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  1. Fanconi anemia patients are more susceptible to infection with tumor virus SV40.

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    Manola Comar

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is a recessive DNA repair disease characterized by a high predisposition to developing neoplasms. DNA tumor polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40 transforms FA fibroblasts at high efficiency suggesting that FA patients could be highly susceptible to SV40 infection. To test this hypothesis, the large tumor (LT antigen of SV40, BKV, JCV and Merkel Cell (MC polyomaviruses were tested in blood samples from 89 FA patients and from 82 of their parents. Two control groups consisting of 47 no-FA patients affected by other genetic bone marrow failure diseases and 91 healthy subjects were also evaluated. Although JCV, BKV and MC were not found in any of the FA samples, the prevalence and viral load of SV40 were higher in FA patients (25%; mean viral load: 1.1×10(2 copies/10(5cells as compared with healthy individuals (4.3%; mean viral load: 0.8×10(1 copies/10(5cells and genetic controls (0% (p<0.005. A marked age-dependent frequency of SV40 was found in FA with respect to healthy subjects suggesting that, although acquired early in life, the virus can widespread more easily in specific groups of population. From the analysis of family pedigrees, 60% of the parents of SV40-positive probands were positive for the virus compared to 2% of the parents of the SV40-negative probands (p<0.005. It is worthy of note that the relative frequency of SV40-positive relatives detected in this study was the highest ever reported, showing that asymptomatic FA carriers are also more susceptible to SV40. In conclusion, we favor the hypothesis that SV40 spread could be facilitated by individuals who are genetically more susceptible to infection, such as FA patients. The increased susceptibility to SV40 infection seems to be associated with a specific defect of the immune system which supports a potential interplay of SV40 with an underlying genetic alteration that increases the risk of malignancies.

  2. Transformation of SV40-immortalized human uroepithelial cells by 3-methylcholanthrene increases IFN- and Large T Antigen-induced transcripts

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    Easton Marilyn J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simian Virus 40 (SV40 immortalization followed by treatment of cells with 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC has been used to elicit tumors in athymic mice. 3-MC carcinogenesis has been thoroughly studied, however gene-level interactions between 3-MC and SV40 that could have produced the observed tumors have not been explored. The commercially-available human uroepithelial cell lines were either SV40-immortalized (HUC or SV40-immortalized and then 3-MC-transformed (HUC-TC. Results To characterize the SV40 - 3MC interaction, we compared human gene expression in these cell lines using a human cancer array and confirmed selected changes by RT-PCR. Many viral Large T Antigen (Tag expression-related changes occurred in HUC-TC, and it is concluded that SV40 and 3-MC may act synergistically to transform cells. Changes noted in IFP 9-27, 2'-5' OAS, IF 56, MxA and MxAB were typical of those that occur in response to viral exposure and are part of the innate immune response. Because interferon is crucial to innate immune host defenses and many gene changes were interferon-related, we explored cellular growth responses to exogenous IFN-γ and found that treatment impeded growth in tumor, but not immortalized HUC on days 4 - 7. Cellular metabolism however, was inhibited in both cell types. We conclude that IFN-γ metabolic responses were functional in both cell lines, but IFN-γ anti-proliferative responses functioned only in tumor cells. Conclusions Synergism of SV40 with 3-MC or other environmental carcinogens may be of concern as SV40 is now endemic in 2-5.9% of the U.S. population. In addition, SV40-immortalization is a generally-accepted method used in many research materials, but the possibility of off-target effects in studies carried out using these cells has not been considered. We hope that our work will stimulate further study of this important phenomenon.

  3. SV40 Infection of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells From Wharton's Jelly Drives the Production of Inflammatory and Tumoral Mediators.

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    Cason, Carolina; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Zanotta, Nunzia; Valencic, Erica; Delbue, Serena; Bella, Ramona; Comar, Manola

    2017-11-01

    The Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from umbilical cord Wharton's jelly (WJSCs) are a source of cells with high potentiality for the treatment of human immunological disorders. Footprints of the oncogenic viruses Simian Virus 40 (SV40) and JC Virus (JCPyV) have been recently detected in human WJSCs specimens. The aim of this study is to evaluate if WJSCs can be efficiently infected by these Polyomaviruses and if they can potentially exert tumoral activity. Cell culture experiments indicated that WJSCs could sustain both SV40 and JCPyV infections. A transient and lytic replication was observed for JCPyV, while SV40 persistently infected WJSCs over a long period of time, releasing a viral progeny at low titer without evident cytopathic effect (CPE). Considering the association between SV40 and human tumors and the reported ability of the oncogenic viruses to drive the host innate immune response to cell transformation, the expression profile of a large panel of immune mediators was evaluated in supernatants by the Bioplex platform. RANTES, IL-3, MIG, and IL-12p40, involved in chronic inflammation, cells differentiation, and transformation, were constantly measured at high concentration comparing to control. These findings represent a new aspect of SV40 biological activity in the humans, highlighting its interaction with specific host cellular pathways. In view of these results, it seems to be increasingly urgent to consider Polyomaviruses in the management of WJSCs for their safely use as promising therapeutic source. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 3060-3066, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. SV40 large T-p53 complex: evidence for the presence of two immunologically distinct forms of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milner, J.; Gamble, J.

    1985-01-01

    The transforming protein of SV40 is the large T antigen. Large T binds a cellular protein, p53, which is potentially oncogenic by virtue of its functional involvement in the control of cell proliferation. This raises the possibility that p53 may mediate, in part, the transforming function of SV40 large T. Two immunologically distinct forms of p53 have been identified in normal cells: the forms are cell-cycle dependent, one being restricted to nondividing cells (p53-Go) and the second to dividing cells (p53-G divided by). The authors have now dissociated and probed the multimeric complex of SV40 large T-p53 for the presence of immunologically distinct forms of p53. Here they present evidence for the presence of p53-Go and p53-G divided by complexed with SV40 large T

  5. Specific Antibodies Reacting with SV40 Large T Antigen Mimotopes in Serum Samples of Healthy Subjects.

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    Mauro Tognon

    Full Text Available Simian Virus 40, experimentally assayed in vitro in different animal and human cells and in vivo in rodents, was classified as a small DNA tumor virus. In previous studies, many groups identified Simian Virus 40 sequences in healthy individuals and cancer patients using PCR techniques, whereas others failed to detect the viral sequences in human specimens. These conflicting results prompted us to develop a novel indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides, mimicking Simian Virus 40 capsid viral protein antigens, named mimotopes. This immunologic assay allowed us to investigate the presence of serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 and to verify whether Simian Virus 40 is circulating in humans. In this investigation two mimotopes from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen, the viral replication protein and oncoprotein, were employed to analyze for specific reactions to human sera antibodies. This indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen was used to assay a new collection of serum samples from healthy subjects. This novel assay revealed that serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 large T antigen mimotopes are detectable, at low titer, in healthy subjects aged from 18-65 years old. The overall prevalence of reactivity with the two Simian Virus 40 large T antigen peptides was 20%. This new ELISA with two mimotopes of the early viral regions is able to detect in a specific manner Simian Virus 40 large T antigen-antibody responses.

  6. Bigh3 silencing increases retinoblastoma tumor growth in the murine SV40-TAg-Rb model.

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    Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Oberson, Anne; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2017-02-28

    BIGH3, a secreted protein of the extracellular matrix interacts with collagen and integrins on the cell surface. BIGH3 can have opposing functions in cancer, acting either as tumor suppressor or promoter by enhancing tumor progression and angiogenesis. In the eye, BIGH3 is expressed in the cornea and the retinal pigment epithelium and could impact on the development of retinoblastoma, the most common paediatric intraocular neoplasm. Retinoblastoma initiation requires the inactivation of both alleles of the RB1 tumor suppressor gene in the developing retina and tumor progression involves additional genomic changes. To determine whether BIGH3 affects retinoblastoma development, we generated a retinoblastoma mouse model with disruption of the Bigh3 genomic locus. Bigh3 silencing in these mice resulted in enhanced tumor development in the retina. A decrease in apoptosis is involved in the initial events of tumorigenesis, followed by an increased activity of the pro-survival ERK pathway as well as an upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Taken together, these data suggest that BIGH3 acts as a tumor suppressor in the retina.

  7. Effects of mutations within the SV40 large T antigen ATPase/p53 binding domain on viral replication and transformation.

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    Peden, K W; Srinivasan, A; Vartikar, J V; Pipas, J M

    1998-01-01

    The simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen is a 708 amino-acid protein possessing multiple biochemical activities that play distinct roles in productive infection or virus-induced cell transformation. The carboxy-terminal portion of T antigen includes a domain that carries the nucleotide binding and ATPase activities of the protein, as well as sequences required for T antigen to associate with the cellular tumor suppressor p53. Consequently this domain functions both in viral DNA replication and cellular transformation. We have generated a collection of SV40 mutants with amino-acid deletions, insertions or substitutions in specific domains of the protein. Here we report the properties of nine mutants with single or multiple substitutions between amino acids 402 and 430, a region thought to be important for both the p53 binding and ATPase functions. The mutants were examined for the ability to produce infectious progeny virions, replicate viral DNA in vivo, perform in trans complementation tests, and transform established cell lines. Two of the mutants exhibited a wild-type phenotype in all these tests. The remaining seven mutants were defective for plaque formation and viral DNA replication, but in each case these defects could be complemented by a wild-type T antigen supplied in trans. One of these replication-defective mutants efficiently transformed the REF52 and C3H10T1/2 cell lines as assessed by the dense-focus assay. The remaining six mutants were defective for transforming REF52 cells and transformed the C3H10T1/2 line with a reduced efficiency. The ability of mutant T antigen to transform REF52 cells correlated with their ability to induce increased levels of p53.

  8. Defective repair of UV-damaged DNA in human tumor and SV40-transformed human cells but not in adenovirus-transformed human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The DNA repair capacities of five human tumor cell lines, one SV40-transformed human cell line and one adenovirus-transformed human cell line were compared with that of normal human fibroblasts using a sensitive host cell reactivation (HCR) technique. Unirradiated and UV-irradiated suspensions of adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) were assayed for their ability to form viral structural antigens (Vag) in the various cell types using immunofluorescent staining. The survival of Vag formation for UV-irradiated Ad 2 was significantly reduced in all the human tumor cell lines and the SV40-transformed human line compared to the normal human fibroblasts, but was apparently normal in the adenovirus-transformed human cells. D 0 values for the UV survival of Ad 2 Vag synthesis in the tumor and virally transformed lines expressed as a percentage of that obtained on normal fibroblast strains were used as a measure of DNA repair capacity. Percent HCR values ranged from 26 to 53% in the tumor cells. These results indicate a deficiency in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage associated with human tumorigenesis and the transformation of human cells by SV40 but not the transformation of human cells by adenovirus. (author)

  9. Immortalization and Characterization of Porcine Macrophages That Had Been Transduced with Lentiviral Vectors Encoding the SV40 Large T Antigen and Porcine Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase

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    Takato Takenouchi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The domestic pig is an important agricultural animal, and thus, infectious diseases that affect pigs can cause severe economic losses in the global swine industry. Various porcine pathogens target macrophages, which are classical innate immune cells. Although macrophages basically protect the host from pathogens, they also seem to contribute to infectious processes. Therefore, cultured macrophages can be used to develop in vitro models for studying not only genes associated with porcine innate immunity but also the infectious processes of porcine pathogens. However, the availability of porcine macrophage cell lines is limited. In this study, we describe a novel immortalized porcine kidney-derived macrophage (IPKM cell line, which was generated by transferring the SV40 large T antigen (SV40LT and porcine telomerase reverse transcriptase (pTERT genes into primary porcine kidney-derived macrophages using lentiviral vectors. The IPKM displayed a typical macrophage morphology and was routinely passaged (doubling time: about 4 days. These cells were immunostained for macrophage markers. In addition, they exhibited substantial phagocytosis of polystyrene microbeads and released inflammatory cytokines upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation. Furthermore, the maturation and secretion of interleukin-1β were observed after nigericin-induced inflammasome activation in LPS-primed IPKM. These findings suggest that IPKM exhibit the typical inflammatory characteristics of macrophages. By transferring the SV40LT and pTERT genes using lentiviral vectors, we also successfully immortalized macrophages derived from the peripheral blood of a low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient pig. These results suggest that the co-expression of SV40LT and pTERT is an effective way of immortalizing porcine macrophages.

  10. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    With the aim of forming the ‘lock-washer’ conformation of the origin-binding domain of SV40 large T antigen in solution, using structure-based analysis an intermolecular disulfide bridge was engineered into the origin-binding domain to generate higher order oligomers in solution. The 1.7 Å resolution structure shows that the mutant forms a spiral in the crystal and has the de novo disulfide bond at the protein interface, although structural rearrangements at the interface are observed relative to the wild type. The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS–PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner

  11. Biological activity of SV40 DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis deals with a study on the biological activity of SV40 DNA. The transforming activity of SV40 DNA and DNA fragments is investigated in order to define as precisely as possible the area of the viral genome that is involved in the transformation. The infectivity of SV40 DNA is used to study the defective repair mechanisms of radiation damages of human xeroderma pigmentosum cells. (C.F.)

  12. Comparative transcriptome profiling of an SV40-transformed human fibroblast (MRC5CVI) and its untransformed counterpart (MRC-5) in response to UVB irradiation.

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    Chang, Cheng-Wei; Chen, Chaang-Ray; Huang, Chao-Ying; Shu, Wun-Yi; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Hong, Ji-Hong; Hsu, Ian C

    2013-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) transforms cells through the suppression of tumor-suppressive responses by large T and small t antigens; studies on the effects of these two oncoproteins have greatly improved our knowledge of tumorigenesis. Large T antigen promotes cellular transformation by binding and inactivating p53 and pRb tumor suppressor proteins. Previous studies have shown that not all of the tumor-suppressive responses were inactivated in SV40-transformed cells; however, the underlying cause is not fully studied. In this study, we investigated the UVB-responsive transcriptome of an SV40-transformed fibroblast (MRC5CVI) and that of its untransformed counterpart (MRC-5). We found that, in response to UVB irradiation, MRC-5 and MRC5CVI commonly up-regulated the expression of oxidative phosphorylation genes. MRC-5 up-regulated the expressions of chromosome condensation, DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic genes, but MRC5CVI did not. Further cell death assays indicated that MRC5CVI was more sensitive than MRC-5 to UVB-induced cell death with increased caspase-3 activation; combining with the transcriptomic results suggested that MRC5CVI may undergo UVB-induced cell death through mechanisms other than transcriptional regulation. Our study provides a further understanding of the effects of SV40 transformation on cellular stress responses, and emphasizes the value of SV40-transformed cells in the researches of sensitizing neoplastic cells to radiations.

  13. Immortalization of Human Fetal Hepatocyte by Ectopic Expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Human Papilloma Virus (E7) and Simian Virus 40 Large T (SV40 T) Antigen Towards Bioartificial Liver Support.

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    Giri, Shibashish; Bader, Augustinus

    2014-09-01

    Generation of genetically stable and non-tumoric immortalization cell line from primary cells would be enormously useful for research and therapeutic purposes, but progress towards this goal has so far been limited. It is now universal acceptance that immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes based on recent advances of telomerase biology and oncogene, lead to unlimited population doubling could be the possible source for bioartificial liver device. Immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes cell line by ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), human papilloma virus gene (E7) and simian virus 40 large T (SV40 T) antigens is main goal of present study. We used an inducible system containing human telomerase and E7, both of which are cloned into responder constructs controlled by doxycycline transactivator. We characterized the immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells by analysis of green fluorescent cells (GFP) positive cells using flow cytometry (FACs) cell sorting and morphology, proliferative rate and antigen expression by immunohistochemical analysis. In addition to we analysized lactate formation, glucose consumption, albumin secretion and urea production of immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells. After 25 attempts for transfection of adult primary hepatocytes by human telomerase and E7 to immortalize them, none of the transfection systems resulted in the production of a stable, proliferating cell line. Although the transfection efficiency was more than 70% on the first day, the vast majority of the transfected hepatocytes lost their signal within the first 5-7 days. The remaining transfected hepatocytes persisted for 2-4 weeks and divided one or two times without forming a clone. After 10 attempts of transfection human fetal hepatocytes using the same transfection system, we obtained one stable human fetal hepatocytes cell line which was able albumin secretion urea production and glucose consumption. We established a

  14. Generation of a Vero-Based Packaging Cell Line to Produce SV40 Gene Delivery Vectors for Use in Clinical Gene Therapy Studies

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    Miguel G. Toscano

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Replication-defective (RD recombinant simian virus 40 (SV40-based gene delivery vectors hold a great potential for clinical applications because of their presumed non-immunogenicity and capacity to induce immune tolerance to the transgene products in humans. However, the clinical use of SV40 vectors has been hampered by the lack of a packaging cell line that produces replication-competent (RC free SV40 particles in the vector production process. To solve this problem, we have adapted the current SV40 vector genome used for the production of vector particles and generated a novel Vero-based packaging cell line named SuperVero that exclusively expresses the SV40 large T antigen. SuperVero cells produce similar numbers of SV40 vector particles compared to the currently used packaging cell lines, albeit in the absence of contaminating RC SV40 particles. Our unique SV40 vector platform named SVac paves the way to clinically test a whole new generation of SV40-based therapeutics for a broad range of important diseases.

  15. Transgenic Mouse Models of SV40-Induced Cancer.

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    Hudson, Amanda L; Colvin, Emily K

    2016-01-01

    The SV40 viral oncogene has been used since the 1970s as a reliable and reproducible method to generate transgenic mouse models. This seminal discovery has taught us an immense amount about how tumorigenesis occurs, and its success has led to the evolution of many mouse models of cancer. Despite the development of more modern and targeted approaches for developing genetically engineered mouse models of cancer, SV40-induced mouse models still remain frequently used today. This review discusses a number of cancer types in which SV40 mouse models of cancer have been developed and highlights their relevance and importance to preclinical research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. SV40 late protein VP4 forms toroidal pores to disrupt membranes for viral release.

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    Raghava, Smita; Giorda, Kristina M; Romano, Fabian B; Heuck, Alejandro P; Hebert, Daniel N

    2013-06-04

    Nonenveloped viruses are generally released from the cell by the timely lysis of host cell membranes. SV40 has been used as a model virus for the study of the lytic nonenveloped virus life cycle. The expression of SV40 VP4 at later times during infection is concomitant with cell lysis. To investigate the role of VP4 in viral release and its mechanism of action, VP4 was expressed and purified from bacteria as a fusion protein for use in membrane disruption assays. Purified VP4 perforated membranes as demonstrated by the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. Dynamic light scattering results revealed that VP4 treatment did not cause membrane lysis or change the size of the liposomes. Liposomes encapsulated with 4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-3-indacene-labeled streptavidin were used to show that VP4 formed stable pores in membranes. These VP4 pores had an inner diameter of 1-5 nm. Asymmetrical liposomes containing pyrene-labeled lipids in the outer monolayer were employed to monitor transbilayer lipid diffusion. Consistent with VP4 forming toroidal pore structures in membranes, VP4 induced transbilayer lipid diffusion or lipid flip-flop. Altogether, these studies support a central role for VP4 acting as a viroporin in the disruption of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release by forming toroidal pores that unite the outer and inner leaflets of membrane bilayers.

  17. SV40 Assembly In Vivo and In Vitro

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    Ariella Oppenheim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Simian virus 40 (SV40 capsid is a T = 7d icosahedral lattice ∼45 nm in diameter surrounding the ∼5 kb circular minichromosome. The outer shell is composed of 360 monomers of the major capsid protein VP1, tightly bound in 72 pentamers. VP1 is a jellyroll β-barrel, with extending N- and C-terminal arms. The N-terminal arms bind DNA and face the interior of the capsid. The flexible C-arms tie together the 72 pentamers in three distinct kinds of interactions, thus facilitating the formation of a T = 7 icosahedron from identical pentameric building blocks. Assembly in vivo was shown to occur by addition of capsomers around the DNA. We apply a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches to study SV40 assembly. Our in vivo and in vitro studies suggest the following model: one or two capsomers bind at a high affinity to ses, the viral DNA encapsidation signal, forming the nucleation centre for assembly. Next, multiple capsomers attach concomitantly, at lower affinity, around the minichromosome. This increases their local concentration facilitating rapid, cooperative assembly reaction. Formation of the icosahedron proceeds either by gradual addition of single pentamers to the growing shell or by concerted assembly of pentamer clusters.

  18. Polio vaccines, SV40 and human tumours, an update on false positive and false negative results.

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    Elmishad, A G; Bocchetta, M; Pass, H I; Carbone, M

    2006-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) has been detected in different human tumours in numerous laboratories. The detection of SV40 in human tumours has been linked to the administration of SV40-contaminated polio vaccines from 1954 until 1963. Many of these reports linked SV40 to human mesothelioma. Some studies have failed to detect SV40 in human tumours and this has caused a controversy. Here we review the current literature. Moreover, we present evidence showing how differences in the sensitivities of methodologies can lead to a very different interpretation of the same study. The same 20 mesothelioma specimens all tested negative, 2/20 tested positive or 7/20 tested positive for SV40 Tag by simply changing the detection method on the same immuno-precipitation/western blot membranes. These results provide a simple explanation for some of the apparent discordant results reported in the literature.

  19. An investigation of the occurrence of sv40 antibodies in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four of the samples were from the healthy population group and the remaining 1 (1/64) was from the patient group. An SV40 antibody-blocking assay and a Western blot were used as additional confirmation for the SV40 antibodies, whereas the Western blot assay developed a single common band on all 5 samples.

  20. The SV40 late protein VP4 is a viroporin that forms pores to disrupt membranes for viral release.

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    Smita Raghava

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonenveloped viruses are generally released by the timely lysis of the host cell by a poorly understood process. For the nonenveloped virus SV40, virions assemble in the nucleus and then must be released from the host cell without being encapsulated by cellular membranes. This process appears to involve the well-controlled insertion of viral proteins into host cellular membranes rendering them permeable to large molecules. VP4 is a newly identified SV40 gene product that is expressed at late times during the viral life cycle that corresponds to the time of cell lysis. To investigate the role of this late expressed protein in viral release, water-soluble VP4 was expressed and purified as a GST fusion protein from bacteria. Purified VP4 was found to efficiently bind biological membranes and support their disruption. VP4 perforated membranes by directly interacting with the membrane bilayer as demonstrated by flotation assays and the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated into large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. The central hydrophobic domain of VP4 was essential for membrane binding and disruption. VP4 displayed a preference for membranes comprised of lipids that replicated the composition of the plasma membranes over that of nuclear membranes. Phosphatidylethanolamine, a lipid found at high levels in bacterial membranes, was inhibitory against the membrane perforation activity of VP4. The disruption of membranes by VP4 involved the formation of pores of ∼3 nm inner diameter in mammalian cells including permissive SV40 host cells. Altogether, these results support a central role of VP4 acting as a viroporin in the perforation of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release.

