We tested the toxicity of 9 pesticides, comparing active principles and their formulations, on three human cell lines (HepG2, HEK293, and JEG3. Glyphosate, isoproturon, fluroxypyr, pirimicarb, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole, and prochloraz constitute, respectively, the active principles of 3 major herbicides, 3 insecticides, and 3 fungicides. We measured mitochondrial activities, membrane degradations, and caspases 3/7 activities. Fungicides were the most toxic from concentrations 300–600 times lower than agricultural dilutions, followed by herbicides and then insecticides, with very similar profiles in all cell types. Despite its relatively benign reputation, Roundup was among the most toxic herbicides and insecticides tested. Most importantly, 8 formulations out of 9 were up to one thousand times more toxic than their active principles. Our results challenge the relevance of the acceptable daily intake for pesticides because this norm is calculated from the toxicity of the active principle alone. Chronic tests on pesticides may not reflect relevant environmental exposures if only one ingredient of these mixtures is tested alone.

  17. Multiple Pesticides Detoxification Function of Maize (Zea mays) GST34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongzhi; Xu, Li; Pang, Sen; Liu, Zhiqian; Zhao, Weisong; Wang, Chengju

    2017-03-08

    ZmGST34 is a maize Tau class GST gene and was found to be differently expressed between two maize cultivars differing in tolerance to herbicide metolachlor. To explore the possible role of ZmGST34 in maize development, the expression pattern and substrate specificity of ZmGST34 were characterized by quantitative RT-PCR and heterologous expression system, respectively. The results indicated that the expression level of ZmGST34 was increased ∼2-5-fold per day during the second-leaf stage of maize seedling. Chloroacetanilide herbicides or phytohormone treatments had no influence on the expression level of ZmGST34, suggesting that ZmGST34 is a constitutively expressed gene in maize seedling. Heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and in Arabidopsis thaliana proved that ZmGST34 can metabolize most chloroacetanilide herbicides and increase tolerance to these herbicides in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. The constitutive expression pattern and broad substrate activity of ZmGST34 suggested that this gene may play an important role in maize development in addition to the detoxification of pesticides.

  18. The Pesticide Scorecard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jerome B.

    1977-01-01

    A scheme for comparing the relative toxicities and environmental safety of agricultural pesticides is presented. It is based on the sum of four key factors: (1) oral toxicity to rats, (2) oral toxicity to fish, (3) longevity, and (4) bioaccumulation. Thirty-one pesticides are ranked by these factors. The ranking indicates that new pesticides are…

  19. Pesticides in the propolis at São Saulo State, Brazil - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v34i4.15859 Pesticides in the propolis at São Saulo State, Brazil - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v34i4.15859

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Moura Kadri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for propolis has caused a raise in its production. However, an increasingly pesticide-dependent agriculture is a great concern with regard to bees, their produce and environmental contamination. Current analysis evaluates the presence of pesticides (organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates, herbicides, fungicides and acaricides in samples of propolis from the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Beekeepers from several localities in the state provided samples of propolis (50, which were collected, stored in non-toxic plastic bags and maintained in a freezer for analyses. Possible pesticide residues were examined by gas chromatography method but no pesticide residues were detected in the examined propolis samples. Propolis analyzed in the state of São Paulo did not show any pesticide contamination. The increasing demand for propolis has caused a raise in its production. However, an increasingly pesticide-dependent agriculture is a great concern with regard to bees, their produce and environmental contamination. Current analysis evaluates the presence of pesticides (organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates, herbicides, fungicides and acaricides in samples of propolis from the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Beekeepers from several localities in the state provided samples of propolis (50, which were collected, stored in non-toxic plastic bags and maintained in a freezer for analyses. Possible pesticide residues were examined by gas chromatography method but no pesticide residues were detected in the examined propolis samples. Propolis analyzed in the state of São Paulo did not show any pesticide contamination.

  20. Weed Resistance to Synthetic Auxin Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Roberto; Goggin, Danica E; Heap, Ian; Horak, Michael J; Jugulam, Mithila; Masters, Robert A; Napier, Richard; Riar, Dilpreet S; Satchivi, Norbert M; Torra, Joel; Westra, Phillip; Wright, Terry R

    2017-12-13

    Herbicides classified as synthetic auxins have been most commonly used to control broadleaf weeds in a variety of crops and in non-cropland areas since the first synthetic auxin herbicide (SAH), 2,4-D, was introduced to the market in the mid-1940s. The incidence of weed species resistant to SAHs is relatively low considering their long-term global application with 29 broadleaf weed species confirmed resistant to date. An understanding of the context and mechanisms of SAH resistance evolution can inform management practices to sustain the longevity and utility of this important class of herbicides. A symposium was convened during the 2nd Global Herbicide Resistance Challenge (May 2017 in Denver, CO, USA) to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of SAH resistance mechanisms including case studies of weed species resistant to SAHs and perspectives on mitigating resistance development in SAH-tolerant crops. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Pesticides in rain in four agricultural watersheds in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J.R.; Majewski, M.S.; Capel, P.D.

    2008-01-01

    Rainfall samples were collected during the 2003 and 2004 growing seasons at four agricultural locales across the USA in Maryland, Indiana, Nebraska, and California. The samples were analyzed for 21 insecticides, 18 herbicides, three fungicides, and 40 pesticide degradates. Data from all sites combined show that 7 of the 10 most frequently detected pesticides were herbicides, with atrazine (70%) and metolachlor (83%) detected at every site. Dacthal, acetochlor, simazine, alachlor, and pendimethalin were detected in more than 50% of the samples. Chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, and diazinon were the only insecticides among the 10 most frequently detected compounds. Of the remaining pesticide parent compounds, 18 were detected in fewer than 30% of the samples, and 13 were not detected. The most frequently detected degradates were deethylatrazine; the oxygen analogs (OAs) of the organophosphorus insecticides chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and malathion; and 1-napthol (degradate of carbaryl). Deethylatrazine was detected in nearly 70% of the samples collected in Maryland, Indiana, and Nebraska but was detected only once in California. The OAs of chlorpyrifos and diazinon were detected primarily in California. Degradates of the acetanilide herbicides were rarely detected in rain, indicating that they are not formed in the atmosphere or readily volatilized from soils. Herbicides accounted for 91 to 98% of the total pesticide mass deposited by rain except in California, where insecticides accounted for 61% in 2004. The mass of pesticides deposited by rainfall was estimated to be less than 2% of the total applied in these agricultural areas. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  2. Age-dependent changes in sensitivity to a pesticide in tadpoles of the common toad (Bufo bufo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Hettyey, Attila

    2017-06-01

    The worldwide en masse application of pesticides and the frequently reported malign effects on several non-target organisms underpin the importance of ecotoxicological research on these anthropogenic pollutants. Previous studies showed that sensitivity to herbicides can vary widely depending on additional stress factors, on the species and even on the population investigated. However, there is little information about how sensitivity changes during ontogeny, and how the duration of exposure is linked to the magnitude of malign effects, even though this knowledge would be important for the interpretation of toxicity test results and for formulating recommendations regarding the timing of pesticide application. We exposed tadpoles of the common toad (Bufo bufo) to three concentrations (0, 2 and 4mg a.e./L) of a glyphosate-based herbicide during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, or 5th period of larval development or during the entire experiment, and measured survival, time until metamorphosis and body mass at metamorphosis to estimate fitness-consequences. Younger tadpoles were more sensitive to the herbicide in all measured traits than older ones, and this age-dependence was especially pronounced at the high herbicide concentration. Furthermore, tadpoles exposed to the herbicide during the entire experiment developed slower than tadpoles exposed only early on, but we did not observe a similar effect either on body mass or survival. The observed age-dependence of sensitivity to herbicides draws attention to the fact that results of toxicity tests obtained for one age-class are not necessarily generalizable across ontogeny. Also, the age of test animals has to be considered when planning ecotoxicological studies and interpreting their results. Finally, taking into account the temporal breeding habits of local amphibians when planning pesticide application would be highly favourable: if tadpoles would not get exposed to the herbicide during their most sensitive early development

  3. Use of allelopathic plant extract with herbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tansel SERİM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Herbicides are one of the plant protection products that have been discussed due to their adversely effects caused by the usage of them although they have an important role on the sustainability of crop production. Researches on the plant protection practices, such as the development of new herbicide application techniques, the reduction of the application rate, the use of adjuvant, changing herbicide application time and the use of allelopathic plant extract, and the applications based on the results of these research have increased in recent years. The cost of weed control may exceed the economic benefits because a large amount of plant extract is needed to control weeds alone with allelopathic chemicals. Using the mixture of plant extracts with the reduced rate of herbicides is important both to reduce environmental and economic losses and to prevent some problem caused by use of herbicide. The extracts of plants which have got allelopathic character, such as sunflower, sorghum, brassica and rice, are commonly used for this aim. The aim of presented review is to emphasize the efficacy of allelopathic plant extract with herbicide to control weeds and its economical contribution.

  4. Trends in pesticide use on soybean, corn and cotton since the introduction of major genetically modified crops in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, Richard H; Capel, Paul D

    2016-05-01

    Genetically modified (GM) varieties of soybean, corn and cotton have largely replaced conventional varieties in the United States. The most widely used applications of GM technology have been the development of crops that are resistant to a specific broad-spectrum herbicide (primarily glyphosate) or that produce insecticidal compounds within the plant itself. With the widespread adoption of GM crops, a decline in the use of conventional pesticides was expected. There has been a reduction in the annual herbicide application rate to corn since the advent of GM crops, but the herbicide application rate is mostly unchanged for cotton. Herbicide use on soybean has increased. There has been a substantial reduction in the amount of insecticides used on both corn and cotton since the introduction of GM crops. The observed changes in pesticide use are likely to be the result of many factors, including the introduction of GM crops, regulatory restrictions on some conventional pesticides, introduction of new pesticide technologies and changes in farming practices. In order to help protect human and environmental health and to help agriculture plan for the future, more detailed and complete documentation on pesticide use is needed on a frequent and ongoing basis. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Trends in pesticide use on soybean, corn and cotton since the introduction of major genetically modified crops in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, Richard H.; Capel, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUNDGenetically modified (GM) varieties of soybean, corn and cotton have largely replaced conventional varieties in the United States. The most widely used applications of GM technology have been the development of crops that are resistant to a specific broad-spectrum herbicide (primarily glyphosate) or that produce insecticidal compounds within the plant itself. With the widespread adoption of GM crops, a decline in the use of conventional pesticides was expected.RESULTSThere has been a reduction in the annual herbicide application rate to corn since the advent of GM crops, but the herbicide application rate is mostly unchanged for cotton. Herbicide use on soybean has increased. There has been a substantial reduction in the amount of insecticides used on both corn and cotton since the introduction of GM crops.CONCLUSIONSThe observed changes in pesticide use are likely to be the result of many factors, including the introduction of GM crops, regulatory restrictions on some conventional pesticides, introduction of new pesticide technologies and changes in farming practices. In order to help protect human and environmental health and to help agriculture plan for the future, more detailed and complete documentation on pesticide use is needed on a frequent and ongoing basis.

  6. Pesticides and Arthropods: Sublethal Effects and Demographic Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Marčić

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Insecticides and acaricides designed to control primary harmful insects and mites may also variously affect some other arthopods present in an (agroecosystem (e.g. secondary pests, predators, parasitoids, saprophytes, bioindicators, pollinators. Apart from insecticides and acaricides, arthropods may also be affected by the activity of other pesticides (fungicides, herbicides, etc.. Regardless of whether they are deemed desirable or not, the effects that pesticides have on arthopods need to be quantified as closely as possible through appropriate experimental procedures. Data acquired in tests designed to determined LD50/LC50 values are inadequate for evaluation of pesticide effectiveness in the field as pesticidesalso cause various sublethal effects, generally disregarded in such investigations. The sublethal effects of pesticides refer to any altered behaviour and/or physiology of individuals that have survived exposure to pesticides at doses/concentrations that can be lethal(within range causing mortality in an experimental population that exceeds mortality in an untreated population or sublethal (below that range. Pesticides affect locomotion and mobility, stimulate dispersion of arthropods from treated areas, complicate or prevent their navigation, orientation and ability to locate hosts, and cause changes in their feeding, mating and egg-laying patterns. Sublethal pesticide effects on arthropod physiology reflect on the life span, rate of development, fecundity and/or fertility, sex ratio and immunity of surviving individuals. Different parameters are being used in arthropod bioassays to determine sublethal effects (ED50/EC50, LOEC, NOEC, total effect index. Compared to acute toxicity tests, these parameters improve the quality of evaluation and create a more accurate view of the effects of a pesticide. However, such approach covers mainly fecundity/fertility alone, while all other sublethal effects remain unaccounted for. Besides, it

  7. The herbicide Glyphosate affects nitrification in the Elbe estuary, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Tina; Lassen, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The Elbe River is one of the biggest European rivers discharging into the North Sea. It also transports high amounts of nutrients and pollutants like pesticides. Important source regions of both nutrients and pollutants are located within the river catchment, which is dominated by agricultural land-use. From these agricultural soils, pesticides can be carried via the river and estuary into the North Sea. Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine) is the most commonly used herbicide worldwide and mainly used to regulate unwanted plant growth and for the expedition of crop ripening. In Germany, ~ 6000 tons of glyphosate are applied yearly in agriculture and private use. Glyphosate is degradable by microorganisms and has a half-life in water of 35 to 60 days. This herbicide specifically inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), an enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of essential aromatic amino acids in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Nitrifying bacteria, which play an important role in the internal nitrogen cycling in the Elbe estuary, also possess this enzyme. The aim of our study was to quantify the concentration of glyphosate in water and sediment samples of the Elbe to get an overview about relevant environmental levels and to assess the impact of glyphosate on inhibition of nitrifying activities. To quantify the effect of glyphosate on nitrification activity, natural samples as well as pure cultures of Nitrosomonas europea (strain Nm50) were incubated with different concentrations of glyphosate over a period of some weeks. The nitrifying activity was determined according to changes of the nitrite and nitrate concentration as well as the cell number. Glyphosate was detectable in water and sediment samples in the Elbe estuary with up to 5 ppb mainly in the Port of Hamburg region. In both incubation experiments an inhibiting effect of glyphosate on nitrification could be shown. The incubated natural water sample was affected by a glyphosate

  8. Water-quality assessment of the Trinity River Basin, Texas - Review and analysis of available pesticide information, 1968-91

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulery, R.L.; Brown, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    In 1991 the Trinity River Basin study unit was among the first 20 study units in which work began under full-scale program implementation of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. A retrospective assessment was undertaken to review and analyze existing pesticide data and related environmental factors. Population and land-use data indicate human modifications to the landscape and hydrologic system of the study area during the period 1968–91. A variety of crops treated with pesticides were identified, with wheat and cotton accounting for the largest number of acres treated annually (541,250 and 519,870 acres, respectively). Agricultural-use estimates for the later period covered by this report (1988–90) indicate that 105 different pesticides were used and that 24 pesticides accounted for 75 percent of average agricultural use in the study area. Sorghum was treated by the largest number of the 24 mostused pesticides, and cotton was treated by the second largest number of those pesticides. Dimethoate and methyl parathion were the most heavily used of the organophosphate class pesticides. The herbicide 2,4–D was the most heavily used chlorophenoxy pesticide. Carbamate pesticides are used extensively in the study area, with carbaryl, carbofuran, methomyl, and thiodicarb accounting for the majority of the use of this class of pesticide. Miscellaneous pesticides included alachlor, arsenic acid, picloram, and glyphosate, among others. The data indicate that herbicide use generally is proportionally higher in the study area than in the Nation, and that insecticide use in the study area generally is proportionally lower than in the Nation.

  9. Pesticides in groundwater in the Anacostia River and Rock Creek watersheds in Washington, D.C., 2005 and 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koterba, Michael T.; Dieter, Cheryl A.; Miller, Cherie V.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the District Department of the Environment, conducted a groundwater-quality investigation to (a) determine the presence, concentrations, and distribution of selected pesticides in groundwater, and (b) assess the presence of pesticides in groundwater in relation to selected landscape, hydrogeologic, and groundwater-quality characteristics in the shallow groundwater underlying the Anacostia River and Rock Creek watersheds in Washington, D.C. With one exception, well depths were 100 feet or less below land surface. The USGS obtained or compiled ancillary data and information on land use (2001), subsurface sediments, and groundwater samples from 17 wells in the lower Anacostia River watershed from September through December 2005, and from 14 wells in the lower Anacostia River and lower Rock Creek watersheds from August through September 2008. Twenty-seven pesticide compounds, reflecting at least 19 different types of pesticides, were detected in the groundwater samples obtained in 2005 and 2008. No fungicides were detected. In relation to the pesticides detected, degradate compounds were as or more likely to be detected than applied (parent) compounds. The detected pesticides chiefly reflected herbicides commonly used in urban settings for non-specific weed control or insecticides used for nonspecific haustellate insects (insects with specialized mouthparts for sucking liquid) or termite-specific control. Detected pesticides included a combination of pesticides currently (2008) in use, banned or under highly restricted use, and some that had replaced the banned or restricted-use pesticides. The presence of banned and restricted-use pesticides illustrates their continued persistence and resistance to complete degradation in the environment. The presence of the replacement pesticides indicates the susceptibility of the surficial aquifer to contamination irrespective of the changes in the pesticides used. A

  10. Ecotoxicological assessment of pesticides towards the plant growth promoting activities of Lentil (Lens esculentus)-specific Rhizobium sp. strain MRL3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahemad, Munees; Khan, Mohammad Saghir

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of the selected pesticides [herbicides (metribuzin and glyphosate), insecticides (imidacloprid and thiamethoxam) and fungicides (hexaconazole, metalaxyl and kitazin)] at the recommended and the higher dose rates on plant growth promoting traits of Rhizobium sp. strain MRL3 isolated from lentil-nodules. Strain MRL3 was explicitly selected owing to its high pesticide-tolerance ability and substantial production of indole acetic acid, siderophores (salicylic acid and 2, 3 dihydroxy benzoic acid), exo-polysaccharides, HCN and ammonia. A trend of pesticide-concentration dependent progressive-decline for plant growth promoting properties of Rhizobium sp. strain MRL3 was observed excluding exo-polysaccharides which was regularly augmented on exceeding the concentration of each tested pesticide from the recommended dose. Commonly, the maximum toxicity to plant growth promoting traits of Rhizobium was shown by glyphosate, imidacloprid and hexaconazole at three times the recommended rate among herbicides, insecticides and fungicides, respectively.

  11. Metabolic profiling of goldfish (Carassius auratis) after long-term glyphosate-based herbicide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Hui; Ruan, Ling-Yu; Zhou, Jin-Wei; Fu, Yong-Hong; Jiang, Lei; Zhao, He; Wang, Jun-Song

    2017-07-01

    Glyphosate is an efficient herbicide widely used worldwide. However, its toxicity to non-targeted organisms has not been fully elucidated. In this study, the toxicity of glyphosate-based herbicide was evaluated on goldfish (Carassius auratus) after long-term exposure. Tissues of brains, kidneys and livers were collected and submitted to NMR-based metabolomics analysis and histopathological inspection. Plasma was collected and the blood biochemical indexes of AST, ALT, BUN, CRE, LDH, SOD, GSH-Px, GR and MDA were measured. Long-term glyphosate exposure caused disorders of blood biochemical indexes and renal tissue injury in goldfish. Metabolomics analysis combined with correlation network analysis uncovered significant perturbations in oxidative stress, energy metabolism, amino acids metabolism and nucleosides metabolism in glyphosate dosed fish, which provide new clues to the toxicity of glyphosate. This integrated metabolomics approach showed its applicability in discovering the toxic mechanisms of pesticides, which provided new strategy for the assessment of the environmental risk of herbicides to non-target organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reducing pesticide use while preserving crop productivity and profitability on arable farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechenet, Martin; Dessaint, Fabrice; Py, Guillaume; Makowski, David; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    Achieving sustainable crop production while feeding an increasing world population is one of the most ambitious challenges of this century1. Meeting this challenge will necessarily imply a drastic reduction of adverse environmental effects arising from agricultural activities2. The reduction of pesticide use is one of the critical drivers to preserve the environment and human health. Pesticide use could be reduced through the adoption of new production strategies3-5; however, whether substantial reductions of pesticide use are possible without impacting crop productivity and profitability is debatable6-17. Here, we demonstrated that low pesticide use rarely decreases productivity and profitability in arable farms. We analysed the potential conflicts between pesticide use and productivity or profitability with data from 946 non-organic arable commercial farms showing contrasting levels of pesticide use and covering a wide range of production situations in France. We failed to detect any conflict between low pesticide use and both high productivity and high profitability in 77% of the farms. We estimated that total pesticide use could be reduced by 42% without any negative effects on both productivity and profitability in 59% of farms from our national network. This corresponded to an average reduction of 37, 47 and 60% of herbicide, fungicide and insecticide use, respectively. The potential for reducing pesticide use appeared higher in farms with currently high pesticide use than in farms with low pesticide use. Our results demonstrate that pesticide reduction is already accessible to farmers in most production situations. This would imply profound changes in market organization and trade balance.

  13. Microencapsulation of herbicide MCPA with native β-cyclodextrin and its methyl and hydroxypropyl derivatives: An experimental and theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Jorge; Cagide, Fernando; Melle-Franco, Manuel; Borges, Fernanda; Garrido, E. Manuela

    2014-03-01

    When a pesticide is released into the environment, most of it is lost before it reaches its target. An effective way to reduce environmental losses of pesticides is by using controlled release technology. Microencapsulation becomes a promising technique for the production of controlled release agricultural formulations. In this work, the microencapsulation of chlorophenoxy herbicide MCPA with native β-cyclodextrin and its methyl and hydroxypropyl derivatives was investigated. The phase solubility study showed that both native and β-CD derivatives increased the water solubility of the herbicide and inclusion complexes are formed in a stoichiometric ratio of 1:1. The stability constants describing the extent of formation of the complexes have been determined by phase solubility studies. 1H NMR experiments were also accomplished for the prepared solid systems and the data gathered confirm the formation of the inclusion complexes. 1H NMR data obtained for the MCPA/CDs complexes disclosed noticeable proton shift displacements for OCH2 group and H6 aromatic proton of MCPA provided clear evidence of inclusion complexation process, suggesting that the phenyl moiety of the herbicide was included in the hydrophobic cavity of CDs. Free energy molecular mechanics calculations confirm all these findings.

  14. A gas/liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for the rapid screening of 250 pesticides in aqueous matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandramouli, B.; Harvan, D.; Brittain, S.; Hass, R. [Eno River Labs, LLC. Durham, NC (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Pesticide residues in food present a potentially serious and significant cause for concern. Many pesticides have been associated with significant health effects to the nervous and endocrine systems and some have been deemed carcinogenic. There are many well-established techniques for pesticide analysis. However, commercial pesticide methods have traditionally only been available for specific pesticide families, such as chlorinated pesticides or herbicides, and at detection limits ranging from 0.05 ppb to 1 ppm in aqueous matrices. Techniques that can quickly screen for the presence/absence of pesticide residues in food matrices are critical in ensuring the safety of food and water. This paper outlines a combined Gas Chromatographic-High Resolution Mass Spectrometric (GC-HRMS) and Liquid Chromatographic Tandem Mass Spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) screening assay for 250 pesticides that was developed for use in water, and soda samples at screening levels ranging from 0.1-5 ppb. The pesticides selected have been identified by the European Union as being of concern and the target of possible legislation. The list encompasses a variety of pesticide classes and compound groupings.

  15. Pesticide sorption and leaching potential on three Hawaiian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen E; Ray, Chittaranjan; Ki, Seo Jin; Spokas, Kurt A; Koskinen, William C

    2015-08-15

    On the Hawaiian Islands, groundwater is the principal source of potable water and contamination of this key resource by pesticides is of great concern. To evaluate the leaching potential of four weak acid herbicides [aminocyclopyrachlor, picloram, metsulfuron-methyl, biologically active diketonitrile degradate of isoxaflutole (DKN)] and two neutral non-ionizable herbicides [oxyfluorfen, alachlor], their sorption coefficients were determined on three prevalent soils from the island of Oahu. Metsulfuron-methyl, aminocylcopyrachlor, picloram, and DKN were relatively low sorbing herbicides (K(oc) = 3-53 mL g(-1)), alachlor was intermediate (K(oc) = 120-150 mL g(-1)), and oxyfluorfen sorbed very strongly to the three soils (K(oc) > 12,000 mL g(-1)). Following determination of K(oc) values, the groundwater ubiquity score (GUS) indices for these compounds were calculated to predicted their behavior with the Comprehensive Leaching Risk Assessment System (CLEARS; Tier-1 methodology for Hawaii). Metsulfuron-methyl, aminocyclopyrachlor, picloram, and DKN would be categorized as likely leachers in all three Hawaiian soils, indicating a high risk of groundwater contamination across the island of Oahu. In contrast, oxyfluorfen, regardless of the degradation rate, would possess a low and acceptable leaching risk due to its high sorption on all three soils. The leaching potential of alachlor was more difficult to classify, with a GUS value between 1.8 and 2.8. In addition, four different biochar amendments to these soils did not significantly alter their sorption capacities for aminocyclopyrachlor, indicating a relatively low impact of black carbon additions from geologic volcanic inputs of black carbon. Due to the fact that pesticide environmental risks are chiefly dependent on local soil characteristics, this work has demonstrated that once soil specific sorption parameters are known one can assess the potential pesticide leaching risks. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Enantioselective Effects of Chiral Pesticides on their Primary Targets and Secondary Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Zhang, Jianyun; Yao, Yijun

    2017-01-01

    Enantioselectivity has been well recognized in the environmental fate and effects of chiral pesticides. Enantiospecific action of the optical enantiomers on the biological molecules establishes the mechanistic basis for the enantioselective toxicity of chiral pesticides to both target and non-target organisms. We undertook a structured search of bibliographic databases for research literature concerning the enantioselective effects of chiral pesticides, including insecticides, herbicides and fungicides, on biomolecules in various species by using some key words. The results of the relevant literatures were reviewed in the text and summarized in tables. Pesticides generally exert their activity on the target organisms via disrupting the primary target biomolecules. In non-target species, effects of pesticides on the secondary targets distinguished from the primary ones make great contribution to their toxicity. Recent investigations have provided convincing evidence of enantioselective toxicity of chiral pesticides to both target and non-target species which is recognized to result from their enantiospecific action on the primary or secondary targets in organisms. This review confirms that chiral pesticides have enantiospecific effects on both primary and secondary target biomolecules in organisms. Future studies regarding toxicological effects of chiral pesticides should focus on the relationship between the enantiomeric difference in the compound-biomolecules interaction and the enantioselectivity in their toxicity.

  17. A Cross-Sectional Study of Pesticide Use and Knowledge of Smallholder Potato Farmers in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Sikhu Okonya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to increased pest and disease problems, potato farmers use pesticides, which could raise environmental and health concerns. This study sought to promote proper and safe pesticide-handling practices by providing data needed to guide pesticide regulation policy and training for extension staff and farmers. A household survey was conducted in three major potato-growing agroecological zones of Uganda. Two hundred and four potato farmers were interviewed about the type and source of pesticides they use in potato cultivation, the frequency of applications, the use of protective clothing, and cases of pesticide poisoning. The types of pesticides used in potato were fungicides (72%, insecticides (62%, and herbicides (3%. Overall, use of personal protective equipment was low, that is, gumboots (73%, gloves (7%, face masks (16%, and long sleeve shirts (42%. Forty-three percent of farmers who applied pesticides reported having experienced skin itching, 25% skin burning sensation, 43% coughing, 60% a runny nose, 27% teary eyes, and 42% dizziness. An IPM approach involving only moderately to slightly hazardous pesticides when pest and disease incidence has reached economic injury levels and by considering all safety measures during application and storage would be environmentally recommendable and result in reduced health risks.

  18. Childhood pesticide poisoning in Zhejiang, China: a retrospective analysis from 2006 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimaer, Aziguli; Chen, Guangdi; Zhang, Meibian; Zhou, Lifang; Fang, Xinglin; Jiang, Wei

    2017-06-28

    Pesticide poisoning in children has been a serious public health issue around the world, especially in the developing countries where agriculture is still one of the largest economic sectors. The purpose of this study was to analyze epidemiological characteristics of acute pesticide poisoning in children from Zhejiang province, China. The pesticide poisoning cases for children were retrieved from Occupational Disease Surveillance and Reporting System, Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, China. The incident cases, deaths, and fatality rate of child pesticide poisoning from 2006 through 2015 were calculated. During the study period, totally 2952 children were poisoned by pesticides, with 66 deaths, resulting in a fatality rate of 2.24%. Among them, there were 1607 male cases with 28 deaths, and 1345 female cases with 38 deaths. Most of the cases occurred in preschool children (1349) and adolescent age group (1269). Organophosphate and carbamate insecticides were the cause of most poisonings (1130), leading to 34 deaths. The highest fatality rate (3.13%) was due to poisoning by herbicides and fungicides, causing 14 deaths out of 448 cases. Poisoning occurred mostly in rural areas (78%). And most pesticide poisoning occurred in the summer (896) and fall (811), while fewest poisoning cases in the winter (483) but with the highest fatality rate (3.52%). This study shows that pesticide poisoning of children is a major health problem in Zhejiang, suggesting preventive strategies should be conducted to control childhood pesticide poisoning.

  19. Removal of pesticide mixtures in a stormwater wetland collecting runoff from a vineyard catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Elodie; Payraudeau, Sylvain; Faivre, Etienne; Grégoire, Caroline; Gangloff, Sophie; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2011-05-01

    Wetlands can collect contaminated runoff from agricultural catchments and retain dissolved and particle-laden pesticides. However, knowledge about the capacity and functioning of wetland systems with respect to the removal of pesticides is very limited. Here we show that stormwater wetlands can efficiently remove pesticides in runoff from vineyard catchments during the period of pesticide application, although flow and hydrochemical conditions of the wetland largely vary over time. During the entire agricultural season, the inflowing load of nine fungicides, six herbicides, one insecticide and four degradation products was 8.039g whereas the outflowing load was 2.181g. Removal rates of dissolved loads by the wetland ranged from 39% (simazine) to 100% (cymoxanil, gluphosinate, kresoxim methyl and terbuthylazine). Dimethomorph, diuron, glyphosate, metalaxyl and tetraconazole were more efficiently removed in spring than in summer. More than 88% of the input mass of suspended solids was retained, underscoring the capability of the wetland to trap pesticide-laden particles via sedimentation. Only the insecticide flufenoxuron was frequently detected in the wetland sediments. Our results demonstrate that stormwater wetlands can efficiently remove pesticide mixtures in agricultural runoff during critical periods of pesticide application, although fluctuations in the runoff regime and hydrochemical characteristics can affect the removal rates of individual pesticides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Spatio-temporal patterns of pesticide residues in the Turia and Júcar Rivers (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ccanccapa, Alexander; Masiá, Ana; Andreu, Vicente; Picó, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted on the occurrence of 50 pesticides in water and sediments of Turia and Júcar Rivers (Valencian Community, Eastern Spain) for a period of two consecutive years each, 2010/2011 and 2012/2013, respectively to assess the contribution of agriculture and urban activities on pesticide pollution. The results showed that mean concentrations of pesticides ranged from ethion and carbofuran were those found at higher concentrations. Ubiquitous pesticides are those with long half-lives. The most polluted parts of the rivers were the headwaters and the mouth, which could be related to the agricultural practices and rainfall. Contrarily, in the abrupt part of the rivers of difficult access the contamination is low. Other quality parameters monitored in this study also corroborate the worst water quality in the alluvial plains that coincides with higher anthropic pressure. The temporal variations also indicated a strong relation of pesticide concentrations with hydrology, the higher the river flow, the higher number and frequency of pesticides but at lower concentrations. On the contrary, at lower river flows higher pesticide concentrations were detected. The risk assessment for aquatic biota pointed out that organophosphorus and fungicides are a threat to fish and daphnia and herbicides and fungicides are hazards for algae. Thus, the strict control of pesticide concentrations is important to preserve the aquatic ecosystems health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pesticide Application among Farmers in the Catchment of Ashaiman Irrigation Scheme of Ghana: Health Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memuna M. Mattah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pesticide use in modern day agriculture has increased tremendously. Pesticides are used to control pests and weeds, as well as protect crops from postharvest losses; however, their effects on humans and the environment cannot be overstated. This study examined pesticide acquisition, handling, and use among 120 farmers within the catchment of a small urban irrigation scheme. Also, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted among selected farmers through which further data was collected to augment that of the survey. Twelve types of pesticides, including herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides, were found in use in the study areas. Three main sources of information about pesticides were identified, 43.3% from extension officers, 39.2% from agrochemical dealers, and 10% from colleague farmers. Seventy-five percent (75% of the respondents purchased the pesticides from agrochemical shops. Out of 74 farmers who were observed spraying pesticides on their farms, only 25.7% wore dresses that covered their whole body but without goggles. About sixty-seven percent (66.7% of the farmers whose chemical got finished left the containers on their farms or threw them into the bushes around. The frequency of application was influenced by affordability and size of farm, among others. The study recommended that training of farmers on pesticide handling and use should be intensified.