  1. SV40 T antigen alone drives karyotype instability that precedes neoplastic transformation of human diploid fibroblasts.

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    Ray, F A; Peabody, D S; Cooper, J L; Cram, L S; Kraemer, P M

    1990-01-01

    To define the role of SV40 large T antigen in the transformation and immortalization of human cells, we have constructed a plasmid lacking most of the unique coding sequences of small t antigen as well as the SV40 origin of replication. The promoter for T antigen, which lies within the origin of replication, was deleted and replaced by the Rous sarcoma virus promoter. This minimal construct was co-electroporated into normal human fibroblasts of neonatal origin along with a plasmid containing the neomycin resistance gene (neo). Three G418-resistant, T antigen-positive clones were expanded and compared to three T antigen-positive clones that received the pSV3neo plasmid (capable of expressing large and small T proteins and having two origins of replication). Autonomous replication of plasmid DNA was observed in all three clones that received pSV3neo but not in any of the three origin minus clones. Immediately after clonal expansion, several parameters of neoplastic transformation were assayed. Low percentages of cells in T antigen-positive populations were anchorage independent or capable of forming colonies in 1% fetal bovine serum. The T antigen-positive clones generally exhibited an extended lifespan in culture but rarely became immortalized. Large numbers of dead cells were continually generated in all T antigen-positive, pre-crisis populations. Ninety-nine percent of all T antigen-positive cells had numerical or structural chromosome aberrations. Control cells that received the neo gene did not have an extended life span, did not have noticeable numbers of dead cells, and did not exhibit karyotype instability. We suggest that the role of T antigen protein in the transformation process is to generate genetic hypervariability, leading to various consequences including neoplastic transformation and cell death.

  2. The Influence of SV40 polyA on Gene Expression of Baculovirus Expression Vector Systems.

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    Salem, Tamer Z; Seaborn, Craig P; Turney, Colin M; Xue, Jianli; Shang, Hui; Cheng, Xiao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The simian virus 40 polyadenylation signal (SV40 polyA) has been routinely inserted downstream of the polyhedrin promoter in many baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS). In the baculovirus prototype Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), the polyhedrin promoter (very late promoter) transcribes its gene by a viral RNA polymerase therefore there is no supporting evidence that SV40 polyA is required for the proper gene expression under the polyhedrin promoter. Moreover, the effect of the SV40 polyA sequence on the polyhedrin promoter activity has not been tested either at its natural polyhedrin locus or in other loci in the viral genome. In order to test the significance of adding the SV40 polyA sequence on gene expression, the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) was evaluated with and without the presence of SV40 polyA under the control of the polyhedrin promoter at different genomic loci (polyherin, ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt), and gp37). In this study, spectrofluorometry and western blot showed reduction of EGFP protein for all recombinant viruses with SV40 polyA, whereas qPCR showed an increase in the egfp mRNA levels. Therefore, we conclude that SV40 polyA increases mRNA levels but decreases protein production in the BEVS when the polyhedrin promoter is used at different loci. This work suggests that SV40 polyA in BEVSs should be replaced by an AcMNPV late gene polyA for optimal protein production or left untouched for optimal RNA production (RNA interference applications).

  3. STX140, but not paclitaxel, inhibits mammary tumour initiation and progression in C3(1/SV40 T/t-antigen transgenic mice.

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    Florence Meyer-Losic

    Full Text Available Despite paclitxael's clinical success, treating hormone-refractory breast cancer remains challenging. Paclitaxel has a poor pharmacological profile, characterized by a low therapeutic index (TIX caused by severe dose limiting toxicities, such as neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy. Consequently, new drugs are urgently required. STX140, a compound previously shown to have excellent efficacy against many tumors, is here compared to paclitaxel in three translational in vivo breast cancer models, a rat model of peripheral neuropathy, and through pharmacological testing. Three different in vivo mouse models of breast cancer were used; the metastatic 4T1 orthotopic model, the C3(1/SV40 T-Ag model, and the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. To determine TIX and pharmacological profile of STX140, a comprehensive dosing regime was performed in mice bearing MDA-MD-231 xenografts. Finally, peripheral neuropathy was examined using a rat plantar thermal hyperalgesia model. In the 4T1 metastatic model, STX140 and paclitaxel significantly inhibited primary tumor growth and lung metastases. All C3(1/SV40 T-Ag mice in the control and paclitaxel treated groups developed palpable mammary cancer. STX140 blocked 47% of tumors developing and significantly inhibited growth of tumors that did develop. STX140 treatment caused a significant (P<0.001 survival advantage for animals in early and late intervention groups. Conversely, in C3(1/SV40 T-Ag mice, paclitaxel failed to inhibit tumor growth and did not increase survival time. Furthermore, paclitaxel, but not STX140, induced significant peripheral neuropathy and neutropenia. These results show that STX140 has a greater anti-cancer efficacy, TIX, and reduced neurotoxicity compared to paclitaxel in C3(1/SV40 T-Ag mice and therefore may be of significant benefit to patients with breast cancer.

  4. Effect of caffeine on the ultraviolet light induction of SV40 virus from transformed hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamansky, G.B.; Kleinman, L.F.; Little, J.B.; Black, P.H.; Kaplan, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of caffeine on the uv light induction of SV40 virus from two transformed hamster cell lines heterogeneous for the induction of infectious virus was studied. The amount of virus induced was significantly increased in both cell lines when exposure to uv light was followed by treatment with caffeine. Caffeine in the absence of uv irradiation did not stimulate virus induction, nor did it stimulate SV40 replication in a lytic infection. There was an apparent difference in the concentrations of caffeine which maximally stimulated SV40 virus induction in the two cell lines. This effect could not be explained by differences in cell survival after exposure to uv light and caffeine. Since caffeine is known to cause the accumulation of gaps formed in DNA during postreplication repair of uv-irradiated rodent cells, our results support the hypothesis that the formation of gaps or breaks in DNA is an important early step in virus induction

  5. ATM and ATR Activities Maintain Replication Fork Integrity during SV40 Chromatin Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowd, Gregory A.; Li, Nancy Yan; Fanning, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Mutation of DNA damage checkpoint signaling kinases ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) or ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) results in genomic instability disorders. However, it is not well understood how the instability observed in these syndromes relates to DNA replication/repair defects and failed checkpoint control of cell cycling. As a simple model to address this question, we have studied SV40 chromatin replication in infected cells in the presence of inhibitors of ATM and ATR activities. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and southern blotting of SV40 chromatin replication products reveal that ATM activity prevents accumulation of unidirectional replication products, implying that ATM promotes repair of replication-associated double strand breaks. ATR activity alleviates breakage of a functional fork as it converges with a stalled fork. The results suggest that during SV40 chromatin replication, endogenous replication stress activates ATM and ATR signaling, orchestrating the assembly of genome maintenance machinery on viral replication intermediates. PMID:23592994

  6. The crystal structure of the SV40 T-antigen origin binding domain in complex with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Moine, Stephanie; Bochkareva, Elena; Bochkarev, Alexey; Bullock, Peter A; Bohm, Andrew

    2007-02-01

    DNA replication is initiated upon binding of "initiators" to origins of replication. In simian virus 40 (SV40), the core origin contains four pentanucleotide binding sites organized as pairs of inverted repeats. Here we describe the crystal structures of the origin binding domain (obd) of the SV40 large T-antigen (T-ag) both with and without a subfragment of origin-containing DNA. In the co-structure, two T-ag obds are oriented in a head-to-head fashion on the same face of the DNA, and each T-ag obd engages the major groove. Although the obds are very close to each other when bound to this DNA target, they do not contact one another. These data provide a high-resolution structural model that explains site-specific binding to the origin and suggests how these interactions help direct the oligomerization events that culminate in assembly of the helicase-active dodecameric complex of T-ag.

  7. Receptor concentration and diffusivity control multivalent binding of Sv40 to membrane bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliwia M Szklarczyk

    Full Text Available Incoming Simian Virus 40 particles bind to their cellular receptor, the glycolipid GM1, in the plasma membrane and thereby induce membrane deformation beneath the virion leading to endocytosis and infection. Efficient membrane deformation depends on receptor lipid structure and the organization of binding sites on the internalizing particle. To determine the role of receptor diffusion, concentration and the number of receptors required for stable binding in this interaction, we analyze the binding of SV40 to GM1 in supported membrane bilayers by computational modeling based on experimental data. We measure the diffusion rates of SV40 virions in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and of the receptor in bilayers by single molecule tracking. Quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D is used to measure binding of SV40 virus-like particles to bilayers containing the viral receptor GM1. We develop a phenomenological stochastic dynamics model calibrated against this data, and use it to investigate the early events of virus attachment to lipid membranes. Our results indicate that SV40 requires at least 4 attached receptors to achieve stable binding. We moreover find that receptor diffusion is essential for the establishment of stable binding over the physiological range of receptor concentrations and that receptor concentration controls the mode of viral motion on the target membrane. Our results provide quantitative insight into the initial events of virus-host interaction at the nanoscopic level.

  8. SV40 virus-like particles as an effective delivery system and its application to a vaccine carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Masaaki; Matsui, Masanori; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    The authors have purified a major capsid protein, VP1 of Simian virus 40 (SV40), using recombinant baculovirus and have established the method of in vitro reassembly of SV40 virus-like particles (SV40-VLPs) from VP1-pentamers. In this reassembly, SV40-VLPs can encapsulate approximately 5 kb exogenous DNA shielded by histone or foreign proteins fused to minor capsid proteins VP2/3 and effectively deliver them into mammalian cells. Insertion of a particular foreign peptide into the surface loops of VP1 provides SV40-VLPs with the ability of cell targeting. Furthermore, SV40-VLPs appear to stimulate innate immunity as a natural adjuvant. Given these characteristics, SV40-VLPs may be a promising vaccine carrier to deliver heterologous antigens for the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes without artificial adjuvants. In this review, the authors describe how SV40-VLPs have been developed and engineered, and discuss their potential benefits and challenges as a cytotoxic T lymphocyte-based vaccine platform.

  9. Down-regulation of T-STAR, a growth inhibitory protein, after SV40-mediated immortalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, J; van Zaane, W; van der Eb, A J; Terleth, C

    2001-11-01

    Normal human cells can undergo a limited number of divisions, whereas transformed cells may have an extended life span and can give rise to immortal cells. To isolate genes involved in the immortalization process, gene expression in SV40-transformed preimmortal human fibroblasts was compared with expression in SV40-transformed immortalized fibroblasts using an mRNA differential display. We found that the growth-inhibitory protein testis-signal transduction and activation of RNA (T-STAR) a homologue of cell-cycle regulator Sam68, is strongly down-regulated in immortalized cells. Overexpression of T-STAR in the SV40-transformed immortalized cells resulted in a strong reduction of colony formation, whereas deletion of the RNA-binding domain of T-STAR abrogated this effect. Down-regulation of testis-signal transduction and activation of RNA (T-STAR) expression is found only in immortal cells isolated after a proliferative crisis accompanied with massive cell death. The strict correlation of down-regulation of T-STAR expression only in those immortal cells that arose after a clear proliferative crisis suggests that the loss of T-STAR might be necessary to bypass crisis.

  10. Small molecule inhibitors of Late SV40 Factor (LSF) abrogate hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): Evaluation using an endogenous HCC model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Devaraja; Siddiq, Ayesha; Willoughby, Jennifer L S; Biagi, Jessica M; Christadore, Lisa M; Yunes, Sarah A; Gredler, Rachel; Jariwala, Nidhi; Robertson, Chadia L; Akiel, Maaged A; Shen, Xue-Ning; Subler, Mark A; Windle, Jolene J; Schaus, Scott E; Fisher, Paul B; Hansen, Ulla; Sarkar, Devanand

    2015-09-22

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal malignancy with high mortality and poor prognosis. Oncogenic transcription factor Late SV40 Factor (LSF) plays an important role in promoting HCC. A small molecule inhibitor of LSF, Factor Quinolinone Inhibitor 1 (FQI1), significantly inhibited human HCC xenografts in nude mice without harming normal cells. Here we evaluated the efficacy of FQI1 and another inhibitor, FQI2, in inhibiting endogenous hepatocarcinogenesis. HCC was induced in a transgenic mouse with hepatocyte-specific overexpression of c-myc (Alb/c-myc) by injecting N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) followed by FQI1 or FQI2 treatment after tumor development. LSF inhibitors markedly decreased tumor burden in Alb/c-myc mice with a corresponding decrease in proliferation and angiogenesis. Interestingly, in vitro treatment of human HCC cells with LSF inhibitors resulted in mitotic arrest with an accompanying increase in CyclinB1. Inhibition of CyclinB1 induction by Cycloheximide or CDK1 activity by Roscovitine significantly prevented FQI-induced mitotic arrest. A significant induction of apoptosis was also observed upon treatment with FQI. These effects of LSF inhibition, mitotic arrest and induction of apoptosis by FQI1s provide multiple avenues by which these inhibitors eliminate HCC cells. LSF inhibitors might be highly potent and effective therapeutics for HCC either alone or in combination with currently existing therapies.

  11. UV-enhanced reactivation of UV-damaged SV40 is due to the restoration of viral early gene function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.C.; Cerutti, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Mammalian cells respond to UV-radiation by inducing an increased ability to support the survival of UV-damaged virus. The authors have tested whether the induction of enhanced viral reactivation (ER) reflects heightened UV-resistance of specific viral functions. For this, the authors examined the extent of ER for SV40 containing UV-damage in three functionally distinct regions of the SV40 genome: (i) the viral regulatory region, (ii) the early genes region and (iii) the late genes region. ER corresponding to a dose reduction factor of 43% was observed for damage in the early genes region. No ER was observed for damage in the regulatory or late genes regions. The authors conclude that ER in SV40 reverses the lethal disruption of an essential function peculiar to the viral early genes region. This function is almost certainly transcription. (author). 48 refs.; 1 fig

  12. Chimeric SV40 virus-like particles induce specific cytotoxicity and protective immunity against influenza A virus without the need of adjuvants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Masaaki [Department of Allergy and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Morikawa, Katsuma [Department of Biological Information, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Suda, Tatsuya [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Ohno, Naohito [Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Matsushita, Sho [Department of Allergy and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Allergy Center, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Akatsuka, Toshitaka [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Handa, Hiroshi, E-mail: handa.h.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Solutions Research Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Matsui, Masanori, E-mail: mmatsui@saitama-med.ac.jp [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan)

    2014-01-05

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a promising vaccine platform due to the safety and efficiency. However, it is still unclear whether polyomavirus-based VLPs are useful for this purpose. Here, we attempted to evaluate the potential of polyomavirus VLPs for the antiviral vaccine using simian virus 40 (SV40). We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope derived from influenza A virus. HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-transgenic mice were then immunized with the chimeric SV40-VLPs. The chimeric SV40-VLPs effectively induced influenza-specific CTLs and heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses without the need of adjuvants. Because DNase I treatment of the chimeric SV40-VLPs did not disrupt CTL induction, the intrinsic adjuvant property may not result from DNA contaminants in the VLP preparation. In addition, immunization with the chimeric SV40-VLPs generated long-lasting memory CTLs. We here propose that the chimeric SV40-VLPs harboring an epitope may be a promising CTL-based vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties. - Highlights: • We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an influenza virus-derived CTL epitope. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce influenza-specific CTLs in mice without adjuvants. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce long-lasting memory CTLs. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs is a promising vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties.

  13. SV40 utilizes ATM kinase activity to prevent non-homologous end joining of broken viral DNA replication products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowd, Gregory A; Mody, Dviti; Eggold, Joshua; Cortez, David; Friedman, Katherine L; Fanning, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PK(cs) kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB) repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR) and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PK(cs) and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5' to 3' end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication.

  14. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Zaika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40. Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections.

  15. Transformation and radiosensitivity of human diploid skin fibroblasts transfected with SV40 T-antigen mutants defective in RB and P53 binding domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LingNah Su; Little, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    A series of human diploid fibroblast cell clones were developed by DNA transfection with either wild-type SV40 T-antigen (SV40T) or T-antigen mutants defective in its various functional domains. Cell clones expressing the wild-type SV40 T were significantly radioresistant as compared with clones transfected with the neo gene only (D o 192 ± 13 vs 127 ± 19). This radioresistance persisted in post-crisis, immortalized cell lines. A series of mutants with point or deletion mutations within each functionally active domain of SV40 T were also examined for their ability to alter radiosensitivity and induce morphological transformation. Cell clones transfected with T-antigen mutants defective in nuclear localization or origin binding showed increased radioresistance similar to clones transfected with wild-type T-antigen, and expressed morphological changes characteristic of SV40 T-transfected cells. (author)

  16. Chimeric SV40 virus-like particles induce specific cytotoxicity and protective immunity against influenza A virus without the need of adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Masaaki; Morikawa, Katsuma; Suda, Tatsuya; Ohno, Naohito; Matsushita, Sho; Akatsuka, Toshitaka; Handa, Hiroshi; Matsui, Masanori

    2014-01-05

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a promising vaccine platform due to the safety and efficiency. However, it is still unclear whether polyomavirus-based VLPs are useful for this purpose. Here, we attempted to evaluate the potential of polyomavirus VLPs for the antiviral vaccine using simian virus 40 (SV40). We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an HLA-A*02:01-restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope derived from influenza A virus. HLA-A*02:01-transgenic mice were then immunized with the chimeric SV40-VLPs. The chimeric SV40-VLPs effectively induced influenza-specific CTLs and heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses without the need of adjuvants. Because DNase I treatment of the chimeric SV40-VLPs did not disrupt CTL induction, the intrinsic adjuvant property may not result from DNA contaminants in the VLP preparation. In addition, immunization with the chimeric SV40-VLPs generated long-lasting memory CTLs. We here propose that the chimeric SV40-VLPs harboring an epitope may be a promising CTL-based vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hyperacetylation and differential deacetylation of histones H4 and H3 define two distinct classes of acetylated SV40 chromosomes early in infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milavetz, Barry

    2004-01-01

    SV40 chromosomes undergoing encapsidation late in infection and SV40 chromatin in virions are hyperacetylated on histones H4 and H3. However, the fate of the SV40 chromosomes containing hyperacetylated histones in a subsequent round of infection has not been determined. In order to determine if SV40 chromosomes undergo changes in the extent of histone acetylation during early infection, we have analyzed SV40 chromosomes isolated 30 min and 3 h postinfection by quantitative ChIP assays, depletion ChIP assays, competitive ChIP assays, and ChIP assays combined with restriction endonuclease sensitivity using antibodies to hyperacetylated histones H4 and H3. We have shown that at 30 min postinfection, the hyperacetylated histones are associated with two distinct classes of SV40 chromosomes. One form is hyperacetylated specifically on histone H4 while a second form is hyperacetylated on both H4 and H3. Both forms of chromosomes appear to contain a nucleosome-free promoter region. Over the course of the next few hours of infection, the class of SV40 chromosomes hyperacetylated on only H4 is reduced or completely eliminated through deacetylation

  18. Curcumin reverses benzidine-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition via suppression of ERK5/AP-1 in SV-40 immortalized human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiqi; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Li; Geng, Hao; Ma, Jiaxing; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Dexin; Zhong, Caiyun

    2017-04-01

    Overexposure to benzidine has been manifested as an important cause of bladder cancer. However, the molecular mechanism of benzidine-induced malignancy is still insufficiently interpreted. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial pathophysiological process in embryonic development as well as initiation and development of epithelium-originated malignant tumors. The role of extracellular regulated protein kinase 5 (ERK5) in benzidine-meditated bladder cancer development has not been explored. In the present study, we explored the role of ERK5/AP-1 pathway in benzidine-induced EMT in human normal urothelial cells and the intervention effect of curcumin on bezidine-induced EMT. We found that benzidine-induced EMT in SV-40 immortalized human urothelial cells (SV-HUC-1) at low concentrations. We detected that ERK5/AP-1 pathway was notably activated. Specific ERK5 inhibitor, XMD8-92 was applied to determine the role of ERK5 in benzidine-induced EMT. Results indicated that XMD8-92 reversed the EMT process. Furthermore, curcumin effectively attenuated benzidine-induced urocystic EMT by suppressing ERK5/AP-1 pathway. In conclusion, the present study revealed the positive role of ERK5/AP-1 in benzidine-provoked urocystic EMT and the curcumin promising use in bladder cancer prevention and intervention via ERK5/AP-1 pathway.

  19. Sequence-selective topoisomerase II inhibition by anthracycline derivatives in SV40 DNA: Relationship with DNA binding affinity and cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capranico, G.; Kohn, K.W.; Pommier, Y.; Zunino, F.