  2. Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in the Assessment of Enantioselective Toxicity of Chiral Pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaoqing; Liu, Ying; Li, Feixue

    2017-01-01

    In biological systems, the individual stereoisomers of chiral substances possess significantly different biochemical properties because the specific structure-activity relationships are required for a common site on biomolecules. In the past decade, there has been increasing concern over the enantioselective toxicity of environmental chiral pollutants, especially chiral pesticides. Different responses and activities of a pair of enantiomers of chiral pesticides were often observed. Therefore, assessment of the enantioselective toxicological properties of chiral pesticides is a prerequisite in application of single-isomer products and particularly important for environmental protection. The development of biomarkers that can predict enantioselective effects from chiral pesticides has recently been gained more and more attention. The biomarkers of oxidative stress have become a topic of significant interest for toxic assessments. In this review, we summarized current knowledge and advances in the understanding of enantiomeric oxidative processes in biological systems in response to chiral pesticides. The consistent results in two types of chiral insecticides (synthetic pyrethroids and organochlorine pesticides) showed the significant difference in cytotoxicity of enantiomers, suggesting the antioxidant enzymes are reliable biomarkers for the assessment of toxicity of chiral chemicals. Results indicate that antioxidant enzymes are sensitive and valid biomarkers to assess the oxidative damage caused by chiral herbicides. In addition, it can be inferred that the enantioselectivity of chiral herbicides on antioxidant enzymes exists in other species. Compared with insecticides and herbicides, researches about the enantioselectivity of oxidative stress caused by chiral fungicides are quite limited. Only two kinds of chiral fungicides has been used to study the enantioselectivity of oxidative stress by now. The current knowledge that enantioselective processes of oxidative

  3. Microalgae dual-head biosensors for selective detection of herbicides with fiber-optic luminescent O2 transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh-Flórez, David; de la Hera, Cristina; Costas, Eduardo; Orellana, Guillermo

    2014-04-15

    The microalgal species Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides (D. c.) was immobilized into porous silicone films and their photosynthetic activity was monitored with an integrated robust luminescent O2 sensor. The biosensor specificity towards a particular pesticide has been achieved by manufacturing a fiber-optic dual-head device containing both analyte-sensitive and analyte-resistant D. c. strains. The latter are not genetically modified microalgae, but a product of modified Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis followed by ratchet selection cycles. In this way the target herbicide decreases the O2 production of the analyte-sensitive immobilized strain without affecting the analyte-resistant population response; any other pollutant will lower the O2 production of both strains. The effect of the sample flow-rate, exposure time to the herbicide, biomass loading, biosensor film thickness, intensity of the actinic light, illumination cycle, and temperature on the biosensor response has been evaluated using waterborne simazine as test bench. The biosensing device is able to provide in situ measurements of the herbicide concentration every 180 min. The biosensor limit of detection for this herbicide was 12 μg L(-1), with a working range of 50-800 μg L(-1). The biosensor specificity to simazine has been assessed by comparing its response to that of isoproturon. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Comparing metabolic functionalities, community structures, and dynamics of herbicide-degrading communities cultivated with different substrate concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gözdereliler, Erkin; Boon, Nico; Aamand, Jens; De Roy, Karen; Granitsiotis, Michael S; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Sørensen, Sebastian R

    2013-01-01

    Two 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA)-degrading enrichment cultures selected from an aquifer on low (0.1 mg liter(-1)) or high (25 mg liter(-1)) MCPA concentrations were compared in terms of metabolic activity, community composition, population growth, and single cell physiology. Different community compositions and major shifts in community structure following exposure to different MCPA concentrations were observed using both 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting and pyrosequencing. The communities also differed in their MCPA-mineralizing activities. The enrichments selected on low concentrations mineralized MCPA with shorter lag phases than those selected on high concentrations. Flow cytometry measurements revealed that mineralization led to cell growth. The presence of low-nucleic acid-content bacteria (LNA bacteria) was correlated with mineralization activity in cultures selected on low herbicide concentrations. This suggests that LNA bacteria may play a role in degradation of low herbicide concentrations in aquifers impacted by agriculture. This study shows that subpopulations of herbicide-degrading bacteria that are adapted to different pesticide concentrations can coexist in the same environment and that using a low herbicide concentration enables enrichment of apparently oligotrophic subpopulations.

  5. A Synthesis of the Effects of Pesticides on Microbial Persistence in Aquatic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Zachery R.; Harwood, Valerie J.; Rohr, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides are a pervasive presence in aquatic ecosystems throughout the world. While pesticides are intended to control fungi, insects, and other pests, their mechanisms of action are often not specific enough to prevent unintended effects, such as on non-target microbial populations. Microorganisms, including algae and cyanobacteria, protozoa, aquatic fungi, and bacteria, form the basis of many food webs and are responsible for crucial aspects of biogeochemical cycling; therefore, the potential for pesticides to alter microbial community structures must be understood to preserve ecosystem services. This review examines studies that focused on direct population-level effects and indirect community-level effects of pesticides on microorganisms. Generally, insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides were found to have adverse direct effects on algal and fungal species. Insecticides and fungicides also had deleterious direct effects in the majority of studies examining protozoa species, although herbicides were found to have inconsistent direct effects on protozoans. Our synthesis revealed mixed or no direct effects on bacterial species among all pesticide categories, with results highly dependent on the target species, chemical, and concentration used in the study. Examination of community-level, indirect effects revealed that all pesticide categories had a tendency to reduce higher trophic levels, thereby diminishing top-down pressures and favoring lower trophic levels. Often, indirect effects exerted greater influence than direct effects. However, few studies have been conducted to specifically address community-level effects of pesticides on microorganisms and further research is necessary to better understand and predict the net effects of pesticides on ecosystem health. PMID:26565685

  6. Degradation of terbuthylazine, difenoconazole and pendimethalin pesticides by selected fungi cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, A P; Serrano, C; Pires, T; Mestrinho, E; Dias, L; Teixeira, D Martins; Caldeira, A T

    2012-10-01

    Contamination of waters by xenobiotic compounds such as pesticides presents a serious environmental problem with substantial levels of pesticides now contaminating European water resources. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of the fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus oryzae, Lentinula edodes, Penicillium brevicompactum and Lecanicillium saksenae, for the biodegradation of the pesticides terbuthylazine, difenoconazole and pendimethalin in batch liquid cultures. These pesticides are common soil and water contaminants and terbuthylazine is considered the most persistent triazine herbicide in surface environments. P. brevicompactum and L. saksenae were achieved by enrichment, isolation and screening of fungi capable to metabolize the pesticides studied. The isolates were obtained from two pesticide-primed materials (soil and biomixture). Despite the relatively high persistence of terbuthylazine, the results obtained in this work showed that the fungi species studied have a high capability of biotransformation of this xenobiotic, comparatively the results obtained in other similar studies. The highest removal percentage of terbuthylazine from liquid medium was achieved with A. oryzae (~80%), although the major biodegradation has been reached with P. brevicompactum. The higher ability of P. brevicompactum to metabolize terbuthylazine was presumably acquired through chronic exposure to contamination with the herbicide. L. saksenae could remove 99.5% of the available pendimethalin in batch liquid cultures. L. edodes proved to be a fungus with a high potential for biodegradation of pesticides, especially difenoconazole and pendimethalin. Furthermore, the metabolite desethyl-terbuthylazine was detected in L. edodes liquid culture medium, indicating terbuthylazine biodegradation by this fungus. The fungi strains investigated could prove to be valuable as active pesticide-degrading microorganisms, increasing the efficiency of biopurification systems containing

  7. Sorption of Pesticides to Natural and Synthetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guluzada, Leyla; Luo, Leilei; Pattky, Martin; Anwander, Reiner; Huhn, Carolin; Haderlein, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Many organic pollutants tend to associate with particles in environment. Such interactions with solid surfaces may not only alter the reactivity and bioavailability of pesticides, but also their uptake. This alteration may occur both in the way and in the amount the compound enters the organisms. In its turn this may change the overall effects of these compounds on organisms and ecosystems. The main goal of the work presented here is to provide mechanistic information on the sorbate-sorbent interactions between nanoparticles and a set of pesticides under environmentally relevant and physiological conditions. As such, the work is part of the interdisciplinary graduate research program EXPAND at the University of Tübingen investigating molecular interactions between pesticides and particles to elucidate how such interactions impact the toxicological effects. To this end, natural and synthetic nanoparticles covering a wide range of physicochemical properties and pesticides for different target organisms were used. Sorption experiments were carried out with insecticides (imidacloprid; thiacloprid), fungicides (hexaconazole; propiconazole) and herbicides (glyphosate with its metabolite AMPA; glufosinate). The choice of the pesticides was based on their environmental significance and their mode of action. Both engineered nanoparticles with tailored surface properties and nanoparticles of natural origin were characterized and applied to cover various modes of sorptive interactions with the pesticides. The impact of various geochemical and physiological conditions including pH, temperature, ionic strength, background electrolytes and DOM (dissolved organic matter) on the sorption of the pesticides to nanoparticles was studied. Sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms were determined and the results are discussed in terms of predominant sorption mechanisms and the suitability of certain nanoparticles for toxicological studies in the framework of the EXPAND project.

  8. Suspected poisoning of domestic animals by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloni, Francesca; Cortinovis, Cristina; Rivolta, Marina; Davanzo, Franca

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing all suspected cases of domestic animal poisoning attributed to pesticides, reported to the Milan Poison Control Centre (MPCC) between January 2011 and December 2013. During this period, pesticides were found to be responsible for 37.3% of all suspected poisoning enquiries received (815). The most commonly species involved was the dog (71.1% of calls) followed by the cat (15.8%), while a limited number of cases involved horses, goats and sheep. Most cases of exposure (47.1%) resulted in mild to moderate clinical signs. The outcome was reported in 59.9% of these cases, with death occurring in 10.4% of them. Insecticides (40.8%) proved to be the most common group of pesticides involved and exposure to pyrethrins-pyrethroids accounted for the majority of calls. According to the MPCC data, there has been a decrease in the number of suspected poisonings cases attributed to pesticides that have been banned by the EU, including aldicarb, carbofuran, endosulfan and paraquat. In contrast, there has been an increase of suspected poisoning cases attributed to the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and acetamiprid, probably due to their widespread use in recent years. Cases of suspected poisoning that involved exposure to rodenticides accounted for 27.6% of calls received by the MPCC and anticoagulant rodenticides were the primary cause of calls, with many cases involving brodifacoum and bromadiolone. Herbicides were involved in 14.2% of calls related to pesticides and glyphosate was the main culprit in cases involving dogs, cats, horses, goats and sheep. As far as exposure to molluscicides (11.5%) and fungicides (5.9%), most of the cases involved dogs and the suspected poisoning agents were metaldehyde and copper compounds respectively. The data collected are useful in determining trends in poisoning episodes and identifying newly emerging toxicants, thus demonstrating the prevalence of pesticides as causative agents in animal

  9. Factors Affecting the Occurrence and Distribution of Pesticides in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Henry M.

    2007-01-01

    The Yakima River Basin is a major center of agricultural production. With a cultivated area of about 450,000 ha (hectares), the region is an important producer of tree fruit, grapes, hops, and dairy products as well as a variety of smaller production crops. To control pest insects, weeds, and fungal infections, about 146 pesticide active ingredients were applied in various formulations during the 2000 growing season. Forty-six streams or drains in the Yakima River Basin were sampled for pesticides in July and October of 2000. Water samples also were collected from 11 irrigation canals in July. The samples were analyzed for 75 of the pesticide active ingredients applied during the 2000 growing season - 63 percent of the pesticides were detected. An additional 14 pesticide degradates were detected, including widespread occurrence of 2 degradates of DDT. The most frequently detected herbicide was 2,4-D, which was used on a variety of crops and along rights-of-way. It was detected in 82 percent of the samples collected in July. The most frequently detected insecticide was azinphos-methyl, which was used primarily on tree fruit. It was detected in 37 percent of the samples collected in July. All occurrences of azinphos-methyl exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency recommended chronic concentration for the protection of aquatic organisms. More than 90 percent of the July samples and 79 percent of the October samples contained two or more pesticides, with a median of nine in July and five in October. The most frequently occurring herbicides in mixtures were atrazine, 2,4-D, and the degradate deethylatrazine. The most frequently occurring insecticides in mixtures were azinphos-methyl, carbaryl, and p,p'-DDE (a degradate of DDT). A greater number of pesticides and higher concentrations were found in July than in October, reflecting greater usage and water availability for transport during the summer growing and irrigation season. Most of the samples collected in

  10. Spatial variation in herbicide leaching from a marine clay soil via subsurface drains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulén, Barbro M; Larsbo, Mats; Kreuger, Jenny K; Svanbäck, Annika

    2014-03-01

    Subsurface transport via tile drains can significantly contribute to pesticide contamination of surface waters. The spatial variation in subsurface leaching of normally applied herbicides was examined together with phosphorus losses in 24 experimental plots with water sampled flow-proportionally. The study site was a flat, tile-drained area with 60% marine clay in the topsoil in southeast Sweden. The objectives were to quantify the leaching of frequently used herbicides from a tile drained cracking clay soil and to evaluate the variation in leaching within the experimental area and relate this to topsoil management practices (tillage method and structure liming). In summer 2009, 0.14, 0.22 and 1.62%, respectively, of simultaneously applied amounts of MCPA, fluroxypyr and clopyralid were leached by heavy rain five days after spraying. In summer 2011, on average 0.70% of applied bentazone was leached by short bursts of intensive rain 12 days after application. Peak flow concentrations for 50% of the treated area for MCPA and 33% for bentazone exceeded the Swedish no-effect guideline values for aquatic ecosystems. Approximately 0.08% of the glyphosate applied was leached in dissolved form in the winters of 2008/2009 and 2010/2011. Based on measurements of glyphosate in particulate form, total glyphosate losses were twice as high (0.16%) in the second winter. The spatial inter-plot variation was large (72-115%) for all five herbicides studied, despite small variations (25%) in water discharge. The study shows the importance of local scale soil transport properties for herbicide leaching in cracking clay soils. © 2013 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Spatial variation in herbicide leaching from a marine clay soil via subsurface drains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulén, Barbro M; Larsbo, Mats; Kreuger, Jenny K; Svanbäck, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Background Subsurface transport via tile drains can significantly contribute to pesticide contamination of surface waters. The spatial variation in subsurface leaching of normally applied herbicides was examined together with phosphorus losses in 24 experimental plots with water sampled flow-proportionally. The study site was a flat, tile-drained area with 60% marine clay in the topsoil in southeast Sweden. The objectives were to quantify the leaching of frequently used herbicides from a tile drained cracking clay soil and to evaluate the variation in leaching within the experimental area and relate this to topsoil management practices (tillage method and structure liming). Results In summer 2009, 0.14, 0.22 and 1.62%, respectively, of simultaneously applied amounts of MCPA, fluroxypyr and clopyralid were leached by heavy rain five days after spraying. In summer 2011, on average 0.70% of applied bentazone was leached by short bursts of intensive rain 12 days after application. Peak flow concentrations for 50% of the treated area for MCPA and 33% for bentazone exceeded the Swedish no-effect guideline values for aquatic ecosystems. Approximately 0.08% of the glyphosate applied was leached in dissolved form in the winters of 2008/2009 and 2010/2011. Based on measurements of glyphosate in particulate form, total glyphosate losses were twice as high (0.16%) in the second winter. The spatial inter-plot variation was large (72–115%) for all five herbicides studied, despite small variations (25%) in water discharge. Conclusions The study shows the importance of local scale soil transport properties for herbicide leaching in cracking clay soils. © 2013 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:23658148

  12. Pesticides and oncogenic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakonaki, Elena; Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Liesivuori, Jyrki; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides constitute a diverse class of chemicals used for the protection of agricultural products. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides can cause malignant transformation of cells in in vitro and in vivo models. In the current minireview a comprehensive summary of recent in vitro findings is presented along with data reported from human population studies, regarding the impact of pesticide exposure on activation or dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Substantial mechanistic work suggests that pesticides are capable of inducing mutations in oncogenes and increase their transcriptional expression in vitro, whereas human population studies indicate associations between pesticide exposure levels and mutation occurrence in cancer-related genes. Further work is required to fully explore the exact mechanisms by which pesticide exposure affects the integrity and normal function of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Herbicide-resistant crops: utilities and limitations for herbicide-resistant weed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jerry M; Owen, Micheal D K

    2011-06-08

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds.

  14. Quantifying herbicide injuries in maize by use of remote sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Dicke, Dominik; Jacobi, Jens; Büchse, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Maize breeders and plant protection companies require early information about negative side effects of herbicides on maize plants to identify cultivars which are susceptible to specific herbicide agents. Experiments were conducted in 2005 and 2006 to quantify herbicide injuries in maize. In 2005, sulfonylurea type herbicides and an untreated control were established in a susceptible and an insusceptible maize cultivar at University of Bonn, Research Station Dikopshof. Multispectral images wer...

  15. New Labeling for Neonicotinoid Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    These documents, a graphic of the bee advisory box and letters to pesticide registrants, describe steps by EPA to change pesticide labels to better protect pollinators by being clearer and more precise in their directions for pesticide application.

  16. Models for Pesticide Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA considers the toxicity of the pesticide as well as the amount of pesticide to which a person or the environments may be exposed in risk assessment. Scientists use mathematical models to predict pesticide concentrations in exposure assessment.

  17. Toxicology of pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    Dubská, Veronika

    2008-01-01

    Toxykology of pesticides Pesticides are substances or mixtures substances as a natural so synthetic origin. By effect of pesticides is removing of pest and undesirable plants. However owing to their toxicity and unaware manipulation with these substances may go to a waste of another than target organism, plants, rivers and land. The target of this graduation theses has been draw up possibility hazards resulting of using these substances.

  18. Understanding Pesticide Risks: Toxicity and Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Muntz, Helen; Miller, Rhonda; Alston, Diane

    2016-01-01

    This fact sheet provides information about pesticide risks to human health, primary means of pesticide exposure, standardized measures of pesticide toxicity, pesticide signal words and type of pesticide formulations.

  19. Soil fungi as indicators of pesticide soil pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić Leka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil fungi, with their pronounced enzymic activity and high osmotic potential, represent a significant indicator of negative effects of different pesticides on the agroecosystem as a whole. In that respect, a trial was set up on the alluvium soil type with the aim to investigate the effect of different herbicides (Simazine, Napropamid, Paraquat, fungicides (Captan and Mancozeb and insecticides (Fenitrothion and Dimethoate on a number of soil fungi under apple trees. The number of soil fungi was determined during four growing seasons by an indirect method of dilution addition on the Czapek agar. The study results indicate that the fungi belong to the group of microorganisms that, after an initial sensible response to the presence of pesticides in the soil, very rapidly establish normal metabolism enabling them even to increase their number. The fungicides and insecticides applied were found to be particularly effective in that respect.

  20. Ethical reflections on herbicide-resistant crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøe, Peter; Madsen, Kathrine Hauge

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops has caused a fierce public debate in Europe.Much of the controversy centres on possible risks to the environment. A specific problem here is thatrisk perception of the scientific experts differs from that of the public. In this paper, risks...... associatedwith herbicide-resistant crops are presented from the point of view of experts and lay people. In thepublic perception, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are troublesome because of their association with twotechnologies: genetic engineering of crops and the use of herbicides. These technologies...... are perceived asrisky because they seem to share certain features: in particular, their long-term effects are unknown andthey are dreaded. Other value questions also come into play. The public seems to be concerned that risksare not outweighed by usefulness, that using HR crops is the wrong path to sustainable...

  1. Metsulfuron-methyl-based herbicidal ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernak, Juliusz; Niemczak, Michał; Shamshina, Julia L; Gurau, Gabriela; Głowacki, Grzegorz; Praczyk, Tadeusz; Marcinkowska, Katarzyna; Rogers, Robin D

    2015-04-08

    Ten sulfonylurea-based herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs) were prepared by combining the metsulfuron-methyl anion with various cation types including quaternary ammonium ([bis(2-hydroxyethyl)methyloleylammonium](+), [2-hydroxyethyltrimethylammonium](+)), pyridinium ([1-dodecylpyridinium](+)), piperidinium ([1-methyl-1-propylpiperidinium](+)), imidazolium ([1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium](+), [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium](+)), pyrrolidinium ([1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium](+)), morpholinium ([4-decyl-4-methylmorpholinium](+)), and phosphonium ([trihexyltetradecylphosphonium](+) and [tetrabutylphosphonium](+)). Their herbicidal efficacy was studied in both greenhouse tests and field trials. Preliminary results for the greenhouse tests showed at least twice the activity for all HILs when compared to the activity of commercial Galmet 20 SG, with HILs with phosphonium cations being the most effective. The results of two-year field studies showed significantly less enhancement of activity than observed in the greenhouse; nonetheless, it was found that the herbicidal efficacy was higher than that of the commercial analog, and efficacy varied depending on the plant species.

  2. Exposure of native bees foraging in an agricultural landscape to current-use pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, Michelle; Vandever, Mark W.; Smalling, Kelly L.

    2016-01-01

    The awareness of insects as pollinators and indicators of environmental quality has grown in recent years, partially in response to declines in honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations. While most pesticide research has focused on honey bees, there has been less work on native bee populations. To determine the exposure of native bees to pesticides, bees were collected from an existing research area in northeastern Colorado from two land cover types: grasslands (2013-2014) and wheat fields (2014). Traps were deployed bi-monthly during the summer at each land cover type and all bees, regardless of species, were composited as whole samples and analyzed for 136 current-use pesticides and degradates. This reconnaissance approach provides a sampling of all species and represents overall pesticide exposure (internal and external). Nineteen pesticides and degradates were detected in 54 composite samples collected. Compounds detected in >10% of the samples included the insecticides thiamethoxam (46%), bifenthrin (28%), clothianidin (24%), chlorpyrifos (17%), and imidacloprid (13%), the fungicides azoxystrobin (17%), and pyraclostrobin (11%), and the herbicide atrazine (19%). Concentrations ranged from 1.1 to 312 ng/g for individual pesticides. Pesticides were detected in samples collected from both grasslands and wheat fields; the location of the sample and the surrounding land cover at the 1000 m buffer influenced the pesticides detected but because of a small number of temporally comparable samples, correlations between pesticide concentration and land cover were not significant. The results show native bees collected in both grasslands and wheat fields are exposed to multiple pesticides, these results can direct future research on routes/timing of pesticide exposure and the design of future conservation efforts for pollinators.

  3. Exposure of native bees foraging in an agricultural landscape to current-use pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, Michelle L; Vandever, Mark; Smalling, Kelly L

    2016-01-15

    The awareness of insects as pollinators and indicators of environmental quality has grown in recent years, partially in response to declines in honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations. While most pesticide research has focused on honey bees, there has been less work on native bee populations. To determine the exposure of native bees to pesticides, bees were collected from an existing research area in northeastern Colorado in both grasslands (2013-2014) and wheat fields (2014). Traps were deployed bi-monthly during the summer at each land cover type and all bees, regardless of species, were composited as whole samples and analyzed for 136 current-use pesticides and degradates. This reconnaissance approach provides a sampling of all species and represents overall pesticide exposure (internal and external). Nineteen pesticides and degradates were detected in 54 composite samples collected. Compounds detected in >2% of the samples included: insecticides thiamethoxam (46%), bifenthrin (28%), clothianidin (24%), chlorpyrifos (17%), imidacloprid (13%), fipronil desulfinyl (7%; degradate); fungicides azoxystrobin (17%), pyraclostrobin (11%), fluxapyroxad (9%), and propiconazole (9%); herbicides atrazine (19%) and metolachlor (9%). Concentrations ranged from 1 to 310 ng/g for individual pesticides. Pesticides were detected in samples collected from both grasslands and wheat fields; the location of the sample and the surrounding land cover at the 1000 m radius influenced the pesticides detected but because of a small number of temporally comparable samples, correlations between pesticide concentration and land cover were not significant. The results show native bees collected in an agricultural landscape are exposed to multiple pesticides, these results can direct future research on routes/timing of pesticide exposure and the design of future conservation efforts for pollinators. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Towards reduced herbicide use in forest vegetation management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Towards reduced herbicide use in forest vegetation management. ... Southern Forests: a Journal of Forest Science ... low cost of chemical herbicides, however, have led to systems of vegetation management that rely on their continued availability and the near exclusion of non-herbicide methods for controlling forest weeds.

  5. Performance of herbicides in sugarcane straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosilaine Araldi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of mechanical harvesting of sugarcane generates a large deposition of straw on the soil surface, providing a coverage that several studies have found important for reducing the weed population. Although such coverage reduces weed infestations, additional management, including chemical control, is still needed. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the leaching of atrazine, pendimethalin, metribuzin, clomazone, diuron and hexazinone in sugarcane straw. The experiment was conducted at the School of Agronomic Engineering at UNESP (Sao Paulo State University - Botucatu/SP. The sugarcane straw was collected in the field, cut and placed in quantities of 10t ha-1 in the capsules used as experimental units. The experimental design was completely randomized, using six herbicide treatments and four replications. Within 24 hours after the herbicides were applied in capsules with straw, five different rainfalls (5, 10, 20, 50 and 100mm were simulated. The leached water was collected for chromatographic analysis. The herbicide percentages that crossed the straw layer were statistically correlated with the rainfall amount by the Mitscherlich model that compares the facility of herbicide removal from sugarcane straw. In summary, pendimethalin did not present quantified transposition of the product by sugarcane straw even with a rain simulation of 100 mm. Furthermore, two different profiles of facility to transpose the herbicides in straw were found: one for metribuzin and hexazinone that crossed quickly through the straw layer and another for atrazine, diuron and clomazone that required more rainfall to be leached from coverage to the soil according to the maximum removable amount of each herbicide.

  6. Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee, a permanent, broadly representative advisory committee, meets with EPA on a regular basis to discuss pesticide regulatory, policy, and program implementation issues.

  7. Pesticide Product Information System (PPIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Information System contains information concerning all pesticide products registered in the United States. It includes registrant name and...

  8. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 340: NTS Pesticide Release Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Obi

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide documentation of the completed corrective action and to provide data confirming the corrective action. The corrective action was performed in accordance with the approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 1999) and consisted of clean closure by excavation and disposal. The Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 was formerly used for storage of farm supplies including pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers. The Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 was formerly used to clean pesticide and herbicide equipment. Steam-cleaning rinsate and sink drainage occasionally overflowed a sump into adjoining drainage ditches. One ditch flows south and is referred to as the quonset hut ditch. The other ditch flows southeast and is referred to as the inner drainage ditch. The Area 23 Skid Huts were formerly used for storing and mixing pesticide and herbicide solutions. Excess solutions were released directly to the ground near the skid huts. The skid huts were moved to a nearby location prior to the site characterization performed in 1998 and reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE, 1998). The vicinity and site plans of the Area 23 sites are shown in Figures 2 and 3, respectively.

  9. Lethal effects of selected novel pesticides on immature stages of Trichogramma pretiosum (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Ashraf; Ruberson, John R

    2017-12-01

    Trichogramma pretiosum Riley is an important egg parasitoid and biological control agent of caterpillar pests. We studied the acute toxicity of 20 pesticides (14 insecticides/miticides, three fungicides and three herbicides) exposed to recommended field rates. Egg, larval, and pupal stages of the parasitoid in their hosts were dipped in formulated solutions of the pesticides and evaluated 10 days later for percentage of host eggs with holes, number of parasitoids emerged per egg with holes, and stage-specific mortality of immature as well as adult wasps within the host eggs. Seven insecticides (buprofezin, chlorantraniliprole, spirotetramat, flonicamid, flubendiamide) and miticides (spiromesifen, cyflumetofen), one herbicide (nicosulfuron), and three fungicides (myclobutanil, pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin + tebuconazole) caused no significant mortality to immature stages or pre-emergent adult parasitoids relative to controls. By contrast, seven insecticides/miticides (abamectin, acetamiprid, dinotefuran, fipronil, novaluron, spinetoram, tolfenpyrad) adversely affected immature and pre-emergent adult T. pretiosum, with tolfenpyrad being particularly lethal. Two herbicides had moderate (glufosinate ammonium) to severe (s-metolachlor) acute lethal effects on the immature parasitoids. This study corroborates earlier findings with adult T. pretiosum. Over half of the pesticides - and all the fungicides - tested in the current study would appear to be compatible with the use of T. pretiosum in integrated pest management programs, with respect to acute parasitoid mortality. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Spatial distributions, source apportionment and ecological risk of SVOCs in water and sediment from Xijiang River, Pearl River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiao; An, Taicheng; Li, Guiying; Wei, Chaohai

    2017-03-09

    Xijiang River is an important drinking water source in Guangxi Province, China. Along the Xijiang River and surrounding tributary, the pollution profile of three important groups of semi-volatile organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and phthalate esters (PAEs), was analyzed. Relatively low levels of PAHs (64-3.7 × 10(2) ng L(-1)) and OCPs (16-70 ng L(-1)), but high levels of PAEs (7.9 × 10(2)-6.8 × 10(3) ng L(-1)) occurred in the water. Comparatively, low levels of OCPs (39-1.8 × 10(2) ng g(-1)) and PAEs (21-81 ng g(-1)), but high levels of PAHs (41-1.1 × 10(3) ng g(-1)) were found in sediment. Principal component analyses for source identification indicated petroleum-derived residues or coal and biomass combustion, and vehicular emission was the main sources for PAHs. The OCPs sources of each category were almost independent, whereas the new input of HCHs and p,p'-DDTs probably existed in some areas. PAEs were mainly originated from personal care products of urban sewage, plastic and other industrial sources. Ecological risk through the risk quotient analysis indicated a small or significant potential adverse effect on fish, daphnia and green algae. Nevertheless, the integrated risk of all pollutants should be taken into account in future study.

  11. Desorption of Herbicides from Atmospheric Particulates During High-Volume Air Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwight V. Quiring

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides can be present in the atmosphere either as vapours and/or in association with suspended particles. High-volume air sampling, in which air is aspirated first through a glass fibre filter to capture pesticides associated with atmospheric particulates and then polyurethane foam (PUF, often in combination with an adsorbent resin such as XAD-2, to capture pesticides present as vapours, is generally employed during atmospheric monitoring for pesticides. However, the particulate fraction may be underestimated because some pesticides may be stripped or desorbed from captured particulates due to the pressure drop created by the high flow of air through the filter. This possibility was investigated with ten herbicide active ingredients commonly used on the Canadian prairies (dimethylamine salts of 2,4-D, MCPA and dicamba, 2,4-D 2-ethylhexyl ester, bromoxynil octanoate, diclofop methyl ester, fenoxaprop ethyl ester, trifluralin, triallate and ethalfluralin and seven hydrolysis products (2,4-D, MCPA, dicamba, bromoxynil, diclofop, clopyralid and mecoprop. Finely ground heavy clay soil fortified with active ingredients/hydrolysis products was evenly distributed on the glass fibre filters of high-volume air samplers and air aspirated through the samplers at a flow rate of 12.5 m3/h for a 7-day period. The proportion desorbed as vapour from the fortified soil was determined by analysis of the PUF/XAD-2 resin composite cartridges. The extent of desorption from the fortified soil applied to the filters varied from 0% for each of the dimethylamine salts of 2,4-D, MCPA and dicamba to approximately 50% for trifluralin, triallate and ethalfluralin.

  12. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Occupational Exposure to Agricultural Pesticide Chemical Groups and Active Ingredients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Schinasi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes results from a systematic review and a series of meta-analyses of nearly three decades worth of epidemiologic research on the relationship between non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL and occupational exposure to agricultural pesticide active ingredients and chemical groups. Estimates of associations of NHL with 21 pesticide chemical groups and 80 active ingredients were extracted from 44 papers, all of which reported results from analyses of studies conducted in high-income countries. Random effects meta-analyses showed that phenoxy herbicides, carbamate insecticides, organophosphorus insecticides and the active ingredient lindane, an organochlorine insecticide, were positively associated with NHL. In a handful of papers, associations between pesticides and NHL subtypes were reported; B cell lymphoma was positively associated with phenoxy herbicides and the organophosphorus herbicide glyphosate. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was positively associated with phenoxy herbicide exposure. Despite compelling evidence that NHL is associated with certain chemicals, this review indicates the need for investigations of a larger variety of pesticides in more geographic areas, especially in low- and middle-income countries, which, despite producing a large portion of the world’s agriculture, were missing in the literature that were reviewed.

  13. Adhesion to sand and ability to mineralise low pesticide concentrations are required for efficient bioaugmentation of flow-through sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Elin Djurhuus; Badawi, Nora; Nybroe, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Pesticide-polluted drinking water may be remediated by inoculating waterworks sand filters with specific degrading bacteria. However, degradation efficiency is often hampered by the poor adhesion behaviour of the introduced bacteria. The phenoxy acid herbicide 4-chloro-2-methyl-phenoxy-acetic acid...

  14. Pesticides residues in the Prochilodus costatus (Valenciennes, 1850) fish caught in the São Francisco River, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Fabiano A; Reis, Lilian P G; Soto-Blanco, Benito; Melo, Marília M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the levels of pesticides in the fish Prochilodus costatus caught in São Francisco River, one of most important rivers in Brazil. Thirty-six fish were captured in three different areas, and samples of the dorsal muscle and pooled viscera were collected for toxicological analysis. We evaluated the presence of 150 different classes of insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and acaricides by multiresidue analysis technique using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), with the limit of detection of 5 ppb. In this study, organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides were detected at the highest levels in the caught fish. Among the 41 organophosphorus pesticides surveyed, nine types were detected (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, dichlorvos, disulfoton, ethion, etrimfos, phosalone, phosmet and pyrazophos) in the muscle, viscera pool, or both in 22 (61.1%) fish. Sampled tissues of 20 (55.6%) fish exhibited at least one of the eight evaluated carbamate pesticides and their metabolites: aldicarb, aldicarb sulfoxide, carbaryl, carbofuran, carbosulfan, furathiocarb, methomyl and propoxur. Fungicides (carbendazim, benalaxyl, kresoxim-methyl, trifloxystrobin, pyraclostrobin and its metabolite BF 500 pyraclostrobin), herbicides (pyridate and fluasifop p-butyl), acaricide (propargite) and pyrethroid (flumethrin) were also detected. In conclusion, P. costatus fish caught in the São Francisco River contained residues of 17 different pesticides, in both muscles and the viscera pool, indicating heavy environmental contamination by pesticides in the study area.

  15. Exposure to Multiple Pesticides and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Men from Six Canadian Provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenadel, Karin; Harris, Shelley A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Spinelli, John J.; Pahwa, Punam; Dosman, James A.; Demers, Paul A.; Blair, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has been linked to several agricultural exposures, including some commonly used pesticides. Although there is a significant body of literature examining the effects of exposure to individual pesticides on NHL, the impact of exposure to multiple pesticides or specific pesticide combinations has not been explored in depth. Data from a six-province Canadian case-control study conducted between 1991 and 1994 were analyzed to investigate the relationship between NHL, the total number of pesticides used and some common pesticide combinations. Cases (n = 513) were identified through hospital records and provincial cancer registries and controls (n = 1,506), frequency matched to cases by age and province of residence, were obtained through provincial health records, telephone listings, or voter lists. In multiple logistic regression analyses, risk of NHL increased with the number of pesticides used. Similar results were obtained in analyses restricted to herbicides, insecticides and several pesticide classes. Odds ratios increased further when only ‘potentially carcinogenic’ pesticides were considered (OR[one pesticide] = 1.30, 95% CI = 0.90–1.88; OR[two to four] = 1.54, CI = 1.11–2.12; OR[five or more] = 1.94, CI = 1.17–3.23). Elevated risks were also found among those reporting use of malathion in combination with several other pesticides. These analyses support and extend previous findings that the risk of NHL increases with the number of pesticides used and some pesticide combinations. PMID:21776232

  16. Assessing human health risks from pesticide use in conventional and innovative cropping systems with the BROWSE model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammoglia, Sabine-Karen; Kennedy, Marc C; Barriuso, Enrique; Alletto, Lionel; Justes, Eric; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Mamy, Laure

    2017-08-01

    Reducing the risks and impacts of pesticide use on human health and on the environment is one of the objectives of the European Commission Directive 2009/128/EC in the quest for a sustainable use of pesticides. This Directive, developed through European national plans such as Ecophyto plan in France, promotes the introduction of innovative cropping systems relying, for example, on integrated pest management. Risk assessment for human health of the overall pesticide use in these innovative systems is required before the introduction of those systems to avoid that an innovation becomes a new problem. The objectives of this work were to assess and to compare (1) the human exposure to pesticides used in conventional and innovative cropping systems designed to reduce pesticide needs, and (2) the corresponding risks for human health. Humans (operator and residents) exposure to pesticides and risks for human health were assessed for each pesticide with the BROWSE model. Then, a method was proposed to represent the overall risk due to all pesticides used in one system. This study considers 3 conventional and 9 associated innovative cropping systems, and 116 plant protection products containing 89 different active substances (i.e. pesticides). The modelling results obtained with BROWSE showed that innovative cropping systems such as low input or no herbicide systems would reduce the risk for human health in comparison to the corresponding conventional cropping systems. On the contrary, BROWSE showed that conservation tillage system would lead to unacceptable risks in the conditions of our study, because of a high number of pesticide applications, and especially of some herbicides. For residents, the dermal absorption was the main exposure route while ingestion was found to be negligible. For operators, inhalation was also a predominant route of exposure. In general, human exposure to pesticides and human health risks were found to be correlated to the treatment frequency

  17. Pesticides in Ground Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    1996-01-01

    Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588.......Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588....