    1990-01-01

    Topoisomerase II mediated double-strand breaks produced by anthracycline analogues were studied in SV40 DNA. The compounds included doxorubicin, daunorubicin, two doxorubicin stereoisomers (4'-epimer and β-anomer), and five chromophore-modified derivatives, with a wide range of cytotoxic activity and DNA binding affinity. Cleavage of 32 P-end-labeled DNA fragments was visualized by autoradiography of agarose and polyacrylamide gels. Structure-activity relationships indicated that alterations in the chromophore structure greatly affected drug action on topoisomerase II. In particular, removal of substituents on position 4 of the D ring resulted in more active inducers of cleavage with lower DNA binding affinity. The stereochemistry between the sugar and the chromophore was also essential for activity. All the active anthracyclines induced a single region of prominent cleavage in the entire SV40 DNA, which resulted from a cluster of sites between nucleotides 4237 and 4294. DNA cleavage intensity patterns exhibited differences among analogues and were also dependent upon drug concentration. Intensity at a given site dependent on both stimulatory and suppressive effects depending upon drug concentration and DNA sequence. A good correlation was found between cytotoxicity and intensity of topoisomerase II mediated DNA breakage

  20. Deletion of a splice donor site ablates expression of the following exon and produces an unphosphorylated RB protein unable to bind SV40 T antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shew, J Y; Chen, P L; Bookstein, R; Lee, E Y; Lee, W H

    1990-01-01

    Studies of mutated retinoblastoma (RB) proteins in human tumor cells potentially reveal regions of the normal RB gene product that are required for its cancer suppression function. We here characterize a mutated RB protein of Mr 104,000 (p104) from a primary small-cell lung carcinoma. Unlike normal RB protein (pp110RB), p104 was unphosphorylated and unable to bind T antigen of SV40 both in vivo and in vitro. On the other hand, nuclear localization and DNA binding activity were preserved in the mutated protein. p104 was immunoprecipitable with four separate polyclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes of the RB polypeptide, suggesting the presence of most exons in their correct reading frame. Following reverse transcription and in vitro amplification, RB mRNA from this tumor was shown to lack nucleotides encoded by exon 16. Analysis of genomic DNA from this tumor showed that exon 16 and its flanking splice donor and acceptor sequences were present and entirely normal; however, a 43-base pair (bp) region containing the splice donor site of intron 15 was deleted instead. Exon 15 was joined directly to exon 17 during mRNA processing via a cryptic splice donor site; exon 16 was presumably skipped because the preceding mutated intron was of insufficient length (less than 80 bp) for normal RB mRNA processing. These results demonstrate that loss of a single small exon disrupts several important biochemical properties of RB protein. In addition, sequence features of the 43-bp depletion suggest involvement of a novel deletional mechanism.

  1. Effects of radiation and chemicals on SV40 oncogenesis. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    This project is directed toward developing rapid, quantitative methods and immunologic markers which will permit the early detection of newly forming tumors induced or enhanced by x-irradiation, chemical carcinogens, viruses or combinations of the three. The projects under study in our ongoing collaborative program seek to develop the detailed understanding and precise methodology required for the early detection of embryonic antigens in transformed cells induced by the co-carcinogenic effects of viruses and low-level radiation. A new technique for assaying the earliest transformed cells appearing in a carcinogen treated population affords a unique tool for this study. Present plans involve efforts to purify embryonic determinants from fetal and transformed cells of hamsters and mice in order to define their role in the transformation process and in tumor development

  2. Inhibition of multidrug resistance by SV40 pseudovirion delivery of an antigene peptide nucleic acid (PNA in cultured cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Macadangdang

    Full Text Available Peptide nucleic acid (PNA is known to bind with extraordinarily high affinity and sequence-specificity to complementary nucleic acid sequences and can be used to suppress gene expression. However, effective delivery into cells is a major obstacle to the development of PNA for gene therapy applications. Here, we present a novel method for the in vitro delivery of antigene PNA to cells. By using a nucleocapsid protein derived from Simian virus 40, we have been able to package PNA into pseudovirions, facilitating the delivery of the packaged PNA into cells. We demonstrate that this system can be used effectively to suppress gene expression associated with multidrug resistance in cancer cells, as shown by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, Western blotting, and cell viability under chemotherapy. The combination of PNA with the SV40-based delivery system is a method for suppressing a gene of interest that could be broadly applied to numerous targets.

  3. Large Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Mimicking A Gynecologic Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sew-Khee Yeat

    2005-06-01

    Conclusion: GISTs express c-kit proteins (CD-117 on immunohistochemistry. They may mimic gynecologic tumors since they share the same pelvic cavity. One should always consider GISTs as part of the differential diagnosis in pelvic tumors.

  4. Homologous SV40 RNA trans-splicing: Special case or prime example of viral RNA trans-splicing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Poddar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To date the Simian Virus 40 (SV40 is the only proven example of a virus that recruits the mechanism of RNA trans-splicing to diversify its sequences and gene products. Thereby, two identical viral transcripts are efficiently joined by homologous trans-splicing triggering the formation of a highly transforming 100 kDa super T antigen. Sequences of other viruses including HIV-1 and the human adenovirus type 5 were reported to be involved in heterologous trans-splicing towards cellular or viral sequences but the meaning of these events remains unclear. We computationally and experimentally investigated molecular features associated with viral RNA trans-splicing and identified a common pattern: Viral RNA trans-splicing occurs between strong cryptic or regular viral splice sites and strong regular or cryptic splice sites of the trans-splice partner sequences. The majority of these splice sites are supported by exonic splice enhancers. Splice sites that could compete with the trans-splicing sites for cis-splice reactions are weaker or inexistent. Finally, all but one of the trans-splice reactions seem to be facilitated by one or more complementary binding domains of 11 to 16 nucleotides in length which, however occur with a statistical probability close to one for the given length of the involved sequences. The chimeric RNAs generated via heterologous viral RNA trans-splicing either did not lead to fusion proteins or led to proteins of unknown function. Our data suggest that distinct viral RNAs are highly susceptible to trans-splicing and that heterologous viral trans-splicing, unlike homologous SV40 trans-splicing, represents a chance event.

  5. Large Phyllodes Tumor: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Tahmasebi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phyllodes tumors account for less than 1% of breast tumors in women. Giantphyllodes tumors are larger than 10 cm in diameter. A 40-year-old lady presented witha left breast lump that was present for two years. She underwent a simple mastectomy.The tumor was 30×26×21 cm in size, weighed 15 kg and had a density of 0.915 gr/cm3.We believe this patient had the third largest breast phyllodes tumor according to size,the second largest according to weight and had the highest density among all cases thusreported in English-language publications.

  6. Origin of Androgen-Insensitive Poorly Differentiated Tumors in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy J. Huss

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Following castration, the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model demonstrates rapid development of SV40-Tag-driven poorly differentiated tumors that express neuroendocrine cell markers. The cell population dynamics within the prostates of castrated TRAMP mice were characterized by analyzing the incorporation of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd and the expression of SV40-Tag, synaptophysin, and androgen receptor (AR. Fourteen days postcastration, the remaining epithelial cells and adenocarcinoma cells were nonproliferative and lacked detectable SV40-Tag or synaptophysin expression. In contrast, morphologically distinct intraglandular foci were identified which expressed SV40-Tag, synaptophysin, and Ki67, but that lacked AR expression. These proliferative SV40-Tag and synaptophysin-expressing intraglandular foci were associated with the rare BrdUrd-retaining cells. These foci expanded rapidly in the postcastration prostate environment, in contrast to the AR- and SV40-Tag-expressing adenocarcinoma cells that lost SV40-Tag expression and underwent apoptosis after castration. Intraglandular foci of synaptophysin-expressing cells were also observed in the prostates of intact TRAMP mice at a comparable frequency; however, they did not progress to rapidly expanding tumors until much later in the life of the mice. This suggests that the foci of neuroendocrine-like cells that express SV40-Tag and synaptophysin, but lack AR, arise independent of androgen-deprivation and represent the source of the poorly differentiated tumors that are the lethal phenotype in the TRAMP model.

  7. A mouse model for chronic lymphocytic leukemia based on expression of the SV40 large T antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ter Brugge, Petra J; Ta, Van B T; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W

    2009-01-01

    leukemia (CLL). Although B-cell development was unperturbed in young mice, aging mice showed accumulation of a monoclonal B-cell population in which the targeted IgH allele was in germline configuration and the wild-type IgH allele had a productive V(D)J recombination. These leukemic B cells were Ig...

  8. Cloning of an SNF2/SWI2-related protein that binds specifically to the SPH motifs of the SV40 enhancer and to the HIV-1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, P L; Schorpp, M; Voz, M L; Jones, K A

    1995-03-03

    We have isolated a human cDNA clone encoding HIP116, a protein that binds to the SPH repeats of the SV40 enhancer and to the TATA/inhibitor region of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 promoter. The predicted HIP116 protein is related to the yeast SNF2/SWI2 transcription factor and to other members of this extended family and contains seven domains similar to those found in the vaccinia NTP1 ATPase. Interestingly, HIP116 also contains a C3HC4 zinc-binding motif (RING finger) interspersed between the ATPase motifs in an arrangement similar to that found in the yeast RAD5 and RAD16 proteins. The HIP116 amino terminus is unique among the members of this family, and houses a specific DNA-binding domain. Antiserum raised against HIP116 recognizes a 116-kDa nuclear protein in Western blots and specifically supershifts SV40 and HIV-1 protein-DNA complexes in gel shift experiments. The binding site for HIP116 on the SV40 enhancer directly overlaps the site for TEF-1, and like TEF-1, binding of HIP116 to the SV40 enhancer is destroyed by mutations that inhibit SPH enhancer activity in vivo. Purified fractions of HIP116 display strong ATPase activity that is preferentially stimulated by SPH DNA and can be inhibited specifically by antibodies to HIP116. These findings suggest that HIP116 might affect transcription, directly or indirectly, by acting as a DNA binding site-specific ATPase.

  9. Arginine-rich cross-linking peptides with different SV40 nuclear localization signal content as vectors for intranuclear DNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacheva, Mariia; Egorova, Anna; Slita, Anna; Maretina, Marianna; Baranov, Vladislav; Kiselev, Anton

    2017-11-01

    The major barriers for intracellular DNA transportation by cationic polymers are their toxicity, poor endosomal escape and inefficient nuclear uptake. Therefore, we designed novel modular peptide-based carriers modified with SV40 nuclear localization signal (NLS). Core peptide consists of arginine, histidine and cysteine residues for DNA condensation, endosomal escape promotion and interpeptide cross-linking, respectively. We investigated three polyplexes with different NLS content (10 mol%, 50 mol% and 90 mol% of SV40 NLS) as vectors for intranuclear DNA delivery. All carriers tested were able to condense DNA, to protect it from DNAase I and were not toxic to the cells. We observed that cell cycle arrest by hydroxyurea did not affect transfection efficacy of NLS-modified carriers which we confirmed using quantitative confocal microscopy analysis. Overall, peptide carrier modified with 90 mol% of SV40 NLS provided efficient transfection and nuclear uptake in non-dividing cells. Thus, incorporation of NLS into arginine-rich cross-linking peptides is an adequate approach to the development of efficient intranuclear gene delivery vehicles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The common mechanisms of transformation by the small DNA tumor viruses: The inactivation of tumor suppressor gene products: p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Arnold J

    2009-02-20

    The small DNA tumor viruses, Polyoma virus, Simian Vacuolating Virus 40, the Papilloma viruses and the human Adenoviruses, were first described during a period of intense virus discovery (1930-1960s) and shown to produce tumors in animals. In each of these cases the viral DNA was shown to persist (commonly integrated into a host chromosome) and only a selected portion of this DNA was expressed as m-RNA and proteins in these cancers. The viral encoded tumor antigens were identified and shown to be required to both establish the tumor and maintain the transformed cell phenotype. The functions of these viral tumor antigens were explored and shown to have common features and mechanisms even though they appear to have evolved from diverse genes. The SV40 large tumor antigen, the human Papilloma virus E7 protein and the Adenovirus E1A protein were shown to bind to and inactivate the functions of the Retinoblastoma proteins in transformed cells. This resulted in the activation of the E2F and DP transcription factors and the entry of cells into the S-phase of DNA synthesis which was required for viral DNA replication. These events triggered the activation of p53 which promotes apoptosis of these virus infected cells limiting virus replication and tumor formation. These viruses responded by evolving and producing the SV40 large tumor antigen, the human Papilloma virus E6 protein and the Adenovirus E1b-55Kd protein which binds to and inactivates the p53 functions in both the infected cells and transformed cells. Some of the human Papilloma viruses and one of the Polyoma viruses have been shown to cause selected cancers in humans. Both the p53 tumor suppressor gene, which was uncovered in the studies with these viruses, and the retinoblastoma protein, have been shown to play a central role in the origins of human cancers via both somatic and germ line mutations in those genes.

  11. Hypofractionation Regimens for Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Large Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jiankui; Wang, Jian Z.; Lo, Simon; Grecula, John C.; Ammirati, Mario; Montebello, Joseph F.; Zhang Hualin; Gupta, Nilendu; Yuh, William T.C.; Mayr, Nina A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate equivalent regimens for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain tumor treatment and to provide dose-escalation guidance to maximize the tumor control within the normal brain tolerance. Methods and Materials: The linear-quadratic model, including the effect of nonuniform dose distributions, was used to evaluate the HSRT regimens. The α/β ratio was estimated using the Gammaknife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy experience for large brain tumors. The HSRT regimens were derived using two methods: (1) an equivalent tumor control approach, which matches the whole-brain radiotherapy experience for many fractions and merges it with the GKSRS data for few fractions; and (2) a normal-tissue tolerance approach, which takes advantages of the dose conformity and fractionation of HSRT to approach the maximal dose tolerance of the normal brain. Results: A plausible α/β ratio of 12 Gy for brain tumor and a volume parameter n of 0.23 for normal brain were derived from the GKSRS and whole-brain radiotherapy data. The HSRT prescription regimens for the isoeffect of tumor irradiation were calculated. The normal-brain equivalent uniform dose decreased as the number of fractions increased, because of the advantage of fractionation. The regimens for potential dose escalation of HSRT within the limits of normal-brain tolerance were derived. Conclusions: The designed hypofractionated regimens could be used as a preliminary guide for HSRT dose prescription for large brain tumors to mimic the GKSRS experience and for dose escalation trials. Clinical studies are necessary to further tune the model parameters and validate these regimens

  12. Metformin disrupts malignant behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma via a novel signaling involving Late SV40 factor/Aurora-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Han; Tsai, Hsin-Ting; Chuang, Hui-Ching; Shiu, Li-Yen; Su, Li-Jen; Chiu, Tai-Jan; Luo, Sheng-Dean; Fang, Fu-Min; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Chien, Chih-Yen

    2017-05-02

    Conventional therapeutic processes in patient with OSCC are associated with several unfavorable effects leading to patients with poor survival rate. Metformin has been shown to protect against a variety of specific diseases, including cancer. However, the precise roles and mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of metformin on OSCC remain elusive. In the current study, in vitro and xenograft model experiments revealed that metformin inhibited growth and metastasis of oral cancer cells. Importantly, metformin-restrained tumorigenesis of oral cancer was accompanied with strong decrease of both Aurora-A and Late SV40 Factor (LSF) expressions. Furthermore, LSF contributed to Aurora-A-elicited malignancy behaviors of oral cancer via binding to the promoter region of Aurora-A. A significant correlation was observed between LSF and Aurora-A levels in a cohort of specimens of oral cancer. These findings showed that a novel LSF/Aurora-A-signaling inhibition supports the rationale of using metformin as potential OSCC therapeutics.

  13. Large malignant ovarian tumors during pregnancy: two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu D

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Dong Xu, Cheng Liang, Jing He Gynecological and Obstetrical Department, Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: The present study reports two cases of large ovarian malignancy during pregnancy, which is very rare. The two patients were received between Nov 2012 and Feb 2013 at Gynecological and Obstetrical Department, Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University (People's Republic of China. Both cases present tumor sized more than 20 cm, with one case of 40 cm. Both patients underwent timely cesarean section, with survival of the Child, and successful removal of the tumor. All patients showed good outcome in the follow-up period. Therefore the large ovarian malignancy during pregnancy could be well treated after careful clinical evaluation. Keywords: ovarian malignancy, pregnancy, incidence

  14. Enhancement of SV40 transformation by treatment of C3H2K cells with uv light and caffeine. I. Combined effect of uv light and caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, T.; Anzai, K.; Andoh, T.

    1975-01-01

    Treatment of cultured mouse cells, C3H2K, with uv light and/or caffeine enhanced the frequency of SV40-induced transformation. This enhancement depends upon the doses of uv and caffeine and the mode of combination of these agents. Irradiation of cells with increasing doses of uv just before infection resulted in approximately 2-fold enhancement of the transformation frequency up to a dose of 90 ergs/mm 2 and 3.3-fold at 150 ergs/mm 2 . Addition of 1 mM caffeine to the medium for 4 days subsequent to infection brought about a 2-fold enhancement. When cells were irradiated and treated with 1 mM caffeine, the enhancement was approximately 4-fold up to a uv dose of 90 ergs/mm 2 and 5.9-fold at 150 ergs/mm 2 . When 0.1 to 4 mM caffeine was added for 4 days postinfection, the absolute number of transformations increased, and an enhancement ratio of 1.3 to 6.8 resulted. After the addition of the same increasing doses of caffeine to uv-irradiated cells (75 ergs/mm 2 ), the enhancement of transformation frequency was even higher ranging 2.0 to 13.3. The transformation frequencies thus obtained by the double treatment were always higher than those predicted if uv and caffeine acted additively. The transformation frequency was little affected by the addition of dibutyrylcyclic AMP and theophylline

  15. Application of SV40 T-transformed human corneal epithelial cells to evaluate potential irritant chemicals for in vitro alternative eye toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cho-Won; Park, Geon-Tae; Bae, Ok-Nam; Noh, Minsoo; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of eye irritation potential is important to human safety, and it is necessary for various cosmetics and chemicals that may contact the human eye. Until recently, the Draize test was considered the standard method for estimating eye irritation, despite its disadvantages such as the need to sacrifice many rabbits for subjective scoring. Thus, we investigated the cytotoxicity and inflammatory response to standard eye irritants using SV40 T-transformed human corneal epithelial (SHCE) cells as a step toward development of an animal-free alternative eye irritation test. MTT and NRU assays of cell viability were performed to investigate the optimal experimental conditions for SHCE cell viability when cells were exposed to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as a standard eye irritant at 6.25×10(-3) to 1×10(-1)%. Additionally, cell viability of SHCE cells was examined in response to six potential eye irritants, benzalkonium chloride, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropanol, SDS, Triton X-100 and Tween 20 at 5×10(-3) to 1×10(-1)%. Finally, we estimated the secretion level of cytokines in response to stimulation by eye irritants in SHCE cells. SHCE cells showed a good response to potential eye irritants when the cells were exposed to potential irritants for 10min at room temperature (RT), and cytokine production increased in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion from SHCE cells may be well correlated with the concentrations of irritants. Taken together, these results suggest that SHCE cells could be an excellent alternative in vitro model to replace in vivo animal models for eye irritation tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Insertion of liver enriched transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) in a vector which contains simian virus (SV40) promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Nbaheen, M.; Pourzand, C.; Tyrrell, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    One way of targeting gene expression in vivo is to control transcription using a tissue-specific regulatory system. Tissue specific promoters or enhancers are in use in transgenic animals and could be utilized in medical for gene therapy. At present the usual method for selection of a tissue-specific promoter is to identify a gene, which is expressed at unusually high level in the target tissue, and then to use the promoter for this gene to drive expression of another therapeutic gene in the target tissue. This approach is logical but does not always lead to high levels of gene expression. A second approach is to investigate the scope for discovery of synthetic specific promoters using a target tissue. The objective of the work described in this paper was to use both approach to design plasmid DNA expression vectors that would carry liver-specific promoter/enhancer linked to reporter gene (i.e. luciferase). Then transfect these vectors to both liver-derived and non-liver cell lines. This is followed by evaluation of the liver-specificity of each construct by measuring the basal level expression of the reporter gene (i.e. luciferase activity) in both cell lines. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) is liver-enriched transcription factor used to design new synthetic enhancers by inserting a tandem array of 1', 3' or 5' repeats of the HNF-4 binding site upstream of the SV40 promoter linked to the luciferase reporter gene within an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-based vector, p 706. The results of transfection revealed that unexpectedly the HNF-4 binding sites in these constructs act as a repressor rather than enhancer of the liver-specific expression of the luciferase gene. (author)

  17. The MRC-5 human embryonal lung fibroblast two-dimensional gel cellular protein database: quantitative identification of polypeptides whose relative abundance differs between quiescent, proliferating and SV40 transformed cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Dejgaard, K; Madsen, Peder

    1990-01-01

    A new version of the MRC-5 two-dimensional gel cellular protein database (Celis et al., Electrophoresis 1989, 10, 76-115) is presented. Gels were scanned with a Molecular Dynamics laser scanner and processed by the PDQUEST II software. A total of 1895 [35S]methionine-labeled cellular polypeptides...... (1323 with isoelectric focusing and 572 with nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) are recorded in this database, containing quantitative and qualitative data on the relative abundance of cellular proteins synthesized by quiescent, proliferating and SV40 transformed MRC-5 fibroblasts. Of the 592...... proteins quantitated so far, the levels of 138 were up- or down-regulated (51 and 87, respectively) by two times or more in the transformed cells as compared to their normal proliferating counterparts, while only 14 behaved similarly in quiescent cells. Seven MRC-5 SV40 proteins, including plastin and two...

  18. Functional involvement of human discs large tumor suppressor in cytokinesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unno, Kenji; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H.

    2008-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division that completes the separation of two daughter cells. We found that the human discs large (hDlg) tumor suppressor homologue is functionally involved in cytokinesis. The guanylate kinase (GUK) domain of hDlg mediates the localization of hDlg to the midbody during cytokinesis, and over-expression of the GUK domain in U2OS and HeLa cells impaired cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from dlg mutant mice contained an increased number of multinucleated cells and showed reduced proliferation in culture. A kinesin-like motor protein, GAKIN, which binds directly to the GUK domain of hDlg, exhibited a similar intracellular distribution pattern with hDlg throughout mitosis and localized to the midbody during cytokinesis. However, the targeting of hDlg and GAKIN to the midbody appeared to be independent of each other. The midbody localization of GAKIN required its functional kinesin-motor domain. Treatment of cells with the siRNA specific for hDlg and GAKIN caused formation of multinucleated cells and delayed cytokinesis. Together, these results suggest that hDlg and GAKIN play functional roles in the maintenance of midbody architecture during cytokinesis

  19. Simian virus 40 large T-antigen point mutants that are defective in viral DNA replication but competent in oncogenic transformation.

    OpenAIRE

    Manos, M M; Gluzman, Y

    1984-01-01

    The large T antigen of simian virus 40 (SV40) is a multifunctional protein that is essential in both the virus lytic cycle and the oncogenic transformation of cells by SV40. To investigate the role of the numerous biochemical and physiological activities of T antigen in the lytic and transformation processes, we have studied DNA replication-deficient, transformation-competent large T-antigen mutants. Here we describe the genetic and biochemical analyses of two such mutants, C2/SV40 and C11/SV...

  20. [Treatment of polyps and villous tumors of the large intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, L U; Agavelian, A M; Kazarian, G A; Bagdasarian, A A; Martirosian, V S

    1987-07-01

    Polyps and villous tumors were found in 1525 of 10624 patients (14.3%) aged from 40 to 60. In 82% of the cases they were in combination with ulcer disease of the stomach and duodenum, with inflammatory diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract, diverticulitis, tumors of the colon. 1519 polypectomies and dissection of villous tumors both via the fibroscope, rectoscope and by transanal access were made. Complications were obtained in 5 patients, recurrent disease was noted in 3 patients (0.9%).

  1. Gastric Collision Tumor Consisting of Mucinous Carcinoma and Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Su Min; Lee, Ye Ri; Han, Eun Mee; Yeon, Jae Woo; Yoo, Jin Young; Choi, Jong Mun; Sim, Ji Ye [Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The concurrence of two different pathological tumors of the stomach is infrequent. Even rarer is a gastric collision tumor of both tumor types. Although there have been a few reported cases of gastric collision tumors that consisted of an adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma, to the best of our knowledge, there is no documented case report of a gastric collision tumor consisting of a mucinous carcinoma and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. We report a case of gastric collision tumor, consisting of a mucinous carcinoma and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma that presented as abdominal discomfort in a 64-year-old man. This finding draws attention to the related findings from previous studies on gastric collision tumors

  2. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  3. Primary CNS anaplastic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma mimicking undifferentiated metastatic tumors: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianyu; Belverud, Shawn; Yeh, Albert Y; Bandovic, Jela; Farmer, Peter; Woldenberg, Rona F; Demopoulos, Alexis; Schulder, Michael; Li, Jian Yi

    2010-02-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare intracranial tumor, with an annual incidence of six per million population. Anaplastic variant of primary CNS diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is less common; to our knowledge, there is only one other case report in the world literature. We describe a 71 year old immunocompetent female without significant past medical history who presented with confusion and a homogeneously enhancing midline mass. The patient underwent craniotomy for tumor biopsy, followed by high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy despite a remarkably low performance status. Histologically, this tumor was composed of undifferentiated polymorphic tumor cells, multi-nucleated giant cells, extensive necrosis, and conspicuous mitotic activity, mimicking undifferentiated metastatic tumors. Immunohistochemical stains demonstrated immunopositivity of tumor cells for CD20, MUM-1, and BCL-6, and negative staining for CD3, CD10, and CD30. The clinical course, diagnostic workup, pathologic correlates, and treatment outcomes are described.

  4. Cell-to-cell communication competence in simian virus 40-transfected rat ovarian cells is reduced following tumor selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, L S; Welsh, T H; Wilson, V G; Burghardt, R C

    1992-06-01

    A pSV3neo-transfected rat ovarian cell line (SV-GC) was developed from a primary granulosa culture (GC) to study gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) during Simian virus 40 (SV40) transformation. SV-GC expressed SV40 large T-antigen (T-ag), grew indefinitely in culture without luteinization, was anchorage independent, and formed tumors in nude mice. Ultrastructural analysis identified abundant gap junctional membrane and suggested that SV-GC was arrested at an early stage of differentiation. Functional GJIC, measured by a dye transfer technique (gap FRAP), was comparable to that observed in normal granulosa cells, suggesting that the expression of T-ag alone was insufficient to reduce GJIC. However, there was approximately a 50% loss in the rate of GJIC in the nude mouse SV-GC-tumor derived and G418 selected cell line (T-SV-GC). SV-GC----T-SV-GC also resulted in a transition from migration of cells as an epithelial sheet to the dissociation of individual fibroblastoid cells. Tumor cell detachment was also seen in migrating malignant human (A2780 and 547) and rat (DC3) ovarian cell lines. Co-culture combinations of normal (GC)----transformed (SV-GC)----tumor-derived (T-SV-GC) cells indicated that the rate of heterologous GJIC was characteristic of the least communicating partner. Taken together, these data suggested that SV-GC----T-SV-GC represented progression toward metastasis with concomitant reduction of GJIC and adhesiveness. These sequentially derived cell lines may be a useful in vitro model system for studies focusing on the mechanism involved in the detachment of cells during the progression of ovarian cancer.

  5. Electrochemical lysis at the stage of endoresection for large posterior intraocular tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Belyy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to design the new combined technique of endoresection with intraoperative intraocular electrochemical lysis at the tumor destruction stage for large posterior intraocular tumors.Methods: 3 patients (3 eyes with large choroidal melanomas t3N0M0 (tumor thickness — 8-10 mm, base diameter — 13-15 mm, juxtapapillary localization. Mean age was 55.4 years old. Endoresection with intraoperational intraocular electrochemical lysis of the tumor was performed. Electrochemical lysis was performed with use of the technical unit ECU 300 (Soering, Germany and the original method of combined intratumoral positioning of two platinum electrodes: anode and cathode.Results: the tumor was removal completely in all 3 cases. the anatomical retinal reattachment was reached in all patients. Sclera was safe in all 3 cases. Visual acuity was not changed (NLP. At the place of the removal tumor a surgical choroidal coloboma without pigmentation all over scleral bed and periphery was shown in all cases in distant postoperative period (from 1.5 to 3 years. No local recurrences or metastasis were revealed in all patients.Conclusion: Further investigations in clinical group are necessarily to determinate the real possibilities of the combined method and the indications for endoresection with intraoperative intraocular electrochemical lysis for large intraocular tumors

  6. The Pig as a Large Animal Model for Studying Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr

    The immune system plays a crucial role in cancer development and progression. Cancer immunoediting encompasses three phases: elimination, equilibrium, and escape; together, describing the complex interplay between tumor and immune cells. Specifically, the immune system both protects against cancer...... of autologous tumor cells, underlining the capacity of the Oncopig immune system to mount a cytotoxic anti-tumor response. Using the results from RNA-seq analysis, we propose a potential mechanism for in vivo inhibition of anti-tumor cytotoxicity based on elevated expression of the immunosuppressive genes IDO1...... support that the Oncopig provides a crucial platform for studying anti-tumor immune responses in a large in vivo system, although the model currently only allows preclinical testing of therapeutics against the early stages of cancer....

  7. Prognostic value of tumor necrosis at CT in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Hugo J.A., E-mail: h.j.a.adams@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Meander Medical Center, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Fijnheer, Rob [Department of Hematology, Meander Medical Center, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Dubois, Stefan V. [Department of Pathology, Meander Medical Center, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Kwee, Thomas C. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •CT is compulsory for staging newly diagnosed DLBCL. •Approximately 13.7% of DLBCL patients have tumor necrosis at CT. •Tumor necrosis status at CT is not associated with any NCCN-IPI factor. •Patients with tumor necrosis at CT have a significantly worse outcome. -- Abstract: Objective: To determine the prognostic value of tumor necrosis at computed tomography (CT) in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 51 patients with newly diagnosed DLBCL who had undergone both unenhanced and intravenous contrast-enhanced CT before R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, oncovin and prednisolone) chemo-immunotherapy. Presence of tumor necrosis was visually and quantitatively assessed at CT. Associations between tumor necrosis status at CT and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) International Prognostic Index (IPI) factors were assessed. Cox regression analysis was used to determine the prognostic impact of NCCN-IPI scores and tumor necrosis status at CT. Results: There were no correlations between tumor necrosis status at CT and the NCCN-IPI factors categorized age (ρ = −0.042, P = 0.765), categorized lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) ratio (ρ = 0.201, P = 0.156), extranodal disease in major organs (φ = −0.245, P = 0.083), Ann Arbor stage III/IV disease (φ = −0.208, P = 0.141), and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (φ = 0.015, P = 0.914). In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, only tumor necrosis status at CT was an independent predictive factor of progression-free survival (P = 0.003) and overall survival (P = 0.004). Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate the prognostic potential of tumor necrosis at CT in newly diagnosed DLBCL.

  8. A Case of Large Phyllodes Tumor Causing “Rupture” of the Breast: A Unique Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid Nabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial tumors which constitute less than 1% of all known breast neoplasms. The importance of recognizing these tumors lies in the need to differentiate them from fibroadenomas and other benign breast lesions to avoid inappropriate surgical management. We report a case of large phyllodes tumor which caused rupture of the breast and presented as an external fungating breast mass, a presentation which is exceedingly rare. Case Presentation. A 32-year-old female presented with a 1-year history of a mass in her right breast and eruption of the mass through the skin for the last 3 months. On physical examination, an ulcerated, irregular, and nodular mass measuring  cms was found hanging in the lower and outer quadrant of the right breast. Ultrasonography revealed an exophytic mass with heterogeneous echotexture and vascularity. Under general anesthesia, the tumor was excised. The resected specimen was  cm in size and the tumor was not invasive to the surrounding tissues. Histological examination confirmed a benign case of Phyllodes tumor. Conclusion. Clinicians should be aware of the myriad ways in which Phyllodes can present. A rapidly growing breast mass in a female should raise strong suspicion for Phyllodes. It is necessary to differentiate it from fibroadenomas to avoid inappropriate surgical management which may lead to local recurrence.

  9. Large malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast with metastases to the lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Augustyn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Phyllodes tumors of the breast account for less than 0.5% of breast cancers and present most commonly in women 45 to 49 years old. The importance in managing fibroepithelial lesions lies in distinguishing fibroadenomas, which are benign, from phyllodes tumors, which can be malignant and require complete surgical excision. We report the case of a 56-year-old female who presented with a rapidly enlarging mass in her right breast 18 cm in maximum dimension that completely effaced the breast and distorted the nipple. The patient underwent a successful total mastectomy after core biopsy revealed a diagnosis of phyllodes tumor. Surgical resection is the primary treatment modality; neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies remain controversial. Here, we report the case of a large malignant phyllodes tumor metastatic to the lungs, review the literature, and discuss diagnostic modalities and adjunct nonsurgical therapies.

  10. Prognostic value of tumor necrosis at CT in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hugo J A; De Klerk, John M H; Fijnheer, Rob; Dubois, Stefan V.; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Kwee, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prognostic value of tumor necrosis at computed tomography (CT) in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Materials and methods This retrospective study included 51 patients with newly diagnosed DLBCL who had undergone both unenhanced and intravenous

  11. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF MALIGNANT TUMORS OF LARGE SALIVARY GLANDS (POPULATION-BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Merabishvili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Malignant tumors of large salivary glands are a relatively rare malignancy. In 2014 as a whole in Russia 1236 cases of these diseases were registered. According to the latest data of the Interna- tional Agency for Research on Cancer (Volume X the most common standardized incidence rate in various countries ranges from 0.6-0.9 per 100,000 men and 0.4-0.6 per 100,000 women. aim of study. The aim of this study is to carry out for the first time in Russia an estimation of a complex of analytical rates including an evaluation of observed and relative survival rates to assess the effectiveness of cancer control related to patients with a diagnosis of malignant tumors of large salivary glands. material and methods. An estimation of a complex of analytical rates was conducted in accordance with database of the Population-based Cancer Registry of St. Petersburg. There were selected 896 patients with a diagnosis of malignant tumors of large salivary glands from 1994 to 2013. Results. It was found that the most frequent value of the standardized incidence rates of malignant tumors of large salivary glands in different countries of the world community for the male population was 0.6-0.9 per 100,000 population and 0.4-0.6 for the female. These values were 0000 equal to 0.7 and 0.4 0/ in Russia (2014, and 0.6 and 0.5 0/ in St. Petersburg (2014. The vast majority 0000 of recorded cases of malignant tumors of large salivary glands were for S07.9 - of malignant tumors of large salivary glands undefined. 46.6 % of primary patients had early stages (I + II. A relative 5-year survival rate was 61.9 % for men and 69.9 % for women, which was slightly less than the European average (Eurocare. Conclusion. This study for the first time in Russia allowed estimating series of analytical rates character- izing the effectiveness of cancer control related to patients with malignant tumors of large salivary glands in St. Petersburg including estimations of a 5

  12. Irradiated large segment allografts in limb saving surgery for extremity tumor - Philippine experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, E.H.M.; Agcaoili, N.; Turqueza, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Limb saving surgery has only recently become an option in the Phillipines. This has given a better comprehension of oncologic principles and from the refinement of bone-reconstruction procedures. Foremost among the latter is the use of large segment bone allografts. Large-segment allografts (LSA) are available from the Tissue and Bone Bank of the University of the Philippines (UP). After harvest, these bones are processed at the Bank, radiation-sterilized at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, and then stored in a -80 degree C deep freezer. We present our 4-year experience (Jan 93 - Dec 96) with LSA for limb saving surgery in musculoskeletal tumors. All patients included had: (1) malignant or aggressive extremity tumors; (2) surgery performed by the UP - Musculoskeletal Tumor Unit (UP-MUST Unit); (3) reconstructions utilizing irradiated large-segment allografts from the UP Tissue and Bone Bank; and (4) follow-up of at least one year or until death. Tumors included osteosarcoma (6) giant cell tumors (11), and metastatic lesions (3). Age ranged from 16-64 years old; 13 males and 7 females. Bones involved were the femur (12) tibia (5) and humerus (3). Average defect length was 15 cm and surgeries performed were intercalary replacement (5), resection arthrodesis (11), hemicondylar allograft (3), and allograft-prosthesis-composite (1). Follow-up ranged was from 17- 60 months or until death. Fifteen (1 5) were alive with NED (no evidence of disease), 3 were dead (2 of disease 1 of other causes), and 2 were AWED (alive with evidence of disease). Functional evaluation using the criteria of the International Society of Limb Salvage (ISOLS) was performed on 18 patients. This averaged 27.5 out of 30 points (92%) for 15 patients. Many having returned to their previous work and recreation. The 3 failures were due to infections in 2 cases (both of whom opted for amputations but who have not been fit with prostheses), and a fracture (secondary to a fall) in one case. Limb

  13. Heterotypic paracrine signaling drives fibroblast senescence and tumor progression of large cell carcinoma of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Andriani, Francesca; Puig, Marta; Facchinetti, Federica; Ramírez, Josep; Gómez-Caro, Abel; Pastorino, Ugo; Fuster, Gemma; Almendros, Isaac; Gascón, Pere; Davalos, Albert; Reguart, Noemí; Roz, Luca; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2016-12-13

    Senescence in cancer cells acts as a tumor suppressor, whereas in fibroblasts enhances tumor growth. Senescence has been reported in tumor associated fibroblasts (TAFs) from a growing list of cancer subtypes. However, the presence of senescent TAFs in lung cancer remains undefined. We examined senescence in TAFs from primary lung cancer and paired control fibroblasts from unaffected tissue in three major histologic subtypes: adenocarcinoma (ADC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and large cell carcinoma (LCC). Three independent senescence markers (senescence-associated beta-galactosidase, permanent growth arrest and spreading) were consistently observed in cultured LCC-TAFs only, revealing a selective premature senescence. Intriguingly, SCC-TAFs exhibited a poor growth response in the absence of senescence markers, indicating a dysfunctional phenotype rather than senescence. Co-culturing normal fibroblasts with LCC (but not ADC or SCC) cancer cells was sufficient to render fibroblasts senescent through oxidative stress, indicating that senescence in LCC-TAFs is driven by heterotypic signaling. In addition, senescent fibroblasts provided selective growth and invasive advantages to LCC cells in culture compared to normal fibroblasts. Likewise, senescent fibroblasts enhanced tumor growth and lung dissemination of tumor cells when co-injected with LCC cells in nude mice beyond the effects induced by control fibroblasts. These results define the subtype-specific aberrant phenotypes of lung TAFs, thereby challenging the common assumption that lung TAFs are a heterogeneous myofibroblast-like cell population regardless of their subtype. Importantly, because LCC often distinguishes itself in the clinic by its aggressive nature, we argue that senescent TAFs may contribute to the selective aggressive behavior of LCC tumors.

  14. Differentiation of large (≥5 cm) gastrointestinal stromal tumors from benign subepithelial tumors in the stomach: Radiologists’ performance using CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ye Ra [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung, E-mail: shkim7071@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun-Ah [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Cheong-il [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Seong Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To identify significant CT findings for the differentiation of large (≥5 cm) gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) from benign subepithelial tumors and to assess whether radiologists’ performance in differentiation is improved with knowledge of significant CT criteria. Materials and methods: One-hundred twenty patients with pathologically proven large (≥5 cm) GISTs (n = 99), schwannomas (n = 16), and leiomyomas (n = 5) who underwent CT were enrolled. Two radiologists (A and B) retrospectively reviewed their CT images in consensus for the location, size, degree and pattern of enhancement, contour, growth pattern and the presence of calcification, necrosis, surface ulceration, or enlarged lymph nodes. CT findings considered significant for differentiation were determined using uni- and multivariate statistical analyses. Thereafter, two successive review sessions for the differentiation of GIST from non-GIST were independently performed by two other reviewers (C and D) with different expertise of 2 and 9 years using a 5-point confidence scale. At the first session, reviewers interpreted CT images without knowledge of significant CT findings. At the second session, the results of statistical analyses were provided to the reviewers. To assess improvement in radiologists’ performance, a pairwise comparison of receiver operating curves (ROC) was performed. Results: Heterogeneous enhancement, presence of necrosis, absence of lymph nodes, and mean size of ≥6 cm were found to be significant for differentiating GIST from schwannoma (P < 0.05). Non-cardial location, heterogeneous enhancement, and presence of necrosis were differential CT features of GIST from leiomyoma (P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses indicated that absence of enlarged LNs was the only statistically significant variable for GIST differentiating from schwannoma. The area under the curve of both reviewers obtained using ROC significantly increased from 0.682 and 0.613 to 0.903 and 0

  15. Determinants of successful CD8+ T-cell adoptive immunotherapy for large established tumors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Christopher A; Gattinoni, Luca; Palmer, Douglas C; Muranski, Pawel; Ji, Yun; Hinrichs, Christian S; Borman, Zachary A; Kerkar, Sid P; Scott, Christopher D; Finkelstein, Steven E; Rosenberg, Steven A; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2011-08-15

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of tumor infiltrating or genetically engineered T cells can cause durable responses in patients with metastatic cancer. Multiple clinically modifiable parameters can comprise this therapy, including cell dose and phenotype, in vivo antigen restimulation, and common gamma-chain (γ(c)) cytokine support. However, the relative contributions of each these individual components to the magnitude of the antitumor response have yet to be quantified. To systematically and quantitatively appraise each of these variables, we employed the Pmel-1 mouse model treating large, established B16 melanoma tumors. In addition to cell dose and magnitude of in vivo antigen restimulation, we also evaluated the relative efficacy of central memory (T(CM)), effector memory (T(EM)), and stem cell memory (T(SCM)) subsets on the strength of tumor regression as well as the dose and type of clinically available γ(c) cytokines, including IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21. We found that cell dose, T-cell differentiation status, and viral vaccine titer each were correlated strongly and significantly with the magnitude of tumor regression. Surprisingly, although the total number of IL-2 doses was correlated with tumor regression, no significant benefit to prolonged (≥6 doses) administration was observed. Moreover, the specific type and dose of γ(c) cytokine only moderately correlated with response. Collectively, these findings elucidate some of the key determinants of successful ACT immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer in mice and further show that γ(c) cytokines offer a similar ability to effectively drive antitumor T-cell function in vivo. ©2011 AACR.

  16. Studies on reconstruction of large skin defects following mammary tumor excision in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhasivan, Sabarish Babu Malli; Shafiuzama, Mohamed; Shammi, Mala; Rao, Ganne Venkata Sudhakar; Souza, Nitin J D; Senthilnayagam, Hemalatha; George, Ravi Sundar; Prabhakar, P. Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The main objective of the study was to describe the use of skin fold advancement flaps (SFAFs) and other reconstructive techniques for closure of large skin defects following mammary tumor excision in dogs. Materials and Methods: Twelve dogs underwent reconstruction of large ventral skin defects following mammary tumor excision with wide margins. Skin fold flaps (flank fold flap and elbow fold flap) were elevated from the flank and elbow region, respectively, and transposed and sutured onto the large ventral skin defect following mastectomy in all the dogs. In addition to the skin fold flaps, other reconstructive techniques such as undermining, walking sutures, and tension-relieving suture techniques were followed during surgery in the closure of large skin defects without skin tension and compromising limb mobility. The skin flap viability was assessed subjectively by gross observation of the flap such as color, temperature, capillary perfusion, and cosmetic appearance, and scoring (1-4) was done. Tissue samples were collected from a surgical site on days 3, 6, and 12 post-operatively for histopathological evaluation and healing status of the skin flap. Results: All the surgical wounds healed primarily, without any major complications and the skin flap remained healthy throughout the healing process post-operatively. Distal flap necrosis was noticed in one case and necrosis of skin flap between two suture lines was noticed in another case in which the necrotized distal portion healed by secondary intention after 7 days. The mean survival of subdermal plexus flap in the above cases was 98% which was a subjective evaluation based on surface area of the skin defect measured by Image’ J software and the flap dimensions. The average healing of skin flap in days was 14.91±0.86. Conclusion: The SFAFs along with other reconstructive techniques help in the reconstruction of large ventral skin defects following mastectomy in dogs without much compromising limb

  17. Studies on reconstruction of large skin defects following mammary tumor excision in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabarish Babu Malli Sadhasivan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main objective of the study was to describe the use of skin fold advancement flaps (SFAFs and other reconstructive techniques for closure of large skin defects following mammary tumor excision in dogs. Materials and Methods: Twelve dogs underwent reconstruction of large ventral skin defects following mammary tumor excision with wide margins. Skin fold flaps (flank fold flap and elbow fold flap were elevated from the flank and elbow region, respectively, and transposed and sutured onto the large ventral skin defect following mastectomy in all the dogs. In addition to the skin fold flaps, other reconstructive techniques such as undermining, walking sutures, and tension-relieving suture techniques were followed during surgery in the closure of large skin defects without skin tension and compromising limb mobility. The skin flap viability was assessed subjectively by gross observation of the flap such as color, temperature, capillary perfusion, and cosmetic appearance, and scoring (1-4 was done. Tissue samples were collected from a surgical site on days 3, 6, and 12 post-operatively for histopathological evaluation and healing status of the skin flap. Results: All the surgical wounds healed primarily, without any major complications and the skin flap remained healthy throughout the healing process post-operatively. Distal flap necrosis was noticed in one case and necrosis of skin flap between two suture lines was noticed in another case in which the necrotized distal portion healed by secondary intention after 7 days. The mean survival of subdermal plexus flap in the above cases was 98% which was a subjective evaluation based on surface area of the skin defect measured by Image 'J software and the flap dimensions. The average healing of skin flap in days was 14.91±0.86. Conclusion: The SFAFs along with other reconstructive techniques help in the reconstruction of large ventral skin defects following mastectomy in dogs without much

  18. A casein-kinase-2-related protein kinase is tightly associated with the large T antigen of simian virus 40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Götz, C; Koenig, M G; Issinger, O G

    1995-01-01

    The simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen is a multifunctional protein involved in SV40 cell transformation and lytic virus infection. Some of its activities are regulated by interaction with cellular proteins and/or by phosphorylation of T antigen by various protein kinases. In this study, we...... of T antigen by the associated kinase is reduced whereas a p34cdc2-kinase-specific peptide has no influence. In addition, the T-antigen-associated protein kinase can use GTP and ATP as phosphate donors. These properties together with the observation that immunopurified T antigen can be phosphorylated...