  18. Food and Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA sets limits on how much of a pesticide may be used on food during growing and processing, and how much can remain on the food you buy. Learn about regulation of pesticides on food and how you can limit exposure.

  19. Pesticide mixtures in streams of several European countries and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Verena C; Szöcs, Eduard; Bhowmik, Avit Kumar; Vijver, Martina G; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2016-12-15

    Given the multitude of pesticides used in agriculture, adjacent streams are typically exposed to pesticide mixtures. Previous studies analysed the ecological risks of a few pesticide mixtures or were limited to an individual region or crop, whereas a large scale analysis of pesticide mixtures is missing. We analysed routine monitoring data from Germany, France, the Netherlands and the USA comprising a total of 4532 sites and 56,084 sampling occasions with the aim to identify the most frequently detected pesticides, their metabolites and mixtures. The most frequently detected compounds were dominated by herbicides and their metabolites. Mixtures mostly comprised of two up to five compounds, whereas mixtures in the USA and France had clearly less compounds than those of Germany and the Netherlands. The number of detected pesticides and thereby the size of mixtures is positively correlated to the number of measured pesticides (r=0.57). In contrast, a low relationship was found to the ratio of agricultural areas within the catchment (r=0.17), and no relationship was found to the size of the catchment (r=0.06). Overall, our study provides priority mixtures for different countries that may be used for future ecotoxicological studies to improve risk assessment for stream ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biomassbed: a biological system to reduce pesticide point contamination at farm level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vischetti, Costantino; Capri, Ettore; Trevisan, Marco; Casucci, Cristiano; Perucci, Piero

    2004-05-01

    A potential method for cleaning water from point-source pollution by organic compounds is using biological reactors. In this study, four reactors were tested for their ability to retain and degrade pesticides. The pesticides tested were the insecticide chlorpyrifos, the fungicide metalaxyl and the herbicide imazamox. The reactors were filled with differing mixtures of vine-branch, citrus peel, urban waste and public green compost. The reactor volume was 188 l. Forced circulation of the contaminated solution was programmed to decontaminate the solution. Both retention and degradation of the compounds by the reactors was studied. Chlorpyrifos was the best retained, due to its physico-chemical characteristics, while only one substrate effectively retained metalaxyl and imazamox (citrus peel+urban waste compost). Degradation of the pesticides in the reactors was faster than published values for degradation in soil. The half-life of all pesticides in the reactors was less than 14 days, compared to literature values of 60-70 days in soil. The combined retention and fast degradation make the biofilter a feasible technique to reduce spill-related and point environmental contamination by pesticides. The technique is most effective against persistent pesticides, while for mobile pesticides, the efficiency can be improved with several passages of the contaminated solution through biofilters.

  1. Gliomas and farm pesticide exposure in women: the Upper Midwest Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón, Tania; Butler, Mary Ann; Ruder, Avima M; Waters, Martha A; Davis-King, Karen E; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Schulte, Paul A; Connally, Barbara; Ward, Elizabeth M; Sanderson, Wayne T; Heineman, Ellen F; Mandel, Jack S; Morton, Roscoe F; Reding, Douglas J; Rosenman, Kenneth D; Talaska, Glenn

    2005-05-01

    An excess incidence of brain cancer in male farmers has been noted in several studies, but few studies have focused on women. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Upper Midwest Health Study evaluated effects of rural exposures for 341 female glioma cases and 528 controls, all adult (18-80 years of age) nonmetropolitan residents of Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. On average, controls lived longer on farms than did cases. After adjusting for age, age group, education, and farm residence, no association with glioma was observed for exposure to arsenicals, benzoic acids, carbamates, chloroacetanilides, dinitroanilines, inorganics, organochlorines, organophosphates, phenoxys, triazines, or urea-based or estrogenic pesticides. An increased risk of glioma was observed for carbamate herbicides but was not statistically significant (odds ratio = 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.9-9.5). No association was observed between glioma and exposure to 12 widely used specific pesticides, after adjustment for age, age group, education, and any other pesticide exposure. These results were not affected after exclusion of proxy respondents (43% of cases, 2% of controls). Women were less likely than men to have applied pesticides, but more likely to have laundered pesticide-contaminated clothes. Storing pesticides in the house was associated with a statistically non-significant increased risk. Results show that exposure to pesticides was not associated with an increased risk of intracranial gliomas in women. Other farm-related factors could be etiologic factors and will be discussed in future reports.

  2. Estimated nationwide effects of pesticide spray drift on terrestrial habitats in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Frank M W; de Snoo, Geert R; van de Zande, Jan C

    2008-03-01

    This study estimated the potential effects of pesticide drift on terrestrial ecosystems outside target areas, for the Dutch situation. A series of field trials was conducted to estimate the effects of drift on different species groups at different distances from a treated plot for different categories of pesticide: herbicides, fungicides and insecticides. Measurements of the pesticide drift deposition resulting from standard agricultural practice were used to model deposition outside the treated area. These data were then combined with national statistics on cropland and pesticide use to assess the ecological effects of pesticide drift for the Netherlands as a whole. Three scenarios were considered: the recent past (1998), the present (2005) and an optimised scenario based on 'best available practice' (2010). In the recent past the impact of herbicide drift on sensitive life stages non-target vascular plants is estimated to have exceeded the 50% effect level on 59% of adjacent linear landscape elements such as ditch banks and hedgerows. For the impact of insecticides and fungicides on non-target insects and fungi this 50% effect figure was 29% and 28% of linear elements, respectively. In the present situation, with (narrow) unsprayed buffer zones and other measures in place, these percentages are down to 41% for herbicides, 21% for insecticides and 14% for fungicides. In the optimised scenario, with a greater buffer width of 2.25m for potatoes (compared to 1.50m in 2005) and 1m for other crops (compared to 0.25 and 0.5m in 2005) and 'best available practice', these percentages can be cut to zero. In natural areas located within farming regions the 10% effect level can be reduced from 31% of such areas (1998) to 0% under conditions of 'best available practice'.

  3. Methods for Rapid Screening in Woody Plant Herbicide Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Stanley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Methods for woody plant herbicide screening were assayed with the goal of reducing resources and time required to conduct preliminary screenings for new products. Rapid screening methods tested included greenhouse seedling screening, germinal screening, and seed screening. Triclopyr and eight experimental herbicides from Dow AgroSciences (DAS 313, 402, 534, 548, 602, 729, 779, and 896 were tested on black locust, loblolly pine, red maple, sweetgum, and water oak. Screening results detected differences in herbicide and species in all experiments in much less time (days to weeks than traditional field screenings and consumed significantly less resources (<500 mg acid equivalent per herbicide per screening. Using regression analysis, various rapid screening methods were linked into a system capable of rapidly and inexpensively assessing herbicide efficacy and spectrum of activity. Implementation of such a system could streamline early-stage herbicide development leading to field trials, potentially freeing resources for use in development of beneficial new herbicide products.

  4. Effects of pesticides on plant growth promoting traits of Mesorhizobium strain MRC4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munees Ahemad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the effect of selected pesticides [herbicides (metribuzin and glyphosate, insecticides (imidacloprid and thiamethoxam and fungicides (hexaconazole, metalaxyl and kitazin] at recommended and higher dose rates on plant growth promoting activities of the Mesorhizobium sp. isolated from chickpea-nodules. A total of 50 rhizobial strains recovered from the nodules of chickpea root systems were identified following morphological, biochemical and host-specificity tests and tested for pesticide-tolerance. Among these strains, the Mesorhizobium sp. strain MRC4 was specifically selected due to the highest tolerance levels for all selected pesticides and the maximum production of plant growth promoting substances. Strain MRC4 produced indole acetic acid (44 μg ml−1, siderophores [salicylic acid (35 μg ml−1 and 2,3-dihydroxy benzoic acid (19 μg ml−1], exo-polysaccharides (21 μg ml−1, HCN and ammonia. Under pesticide-stress, pesticide-concentration dependent progressive-decline in all plant growth promoting traits of the Mesorhizobium sp. strain MRC4 exposed was observed except for exo-polysaccharides which consistently increased with exceeding the concentration of each pesticide from recommended dose. For instance, hexaconazole at three times the recommended dose elicited the maximum stress on siderophore-biosynthesis by the Mesorhizobium sp. strain MRC4 and decreased salicylic acid and DHBA by 40% and 47%, respectively and the greatest stimulatory effect on exo-polysaccharides secretion was shown by imidacloprid which stimulated the Mesorhizobium sp. strain MRC4 to secrete EPS by 38%, compared to control. Generally, the maximum toxicity to plant growth promoting traits of Mesorhizobium was shown by glyphosate, thiamethoxam and hexaconazole, at three times the recommended rate among herbicides, insecticides and fungicides, respectively. This study revealed an additional aspect of the toxicological

  5. Effects of flow regime and pesticides on periphytic communities: evolution and role of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Aurélie; Montuelle, Bernard; Bouchez, Agnès

    2011-04-01

    The effects of chemical and physical factors on periphyton structure, diversity and functioning were investigated in an outdoor mesocosm experiment. Stream biofilms were subjected to a pesticide mix (diuron and azoxystrobin) under two different hydraulic regimes. The hydraulic regimes differed by spatial variations of flow conditions (turbulent with high variations vs. laminar with low variations). The effects of the hydraulic regime and pesticides were assessed at the level of the periphytic communities. We focused on the change in the biodiversity of these communities under the two hydraulic regimes, and on the role of these biodiversity changes in case of pesticide contamination. Changes in structural (biomass, cell density), diversity (community composition assessed by PCR-DGGE and microscopic analysis) and functional (bacterial and algal production, sensitivity to the herbicide) parameters were monitored throughout a 2-month experiment. The results showed that exposure to pesticides affected the phytobenthic community targeted by the herbicide, impacting on both its growth dynamics and its primary production. Conversely, the impact of the flow regime was greater than that of pesticides on the non-target bacterial community with higher bacterial density and production in laminar mesocosms (uniform regime). An interaction between flow and pollution effects was also observed. Communities that developed in turbulent mesocosms (heterogeneous regime) were more diversified, as a result of increased microhabitat heterogeneity due to high spatial variations. However, this higher biodiversity did not increase the ability of these biofilms to tolerate pesticides, as expected. On the contrary, the sensitivity of these communities to pesticide contamination was, in fact, increased. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Host-Guest Interaction between Herbicide Oxadiargyl and Hydroxypropyl- β -Cyclodextrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Benfeito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the face of a growing human population and increased urbanization, the demand for pesticides will simply rise. Farmers must escalate yields on increasingly fewer farm acres. However, the risks of pesticides, whether real or perceived, may force changes in the way these chemicals are used. Scientists are working toward pest control plans that are environmentally sound, effective, and profitable. In this context the development of new pesticide formulations which may improve application effectiveness, safety, handling, and storage can be pointed out as a solution. As a contribution to the area, the microencapsulation of the herbicide oxadiargyl (OXA in (2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD was performed. The study was conducted in different aqueous media (ultrapure water and in different pH buffer solutions. In all cases an increment of the oxadiargyl solubility as a function of the HP-β-CD concentration that has been related to the formation of an inclusion complex was verified. UV-Vis and NMR experiments allowed concluding that the stoichiometry of the OXA/HP-β-CD complex formed is 1 : 1. The gathered results can be regarded as an important step for its removal from industrial effluents and/or to increase the stabilizing action, encapsulation, and adsorption in water treatment plants.

  7. C, N, and H isotope fractionation of the herbicide isoproturon reflects different microbial transformation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Holger; Sørensen, Sebastian R; Meyer, Armin H; Aamand, Jens; Elsner, Martin

    2010-04-01

    The fate of pesticides in the subsurface is of great interest to the public, industry, and regulatory authorities. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a promising tool complementary to existing methods for elucidating pesticide degradation reactions. Here, we address three different initial biotransformation reactions of the phenylurea herbicide isoproturon (3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) in pure culture experiments with bacterial and fungal strains. When analyzing isotopic changes in different parts of the isoproturon molecule, hydroxylation of the isopropyl group by fungi was found to be associated with C and H isotope fractionation. In contrast, hydrolysis by Arthrobacter globiformis D47 caused strong C and N isotope fractionation, albeit in a different manner than abiotic hydrolysis so that isotope measurements can distinguish between both modes of transformation. No significant isotope fractionation was observed during N-demethylation by Sphingomonas sp. SRS2. The observed isotope fractionation patterns were in agreement with the type of reactions and elements involved. Moreover, their substantially different nature suggests that isotope changes in natural samples may be uniquely attributed to either pathway, allowing even to distinguish the abiotic versus biotic nature of hydrolysis. Our investigations show how characteristic isotope patterns may significantly add to the present understanding of the environmental fate of pesticides.

  8. PESTICIDES: BENEFITS AND HAZARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Maksymiv

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are an integral part of modern life used to prevent growth of unwanted living  organisms. Despite the fact that scientific statements coming from many toxicological works provide indication on the low risk of the pesticides and their residues, the community especially last years is deeply concerned about massive application of pesticides in diverse fields. Therefore evaluation of hazard risks particularly in long term perspective is very important. In the fact there are at least two clearly different approaches for evaluation of pesticide using: the first one is defined as an objective or probabilistic risk assessment, while the second one is the potential economic and agriculture benefits. Therefore, in this review the author has considered scientifically based assessment of positive and negative effects of pesticide application and discusses possible approaches to find balance between them.

  9. Regulation of pesticide degradation in the detritusphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Holger; Poll, Christian; Ingwersen, Joachim; Ditterich, Franziska; Gebala, Aurelia; Kandeler, Ellen; Streck, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    The detritusphere is a microbial hot spot of C turnover and degradation of pesticides in soils. We aimed at an improved understanding of the regulation mechanisms, which are responsible for stimulated degradation of the herbicide MCPA (2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid) in response to increased C availability in the detritusphere. We combined a microcosm experiment with biogeochemical modeling and linked genetic information on abundances of total bacteria, fungi and specific pesticide degraders in soil to the coupled biogeochemical dynamics of C and MCPA. As a result of diffusive and convective C transport from litter into the adjacent soil we found increased dissolved organic C (DOC) in soil up to a 6 mm distance to litter (detritusphere). In the detritusphere, we observed increased microbial C and accelerated MCPA degradation. These dynamics were accurately reproduced by the model. Whereas the observed increase of bacteria and pesticide degrader populations in the detritusphere was simulated satisfactorily, the model could not reproduce the steep increase of fungi indicated by the fungal marker gene. Our simulations suggest that bacterial MCPA degraders mostly benefited from high-quality DOC, whereas fungal activity and growth were specifically stimulated by low-quality DOC. According to the simulations, MCPA was predominantly degraded via fungal co-metabolism. Our study demonstrates that biogeochemical processes in soil hotspots are regulated by the interaction of transport processes and microbial dynamics. It further reveals that mathematical modelling is as powerful tool to gain comprehensive insight into the microbial regulation of matter cycling in soil. Genetic information has a high potential to parameterize and evaluate complex mechanistic models, but model approaches must be improved based on extended information on gene dynamics at the cellular level.

  10. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DIFFERENT HERBICIDES IN THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    palitos de madeira impregnados com herbicida. (Banana pruning with wood pins impregnated with herbicide). In: Anais. Congreso Brasileiro de Fruticultura, Campinas, 1987/09, Sociedade. Brasileira de Fruticultura., Campinas (BRA). pp. 155-160. Robinson, J.C. 1995. Systems of cultivation and management. In: Gowen ...

  11. Herbicides as stimulators regulators and ripeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of low doses of herbicide as plant growth regulators to increase sugar concentrations (ripen) in sugarcane prior to harvest plays an important role in the profitable and sustainable production of sugarcane in the U.S. as well as in other sugarcane industries around the world. Several studies...

  12. Complex mixtures of Pesticides in Midwest U.S. streams indicated by POCIS time-integrating samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C; Alvarez, David A; Mahler, Barbara J; Nowell, Lisa; Sandstrom, Mark; Moran, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The Midwest United States is an intensely agricultural region where pesticides in streams pose risks to aquatic biota, but temporal variability in pesticide concentrations makes characterization of their exposure to organisms challenging. To compensate for the effects of temporal variability, we deployed polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) in 100 small streams across the Midwest for about 5 weeks during summer 2013 and analyzed the extracts for 227 pesticide compounds. Analysis of water samples collected weekly for pesticides during POCIS deployment allowed for comparison of POCIS results with periodic water-sampling results. The median number of pesticides detected in POCIS extracts was 62, and 141 compounds were detected at least once, indicating a high level of pesticide contamination of streams in the region. Sixty-five of the 141 compounds detected were pesticide degradates. Mean water concentrations estimated using published POCIS sampling rates strongly correlated with means of weekly water samples collected concurrently, however, the POCIS-estimated concentrations generally were lower than the measured water concentrations. Summed herbicide concentrations (units of ng/POCIS) were greater at agricultural sites than at urban sites but summed concentrations of insecticides and fungicides were greater at urban sites. Consistent with these differences, summed concentrations of herbicides correlate to percent cultivated crops in the watersheds and summed concentrations of insecticides and fungicides correlate to percent urban land use. With the exception of malathion concentrations at nine sites, POCIS-estimated water concentrations of pesticides were lower than aquatic-life benchmarks. The POCIS provide an alternative approach to traditional water sampling for characterizing chronic exposure to pesticides in streams across the Midwest region. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Complex mixtures of Pesticides in Midwest U.S. streams indicated by POCIS time-integrating samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Alvarez, David; Mahler, Barbara J.; Nowell, Lisa H.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Moran, Patrick W.

    2017-01-01

    The Midwest United States is an intensely agricultural region where pesticides in streams pose risks to aquatic biota, but temporal variability in pesticide concentrations makes characterization of their exposure to organisms challenging. To compensate for the effects of temporal variability, we deployed polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) in 100 small streams across the Midwest for about 5 weeks during summer 2013 and analyzed the extracts for 227 pesticide compounds. Analysis of water samples collected weekly for pesticides during POCIS deployment allowed for comparison of POCIS results with periodic water-sampling results. The median number of pesticides detected in POCIS extracts was 62, and 141 compounds were detected at least once, indicating a high level of pesticide contamination of streams in the region. Sixty-five of the 141 compounds detected were pesticide degradates. Mean water concentrations estimated using published POCIS sampling rates strongly correlated with means of weekly water samples collected concurrently, however, the POCIS-estimated concentrations generally were lower than the measured water concentrations. Summed herbicide concentrations (units of ng/POCIS) were greater at agricultural sites than at urban sites but summed concentrations of insecticides and fungicides were greater at urban sites. Consistent with these differences, summed concentrations of herbicides correlate to percent cultivated crops in the watersheds and summed concentrations of insecticides and fungicides correlate to percent urban land use. With the exception of malathion concentrations at nine sites, POCIS-estimated water concentrations of pesticides were lower than aquatic-life benchmarks. The POCIS provide an alternative approach to traditional water sampling for characterizing chronic exposure to pesticides in streams across the Midwest region.

  14. Pesticide runoff from energy crops: A threat to aquatic invertebrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzel, Katja; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thrän, Daniela; Kattwinkel, Mira

    2015-12-15

    The European Union aims to reach a 10% share of biofuels in the transport sector by 2020. The major burden is most likely to fall on already established annual energy crops such as rapeseed and cereals for the production of biodiesel and bioethanol, respectively. Annual energy crops are typically cultivated in intensive agricultural production systems, which require the application of pesticides. Agricultural pesticides can have adverse effects on aquatic invertebrates in adjacent streams. We assessed the relative ecological risk to aquatic invertebrates associated with the chemical pest management from six energy crops (maize, potato, sugar beet, winter barley, winter rapeseed, and winter wheat) as well as from mixed cultivation scenarios. The pesticide exposure related to energy crops and cultivation scenarios was estimated as surface runoff for 253 small stream sites in Central Germany using a GIS-based runoff potential model. The ecological risk for aquatic invertebrates, an important organism group for the functioning of stream ecosystems, was assessed using acute toxicity data (48-h LC50 values) of the crustacean Daphnia magna. We calculated the Ecological Risk from potential Pesticide Runoff (ERPR) for all three main groups of pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides). Our findings suggest that the crops potato, sugar beet, and rapeseed pose a higher ecological risk to aquatic invertebrates than maize, barley, and wheat. As maize had by far the lowest ERPR values, from the perspective of pesticide pollution, its cultivation as substrate for the production of the gaseous biofuel biomethane may be preferable compared to the production of, for example, biodiesel from rapeseed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Analysis of reports of cases of pesticide poisoning in Jiangsu Province, China, from 2006 to 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Ding, Bangmei; Shen, Han; Zhu, Baoli; Gao, Qianqian

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the characteristics of pesticide poisoning in Jiangsu Province, China, and to provide a scientific basis for developing effective intervention measures and prevention strategies. The data from report cards of pesticide poisoning in Jiangsu Province from 2006 to 2013 were arranged using EXCEL tables, and assessed. Statistical analysis was applied to the epidemiological data using SPSS. From 2006 to 2013, a total of 32672 cases of pesticide poisoning were reported in Jiangsu Province. Most of the cases were caused by non-occupational poisoning (life poisoning) (72.78%). A majority of patients with pesticide poisoning were 35-54 years old (40.85%) or older than 65 years (15.69%). There were more female patients (58.22%) than male patients (41.78%). Among patients with occupational poisoning, male patients (50.90%) were more than female patients. Among patients with non-occupational poisoning, female patients were more than male patients (38.37%). Pesticide poisoning mainly occurred from July to September. The case-fatality rate of occupational poisoning (0.47%) was lower than that of non-occupational poisoning (7.10%). All 13 cities in Jiangsu Province reported cases of pesticide poisoning. There were more cases in the northern regions than in the southern regions. Pesticide poisoning was mainly caused by organophosphorus insecticides including methamidophos, dichlorvos, dimethoate, omethoate, and parathion, which accounted for 65.58%of all cases. Paraquat had the highest case-fatality rate (10.06%) among all pesticides, followed by tetramine (10.00%), dimethoate or omethoate (7.85%), methamidophos (7.79%), and dimehypo (7.68%). Pesticide poisoning cannot be ignored. The management and control should be improved in production and usage of highly toxic pesticides including organophosphorus insecticides, rodenticides, and herbicides. More attention should be paid to the protection of vulnerable groups including women, children, and the elderly.

  16. Occurrence of currently used pesticides in ambient air of Centre Region (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscollà, Clara; Colin, Patrice; Yahyaoui, Abderrazak; Petrique, Olivier; Yusà, Vicent; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Pastor, Agustin

    2010-10-01

    Ambient air samples were collected, from 2006 to 2008 at three rural and two urban sites in Centre Region (France) and analyzed for 56 currently used pesticides (CUPs), of which 41 were detected. The four CUPs most frequently detected were the herbicides trifluralin, acetochlor and pendimethalin and the fungicide chlorothalonil, which were found with frequencies ranging between 52 and 78%, and with average concentrations of 1.93, 1.32, 1.84 and 12.15 ng m -3, respectively. Among the detected pesticides, concentrations of eight fungicides (spiroxamine, fenpropimorph, cyprodinil, tolyfluanid, epoxiconazole, vinchlozolin, fluazinam, fludioxinil), two insecticides (propargite, ethoprophos), and one herbicide (oxyfluorfen) are, to our knowledge, reported for the first time in the literature. The majority of the CUPs showed a seasonal trend, with most of the detections and the highest concentrations occurring during the spring and early summer. The most important pesticides detected were related to arable crops and fruit orchards, the main cultures in this region, highlighting the fact that the main sources come from local applications. Minor differences were found in the profiles of pesticides within rural areas and between rural and urban areas.

  17. Snails as indicators of pesticide drift, deposit, transfer and effects in the vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druart, Coline; Millet, Maurice; Scheifler, Renaud; Delhomme, Olivier; Raeppel, Caroline; de Vaufleury, Annette

    2011-09-15

    This paper presents a field-study of real pesticide application conditions in a vineyard. The objective was to measure the exposure, the transfer and the effects of pesticides on a non-target soil invertebrate, the land snail Helix aspersa. There was no drift of the herbicides (glyphosate and glufosinate) whereas the fungicides (cymoxanil, folpet, tebuconazole and pyraclostrobin) were detected up to 20 m from the treated area. For folpet and particularly tebuconazole, spray deposits on soil (corresponding to losses for the intended target i.e. the vine leaves) were high (41.1% and 88.8% loss of applied dose, respectively). For herbicides, the target was the soil and losses (percentage of compounds which did not reach the soil) were of 22% for glufosinate and 52% for glyphosate. In the study plot, glyphosate was transferred to and accumulated in snail tissues (4 mg kg(-1) dry weight, dw), as was its metabolite AMPA (8 mg kg(-1) dw) which could be in relation with the reduced growth observed in snails. No effects on snail survival or growth were found after exposure to the other organic compounds or to copper and sulphur-fungicides, although transfer of tebuconazole, pyraclostrobin and copper occurred. This study brings original field data on the fate of pesticides in a vineyard agro-ecosystem under real conditions of application and shows that transfer and effects of pesticides to a non-target organism occurred. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 77 FR 74003 - Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on Antimicrobial Pesticide Products With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... label changes are designed to improve protection of public health through proper use of mold-related... AGENCY Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on Antimicrobial Pesticide Products With Mold... Registration Notice (PR Notice) titled ``Guidance on Antimicrobial Pesticide Products with Mold-Related Label...

  19. Multiple herbicide resistance in Lolium multiflorum and identification of conserved regulatory elements of herbicide resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of L. multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them a reliable marker. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of Lolium multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O.sativa and A.thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward towards a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management.

  20. Gene transcription in Daphnia magna: effects of acute exposure to a carbamate insecticide and an acetanilide herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Joana Luísa; Hill, Christopher J; Sibly, Richard M; Bolshakov, Viacheslav N; Gonçalves, Fernando; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Callaghan, Amanda

    2010-05-05

    Daphnia magna is a key invertebrate in the freshwater environment and is used widely as a model in ecotoxicological measurements and risk assessment. Understanding the genomic responses of D. magna to chemical challenges will be of value to regulatory authorities worldwide. Here we exposed D. magna to the insecticide methomyl and the herbicide propanil to compare phenotypic effects with changes in mRNA expression levels. Both pesticides are found in drainage ditches and surface water bodies standing adjacent to crops. Methomyl, a carbamate insecticide widely used in agriculture, inhibits acetylcholinesterase, a key enzyme in nerve transmission. Propanil, an acetanilide herbicide, is used to control grass and broad-leaf weeds. The phenotypic effects of single doses of each chemical were evaluated using a standard immobilisation assay. Immobilisation was linked to global mRNA expression levels using the previously estimated 48h-EC(1)s, followed by hybridization to a cDNA microarray with more than 13,000 redundant cDNA clones representing >5000 unique genes. Following exposure to methomyl and propanil, differential expression was found for 624 and 551 cDNAs, respectively (one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction, Ppesticides promoted transcriptional changes in energy metabolism (e.g., mitochondrial proteins, ATP synthesis-related proteins), moulting (e.g., chitin-binding proteins, cuticular proteins) and protein biosynthesis (e.g., ribosomal proteins, transcription factors). Methomyl induced the transcription of genes involved in specific processes such as ion homeostasis and xenobiotic metabolism. Propanil highly promoted haemoglobin synthesis and up-regulated genes specifically related to defence mechanisms (e.g., innate immunity response systems) and neuronal pathways. Pesticide-specific toxic responses were found but there is little evidence for transcriptional

  1. Comparison of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Electron Ionization and Negative-Ion Chemical Ionization for Analyses of Pesticides at Trace Levels in Atmospheric Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Raina; Patricia Hall

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of detection limits of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with both electron ionization (EI) and negative-ion chemical ionization (NCI) are presented for over 50 pesticides ranging from organochlorines (OCs), organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and pre-emergent herbicides used in the Canadian prairies (triallate, trifluralin, ethalflurali...

  2. Reducing Pesticide Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides information about pesticide spray drift, including problems associated with drift, managing risks from drift and the voluntary Drift Reduction Technology program that seeks to reduce spray drift through improved spray equipment design.

  3. Pesticide-Exposure Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    The "Pesticide-exposure Matrix" was developed to help epidemiologists and other researchers identify the active ingredients to which people were likely exposed when their homes and gardens were treated for pests in past years.

  4. Pesticide Registration Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — PRISM provides an integrated, web portal for all pesticide related data, communications, registrations and transactions for OPP and its stakeholders, partners and...

  5. Why We Review Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    As required by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), EPA periodically reviews existing registered pesticides to ensure they can be used safely, without unreasonable risks to human health and the environment.

  6. [Acute pesticide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Nah, J J; Collí-Quintal, J

    2000-01-01

    To describe the epidemiologic pattern of acute pesticide poisoning (APP) in a general hospital in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. From 1994 to 1998, 33 patients 13 years of age or older with diagnosis of APP were studied. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze information. Males were frequently affected (82%), specially those coming from rural areas (60%). The mean age of the group was 34 +/- 15.8 years. In 79% of the cases, pesticides were used to commit suicide and 33% of poisoning cases were due to organophospate pesticides. The mortality rate was 12%. In this small sample, acute poisoning from pesticides in the agricultural setting may be underestimated, since it was less frequent than in the general population. APP was more commonly used by indigent people to commit suicide.

  7. The Danish Pesticide Tax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Branth; Nielsen, Helle Ørsted; Andersen, Mikael Skou

    2015-01-01

    This case study analyses the effects of the Danish pesticide tax (1996-2013) on agriculture which was introduced as an ad valorem tax in 1996, doubled in 1998, and redesigned in 2013 as a tax based on the toxicity of the pesticides. The Danish pesticide taxes probably represent the world’s highest...... pesticide taxes on agriculture, which makes it interesting to analyze how effective they have been. Here the effects of the ad valorem tax (1996-2013) are analyzed. The case study demonstrates the challenges of choosing an optimal tax design in a complex political setting where, additionally, not all...... individuals in the target group necessarily react to the economic incentives as predicted by economic modeling. It also demonstrates that a small first green-tax-step over time might develop into a better tax design....

  8. What are Antimicrobial Pesticides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial pesticides are substances or mixtures of substances used to destroy or suppress the growth of harmful microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, or fungi on inanimate objects and surfaces.

  9. Glyphosate herbicide formulation: a potentially lethal ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Julian; Ryan, Matthew

    2004-06-01

    Glyphosate surfactant herbicide (GlySH) toxicity is an uncommon poisoning. We report two fatalities involving suicidal ingestion of this herbicide. Both deaths occurred despite early recognition of the serious nature of the poisoning and aggressive treatment. The deaths in this series are analysed in the context of a review of existing literature. Although traditionally regarded as minimally toxic, many deaths have been reported following suicidal ingestion. Severe GlySH toxicity may be refractory even to the most intensive supportive care. The triad of pulmonary oedema, metabolic acidosis and hyperkalaemia portends poor outcome. While containing a carbon phosphorus moiety, GlySH does not exhibit organophosphate toxicity. A clinical guide to assessing severity of GlySH toxicity is proposed and treatment modalities discussed.

  10. Biostimulation for the Enhanced Degradation of Herbicides in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramdas Gopinath Kanissery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleanup of herbicide-contaminated soils has been a dire environmental concern since the advent of industrial era. Although microorganisms are excellent degraders of herbicide compounds in the soil, some reparation may need to be brought about, in order to stimulate them to degrade the herbicide at a faster rate in a confined time frame. “Biostimulation” through the appropriate utilization of organic amendments and nutrients can accelerate the degradation of herbicides in the soil. However, effective use of biostimulants requires thorough comprehension of the global redox cycle during the microbial degradation of the herbicide molecules in the soil. In this paper, we present the prospects of using biostimulation as a powerful remediation strategy for the rapid cleanup of herbicide-polluted soils.

  11. Non-target-site herbicide resistance: a family business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Joshua S; Tranel, Patrick J; Stewart, C Neal

    2007-01-01

    We have witnessed a dramatic increase in the frequency and diversity of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes over the past two decades, which poses a threat to the sustainability of agriculture at both local and global levels. In addition, non-target-site mechanisms of herbicide resistance seem to be increasingly implicated. Non-target-site herbicide resistance normally involves the biochemical modification of the herbicide and/or the compartmentation of the herbicide (and its metabolites). In contrast to herbicide target site mutations, fewer non-target mechanisms have been elucidated at the molecular level because of the inherently complicated biochemical processes and the limited genomic information available for weedy species. To further understand the mechanisms of non-target-site resistance, we propose an integrated genomics approach to dissect systematically the functional genomics of four gene families in economically important weed species.

  12. Environmental impacts of genetically modified (GM) crop use 1996–2014: Impacts on pesticide use and carbon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Graham; Barfoot, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper updates previous assessments of important environmental impacts associated with using crop biotechnology in global agriculture. It focuses on the environmental impacts associated with changes in pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions arising from the use of GM crops since their first widespread commercial use in the mid 1990s. The adoption of GM insect resistant and herbicide tolerant technology has reduced pesticide spraying by 581.4 million kg (−8.2%) and, as a result, decreased the environmental impact associated with herbicide and insecticide use on these crops (as measured by the indicator, the Environmental Impact Quotient [EIQ]) by18.5%. The technology has also facilitated important cuts in fuel use and tillage changes, resulting in a significant reduction in the release of greenhouse gas emissions from the GM cropping area. In 2014, this was equivalent to removing nearly 10 million cars from the roads. PMID:27253265

  13. Environmental impacts of genetically modified (GM) crop use 1996–2013: Impacts on pesticide use and carbon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Graham; Barfoot, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper updates previous assessments of how crop biotechnology has changed the environmental impact of global agriculture. It focuses on the environmental impacts associated with changes in pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions arising from the use of GM crops since their first widespread commercial use in the mid 1990s. The adoption of GM insect resistant and herbicide tolerant technology has reduced pesticide spraying by 553 million kg (−8.6%) and, as a result, decreased the environmental impact associated with herbicide and insecticide use on these crops (as measured by the indicator the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ)) by19.1%. The technology has also facilitated important cuts in fuel use and tillage changes, resulting in a significant reduction in the release of greenhouse gas emissions from the GM cropping area. In 2013, this was equivalent to removing 12.4 million cars from the roads. PMID:25760405

  14. Environmental impacts of genetically modified (GM) crop use 1996-2015: Impacts on pesticide use and carbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Graham; Barfoot, Peter

    2017-04-03

    This paper updates previous assessments of important environmental impacts associated with using crop biotechnology in global agriculture. It focuses on the environmental impacts associated with changes in pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions arising from the use of GM crops since their first widespread commercial use in the mid-1990s. The adoption of GM insect resistant and herbicide tolerant technology has reduced pesticide spraying by 618.7 million kg (-8.1%) and, as a result, decreased the environmental impact associated with herbicide and insecticide use on these crops (as measured by the indicator, the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ)) by18.6%. The technology has also facilitated important cuts in fuel use and tillage changes, resulting in a significant reduction in the release of greenhouse gas emissions from the GM cropping area. In 2015, this was equivalent to removing 11.9 million cars from the roads.

  15. Environmental impacts of genetically modified (GM) crop use 1996-2013: Impacts on pesticide use and carbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Graham; Barfoot, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper updates previous assessments of how crop biotechnology has changed the environmental impact of global agriculture. It focuses on the environmental impacts associated with changes in pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions arising from the use of GM crops since their first widespread commercial use in the mid 1990s. The adoption of GM insect resistant and herbicide tolerant technology has reduced pesticide spraying by 553 million kg (-8.6%) and, as a result, decreased the environmental impact associated with herbicide and insecticide use on these crops (as measured by the indicator the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ)) by 19.1%. The technology has also facilitated important cuts in fuel use and tillage changes, resulting in a significant reduction in the release of greenhouse gas emissions from the GM cropping area. In 2013, this was equivalent to removing 12.4 million cars from the roads.

  16. Environmental impacts of genetically modified (GM) crop use 1996-2014: Impacts on pesticide use and carbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Graham; Barfoot, Peter

    2016-04-02

    This paper updates previous assessments of important environmental impacts associated with using crop biotechnology in global agriculture. It focuses on the environmental impacts associated with changes in pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions arising from the use of GM crops since their first widespread commercial use in the mid 1990s. The adoption of GM insect resistant and herbicide tolerant technology has reduced pesticide spraying by 581.4 million kg (-8.2%) and, as a result, decreased the environmental impact associated with herbicide and insecticide use on these crops (as measured by the indicator, the Environmental Impact Quotient [EIQ]) by18.5%. The technology has also facilitated important cuts in fuel use and tillage changes, resulting in a significant reduction in the release of greenhouse gas emissions from the GM cropping area. In 2014, this was equivalent to removing nearly 10 million cars from the roads.

  17. Pesticides are Associated with Allergic and Non-Allergic Wheeze among Male Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppin, Jane A.; Umbach, David M.; Long, Stuart; London, Stephanie J.; Henneberger, Paul K.; Blair, Aaron; Alavanja, Michael; Freeman, Laura E. Beane; Sandler, Dale P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Growing evidence suggests that pesticide use may contribute to respiratory symptoms. Objective: We evaluated the association of currently used pesticides with allergic and non-allergic wheeze among male farmers. Methods: Using the 2005–2010 interview data of the Agricultural Health Study, a prospective study of farmers in North Carolina and Iowa, we evaluated the association between allergic and non-allergic wheeze and self-reported use of 78 specific pesticides, reported by ≥ 1% of the 22,134 men interviewed. We used polytomous regression models adjusted for age, BMI, state, smoking, and current asthma, as well as for days applying pesticides and days driving diesel tractors. We defined allergic wheeze as reporting both wheeze and doctor-diagnosed hay fever (n = 1,310, 6%) and non-allergic wheeze as reporting wheeze but not hay fever (n = 3,939, 18%); men without wheeze were the referent. Results: In models evaluating current use of specific pesticides, 19 pesticides were significantly associated (p pyraclostrobin) had significantly different associations for allergic and non-allergic wheeze. In exposure–response models with up to five exposure categories, we saw evidence of an exposure–response relationship for several pesticides including the commonly used herbicides 2,4-D and glyphosate, the insecticides permethrin and carbaryl, and the rodenticide warfarin. Conclusions: These results for farmers implicate several pesticides that are commonly used in agricultural and residential settings with adverse respiratory effects. Citation: Hoppin JA, Umbach DM, Long S, London SJ, Henneberger PK, Blair A, Alavanja M, Beane Freeman LE, Sandler DP. 2017. Pesticides are associated with allergic and non-allergic wheeze among male farmers. Environ Health Perspect 125:535–543; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP315 PMID:27384423

  18. Removal of pesticides and ecotoxicological changes during the simultaneous treatment of triazines and chlorpyrifos in biomixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizano-Fallas, Verónica; Masís-Mora, Mario; Espinoza-Villalobos, David; Lizano-Brenes, Michelle; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E

    2017-09-01

    Biopurification systems constitute a biological approach for the treatment of pesticide-containing wastewaters produced in agricultural activities, and contain an active core called biomixture. This work evaluated the performance of a biomixture to remove and detoxify a combination of three triazine herbicides (atrazine/terbuthylazine/terbutryn) and one insecticide (chlorpyrifos), and this efficiency was compared with dissipation in soil alone. The potential enhancement of the process was also assayed by bioaugmentation with the ligninolytic fungi Trametes versicolor. Globally, the non-bioaugmented biomixture exhibited faster pesticide removal than soil, but only in the first stages of the treatment. After 20 d, the largest pesticide removal was achieved in the biomixture, while significant removal was detected only for chlorpyrifos in soil. However, after 60 d the removal values in soil matched those achieved in the biomixture for all the pesticides. The bioaugmentation failed to enhance, and even significantly decreased the biomixture removal capacity. Final removal values were 82.8% (non-bioaugmented biomixture), 43.8% (fungal bioaugmented biomixture), and 84.7% (soil). The ecotoxicological analysis revealed rapid detoxification (from 100 to 170 TU to pesticide removal. On the contrary, despite important herbicide elimination, no clear detoxification patterns were observed in the phytotoxicity towards Lactuca sativa. Findings suggest that the proposed biomixture is useful for fast removal of the target pesticides; even though soil also removes the agrochemicals, longer periods would be required. On the other hand, the use of fungal bioaugmentation is discouraged in this matrix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxidative stress induced by glyphosate-based herbicide on freshwater turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héritier, Laurent; Duval, David; Galinier, Richard; Meistertzheim, Anne-Leila; Verneau, Olivier

    2017-12-01

    Freshwater ecosystems face very strong anthropogenic pressures, among which overexploitation, habitat degradation, flow modification, species invasion, and water pollution lead to growing threats on biodiversity. Urbanization through wastewater treatment, industry through the release of inorganic and organic chemicals, and agriculture through the use of pesticides and herbicides are the main factors involved in water pollution. In France, more precisely in the Pyrénées-Orientales department, the poor quality of the watercourses is attributable overall to the use of glyphosate-based herbicides in agricultural activities. Because these chemicals can impact individuals, populations, and biodiversity, we investigated, under experimental conditions, the physiological response of animals facing abiotic contaminants. We selected as a model, juveniles of the freshwater turtle Trachemys scripta elegans. We measured the gene expression and activity of the catalase and superoxide dismutase enzymes as well as the levels of lipid peroxidation, which are all oxidative stress biomarkers, in turtles challenged with high concentrations of glyphosate-based herbicides, on the one hand, and with degraded waters collected from a local watercourse, on the other. We also measured the acetylcholinesterase activity across the same animals. We showed through variations in gene expression and enzyme activity that a glyphosate commercial formulation induced a stress in turtles. A similar outcome was obtained when turtles faced degraded waters. The results indicated that the poor quality of regional waters could be a real threat for animal health. Because turtles are globally less sensitive to contaminants than amphibians, which are lacking in the degraded waters of the Pyrénées-Orientales department, they could constitute an excellent model to follow the evolution of water quality through the study of oxidative stress biomarkers. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3343-3350. © 2017 SETAC.

  20. Effects of the herbicide diuron on cordgrass (Spartina foliosa) reflectance and photosynthetic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S.L.; Carranza, A.; Kunzelman, J.; Datta, S.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Early indicators of salt marsh plant stress are needed to detect stress before it is manifested as changes in biomass and coverage. We explored a variety of leaf-level spectral reflectance and fluorescence variables as indicators of stress in response to the herbicide diuron. Diuron, a Photosystem II inhibitor, is heavily used in areas adjacent to estuaries, but its ecological effects are just beginning to be recognized. In a greenhouse experiment, we exposed Spartina foliosa, the native cordgrass in California salt marshes, to two levels of diuron. After plant exposure to diuron for 28 days, all spectral reflectance indices and virtually all fluorescence parameters indicated reduced pigment and photosynthetic function, verified as reduced CO2 assimilation. Diuron exposure was not evident, however, in plant morphometry, indicating that reflectance and fluorescence were effective indicators of sub-lethal diuron exposure. Several indices (spectral reflectance index ARI and fluorescence parameters EQY, Fo, and maximum rETR) were sensitive to diuron concentration. In field trials, most of the indices as well as biomass, % cover, and canopy height varied predictably and significantly across a pesticide gradient. In the field, ARI and Fo regressed most significantly and strongly with pesticide levels. The responses of ARI and Fo in both the laboratory and the field make these indices promising as sensitive, rapid, non-destructive indicators of responses of S. foliosa to herbicides in the field. These techniques are employed in remote sensing and could potentially provide a link between landscapes of stressed vegetation and the causative stressor(s), which is crucial for effective regulation of pollution. ?? 2008 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation.

  1. Electrochemical degradation and mineralization of glyphosate herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nam; Drogui, Patrick; Doan, Tuan Linh; Le, Thanh Son; Nguyen, Hoai Chau

    2017-12-01

    The presence of herbicide is a concern for both human and ecological health. Glyphosate is occasionally detected as water contaminants in agriculture areas where the herbicide is used extensively. The removal of glyphosate in synthetic solution using advanced oxidation process is a possible approach for remediation of contaminated waters. The ability of electrochemical oxidation for the degradation and mineralization of glyphosate herbicide was investigated using Ti/PbO 2 anode. The current intensity, treatment time, initial concentration and pH of solution are the influent parameters on the degradation efficiency. An experimental design methodology was applied to determine the optimal condition (in terms of cost/effectiveness) based on response surface methodology. Glyphosate concentration (C 0  = 16.9 mg L -1 ) decreased up to 0.6 mg L -1 when the optimal conditions were imposed (current intensity of 4.77 A and treatment time of 173 min). The removal efficiencies of glyphosate and total organic carbon were 95 ± 16% and 90.31%, respectively. This work demonstrates that electrochemical oxidation is a promising process for degradation and mineralization of glyphosate.

  2. Pesticide use in agriculture and Parkinson's disease in the AGRICAN cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouchieu, Camille; Piel, Clément; Carles, Camille; Gruber, Anne; Helmer, Catherine; Tual, Séverine; Marcotullio, Elisabeth; Lebailly, Pierre; Baldi, Isabelle

    2017-11-09

    Epidemiological studies have reported an increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in farmers exposed to pesticides, but no clear conclusion can be drawn on the type of pesticide and duration of use associated with an effect. In the French agricultural cohort AGRICAN, we assessed associations between PD and pesticide use according to the types of livestock and crops grown, including exposure to some active ingredients with duration of use. Self-reported PD and history of lifetime exposure to 13 crops and 5 types of animals and pesticide use were collected at enrolment (2005-07) among 181 842 participants. Exposure to selected active ingredients and duration of use lifelong were assessed with the crop-exposure matrix PESTIMAT. Associations between pesticide use and PD were estimated by logistic regression according to crops and livestock, adjusted for sex, age, educational level, smoking status and alcohol consumption. PD was reported by 1732 subjects (1.2%) at enrolment in the cohort. Pesticide use lifelong was associated with an increased risk of PD in all types of activities [odds ratio (OR) = 1.31 (cattle) to 1.79 (peas), P supports additional evidence of an association of PD with dithiocarbamate fungicides, rotenone and the herbicides diquat and paraquat.

  3. Monitoring a large number of pesticides and transformation products in water samples from Spain and Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousis, Nikolaos I; Bade, Richard; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Zuccato, Ettore; Sancho, Juan V; Hernandez, Felix; Castiglioni, Sara

    2017-07-01

    Assessing the presence of pesticides in environmental waters is particularly challenging because of the huge number of substances used which may end up in the environment. Furthermore, the occurrence of pesticide transformation products (TPs) and/or metabolites makes this task even harder. Most studies dealing with the determination of pesticides in water include only a small number of analytes and in many cases no TPs. The present study applied a screening method for the determination of a large number of pesticides and TPs in wastewater (WW) and surface water (SW) from Spain and Italy. Liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used to screen a database of 450 pesticides and TPs. Detection and identification were based on specific criteria, i.e. mass accuracy, fragmentation, and comparison of retention times when reference standards were available, or a retention time prediction model when standards were not available. Seventeen pesticides and TPs from different classes (fungicides, herbicides and insecticides) were found in WW in Italy and Spain, and twelve in SW. Generally, in both countries more compounds were detected in effluent WW than in influent WW, and in SW than WW. This might be due to the analytical sensitivity in the different matrices, but also to the presence of multiple sources of pollution. HRMS proved a good screening tool to determine a large number of substances in water and identify some priority compounds for further quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Derivative spectrophotometric determination of the herbicides picloram and triclopyr in mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BILJANA F. ABRAMOVIC

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A derivative spectrophotometric method for the determination of the herbicides picloram (4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropicolinic acid and triclopyr (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyloxyacetic acid in mixtures was developed in this work. Derivative spectrophotometric determination of the selected herbicides was preceded by investigations concerning the influence of pH, in the pH interval from 1 to 9. At pH 3.2, picloram and triclopyr solutions are stable under daylight for nine months. This pH was used for all subsequent determinations. It was also found that the use of the first derivative of the spectra at 232 nm was optimal for the determination of picloram, while use of the second derivative of the spectra at 211 nm was best suited for the determination of triclopyr. The calibration curves are linear in the concentration range 0.8 – 13 µg cm-3 with correlation coefficients –0.9998 for picloram and 0.9996 for triclopyr. The limit of detection of the developed method is 0.08 µg cm-3 for picloram and 0.03 µg cm-3 for triclopyr. Derivative spectrophotometry was shown to be an appropriate method for the determination of picloram and triclopyr in mixtures and in pesticide formulations, unlike the deconvolution method.

  5. Herbicide glufosinate inhibits yeast growth and extends longevity during wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Beatriz; Picazo, Cecilia; Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia; Aranda, Agustín

    2017-09-29

    Glufosinate ammonium (GA) is a widely used herbicide that inhibits glutamine synthetase. This inhibition leads to internal amino acid starvation which, in turn, causes the activation of different nutrient sensing pathways. GA also inhibits the enzyme of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in such a way that, although it is not used as a fungicide, it may alter yeast performance in industrial processes like winemaking. We describe herein how GA indeed inhibits the yeast growth of a wine strain during the fermentation of grape juice. In turn, GA extends longevity in a variety of growth media. The biochemical analysis indicates that GA partially inhibits the nutrient sensing TORC1 pathway, which may explain these phenotypes. The GCN2 kinase mutant is hypersensitive to GA. Hence the control of translation and amino acid biosynthesis is required to also deal with the damaging effects of this pesticide. A global metabolomics analysis under winemaking conditions indicated that an increase in amino acid and in polyamines occurred. In conclusion, GA affects many different biochemical processes during winemaking, which provides us with some insights into both the effect of this herbicide on yeast physiology and into the relevance of the metabolic step for connecting nitrogen and carbon metabolism.

  6. Antifungal and Herbicidal Effects of Fruit Essential Oils of Four Myrtus communis Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordali, Saban; Usanmaz, Ayse; Cakir, Ahmet; Komaki, Amanmohammad; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils isolated by hydrodistillation from the fruits of four selected Myrtus communis L. genotypes from Turkey was characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. 1,8-Cineole (29.20-31.40%), linalool (15.67-19.13%), α-terpineol (8.40-18.43%), α-pinene (6.04-20.71%), and geranyl acetate (3.98-7.54%) were found to be the major constituents of the fruit essential oils of all M. communis genotypes investigated. The oils were characterized by high amounts of oxygenated monoterpenes, representing 73.02-83.83% of the total oil compositions. The results of the fungal growth inhibition assays showed that the oils inhibited the growth of 19 phytopathogenic fungi. However, their antifungal activity was generally lower than that of the commercial pesticide benomyl. The herbicidal effects of the oils on the seed germination and seedling growth of Amaranthus retroflexus L., Chenopodium album L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Lactuca serriola L., and Rumex crispus L. were also determined. The oils completely or partly inhibited the seed germinations and seedling growths of the plants. The findings of the present study suggest that the M. communis essential oils might have potential to be used as natural herbicides as well as fungicides. Copyright © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  7. Adsorption of triazine herbicides from aqueous solution by functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes grown on silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Archivio, Angelo Antonio; Maggi, Maria Anna; Odoardi, Antonella; Santucci, Sandro; Passacantando, Maurizio

    2018-02-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), because of their small size and large available surface area, are potentially efficient sorbents for the extraction of water solutes. Dispersion of MWCNTs in aqueous medium is suitable to adsorb organic contaminants from small sample volumes, but, the recovery of the suspended sorbent for successive re-use represents a critical step, which makes this method inapplicable in large-scale water-treatment technologies. To overcome this problem, we proposed here MWCNTs grown on silicon supports and investigated on a small-volume scale their adsorption properties towards triazine herbicides dissolved in water. The adsorption efficiency of the supported MWCNTs has been tested on seven triazine herbicides, which are emerging water contaminants in Europe and USA, because of their massive use, persistence in soils and potential risks for the aquatic organisms and human health. The investigated compounds, in spite of their common molecular skeleton, cover a relatively large property range in terms of both solubility in water and hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity. The functionalisation of MWCNTs carried out by acidic oxidation, apart from increasing wettability of the material, results in a better adsorption performance. Increasing of functionalisation time between 17 and 60 h progressively increases the extraction of all seven pesticides and produces a moderate increment of selectivity.

  8. Herbicider i terrestriske vådområder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Riis, Tenna

    Vådområder er truet natur beskyttet af flere EU-direktiver. Vi har i dette projekt undersøgt om herbicider er en trussel mod deres tilstand. Vi undersøgte herbicideksponering på 11 ådalsstrækninger fordelt på 7 ådale og fandt herbicider alle steder. Koncentrationen af herbicider i grundvand og va...

  9. Soil microbial and faunal responses to herbicide tolerant maize and herbicide in two soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, Bryan; Caul, Sandra; Thompson, J.

    2008-01-01

    of cotton strips and the nematode community; (3) herbicide application in general altered the community level physiological profile of the microbial community and reduced both soil basal respiration and the abundance of protozoa; and (4) the specific application of glufosinate-ammonium to T25 maize altered......A glasshouse experiment was set up to compare processes and organisms in two soils planted with genetically modified (GM) herbicide tolerant (HT) maize treated with appropriate herbicides. This was part of a wider project (ECOGEN) looking at the consequences of GM cropping systems on soil biology...... using a tiered approach at laboratory, glasshouse and field scales. Soil for the experiment was taken from field sites where the same maize cultivars were grown to allow comparison between results under glasshouse and field conditions. The maize cultivars T25 (GM HT glufosinate-ammonium tolerant...

  10. Occurrence of dichloroacetamide herbicide safeners and co-applied herbicides in midwestern U.S. streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Emily; Hladik, Michelle; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2017-01-01

    Dichloroacetamide safeners (e.g., AD-67, benoxacor, dichlormid, and furilazole) are co-applied with chloroacetanilide herbicides to protect crops from herbicide toxicity. While such safeners have been used since the early 1970s, there are minimal data about safener usage, occurrence in streams, or potential ecological effects. This study focused on one of these research gaps, occurrence in streams. Seven Midwestern U.S. streams (five in Iowa and two in Illinois), with extensive row-crop agriculture, were sampled at varying frequencies from spring 2016 through summer 2017. All four safeners were detected at least once; furilazole was the most frequently detected (31%), followed by benoxacor (29%), dichlormid (15%), and AD-67 (2%). The maximum concentrations ranged from 42 to 190 ng/L. Stream detections and concentrations of safeners appear to be driven by a combination of timing of application (spring following herbicide application) and precipitation events. Detected concentrations were below known toxicity levels for aquatic organisms.

  11. Estimation of the validation parameters for a fast analysis of herbicide residues by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilio, A; Girolimetti, S; Barbini, D Attard

    2014-01-01

    Due to strict regulatory requirements for pesticide residue analysis, only the results of residue analysis with acceptable quality should be reported. As a consequence proper validation of the measurement method is required. In this context, accuracy, precision, specificity, limit of determination (LOQ), matrix effect, linearity, uncertainty calculation and ruggedness become increasingly important. This paper reports a description of the validation parameters of a fast method for the determination of five phenoxy acid herbicides (2,4-D, MCPA, MCPP, haloxyfop and fluazifop) in food crops. The recoveries were performed in the concentration range from 0.05 to 0.5 mg kg⁻¹ for apples, pears, carrots and celeriac with five replicates at each level. The mean recoveries ranged from 70% to 95% for all crops. The precision of the method expressed as a relative standard deviation (RSD%) was found to be in the range 3-14%. For all herbicides, the linearity response of the detector was tested by correlation coefficients (r² > 0.99) in the concentration range from 0.05 to 0.5 mg kg⁻¹. The LOQ was determined as the lowest spiked level meeting the requirement of accuracy (70-120%) and precision (RSD% herbicides in routine testing laboratories.

  12. Influence of sugar cane vinasse on the sorption and degradation of herbicides in soil under controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourencetti, Carolina; De Marchi, Mary R R; Ribeiro, Maria L

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the influence of sugar cane vinasse on the persistence, sorption and leaching potential of diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea), hexazinone (3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-dione) and tebuthiuron (1-(5-tert-butyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-1,3-dimethylurea) in both a clay and sandy soil from a tropical area of Brazil. The experiments were conducted out under controlled laboratory conditions. The addition of sugarcane vinasse to soil influenced the persistence and sorption of the herbicides in both the studied clay and sandy soils, with a considerable decrease in the diuron DT₅₀ values in clay soil. The Ground Water Ubiquity Score (GUS) Index classifies the herbicides as leachers in both soils and treatments, with the exception of diuron, which is classified as a non-leacher in clay soil-vinasse and as a transient herbicide in sandy soil. These results suggest that special attention should be given to areas such as those where the sandy soil was collected in this study, which is a recharge area of the Guarani Aquifer and is likely to experience groundwater contamination due to the high leaching potential of the applied pesticides.

  13. Pesticides in Ground Water of the Maryland Coastal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denver, Judith M.; Ator, Scott W.

    2006-01-01

    Selected pesticides are detectable at low levels (generally less than 0.1 microgram per liter) in unconfined ground water in many parts of the Maryland Coastal Plain. Samples were recently collected (2001-04) from 47 wells in the Coastal Plain and analyzed for selected pesticides and degradate compounds (products of pesticide degradation). Most pesticide degradation occurs in the soil zone before infiltration to the water table, and degradates of selected pesticides were commonly detected in ground water, often at higher concentrations than their respective parent compounds. Pesticides and their degradates often occur in ground water in mixtures of multiple compounds, reflecting similar patterns in usage. All measured concentrations in ground water were below established standards for drinking water, and nearly all were below other health-based guidelines. Although drinking-water standards and guidelines are typically much higher than observed concentrations in ground water, they do not exist for many detected compounds (particularly degradates), or for mixtures of multiple compounds. The distribution of observed pesticide compounds reflects known usage patterns, as well as chemical properties and environmental factors that affect the fate and transport of these compounds in the environment. Many commonly used pesticides, such as glyphosate, pendimethalin, and 2,4-D were not detected in ground water, likely because they were sorbed onto organic matter or degraded in the soil zone. Others that are more soluble and (or) persistent, like atrazine, metolachlor, and several of their degradates, were commonly detected in ground water where they have been used. Atrazine, for example, an herbicide used primarily on corn, was most commonly detected in ground water on the Eastern Shore (where agriculture is common), particularly where soils are well drained. Conversely, dieldrin, an insecticide previously used heavily for termite control, was detected only on the Western

  14. Herbicide injury induces DNA methylome alterations in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjune Kim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of herbicide-resistant weeds is a major threat facing modern agriculture. Over 470 weedy-plant populations have developed resistance to herbicides. Traditional evolutionary mechanisms are not always sufficient to explain the rapidity with which certain weed populations adapt in response to herbicide exposure. Stress-induced epigenetic changes, such as alterations in DNA methylation, are potential additional adaptive mechanisms for herbicide resistance. We performed methylC sequencing of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves that developed after either mock treatment or two different sub-lethal doses of the herbicide glyphosate, the most-used herbicide in the history of agriculture. The herbicide injury resulted in 9,205 differentially methylated regions (DMRs across the genome. In total, 5,914 of these DMRs were induced in a dose-dependent manner, wherein the methylation levels were positively correlated to the severity of the herbicide injury, suggesting that plants can modulate the magnitude of methylation changes based on the severity of the stress. Of the 3,680 genes associated with glyphosate-induced DMRs, only 7% were also implicated in methylation changes following biotic or salinity stress. These results demonstrate that plants respond to herbicide stress through changes in methylation patterns that are, in general, dose-sensitive and, at least partially, stress-specific.

  15. Uses of thaxtomin and thaxtomin compositions as herbicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivunen, Marja; Marrone, Pamela

    2016-12-27

    There is a need for a selective, low-risk herbicide that can be used to control weeds in cereal cultures and turf. The present invention discloses that a bacterial secondary metabolite, thaxtomin and optionally another herbicide is an effective herbicide on broadleaved, sedge and grass weeds. Thaxtomin A and structurally similar compounds can be used as natural herbicides to control the germination and growth of weeds in cereal, turf grass, Timothy grass and pasture grass cultures with no phytotoxicity to these crops. As a natural, non-toxic compound, thaxtomin can be used as a safe alternative for weed control in both conventional and organic farming and gardening systems.

  16. Vegetative filter strips efficiency controlling soil loss and trapping herbicides in two olive orchards at the short-term

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luna, Elena; Guzmán, Gema; Gómez, José A.

    2014-05-01

    The optimization of water use in a semi-arid climate is based on an optimal use of rainwater adopting management practices that prevent and/or control runoff. This is a key point for increasing the economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture due to the minimization of diffuse pollution associated to runoff and to sediment and chemical transport. One strategy is the establishment of vegetative filters strips that prevent pesticides (Stehle et al. 2011), herbicides (Vianello et al. 2005), fertilizers (Withers et al. 2009) and runoff-sediment (Campo-Bescós et al. 2013) from entering streams or surface water reservoirs. To evaluate the short-term risks associated with the use of herbicides a trial was designed in two olive groves located in Benacazón (Sevilla) and Cabra (Córdoba) both with an average steepness of 11%. Two different management systems were evaluated, bare soil and bare soil with vegetative filter strips. Pre-emergence herbicides were applied and analysed at the beginning of the trial by chromatography GC-MS and after each rainfall event both in soil and sediment. Runoff and soil losses were measured, as well. The results obtained from this study show that soil management practices such as, the use of vegetative filter strips results in a reduction of soil losses and runoff. This it is translated in the improvement of soil quality and a reduction of water pollution caused by the use of herbicides. This information will improve the understanding of insufficiently known aspects and it will help to increase the knowledge for a better implementation of sustainable management practices at a farm scale and at larger temporal scale. References: Campo-Bescós, M. A., Muñoz-Carpena, R., & Kiker, G. (2013) Influencia del suelo en la eficiencia de la implantación de filtros verdes en un distrito de riego por superficie en medio árido. En Estudios de la Zona no Saturada del Suelo, Vol. XI: 183-187. Stehle, S., Elsaesser, D., Gregoire, C., Imfeld

  17. Examination of the translocation of sulfonylurea herbicides in sunflower plants by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David M G; Carolan, Vikki A; Crosland, Susan; Sharples, Kate R; Clench, Malcolm R

    2010-11-30

    Pesticides are widely used in agriculture to control weeds, pests and diseases. Successful control is dependent on the compound reaching the target site within the organism after spray or soil application. Conventional methods for determining uptake and movement of herbicides and pesticides include autoradiography, liquid scintillation and chromatographic techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Autoradiography using radiolabelled compounds provides the best indication of a compound's movement within the plant system. Autoradiography is an established technique but it relies on the synthesis of radiolabelled compounds. The distribution of four sulfonylurea herbicides in sunflower plants has been studied 24  h after foliar application. The use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) images of protonated molecules and fragment ions (resulting from fragmentation at the urea bond within the sulfonylurea herbicides) has provided evidence for translocation above and below the application point. The translocation of nicosulfuron and azoxystrobin within the same plant system has also been demonstrated following their application to the plant stem. This study provides evidence that MALDI-MSI has great potential as an analytical technique to detect and assess the foliar, root and stem uptake of agrochemicals, and to reveal their distribution through the plant once absorbed and translocated. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Pesticides in drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Grmek-Košnik

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of pesticides deceives of indisputable advantage, however remainders of pesticides in drinking water might represent potential danger for health on foodstuffs. In European Union (EU pesticides and their relevant metabolic, degrading and reactive products, with exception for aldrin, dieldrin, heptaclor and heptaclor epoxide, should not exceed the concentration of 0.10 μg/l. At limit value 0.10 μg/l we wish to achieve null value these substances in drinking water.Methods: In years 2004 and 2005 monitoring of pesticides in drinking waters on pipes of consumers in all larger towns in state was done. Majority of pesticides were analysed by gas chromatography in combination with mass spectrometry while fluid cromatography was used primarily for badly volatile or polar and termolabile compound.Results: Results of analyses of drinking water and of ground waters for years 2004 and 2005 showed that levels of atrazine, desethyl-atrazine and 2.6 dichlorobenzamide were exceeded few times when compared to required levels. In 2005 bentazone, MCPP, metolachlor, terbuthylazin were exceeded. In 2004 concentration of pesticides were exceeded in 25 samples in 15 different areas, supplying 183,881 inhabitants. In 2005 concentration of pesticides were exceeded in 31 samples in 14 different areas, supplying 151,297 inhabitants. The distribution shows, that contamination was present mostly in the northeast part of Slovenia, where intensive agriculture takes place.Conclusions: Received status review acquired by monitoring of pesticides in drinking water is only an assessment of circumstances that will gain in representativity by enlarged number of sampling locations and longer observation time. For assessment of trends of pollution of drinking water in Slovenia it will be necessary to monitor concentration of pesticides through longer period. We could have unpolluted drinking water only with restricted use of pesticides on water-protection ranges or

  19. Agricultural pesticides and veterinary substances in Uruguayan beeswax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriet, Jorge; Campá, Juan Pablo; Grajales, Mauricio; Lhéritier, Christophe; Gómez Pajuelo, Antonio; Mendoza-Spina, Yamandú; Carrasco-Letelier, Leonidas

    2017-06-01

    Over the last decade, Uruguay has expanded and intensified its rainfed crop production. This process has affected beekeeping in several ways: for example, by reducing the space available. This has increased the density of apiaries, the risk of varroosis and acaricide use. Additionally, the dominance of no-tillage crops has increased the frequencies of application and of loads of pesticides in regions where such crops share the land with beekeeping and honey production. Therefore, the exposure of bees to xenobiotics (agricultural pesticides and veterinary products) has increased in line with pollution of hives and their products. To document pollution from hive exposure to pesticides, we surveyed the presence of 30 xenobiotics normally used in Uruguay, in recycled beeswax (RB) and in honey cappings (HC) from the main Uruguayan beekeeping regions. There was contamination of all the analyzed samples (RB and HC) with the herbicide atrazine at a range of 1-2 ng g-1. At least three or four additional xenobiotics were detected: insecticides (chlorpyrifos-ethyl and thiacloprid); fungicides (azoxystrobin and tebuconazole); and veterinary products (coumaphos, ethion, and tau-fluvalinate). The frequency of detection of chlorpyrifos-ethyl and coumaphos in RB samples was higher than in those of HC. Moreover, the concentrations of azoxystrobin, coumaphos, and tebuconazole in RB samples were higher than in HC samples. Therefore, we suggest the use of HC to produce recycled printed beeswax films for use in hives to minimize pollution transfer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Vegetated Ditches for the Mitigation of Pesticides Runoff in the Po Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Stefan; Pappalardo, Salvatore E; Cardinali, Alessandra; Masin, Roberta; Zanin, Giuseppe; Borin, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    In intensive agricultural systems runoff is one of the major potential diffuse pollution pathways for pesticides and poses a risk to surface water. Ditches are common in the Po Valley and can potentially provide runoff mitigation for the protection of watercourses. The effectiveness depends on ditch characteristics, so there is an urgent need for site-specific field trials. The use of a fugacity model (multimedia model) can allows recognition of the mitigation main processes. A field experiment was conducted in order to evaluate the mitigation capacity of a typical vegetated ditch, and results were compared with predictions by a fugacity model. To evaluate herbicide mitigation after an extreme runoff, the ditch was flooded with water containing mesotrione, S-metolachlor and terbuthylazine. Two other subsequent floods with uncontaminated water were applied 27 and 82 days later to evaluate herbicides release. Results show that the ditch can immediately reduce runoff concentration of herbicides by at least 50% even in extreme flooding conditions. The half-distances were about 250 m. As a general rule, a runoff of 1 mm from 5 ha is mitigated by 99% in 100 m of vegetated ditch. Herbicides retention in the vegetated ditch was reversible, and the second flood mobilized 0.03-0.2% of the previous one, with a concentration below the drinking water limit of 0.1 μg L(-1). No herbicide was detected in the third flood, because the residual amount in the ditch was too low. Fugacity model results show that specific physical-chemical parameters may be used and a specific soil-sediment-plant compartment included for modelling herbicides behaviour in a vegetated ditch, and confirm that accumulation is low or negligible for herbicides with a half-life of 40 days or less. Shallow vegetated ditches can thus be included in a general agri-environment scheme for the mitigation of pesticides runoff together with wetlands and linear buffer strips. These structures are present in the

  1. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil and its components. III. Influence of clay acidity, humic acid coating and herbicide structure on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-ping; Fang, Zhuo; Liu, Hui-jun; Yang, Wei-chun

    2002-04-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite, soil humic acid, and their mixtures was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption isotherms of acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on Ca(2+)-, Mg(2+)-, Al(3+)- and Fe(3+)-saturated clays were well described by the Freundlich equation. Regardless of the type of exchange cations, Kf decreased in the order of metolachlor > acetolachlor > alachlor > propachlor on the same clay. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in binding, probably via H-bond with water molecules in the clay interlayer. The type and position of substitutions around the carbonyl group may have affected the electronegativity of oxygen, thus influencing the relative adsorption of these herbicides. For the same herbicide, adsorption on clay increased in the order of Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Al3+ < or = Fe3+ which coincided with the increasing acidity of homoionic clays. Acidity of cations may have affected the protonation of water, and thus the strength of H-bond between the clay water and herbicide. Complexation of clay and humic acid resulted in less adsorption than that expected from independent adsorption by the individual constituents. The effect varied with herbicides, but the greatest decrease in adsorption occurred at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio for all the herbicides. Causes for the decreased adsorption need to be characterized to better understand adsorption mechanisms and predict adsorption from soil compositions.

  2. ALTERNATIVES TO HERBICIDES IN AN APPLE ORCHARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Mihaescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides have taken a long time the most important place among the means of combating pests. Their use often irrational abusive led to many negative secondary phenomena among which the pollution are the most important. Integrated control requires the use of chemicals especially those selective, with other methods which typically produces the effectiveness of the entire system. Knowledge of pesticides in terms of chemical, biological agricultural and environmental toxicology, have continuously progressed so that the last 40 years have founded a new discipline.