  19. Androgenic dependence of exophytic tumor growth in a transgenic mouse model of bladder cancer: a role for thrombospondin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Jorge L

    2008-04-01

    FPDCT allows longitudinal monitoring of exophytic tumor growth in the UPII-SV40T model of BC that bypasses need for chemical carcinogens, which confound analysis of androgen effects. Androgens increase tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo and decrease TSP1 expression, possibly explaining the therapeutic effect of castration. This effect may, in part, explain gender differences in BC incidence and implies anti-androgenic therapies may be effective in preventing and treating BC.

  20. Myeloid leukemias and virally induced lymphomas in miniature inbred swine; development of a large animal tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAIMON eDURAN-STRUUCK

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the MGH miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in MHC characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model.

  1. Simian virus 40 infection in humans and association with human diseases: results and hypotheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Sabbioni, Silvia; Martini, Fernanda; Negrini, Massimo; Corallini, Alfredo; Tognon, Mauro

    2004-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a monkey virus that was introduced in the human population by contaminated poliovaccines, produced in SV40-infected monkey cells, between 1955 and 1963. Epidemiological evidence now suggests that SV40 may be contagiously transmitted in humans by horizontal infection, independent of the earlier administration of SV40-contaminated poliovaccines. This evidence includes detection of SV40 DNA sequences in human tissues and of SV40 antibodies in human sera, as well as rescue of infectious SV40 from a human tumor. Detection of SV40 DNA sequences in blood and sperm and of SV40 virions in sewage points to the hematic, sexual, and orofecal routes as means of virus transmission in humans. The site of latent infection in humans is not known, but the presence of SV40 in urine suggests the kidney as a possible site of latency, as it occurs in the natural monkey host. SV40 in humans is associated with inflammatory kidney diseases and with specific tumor types: mesothelioma, lymphoma, brain, and bone. These human tumors correspond to the neoplasms that are induced by SV40 experimental inoculation in rodents and by generation of transgenic mice with the SV40 early region gene directed by its own early promoter-enhancer. The mechanisms of SV40 tumorigenesis in humans are related to the properties of the two viral oncoproteins, the large T antigen (Tag) and the small t antigen (tag). Tag acts mainly by blocking the functions of p53 and RB tumor suppressor proteins, as well as by inducing chromosomal aberrations in the host cell. These chromosome alterations may hit genes important in oncogenesis and generate genetic instability in tumor cells. The clastogenic activity of Tag, which fixes the chromosome damage in the infected cells, may explain the low viral load in SV40-positive human tumors and the observation that Tag is expressed only in a fraction of tumor cells. 'Hit and run' seems the most plausible mechanism to support this situation. The small tag

  2. Reconstruction of Large Full Thickness Chest Wall Defects Following Resection of Malignant Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, E.A.; El-Zohairy, M.A.; Bukhari, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full-thickness chest wall resection is the well-established treatment for primary or metastatic chest wall tumors. Adequate surgery with large resections is always needed to achieve a radical resection in healthy tissues, leading to optimal local control of the disease. The purpose of this study is to present our experience in chest wall reconstruction after major tumor resection. Patients and Methods: Between January 2006 and January 2010, 18 consecutive patients who underwent major chest wall resections for primary or metastatic chest wall tumors were studied. All had resection of at least three ribs and immediate reconstruction. Surgical procedures, extent of the resection, resulting defects and postoperative morbidity and mortality were discussed. Results: Surgical indications included primary, recurrent and metastatic chest wall neoplasms, sarcoma and recurrent breast cancer were the most frequent diagnoses. Resection of 3 ribs was performed in 8 patients, while resection of more than 3 ribs was performed in 10 patients. Resection of sternum and adjacent costal cartilages was performed in one patient, right chest wall resections were performed in 7 patients while left chest wall resections were performed in 10 patients. Immediate repair of the defects was performed in all cases, all patient had placement of prosthesis either polypropylene or polytetrafluoroethylene, 3 patients had methylacrylate in addition to the prosthesis. Coverage w as achieved using myocutaneous flaps in 7 patients. Mechanical ventilation was needed in 11 patients with a mean duration of ventilation 2.211.8 days (range between 1- 6 days). No 30-days mortality was recorded. Four patients 22.2% developed complications, 2 patients need prolonged mechanical ventilation for respiratory insufficiency and 2 patients had partial flap necrosis and wound infection. Mean hospital stay was 10.1±3.2 days. Conclusion: Immediate reconstruction of large full thickness chest wall defects following

  3. Successful Flexible Bronchoscopic Management of Dynamic Central Airway Obstruction by a Large Tracheal Carcinoid Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Hadda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Typical carcinoid of the trachea presenting as an endoluminal polypoidal mass is a rare occurrence. Herein, we report a case of a 34-year-old female patient who presented with features of central airway obstruction. Flexible bronchoscopy demonstrated a large pedunculated growth arising from the lower end of the trachea near carina which was flopping in and out of the main tracheal lumen and the proximal right bronchus leading to dynamic airway obstruction. Successful electrosurgical excision (using a snare loop of the polypoidal growth was performed using the flexible bronchoscope itself. The patient had immediate relief of airway obstruction and histopathological examination of the polyp demonstrated features of typical carcinoid (WHO Grade I neuroendocrine tumor.

  4. Successful Flexible Bronchoscopic Management of Dynamic Central Airway Obstruction by a Large Tracheal Carcinoid Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Karan; Mohan, Anant; Kalai, Umasankar; Guleria, Randeep

    2014-01-01

    Typical carcinoid of the trachea presenting as an endoluminal polypoidal mass is a rare occurrence. Herein, we report a case of a 34-year-old female patient who presented with features of central airway obstruction. Flexible bronchoscopy demonstrated a large pedunculated growth arising from the lower end of the trachea near carina which was flopping in and out of the main tracheal lumen and the proximal right bronchus leading to dynamic airway obstruction. Successful electrosurgical excision (using a snare loop) of the polypoidal growth was performed using the flexible bronchoscope itself. The patient had immediate relief of airway obstruction and histopathological examination of the polyp demonstrated features of typical carcinoid (WHO Grade I neuroendocrine tumor). PMID:25478275

  5. EGF-induced EMT and invasiveness in serous borderline ovarian tumor cells: a possible step in the transition to low-grade serous carcinoma cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Auersperg, Nelly; Leung, Peter C K

    2012-01-01

    In high-grade ovarian cancer cultures, it has been shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces cell invasion by activating an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the effect of EGF on serous borderline ovarian tumors (SBOT) and low-grade serous carcinomas (LGC) cell invasion remains unknown. Here, we show that EGF receptor (EGFR) was expressed, that EGF treatment increased cell migration and invasion in two cultured SBOT cell lines, SBOT3.1 and SV40 large T antigen-infected SBOT cells (SBOT4-LT), and in two cultured LGC cell lines, MPSC1 and SV40 LT/ST-immortalized LGC cells (ILGC). However, EGF induced down-regulation of E-cadherin and concurrent up-regulation of N-cadherin in SBOT cells but not in LGC cells. In SBOT cells, the expression of the transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin, Snail, Slug and ZEB1 were increased by EGF treatment. Treatment with EGF led to the activation of the downstream ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt. The MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 diminished the EGF-induced cadherin switch and the up-regulation of Snail, Slug and ZEB1 and the EGF-mediated increase in SBOT cell migration and invasion. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 had similar effects, but it could not block the EGF-induced up-regulation of N-cadherin and ZEB1. This study demonstrates that EGF induces SBOT cell migration and invasion by activating EMT, which involves the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways and, subsequently, Snail, Slug and ZEB1 expression. Moreover, our results suggest that there are EMT-independent mechanisms that mediate the EGF-induced LGC cell migration and invasion.

  6. EGF-induced EMT and invasiveness in serous borderline ovarian tumor cells: a possible step in the transition to low-grade serous carcinoma cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Chien Cheng

    Full Text Available In high-grade ovarian cancer cultures, it has been shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF induces cell invasion by activating an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. However, the effect of EGF on serous borderline ovarian tumors (SBOT and low-grade serous carcinomas (LGC cell invasion remains unknown. Here, we show that EGF receptor (EGFR was expressed, that EGF treatment increased cell migration and invasion in two cultured SBOT cell lines, SBOT3.1 and SV40 large T antigen-infected SBOT cells (SBOT4-LT, and in two cultured LGC cell lines, MPSC1 and SV40 LT/ST-immortalized LGC cells (ILGC. However, EGF induced down-regulation of E-cadherin and concurrent up-regulation of N-cadherin in SBOT cells but not in LGC cells. In SBOT cells, the expression of the transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin, Snail, Slug and ZEB1 were increased by EGF treatment. Treatment with EGF led to the activation of the downstream ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt. The MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 diminished the EGF-induced cadherin switch and the up-regulation of Snail, Slug and ZEB1 and the EGF-mediated increase in SBOT cell migration and invasion. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 had similar effects, but it could not block the EGF-induced up-regulation of N-cadherin and ZEB1. This study demonstrates that EGF induces SBOT cell migration and invasion by activating EMT, which involves the activation of the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways and, subsequently, Snail, Slug and ZEB1 expression. Moreover, our results suggest that there are EMT-independent mechanisms that mediate the EGF-induced LGC cell migration and invasion.

  7. High yield of synchronous lesions in referred patients with large lateral spreading colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Benjamin L; Ponugoti, Prasanna L; Rex, Douglas K

    2017-01-01

    There are few data on the prevalence of synchronous colorectal lesions in patients who have large lateral spreading tumors (LLSTs). We sought to describe the rate of synchronous lesions found in patients who underwent endoscopic resection of large sessile adenomas and serrated lesions. This is a retrospective assessment of a prospectively created database of 728 consecutive patients with resected LLSTs who underwent complete clearing of the colon during 2 colonoscopies by a single expert endoscopist. The 728 patients with resected LLSTs and complete clearing had 4578 synchronous lesions, including 584 patients (80.2%) with at least 1 synchronous conventional adenoma, 132 (18.1%) with at least 1 synchronous conventional adenoma ≥ 20 mm in size, 294 (40.4%) with at least 1 synchronous advanced conventional adenoma, and 6 patients with a synchronous lesion with cancer. Patients with an index large sessile conventional adenoma compared with those with an index large serrated lesion had on average more synchronous conventional adenomas (4.8 vs 2.9, P = .001) and fewer synchronous serrated lesions (1.4 vs 4.5, P < .001). Of the 97 patients with a serrated class index lesion, 28 (28.9%) met criteria for serrated polyposis. There is a very high prevalence of synchronous lesions, including other large and advanced synchronous lesions, in patients with flat or sessile conventional adenomas and serrated colorectal polyps. Patients with LLSTs in the colon need detailed clearing of the rest of the colon. Patients referred for endoscopic resection of serrated lesions ≥ 20 mm have a very high prevalence of serrated polyposis. This study has potential implications for further stratification of high-risk patient groups in postpolypectomy surveillance guidelines. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Large cell/anaplastic medulloblastoma with myogenic, melanotic and neuronal differentiation: A case report of a rare tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany A. Fathaddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is an embryonal neuroepithelial tumor of the cerebellum and is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor in children. Different histological variants and patterns have been described. The classic variant represents the majority of cases. This report describes a rare case of large cell/anaplastic medulloblastoma with myogenic, melanotic and neuronal differentiation arising in the cerebellum of a 3-year-old boy who presented with headache and vomiting. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a heterogeneously enhanced lesion in the fourth ventricle. Surgical resection of the tumor was accomplished, but a residual tumor was left behind because of the involvement of the brainstem. Postoperatively, the patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently, 20 months after treatment, the patient has survived without further progression. Pathological examination revealed a high grade primitive neuronal tumor with foci of myogenic features, melanin containing epithelial elements and ganglion-like cells, which were confirmed by immunohistochemistry.

  9. LARG at chromosome 11q23 has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Danny C.T.; Rudduck, Christina; Chin, Koei; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lie, Daniel K.H.; Chua, Constance L.M.; Wong, Chow Yin; Hong, Ga Sze; Gray, Joe; Lee, Ann S.G.

    2008-05-06

    Deletion of 11q23-q24 is frequent in a diverse variety of malignancies, including breast and colorectal carcinoma, implicating the presence of a tumor suppressor gene at that chromosomal region. We show here that LARG, from 11q23, has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor. We examined a 6-Mb region on 11q23 by high-resolution deletion mapping, utilizing both loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis and microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). LARG (also called ARHGEF12), identified from the analyzed region, was underexpressed in 34% of primary breast carcinomas and 80% of breast cancer cell lines including the MCF-7 line. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification on 30 primary breast cancers and six breast cancer cell lines showed that LARG had the highest frequency of deletion compared to the BCSC-1 and TSLC1 genes, two known candidate tumor suppressor genes from 11q. In vitro analysis of breast cancer cell lines that underexpress LARG showed that LARG could be reactivated by trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, but not by 5-Aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent. Bisulfite sequencing and quantitative high-throughput analysis of DNA methylation confirmed the lack of CpG island methylation in LARG in breast cancer. Restoration of LARG expression in MCF-7 cells by stable transfection resulted in reduced proliferation and colony formation, suggesting that LARG has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor gene.

  10. Stromal tumor presents as a large extragastrointestinal mass in the abdominal cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Chung-Kai; Hsu, Chia-Yang; Chan, Che-Chang; Li, Anna; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are nonepithelial neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract and have been increasingly recognized in recent years. In contrast, stromal tumor outside the gastrointestinal tract is not frequently found. Here, we present a 57-year-old male patient who had abdominal fullness for several months. It was caused by a 23-cm heterogeneous tumor mass that was successfully removed from the left upper abdominal cavity. The tumor adhered tightly to adjacent organs but postope...

  11. Plastic surgery for large wound defects using vascularized flops in treatment of skin and soft-tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotkevich, E.A.; Zalutskij, I.V.; Ismail-Zade, R.S.; Frolov, G.N.

    1992-01-01

    The results were presented on plastic and reconstructive -anaplastic surgery in resection of locally spread and relapse tumors of the skin and soft tissues after multiple courses of radiation and combined treatment. 38 patients with skin melanoma and softtissue sarcomas received radio- and/or chemotherapy in preoperative period under conditions of local hyperthermia of the tumor. Two types of plasty of large wound defects using vascularized flaps were considered

  12. Pattern of antitumor activity of a novel camptothecin, ST1481, in a large panel of human tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratesi, Graziella; De Cesare, Michelandrea; Carenini, Nives; Perego, Paola; Righetti, Sabina C; Cucco, Carla; Merlini, Lucio; Pisano, Claudio; Penco, Sergio; Carminati, Paolo; Vesci, Loredana; Zunino, Franco

    2002-12-01

    ST1481 is the lead compound of a novel series of 7-modified camptothecins, the 7-oxyimino methyl derivatives, characterized by potent topoisomerase I inhibition and cytotoxic activity. Based on its therapeutic efficacy in a human non-small cell lung carcinoma model and its favorable pharmacological profile, the novel analogue was selected for further preclinical development. We investigated the growth-inhibitory effects of ST1481 and topotecan, used as a reference compound, in a panel of human tumor cell lines of various tumor types (ovarian carcinoma, glioblastoma, osteosarcoma, and melanoma), including sublines with acquired resistance to cisplatin. We explored the antitumor efficacy in a large panel of human tumor xenografts, with particular reference to intrinsically resistant tumor types, using oral administration and an intermittent treatment schedule. ST1481 showed a potent antiproliferative activity with comparable effects in all tested cell lines. Only U-87-MG glioma cells were less sensitive, presumably as a consequence of the efficiency of the S-phase checkpoint. ST1481 produced a remarkable antitumor effect (tumor volume inhibition > 85%) in 16 of 18 examined models, with an appreciable rate of complete tumor regressions in 11 of 18 models (despite the nonoptimal intermittent treatment schedule). The most impressive antitumor effects were observed against lung carcinoma, melanoma, and osteosarcoma models, as documented by the high rate of complete responses (up to 100%). The efficacy of ST1481 was significantly superior to that of topotecan in 9 of 17 tumors. The novel drug was also markedly effective against slowly growing tumors (A549 lung carcinoma and HT29 colon carcinoma) when a daily protracted treatment was used to fully exploit the therapeutic potential of camptothecins. The unusual potency of ST1481 in a variety of tumor cell lines suggests the ability of the drug to overcome several resistance factors. The profile of antitumor efficacy further

  13. Classification of large circulating tumor cells isolated with ultra-high throughput microfluidic Vortex technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, James; Yu, Victor; Dhar, Manjima; Renier, Corinne; Matsumoto, Melissa; Heirich, Kyra; Garon, Edward B.; Goldman, Jonathan; Rao, Jianyu; Sledge, George W.; Pegram, Mark D.; Sheth, Shruti; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Sollier, Elodie; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are emerging as rare but clinically significant non-invasive cellular biomarkers for cancer patient prognosis, treatment selection, and treatment monitoring. Current CTC isolation approaches, such as immunoaffinity, filtration, or size-based techniques, are often limited by throughput, purity, large output volumes, or inability to obtain viable cells for downstream analysis. For all technologies, traditional immunofluorescent staining alone has been employed to distinguish and confirm the presence of isolated CTCs among contaminating blood cells, although cells isolated by size may express vastly different phenotypes. Consequently, CTC definitions have been non-trivial, researcher-dependent, and evolving. Here we describe a complete set of objective criteria, leveraging well-established cytomorphological features of malignancy, by which we identify large CTCs. We apply the criteria to CTCs enriched from stage IV lung and breast cancer patient blood samples using the High Throughput Vortex Chip (Vortex HT), an improved microfluidic technology for the label-free, size-based enrichment and concentration of rare cells. We achieve improved capture efficiency (up to 83%), high speed of processing (8 mL/min of 10x diluted blood, or 800 μL/min of whole blood), and high purity (avg. background of 28.8±23.6 white blood cells per mL of whole blood). We show markedly improved performance of CTC capture (84% positive test rate) in comparison to previous Vortex designs and the current FDA-approved gold standard CellSearch assay. The results demonstrate the ability to quickly collect viable and pure populations of abnormal large circulating cells unbiased by molecular characteristics, which helps uncover further heterogeneity in these cells. PMID:26863573

  14. Tumor necrosis at FDG-PET is an independent predictor of outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hugo J A; De Klerk, John M H; Fijnheer, Rob; Heggelman, Ben G F; Dubois, Stefan V.; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Kwee, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prognostic performance of tumor necrosis at FDG-PET in patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who are treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) therapy. Materials and methods 108 patients with

  15. Large gastrointestinal stromal tumor and advanced adenocarcinoma in the rectum coexistent with an incidental prostate carcinoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Radical surgery with perioperative adjuvant chemotherapy using tyrosine kinase inhibitors is the choice for treatment of large GISTs with a malignant potential. Our report suggests that aggressive surgical approach would be feasible, when a secondary tumor is present near the GIST.

  16. Giant Cell Tumor of Rib Arising Anteriorly as a Large Inframammary Mass: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sharma

    2012-01-01

    posteriorly. The rarity of this tumor poses diagnostic and therapeutic problems for physicians, especially when it is located in the anterior arc of the rib in close proximity to the breasts in female patients. Case Presentation. We report the case of a 32-year-old Asian female with a giant cell tumor of her anterior rib, presenting as a large inframammary mass. Computed tomography showed a tumor arising from the 7th rib anteriorly with marginal sclerosis, cortical destruction, and a soft tissue mass. She was treated with surgical resection, and the defect was reconstructed primarily. The surgical specimen measured 28.0 × 24.0 cm. The microscopic examination showed a large number of multinucleate giant cells scattered over the parenchyma. Patient recovered uneventfully and continues to be recurrence-free six years after surgical resection. Conclusion. We report the largest known case of giant cell tumor arising from the anterior aspect of a rib. We recommend including giant cell tumor in the differential diagnosis of chest wall masses especially in female patients, regardless of the size on clinical examination.

  17. A probiotic strain of L. acidophilus reduces DMH-induced large intestinal tumors in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, G H; Royle, P J; Playne, M J

    1999-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria strains were examined for their influence on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced intestinal tumors in 100 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Lactobacillus acidophilus (Delvo Pro LA-1), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (GG), Bifidobacterium animalis (CSCC1941), and Streptococcus thermophilus (DD145) strains were examined for their influence when added as freeze-dried bacteria to an experimental diet based on a high-fat semipurified (AIN-93) rodent diet. Four bacterial treatments were compared: L. acidophilus, L. acidophilus + B. animalis, L. rhamnosus, and S. thermophilus, the bacteria being added daily at 1% freeze-dried weight (10(10) colony-forming units/g) to the diet. Trends were observed in the incidence of rats with large intestinal tumors for three treatments: 25% lower than control for L. acidophilus, 20% lower for L. acidophilus + B. animalis and L. rhamnosus treatments, and 10% lower for S. thermophilus. Large intestinal tumor burden was significantly lower for treated rats with L. acidophilus than for the control group (10 and 3 tumors/treatment group, respectively, p = 0.05). Large intestinal tumor mass index was also lower for the L. acidophilus treatment than for control (1.70 and 0.10, respectively, p L. acidophilus, no adenocarcinomas were present in the colons. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of bacterial chromosomal DNA fragments was used to differentiate introduced (exogenous) bacterial strains from indigenous bacteria of the same genera present in the feces. Survival during gut passage and displacement of indigenous lactobacilli occurred with introduced L. acidophilus and L. rhamnosus GG during the probiotic treatment period. However, introduced strains of B. animalis and S. thermophilus were not able to be isolated from feces. It is concluded that this strain of L. acidophilus supplied as freeze-dried bacteria in the diet was protective, as seen by a small but significant inhibition of tumors within the rat colon.