  3. Human Health Benchmarks for Pesticides

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Advanced testing methods now allow pesticides to be detected in water at very low levels. These small amounts of pesticides detected in drinking water or source...

  4. Antimicrobial Pesticide Use Site Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Use Site Index provides guidance to assist applicants for antimicrobial pesticide registration by helping them identify the data requirements necessary to register a pesticide or support their product registrations.

  5. Effect of various cyclodextrins on photodegradation of a hydrophobic herbicide in aqueous suspensions of different soil colloidal components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Jaime; Maqueda, Celia; Undabeytia, Tomas; Morillo, Esmeralda

    2007-09-01

    This paper investigated the photochemical behaviour of the herbicide norflurazon (NFL) in the presence of different soil colloidal components and several cyclodextrins (CDs). The interaction of NFL with CDs yielded the formation of inclusion complexes at 1:1 stoichiometric ratio in solution, with an increase of the herbicide solubility. The irradiation of NFL aqueous solutions in the presence of CDs showed that the higher the formation constant of NFL-CD complexes (Kc) and their solubility, the higher their photocatalytic effects, following the CDs in the order: RAMEB>HPBCD>beta-CD>alpha-CD>gamma-CD. The presence of the different soil colloidal components in aqueous suspension provoked the reduction of the NFL photodegradation rate, due to a screening effect, especially when goethite and humic acids were present. No disappearance of NFL was detected in parallel studies carried out in the dark, except in the case of humic acids, where a 5% adsorption of the initial amount of NFL was adsorbed in the dark control. The presence of the different CDs in such systems showed an inductive photodegradation effect on the herbicide. This could be largely explained by the inclusion effects of CDs in catalyzing interactions between NFL and certain reactive radicals generated by the different colloidal components. Although this work was carried out at laboratory scale and therefore, has limited applications, it reveals that cyclodextrins increase solubilization of hydrophobic herbicides and could lead to their increased photodegradation. This could be a promising method for pesticide-contaminated water remediation. However, it is important to consider the effect of the soil colloidal components in the different aquatic systems and their concentrations, since they can alter the photodegradative effects of the cyclodextrins.

  6. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in ...

  7. Use of farming and agro-industrial wastes as versatile barriers in reducing pesticide leaching through soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoll, J; Ruiz, E; Flores, P; Vela, N; Hellín, P; Navarro, S

    2011-03-15

    Increased interest has been recently focused on assessing the influence of the addition of organic wastes related to movement of pesticides in soils of low organic matter (OM) content. This study reports the effect of two different amendments, animal manure (composted sheep manure) and agro-industrial waste (spent coffee grounds) on the mobility of 10 pesticides commonly used for pepper protection on a clay-loam soil (OM = 0.22%). The tested compounds were azoxystrobin, cyprodinil, fludioxonil, hexaconazole, kresoxim-methyl, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole, and triadimenol (fungicides), pirimicarb (insecticide), and propyzamide (herbicide). Breakthrough curves were obtained from disturbed soil columns. Cumulative curves obtained from unamended soil show a leaching of all pesticides although in different proportions (12-65% of the total mass of compound applied), showing triadimenol and pirimicarb the higher leachability. Significant correlation (r = 0.93, p<0.01) was found between the observed and bibliographical values of GUS index. The addition of the amendments used drastically reduced the movement of the studied pesticides. Only two pesticides were found in leachates from amended soils, pyrimethanil (<1%) for both, and pirimicarb (44%) in the soil amended with spent coffee grounds. A decrease in pesticide leaching was observed with the increase in dissolved organic matter (DOM) of leachates. The results obtained point to the interest in the use of organic wastes in reducing the pollution of groundwater by pesticide drainage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Monitoring of pesticide residues in market basket samples of vegetable from Lucknow City, India: QuEChERS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ashutosh K; Trivedi, Purushottam; Srivastava, M K; Lohani, M; Srivastava, Laxman Prasad

    2011-05-01

    The study was conducted on 20 vegetables including leafy, root, modified stem, and fruity vegetables like bitter gourd, jack fruit, french-bean, onion, colocassia, pointed gourd, capsicum, spinach, potato, fenugreek seeds, carrot, radish, cucumber, beetroot, brinjal, cauliflower, cabbage, tomato, okra, and bottle gourd. Forty-eight pesticides including 13 organochlorines (OCs), 17 organophosphates (OPs), 10 synthetic pyrethriods (SPs), and eight herbicides (H) pesticides were analyzed. A total number of 60 samples, each in triplicates, were analyzed using Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe method. The quantification was done by GC-ECD/NPD. The recovery varies from 70.22% to 96.32% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 15%. However the limit of detection ranged from 0.001-0.009 mg kg(-1)for OCs, SPs, OPs, and H, respectively. Twenty-three pesticides were detected from total 48 analyzed pesticides in the samples with the range of 0.005-12.35 mg kg(-1). The detected pesticides were: Σ-HCH, Dicofol, Σ-Endosulfan, Fenpropathrin, Permethrin-II, β-cyfluthrin-II, Fenvalerate-I, Dichlorvos, Dimethoate, Diazinon, Malathion, Chlorofenvinfos, Anilophos, and Dimethachlor. In some vegetables like radish, cucumber, cauliflower, cabbage, and okra, the detected pesticides (Σ-HCH, Permethrin-II, Dichlorvos, and Chlorofenvinfos) were above maximum residues limit (MRL) (PFA 1954). However, in other vegetables the level of pesticide residues was either below detection limit or MRL.

  9. In Case of Pesticide Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Consumers Contact Us Share In Case of Pesticide Emergency If someone has swallowed or inhaled a pesticide or gotten it in the eye or on ... for help with first aid information. The National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) (1-800-858-7378) also ...

  10. Pesticides: A Community Action Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumstead, Cynthia, Ed.; And Others

    Developed to provide an introduction to the issues surrounding the use of chemical pesticides, this booklet encourages individuals and communities to become active in determining the safe use and regulation of pesticides. The major components of the guide include: (1) an explanation of the issue; (2) pesticides and their effect on human health;…

  11. Impact of irrigation rate on pre-emergence herbicide activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of preemergence herbicide applications in cotton has increased since the development of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri). Cotton producers are relying on residual herbicides for control of Palmer amaranth, as postemergence options are limited or ineffective. S...

  12. Evaluation of Botanical Herbicides against Common Weed Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of botanical herbicides against common weed species of coffee. [2] herbicides were varied among plant extracts as well as with application frequency. Essential oils extracted from E. citrodora and C. winterianus caused significantly the highest percentage growth retardation of weeds as compared to untreated ...

  13. Efficacy and economics of different herbicides in aerobic rice system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aerobic rice system, the most promising irrigation water saving rice production technology, is highly impeded by severe weed pressure. Weed control through the use of same herbicide causes development of herbicide resistant weed biotypes and serious problem in weed management. This study was aimed at finding out ...

  14. Herbicide volatilization trumps runoff losses, a multi-year investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface runoff and volatilization are two processes critical to herbicide off-site transport. To determine the relevance of these off-site transport mechanisms, runoff and turbulent vapor fluxes were simultaneously monitored on the same site for eight years. Site location, herbicide formulations, ...

  15. Effect of four herbicides on microbial population, soil organic matter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of four herbicides (atrazine, primeextra, paraquat and glyphosate) on soil microbial population, soil organic matter and dehydrogenase activity was assessed over a period of six weeks. Soil samples from cassava farms were treated with herbicides at company recommended rates. Soil dehydrogenase activity was ...

  16. Condition of antioxidant system of Zea mays under herbicide action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Rossihina

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The change of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase enzymatic activity in maize leaves under action of soil herbicides – Harness, Frontier, Merlin – has been studied. It is shown the increase of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activity and the decrease of catalase activity. It is directed to reduce the oxidation stress and thereby the herbicidal damage.

  17. Role of herbicide-resistant crops in integrated weed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical weed control began with the use of 2,4-D in the mid-1940s. Since then, a wide array of herbicides has been commercialized and that has greatly contributed to increased crop yields. With the introduction of several new, more specific and more effective herbicides, the cost of weed control wi...

  18. The role of low impact herbicide treatments in ecosystem management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles K. McMahon; James H. Miller; David F. Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Abstract. Environmentally safe, selective herbicide treatments can be adapted to manage habitats and direct succession toward desired future conditions within the principles of ecosystem 0. Six roles for herbicide treatments in ecosystem management are suggested: create and maintain desired habitats; create mixed and uneven-aged stands; restore...

  19. The toxicological effect of paraquat post emergence herbicide on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed that there were significant differences (P< 0.05) in vegetative growth in cowpea plants when paraquat was used as post emergence herbicide for weed control. There was good growth and adequate weed control achieved by all herbicide treatments evaluated until 9 weeks after planting (WAP) before ...

  20. Growth Regulator Herbicides Prevent Invasive Annual Grass Seed Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auxinic herbicides, such as 2,4-D and dicamba, that act as plant growth regulators are commonly used for broadleaf weed control in cereal crops (e.g. wheat, barley), grasslands, and non-croplands. If applied at later growth stages, while cereals are developing reproductive parts, the herbicides can...

  1. Herbicide-resistant crop biotechnology: potential and pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicide-resistant crops are an important agricultural biotechnology that can enable farmers to effectively control weeds without harming their crops. Glyphosate-resistant (i.e. Roundup Ready) crops have been the most commercially successful varieties of herbicide-resistant crops and have been plan...

  2. ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS BY LC/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acetanilide herbicides are frequently applied in the U.S. on crops (corn, soybeans, popcorn, etc.) to control broadleaf and annual weeds. The acetanilide and acetamide herbicides currently registered for use in the U.S. are alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, propachlor, flufen...

  3. Kudzu Suppression by Herbicides in Two-Year Field trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicides are currently the principle means of halting the spread of kudzu (Pueraria montana var lobata) and reclaiming kudzu-infested lands. The efficacy of several herbicides on this invasive weed has been well-established, but these chemicals can be prohibitively expensive, come with significan...

  4. Predicting herbicidal plant mortality with mobile photosynthesis meters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempenaar, C.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Snel, J.F.H.; Smutny, V.; Zhang, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Herbicide dose optimisation, i.e. maximising weed control and crop yield with herbicide dose, is an important part of integrated weed management strategies. However, the adoption of optimised dose technology and variable rate application has been limited because of the relatively long period between

  5. Efficacy of selected herbicide formulations on sugarcane field weeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Terbuthylazine 500 SC and 90 WG were applied as pre-emergence herbicides while dicamba 480 SL and dicamba 70 SG as post emergence herbicides. The result shows that application of the above formulations did not significantly affect the emergence of sugarcane. The efficacy of pre-emergence application decreases ...

  6. Expanding the eco-evolutionary context of herbicide resistance research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Paul; Busi, Roberto; Renton, Michael; Vila-Aiub, Martin M

    2014-09-01

    The potential for human-driven evolution in economically and environmentally important organisms in medicine, agriculture and conservation management is now widely recognised. The evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds is a classic example of rapid adaptation in the face of human-mediated selection. Management strategies that aim to slow or prevent the evolution of herbicide resistance must be informed by an understanding of the ecological and evolutionary factors that drive selection in weed populations. Here, we argue for a greater focus on the ultimate causes of selection for resistance in herbicide resistance studies. The emerging fields of eco-evolutionary dynamics and applied evolutionary biology offer a means to achieve this goal and to consider herbicide resistance in a broader and sometimes novel context. Four relevant research questions are presented, which examine (i) the impact of herbicide dose on selection for resistance, (ii) plant fitness in herbicide resistance studies, (iii) the efficacy of herbicide rotations and mixtures and (iv) the impacts of gene flow on resistance evolution and spread. In all cases, fundamental ecology and evolution have the potential to offer new insights into herbicide resistance evolution and management. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Economics of herbicide weed management in wheat in Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective use of herbicides for the control of annual grass and broadleaf weeds in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was not a reality in Ethiopia, until in recent years. This study aimed at ... Sensitivity analysis (aMRR) also remained the most profitable even when the price of herbicide increased by 20%. Hence, Mesosulfron ...

  8. Behaviour of herbicides in soil : simulation and experimental assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    1986-01-01

    The mathematical models of the transport and the transformation rate of herbicides in soil that are available in the literature and the tests done on them are reviewed.

    A simulation model of the transport of herbicides in field soil, based on the best model available in the literature, was

  9. Estimation of herbicide bioconcentration in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Luiz Cerdeira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is an important crop for sugar and biofuel production in Brazil. Growers depend greatly on herbicides to produce it. This experiment used herbicide physical-chemical and sugarcane plant physiological properties to simulate herbicide uptake and estimate the bioconcentration factor (BCF. The (BCF was calculated for the steady state chemical equilibrium between the plant herbicide concentration and soil solution. Plant-water partition coefficient (sugarcane bagasse-water partition coefficient, herbicide dilution rate, metabolism and dissipation in the soil-plant system, as well as total plant biomass factors were used. In addition, we added Tebuthiuron at rate of 5.0kg a.i. ha-1 to physically test the model. In conclusion, the model showed the following ranking of herbicide uptake: sulfentrazone > picloram >tebuthiuron > hexazinone > metribuzin > simazine > ametryn > diuron > clomazone > acetochlor. Furthermore, the highest BCF herbicides showed higher Groundwater Ubiquity Score (GUS index indicating high leaching potential. We did not find tebuthiuron in plants after three months of herbicide application

  10. Decision Support System for Optimized Herbicide Dose in Spring Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Mette; Kudsk, Per; Mathiassen, Solvejg K

    2014-01-01

    Crop Protection Online (CPO) is a decision support system, which integrates decision algorithms quantifying the requirement for weed control and a herbicide dose model. CPO was designed to be used by advisors and farmers to optimize the choice of herbicide and dose. The recommendations from CPO...

  11. Selectivity and stability of new herbicides and herbicide combinations for the seed yields of some field crops II. Effect at milk thistle (Silybum Marianum Gaertn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Delchev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. During 2013 – 2015 on pellic vertisol soil type was conducted a field experiment. Under investigation was Bulgarian milk thistle cultivar Silmar (Silybum marianum Gaertn.. Factor A included the years of investigation. Factor B included no treated check, 6 soil-applied herbicides – Tendar EC, Sharpen 33 EC, Merlin flex 480 SC, Smerch 24 ЕC, Raft 400 SC, Eagle 75 DF and 5 foliar-applied herbicides – Kalin flo, Eclipse 70 DWG, Sultan 500 SC, Granstar super 50 SG, Starane 250 EK. Factor C included no treated check and 1 antigraminaceous herbicide – Tiger platinium 5 EC. All herbicides, herbicide combinations and herbicide tank-mixtures were applied in a working solution of 200 l/ha. Mixing of foliar-applied herbicides was done in the tank on the sprayer. Soil-applied herbicides were treated during the period after sowing before emergence. Foliar-applied herbicides were treated during rosette stage of the milk thistle. Tank mixtures of antigraminaceous herbicide Tiger platinum with foliar herbicides Kalin flo, Eclipse, Sultan, Granstar super and Starane leads to obtaining high seed yields of milk thistle. High yields seeds are also obtained by foliar treatment with Tiger platinum after soil-applied herbicides Raft, Sharpen and Eagle. The use of the soil-applied herbicides Smerch, Merlin flex and Tendar does not increase the seed yield due to its higher phytotoxicity against milk thistle. Herbicide Tendar and herbicide combination Tendar + Tiger platinum are the most unstable, followed by herbicide Merlin flex. Herbicide tank-mixtures Kalin flo + Tiger platinum and Eclipse + Tiger platinum and herbicide combination Raft + Tiger platinum are technologically the most valuable. They combine high seed yield with high stability with relation to different years. Single application of soil-applied or foliar-applied herbicides have low estimate; due to that they must be combined for full control of weeds in milk thistle crops.

  12. Managed aquifer recharge as environmental tool risk mitigation linked to the presence of herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Roma, Antonella; Nieto Yàbar, Daniel; Pepi, Salvatore; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2017-04-01

    The pollution due to some herbicides which was used in flood plains and karst areas of various regions in the world is causing major problems in supplying drinking water from surface water bodies and aquifers. Pesticides and herbicides are widely used in agriculture, vineyards, industry and public hygiene. They are spread on soil surface, in air, into deep soil causing problems in surface water bodies and aquifers. In Italy the interest of presence of pesticides in water resources began around 1980 after episodes of drinking water contamination due to some herbicides and atrazine (ATR). After years away from the ban on the use of atrazine (use prohibition in the 90's), its degradation products are still present in groundwater of large areas of the plains of Nord Italy (Bottoni et al.,2013). Intensive use of triazines has become harmful for the local population that live in the Veneto-Friuli plain where the high gravels permeability of alluvial fans allowed to the widespread diffusion of triazines and related metabolites. The main mechanism of atrazine action in soil is microbial degradation, the kinetics of these products is closely connected with the availability of nitrates in the soil. The half-life of atrazine is 30-180 days but its disintegration is blocked by nitrates presence (Jones et al 1982). ATR is trapped in cohesive levels as peat and silty clay soils and periodically released by the interaction water sediment. Artificial recharge in areas with highly permeable aquifers allows to realize qualitative and quantitative regeneration because water low in nitrates and Dissolved Oxygen can promote the biological and chemical disintegration of pesticides such as atrazine and its metabolites. A case study is represented by the Friuli plain, near the Tagliamento river. Based on the WARBO project data that has applied artificial recharge in Mereto di Tomba test site where the dissolved nitrate content of water in some cases exceed the 50 mg/L limit according to

  13. Growth inhibition and recovery of Lemna gibba after pulse exposure to sulfonylurea herbicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrantz, Rikke Tjørnhøj; Baun, Anders; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2013-01-01

    The exposure of non-target aquatic organisms to pesticides often happens as short-term, high exposure events (pulses) and effects of these must be addressed in the current regulation in the EU. It is, however, questionable whether the effects of pulse exposures are adequately covered by the stand......The exposure of non-target aquatic organisms to pesticides often happens as short-term, high exposure events (pulses) and effects of these must be addressed in the current regulation in the EU. It is, however, questionable whether the effects of pulse exposures are adequately covered...... by the standardized ecotoxicological tests used in environmental effect assessments, since these aim at maintaining constant exposure concentrations during the incubation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of four sulfonylurea herbicides (flupyrsulfuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, rimsulfuron, and thifensulfuron...... tests. The approach of this study enables experimentally based comparisons between observations of effects between the two exposure regimes. We propose that results obtained in this way be applied in effect assessments for intermittent releases....

  14. Pesticide Residues in Canned Foods, Fruits, and Vegetables: The Application of Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Chromatographic Techniques in the Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. EL-Saeid

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple pesticide residues have been observed in some samples of canned foods, frozen vegetables, and fruit jam, which put the health of the consumers at risk of adverse effects. It is quite apparent that such a state of affairs calls for the need of more accurate, cost-effective, and rapid analytical techniques capable of detecting the minimum concentrations of the multiple pesticide residues. The aims of this paper were first, to determine the effectiveness of the use of Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE and Supercritical Fluid Chromatography (SFC techniques in the analysis of the levels of pesticide residues in canned foods, vegetables, and fruits; and second, to contribute to the promotion of consumer safety by excluding pesticide residue contamination from markets. Fifteen different types of imported canned and frozen fruits and vegetables samples obtained from the Houston local food markets were investigated. The major types of pesticides tested were pyrethroids, herbicides, fungicides, and carbamates.By using these techniques, the overall data showed 60.82% of the food samples had no detection of any pesticide residues under this investigation. On the other hand, 39.15% different food samples were contaminated by four different pyrethroid residues ± RSD% ranging from 0.03 ± 0.005 to 0.05 ± 0.03 ppm, of which most of the pyrethroid residues were detected in frozen vegetables and strawberry jam. Herbicide residues in test samples ranged from 0.03 ± 0.005 to 0.8 ± 0.01 ppm. Five different fungicides, ranging from 0.05 ± 0.02 to 0.8 ±0.1 ppm, were found in five different frozen vegetable samples. Carbamate residues were not detected in 60% of investigated food samples. It was concluded that SFE and SFC techniques were accurate, reliable, less time consuming, and cost effective in the analysis of imported canned foods, fruits, and vegetables and are recommended for the monitoring of pesticide contaminations.

  15. Pesticide exposure and risk of Parkinson's disease: A family-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Burton L

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pesticides and correlated lifestyle factors (e.g., exposure to well-water and farming are repeatedly reported risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD, but few family-based studies have examined these relationships. Methods Using 319 cases and 296 relative and other controls, associations of direct pesticide application, well-water consumption, and farming residences/occupations with PD were examined using generalized estimating equations while controlling for age-at-examination, sex, cigarette smoking, and caffeine consumption. Results Overall, individuals with PD were significantly more likely to report direct pesticide application than their unaffected relatives (odds ratio = 1.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.29. Frequency, duration, and cumulative exposure were also significantly associated with PD in a dose-response pattern (p ≤ 0.013. Associations of direct pesticide application did not vary by sex but were modified by family history of PD, as significant associations were restricted to individuals with no family history. When classifying pesticides by functional type, both insecticides and herbicides were found to significantly increase risk of PD. Two specific insecticide classes, organochlorines and organophosphorus compounds, were significantly associated with PD. Consuming well-water and living/working on a farm were not associated with PD. Conclusion These data corroborate positive associations of broadly defined pesticide exposure with PD in families, particularly for sporadic PD. These data also implicate a few specific classes of pesticides in PD and thus emphasize the need to consider a more narrow definition of pesticides in future studies.

  16. Layered double hydroxides as adsorbents and carriers of the herbicide (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid (MCPA): systems Mg-Al, Mg-Fe and Mg-Al-Fe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, F; Celis, R; Pavlovic, I; Barriga, C; Cornejo, J; Ulibarri, M A

    2009-09-15

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds [Mg(3)Al(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O; [Mg(3)Fe(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O; [Mg(3)Al(0.5)Fe(0.5)(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O (LDHs) and calcined product of [Mg(3)Al(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O, Mg(3)AlO(4.5) (HT500), were studied as potential adsorbents of the herbicide MCPA [(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid] as a function of pH, contact time and pesticide concentration, and also as support for the slow release of this pesticide, with the aim to reduce the hazardous effects that it can pose to the environment. The information obtained in the adsorption study was used for the preparation of LDH-MCPA complexes. The results showed high and rapid adsorption of MCPA on the adsorbents as well as that MCPA formulations based on LDHs and HT500 as pesticide supports displayed controlled release properties and reduced herbicide leaching in soil columns compared to a standard commercial MCPA formulation. Thereby, we conclude that the LDHs employed in this study can be used not only as adsorbents to remove MCPA from aqueous solutions, but also as supports for the slow release of this highly mobile herbicide, thus controlling its immediate availability and leaching.

  17. PREDICTING OF RISKS OF GROUNDWATER AND SURFACE WATER POLLUTION WITH DIFFERENT CLASSES OF HERBICIDES IN SOIL IN EASTERN EUROPE CLIMATE CONDITIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshun, M; Dema, O; Kucherenko, O; Korshun, O; Garkavyi, S; Pelio, I; Antonenko, A; Velikaia, N

    2016-11-01

    Application of pesticides in modern agriculture is a powerful permanent risk factor for public health and the natural environment. The aim of the study was a comparative hygienic assessment of the danger of contamination of ground and surface water sources with most widely used herbicides of different chemical classes (sulfonylureas, imidazolinones, pirimidinilkarboksilovye compounds semicarbazones). Field hygienic experiments for studying of the residues dynamics of studied herbicides concentration in agrocenosis objects were made by us in different types of soils: chernozem, sod-podzolic, podzolized forest. Then the half-life periods (DT50) of the substances in the soil were calculated. It was found that according to GUS index there is a high probability of leaching into groundwater of sulfonylureas and imidazolinones; according to LEACH index all investigated substances have a high risk of run-off into groundwater and surface water.

  18. Genotoxic Potential of Two Herbicides and their Active Ingredients Assessed with Comet Assay on a Fish Cell Line, Epithelioma Papillosum Cyprini (EPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Kristian; Rank, Jette; Jensen, Klara

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the epithelioma papillosum cyprini (EPC) cell line handling procedure for the comet assay to investigate the genotoxic potential of widely used pesticides. The effects of various media and handling of the EPC cell line were examined. Results indicated that av......-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid) individually and in a ternary mixture were examined with the comet assay. Data showed that among the active ingredients only 2,4-D andMCPA induced DNA damage, while both herbicides were genotoxic at high concentrations....... that avoiding trypsin to detach cells led to lower level of DNA damage in the negative control. Further, two commonly used herbicides (Dezormon and Optica trio) and their four active ingredients (4-chloro-o-tolyloxyacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propionic acid, 2...

  19. A Complete Analytical Screening Identifies the Real Pesticide Contamination of Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschet, Christoph; Wittmer, Irene; Simovic, Jelena; Junghans, Marion; Singer, Heinz; Stamm, Christian; Leu, Christian; Hollender, Juliane

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive assessment of pesticides in surface waters is challenging due to the large number of potential contaminants. In Switzerland for example, roughly 500 active ingredients are registered as either plant protection agent (PPA) or as biocide. In addition, an unlimited number of transformations products (TPs) can enter or be formed in surfaced waters. Most scientific publications or regulatory monitoring authorities have implemented 15-40 pesticides in their analytics. Only a few TPs are normally included. Interpretations of the surface water quality based on these subsets remains error prone. In the presented study, we carried out a nearly complete analytical screening covering 86% of all polar organic pesticides (from agricultural and urban sources) in Switzerland (300 substances) and 134 TPs with limits of quantification in the low ng/L range. The comprehensive pesticide screening was conducted by liquid-chromatography coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Five medium-sized rivers (Strahler stream order 3-4, catchment size 35-105 km2), containing high percentiles of diverse crops, orchards and urban settlements in their catchments, were sampled from March till July 2012. Nine subsequent time-proportional bi-weekly composite samples were taken in order to quantify average concentrations. In total, 104 different active ingredients could be detected in at least one of the five rivers. Thereby, 82 substances were only registered as PPA, 20 were registered as PPA and as biocide and 2 were only registered as biocide. Within the PPAs, herbicides had the most frequent detections and the highest concentrations, followed by fungicides and insecticides. Most concentrations were found between 1 and 50 ng/L; however 31 substances (mainly herbicides) had concentrations above 100 ng/L and 3 herbicides above 1000 ng/L. It has to be noted that the measured concentrations are average concentrations over two weeks in medium sized streams and that maximum

  20. Impact of chronic and acute pesticide exposures on periphyton communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tlili, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.tlili@cemagref.fr [CEMAGREF, UR MAEP, 3 quai Chauveau CP 69336 Lyon Cedex 09 (France); Montuelle, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.montuelle@cemagref.fr [CEMAGREF, UR MAEP, 3 quai Chauveau CP 69336 Lyon Cedex 09 (France); INRA UMR CARRTEL, Laboratoire de Microbiologie Aquatique, BP 511, 74203, Thonon Cedex (France); Berard, Annette, E-mail: annette.berard@avignon.inra.fr [INRA UMR EMMAH 1114, Domaine Saint-Paul-Site Agroparc 84914 Avignon Cedex 9 (France); Bouchez, Agnes, E-mail: agnes.bouchez@thonon.inra.fr [INRA UMR CARRTEL, Laboratoire de Microbiologie Aquatique, BP 511, 74203, Thonon Cedex (France)

    2011-05-01

    Aquatic ecosystems face variable exposure to pesticides, especially during floodings which are associated with short bursts of high contaminant concentrations that influence biological systems. A study was undertaken to highlight the impact of the herbicide diuron applied in mixture with the fungicide tebuconazole on natural periphyton during flooding events. Periphyton were grown in two series of two lotic outdoor mesocosms: one series was non-contaminated while the other was exposed to chronic contamination. After 4 weeks, one channel of each series was exposed to three successive pulses, with each pulse followed by one week of recovery. Impacts on periphyton were assessed by using Denaturing Gel Gradient Electrophoresis to characterize eukaryotic community structure. At a functional scale, photosynthetic efficiency was quantified during each pulse, and the induced tolerance to diuron was estimated by performing short-term inhibition tests based on photosynthetic efficiency. Moreover, pesticide concentrations in the water column and periphyton matrix were measured. Diuron was adsorbed in the periphyton during each pulse and desorbed 13 h after pulse end. The different pulses affected the eukaryotic community structures of the control biofilms, but not of the chronically exposed ones. During the first pulse, photosynthetic efficiency was correlated with pesticide concentration in the water phase, and there was no difference between periphyton from chronically contaminated channels and control channels. However, during the second and third pulses, the photosynthetic efficiency of periphyton chronically exposed to pesticides appeared to be less impacted by the acute pulsed exposure of pesticide. These changes were consistent with the acquisition of induced tolerance to diuron since only after the third pulse that periphyton from chronic channel became tolerant to diuron. Our experimental study indicates that the effects of pulsed acute exposures to pesticides on

  1. Betaine and Carnitine Derivatives as Herbicidal Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernak, Juliusz; Niemczak, Michał; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Fochtman, Przemysław; Marcinkowska, Katarzyna; Praczyk, Tadeusz

    2016-08-16

    This study focused on the synthesis and subsequent characterization of herbicidal ionic liquids based on betaine and carnitine, two derivatives of amino acids, which were used as cations. Four commonly used herbicides (2,4-D, MCPA, MCPP and Dicamba) were used as anions in simple (single anion) and oligomeric (two anions) salts. The obtained salts were subjected to analyzes regarding physicochemical properties (density, viscosity, refractive index, thermal decomposition profiles and solubility) as well as evaluation of their herbicidal activity under greenhouse and field conditions, toxicity towards rats and biodegradability. The obtained results suggest that the synthesized herbicidal ionic liquids displayed low toxicity (classified as category 4 compounds) and showed similar or improved efficacy against weed compared to reference herbicides. The highest increase was observed during field trials for salts containing 2,4-D as the anion, which also exhibited the highest biodegradability (>75 %). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Leaves coverage of spray liquid and influence on herbicide efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Prokop

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of spray liquid leaves coverage on efficacy of herbicides was investigated. Five nozzles sizes were used to reach different percentage coverage. The effect of leaves coverage on Elytrigia repens (L. Desv. was evaluated using systemic herbicide (clethodim 240 g / l + surfactant and the effect of leaves coverage on Chenopodium album L. and Galium aparine L. was evaluated using contact herbicides (bentazone 600 g / l and the mixture of bentazone 480 g / l + activator 150 g / l. No significant differences of the efficacy were observed between different percentages of leaves coverage in case of systemic herbicides. Vice versa the efficacy significantly increased with higher percentage of leaves coverage in case of contact herbicides.

  3. Pesticides in water supply wells in Zealand, Denmark: a statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Thorling, Lærke; Binning, Philip John

    2012-01-01

    Data from the Danish National Borehole Database are used to predict drinking water well vulnerability to contamination by pesticides, and to identify the dominant mechanisms leading to well pollution in Zealand, Denmark. The frequency of detection and concentrations of 4 herbicides and 3 herbicide metabolites are related to factors accounting for geology (thicknesses of sand, clay and chalk layers), geographical location (distance to surface water and distance to contaminated sites), redox conditions and well depth using logistic regression, the binomial test and Spearman correlation techniques. Results show that drinking water wells located in urban areas are more vulnerable to BAM and phenoxy acids contamination, while non-urban area wells are more subject to bentazone contamination. Parameters accounting for the hydraulic connection between the well and the surface (well depth and thickness of the clay confining layer) are often strongly related to well vulnerability. Results also show that wells close to surface water are more vulnerable to contamination, and that sandy layers provide better protection against the leaching of oxidizable pesticides than clay aquitards, because they are more likely to be aerobic. 4-CPP is observed more often at greater well depth, perhaps because of anaerobic dechlorination of dichlorprop. The field data are used to create a set of probabilistic models to predict well vulnerability to contamination by pesticides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Brüsch, Walter Michael; Juhler, Rene K.

    Environmental Protection Agency that no restriction is needed given a yearly average concentration not exceeding 0.1 μg/l. New results from one of PLAP-field-sites show that late sommer periods with several pronounced rain events (more than 50 mm/day) can generate leaching of the herbicide glyphosate through...... concentration). Thus: exhibited and/or their degradation product(-s) 1 m b.g.s. in yearly average concentrations exceeding 0.1 μg/l (maximum allowable concentration). Thus: o azoxystrobin and its degradation product CyPM o bentazone o ethofumesate o TFMP (degradation product of fluazifop-P-butyl) o glyphosate......, and triasulfuron) were not detected during the 1999-2009 monitoring period. 9 of the pesticides and/or their degradation products: o bentazone o ethofumesate o TFMP and fluazifop-P (degradation products of fluazifop-P-butyl) o glyphosate and its degradation product AMPA o metamitron and its degradation product...

  5. Assessmet of temporal distribution of pesticide residues in vineyard soils of La Rioja (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pose Juan, Eva; Herrero Hernandez, Eliseo; Soledad Andrades, Maria; Rodriguez Cruz, Maria Sonia; Sanchez Martin, Maria Jesus

    2013-04-01

    The use and application of pesticides in vineyard is a common practice, which is important to prevent pest and diseases and improve the crop health and production, but on the other hand it could involve a potential risk for humans and the environment. For this reason, it is important to develop and validate a simple and fast multiresidue method to determine the presence of these compounds in soils. La Rioja region (Spain) is one of the most important wine-growing regions in Spain, which also entails that could be an important area of pesticide pollution. The objective of this work is to assess the temporal distribution of the possible pesticide pollution in soils from different areas of La Rioja (Spain). The pesticides selected in this study included fungicides (metalaxyl, and its metabolite CGA62826, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole, myclobutanil, kresoxim-methyl, triadimenol and flutriafol); herbicides (fluometuron, terbuthylazine and its metabolites desethylterbuthylazine and hydroxyterbuthylazine, lenacil, ethofumesate and acetochlor) and insecticides (methoxyfenozide and pirimicarb). The pesticide residues were evaluated by two analytical techniques, gas chromatography and liquid chromatography (GC-MS and LC-MS). The extraction procedure of pesticides from soils was optimized using two soil samples (blank soils) with different texture and characteristics collected from areas without pesticide application. Recoveries were studied in soil samples fortified with all pesticides at two levels of concentrations (the agronomic dose, 0.1 mg kg-1, and ten times this dose, 1 mg kg-1). Different extraction solvents were tested. The best results were obtained with methanol:acetone (50:50) mixture or methanol:CaCl2 0.01 M (50:50) mixture for hydroxyterbuthylazine and CGA62826. The accuracy (average recovery) and precision (reproducibility and repeatability) of the method were assessed using six replicates and the limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were

  6. [Effects of herbicide on grape leaf photosynthesis and nutrient storage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei; Wang, Hui; Zhai, Heng

    2011-09-01

    Selecting three adjacent vineyards as test objects, this paper studied the effects of applying herbicide in growth season on the leaf photosynthetic apparatus and branch nutrient storage of grape Kyoho (Vitis vinfrraxVitis labrusca). In the vineyards T1 and T2 where herbicide was applied in 2009, the net photosynthesis rate (Pa) of grape leaves had a significant decrease, as compared with that in vineyard CK where artificial weeding was implemented. The leaves at the fourth node in vineyard T1 and those at the sixth node in vineyard T2 had the largest decrement of Pn (40.5% and 32.1%, respectively). Herbicide had slight effects on the leaf stomatal conductance (Gs). In T1 where herbicide application was kept on with in 2010, the Pn, was still significantly lower than that in CK; while in T2 where artificial weeding was implemented in 2010, the Pn and Gs of top- and middle node leaves were slightly higher than those in T1, but the Pn was still lower than that in CK, showing the aftereffects of herbicide residual. The herbicide application in 2009 decreased the leaf maximum photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm) and performance index (P1) while increased the relative variable fluorescence in the J step and K step, indicating the damage of electron transportation of PS II center and oxygen-evolving complex. Herbicide application decreased the pigment content of middle-node leaves in a dose-manner. Applying herbicide enhanced the leaf catalase and peroxidase activities significantly, increased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of middle-node leaves, but decreased the SOD activity of top- and bottom node leaves. After treated with herbicide, the ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity of middle- and bottom node leaves increased, but that of top-node leaves decreased. Herbicide treatment aggravated leaf lipid peroxidation, and reduced the soluble sugar, starch, free amino acids, and soluble protein storage in branches.