  18. Response to Anastrozole Treatment in a Case with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome and a Large Cell Calcifying Sertoli Cell Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç Yekedüz, Merve; Şıklar, Zeynep; Burgu, Berk; Kuloğlu, Zarife; Kocaay, Pınar; Çamtosun, Emine; İsakoca, Mehmet; Kansu, Aydan; Soygür, Tarkan; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2017-06-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait characterized by multiple gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and an increased risk of neoplasm. Large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumor (LCCSCT) is a kind of sex cord-stromal tumor which may co-exist with PJS and which is characterized radiologically by calcification foci within the testes. Surgical treatment options for this tumor range from testis-preserving surgery to radical orchiectomy. Not with standing this invasive approach, recently, there are some case reports demonstrating the efficacy of aromatase inhibitors in avoiding orchiectomy and its associated complications. In this paper, we have presented a LCCSCT case diagnosed in a boy with PJS and his response to anastrozole treatment.

  19. High expression of dopamine receptor subtype 2 in a large series of neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Veronese, Silvio; Ciaramella, Paolo Dalino; Pugliese, Raffaele; Boniardi, Marco; De Carlis, Luciano; Torre, Massimo; Ravini, Mario; Gambacorta, Marcello; Loli, Paola

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate by immumohistochemistry the presence of DR subtype 2 (D2R) in well differentiated NETs of different sites and in normal islet cells. Recent data in vitro and in vivo support that dopaminergic drugs might exert an inhibitory effect on hormone secretion and, possibly, on tumor growth in neuroendocrine tumors (NET)s. Their potential therapeutic role needs the demonstration of dopamine receptors (DR) in tumor cells. Little is known on the expression of DR in NETs. 85% of samples (100% of bronchial carcinoids and 93% of islet cell tumors) showed positivity for D2R; intensity of immunoreaction in NETs was similar or higher than in pituitary (54% and respectively 31% of cases). D2R positivity in more than 70% of tumor cells was observed in 46% of samples. Same intensity of D2R-immunoreactivity was found in pituitary and normal islet cells. No differences in D2R expression were recorded on considering tumor grading, size, proliferative activity, presence of metastases, endocrine activity and gender. A significant difference (62.5% vs 96.4%, p = 0.039) was observed in the prevalence of D2R expression between patients with more aggressive tumors and patients without recurrence/progression of disease during follow-up. 46 NET samples from 44 patients and normal endocrine pancreatic tissue were studied. D2R-staining was performed on NETs and compared with six non-secreting pituitary adenomas and related to clinical-pathological data. The present data demonstrate a high expression of D2R in NETs; this finding is of clinical relevance in view of the potential role of dopaminergic drugs in inhibiting secretion and/or cell proliferation in NETs.

  20. Asymmetric Assembly of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T-Antigen Origin Binding Domains at the Viral Origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Harrison; G Meinke; H Kwun; H Rogalin; P Phelan; P Bullock; Y Chang; P Moore; A Bohm

    2011-12-31

    The double-stranded DNA polyomavirus Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive but rare human skin cancer that most often affects immunosuppressed and elderly persons. As in other polyomaviruses, the large T-antigen of MCV recognizes the viral origin of replication by binding repeating G(A/G)GGC pentamers. The spacing, number, orientation, and necessity of repeats for viral replication differ, however, from other family members such as SV40 and murine polyomavirus. We report here the 2.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the MCV large T-antigen origin binding domain (OBD) in complex with a DNA fragment from the MCV origin of replication. Consistent with replication data showing that three of the G(A/G)GGC-like binding sites near the center of the origin are required for replication, the crystal structure contains three copies of the OBD. This stoichiometry was verified using isothermal titration calorimetry. The affinity for G(A/G)GGC-containing double-stranded DNA was found to be {approx} 740 nM, approximately 8-fold weaker than the equivalent domain in SV40 for the analogous region of the SV40 origin. The difference in affinity is partially attributable to DNA-binding residue Lys331 (Arg154 in SV40). In contrast to SV40, a small protein-protein interface is observed between MCV OBDs when bound to the central region of the origin. This protein-protein interface is reminiscent of that seen in bovine papilloma virus E1 protein. Mutational analysis indicates, however, that this interface contributes little to DNA binding energy.

  1. Automatic Multiple-Needle Surgical Planning of Robotic-Assisted Microwave Coagulation in Large Liver Tumor Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoli Liu

    Full Text Available The "robotic-assisted liver tumor coagulation therapy" (RALTCT system is a promising candidate for large liver tumor treatment in terms of accuracy and speed. A prerequisite for effective therapy is accurate surgical planning. However, it is difficult for the surgeon to perform surgical planning manually due to the difficulties associated with robot-assisted large liver tumor therapy. These main difficulties include the following aspects: (1 multiple needles are needed to destroy the entire tumor, (2 the insertion trajectories of the needles should avoid the ribs, blood vessels, and other tissues and organs in the abdominal cavity, (3 the placement of multiple needles should avoid interference with each other, (4 an inserted needle will cause some deformation of liver, which will result in changes in subsequently inserted needles' operating environment, and (5 the multiple needle-insertion trajectories should be consistent with the needle-driven robot's movement characteristics. Thus, an effective multiple-needle surgical planning procedure is needed. To overcome these problems, we present an automatic multiple-needle surgical planning of optimal insertion trajectories to the targets, based on a mathematical description of all relevant structure surfaces. The method determines the analytical expression of boundaries of every needle "collision-free reachable workspace" (CFRW, which are the feasible insertion zones based on several constraints. Then, the optimal needle insertion trajectory within the optimization criteria will be chosen in the needle CFRW automatically. Also, the results can be visualized with our navigation system. In the simulation experiment, three needle-insertion trajectories were obtained successfully. In the in vitro experiment, the robot successfully achieved insertion of multiple needles. The proposed automatic multiple-needle surgical planning can improve the efficiency and safety of robot-assisted large liver tumor

  2. Automatic Multiple-Needle Surgical Planning of Robotic-Assisted Microwave Coagulation in Large Liver Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaoli; Xia, Zeyang; Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Jing; Ren, He; Lu, Tong; Yang, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    The "robotic-assisted liver tumor coagulation therapy" (RALTCT) system is a promising candidate for large liver tumor treatment in terms of accuracy and speed. A prerequisite for effective therapy is accurate surgical planning. However, it is difficult for the surgeon to perform surgical planning manually due to the difficulties associated with robot-assisted large liver tumor therapy. These main difficulties include the following aspects: (1) multiple needles are needed to destroy the entire tumor, (2) the insertion trajectories of the needles should avoid the ribs, blood vessels, and other tissues and organs in the abdominal cavity, (3) the placement of multiple needles should avoid interference with each other, (4) an inserted needle will cause some deformation of liver, which will result in changes in subsequently inserted needles' operating environment, and (5) the multiple needle-insertion trajectories should be consistent with the needle-driven robot's movement characteristics. Thus, an effective multiple-needle surgical planning procedure is needed. To overcome these problems, we present an automatic multiple-needle surgical planning of optimal insertion trajectories to the targets, based on a mathematical description of all relevant structure surfaces. The method determines the analytical expression of boundaries of every needle "collision-free reachable workspace" (CFRW), which are the feasible insertion zones based on several constraints. Then, the optimal needle insertion trajectory within the optimization criteria will be chosen in the needle CFRW automatically. Also, the results can be visualized with our navigation system. In the simulation experiment, three needle-insertion trajectories were obtained successfully. In the in vitro experiment, the robot successfully achieved insertion of multiple needles. The proposed automatic multiple-needle surgical planning can improve the efficiency and safety of robot-assisted large liver tumor therapy

  3. Ras signaling influences permissiveness of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells to oncolytic herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farassati, Faris; Pan, Weihong; Yamoutpour, Farnaz; Henke, Susann; Piedra, Mark; Frahm, Silke; Al-Tawil, Said; Mangrum, Wells I; Parada, Luis F; Rabkin, Samuel D; Martuza, Robert L; Kurtz, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    Lack of expression of neurofibromin in neurofibromatosis 1 and its lethal derivative, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), is thought to result in the overactivation of the Ras signaling pathway. Our previous studies have shown that cells with overactivation in the Ras pathway are more permissive to infection with herpes simplex virus 1 and its mutant version R3616. In this study, we show that among five different mouse MPNST cell lines, only the ones with elevated levels of Ras signaling are highly permissive to infection with oncolytic herpes G207. Specific inhibitors of the Ras, ERK, and JNK pathways all reduced the synthesis of viral proteins in MPNST cells. The cell lines that contained lower levels of Ras and decreased activation of downstream signaling components underwent an enhancement in apoptosis upon exposure to G207. Additionally, mouse SW10 Schwann cells were able to become infected by parental herpes but were found to be resistant to G207. The immortalization of these cell lines with the expression of SV40 large T antigen increased the levels of Ras activation and permissiveness to oncolytic herpes. A Ras/Raf kinase inhibitor reduced the synthesis of both herpes simplex virus-1 and G207 proteins in SW10 cells. The results of this study, therefore, introduce Ras signaling as a divergent turning point for the response of MPNST cells to an assault by oncolytic herpes.

  4. A Hard Ball for a Tennis Player: A Rare Case of Large Calcifying Sertoli Cell Testicular Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Albisinni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A 46 year old tennis player was addressed to our clinic after incidental finding of right testicular calcification on plain x-ray of the spine. Urologic consultation revealed a hard non-tender testicular mass which required inguinal orchiectomy. Final histology revealed large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumor: we herein present the case and review current physiopathology of such rare testicular disease.

  5. SU-F-T-538: CyberKnife with MLC for Treatment of Large Volume Tumors: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bichay, T; Mayville, A [Mercy Health, Saint Mary’s, Grand Rapids, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: CyberKnife is a well-documented modality for SRS and SBRT treatments. Typical tumors are small and 1–5 fractions are usually used. We determined the feasibility of using CyberKnife, with an InCise multileaf collimator option, for larger tumors undergoing standard dose and fractionation. The intent was to understand the limitation of using this modality for other external beam radiation treatments. Methods: Five tumors from different anatomical sites with volumes from 127.8 cc to 1,320.5 cc were contoured and planned on a Multiplan V5.1 workstation. The target average diameter ranged from 7 cm to 13 cm. The dose fractionation was 1.8–2.0 Gy/fraction and 25–45 fractions for total doses of 45–81 Gy. The sites planned were: pancreas, head and neck, prostate, anal, and esophagus. The plans were optimized to meet conventional dose constraints based on various RTOG protocols for conventional fractionation. Results: The Multiplan treatment planning system successfully generated clinically acceptable plans for all sites studied. The resulting dose distributions achieved reasonable target coverage, all greater than 95%, and satisfactory normal tissue sparing. Treatment times ranged from 9 minutes to 38 minutes, the longest being a head and neck plan with dual targets receiving different doses and with multiple adjacent critical structures. Conclusion: CyberKnife, with the InCise multileaf collimation option, can achieve acceptable dose distributions in large volume tumors treated with conventional dose and fractionation. Although treatment times are greater than conventional accelerator time; target coverage and dose to critical structures can be kept within a clinically acceptable range. While time limitations exist, when necessary CyberKnife can provide an alternative to traditional treatment modalities for large volume tumors.

  6. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications.

  7. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of large size, extragastrointestinal localization and different morphological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shpon’ka I.S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problems of accurate verification of the gastro¬intestinal stromal tumor are relevant today for many reasons. Thus, the histological diagnosis is complicated by the morphological similarity of other gastrointestinal tract mesenchymal neoplasms and by histologicaly different zones within the same investigation. We present the situation with the above issues: the differential diagnosis includes an analysis of morphological criteria and received immunohisto-chemical reactions. Between immunophenotypes of histologicaly different zones principal difference is not revealed.

  8. A large giant cell tumor of the larynx: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Andrew; LeBlanc, Rachelle; Spafford, Peter

    2017-04-04

    Giant cell tumors (GCTs) are typically found in the metaphyseal-epiphyseal area of long bones but can also occur in the head and neck region. GCT of the larynx is a rare entity with only 42 reported cases in the international literature. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge this is the largest laryngeal GCT reported in the literature to date. GCT of the larynx can present with dysphonia, dyspnea, and/or dysphagia and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a neck mass. This case report describes a giant cell tumor of the left thyroid cartilage in a 30-year-old man who initially presented with dysphonia and dysphagia. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a 5 × 5.7 cm mass centered on the left thyroid cartilage, which was further diagnosed by histopathology as giant cell tumour by open biopsy. The patient was counselled on treatment options and it was decided to proceed with a surgical approach. The patient consented to and successfully underwent a total laryngectomy (TL). Currently the patient has no evidence of disease at 13 months follow-up, has an optimal prosthetic voice, and is able to tolerate all textures of foods. GCTs of the larynx have a good prognosis and can be treated successfully through complete resection of the tumor, negating the need for adjunctive therapy such as radiation, chemo or denosumab therapy.

  9. [Clinical observation of a conservative treatment for large keratocystic odontogenic tumors in the mandible: enucleation followed by open packing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, Liu; Hongzhi, Zhou; Rui, Hou; Yuxiang, Ding; Ruifeng, Qin; Kaijin, Hu

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to present the long-term effects of open healing of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) in the mandible. A retrospective case series study was conducted on 41 patients with large KCOTs (the maximum diameter of the tumors exceeded 5 cm) treated at our institution between September 2003 and April 2011. A conservative surgical treatment was applied. The treatment involved enucleation of the primary lesion through narrow unroofing and open packing of the residual osseous defect with iodoform gauze for secondary healing. Bone regenera- tion and surgical complications were observed. The long-term effects of the treatment were followed up. The inferior alveolar nerve was exposed in the KCOT bone cavity in all cases, and some nerves adhered to the tumor tightly. The post- operative follow-up time was 81.5 months on the average (36 to 127 months). The packing gauze was changed every two weeks after enucleation, and the total duration time for packing was 8.9 months on the average (3 to 15 months). Notable bone regeneration and satisfactory secondary healing were observed clinically and radiographically. The KCOT-affected teeth were reserved, and their chewing functions were restored. Two cases presented recurrences after the initial treatment. The recurrence rate was 4.9% (2/41). No serious complications were observed. Enucleation associated with subsequent open packing is a reliable treatment for patients with large KCOTs in the mandible.

  10. Use of Aromatase Inhibitors in Large Cell Calcifying Sertoli Cell Tumors: Effects on Gynecomastia, Growth Velocity, and Bone Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Melissa K.; Gourgari, Evgenia; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LCCSCT) present in isolation or, especially in children, in association with Carney Complex (CNC) or Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS). These tumors overexpress aromatase (CYP19A1), which leads to increased conversion of delta-4-androstenedione to estrone and testosterone to estradiol. Prepubertal boys may present with growth acceleration, advanced bone age, and gynecomastia. Objective: To investigate the outcomes of aromatase inhibitor therapy (AIT) in prepubertal boys with LCCSCTs. Design: Case series of a very rare tumor and chart review of cases treated at other institutions. Setting: Tertiary care and referral center. Patients: Six boys, five with PJS and one with CNC, were referred to the National Institutes of Health for treatment of LCCSCT. All patients had gynecomastia, testicular enlargement, and advanced bone ages, and were being treated by their referring physicians with AIT. Interventions: Patients were treated for a total of 6–60 months on AIT. Main Outcome Measures: Height, breast tissue mass, and testicular size were all followed; physical examination, scrotal ultrasounds, and bone ages were obtained, and hormonal concentrations and tumor markers were measured. Results: Tumor markers were negative. All patients had decreases in breast tissue while on therapy. Height percentiles declined, and predicted adult height moved closer to midparental height as bone age advancement slowed. Testicular enlargement stabilized until entry into central puberty. Only one patient required unilateral orchiectomy. Conclusions: Patients with LCCSCT benefit from AIT with reduction and/or elimination of gynecomastia and slowing of linear growth and bone age advancement. Further study of long-term outcomes and safety monitoring are needed but these preliminary data suggest that mammoplasty and/or orchiectomy may be foregone in light of the availability of medical therapy. PMID:25226294

  11. Selective cytotoxicity of transformed cells but not normal cells by a sialoglycopeptide growth regulator in the presence of tumor necrosis factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, K. M.; Fattaey, H.; Johnson, T. C.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-resistant, SV40-transformed, murine fibroblast cell lines, F5b and F5m, became sensitive to TNF-mediated cytolysis after treatment with a biologically active 18 kDa peptide fragment (SGP) derived from a 66-kDa parental cell surface sialoglycoprotein. Neither TNF nor the SGP alone exhibited cytotoxicity to the two SV40-transformed cell lines. However, Balb/c 3T3 cells, incubated with SGP alone or with SGP and TNF, were not killed. Therefore, SGP can selectively sensitize cells for TNF alpha-mediated cytotoxicity. This selective sensitization may be due to the previously documented ability of the SGP to selectively mediate cell cycle arrest.

  12. Failure to induce tumors in the large intestine of Capuchin mokeys (Cebus apella) by using 1,2-dimethylhydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Negrette, M; Borda, J T; Montenegro, M A; Lertora, W J; Gimeno, E J

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce tumors in the large intestine of Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella) by the administration of the colonotropic carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). The subjects were 12 monkeys, all males, age 30 months, with a mean weight of 2.858 kg. The DMH was administered subcutaneously to six of the monkeys at a dosage of 25 mg/kg of body weight once a week for 16 weeks; control monkeys received an equivalent volume of the stock solution without DMH. Twenty months after administration of the first dose, the animals were sacrificed. None of the monkeys showed intestinal tumors. Samples of the gastrointestinal tract were removed, fixed, and stained according to standard histological techniques. Histological changes were seen in all of the DMH-treated animals; these consisted of glandular hyperplasia and hyperplasia of the epithelium overlying the lymphoid nodules. In addition, foci of dysplasia were found in three of the animals. Our results suggest that the DMH induced pre-neoplastic changes, characterized by hyperplasia and dysplasia, in the mucosa of the large intestine.

  13. Laparoscopic versus open distal pancreatectomy for nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a large single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Hyup; Han, In Woong; Heo, Jin Seok; Choi, Seong Ho; Choi, Dong Wook; Han, Sunjong; You, Yung Hun

    2018-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) account for 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Nonfunctioning PNETs (NF-PNETs) account for 60-90% of all PNETs. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is becoming the treatment of choice for benign lesions in the body and tail of the pancreas. However, LDP has not yet been widely accepted as the gold standard for NF-PNETs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and oncologic outcomes after laparoscopic versus open distal pancreatectomy (ODP) for NF-PNETs. Between April 1995 and September 2016, 94 patients with NF-PNETs underwent open or laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy at Samsung Medical Center. Patients were divided into two groups: those who underwent LDP and those who underwent ODP. Both groups were compared in terms of clinical and oncologic variables. LDP patients had a significantly shorter hospital stay compared with ODP patients, amounting to a mean difference of 2 days (p < 0.001). Overall complication rates did not differ significantly between the ODP and LDP groups (p = 0.379). The 3-year overall survival rates in the ODP and LDP groups were 93.7 and 100%, respectively (p = 0.069). In this study, LDP for NF-PNETs had similar oncologic outcomes compared with ODP. In addition, LDP was associated with a shorter hospital stay compared with ODP. Therefore, LDP is a safe and effective procedure for patients with NF-PNETs. A multicenter study and a randomized controlled trial are needed to better assess the clinical and oncologic outcomes.

  14. Early reconstruction of bone defect created after initial surgery of a large keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matijević Stevo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is defined as a benign cystic neoplasm of the jaws of odontogenic origin with a high rate of recurrence. The most lesions occur in the posterior part of the mandible. Treatment of KCOT remains controversial, but the goals of treatment should involve eliminating the potential for recurrence while minimizing surgical morbidity. However, another significant therapeutic problem related to the management of KCOT is an adequate and early reconstruction of the existing jaw defect, as well as appropriate aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of a patient, especially in cases of a very large destruction of the jaws bone. Case report. We presented a 65-year-old female patient with very large KCOT of the mandible. Orthopantomographic radiography showed a very large elliptical multilocular radiolucency, located on the right side of the mandible body and the ascending ramus of the mandible, with radiographic evidence of cortical perforation at the anterior border of the mandibular ramus and the superior border of the alveolar part of the mandible. The surgical treatment included two phases. In the first phase, the tumor was removed by enucleation and additional use of Carnoy solution, performing peripheral ostectomy and excision of the affected overlying mucosa, while in the second phase, restorative surgery of the existing mandibular defect was performed 6 months later. Postoperatively, we did not register any of postoperative complications, nor recurrence within 2 years of the follow-up. Conclusion. Adequate and early reconstruction of the existing jaw defect and appropriate aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of the patient should be the primary goal in the treatment of KCOT, having in mind the need for a long-term post-surgical follow-up.

  15. SU-F-T-437: 3 Field VMAT Technique for Irradiation of Large Pelvic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakhursky, V [Radiation Oncology, Norwalk Hospital, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: VMAT treatment planning for large pelvic volume irradiation could be suboptimal due to inability of Varian linac to split MLC carriage during VMAT delivery for fields larger than 14.5cm in X direction (direction of leaf motion). We compare the dosimetry between 3 VMAT planning techniques, two 2-arc field techniques and a 3-arc field technique: a) two small in X direction (less than 14.5cm) arc fields, complementing each other to cover the whole lateral extent of target during gantry rotation, b) two large arc fields, each covering the targets completely during the rotation, c) a 3 field technique with 2 small in X direction arcs and 1 large field covering whole target. Methods: 5 GYN cancer patients were selected to evaluate the 3 VMAT planning techniques. Treatment plans were generated using Varian Eclipse (ver. 11) TPS. Dose painting technique was used to deliver 5300 cGy to primary target and 4500 cGy to pelvic/abdominal node target. All the plans were normalized so that the prescription dose of 5300 cGy covered 95% of primary target volume. PTV and critical structures DVH curves were compared to evaluate all 3 planning techniques. Results: The dosimetric differences between the two 2-arc techniques were minor. The small field 2-arc technique showed a colder hot spot (0.4% averaged), while variations in maximum doses to critical structures were statistically nonsignificant (under 1.3%). In comparison, the 3-field technique demonstrated a colder hot spot (1.1% less, 105.8% averaged), and better sparing of critical structures. The maximum doses to larger bowel, small bowel and gluteal fold were 3% less, cord/cauda sparing was 4.2% better, and bladder maximum dose was 4.6% less. The differences in maximum doses to stomach and rectum were statistically nonsignificant. Conclusion: 3-arc VMAT technique for large field irradiation of pelvis demonstrates dosimetric advantages compared to 2-arc VMAT techniques.