  7. Quantification of pesticides used in agriculture in the EU-27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Susanne; Fantke, Peter; Theloke, Jochen; Friedrich, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    were identified for each EU member state. The focus was on herbicides and insecticides. Also, the average dosage (i.e. application rate [kg active substance/ha]) for chemical classes per crop category and country was provided. Each active substance was then related to the average dosage of its chemical class for each crop category and country. The amount of active substance applied on a specific crop type in a country was calculated by multiplying the country specific crop production area with the respective dosage. Based on the loss fraction of applied substance to air, the emission into air can be calculated. With this approach we identified 89 active substances of relevance (63 herbicides, 26 insecticides) in the EU-27. The analysis showed a high variation of active substances between the member states, i.e. each country uses particular herbicides and insecticides for particular commodities according to specific climate conditions. For the majority of the member states, our approach covers more than 70 % of total use compared to the aggregated consumption of active substances per country as published in Eurostat. For some specific countries with substance-specific application data available, our results can be compared to real application rates. Discrepancies can be considered as an indicator for the variation of our estimates. By relating the emission inventory data sets to land use maps, they can be spatially disaggregated and thus may serve as input for a subsequent exposure and impact assessment modelling of individual pesticides. References: Arias-Estévez, M., López-Periago, E., Martínez-Carballo, E., Simal-Gándara, J., Mejuto, J.-C., García-Río, L. (2008). The mobility and degradation of pesticides in soils and the pollution of groundwater resources. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 123(4): 247-260. EPER. The European Pollutant Emission Register. Available online at: http://www.eper.ec.europa.eu/. E-PRTR. The European Pollutant Release and

  8. Selectivity and stability of herbicides and herbicide combinations for the grain yield of maize (Zea Mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Barakova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The research was conducted during 2012 - 2014 on pellic vertisol soil type. Under investigation was cycloxydim tolerant maize hybrid Ultrafox duo (Zea mays L.. Factor A included the years of investigation. Factor B included no treated check and 3 soil-applied herbicides – Adengo 465 SC (isoxaflutol + tiencarbazon – 440 ml/ha, Wing P (pendimethalin + dimethenamid – 4 l/ha and Lumax 538 SC (S-metolachlor + terbuthylazine + mesotrione – 4 l/ha. Factor C included no treated check and 5 foliar-applied herbicides – Stellar 210 SL (topramezon + dicamba – 1 l/ha, Principal plus (nicosulfuron + rimsulfuron + dicamba – 380 g/ha, Ventum WG (foramsulfuron + iodosulfuron – 150 g/ha, Monsun active OD (foramsulfuron + tiencarbazon – 1.5 l/ha and Laudis OD (tembotrione – 2 l/ha. In addition to these variants by conventional technology for maize growing one variant by Duo system technology is also included in the experiment. It includes soil-applied herbicide Merlin flex 480 SC (isoxaflutole – 420 g/ha and tank mixture of antigraminaceous herbicide Focus ultra (cycloxydim - 2 l/ha + antibroadleaved herbicide Kalam (tritosulfuron + dicamba – 300 g/ha. It is found that herbicide combination of soil-applied herbicide Merlin flex with tank mixture Focus ultra + Kalam by Duo system technology leads to obtaining high grain yield. High yields of maize grain are also obtained by herbicide combinations Lumax + Principal plus, Lumax + Laudis and Wing + Principal plus. The most unstable are the non-treated check and single use of soilapplied herbicides Adengo, Wing and Lumax. Technologically the most valuable are herbicide combination Merlin flex + Focus ultra + Kalam by Duo system technology, followed by combinations of foliar-applied herbicides Principal plus and Laudis with soil-applied herbicides Adengo, Wing and Lumax by conventional technology. Single use of herbicides has low estimate due to must to combine soil-applied with foliar

  9. Comparison of the effects of two herbicides and an insecticide on tropical freshwater plankton in microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboulanger, C; Bouvy, M; Carré, C; Cecchi, P; Amalric, L; Bouchez, A; Pagano, M; Sarazin, G

    2011-11-01

    Natural plankton communities from a tropical freshwater reservoir (Combani Reservoir, Mayotte Island, Mozambique Channel) were exposed, in 20-l nutrient-enriched microcosms, to two nominal concentrations of three pesticides: the herbicides diuron (2.2 and 11 μg/l) and paraquat (10 and 40.5 μg/l) and the insecticide fenitrothion (10 and 100 μg/l), commonly used in the tropics for agriculture and disease vector control. Bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, and zooplankton communities were monitored for 5 days after exposure, and the concentrations of toxicant and major nutrients were measured. Bacterioplankton growth was noticeable in all systems and was slightly affected by pesticide at any concentration. A transitory increase in thymidine-based bacterial production was observed in diuron- and fenitrothion-treated microcosms, followed by a marked decrease in all microcosms after 5 days. The functional diversity of bacterioplankton, evaluated using BIOLOG ECO(®) microplates, was reduced by exposure to the highest pesticide concentrations. Phytoplankton was affected by pesticides in different ways. Chlorophyll biomass and biovolumes were increased by diuron addition and decreased by paraquat, whereas fenitrothion-treated microcosms remained unaffected relative to controls. Phytoplankton taxonomic diversity was decreased by paraquat and high doses of fenitrothion but was unaffected by addition of diuron. The decrease in diversity was due to a reduction in the number of species, whereas the density of small cells increased, especially after addition of paraquat. Heterotrophic flagellates were sensitive to paraquat and to the highest diuron concentration; a reduction in biomass of up to 90% was observed for 40.5 μg/l paraquat. Zooplankton, dominated by Thermocyclops decipiens and Diaphanosoma excisum, was slightly sensitive to diuron, and very sensitive to paraquat. High concentrations of the insecticide fenitrothion were effective only on young stages. The potential

  10. Biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Sun, Samio; Li, Chen-Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rosen, Barry P

    2014-01-21

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoarsenicals are degraded to inorganic arsenic. The toxicological effects of arsenicals depend on their oxidation state, chemical composition, and bioavailability. Here we report that the active forms are the trivalent arsenic-containing species. We constructed a whole-cell biosensor utilizing a modified ArsR repressor that is highly selective toward trivalent methyl and aromatic arsenicals, with essentially no response to inorganic arsenic. The biosensor was adapted for in vitro detection of organoarsenicals using fluorescence anisotropy of ArsR-DNA interactions. It detects bacterial biomethylation of inorganic arsenite both in vivo and in vitro with detection limits of 10(-7) M and linearity to 10(-6) M for phenylarsenite and 5 × 10(-6) M for methylarsenite. The biosensor detects reduced forms of MSMA and roxarsone and offers a practical, low cost method for detecting activate forms and breakdown products of organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

  11. Selectivity of herbicides in crambe crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Sasso Ferreira Souza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The low productivity of crambe can be associated with many factors, among these, the competition with weeds, which reduces the yield, harvest affects and contributes to the increase in seed moisture. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the tolerance of crambe plants cv. FMS Brilhante to herbicides applied in preplant incorporated (PPI, preemergence (PRE, and postemergence (POST. The study was installed in a green-house and the treatments consisted of the herbicide application in: pre-plant incorporated ofdiclosulam, flumetsulam, metribuzin, and trifluralin;preemergence applicationof atrazine, diclosulam, diuron, flumetsulam, metribuzim, S-metolachlor, sulfentrazone, and trifluralin; and postemergence application ofbentazon, carfentrazone-ethyl, clefoxydim, cletodim + fenoxaprop-p-ethyl, ethoxysulfuron, fomesafen, fluazifop-p-butyl, flumioxazin, halosulfuron, imazamox, imazapic, lactofen, nicosulfuron, oxadiazon, quinclorac, and setoxydim. Visual evaluations of phytotoxicity on crambe plants were realized after applications, the seedlings were counted and the height and plant dry matter were determined in the end of the evaluation period. In conditions where the studies were conducted, we can conclude that only the trifluralin application in PRE and the application of clefoxidim+fenoxaprop-p-ethyl, fluazifop-p-butyl, quinclorac, setoxydim and clefoxydim in POST showed selectivity and potential use for FMS Brilhante crambe cultivar.

  12. Glyphosate: Surfactant herbicide poisoning - Is it mild?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Venugopal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate Surfactant is a nonselective widely used herbicide in agriculture, forestry, industrial weed control, lawn, garden and aquatic environments. They have favorable toxicity with occupational and accidental exposures. The toxicity in humans is mucosal and gastrointestinal irritation, hypotension, metabolic acidosis, pulmonary insufficiency, and oliguria. Patient may appear asymptomatic for many hours before slowly lapse into a hypotensive, apparently nonhypovolaemic shock that can often ends fatally. We hereby report a case of a 25-year-old male patient who was admitted to our tertiary care hospital following suicidal consumption of around 250-300 ml of herbicide containing glyphosate (glypho; . Initially, gastric lavage done and the patient was managed with intubation and mechanical ventilation. He also developed acute renal failure, and renal function reverted to normal after four sittings of hemodialysis. Patient was successfully treated and discharged home. This case report emphasizes on timely systemic supportive measure as the sole method of treatment since this poison has no specific antidote.

  13. Combined Effects of Pesticides and Trematode Infections on Hourglass Tree Frog Polypedates cruciger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Uthpala A; Rohr, Jason R; Navaratne, Ayanthi N; Amerasinghe, Priyanie H; Rajakaruna, Rupika S

    2016-03-01

    The impact of widespread and common environmental factors, such as chemical contaminants, on infectious disease risk in amphibians is particularly important because both chemical contaminants and infectious disease have been implicated in worldwide amphibian declines. Here we report on the lone and combined effects of exposure to parasitic cercariae (larval stage) of the digenetic trematode, Acanthostomum burminis, and four commonly used pesticides (insecticides: chlorpyrifos, dimethoate; herbicides: glyphosate, propanil) at ecologically relevant concentrations on the survival, growth, and development of the common hourglass tree frog, Polypedates cruciger Blyth 1852. There was no evidence of any pesticide-induced mortality on cercariae because all the cercariae successfully penetrated each tadpole host regardless of pesticide treatment. In isolation, both cercarial and pesticide exposure significantly decreased frog survival, development, and growth, and increased developmental malformations, such as scoliosis, kyphosis, and also edema and skin ulcers. The combination of cercariae and pesticides generally posed greater risk to frogs than either factor alone by decreasing survival or growth or increasing time to metamorphosis or malformations. The exception was that lone exposure to chlorpyrifos had higher mortality without than with cercariae. Consistent with mathematical models that suggest that stress should increase the impact of generalist parasites, the weight of the evidence from the field and laboratory suggests that ecologically relevant concentrations of agrochemicals generally increase the threat that trematodes pose to amphibians, highlighting the importance of elucidating interactions between anthropogenic activities and infectious disease in taxa of conservation concern.

  14. Land use effects on pesticides in sediments of prairie pothole wetlands in North and South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Scott T.; Belden, Jason B.; Smith, Loren M.; Morrison, Shane A.; Daniel, Dale W.; Euliss, Betty R.; Euliss, Ned H. Jr.; Kensinger, Bart J.; Tangen, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Prairie potholes are the dominant wetland type in the intensively cultivated northern Great Plains of North America, and thus have the potential to receive pesticide runoff and drift. We examined the presence of pesticides in sediments of 151 wetlands split among the three dominant land use types, Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), cropland, and native prairie, in North and South Dakota in 2011. Herbicides (glyphosate and atrazine) and fungicides were detected regularly, with no insecticide detections. Glyphosate was the most detected pesticide, occurring in 61% of all wetlands, with atrazine in only 8% of wetlands. Pyraclostrobin was one of five fungicides detected, but the only one of significance, being detected in 31% of wetlands. Glyphosate was the only pesticide that differed by land use, with concentrations in cropland over four-times that in either native prairie or CRP, which were equal in concentration and frequency of detection. Despite examining several landscape variables, such as wetland proximity to specific crop types, watershed size, and others, land use was the best variable explaining pesticide concentrations in potholes. CRP ameliorated glyphosate in wetlands at concentrations comparable to native prairie and thereby provides another ecosystem service from this expansive program.

  15. Pesticide fate on catchment scale: conceptual modelling of stream CSIA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Stefanie R.; van der Velde, Ype; Elsayed, Omniea F.; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Lefrancq, Marie; Payraudeau, Sylvain; van Breukelen, Boris M.

    2017-10-01

    Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) has proven beneficial in the characterization of contaminant degradation in groundwater, but it has never been used to assess pesticide transformation on catchment scale. This study presents concentration and carbon CSIA data of the herbicides S-metolachlor and acetochlor from three locations (plot, drain, and catchment outlets) in a 47 ha agricultural catchment (Bas-Rhin, France). Herbicide concentrations at the catchment outlet were highest (62 µg L-1) in response to an intense rainfall event following herbicide application. Increasing δ13C values of S-metolachlor and acetochlor by more than 2 ‰ during the study period indicated herbicide degradation. To assist the interpretation of these data, discharge, concentrations, and δ13C values of S-metolachlor were modelled with a conceptual mathematical model using the transport formulation by travel-time distributions. Testing of different model setups supported the assumption that degradation half-lives (DT50) increase with increasing soil depth, which can be straightforwardly implemented in conceptual models using travel-time distributions. Moreover, model calibration yielded an estimate of a field-integrated isotopic enrichment factor as opposed to laboratory-based assessments of enrichment factors in closed systems. Thirdly, the Rayleigh equation commonly applied in groundwater studies was tested by our model for its potential to quantify degradation on catchment scale. It provided conservative estimates on the extent of degradation as occurred in stream samples. However, largely exceeding the simulated degradation within the entire catchment, these estimates were not representative of overall degradation on catchment scale. The conceptual modelling approach thus enabled us to upscale sample-based CSIA information on degradation to the catchment scale. Overall, this study demonstrates the benefit of combining monitoring and conceptual modelling of concentration

  16. Pesticide emissions from greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink BJWG; SEC

    2004-01-01

    There are very few measurements of aerial pesticide concentrations nearby greenhouses, useful for human risk assessments. Therefore, RIVM has improved a computer module in USES, an integral risk-decision system for authorities, for assessing the acute environmental exposure. The exposure of nearby

  17. Selectivity of pesticides used in peach orchards on the larval stage of the predator Chrysoperla externa (Hagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Dionei Grützmacher

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The selectivity of sixteen pesticides used in peach orchards in Brazil was evaluated on larvae of Chrysoperla externa (Hagen (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae in laboratory (25±1ºC, 70±10% RH and 14 hours photophase. The bioassays consisted on the exposure of larvae to fresh dry pesticide film applied on glass plates. Lenght of each development stage, the mortality, the fecundity and fertility of survival adults were evaluated. Pesticides were classified according to the total toxic effect in harmless (99%, in conformity to “International Organization for Biological Control of Noxious Animals and Plants” (IOBC recommendation. Only abamectin and deltamethrin caused significant prolongation in the post embryonic period. Fecundity and fertility of survival adults were not affected by any pesticide tested. The acaricide/insecticide abamectin, the two mineral oils, the fungicides mancozeb, dodine, azoxystrobin, captan, mancozeb + cooper oxichloride and pholpet, and the herbicide ghlyphosate were harmless; the fungicide tebuconazole was slightly harmful; the insecticide deltamethrin was moderately harmful; and the insecticides malathion, dimethoate and phosmet, and the herbicide paraquat dichloride were harmful to C. externa larvae.

  18. Influence of adjuvants and interactions between herbicides and weed species by determination of relative adjuvant-effect on herbicide dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brathuhn, Arne

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available When adjuvants are used as a partner for herbicides in tank-mixtures, they can have a positive influence on herbicidal efficacy in certain situations. The addition of adjuvants can contribute to an enhanced effect of the herbicide when applying the maximum registered dose or when securing weed control of reduced application rates. The influence of adjuvants depends on weather factors, the herbicide partner and the particular weed species. This study examined the influence of different herbicide-adjuvant-combinations on various weed species. The objective of the study was to clarify, if the addition of an adjuvant to a herbicide leads to comparable results within the examined weed species or if the influence of an adjuvant use varies. The determination of relative adjuvant effects allowed comparisons of the data. The influence of six herbicideadjuvant-combinations on six weed species was evaluated in greenhouse trials. All herbicides used were from the group of ALS-inhibitors (HRAC-group B. Data of the greenhouse experiments were compared to results from field trials, which were conducted at five sites in Rhineland-Palatinate. One herbicide with and without an addition of an adjuvant was applied per site. Data of the studies reveal that the use of adjuvants results in a positive influence on herbicidal efficacy in most cases. However, strong differences in intensity as well as quality of adjuvant effects regarding the response of different weed species were observed. The efficacy of the herbicide BIATHLON® for example was improved by addition of an adjuvant for Galium aparine by a factor 364.56. For Daucus carota this factor was 2.98. Growers should necessarily take account of these differences when using adjuvants, especially when they are used to secure reduced application rates.

  19. Research methods in weed science: herbicide absorption and translocation in plants using radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicide absorption and translocation in plants is a key component in the study of herbicide physiology, mode of action, selectivity, resistance mechanisms, and in the registration process. Radioactive herbicides have been in use for over half-a-century in the research and study of herbicide absorp...

  20. Development of a GIS-based indicator for environmental pesticide exposure and its application to a Belgian case-control study on bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Christa; Schoeters, Greet; Kellen, Eliane; Buntinx, Frank; Zeegers, Maurice

    2009-03-01

    We developed two indicators to assess the exposure of residents to agricultural pesticide use and applied it in a case-control study on bladder cancer in the province of Limburg, Belgium. The first indicator used a distance-weighted measure of crop area for specified crops (fruit trees, fruit bushes and vegetables). The second indicator used a distance-weighted measure of pesticide use. We used information at three scale levels: (a) information at individual's level, such as distance to crop fields; (b) information at the level of the municipality, such as time-series of crop area; and (c) regional information, such as pesticide use. Pesticide use data were available per group of pesticides (fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, growth regulators and group of other pesticides). Indicators were calculated for each individual in the case-control study. The indicators were calculated per year for a period of 20 years, taking into account address history. Variation of pesticide use and toxicity with time was addressed by a relative risk factor. A very strong correlation was found between the area of fruit trees and bushes and the use of fungicides as well as the use of "other pesticides", indicating that these groups of pesticides are predominantly used in fruit production. The indicator for fruit trees is highly skewed to the right, indicating a high number of subjects with low potential exposure to fruit trees. Pesticide pressure indicators are less skewed as they combine application to multiple crops; the highest skewness is found for fungicides corresponding with the distribution for fruit trees. Statistical analysis revealed no association between the indicators and the incidence of bladder cancer. The results show that, using GIS, it is possible to reconstruct potential environmental pesticide exposure accounting for changes in pesticide use, crop area and residence history. Validation of the method with measured exposure is considered essential in view of its

  1. Pesticide residues in grapes and wine in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabras, P; Conte, E

    2001-10-01

    Two hundred and one pesticides comprising 84 fungicides, 88 insecticides and 29 herbicides are registered in Italy for use on grapes. Recently, the maximum residue limits (MRLs) for 16 fungicides and five insecticides were established for wine. However, literature data shows that some MRLs for wine are not consistent with the corresponding values for grapes. In Italy, the Ministry of Health has the responsibility for checking pesticide contamination in fruit and vegetables in general distribution (i.e. grocery shops, food stores). From 1996 to 1999, out of 1532 grape samples analysed, levels of 1.0, 0.9, 1.8 and 1.9% in each year respectively were contaminated. As part of the National Residue Monitoring Programme, the Ministry of Agriculture carried out investigations of samples collected directly from the field (therefore of a known pesticide treatment history) in order to find the causes of the observed irregularities and to identify preventative measures. In 1996, 1998 and 1999, out of 481, 1195 and 1949 grape samples analysed, 7.9, 6.5 and 2.5% respectively were contaminated, while no residues were detected in 259 wine samples. The National Observatory on Pesticide Residues collects data from analyses performed by highly reliable, non-institutional laboratories on samples from farming cooperatives or individual forms, food companies, wholesale and retail markets. Of the 846 grapes samples and 190 wine samples collected in 1998 and 1999, a total of 6.1 and 2.1% respectively of grapes and 0% for all wine samples were found to contain residues.

  2. Biostimulation and enhancement of pesticide degradation around water abstraction fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Suzi

    to develop remediation solutions. Abstraction fields often include several wells. Even if only one of the wells is contaminated, this water mixes with uncontaminated groundwater from the other wells and causes excessive volumes of water to be treated at the waterworks. An alternative approach...... by diffuse sources in or around water abstraction fields. This approach could lead to more efficient in situ remediation solutions and protection of groundwater as a drinking water supply. Herbicides are generally expected to be difficult to be degraded under anaerobic conditions, but prone to biodegradation...... to be a potential remediation solution for pesticides. Furthermore, bentazone mineralization was first time found in aquifer sediments at low oxygen concentrations. Enhanced biostimulation by adding nitrate or nutrients was also seen as potential technologies, however, in the case of nitrate, it was suggested...

  3. Towards the field-scale experiments and numerical modeling of pesticides in tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, J.; Ray, C.; Sanda, M.; Vogel, T.; Green, R.; Loo, B.

    2004-12-01

    Intensive use of pesticides in agriculture inevitably poses an increased threat to groundwater. Recent findings of pesticide residues in selected drinking water wells in Hawaii brings further attention to this problem since the primary source for potable water in Hawaii is groundwater from basal or dike-confined aquifers. A challenging research project was carried out at the University of Hawaii to elucidate potential impacts of selected pesticides on groundwater and to understand pesticide behavior in tropical soils. The major outcome of the project will be a recommendation to the Hawaii Department of Agriculture whether to restrict or approve these pesticide products entering Hawaii's agricultural market. Three sites on Oahu, one on Maui, and one on Kauai were selected for field evaluation of leaching. The soil types on Oahu are Wahiawa Oxisol (Poamoho), Molokai Oxisol (Kunia), and Waialua Vertisol (Waimanalo). The soil at Kula, Maui is an andisol (loam of Kula series) and that at Mana, Kauai is a Vertisol of Malama series. Three herbicides (S-metolachlor, imazaquin, sulfometuron methyl), one fungicide (trifloxystrobin), and one insecticide (imidacloprid) were used in our study. In addition, a commonly used herbicide (atrazine) and potassium bromide tracer were applied as reference chemicals. After spraying, the plots were covered with straw to decrease evaporation from bare soil surface and irrigated with aerial sprinklers for a period of 16 weeks. Disturbed soil samples from various depths were taken at regular intervals for pesticide analysis. Water flow dynamics was monitored with TDR probes and tensiometers installed at three depths. Weather data were acquired simultaneously. In-situ measurements of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity were done using a tension disc infiltrometer. Laboratory experiments of soil-water retention, as well as degradation, sorption, and column displacement experiments for the selected pesticides were conducted. Hence, comprehensive

  4. Effects of pesticide mixtures in human and animal models: An update of the recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzati, V; Briand, O; Guillou, H; Gamet-Payrastre, L

    2016-07-25

    This review aims to provide an update on our current knowledge of the various effects of pesticide cocktails. We have collected data from studies conducted in mammalian models in vitro and in vivo that was published between 2000 and 2014. All ecotoxicological studies were voluntarily excluded. Cocktail effects were classified according to how they had been classified by each author. The frequency of the various cocktail effects and the classes and chemical families of pesticides involved in the observed effects were assessed. When focusing on the function of pesticides (i.e. herbicide, insecticide or fungicide), 46% of the mixtures contained insecticides alone, 15% fungicides alone, and 4.5% herbicides alone. Mixtures with effects associated with neurotoxicity were mainly composed of insecticides, and most studies on the effects of fungicide mixtures (90%) were associated with effects on endocrine regulation and/or reproduction. Dose addition was observed with each kind of mixture except herbicide combinations. In contrast, synergic interactions or greater-than-additive effects were mainly reported for insecticide mixtures. There were few examples of potentiating and antagonistic interactions. We have identified chemical families of compounds specifically involved in synergy, addition, potentiation and antagonism, and those that do not interact when combined. The chemical families identified as being involved in synergy are in agreement with data from another recently published compilation of ecotoxicological studies. For most mixtures investigated, further validation data is still needed from experiments using other compounds and other experimental models but this update provides useful information to help in human health risk assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Decadal-scale changes of pesticides in ground water of the United States, 1993-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bexfield, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Pesticide data for ground water sampled across the United States between 1993-1995 and 2001-2003 by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program were evaluated for trends in detection frequency and concentration. The data analysis evaluated samples collected from a total of 362 wells located in 12 local well networks characterizing shallow ground water in agricultural areas and six local well networks characterizing the drinking water resource in areas of variable land use. Each well network was sampled once during 1993-1995 and once during 2001-2003. The networks provide an overview of conditions across a wide range of hydrogeologic settings and in major agricultural areas that vary in dominant crop type and pesticide use. Of about 80 pesticide compounds analyzed, only six compounds were detected in ground water from at least 10 wells during both sampling events. These compounds were the triazine herbicides atrazine, simazine, and prometon; the acetanilide herbicide metolachlor; the urea herbicide tebuthiuron; and an atrazine degradate, deethylatrazine (DEA). Observed concentrations of these compounds generally were <0.12 ??g L-1. At individual wells, changes in concentrations typically were <0.02 ??g L-1. Data analysis incorporated adjustments for changes in laboratory recovery as assessed through laboratory spikes. In wells yielding detectable concentrations of atrazine, DEA, and prometon, concentrations were significantly lower (?? = 0.1) in 2001-2003 than in 1993-1995, whereas detection frequency of these compounds did not change significantly. Trends in atrazine concentrations at shallow wells in agricultural areas were found to be consistent overall with recent atrazine use data. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  6. A pesticide monitoring survey in rivers and lakes of northern Greece and its human and ecotoxicological risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Emmaluel N; Vryzas, Zisis; Kotopoulou, Athena; Kintzikoglou, Katerina; Makris, Konstantinos C; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2015-06-01

    A pesticide monitoring study covering the main rivers and lakes of Northern Greece (Macedonia, Thrace and Thessaly) was undertaken. A total of 416 samples were collected over a 1.5-year sampling period (September 1999- February 2001) from six rivers and ten lakes. The water samples were analyzed with an off-line solid phase extraction technique coupled with a gas chromatography ion trap mass spectrometer using an analytical method for 147 pesticides and their metabolites, including organochlorines, organophosphates, triazines, chloroacetanilides, pyrethroids, carbamates, phthalimides and other pesticides (herbicides, insecticides and fungicides). Based on the pesticide survey results, a human health carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk assessment was conducted for adults and children. Ecotoxicological risk assessment was also conducted using default endpoint values and the risk quotient method. Results showed that the herbicides metolachlor, prometryn, alachlor and molinate, were the most frequently detected pesticides (29%, 12.5%, 12.5% and 10%, respectively). They also exhibited the highest concentration values, often exceeding 1 μg/L. Chlorpyrifos ethyl was the most frequently detected insecticide (7%). Seasonal variations in measured pesticide concentrations were observed in all rivers and lakes. The highest concentrations were recorded during May-June period, right after pesticide application. Concentrations of six pesticides were above the maximum allowable limit of 0.1 μg/L set for drinking water. Alachlor, atrazine and a-HCH showed unacceptable carcinogenic risk estimates (4.5E-06, 4.6E-06 and 1.3E-04, respectively). Annual average concentrations of chlorpyriphos ethyl (0.031 μg L), dicofol (0.01 μg/L), dieldrin (0.02 μg/L) and endosulfan a (0.065 μg/L) exceeded the EU environmental quality standards. The risk quotient estimates for the insecticides chorpyrifos ethyl, diazinon and parathion methyl and herbicide prometryn were above acceptable risk

  7. Washoff of Residual Photosystem II Herbicides from Sugar Cane Trash under a Rainfall Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Aaditi; Silburn, Mark; Craig, Ian; Shaw, Melanie; Foley, Jenny

    2016-05-25

    Herbicides are often applied to crop residues, but their fate has not been well studied. We measured herbicide washoff from sugar cane trash during simulated rainfall, at 1, 8, and 40 days after spraying (DAS), to provide insight into herbicide fate and for use in modeling. Herbicides included are commonly used in the sugar industry, either in Australia or in Brazil. Concentrations of all herbicides and applied Br tracer in washoff declined exponentially over time. The rate of washoff during rainfall declined with increasing DAS. Cumulative washoff as a function of rainfall was similar for most herbicides, although the most soluble herbicides did have more rapid washoff. Some but not all herbicides became more resistant to washoff with increasing DAS. Of the total mass washed off, 80% washed off in the first 30 mm (∼40 min) of rainfall for most herbicides. Little herbicide remained on the trash after rainfall, implying nearly complete washoff.

  8. Protocols for Robust Herbicide Resistance Testing in Different Weed Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panozzo, Silvia; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-07-02

    Robust protocols to test putative herbicide resistant weed populations at whole plant level are essential to confirm the resistance status. The presented protocols, based on whole-plant bioassays performed in a greenhouse, can be readily adapted to a wide range of weed species and herbicides through appropriate variants. Seed samples from plants that survived a field herbicide treatment are collected and stored dry at low temperature until used. Germination methods differ according to weed species and seed dormancy type. Seedlings at similar growth stage are transplanted and maintained in the greenhouse under appropriate conditions until plants have reached the right growth stage for herbicide treatment. Accuracy is required to prepare the herbicide solution to avoid unverifiable mistakes. Other critical steps such as the application volume and spray speed are also evaluated. The advantages of this protocol, compared to others based on whole plant bioassays using one herbicide dose, are related to the higher reliability and the possibility of inferring the resistance level. Quicker and less expensive in vivo or in vitro diagnostic screening tests have been proposed (Petri dish bioassays, spectrophotometric tests), but they provide only qualitative information and their widespread use is hindered by the laborious set-up that some species may require. For routine resistance testing, the proposed whole plant bioassay can be applied at only one herbicide dose, so reducing the costs.

  9. Dechlorination of chloroacetanilide herbicides by plant growth regulator sodium bisulfite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Haitao; Chen, Jingwen; Cai, Xiyun; Liu, Ping; Wang, Ying; Huang, Liping; Qiao, Xianliang; Hao, Ce

    2009-08-01

    Chloroacetanilide herbicides are frequently detected in groundwater and surface waters, and pose high risks to aquatic biota. In this study, sodium bisulfite (NaHSO(3)), a plant growth regulator used in China, was used to remove three chloroacetanilide herbicides including alachlor, acetochlor and S-metolachlor. These herbicides were rapidly dechlorinated by NaHSO(3) in neutral conditions. The dechlorination was accelerated with increasing pH, temperature and NaHSO(3) concentrations. Kinetic analysis and mass spectrum identification revealed that the reaction followed S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution, in which the chlorine was replaced by the reactive specie sulfite. Alachlor and its isomer acetochlor had similar reaction rates, whereas they were more readily transformed than S-metolachlor that had larger steric hindrance and weaker electrophilicity. The transformation products were chloroacetanilide ethane sulfonic acids (ESAs), which were also encountered as major metabolites of these herbicides in natural environment via common metabolic pathways and were less toxic to green algae compared to the parent herbicides. These results indicate that NaHSO(3) can accelerate transformation of chloroacetanilide herbicides to the less toxic transformation products by nucleophilic substitution and dechlorination in aquatic environment. NaHSO(3) can be potentially used for the removal of chloroacetanilide herbicides from wastewater effluent, spill sites and accidental discharge.

  10. Studies on maize inbred lines susceptibility to herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Lidija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of results obtained during long- term studies on the response of maize inbred lines to herbicides. Under the agroecological conditions of Zemun Polje the response (reaction of maize inbred lines to herbicides of different classes was investigated. Biological tests were performed and some agronomic, morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters were determined when the response of maize inbred lines to herbicides was estimated. The use of active ingredients of herbicides from triazine, acetanilide, thiocarbamate to new chemical groups (sulfonylurea etc., have been resulted in changes in weed suppression and susceptibility of inbred lines. Obtained results show that effects of herbicides on susceptible maize genotypes can be different: they can slowdown the growth and development and affect the plant height; they can also affect the stages of the tassel and ear development and at the end they can reduced grain yield of the tested inbreds. Numerous studies confirmed the existence of differences in susceptibility level of maize genotypes in relation to herbicides. According to gained results the recommendations for growers are made on the possibility of the application of new herbicides in the hybrid seed production.

  11. Novel 4-Methylumbelliferone Amide Derivatives: Synthesis, Characterization and Pesticidal Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel 4-methylumbelliferone amide derivatives were designed, synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and HR-ESI-MS. The structures of compounds 4bd and 4be (compounds named by authors were further confirmed by X-ray single crystal diffraction. The acaricidal, herbicidal and antifungal activities of the synthesized compounds were assayed for their potential use as pesticide. The results indicated that compounds 4bi, 4ac and 4bd were strong acaricidals against Tetranychus cinnabarinus, with 72h corrected mortalities of greater than 80% at 1000 mg/L. Meanwhile, compounds 4bh and 4bf exhibit the strongest inhibition against the taproot development of Digitaria sanguinalis and Chenopodium glaucum, and were even more potent than the commercial herbicide Acetochlor against D. sanguinalis. In addition, compounds 4bk, 4bh and 4bp showed the highest antifungal activity against the mycelium growth of Valsa mali, which makes them more effective than commercial fungicide Carbendazim.

  12. Screening for estrogen and androgen receptor activities in 200 pesticides by in vitro reporter gene assays using Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Katsura, Eiji; Takeuchi, Shinji; Niiyama, Kazuhito; Kobayashi, Kunihiko

    2004-01-01

    We tested 200 pesticides, including some of their isomers and metabolites, for agonism and antagonism to two human estrogen receptor (hER) subtypes, hERalpha and hERbeta, and a human androgen receptor (hAR) by highly sensitive transactivation assays using Chinese hamster ovary cells. The test compounds were classified into nine groups: organochlorines, diphenyl ethers, organophosphorus pesticides, pyrethroids, carbamates, acid amides, triazines, ureas, and others. These pesticides were tested at concentrations methiocarb were predominantly hERbeta rather than hERalpha agonistic. Weak antagonistic effects toward hERalpha and hERbeta were shown in five and two pesticides, respectively. On the other hand, none of tested pesticides showed hAR-mediated androgenic activity, but 66 of 200 pesticides exhibited inhibitory activity against the transcriptional activity induced by 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. In particular, the antiandrogenic activities of two diphenyl ether herbicides, chlornitrofen and chlomethoxyfen, were higher than those of vinclozolin and p,p -dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene, known AR antagonists. The results of our ER and AR assays show that 34 pesticides possessed both estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, indicating pleiotropic effects on hER and hAR. We also discussed chemical structures related to these activities. Taken together, our findings suggest that a variety of pesticides have estrogenic and/or antiandrogenic potential via ER and/or AR, and that numerous other manmade chemicals may also possess such estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities. PMID:15064155

  13. Herbicide contamination and dispersion pattern in lowland springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laini, Alex; Bartoli, Marco; Lamastra, Lucrezia; Capri, Ettore; Balderacchi, Matteo; Trevisan, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Herbicides reduce the diversity of flora and fauna in freshwater ecosystems and also contaminate groundwater due to leaching. Herbicide contamination can be a serious threat for all groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDE), altering their chemical and biological quality. Successful management to protect GDE is dependent on detailed knowledge of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical features of the surrounding environment. We consider the possible diffuse contamination by herbicides of groundwater and of GDE as lowland springs, semi-artificial ecosystems with elevated biodiversity. The main objectives of the present work were thus: (1) to map herbicide contamination in lowland springs, (2) to evaluate the potential risk for biota and (3) to quantify the extent of the area from which the herbicide use can affect the water quality of lowland springs. In June and August 2009, nearly 23 springs within the Po River Plain (Northern Italy) were sampled and analyzed for five herbicides used to control weeds in maize. Hydrogeological properties, half-lives of the herbicides and their concentrations in both groundwater and springs were used to quantify the area from which the contamination could originate. Such evaluation was performed by means of GIS techniques. Terbuthylazine were the only herbicide found, together with its metabolite desethylterbuthylazine. In 16 out of 84 measurements, their concentrations were above the threshold for drinking water; however, they were always below the ecotoxicological end-points of aquatic flora and fauna. Spatial analyses reveal that the theoretical area from which herbicides can contaminate spring water is within a distance varying between a few and 1800 m. Our findings indicate that conservation plans should focus on the fields adjacent to or surrounding the springs and should address the optimization of irrigation practices, restoration of buffer strips, crop rotation and in general more sustainable agricultural practices in the

  14. Selectivity and stability of new herbicides and herbicide combinations for the seed yields of some field crops I. Effect at Coriander (Coriandrum Sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Delchev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. . The research was conducted during 2013 – 2015 on pellic vertisol soil type. Under investigation was Bulgarian coriander cultivar Lozen 1 (Coriandrum sativum L.. The purpose of the investigation was to establish the selectivity and stability of some herbicides, herbicide combinations and herbicide tank mixtures on the coriander. Factor A included the years of investigation. Factor B included no treated check, 6 soil-applied herbicides – Tendar EC, Silba SC, Sharpen 33 EC, Merlin flex 480 SC, Smerch 24 ЕC, Raft 400 SC and 5 foliar-applied herbicides – Kalin flo, Eclipse 70 DWG, Sultan 500 SC, Corrida 75 DWG, Lontrel 300 EC. Factor C included no treated check and 1 antigraminaceous herbicide – Tiger platinium 5 EC. Soil-applied herbicides were treated during the period after sowing before emergence. Foliar-applied herbicides were treated during rosette stage of the coriander. It is found that tank mixtures of Tiger platinum with foliar herbicides Kalin flo, Eclipse, Sultan, Corrida and Lontrel lead to obtaining of high seed yields. High yields of coriander seeds also are obtained by foliar treatment with antigraminaceous herbicide Tiger platinum after soil-applied herbicides Raft, Smerch, Sharpen, Silba and Tendar. The use of the soil-applied herbicide Merlin flex does not increase the seed yield, due to its higher phytotoxicity on coriander. The most unstable are herbicide Merlin flex and herbicide combination Merlin flex + Tiger platinum. Technologically the most valuable are herbicide combination Raft + Tiger platinum and herbicide tankmixture Kalin flo + Tiger platinum. Self-use of soil-applied or foliar-applied herbicides have low estimate due to they must to combine for full control of weeds in coriander crops.

  15. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

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    Franck Emmanuel Dayan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl-(2E,4E-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in response between plants treated with sarmentine and herbicidal soaps such as pelargonic acid (nonanoic acid. However, little was known about the mechanism of action leading to the rapid desiccation of foliage treated by sarmentine. In cucumber cotyledon disc-assays, sarmentine induced rapid light-independent loss of membrane integrity at 100 µM or higher concentration, whereas 3 mM pelargonic acid was required for a similar effect. Sarmentine was between 10 and 30 times more active than pelargonic acid on wild mustard, velvetleaf, redroot pigweed and crabgrass. Additionally, the potency of 30 µM sarmentine was greatly stimulated by light, suggesting that this natural product may also interfere with photosynthetic processes. This was confirmed by observing a complete inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport at that concentration. Sarmentine also acted as an inhibitor of photosystem II on isolated thylakoid membranes by competing for the binding site of plastoquinone. This can be attributed in part to structural similarities between herbicides like sarmentine and diuron. While this mechanism of action accounts for the light stimulation of the activity of sarmentine, it does not account for its ability to destabilize membranes in darkness. In this respect, sarmentine has some structural similarity to crotonoyl-CoA, the substrate of enoyl-ACP reductase, a key enzyme in the early steps of fatty acid synthesis. Inhibitors of this enzyme, such as triclosan, cause rapid loss of membrane integrity in the dark. Sarmentine inhibited the activity of enoyl-ACP reductase, with an I50app of 18.3 µM. Therefore, the herbicidal activity of sarmentine appears to

  16. Derivatives of phenyl tribromomethyl sulfone as novel compounds with potential pesticidal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof M. Borys

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A halogenmethylsulfonyl moiety is incorporated in numerous active herbicides and fungicides. The synthesis of tribromomethyl phenyl sulfone derivatives as novel potential pesticides is reported. The title sulfone was obtained by following three different synthetic routes, starting from 4-chlorothiophenol or 4-halogenphenyl methyl sulfone. Products of its subsequent nitration were subjected to the SNAr reactions with ammonia, amines, hydrazines and phenolates to give 2-nitroaniline, 2-nitrophenylhydrazine and diphenyl ether derivatives. Reduction of the nitro group of 4-tribromomethylsulfonyl-2-nitroaniline yielded the corresponding o-phenylenediamine substrate for preparation of structurally varied benzimidazoles.

  17. Pesticides in the Lake Kinneret basin: a combined approach towards mircopollutant management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaßmann, M.; Friedler, E.; Dubwoski, Y.; Dinerman, E.; Olsson, O.; Bauer, M.

    2009-04-01

    Lake Kinneret is the only large surface waterbody in Israel, supplying about 27% of the country's freshwater. Water quality in Lake Kinneret is of major concern and improving the ecological status of this large water body is now a national priority. While many studies in the past focused on nutrients inflows and phytoplankton dynamics, less research has been done on assessing the fate and pathways of micropollutants at semi-arid environments in common and Lake Kinneret in particular. Since the watershed area of Lake Kinneret is used primarily for agriculture, it is important to evaluate the fate and dynamic transfer of organic micropollutants such as pesticides and herbicides in the watershed streams and in the lake itself. This study introduces a combined concept of extensive measurements and modelling tools to observe and simulate the pesticide release chain (i) application - (ii) diffuse release to rivers - (iii) transport in the river - (iv) accumulation in the lake. The available information regarding identification of application zones (i) and the amounts of used pesticides is based on stakeholders interviews, a survey of the different crop types and orchards and a comparison to sold amounts of the target pesticides (Melman and Bar-Ilan 2008). In the current research, a single field mass balance of pesticides is carried out to determine the field release to rivers (ii) by an extensive measurement campaign on the different compartments (soil, vegetation, atmosphere) and phases (water, air, solids) of a single field. The mass balance results in a release pattern of pesticide, which will be overtaken into the modelling approach. Transport of pesticides in rivers (iii) is modelled on the base of a recently developed stream network model for ephemeral streams (MOHID River), introducing important instream fate processes of pesticides and supported by six instream measurement stations of hydrological as well as pesticide data in the basin. To determine the final

  18. [The characteristics and trends of acute pesticide poisoning of Shaoxing in 2006 to 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guo-qin; Lian, Ling-jun; Wang, Chun-hui; Li, Ming; Wang, Ji-gang; Pan, Nan-yan; Wang, Sha-sha

    2013-07-01

    To describe the epidemiological characteristics of acute pesticide poisoning in Shaoxing, China during 2006-2011 and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of pesticide poisoning. The data on pesticide poisoning in Shaoxing during 2006-2011 were obtained from the China Information System for Disease Control and Prevention and were then analyzed. A total of 2024 cases of acute pesticide poisoning were reported in Shaoxing during 2006-2011, and 44 cases were missed, accounting for 2.1% (44/2068) of all cases. Among the 2024 cases, 119 (5.9%) died; the fatality rates of productive poisoning and unproductive poisoning were 1.0% (3/289) and 6.7% (116/1735), respectively. The reported cases included 1038 (51.3%) females and 986 (48.7%) males, and there were no significant differences in the ratio between male and female cases of acute pesticide poisoning from 2006 to 2011 (χ2 = 9.16, P = 0.10). The 2024 cases had a mean age of 47.0±18.7 years; the male cases had a significantly higher mean age than the female cases (50.7±19.0 vs 43.4±17.8 years, t = 9.01, P poisoning, and 1735 (85.7%) suffered unproductive poisoning. In the 986 male cases, 219 (22.2%) suffered productive poisoning; in the 1038 female cases, 968 (93.3%) suffered unproductive poisoning. The pesticides that caused poisoning included insecticide (86.7%, 1754/2024), herbicide (5.1%, 104/2024), rodenticide (3.6%, 72/2024), and bactericide, mixed preparation, biochemical pesticides, and other four categories of pesticides (4.6%, 94/2024); of the 1754 cases caused by insecticide, 1455 (83.0%) were attributed to organophosphorus insecticide. The incidence of unproductive acute pesticide poisoning is high in Shaoxing, and it mainly affects females. Most cases of acute pesticide poisoning are aged 30∼60 years. Insecticide is the main cause of poisoning. It is necessary to enhance health knowledge popularization and safety management of pesticides.

  19. Reduced birth weight in relation to pesticide mixtures detected in cord blood of full-term infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickerham, Erin L.; Lozoff, Betsy; Shao, Jie; Kaciroti, Niko; Xia, Yankai; Meeker, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that prenatal exposure to pesticides may be associated with decreased fetal growth. The specific pesticides investigated and results reported across studies have been inconsistent, and there is a mounting need for the consideration of mixtures rather than individual agents in studies of health outcomes in relation to environmental exposures. There are also many individual pesticides that have not been investigated in human health studies to date. We conducted a pilot study in rural Zhejiang province, China, measuring 20 non-persistent pesticides (10 insecticides, 6 herbicides, 3 fungicides, and 1 repellant) in umbilical cord blood of 112 full term (>37 weeks) infants. The pesticides detected with the greatest frequency were diethyltoluamide (DEET) (73%), a repellant, and vinclozolin (49%), a fungicide. The samples had detectable concentrations for a mean of 4.6 pesticides (SD=1.9) with a maximum of 10. Adjusting for potential confounders, newborn birth weight was inversely associated with the number of pesticides detected in cord blood (p = 0.04); birth weight decreased by a mean of 37.1 grams (95% CI, −72.5 to −1.8) for each detected pesticide. When assessing relationships by pesticide type, detection of fungicides was also associated with decreased birth weight (adjusted β = −116 grams [95% CI, −212 to −19.2]). For individual pesticides analyzed as dichotomous (detect vs. non-detect) variables, only vinclozolin (adjusted β = −174 grams [95% CI, −312 to −36.3] and acetochlor (adjusted β = −165 grams [95% CI, −325 to −5.7]) were significantly associated with reduced birth weight. No significant associations were seen between birth weight and individual pesticides assessed as continuous or 3-level ordinal variables. Our findings from this pilot investigation suggest that exposure to fungicides may adversely impact fetal growth. Exposure to mixtures of multiple pesticides is also of concern and should be explored

  20. Effects of multiple but low pesticide loads on aquatic fungal communities colonizing leaf litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talk, Anne; Kublik, Susanne; Uksa, Marie; Engel, Marion; Berghahn, Rüdiger; Welzl, Gerhard; Schloter, Michael; Mohr, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In the first tier risk assessment (RA) of pesticides, risk for aquatic communities is estimated by using results from standard laboratory tests with algae, daphnids and fish for single pesticides such as herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides. However, fungi as key organisms for nutrient cycling in ecosystems as well as multiple pesticide applications are not considered in the RA. In this study, the effects of multiple low pesticide pulses using regulatory acceptable concentrations (RACs) on the dynamics of non-target aquatic fungi were investigated in a study using pond mesocosm. For that, fungi colonizing black alder (Alnus glutinosa) leaves were exposed to multiple, low pulses of 11 different pesticides over a period of 60days using a real farmer's pesticide application protocol for apple cropping. Four pond mesocosms served as treatments and 4 as controls. The composition of fungal communities colonizing the litter material was analyzed using a molecular fingerprinting approach based on the terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (t-RFLP) of the fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) gene(s). Our data indicated a clear fluctuation of fungal communities based on the degree of leaf litter degradation. However significant effects of the applied spraying sequence were not observed. Consequently also degradation rates of the litter material were not affected by the treatments. Our results indicate that the nutrient rich environment of the leaf litter material gave fungal communities the possibility to express genes that induce tolerance against the applied pesticides. Thus our data may not be transferred to other fresh water habitats with lower nutrient availability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Association between diabetes and pesticides: a case-control study among Thai farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntarawijit, Chudchawal; Juntarawijit, Yuwayong

    2018-01-27

    Pesticides are an agricultural chemical suspected to be a significant contributor to a global diabetes pandemic. The purpose of this study was to confirm previous findings of the link between diabetes and some agricultural pesticides and to identify the particular pesticides that are most likely to pose a risk of diabetes in the community. A population-based case-controlled study was conducted among residents in the Bang Rakam district of Phitsanulok Province in Thailand. Lifetime pesticide exposure and other relevant data were collected from 866 participating cases with diabetes mellitus and 1021 healthy controls. After adjusting for gender, age, BMI, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, family history of diabetes, and occupation, it was found that the prevalence of diabetes was positively associated with exposure to all types of pesticides, including insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, rodenticides, and molluscicides, with exposure to rodenticides being statistically significant (OR = 1.35; 95%CI 1.04-1.76). Among 35 individual brand-named pesticides investigated, we found statistically significant ORs with three insecticides, including one organochlorine [endosulfan (OR = 1.40; 95%CI 1.01-1.95)], one organophosphate [mevinphos (OR = 2.22; 95%CI 1.17-4.19)], and one carbamate [carbaryl/Sevin (OR = 1.50; 95%CI 1.02-2.19)]; and one fungicides [benlate (OR = 2.08; 95%CI 1.03-4.20)]. Our results suggest that the occurrence of diabetes among Thai farmer was associated with pesticide exposure. This finding is in line with previous epidemiological and animal studies. Further study using a larger sample size is needed to confirm the relationship and to identify the more toxic compounds.

  2. Pesticides and atopic and nonatopic asthma among farm women in the Agricultural Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppin, Jane A; Umbach, David M; London, Stephanie J; Henneberger, Paul K; Kullman, Greg J; Alavanja, Michael C R; Sandler, Dale P

    2008-01-01

    Risk factors for asthma among farm women are understudied. We evaluated pesticide and other occupational exposures as risk factors for adult-onset asthma. Studying 25,814 farm women in the Agricultural Health Study, we used self-reported history of doctor-diagnosed asthma with or without eczema and/or hay fever to create two case groups: patients with atopic asthma and those with nonatopic asthma. We assessed disease-exposure associations with polytomous logistic regression. At enrollment (1993-1997), 702 women (2.7%) reported a doctor's diagnosis of asthma after age 19 years (282 atopic, 420 nonatopic). Growing up on a farm (61% of all farm women) was protective for atopic asthma (odds ratio [OR], 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43-0.70) and, to a lesser extent, for nonatopic asthma (OR, 0.83; 95%CI, 0.68-1.02; P value for difference = 0.008). Pesticide use was almost exclusively associated with atopic asthma. Any use of pesticides on the farm was associated only with atopic asthma (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.14-1.87). This association with pesticides was strongest among women who had grown up on a farm. Women who grew up on farms and did not apply pesticides had the lowest overall risk of atopic asthma (OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.27-0.62) compared with women who neither grew up on farms nor applied pesticides. A total of 7 of 16 insecticides, 2 of 11 herbicides, and 1 of 4 fungicides were significantly associated with atopic asthma; only permethrin use on crops was associated with nonatopic asthma. These findings suggest that pesticides may contribute to atopic asthma, but not nonatopic asthma, among farm women.

  3. Effects of Pesticide Mixtures on Host-Pathogen Dynamics of the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia C Buck

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic and natural stressors often interact to affect organisms. Amphibian populations are undergoing unprecedented declines and extinctions with pesticides and emerging infectious diseases implicated as causal factors. Although these factors often co-occur, their effects on amphibians are usually examined in isolation. We hypothesized that exposure of larval and metamorphic amphibians to ecologically relevant concentrations of pesticide mixtures would increase their post-metamorphic susceptibility to the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, a pathogen that has contributed to amphibian population declines worldwide. We exposed five anuran species (Pacific treefrog, Pseudacris regilla; spring peeper, Pseudacris crucifer; Cascades frog, Rana cascadae; northern leopard frog, Lithobates pipiens; and western toad, Anaxyrus boreas from three families to mixtures of four common insecticides (chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, permethrin, and endosulfan or herbicides (glyphosate, acetochlor, atrazine, and 2,4-D or a control treatment, either as tadpoles or as newly metamorphic individuals (metamorphs. Subsequently, we exposed animals to Bd or a control inoculate after metamorphosis and compared survival and Bd load. Bd exposure significantly increased mortality in Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads, but not in Cascades frogs or northern leopard frogs. However, the effects of pesticide exposure on mortality were negligible, regardless of the timing of exposure. Bd load varied considerably across species; Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads had the highest loads, whereas Cascades frogs and northern leopard frogs had the lowest loads. The influence of pesticide exposure on Bd load depended on the amphibian species, timing of pesticide exposure, and the particular pesticide treatment. Our results suggest that exposure to realistic pesticide concentrations has minimal effects on Bd-induced mortality, but can alter Bd load

  4. Using integrated inter- row cultivation and herbicide band application in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris weed management for reducing herbicide use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    gholamreza maleki

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted to investigate different weed management methods for reduce herbicide use in sugar beet at Arak Agriculture & Natural Research Center in 2005.Trial was designed in split-plot and consisted of 18 treatments with four replication. Each plot contains four 50 cm. rows. distance in inter row and 25cm. between plants on row. Main factor was inter row (with & without cultivation. Sub factors were herbicide dosages in two application methods (band & spread application. Herbicides were Desmedipham(Betanal A. M. plus Chloridazon (pyramin that used as tank mix application. Inter row cultivation done with tender wheal tractor and spraying by stable pressure charging sprayer with drop raining nozzle. The result showed no significance difference between main plots in crop characteristics evaluated. Highest root yield, plant total weight and more reduce weed biomass and control was obtained with 100 and 75 percent of the recommended dosages of the herbicide in spread application and 75 percent recommended dosages in band application. Therefore, in order to decreasing herbicide use toward environmental safety aspects and increasing economical profit for farmers, it is recommended to use 75 percent herbicide dosage in spread and band application in integrated with cultivation instead of complete dose alone in sugar beet. Keywords: Weed management, sugar beet, reduced herbicide dose, inter-row soil manipulation.

  5. Using next-generation sequencing to detect mutations endowing resistance to pesticides: application to acetolactate-synthase (ALS)-based resistance in barnyard grass, a polyploid grass weed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Délye, Christophe; Causse, Romain; Gautier, Véronique; Poncet, Charles; Michel, Séverine

    2015-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies offer tremendous possibilities for accurate detection of mutations endowing pesticide resistance, yet their use for this purpose has not emerged in crop protection. This study aims at promoting NGS use for pesticide resistance diagnosis. It describes a simple procedure accessible to virtually any scientist and implementing freely accessible programs for the analysis of NGS data. Three PCR amplicons encompassing seven codons of the acetolactate-synthase gene crucial for herbicide resistance were sequenced using non-quantified pools of crude DNA extracts from 40 plants in each of 28 field populations of barnyard grass, a polyploid weed. A total of 63,959 quality NGS sequence runs were obtained using the 454 technology. Three herbicide-resistance-endowing mutations (Pro-197-Ser, Pro-197-Leu and/or Trp-574-Leu) were identified in seven populations. The NGS results were confirmed by individual plant Sanger sequencing. This work demonstrated the feasibility of NGS-based detection of pesticide resistance, and the advantages of NGS compared with other molecular biology techniques for analysing large numbers of individuals. NGS-based resistance diagnosis has the potential to play a substantial role in monitoring resistance, maintaining pesticide efficacy and optimising pesticide applications. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction.

  7. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction.

  8. Complex mixtures of dissolved pesticides show potential aquatic toxicity in a synoptic study of Midwestern U.S. streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Moran, Patrick W.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Norman, Julia E.; Nakagaki, Naomi; Shoda, Megan E.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Stone, Wesley W.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Hladik, Michelle L.

    2018-01-01

    Aquatic organisms in streams are exposed to pesticide mixtures that vary in composition over time in response to changes in flow conditions, pesticide inputs to the stream, and pesticide fate and degradation within the stream. To characterize mixtures of dissolved-phase pesticides and degradates in Midwestern streams, a synoptic study was conducted at 100 streams during May–August 2013. In weekly water samples, 94 pesticides and 89 degradates were detected, with a median of 25 compounds detected per sample and 54 detected per site. In a screening-level assessment using aquatic-life benchmarks and the Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI), potential effects on fish were unlikely in most streams. For invertebrates, potential chronic toxicity was predicted in 53% of streams, punctuated in 12% of streams by acutely toxic exposures. For aquatic plants, acute but likely reversible effects on biomass were predicted in 75% of streams, with potential longer-term effects on plant communities in 9% of streams. Relatively few pesticides in water—atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor, imidacloprid, fipronil, organophosphate insecticides, and carbendazim—were predicted to be major contributors to potential toxicity. Agricultural streams had the highest potential for effects on plants, especially in May–June, corresponding to high spring-flush herbicide concentrations. Urban streams had higher detection frequencies and concentrations of insecticides and most fungicides than in agricultural streams, and higher potential for invertebrate toxicity, which peaked during July–August. Toxicity-screening predictions for invertebrates were supported by quantile regressions showing significant associations for the Benthic Invertebrate-PTI and imidacloprid concentrations with invertebrate community metrics for MSQA streams, and by mesocosm toxicity testing with imidacloprid showing effects on invertebrate communities at environmentally relevant concentrations. This study documents the most

  9. Health Risk Assessment of Pesticide Usage in Menia El-Kamh Province of Sharkia Governorate in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Assad

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Menia El-Kamh province of the Sharkia Governorate constitutes one of the largest agricultural areas in Egypt. About 88% of the nearly 472,000 people living in this province rely on agricultural activities for subsistence. Several pesticides including organochloride, organophosphorus, carbamate, and pyrethroid insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides are commonly used in citrus, vegetable and other crop-growing areas to increase agricultural productivity. However, their use has also been associated with several cases of pesticide poisoning. In this research, we conducted a field survey to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the farmer’s community regarding the safe use of pesticides. We also evaluated the residual concentrations of selected pesticides in water, soil, milk, fish, and orange samples, and estimated the potential health risks associated with the exposure to these pesticides. Data obtained from the field survey indicate that more than 95% of farm workers do not practice safety precautions during pesticide formulation and application; leading to a considerable prevalence of pesticide-related illnesses in this agricultural community. Pesticide residues in various environmental samples varied greatly; from below detection levels (3-5 ng to as high as 325 ppb depending on the matrix of interest, and the specific pesticide of concern. The analysis of health risk estimates indicated that chlorpyrifos, DDT, dimethoate, methomyl, and larvin did not pose a direct hazard to human health, although present in water, milk, orange, and/or fish. However, aldicarb, and carbosulfan levels exceeded the reference doses, indicating a great potential for systemic toxicity, especially in children who are considered to be the most vulnerable population subgroup. The upper-bound values of cancer risk from DDT exposure were estimated to be about 8 (adults, and 55 (children excess cancers in a population of one million.

  10. U.S. EPA, Pesticide Product Label, AATREX 4L HERBICIDE, 03/09/1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... ', ...f· ",'. Pc'!.tl'rrf"qf'nCf' tl'c,aa f'al ",,,,0 ~~'1"(j .... ,r., ~""ilU,]M 'CO "'f'!oTf',n KS ,..,. OK ~X ;I""OOf'''f''\\',q\\)1,~~~Al""tlCA\\)'''Jl ',:' . loA·· ... ...

  11. Hydrolytic degradation of azimsulfuron, a sulfonylurea herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschin, Giovanna; D'Agostina, Alessandra; Antonioni, Cristina; Locati, Daniela; Arnoldi, Anna

    2007-07-01

    The chemical degradation of the herbicide azimsulfuron was investigated in aqueous solutions at different pH values. The hydrolysis rate, determined by HPLC analyses, was pH dependent and was much faster in acidic than in neutral or weakly basic conditions. The metabolites formed at different pH values were compared with standards when possible or isolated and identified using ESI-LC-MS/MS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. The two main products of hydrolysis in mild acidic solution were identified as 2-amino-4,6-dimethoxy-pyrimidine and 2-methyl-4-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-yl)-2H-pyrazole-3-sulfonamide, both produced as a result of the sulfonylurea bridge cleavage. Under basic conditions, a new product, a substituted 2-pyrimidinamine, deriving from the contraction of the sulfonylurea bridge, was isolated and completely characterized for the first time.

  12. [Microbial degradation of glyphosate herbicides (review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridov, A V; Shushkova, T V; Ermakova, I T; Ivanova, E V; Epiktetov, D O; Leont'evskii, A A

    2015-01-01

    This review analyzes the issues associated with biodegradation of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine), one of the most widespread herbicides. Glyphosate can accumulate in natural environments and can be toxic not only for plants but also for animals and bacteria. Microbial transformation and mineralization ofglyphosate, as the only means of its rapid degradation, are discussed in detail. The different pathways of glyphosate catabolism employed by the known destructing bacteria representing different taxonomic groups are described. The potential existence of alternative glyphosate degradation pathways, apart from those mediated by C-P lyase and glyphosate oxidoreductase, is considered. Since the problem of purifying glyphosate-contaminated soils and water bodies is a topical issue, the possibilities of applying glyphosate-degrading bacteria for their bioremediation are discussed.

  13. Herbicide Glyphosate Impact to Earthworm (E. fetida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Dajoraitė

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is a broad spectrum weed resistant herbicide. Glyphosate may pose negative impact on land ecosystems because of wide broad usage and hydrofilic characteristic. The aim of this study was to investigate negative effects of glyphosate on soil invertebrate organisms (earthworm Eisenia fetida. The duration of experiment was 8 weeks. The range of the test concentrations of glyphosate were: 0,1, 1, 5, 10, 20 mg/kg. To investigate the glyphosate impact on earthworm Eisenia fetida the following endpoints were measured: survival, reproduction and weight. The exposure to 20 mg/kg glyphosate has led to the 100% mortality of earthworms. Glyphosate has led to decreased E. fetida reproduction, the cocoons were observed only in the lowest concentration (0,1 mg/kg. In general: long-term glyphosate toxicity to earthworms (E. fetida may be significant.

  14. Historical perspective of pesticide poisoning in Japan and measures taken by the Japanese association of rural medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagami, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The use of pesticides has rapidly increased in Japan since the end of World War II, significantly reducing work burdens and boosting food production. In the meantime, pesticides, responsible for poisoning and environmental pollution, have for many years posed grave issues that have had to be tackled by scientists of rural medicine for a long period. The Japanese Association of Rural Medicine, founded by the late Toshikazu Wakatsuki, has grappled with those issues for many years. Above all, the association has fulfilled its social obligations, such as by bringing the toxicity of organic mercury to light in animal tests to prompt the government to prohibit its use, and by casting light on birth defects caused by defoliants aerially sprayed during the Vietnam War to urge U.S. military forces to break off herbicide warfare. As it has become possible to make less toxic pesticides available for farm work in recent years, death-inducing accidents have seldom occurred during the spraying of pesticides, and the association's activities are now at a low ebb. Now that pesticides, which after all are biologically toxic compounds, are openly used on farms, there is the need to pay constant attention to their impacts on the human body and the environment. In the future, it is necessary to epidemiologically probe into chronic impacts on the human body and contribute to the prevention of pesticide poisoning in Southeast Asia.

  15. Estimates of herbicide use for the sixty-first through the eightieth most-use herbicides in the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of herbicide use for the sixty-first through the eightieth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in...

  16. Estimates of herbicide use for the forty-first through the sixtieth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of herbicide use for the forty-first through the sixtieth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in...

  17. Estimates of herbicide use for the eighty-first through the ninety-sixth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of herbicide use for the eighty-first through the ninety-sixth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in...

  18. Estimates of herbicide use for the twenty-first through the fortieth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains estimates of herbicide use for the twenty-first through the fortieth most-used herbicides in the conterminous United States as reported in...

  19. PESTICIDE SCREENING RESULTS FROM EIGHT DAYCARE CENTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To improve assessments of children's exposures to pesticides in support of the Food Quality Protection Act, priority research and data needs include: pesticide use patterns, pesticide residue distributions, and dermal exposure assessment approaches. To address these gaps, the ...

  20. 75 FR 8939 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has received applications to register pesticide products containing an active ingredient not included in any previously registered pesticide products. Pursuant to the...

  1. 76 FR 38160 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has received applications to register pesticide products containing an active ingredient not included in any previously registered pesticide products. Pursuant to the...

  2. 75 FR 24694 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has received applications to register pesticide products containing an active ingredient not included in any previously registered pesticide product. Pursuant to the provisions...

  3. 75 FR 80490 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has received applications to register pesticide products containing active ingredients not included in any previously registered pesticide products. Pursuant to the provisions of...

  4. 77 FR 14362 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces receipt of applications to register pesticide products... by the docket identification (ID) number and the file symbol for the pesticide of interest as shown...

  5. 75 FR 71695 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has received applications to register new uses for pesticide products containing... Pesticide Programs (OPP) Regulatory Public Docket (7502P), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200...

  6. 75 FR 32767 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces receipt of applications to register new uses for pesticide...: Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) Regulatory Public Docket (7502P), Environmental Protection Agency...

  7. 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP) covers discharges of biological pesticides, and chemical pesticides that leave a residue, in areas where EPA is the NPDES...

  8. Tips for Reducing Pesticide Impacts on Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web page provides tips for pesticide users in residential and agricultural settings, as well as tips for certified pesticide applicators for ways to protect wildlife from potentially harmful effects of pesticides.

  9. Radiation induced microbial pesticide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Sang Jae

    2000-01-01

    To control plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria (K1, K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 13 kinds of fungi. Mutants of K1 and YS1 strains were induced by gamma-ray radiation and showed promising antifungal activities. These wild type and mutants showed resistant against more than 27 kinds of commercial pesticides among 30 kinds of commercial pesticides test particularly, YS1-1006 mutant strain showed resistant against hydrogen oxide. And mutants had increased antifungal activity against Botryoshaeria dothidea. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful method for the induction of functional mutants. (author)

  10. Influence of Herbicide Triasulfuron on Soil Microbial Community in an Unamended Soil and a Soil Amended with Organic Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pose-Juan, Eva; Igual, José M.; Sánchez-Martín, María J.; Rodríguez-Cruz, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of organic amendments and pesticides on a soil microbial community has garnered considerable interest due to the involvement of microorganisms in numerous soil conservation and maintenance reactions. The aim of this work was to assess the influence on a soil microbial community of the simultaneous application of the herbicide triasulfuron at three doses (2, 10, and 50 mg kg-1), with an organic amendment [sewage sludge (SS) or green compost (GC)]. Dissipation kinetics, soil microbial biomass, dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and respiration, and the profile of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) extracted from the soil, were determined in unamended (S) soil and amended (S+SS and S+GC) ones. Triasulfuron dissipation followed the single first-order kinetics model. Half-life (DT50) values were higher in the amended soils than in the unamended one for the 10 and 50 mg kg-1 doses. The dissipation rates were lower in the S+GC soil for the three herbicide doses applied. In general, soil biomass, DHA and respiration values increased in SS- and GC-amended soils compared to the unamended one. DHA values decreased (S and S+SS) or increased (S+GC) with the incubation time of soil with herbicide at the different doses applied. Respiration values increased with the herbicide doses applied and decreased with the incubation time, although maximum values were obtained for soils treated with the highest dose after 70 days of incubation. PLFA analysis indicated different effects of triasulfuron on the soil microbial community structure depending on the organic amendments. While the increasing triasulfuron doses resulted in deeper alterations in the S soil, the time after triasulfuron application was the most important variation in the S+SS and S+GC soils. The overall results indicate that the soil amendment has an effect on herbicide dissipation rate and the soil microbial community. Initially, a high dose of triasulfuron had detrimental effects on the soil microbial community

  11. Influence of Herbicide Triasulfuron on Soil Microbial Community in an Unamended Soil and a Soil Amended with Organic Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pose-Juan, Eva; Igual, José M; Sánchez-Martín, María J; Rodríguez-Cruz, M S

    2017-01-01

    The effect of organic amendments and pesticides on a soil microbial community has garnered considerable interest due to the involvement of microorganisms in numerous soil conservation and maintenance reactions. The aim of this work was to assess the influence on a soil microbial community of the simultaneous application of the herbicide triasulfuron at three doses (2, 10, and 50 mg kg-1), with an organic amendment [sewage sludge (SS) or green compost (GC)]. Dissipation kinetics, soil microbial biomass, dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and respiration, and the profile of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) extracted from the soil, were determined in unamended (S) soil and amended (S+SS and S+GC) ones. Triasulfuron dissipation followed the single first-order kinetics model. Half-life (DT50) values were higher in the amended soils than in the unamended one for the 10 and 50 mg kg-1 doses. The dissipation rates were lower in the S+GC soil for the three herbicide doses applied. In general, soil biomass, DHA and respiration values increased in SS- and GC-amended soils compared to the unamended one. DHA values decreased (S and S+SS) or increased (S+GC) with the incubation time of soil with herbicide at the different doses applied. Respiration values increased with the herbicide doses applied and decreased with the incubation time, although maximum values were obtained for soils treated with the highest dose after 70 days of incubation. PLFA analysis indicated different effects of triasulfuron on the soil microbial community structure depending on the organic amendments. While the increasing triasulfuron doses resulted in deeper alterations in the S soil, the time after triasulfuron application was the most important variation in the S+SS and S+GC soils. The overall results indicate that the soil amendment has an effect on herbicide dissipation rate and the soil microbial community. Initially, a high dose of triasulfuron had detrimental effects on the soil microbial community

  12. Monitoring pesticides in wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustman, E.H.; Martin, W.E.; Heath, R.G.; Reichel, W.L.