  16. A nanocomplex that is both tumor cell-selective and cancer gene-specific for anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu Youli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many in vitro studies have demonstrated that silencing of cancerous genes by siRNAs is a potential therapeutic approach for blocking tumor growth. However, siRNAs are not cell type-selective, cannot specifically target tumor cells, and therefore have limited in vivo application for siRNA-mediated gene therapy. Results In this study, we tested a functional RNA nanocomplex which exclusively targets and affects human anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL by taking advantage of the abnormal expression of CD30, a unique surface biomarker, and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK gene in lymphoma cells. The nanocomplexes were formulated by incorporating both ALK siRNA and a RNA-based CD30 aptamer probe onto nano-sized polyethyleneimine-citrate carriers. To minimize potential cytotoxicity, the individual components of the nanocomplexes were used at sub-cytotoxic concentrations. Dynamic light scattering showed that formed nanocomplexes were ~140 nm in diameter and remained stable for more than 24 hours in culture medium. Cell binding assays revealed that CD30 aptamer probes selectively targeted nanocomplexes to ALCL cells, and confocal fluorescence microscopy confirmed intracellular delivery of the nanocomplex. Cell transfection analysis showed that nanocomplexes silenced genes in an ALCL cell type-selective fashion. Moreover, exposure of ALCL cells to nanocomplexes carrying both ALK siRNAs and CD30 RNA aptamers specifically silenced ALK gene expression, leading to growth arrest and apoptosis. Conclusions Taken together, our findings indicate that this functional RNA nanocomplex is both tumor cell type-selective and cancer gene-specific for ALCL cells.

  17. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavodna, Katarina; Krivulcik, Tomas; Bujalkova, Maria Gerykova; Slamka, Tomas; Martinicky, David; Ilencikova, Denisa; Bartosova, Zdena

    2009-01-01

    Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6), and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6). The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7). We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1 or MSH2 gene (heterozygous LGR region, SNP, or

  18. Heavily T2 weighted MR assessment of fornical injury after anterior interhemispheric approach for large suprasellar tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, N.; Kubota, M.; Murai, H.; Yamaura, A.; Sunami, K.; Uozumi, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fornical injury in transforaminal approach is well known. Its injury in the anterior interhemispheric approach (AIA) has been rarely highlighted. We report 2 cases with a large suprasellar tumor who underwent AIA. Postoperative heavily T2 weighted reversed (T2R) MR images demonstrated its unilateral injury. The clinical significance of symptom-free fornical injury after AIA is discussed. Cases 1 and 2 were a 15 year-old girl with a meningioma and a 49-year-old woman with a craniopharyngioma, respectively. They underwent AIA. Postoperative T2R images revealed unilateral fornical crus atrophy. They did not present associated memory deficits. Case 1 had the injury of both fornical column and anterior commissure. They were speculatively torn by intra-operative lateral retraction of the frontal lobes. Case 2 had unilateral atrophy of the mammillary body and postcommissural fornix, which were probably caused by ischemic damage related to surgical manipulation, since case 2 had an associated anterior thalamic infarct. During the Operation for large suprasellar tumors, excessive laterally directed brain retraction should be avoided, since such manipulation may easily tear the overstretched anterior commissure and fornical column. Once we notice or suspect fornical injury an MR studies in cases of re-operation, we have to choose a surgical approach and operative manipulation to preserve an intact fornix. The MR evaluation of fornix should be included in the peri-operative radiological assessment, since patients with unilateral fornical injury were free of memory disturbance, and T2R imaging is a useful MR sequence for depicting the anatomy related to the fornix. (author)

  19. Successful Pregnancy in a Female with a Large Prolactinoma after Pituitary Tumor Apoplexy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butheinah A. Al-Sharafi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is a rare condition which may cause death of the patient in severe cases and many times leads to hypopituitarism. We report a case of apoplexy in a large prolactinoma resulting in empty sella syndrome followed by a successful pregnancy. Our patient is a 32-year-old female with a history of a macroprolactinoma for approximately 17 years who presented to our hospital with a history of severe headache, decreased level of consciousness, fever, nausea, vomiting, and diplopia of 12 hours duration. Magnetic resonance imaging done on admission showed an increase in the size of the pituitary adenoma with a subtle hemorrhage. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit and treated conservatively. The condition of the patient improved within a few days. A few months later, she started having regular menstrual periods. A magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary 1.5 years later was reported as empty sella syndrome, and approximately one year later she became pregnant. With the pituitary adenoma being resolved after developing pituitary apoplexy and continuing on cabergoline, the patient had a successful pregnancy with no recurrence of the adenoma after delivery and breastfeeding.

  20. Functional and Aesthetic Outcome of Reconstruction of Large Oro-Facial Defects Involving the Lip after Tumor Resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denewer, A.D.; Setie, A.E.; Hussein, O.A.; Aly, O.F.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is a challenging disease to both surgeons and radiation oncologists due to proximity of many important anatomical structures. Surgery could be curative as these cancers usually metastasize very late by blood stream. Aim of the Work: This work addresses the oncologic, functional and aesthetic factors affecting reconstruction of large orofacial defects involving the lip following tumor resection. Patients and Methods: The study reviews the surgical outcome of one hundred and twelve patients with invasive tumors at. or extending to, the lip(s). treated at the Mansoura University - Surgical Oncology Department, from January 2000 to January 2005. Tumor stage were T 2 (43), T 3 (56) and T 4 (13). Nodal state was N 0 in 80, N 1 in 29 and N 2 in three cases. AJCC stage grouping was II (T 2 N 0 ) in 33 patients. stage III (T 3 N 0 orT 1-3 N 1 ) in 64 cases and stage IV (T 4 due to bone erosion or N 2 ) in 15 cases. The technique used for lip reconstruction was unilateral or bilateral myocutaneous depressor anguli oris flap (MCDAOF) for isolated lip defect (n=63). Bilateral myocutaneous depressor anguli oris (MCDAOF) plus local cervical rotational flap chin defects (n=3). pectorals major myocutaneous pedicled flap for cheek defects involving the lip together with a tongue flap for mucosal reconstruction (n=35). sternocleidomastoid clavicular myo-osseous flap for concomitant mandibular defects (n=] 2). Results: esthetic and functional results are evaluated regarding appearance, oral incompetence, disabling microstomia and eating difficulties. depressor anguli oris reconstruction allowed functioning static and dynamic oral function in all cases in contrast to the Pectorals major flap. there were 18 cases of oral incompetence (46.1%), nine cases of speech difficulty (23%) and five patients with poor cosmetic appearance within the second group total flap loss was not encountered, Partial nap loss affected thirteen

  1. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

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    Knybel, Lukas [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Cvek, Jakub, E-mail: Jakub.cvek@fno.cz [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  2. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knybel, Lukas; Cvek, Jakub; Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  3. Cell and molecular biology of simian virus 40: implications for human infections and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.; Lednicky, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus of rhesus macaque origin, was discovered in 1960 as a contaminant of polio vaccines that were distributed to millions of people from 1955 through early 1963. SV40 is a potent DNA tumor virus that induces tumors in rodents and transforms many types of cells in culture, including those of human origin. This virus has been a favored laboratory model for mechanistic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and of cellular transformation. The viral replication protein, named large T antigen (T-ag), is also the viral oncoprotein. There is a single serotype of SV40, but multiple strains of virus exist that are distinguishable by nucleotide differences in the regulatory region of the viral genome and in the part of the T-ag gene that encodes the protein's carboxyl terminus. Natural infections in monkeys by SV40 are usually benign but may become pathogenic in immunocompromised animals, and multiple tissues can be infected. SV40 can replicate in certain types of simian and human cells. SV40-neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated polio vaccines. SV40 DNA has been identified in some normal human tissues, and there are accumulating reports of detection of SV40 DNA and/or T-ag in a variety of human tumors. This review presents aspects of replication and cell transformation by SV40 and considers their implications for human infections and disease pathogenesis by the virus. Critical assessment of virologic and epidemiologic data suggests a probable causative role for SV40 in certain human cancers, but additional studies are necessary to prove etiology.

  4. Eradication of large solid tumors by gene therapy with a T cell receptor targeting a single cancer-specific point mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisegang, Matthias; Engels, Boris; Schreiber, Karin; Yew, Poh Yin; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Idel, Christian; Arina, Ainhoa; Duraiswamy, Jaikumar; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Uckert, Wolfgang; Nakamura, Yusuke; Schreiber, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cancers usually contain multiple unique tumor-specific antigens produced by single amino acid substitutions (AAS) and encoded by somatic non-synonymous single nucleotide substitutions. We determined whether adoptively transferred T cells can reject large, well-established solid tumors when engineered to express a single type of T cell receptor (TCR) that is specific for a single AAS. Experimental Design By exome and RNA sequencing of an UV-induced tumor, we identified an AAS in p68 (mp68), a co-activator of p53. This AAS seemed to be an ideal tumor-specific neoepitope because it is encoded by a trunk mutation in the primary autochthonous cancer and binds with highest affinity to the MHC. A high-avidity mp68-specific TCR was used to genetically engineer T cells as well as to generate TCR-transgenic mice for adoptive therapy. Results When the neoepitope was expressed at high levels and by all cancer cells, their direct recognition sufficed to destroy intra-tumor vessels and eradicate large, long-established solid tumors. When the neoepitope was targeted as autochthonous antigen, T cells caused cancer regression followed by escape of antigen-negative variants. Escape could be thwarted by expressing the antigen at increased levels in all cancer cells or by combining T cell therapy with local irradiation. Therapeutic efficacies of TCR-transduced and TCR-transgenic T cells were similar. Conclusions Gene therapy with a single TCR targeting a single AAS can eradicate large established cancer but a uniform expression and/or sufficient levels of the targeted neoepitope or additional therapy are required to overcome tumor escape. PMID:26667491

  5. Tumor-Protective Mechanism Identified from Premature Aging Disease | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is an extraordinarily rare genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene, which encodes architectural proteins of the human cell nucleus. The mutation causes the production of a mutant protein called progerin. Patients with HGPS display signs of premature aging, such as hair loss, slowed growth, weakening of bone and joint integrity, and cardiovascular disease. Most die in their mid-teens of heart disease or stroke. Intriguingly, these patients do not develop another aging-related disease, cancer, despite having dramatically elevated levels of DNA damage. Tom Misteli, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, and his colleagues hypothesized that, rather than patients not living long enough to develop cancer, a resistance mechanism was operating in HGPS cells to prevent cancer formation. To begin testing this idea, the researchers transformed fibroblasts from HGPS patients or age-matched, healthy controls with telomerase, constitutively-activated HRAS, and SV40 large and small T antigens. Transformed HGPS cells displayed morphological changes and increased proliferation similar to transformed controls but formed fewer colonies in soft agar and fewer tumors when injected into mice. When the investigators examined global gene expression in the two populations of cells, they found that transformed HGPS cells failed to activate many of the genes that are induced in response to transformation in controls, including oncogenic and proliferation pathways. In addition the transformed HGPS cells were unable to undergo oncogenic de-differentiation. Importantly, the tumor resistance in HGPS cells was due to the presence of the progerin protein, which was both necessary and sufficient to protect cells from oncogenic transformation. Together these results suggested that HGPS cells resist cancer-inducing stimuli by not undergoing the genetic reprogramming necessary for tumor initiation. The scientists

  6. Does the presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at CT have any prognostic value in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hugo J A; de Klerk, John M H; Fijnheer, Rob; Heggelman, Ben G F; Dubois, Stefan V.; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Kwee, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic value of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at computed tomography (CT) in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 105 patients with newly diagnosed DLBCL who had undergone CT and bone

  7. Rejection of large HPV-16 expressing tumors in aged mice by a single immunization of VacciMax® encapsulated CTL/T helper peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacDonald Lisa

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence of cancer increases significantly in later life, yet few pre-clinical studies of cancer immunotherapy use mice of advanced age. A novel vaccine delivery platform (VacciMax®,VM is described that encapsulates antigens and adjuvants in multilamellar liposomes in a water-in-oil emulsion. The therapeutic potential of VM-based vaccines administered as a single dose was tested in HLA-A2 transgenic mice of advanced age (48–58 weeks old bearing large palpable TC1/A2 tumors. The VM-based vaccines contained one or more peptides having human CTL epitopes derived from HPV 16 E6 and E7. VM formulations contained a single peptide, a mixture of four peptides or the same four peptides linked together in a single long peptide. All VM formulations contained PADRE and CpG as adjuvants and ISA51 as the hydrophobic component of the water-in-oil emulsion. VM-formulated vaccines containing the four peptides as a mixture or linked together in one long peptide eradicated 19-day old established tumors within 21 days of immunization. Peptide-specific cytotoxic cellular responses were confirmed by ELISPOT and intracellular staining for IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells. Mice rendered tumor-free by vaccination were re-challenged in the opposite flank with 10 million HLF-16 tumor cells, another HLA-A2/E6/E7 expressing tumor cell line. None of these mice developed tumors following the re-challenge. In summary, this report describes a VM-formulated therapeutic vaccine with the following unprecedented outcome: a eradication of large tumors (> 700 mm3 b in mice of advanced age c in less than three weeks post-immunization d following a single vaccination.

  8. Rejection of large HPV-16 expressing tumors in aged mice by a single immunization of VacciMax encapsulated CTL/T helper peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daftarian, Pirouz M; Mansour, Marc; Pohajdak, Bill; Fuentes-Ortega, Antar; Korets-Smith, Ella; Macdonald, Lisa; Weir, Genevieve; Brown, Robert G; Kast, W Martin

    2007-06-07

    The incidence of cancer increases significantly in later life, yet few pre-clinical studies of cancer immunotherapy use mice of advanced age. A novel vaccine delivery platform (VacciMax,VM) is described that encapsulates antigens and adjuvants in multilamellar liposomes in a water-in-oil emulsion. The therapeutic potential of VM-based vaccines administered as a single dose was tested in HLA-A2 transgenic mice of advanced age (48-58 weeks old) bearing large palpable TC1/A2 tumors. The VM-based vaccines contained one or more peptides having human CTL epitopes derived from HPV 16 E6 and E7. VM formulations contained a single peptide, a mixture of four peptides or the same four peptides linked together in a single long peptide. All VM formulations contained PADRE and CpG as adjuvants and ISA51 as the hydrophobic component of the water-in-oil emulsion. VM-formulated vaccines containing the four peptides as a mixture or linked together in one long peptide eradicated 19-day old established tumors within 21 days of immunization. Peptide-specific cytotoxic cellular responses were confirmed by ELISPOT and intracellular staining for IFN-gamma producing CD8+ T cells. Mice rendered tumor-free by vaccination were re-challenged in the opposite flank with 10 million HLF-16 tumor cells, another HLA-A2/E6/E7 expressing tumor cell line. None of these mice developed tumors following the re-challenge. In summary, this report describes a VM-formulated therapeutic vaccine with the following unprecedented outcome: a) eradication of large tumors (> 700 mm3) b) in mice of advanced age c) in less than three weeks post-immunization d) following a single vaccination.

  9. Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) at the Time of Transurethral Resection of Bladder Tumor: A Large Retrospective Study and Analysis of Racial Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazeh, Ngii N.; Canter, Daniel J.; Damodaran, Shivashankar; Rushmer, Timothy; Richards, Kyle A.; Abel, E. Jason; Jarrard, David F.; Downs, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is an indicator of systemic inflammation and has been proven to be associated with an increased risk of extravesical disease, decreased cancer specific survival and overall survival in bladder cancer patients. A large proportion of healthy African Americans have a WBC count that is persistently lower than the normal range defined for individuals of European ancestry, this condition has been called “benign ethnic neutropenia”. The purpose of our study was to determine if NLR was different in patients of African ancestry (AA) vs European ancestry (EA) across different tumor grades and stages at the time of transurethral resection of bladder tumor(s) (TURBT). Materials and Methods: The records of consecutive patients who underwent TURBT were reviewed from the University of Wisconsin and the Atlanta Veterans’ Administration Medical Center (2000–2012). NLR was compared across tumor stage, tumor grade and ethnicity. Results: 297 consecutive patients met study criteria. 89% and 86%, were males and of European ancestry (EA) respectively. NLRs were different across T-stages (Ta-2.5, T1-3.9, T2-3.8; p = 0.001). but not across tumor grades in Ta (LG-2.5 vs HG-3.9, p = 0.57). EA had higher NLRs than AA (3.4 vs 1.9; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Higher NLRs appear to be associated with more advanced tumor stage at the time of TURBT. Patients of African ancestry have lower NLRs across all tumor stages compared to patients of European ancestry. Ethnicity should be taken into account when interpreting the NLR in patients with bladder cancer. PMID:28516153

  10. Functional genomic mRNA profiling of a large cancer data base demonstrates mesothelin overexpression in a broad range of tumor types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Laetitia E; de Groot, Derk Jan A; Bense, Rico D; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N

    2015-09-29

    The membrane bound glycoprotein mesothelin (MSLN) is a highly specific tumor marker, which is currently exploited as target for drugs. There are only limited data available on MSLN expression by human tumors. Therefore we determined overexpression of MSLN across different tumor types with Functional Genomic mRNA (FGM) profiling of a large cancer database. Results were compared with data in articles reporting immunohistochemical (IHC) MSLN tumor expression. FGM profiling is a technique that allows prediction of biologically relevant overexpression of proteins from a robust data set of mRNA microarrays. This technique was used in a database comprising 19,746 tumors to identify for 41 tumor types the percentage of samples with an overexpression of MSLN compared to a normal background. A literature search was performed to compare the FGM profiling data with studies reporting IHC MSLN tumor expression. FGM profiling showed MSLN overexpression in gastrointestinal (12-36%) and gynecological tumors (20-66%), non-small cell lung cancer (21%) and synovial sarcomas (30%). The overexpression found in thyroid cancers (5%) and renal cell cancers (10%) was not yet reported with IHC analyses. We observed that MSLN amplification rate within esophageal cancer depends on the histotype (31% for adenocarcinomas versus 3% for squamous-cell carcinomas). Subset analysis in breast cancer showed MSLN amplification rates of 28% in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and 33% in basal-like breast cancer. Further subtype analysis of TNBCs showed the highest amplification rate (42%) in the basal-like 1 subtype and the lowest amplification rate (9%) in the luminal androgen receptor subtype.

  11. Computer-driven quantitative image analysis in the assessment of tumor cell and T cell features in diffuse large B cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudio, Francesco; Tamma, Roberto; Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Perrone, Tommasina; Laddaga, Filomena Emanuela; De Candia, Mariastella; Maiorano, Eugenio; Ribatti, Domenico; Specchia, Giorgina

    2018-04-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is recognized as the most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtype. Advanced high-resolution digital scans of pathology slides have enabled the development of computer-based image analysis algorithms that may assist pathologists in quantifying immunohistochemical stains. In this retrospective study, we reviewed data from 29 patients affected by DLBCL. In order to evaluate the number of tumor cells and microenvironment T cells, we performed an analysis of CD20, Ki67, and CD3 counts, assessed with the Positive Pixel Count algorithm embedded in the Aperio ImageScope software. A lower tumor cell count was observed in patients with a non-germinal center immunophenotype, high LDH, splenomegaly and an IPI ≥ 3. A lower number of CD3 was observed in patients with bulky disease, an IPI ≥ 3 and disease stage 3-4. Overall, these data confirm that quantitative analysis of the tumor cells and of the tumor microenvironment by means of computer-driven quantitative image analysis may add new information in DLBCL diagnosis.

  12. The impact of bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer with an intact primary tumor: Results from a large prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Belinda; Wong, Hui-Li; Tacey, Mark; Tie, Jeanne; Wong, Rachel; Lee, Margaret; Nott, Louise; Shapiro, Jeremy; Jennens, Ross; Turner, Natalie; Tran, Ben; Ananda, Sumitra; Yip, Desmond; Richardson, Gary; Parente, Phillip; Lim, Lionel; Stefanou, Greg; Burge, Matthew; Iddawela, Mahesh; Power, Jeremy; Gibbs, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Debate continues regarding the benefits versus risks of initial resection of the primary tumor in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients with an asymptomatic primary tumor. Although the benefit of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agent bevacizumab alongside first-line chemotherapy in mCRC is established, the impact of bevacizumab on the intact primary tumor (IPT) is less well understood. Data from an Australian mCRC registry were used to assess the impact of bevacizumab-based regimens in the presence of an IPT, to see if this differs from effects in resected primary tumor (RPT) patients and to understand the safety profile of bevacizumab in patients with IPT. Progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and safety endpoints were analyzed. Of 1204 mCRC patients, 826 (69%) were eligible for inclusion. Bevacizumab use was similar in both arms (IPT (64%) versus RPT (70%)); compared with chemotherapy alone, bevacizumab use was associated with significantly longer PFS (IPT: 8.5 months vs 4.7 months, P = 0.017; RPT: 10.8 months vs 5.8 months, P Bevacizumab use in an IPT was associated with more GI perforations (4.5% vs 1.8%, P = 0.210) but less frequent bleeding (1.5% vs 5.3%, P = 0.050) and thrombosis (1.5% vs 2.7%, P = 0.470), versus chemotherapy alone. Median survival was equivalent between patients that did or did not experience bevacizumab-related adverse events - 20.0 months versus 19.9 months, hazard ratio = 0.98, P = 0.623. 1 CONCLUSIONS: The addition of bevacizumab significantly improved survival outcomes in mCRC with an IPT. The occurrence of bevacizumab-related adverse events did not significantly impact survival outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Large mediastinal tumor mass as a prognostic factor in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Is the definition on the basis of a chest radiograph in the era of CT obsolete?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T.; Mueller, R.P.; Mueller, H.; Engert, A.; Kuhnert, G.; Kobe, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The risk factor 'large mediastinal tumor mass' is an internationally accepted unfavorable prognostic factor in the staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The definition of this risk factor varies considerably between large cooperative study groups. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine to which degree data obtained from chest radiograph (CRX) give the same results as those from CT scans (CT). Methods: A total of 145 de novo HL patients in early unfavorable and advanced stages were included in this study. A total of 94 patients had a large mediastinal tumor mass according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), while 51 had mediastinal lymph node involvement only. The size of mediastinal involvement and the thoracic diameter were measured on CRX and CT. Agreement between CRX and CT was determined by sensitivity and specificity analysis as well as descriptive statistics and correlations. Results: The correlation of the diameters on CRX with those of CT was 0.95 for the tumor size and 0.77 for the thoracic diameter. The diagnostic decision - large mediastinal mass or not - correlated with 0.81 between CRX and CT and was identical in 90.3% of cases. The sensitivity was 0.87 and the specificity 0.96 for CRX, which is considered the current standard. Conclusion: The results show that there is a high agreement between the measurements of CRX and CT. Diagnosis of a large mediastinal mass disagreed in 10% of patients. Since the correct diagnosis of this risk factor is decisive for the adequate multimodal treatment choice, CRX should not be omitted. (orig.)