    1971-01-01

    Early in the development of the wildlife monitoring program, certain criteria were recognized as being important in the selection of species of wild animals suitable for pesticide monitoring purposes. Ideally, the forms selected should be geographically well distributed, and they should be reasonably abundant and readily available for sampling. In addition, animals occurring near the top of food chains have the capacity to reflect residues in organisms occurring at lower levels in the same food chains. Based on these criteria, species chosen for monitoring include the starling (Sturnus vulgaris), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and black ducks (Anas rubripes), and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). The black duck is substituted for the mallard in States where suitable numbers of mallards cannot be obtained. The Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife is held responsible for the execution of the wildlife portion of the National Pesticide Monitoring Program. The primary objective is to ascertain on a nationwide basis and independent of specific treatments the levels and trends of certain pesticidal chemicals and other pollutants in the bodies of selected forms of wildlife. The program was first described by Johnson et al. (4) in 1967. The purpose of this report is to update and redescribe the wildlife monitoring program and briefly review accomplishments.

  13. Integrated effect of seeding rate, herbicide dosage and application ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrated effect of seeding rate, herbicide dosage and application timing on durum wheat ( Triticum turgidum l. var durum) yield, yield components and wild oat (avena fatua l.) control in south eastern Ethiopia.

  14. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-ming; Wang, Xing-jun; Zheng, He-hui

    2002-10-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organic matter addition were measured during 35 days laboratory incubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid) mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in the different treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soil alone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation. Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlor biodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. The biodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone, soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6 d, 6.1 d and 5.4 d and 5.3 d, 4.9 d and 5.3 d respectively. The biodegradation products were hydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, and hydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor.

  15. The influence of the application of grass herbicides on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Economic analysis; Fluazifop-butyl; Merino sheep; Pastures; Propyzamide; Wool production; adg; animal production; dryland; fluzifop-butyl; grass; lucerne; treatments; weeds; yield; production; grasses; herbicides; southern cape; south africa; ruens; stocking rates; medicago sativa; medicago truncatula ...

  16. Pesticide loss to the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plimmer, J R

    1990-01-01

    Pesticides may be transformed by chemical and biological processes or transported from the site of application by several processes including runoff, movement through the soil to ground water, volatilization, transport on soil particles, and wind erosion. Contamination of water by pesticide residues is a matter of concern as is contamination of the earth's atmosphere. The form in which a pesticide enters the air and the dimensions of pesticide-containing particulate matter affect movement and deposition. Local transport over distances of several miles may be responsible for adverse effects on nontarget species. Effects of long-range transport are more difficult to assess, but pesticides increase the burden of organic chemicals in the atmosphere. Field measurements of pesticide volatilization and deposition of residues in rainfall, particulate matter, fog, etc., provide information on the relative importance of these processes. Adequate information concerning chemical reactions of pesticides in air is lacking. Because it is desirable to minimize low-level human and environmental exposure resulting from airborne pesticide residues, potential for losses to the air should be taken into account in selecting pesticide formulations and application methods.

  17. Pesticides analysed in rainwater in Alsace region (Eastern France): Comparison between urban and rural sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheyer, Anne; Morville, Stéphane; Mirabel, Philippe; Millet, Maurice

    Current-used pesticides commonly applied in Alsace region (Eastern France) on diverse crops (maize, vineyard, vegetables, etc.) were analysed, together with Lindane, in rainwater between January 2002 and June 2003 simultaneously on two sites situated in a typical rural (Erstein, France) and urban area (Strasbourg, France). Rainwater samples were collected on a weekly basis by using two automatic wet only collectors associated with an open collector for the measurement of rainwater height. Pesticides were analysed by GC-MSMS and extracted from rainwater by SPME. Two runs were performed. The first one was performed by using a PDMS (100 μm) fibre for pesticides where direct injection into GC is possible (alachlor, atrazine, azinphos-ethyl, azinphos-methyl, captan, chlorfenvinphos, dichlorvos, diflufenican, α- and β-endosulfan, iprodione, lindane, metolachlor, mevinphos, parathion-methyl, phosalone, phosmet, tebuconazole, triadimefon and trifluralin). The second run was performed by using PDMS/DVB fibre and this run concerns pesticides where a preliminary derivatisation step with pentafluorobenzylbromide (PFBBr) is required for very low volatiles (bromoxynil,2,4-MCPA, MCPP and 2,4-D) or thermo labiles (chlorotoluron, diuron and isoproturon) pesticides. Results showed that the more concentrated pesticides detected were those used as herbicides in large quantities in Alsace region for maize crops (alachlor, metolachlor and atrazine). Maximum concentrations for these herbicides have been measured during intensive applications periods on maize crops following by rapid decrease immediately after use. For Alachlor, most important peaks have been observed between 21 and 28 April 2003 (3327 ng L -1 at Erstein and 5590 ng L -1 at Strasbourg). This is also the case for Metolachlor where most important peak was observed during the same week. Concentrations of pesticides measured out of application periods were very low for many pesticides and some others where never detected

  18. Impact of the rainfall pattern on synthetic pesticides and copper runoff from a vineyard catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payraudeau, Sylvain; Meite, Fatima; Wiegert, Charline; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2017-04-01

    Runoff is a major process of pesticide transport from agricultural land to downstream aquatic ecosystems. The impact of rainfall characteristics on the transport of runoff-related pesticide is rarely evaluated at the catchment scale. Here, we evaluate the influence of rainfall pattern on the mobilization of synthetic pesticides and copper fungicides in runoff from a small vineyard catchment, both at the plot and catchment scales. During two vineyard growing seasons in 2015 and 2016 (from March to October), we monitored rainfall, runoff, and concentrations of copper and 20 fungicides and herbicides applied by winegrowers at the Rouffach vineyard catchment (France, Alsace; 42.5 ha). Rainfall data were recorded within the catchment while runoff measurement and flow-proportional water sampling were carried out at the outlet of the plot (1486 m2; 87.5 × 17 m) and the catchment. In total, discharges of the 14 runoff events were continuously monitored between March and October 2015 using bubbler flow modules combined with Venturi channels. Detailed and distributed dataset on pesticide applications were extracted from survey (copper formulations and type of pesticides, amount and application dates). Pools of copper and synthetic pesticides were quantified weekly in the topsoil (0-3 cm) by systematic sampling across the catchment. The concentrations of copper (10 mg.kg-1 dried soil) and synthetic pesticides (close to the quantification limit, i.e. 0.05 µg.L-1) available in the top soil for off-site transport largely differed over time. Between March and October, an accumulation of copper of 10% was observed in the top-soil while pesticide concentration decreased below the quantification limits after a few days or weeks following application, depending of the compounds. The average runoff generated at the plot scale was very low (0.13% ± 0.30). The maximum runoff reached 1.37% during the storm of July 22, 2015. Synthetic pesticides exported by runoff was less than 1‰ of

  19. Occurrence of pesticides in water and sediment collected from amphibian habitats located throughout the United States, 2009-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Orlando, James L.; Calhoun, Daniel; Battaglin, William A.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    herbicides, 4 insecticides, 1 synergist, and 2 pesticide degradates. On a national scale, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), the primary degradate of the herbicide glyphosate, which is the active ingredient in Roundup®, was the most frequently detected pesticide in water (16 of 54 samples) followed by glyphosate (8 of 54 samples). The maximum number of pesticides observed at a single site was nine compounds in a water sample from a site in Louisiana. The maximum concentration of a pesticide or degradate observed in water was 2,880 nanograms per liter of clomazone (a herbicide) at a site in Louisiana. In California, a total of eight pesticides were detected among all of the low and high elevation sites; AMPA was the most frequently detected pesticide, but glyphosate was detected at the highest concentrations (1.1 micrograms per liter). Bed-sediment samples were analyzed for 94 pesticides by using accelerated solvent extraction, gel permeation chromatography for sulfur removal, and carbon/alumina stacked solid-phase extraction cartridges to remove interfering sediment matrices. In bed sediment, 22 pesticides were detected in one or more of the samples, including 9 fungicides, 3 pyrethroid insecticides, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT) and its major degradates, as well as several herbicides. Pyraclostrobin, a strobilurin fungicide, and bifenthrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, were detected most frequently. Maximum pesticide concentrations ranged from less than their respective method detection limits to 1,380 micrograms per kilogram (tebuconazole in California). The number of pesticides detected in samples from each site ranged from zero to six compounds. The sites with the greatest number of pesticides were in Maine and Oregon with six pesticides detected in one sample from each state, followed by Georgia with four pesticides in one sample. For California, a total of 10 pesticides were detected among all sites, and 4 pesticides were detected at both low and high

  20. Selectivity of herbicides in Camelina (Camelina sativa (L. Crtz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheliga, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Camelina (Camelina sativa (L. Crtz. is a cruciferous plant. As an oilseed crop camelina is mainly grown for oil production. After the 1960s, however, the cultivation has become less important. Only in recent years, interest in this culture was awakened in the search for new sources of omega 3 fatty acids, natural antioxidants and a potential crop for the production of biofuels. The use of camelina oil for different purposes within the framework of the material use of renewable raw materials is of particular interest due to the high levels of linoleic and linolenic acid. For the establishment of camelina as a crop in agricultural crop rotation systems weed control should not be disregarded despite the rather good competitive ability against weeds. Based on greenhouse experiments a field trial in 2015 with different herbicide strategies was carried out. Besides Butisan Top (metazachlor + quinmerac, Devrinol FL (napropamide and Stomp Aqua (pendimethalin and also Betasana SC (phenmedipham has been tested in various amounts and combinations. Using assessments to weed density and herbicide tolerance different herbicide strategies were compared with each other. Though, it is difficult to find a compromise between satisfactory herbicidal effect and a slight injury to the crop plant. The herbicide selection, the application rate and the combination of different herbicides have an effect on the crop. To confirm the data obtained further tests are necessary.

  1. Proteolytic pathways induced by herbicides that inhibit amino acid biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia Zulet

    Full Text Available The herbicides glyphosate (Gly and imazamox (Imx inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling.Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment.These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined.

  2. Sampling of herbicides in streams during flood events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jens; Grant, Ruth; Larsen, Søren E; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte

    2012-12-01

    In stream water xenobiotics usually occur as pulses in connection with floods caused by surface run-off and tile drainage following precipitation events. In streams located in small agricultural catchments we monitored herbicide concentrations during flood events by applying an intensive sampling programme of ½ h intervals for 7 h. In contrast to grab sampling under non-flood conditions, clearly elevated concentrations were recorded during the floods, and pulses varying in occurrence, duration and concentration were recorded. Pulses of recently applied herbicides were the most prominent, but also agricultural herbicides used in previous seasons caused pulses in the streams. Asynchronism of chemographs may be related to the characteristics of the compounds as well as their transport pathways and transformation in compartments between the source and the point of sampling in the stream. Thus, the occurrence of chemographs is difficult to predict, which ought to be taken into account when designing a sampling strategy. Even though the chemographs of herbicides and their transformation products (glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) as well as terbuthylazine and desethylterbuthylazine) seem to be synchronous, their occurrence may still be difficult to predict. It is evident that grab sampling under non-flood conditions yields insufficient information on the dynamics of occurrence of herbicides in stream water, both with respect to environmental effects and the calculation of the load to a recipient. In conclusion, the design of a sampling strategy regarding herbicides in stream waters should adequately consider the aim of the investigation.

  3. Effects of valley meteorology on forest pesticide spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, C.D.

    1990-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted this study for the Missoula Technology and Development Center of the US Department of Agriculture's Forest Service. The purpose of the study was to summarize recent research on valley meteorology during the morning transition period and to qualitatively evaluate the effects of the evolution of valley temperature inversions and wind systems on the aerial spraying of pesticides in National Forest areas of the western United States. Aerial spraying of pesticides and herbicides in forests of the western United States is usually accomplished in the morning hour after first light, during the period known to meteorologists as the morning transition period.'' This document describes the key physical processes that occur during the morning transition period on undisturbed days and the qualitative effects of these processes on the conduct of aerial spraying operations. Since the timing of valley meteorological events may be strongly influenced by conditions that are external to the valley, such as strong upper-level winds or the influence of clouds on the receipt of solar energy in the valley, some remarks are made on the qualitative influence of these processes. Section 4 of this report suggests ways to quantify some of the physical processes to provide useful guidance for the planning and conduct of spraying operations. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee and Pesticide Regulatory Reform Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs will hold a public meeting of the Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC) on Wednesday, May 3, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., and on Thursday, May 4, from 8:30 a.m. to noon.

  5. Evaluation System for Pesticides (ESPE). 1. Agricultural pesticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans HJB; Beek MA; Linders JBHJ

    1992-01-01

    In this report a risk assessment or evaluation system for agricultural pesticides is presented, which estimates the hazards for man and environment resulting from the use of these pesticides. The evaluation system has also been placed within the context of the Uniform System for the Evaluation of

  6. Exposures of 129 Preschool Children to Organochlorines, Organophosphates, Pyrethroids, and Acid Herbicides at Their Homes and Daycares in North Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha K. Morgan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Few data exist on the concurrent exposures of young children to past-use and current-use pesticides in their everyday environments. In this further analysis of study data, we quantified the potential exposures and intake doses of 129 preschool children, ages 20 to 66 months, to 16 pesticides (eight organochlorines, two organophosphates, three pyrethroids, and three acid herbicides. Environmental samples (soil, dust, outdoor air, and indoor air and personal samples (hand wipes, solid food, and liquid food were collected at 129 homes and 13 daycare centers in six counties in North Carolina between 2000 and 2001. α-Chlordane, γ-chlordane, heptachlor, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, cis-permethrin, trans-permethrin, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D were detected ≥50% in two or more media in both settings. Of these pesticides, the children’s estimated median potential intake doses through dietary ingestion, nondietary ingestion, and inhalation routes were the highest for 2,4-D and cis/trans-permethrin (both 4.84 ng/kg/day, cis/trans-permethrin (2.39 ng/kg/day, and heptachlor (1.71 ng/kg/day, respectively. The children’s estimated median potential aggregate intake doses by all three routes were quantifiable for chlorpyrifos (4.6 ng/kg/day, cis/trans-permethrin (12.5 ng/kg/day, and 2,4-D (4.9 ng/kg/day. In conclusion, these children were likely exposed daily to several pesticides from several sources and routes at their homes and daycares.

  7. Bacterial communities in batch and continuous-flow wetlands treating the herbicide S-metolachlor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayed, O.F. [Laboratory of Hydrology and Geochemistry of Strasbourg (LHyGeS), UMR 7517 University of Strasbourg/ENGEES/CNRS (France); Génétique Moléculaire, Génomique, Microbiologie (GMGM), UMR 7156 University of Strasbourg/CNRS (France); Maillard, E. [Laboratory of Hydrology and Geochemistry of Strasbourg (LHyGeS), UMR 7517 University of Strasbourg/ENGEES/CNRS (France); Vuilleumier, S. [Génétique Moléculaire, Génomique, Microbiologie (GMGM), UMR 7156 University of Strasbourg/CNRS (France); Imfeld, G., E-mail: imfeld@unistra.fr [Laboratory of Hydrology and Geochemistry of Strasbourg (LHyGeS), UMR 7517 University of Strasbourg/ENGEES/CNRS (France)

    2014-11-15

    Knowledge of wetland bacterial communities in the context of pesticide contamination and hydrological regime is scarce. We investigated the bacterial composition in constructed wetlands receiving Mercantor Gold{sup ®} contaminated water (960 g L{sup −1} of the herbicide S-metolachlor, > 80% of the S-enantiomer) operated under continuous-flow or batch modes to evaluate the impact of the hydraulic regime. In the continuous-flow wetland, S-metolachlor mass removal was > 40%, whereas in the batch wetland, almost complete removal of S-metolachlor (93–97%) was observed. Detection of ethanesulfonic and oxanilic acid degradation products further indicated S-metolachlor biodegradation in the two wetlands. The dominant bacterial populations were characterised by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 454 pyrosequencing. The bacterial profiles evolved during the first 35 days of the experiment, starting from a composition similar to that of inlet water, with the use of nitrate and to a lesser extent sulphate and manganese as terminal electron acceptors for microbial metabolism. Proteobacteria were the most abundant phylum, with Beta-, Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria representing 26%, 19% and 17% respectively of total bacterial abundance. Bacterial composition in wetland water changed gradually over time in continuous-flow wetland and more abruptly in the batch wetland. Differences in overall bacterial water structure in the two systems were modest but significant (p = 0.008), and S-metolachlor, nitrate, and total inorganic carbon concentrations correlated with changes in the bacterial profiles. Together, the results highlight that bacterial composition profiles and their dynamics may be used as bioindicators of herbicide exposure and hydraulic disturbances in wetland systems. - Highlights: • We evaluated the bacterial composition in wetlands treating S-metolachlor • Hydraulic regime impacted biogeochemical processes and S-metolachlor removal

  8. Behavior of pesticides in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan A. Norris

    1974-01-01

    A number of chemicals of diverse characteristics have arbitrarily been classed together on the basis of their use and given the descriptive name "pesticides." An unfortunate aura of mystery has developed about these chemicals. However, there is nothing unique or mysterious about the chemicals we refer to as "pesticides." Like other chemicals, they...

  9. Evaluation of DNA damage in Chinese toad (Bufo bufo gargarizans) after in vivo exposure to sublethal concentrations of four herbicides using the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao Hui; Li, Shao Nan; Zhang, Le; Zhu, Guo Nian; Zhuang, Hui Sheng

    2008-05-01

    Chinese toad, Bufo bufo gargarizans, is frequently found in rice fields, muddy ponds, wetlands and other aquatic ecosystems in China. Because of its habitat, it has many chances of being exposed to pesticides, such as acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl, and paraquat, which are extensively used in rice or cereal fields. Amphibians may serve as model organisms for determining the genotoxic effects of pollutants contaminating these areas. In the present study DNA damage was evaluated in the Chinese toad using the comet assay, as a potential tool for the assessment of ecogenotoxicity. The first step was to determine the acute toxicity of the above-mentioned herbicides. In acute tests, tadpoles were exposed to a series of relatively high concentrations of acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl, and paraquat for 96 h. The LC(50 )(96 h) of acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl and paraquat were measured as 0.76, 1.32, 20.1 and 164 mg l(-1), respectively. Also, negative effects on the behavior of tadpoles were observed with acetochlor, butachlor, and paraquat. Secondly, the comet assay was used for detecting DNA damage in Chinese toad tadpoles exposed to sublethal concentrations of four herbicides. Significant (P Bufo bufo gargarizans for genotoxicity assessment of herbicides.

  10. Degradative treatment of bispyribac sodium herbicide from synthetically contaminated water by colloidal MnO2 dioxide in the absence and presence of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamruzzaman; Nasar, Abu

    2017-11-09

    Bispyribac sodium (BS) is one of the most commonly used herbicides used to kill selectively unwanted herbs particularly in rice plantation. However, the increasing use of herbicides in agricultural field is associated with a potential risk to water resources and aquatic system. Thus, the treatment of such pesticides after fulfillment of their herbicidal activity is of quite interest to minimize the contamination of water. The degradation kinetics of BS from synthetic contaminated water by water-soluble colloidal MnO2 in acidic medium (HClO4) has been studied spectrophotometrically in the absence and presence of different surfactants. The degradation has been observed to be fractionally ordered in both BS and HClO4 under pseudo-first-order reaction condition with respect to MnO2. The anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) has been observed to be ineffective whereas the cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide) causes flocculation with oppositely charged colloidal MnO2 and therefore could not be studied further. However, the non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-100) has been observed to accelerate the reaction rate. The catalytic effect of this surfactant has been analyzed and discussed in the light of the available mathematical model. The kinetic data have been used to generate the various activation parameters accompanying the degradation process of BS in the absence and presence of the non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-100.

  11. APPLICATION OF QuEChERS METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PHENYLUREA HERBICIDES IN BEETROOT BY HPLC WITH UV-VIS DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Surma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenylurea herbicides are an important group of herbicides utilized in weed control. They have been on sale since the 1950s and are still in common use throughout the world from pre- and post-emergence control of many annual and perennial broad-leaved weeds. The aim of this work was to evaluate the utility of the QuEChERS method for the determination of phenylurea pesticides (chlortoluron, isoproturon, linuron, metobromuron, metoxuron, monolinuron in beetroot by HPLC with UV/Vis detection. Different types of sorbents (PSA, C18, SAX and NH2 and solvents (hexane, ethyl acetate were applied. The obtained results showed that the best recovery ratios were received for the method with PSA and GCB sorbents and using acetonitrile as an extraction solvent with RSD lower than 15% for most compounds. The linearity of calibration curves was higher than 0.98 for all target analytes. The results show that the QuEChERS method can be successfully applied for the determination of phenylurea herbicides in beetroot.

  12. Temporal and seasonal variation of atmospheric concentrations of currently used pesticides in Champagne in the centre of Reims from 2012 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiot, A.; Chrétien, E.; Drab-Sommesous, E.; Rivière, E.; Chakir, A.; Roth, E.

    2018-02-01

    For four years (2012-2015), pesticides were analyzed in atmospheric samples in the Centre of Reims (France). Among the analyzed substances, 28 have been quantified at least one time during the 4 sampling years. The annual cumulated pesticide concentrations were respectively 158.8, 38.5, 84.5 and 86.6 ng m-3 from 2012 to 2015, showing a great variability in the presence of pesticides in the atmosphere of the Centre of Reims. The top nine pesticides quantified in the atmosphere were cymoxanil, chlorothalonil and prosulfocarb reaching concentrations up to 13-14 ng m-3 and folpel, cyazofamid, fluazinam, pendimethalin, fenpropidin and spiroxamine reaching concentrations between 1 and 5 ng m-3. Among the nine predominant pesticides, seven of them were fungicides especially used against septoriose, mildew and oïdium occurring as well in vineyard and arable crops. Herbicides quantified were those which are used in arable crops. Insecticides especially carbaryl, chlorpyrifos ethyl and lindane were negligible in the atmosphere. The role of meteorological conditions in the development of diseases and the application rates of pesticide was related to the presence of pesticide in the atmosphere.

  13. Amphibians at risk? Susceptibility of terrestrial amphibian life stages to pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brühl, Carsten A; Pieper, Silvia; Weber, Brigitte

    2011-11-01

    Current pesticide risk assessment does not specifically consider amphibians. Amphibians in the aquatic environment (aquatic life stages or postmetamorphic aquatic amphibians) and terrestrial living juvenile or adult amphibians are assumed to be covered by the risk assessment for aquatic invertebrates and fish, or mammals and birds, respectively. This procedure has been evaluated as being sufficiently protective regarding the acute risk posed by a number of pesticides to aquatic amphibian life stages (eggs, larvae). However, it is unknown whether the exposure and sensitivity of terrestrial living amphibians are comparable to mammalian and avian exposure and sensitivity. We reviewed the literature on dermal pesticide absorption and toxicity studies for terrestrial life stages of amphibians, focusing on the dermal exposure pathway, that is, through treated soil or direct overspray. In vitro studies demonstrated that cutaneous absorption of chemicals is significant and that chemical percutaneous passage, P (cm/h), is higher in amphibians than in mammals. In vivo, the rapid and substantial uptake of the herbicide atrazine from treated soil by toads (Bufo americanus) has been described. Severe toxic effects on various amphibian species have been reported for field-relevant application rates of different pesticides. In general, exposure and toxicity studies for terrestrial amphibian life stages are scarce, and the reported data indicate the need for further research, especially in light of the global amphibian decline. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  14. Health assessment for FMC Pesticide Pit, Yakima, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD009039785. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-07

    The FMC Pesticide Pit (FMC) is on the National Priorities List. FMC, a former pesticide-formulation facility, disposed of wastes in an unlined pit area from 1952 to 1969. Preliminary on-site sampling results have identified pesticides and herbicides present in all soil. They include various organochlorines such as aldrin (1 to 110 ppm), benzene hydrochloride (BHC) (1 to 2,000 ppm), DDT (1 to 120,000), Ovex (1 to 19,000 ppm), and organophosphate compounds such as ethion (1 to 12,000), and ethyl parathion (1 to 16,000 ppm). In addition, carbamates were detected as carbaryl (1 to 1,800 ppm), and chromium (6 to 440 ppm) was also found. On-site ground water monitoring data demonstrated concentrations of BHC (0.04 to 0.09 ppb), DDT derivatives (0.02 to 9.9 ppb), endosulfan isomers (0.02 to 1.1 ppb), and derivatives (0.02 to 9.9 ppb), endosulfan isomers (0.02 to 1.1 ppb), and acetone (17 to 16,000 ppb). The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of exposure to contaminated ground water. However, there are other pesticide manufacturing plants in the area that probably contribute to the off-site ground water contamination.

  15. Multiresidue determination and potential risks of emerging pesticides in aquatic products from Northeast China by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lei; Lu, Xianbo; Tan, Jun; Wang, Longxing; Chen, Jiping

    2018-01-01

    A simple method for determining 33 pesticides with a wide polarity range (logK ow 0.6-4.5) in aquatic products was developed based on LC-MS/MS. The target analytes included three types of widely used pesticides: insecticides, fungicides and herbicides. Based on the optimization of ultrasonic assisted extraction and GPC clean-up procedures, the matrix effect, extraction recoveries and LOD were improved distinctively. LOQ of this method was below 0.5ng/g for all pesticides, which is superior to values in the literature, and the matrix effect was reduced effectively (-14.7% to 7.5%). The method was successfully applied to investigate the pesticide residue levels of twenty-five samples including seven common kinds of fishes from Northeast China. The results showed that all targeted pesticides were present in the fish samples; however, their levels were low, except for atrazine, linuron, ethoprophos, tetrachlorvinphos, acetochlor and fenthion. Atrazine and linuron caught our attention because the concentrations of atrazine in fish samples from Liaoning province were in the range of 0.5-8ng/g (w/w) with mean concentration of 2.3ng/g, which were far above those of other pesticides. The levels of linuron were in the range of 0.6-6ng/g (mean concentration 2.8ng/g), which were the highest among all targeted pesticides in the Inner Mongolia. This is the first systematic investigation on the characteristics and levels of these pesticides in aquatic products from northeast China. Considering their toxicity and bioaccumulation, the potential risk of atrazine and linuron from consuming aquatic products should be paid more attention. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Lower tier toxicity risk assessment of agriculture pesticides detected on the Río Madre de Dios watershed, Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Andrés, M; Rämö, R; Mena Torres, F; Ugalde, R; Grandas, L; Ruepert, C; Castillo, L E; Van den Brink, P J; Gunnarsson, J S

    2016-10-25

    Costa Rica is a tropical country with one of the highest biodiversity on Earth. It also has an intensive agriculture, and pesticide runoff from banana and pineapple plantations may cause a high toxicity risk to non-target species in rivers downstream the plantations. We performed a first tier risk assessment of the maximum measured concentrations of 32 pesticides detected over 4 years in the River Madre de Dios (RMD) and its coastal lagoon on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica. Species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) were plotted in order to derive HC5 values for each pesticide, i.e., hazard concentrations for 5 % of the species, often used as environmental criteria values in other countries. We also carried out toxicity tests for selected pesticides with native Costa Rican species in order to calculate risk coefficients according to national guidelines in Costa Rica. The concentrations of herbicides diuron and ametryn and insecticides carbofuran, diazinon, and ethoprophos exceeded either the HC5 value or the lower limit of its 90 % confidence interval suggesting toxic risks above accepted levels. Risk coefficients of diuron and carbofuran derived using local guidelines indicate toxicity risks as well. The assessed fungicides did not present acute toxic risks according to our analysis. Overall, these results show a possible toxicity of detected pesticides to aquatic organisms and provide a comparison of Costa Rican national guidelines with more refined methods for risk assessment based on SSDs. Further higher tier risk assessments of pesticides in this watershed are also necessary in order to consider pesticide water concentrations over time, toxicity from pesticide mixtures, and eventual effects on ecosystem functions.

  17. Modeling water infiltration and pesticides transport in unsaturated zone of a sedimentary aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoli, Pauline; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Baran, Nicole; Lassabatère, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater quality monitoring has become an important environmental, economic and community issue since increasing needs drinking water at the same time with high anthropic pressure on aquifers. Leaching of various contaminants as pesticide into the groundwater is closely bound to water infiltration in the unsaturated zone which whom solute transport can occur. Knowledge's about mechanisms involved in the transfer of pesticides in the deep unsaturated zone are lacking today. This study aims to evaluate and to model leaching of pesticides and metabolites in the unsaturated zone, very heterogeneous, of a fluvio-glacial aquifer, in the South-East of France, where contamination of groundwater resources by pesticides is frequently observed as a consequence of intensive agricultural activities. Water flow and pesticide transport were evaluated from column tests under unsaturated conditions and from adsorption batch experiments onto the predominant lithofacies collected, composed of a mixture of sand and gravel. A maize herbicide, S-metolachlor, applied on the study site and worldwide and its two major degradation products (metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid and metolachlor oxanilic acid) were studied here. A conservative tracer, bromide ion, was used to determine water dispersive parameters of porous media. Elution curves were obtained from pesticide concentrations analyzed by an ultra-performance liquid chromatography system interfaced to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and from bromide concentrations measured by ionic chromatography system. Experimental data were implemented into Hydrus to model flow and solute transfer through a 1D profile in the vadose zone. Nonequilibrium solute transport model based on dual-porosity model with mobile and immobile water is fitting correctly elution curves. Water dispersive parameters show flow pattern realized in the mobile phase. Exchanges between mobile and immobile water are very limited. Because of low adsorptions onto

  18. Pesticide impact study in the peri-urban horticultural area of Gran La Plata, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Loughlin, Tomás M; Peluso, Leticia; Marino, Damián J G

    2017-11-15

    Vegetable production systems are characterized by intense pesticide use, yet the effects on the surrounding environment are largely unknown and need to be studied. Given this knowledge gap, the objective of this work is to determine the impact of horticulture on a representative watercourse by conducting an integrated study of the occurrence and concentration of pesticides in bottom sediments and their relation to lethal and sublethal effects on benthic fauna. Two sampling campaigns were conducted during seasons of low and high pesticide application in five sites along the Carnaval creek, located in the peri-urban area of La Plata City (Buenos Aires, Argentina). The samples were tested for 36 pesticide compounds by GC-MS and LC-MS, and whole-sediment laboratory toxicity tests were performed using the native amphipod Hyalella curvispina. The results showed a general but variable distribution in the concentrations detected along the stream. For each sampling campaign (first/second), the total pesticide loads, measured as the sum of herbicides, insecticides and fungicides, were 1080/2329, 3715/88, and 367/5ngg(-1) dw, respectively. Lethal and sublethal effects were observed in both sampling campaigns. In order to correlate both sets of results, data were assessed by multivariate analysis, including principal component analysis. The observed toxicity was considered to be mainly due to insecticides; thus, horticultural practices have an impact on nearby watercourses and can potentially endanger the benthic fauna. This is the first study in Argentina to assess the impact of pesticides on aquatic environments close to horticultural production areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of pesticides used in banana and pineapple plantations on aquatic ecosystems in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diepens, Noël J; Pfennig, Sascha; Van den Brink, Paul J; Gunnarsson, Jonas S; Ruepert, Clemens; Castillo, Luisa E

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge on fate and effect of agricultural pesticides comes is mainly from temperate ecosystems. More studies are needed in tropical systems in order to assess contamination risks to nontarget endemic tropical species from the extensive use of pesticides e.g. in banana and pineapple plantations. In this study, acute laboratory toxicity tests with organophosphate pesticides ethoprophos and chlorpyrifos were conducted on two Costa Rican species, cladoceran Daphnia ambigua and fish Parachromis dovii. Tests showed that chlorpyrifos was more toxic than ethoprophos to D. ambigua and P. dovii and that D. ambigua was also more sensitive than P. dovii to both pesticides. Additionally, bioassays were performed by exposing D. magna and P. dovii to contaminated water collected from the field. Chemical analyses of field water revealed that fungicides were generally the most frequent pesticide group found, followed by insecticides/nematicides and herbicides. The bioassays and values obtained from the literature confirmed that D. magna was more sensitive to pesticide contamination than P. dovii and that D. ambigua was more sensitive than D. magna, suggesting that the native cladoceran is a more suitable test species than its temperate counterpart. Species sensitivity distributions showed no significant difference in sensitivity between tropical and temperate fish and the arthropod species exposed to chlorpyrifos in this study. Choline esterase activity (ChE) was measured in P. dovii in laboratory tests in order to assess the applicability of this biomarker. ChE inhibition in P. dovii was observed in the laboratory at levels below the LC10 of both ethoprophos and chlorpyrifos, confirming that ChE is an efficient biomarker of exposure. Both indigenous Costa Rican species used in this study were found to be suitable standard tropical test species. Further studies are needed to investigate how protective the safe environmental concentrations, derived from LC50 of native

  20. Passive exposure to agricultural pesticides and risk of childhood leukemia in an Italian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagoli, Carlotta; Costanzini, Sofia; Heck, Julia E; Malavolti, Marcella; De Girolamo, Gianfranco; Oleari, Paola; Palazzi, Giovanni; Teggi, Sergio; Vinceti, Marco

    2016-11-01

    Exposure to pesticides has been suggested as a risk factor for childhood leukemia, but definitive evidence on this relation and the specific pesticides involved is still not clear. We carried out a population-based case-control study in a Northern Italy community to assess the possible relation between passive exposure to agricultural pesticides and risk of acute childhood leukemia. We assessed passive pesticide exposure of 111 childhood leukemia cases and 444 matched controls by determining density and type of agricultural land use within a 100-m radius buffer around children's homes. We focused on four common crop types, arable, orchard, vineyard and vegetable, characterized by the use of specific pesticides that are potentially involved in childhood induced leukemia. The use of these pesticides was validated within the present study. We computed the odds ratios (OR) of the disease and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) according to type and density of crops around the children's homes, also taking into account traffic pollution and high-voltage power line magnetic field exposure. Childhood leukemia risk did not increase in relation with any of the crop types with the exception of arable crops, characterized by the use of 2.4-D, MCPA, glyphosate, dicamba, triazine and cypermethrin. The very few children (n=11) residing close to arable crops had an OR for childhood leukemia of 2.04 (95% CI 0.50-8.35), and such excess risk was further enhanced among children aged <5 years. Despite the null association with most crop types and the statistical imprecision of the estimates, the increased leukemia risk among children residing close to arable crops indicates the need to further investigate the involvement in disease etiology of passive exposure to herbicides and pyrethroids, though such exposure is unlikely to play a role in the vast majority of cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.