  14. Large mediastinal tumor mass as a prognostic factor in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Is the definition on the basis of a chest radiograph in the era of CT obsolete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, J; Mueller, R-P; Mueller, H; Kuhnert, G; Engert, A; Kobe, C; Haverkamp, U; Eich, H T

    2012-11-01

    The risk factor "large mediastinal tumor mass" is an internationally accepted unfavorable prognostic factor in the staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The definition of this risk factor varies considerably between large cooperative study groups. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine to which degree data obtained from chest radiograph (CRX) give the same results as those from CT scans (CT). A total of 145 de novo HL patients in early unfavorable and advanced stages were included in this study. A total of 94 patients had a large mediastinal tumor mass according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), while 51 had mediastinal lymph node involvement only. The size of mediastinal involvement and the thoracic diameter were measured on CRX and CT. Agreement between CRX and CT was determined by sensitivity and specificity analysis as well as descriptive statistics and correlations. The correlation of the diameters on CRX with those of CT was 0.95 for the tumor size and 0.77 for the thoracic diameter. The diagnostic decision-large mediastinal mass or not-correlated with 0.81 between CRX and CT and was identical in 90.3% of cases. The sensitivity was 0.87 and the specificity 0.96 for CRX, which is considered the current standard. The results show that there is a high agreement between the measurements of CRX and CT. Diagnosis of a large mediastinal mass disagreed in 10% of patients. Since the correct diagnosis of this risk factor is decisive for the adequate multimodal treatment choice, CRX should not be omitted.

  15. Clinical impact of tumor location on the colon cancer survival and recurrence: analyses of pooled data from three large phase III randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Toru; Kashiwabara, Kosuke; Oba, Koji; Honda, Michitaka; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Hamada, Chikuma; Maeda, Hiromichi; Mayanagi, Shuhei; Kanda, Mitsuro; Sakamoto, Junichi; Saji, Shigetoyo; Yoshikawa, Takaki

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were affected by the tumor location in patients who underwent curative resection for colon cancer in a pooled analysis of three large phase III studies performed in Japan. In total, 4029 patients were included in the present study. Patients were classified as having right-side colon cancer (RC) if the primary tumor was located in the cecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure or transverse colon, and left-side colon cancer (LCC) if the tumor site was within the splenic flexure, descending colon, sigmoid colon or recto sigmoid junction. The risk factors for the OS and DFS were analyzed. In the present study, 1449 patients were RC, and 2580 were LCC. The OS rates at 3 and 5 years after surgery were 87.6% and 81.6% in the RC group and 91.5% and 84.5% in the LCC group, respectively. Uni- and multivariate analyses showed that RRC increased the risk of death by 19.7% (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.197; 95% confidence interval, 1.020-1.408; P = 0.0272). In contrast, the DFS was similar between the two locations. The present study confirmed that the tumor location was a risk factor for the OS in patients who underwent curative treatment for colon cancer. Tumor location may, therefore, need to be considered a stratification factor in future phase III trials of colon cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Increased expression of IRF8 in tumor cells inhibits the generation of Th17 cells and predicts unfavorable survival of diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weijie; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Zhigang; Du, Qinghua; Du, Hong; Yang, Li; Ling, Yanying; Xiong, Huabao; Li, Qingshan

    2017-07-25

    The immunological pathogenesis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains elusive. Searching for new prognostic markers of DLBCL is a crucial focal point for clinical scientists. The aim of the present study was to examine the prognostic value of interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) expression and its effect on the development of Th17 cells in the tumor microenvironment of DLBCL patients. Flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR were used to detect the distribution of Th17 cells and related cytokines and IRF8 in tumor tissues from DLBCL patients. Two DLBCL cell lines (OCI-LY10 and OCI-LY1) with IRF8 knockdown or overexpression and two human B lymphoblast cell lines were co-cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro to determine the effect of IRF8 on the generation of Th17 cells. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to investigate the involvement of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) in the effect of IRF8 on Th17 cell generation. The survival of 67 DLBCL patients was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank analysis. The percentage of Th17 cells was lower in DLBCL tumor tissues than in PBMCs and corresponding adjacent benign tissues. Relative expression of interleukin (IL)-17A was lower, whereas that of interferon (IFN)-γ was higher in tumor tissues than in benign tissues. Co-culture with DLBCL cell lines inhibited the generation of Th17 cells in vitro. IRF8 upregulation was detected in DLBCL tumor tissues, and it was associated with decreased DLBCL patient survival. Investigation of the underlying mechanism suggested that IRF8 upregulation in DLBCL, through an unknown mechanism, inhibited Th17 cell generation by suppressing RORγt in neighboring CD4+ T cells. Tumor cells may express soluble or membrane-bound factors that inhibit the expression of RORγt in T cells within the tumor microenvironment. Our findings suggest that IRF8 expression could

  17. Misonidazole cytotoxicity in vivo: a comparison of large single doses with smaller doses and extended contact of the drug with tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conroy, P.J.; Sutherland, R.M.; Passalacqua, W.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the kinetics and magnitude of misonidazole cytotoxicity in EMT6/Ro tumors using an in vivo-in vitro clonogenicity assay. A comparison was made between the cytotoxic effects of large single doses with smaller doses of misonidazole administered ip and those produced on extended contact of the drug with tumor cells using a continuous iv drug infusion system. After a single ip dose of 1 mg/g, cytotoxicity was maximum at 18 to 24 h; by 72 h the clonogenic cells per tumor had returned to control levels. The maximum cytotoxicity was greater (a decrease of 10 times) if the animals were kept at 37 0 C compared with ambient conditions (a decrease of 4.5 times) where the body temperature would decrease due to the drug. A dose-response curve performed with the animals at 37 0 C showed no significant cytotoxicity at 18 h after single ip doses of 0.5 mg/g or less. Other experiments were carried out at 37 0 C using a drug continuous infusion system. Two profiles were studied: (a) continuous constant rate infusion over 3 days of constant serum and tumor levels of both 100 and 200 μg/ml and (b) continuous variable rate infusion where the maximum serum levels reached 80 or 200 μg/ml after 2 to 4 h and decayed with a half-life of 12 h as in humans. Significant cytotoxicity was obtained under both of these conditions. Maximum cytotoxicity occurred at about 24 h in both types of experiments and amounted to decreases of clonogenic tumor cells of 4.5 and 7 times for 100 and 200 μg/ml, respectively, after constant rate infusion and 2 to 4 times for 80 and 200 μg/ml, respectively, after variable rate infusion. Because of the relatively rapid recovery in the number of clonogenic tumor cells by 72 h, the cytotoxic effects were not reflected as changes in tumor size even when the animals were maintained at 37 0 C

  18. Tumor-mimicking large vegetation attached to the tricuspid valve without predisposing factors: A case report on CT and echocardiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jung Min; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Hwang, Hye Won; Kim, Jung Sun; Kim, Wook Sung; Peck, Kyong Ran; Park, Sung Ji

    2015-01-01

    We report the CT and echocardiographic findings of a tumor-mimicking large vegetation attached to the tricuspid valve (TV) of a 45-year-old man without predisposing factors. Echocardiography revealed a mobile homogeneous echogenic mass attached to the TV. Cardiac CT showed a 4.5 × 2.3 cm irregular low-density mass with scant enhancement in the right ventricle. Based on clinical findings of fever, positive blood culture results for Streptococcus viridans, and pathologic confirmation of the lesion, a diagnosis of infective endocarditis and vegetation was made

  19. Tumor-mimicking large vegetation attached to the tricuspid valve without predisposing factors: A case report on CT and echocardiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jung Min; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Hwang, Hye Won; Kim, Jung Sun; Kim, Wook Sung; Peck, Kyong Ran; Park, Sung Ji [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    We report the CT and echocardiographic findings of a tumor-mimicking large vegetation attached to the tricuspid valve (TV) of a 45-year-old man without predisposing factors. Echocardiography revealed a mobile homogeneous echogenic mass attached to the TV. Cardiac CT showed a 4.5 × 2.3 cm irregular low-density mass with scant enhancement in the right ventricle. Based on clinical findings of fever, positive blood culture results for Streptococcus viridans, and pathologic confirmation of the lesion, a diagnosis of infective endocarditis and vegetation was made.

  20. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma originating from the uterine endometrium: a report on magnetic resonance features of 2 cases with very rare and aggressive tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Makihara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC of the female genital tract are aggressive and uncommon tumors, which usually involve the uterine cervix and ovary, and are seen very rarely in the endometrium. Only less than 10 cases of large cell NEC (LCNEC of the endometrium have been reported in the literature and their radiological findings are not well described. We report here two cases of pathologically proven LCNEC of the uterine endometrium. In both cases, the uterine body was enlarged and the tumor occupied part of the uterine cavity. Endometrial mass exhibited heterogeneous high intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR images, and diffusion-weighted MR images revealed high intensity throughout the tumor, consistent with malignancy. LCNEC is a highly malignant neoplasm without particular findings in terms of diagnostic imaging and pathology, so its preoperative definitive diagnosis is very difficult. However, when laboratory test, pathologic diagnosis and MR imaging suggest a poorly differentiated uterine malignancy, positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan should be performed as a general assessment to help with diagnosis.

  1. Does the presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at CT have any prognostic value in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Hugo J.A.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Kwee, Thomas C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de [Meander Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Fijnheer, Rob [Meander Medical Center, Department of Hematology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Heggelman, Ben G.F. [Meander Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Dubois, Stefan V. [Meander Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    To determine the prognostic value of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at computed tomography (CT) in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This retrospective study included 105 patients with newly diagnosed DLBCL who had undergone CT and bone marrow biopsy (BMB) before R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, Oncovin, and prednisolone) chemo-immunotherapy. Cox regression analyses were used to determine the associations of cortical bone status at CT (absence vs. presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction), BMB findings (negative vs. positive for lymphomatous involvement), and dichotomized National Comprehensive Cancer Network International Prognostic Index (NCCN-IPI) strata (low risk vs. high risk) with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Univariate Cox regression analysis indicated that cortical bone status at CT was no significant predictor of either PFS or OS (p = 0.358 and p = 0.560, respectively), whereas BMB findings (p = 0.002 and p = 0.013, respectively) and dichotomized NCCN-IPI risk strata (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively) were significant predictors of both PFS and OS. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, only the dichotomized NCCN-IPI score was an independent predictive factor of PFS and OS (p = 0.004 and p = 0.003, respectively). The presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at CT was not found to have any prognostic implications in newly diagnosed DLBCL. (orig.)

  2. Differential Expression of miR-155 and miR-21 in Tumor and Stroma Cells in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Petersen, Helga D; Ralfkiaer, Ulrik; Sjö, Lene D

    2015-01-01

    OncomiRs miR-21 and miR-155 have been linked to lymphomagenesis, but information on their implication in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is limited. Here, we used locked nucleic acid-based in situ hybridization (ISH) detection techniques on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded DLBCL tissue...... samples to identify miR-155 and miR-21 at the cellular level in 56 patients diagnosed with DLBCL, and compared them to miR array data. miR-155 was observed in tumor cells in 19/56 (33.9%) of the samples evaluated by ISH. miR-21 was localized to the stromal compartment in 41/56 (73.2%). A subset of these......, 16/56 (28.6%), also showed labeling in tumor cells. When comparing ISH-scores and miR array data, miR-155 in tumor cells, identified by ISH, was associated with miR-155 expression in miR array data (P=0.030). Equally, miR-21 expression by miR array data were highly associated with miR-21 ISH...

  3. Curettage with cement augmentation of large bone defects in giant cell tumors with pathological fractures in lower-extremity long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Som P; Garg, Gaurav

    2016-09-01

    Thorough curettage and cement augmentation is the procedure of choice for treating giant cell tumor lesions, particularly those associated with large defects. Its association with pathological fractures has not been studied to a great extent, although a pathological fracture following a giant cell tumor is not a contraindication to treatment by curettage and cementation. We present our experience of bone cementation following intralesional curettage for treatment of giant cell tumors of the long bones of lower limbs with associated pathological fractures. A total of 38 patients who had undergone a procedure in the weight-bearing long bones of lower limbs were included in the study. The age of the patients ranged from 18-79 years with a mean age of 38.57 years. The average follow-up was 102.42 months (8.5 years) ranging from 60-186 months (5-15.5 years). Results were based on serial radiographs showing consolidation of the lesion along with a subjective clinical examination and Enneking functional evaluation noted in the patient's records. Approximately 76 % of the lesions occurred around the knee. The results were graded as excellent (72 %), good (12.82 %) fair (10.25 %) and poor (5.12 %). Four cases developed a recurrence. Apart from a few documented complications, the lesions showed good consolidation and healed well. Giant cell tumors of the long bones of lower limbs with an associated pathological fracture at diagnosis can be managed with thorough curettage and cement augmentation of the bone defect with a satisfactory outcome. Level IV.

  4. CXCR5+CD8+T cells present elevated capacity in mediating cytotoxicity toward autologous tumor cells through interleukin 10 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiahong; Zha, Jie; Guo, Xutao; Shi, Pengcheng; Xu, Bing

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a common and aggressive subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, with limited treatment options in refractory and relapsed patients. Growing evidence supports the notion that CD8 + T cell immunity could be utilized to eliminate B cell lymphomas. CXCR5 + CD8 + T cell is a novel cell subtype and share CXCR5 expression with CD19 + tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the frequency and function of existing CXCR5 + CD8 + T cells in DLBCL patients. We found that DLBCL patients as a group demonstrated significantly higher level of CXCR5 + CD8 + T cells than healthy individuals, with huge variability in each patient. Using anti-CD3/CD28-stimulated CD8 + T cells as effector (E) cells and autologous CD19 + tumor cells as target (T) cells, at high E:T ratio, no difference between the intensities of CXCR5 + CD8 + T cell- and CXCR5 - CD8 + T cell-mediated cytotoxicity were observed. However, at intermediate and low E:T ratios, the CXCR5 + CD8 + T cells presented stronger cytotoxicity than CXCR5 - CD8 + T cells. The expressions of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin were significantly higher in CXCR5 + CD8 + T cells than in CXCR5 - CD8 + T cells, with no significant difference in the level of degranulation. Tumor cells in DLBCL were known to secrete high level of interleukin 10 (IL-10). We therefore blocked the IL-10/IL-10R pathway, and found that the expressions of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin by CXCR5 + CD8 + T cells were significantly elevated. Together, these results suggest that CXCR5 + CD8 + T cells are potential candidates of CD8 + T cell-based immunotherapies, could mediate elimination of autologous tumor cells in DLBCL patients, but are also susceptible to IL-10-mediated suppression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Restriction landmark genomic scanning of mouse liver tumors for gene amplification: overexpression of cyclin A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, R; Morrow, A D; Plass, C; Held, W A

    2000-07-21

    SV40 T/t antigen-induced liver tumors from transgenic mice were analyzed by Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning (RLGS). Using NotI as the restriction landmark, RLGS targets CpG islands found in gene-rich regions of the genome. Since many RLGS landmarks are mapped, the candidate gene approach can be used to help determine which genes are altered in tumors. RLGS analysis revealed one tumor-specific amplification mapping close to CcnA2 (cyclin A2) and Fgf2 (fibroblast growth factor 2). Southern analysis confirmed that both oncogenes are amplified in this tumor and in a second, independent liver tumor. Whereas Fgf2 RNA is undetectable in tumors, CcnA2 RNA and cyclin A2 protein was overexpressed in 25 and 50% of tumors, respectively. Combining RLGS with the candidate gene approach indicates that cyclin A2 amplification and overexpression is a likely selected event in transgenic mouse liver tumors. Our results also indicate that our mouse model for liver tumorigenesis in mice accurately recapitulates events observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Treatment of large stage I-II lung tumors using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Planning considerations and early toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Chin Loon; Palma, David; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric predictors of early clinical toxicity following SBRT in patients with lung tumors and planning target volumes (PTV) exceeding 80 cm 3 . Methods: Eighteen consecutive patients who were treated using volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc TM ) were assessed. All were either unfit or refused to undergo surgery or chemoradiotherapy. PTV planning objectives were as used in the ROSEL study protocol. Clinical toxicity was scored using Common Toxicity Criteria AE4.0. Lung volumes receiving 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy (V 5 , V 10 , V 15 and V 20 ) and mean lung dose were assessed and correlated to symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: Median age, age-adjusted Charlson-comorbidity score and PTV size were 74, 7.5 and 137 cm 3 , respectively. At a median follow-up of 12.8 months, 8 deaths were recorded: 5 arising from comorbidity, 2 were potentially treatment-related and 1 had local recurrence. RP was reported in 5 patients (grade 2 in 3 and grade 3 in 2). All RP occurred in plans without a high priority optimization objective on contralateral lung. Acute RP was best predicted by contralateral lung V 5 (p 80 cm 3 , the contralateral lung V 5 best predicts RP. Limiting contralateral lung V 5 to <26% may reduce acute toxicity.

  7. Trans-eyebrow supraorbital approach in large suprasellar craniopharyngioma surgery in adults: analysis of optic nerve length and extent of tumor resection. Original article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Ricardo; Galeano, Inma; Evangelista, Rocío; Pancucci, Giovanni; Guarín, Juliana; Ayuso, Angel; Misra, Mukesh

    2017-05-01

    One of the main drawbacks in the surgery of large craniopharyngiomas is the presence of a prefixed optic chiasm. Our main objective in this study is to compare the predictive value of the optic nerve length and optic chiasm location on large craniopharyngiomas' extent of resection. We retrospectively studied 21 consecutive patients with large craniopharyngiomas who underwent tumor resection through the trans-eyebrow supraorbital approach. Clinical and radiological findings on preoperative MRI were recorded, including the optic chiasm location classified as prefixed, postfixed or normal. We registered the optic nerve length measured intraoperatively prior to tumor removal and confirmed the measurements on preoperative MRI. Using a linear regression model, we calculated a prediction formula of the percentage of the extent of resection as a function of optic nerve length. On preoperative MRI, 15 patients were considered to have an optic chiasm in a normal location, 3 cases had a prefixed chiasm, and the remaining 3 had a postfixed chiasm. In the group with normal optic chiasm location, a wide range of percentage of extent of resection was observed (75-100%). The percentage of extent of resection of large craniopharyngiomas was observed to be dependent on the optic nerve length in a linear regression model (p < 0.0001). According to this model in the normal optic chiasm location group, we obtained an 87% resection in 9-mm optic nerve length patients, a 90.5% resection in 10-mm optic nerve length patients and 100% resection in 11-mm optic nerve length patients. Optic chiasm location provides useful information to predict the percentage of resection in both prefixed and postfixed chiasm patients but not in the normal optic chiasm location group. Optic nerve length was proven to provide a more accurate way to predict the percentage of resection than the optic chiasm location in the normal optic chiasm location group.

  8. Investigation of the relationship between gross tumor volume location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L; Liao, Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K

    2012-04-01

    Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior-inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose-volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant improvement in the fit of the pneumonitis model. Copyright

  9. Investigation of the Relationship Between Gross Tumor Volume Location and Pneumonitis Rates Using a Large Clinical Database of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non–small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior–inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman–Kutcher–Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Results: Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose–volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Conclusions: Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant

  10. Suprarenal inferior vena cava filter placement prior to transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of a renal cell carcinoma with large renal vein tumor thrombus: Prevention of pulmonary tumor emboli after TAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Shozo; Matsumoto, Shinnichi; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Koshino, Tukasa; Sako, Masao; Kono, Michio

    1997-01-01

    To prevent embolization of necrotic renal vein tumor after transcatheter embolization of a left renal cell carcinoma, we placed a suprarenal Bird's nest inferior vena cava filter. The patient tolerated the procedure well and had extensive tumor infarction including the tumor thrombus on 6-month follow-up computed tomography

  11. Intratubular large cell hyalinizing Sertoli cell tumor of the testis presenting with prepubertal gynecomastia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhan, Hale; Abaci, Ayhan; Sarsık, Banu; Öztürk, Tülay; Olguner, Mustafa; Catli, Gonul; Anik, Ahmet; Olgun, Nur; Bober, Ece

    2017-08-01

    Intratubular large cell hyalinizing Sertoli cell neoplasia (ITLCHSCN) resulting from Sertoli cells of the testis are mainly reported in young adults and these are rarely seen in childhood. The most common presenting symptoms of the patients diagnosed with ITLCHSCN are gynecomastia, enlargement in the testicles, increase in growth velocity, and advanced bone age. Symptoms are basically resulting from increased aromatase enzyme activity in Sertoli cells. In this case report, an eight-and-a-half-year-old case presenting with complaint of bilateral gynecomastia since two years, showing no endocrine abnormality in laboratory during two years of follow-up, determined to have progression in bilateral gynecomastia, increase in testicular volumes, advanced bone age, increase in growth velocity in the clinical follow-up, and diagnosed with ITLCHSCN after testis biopsy was presented.

  12. Identification of tumor promoters by their inhibitory effect on intercellular transfer of lucifer yellow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budunova, I V; Mittelman, L A; Belitsky, G A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the tumor promoters 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), mezerein, teleocidin, anthralin, the Ca2+-ionophore A23187, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and phenobarbital (PB) on lucifer yellow transfer in cultures of SV-40-transformed Djungarian hamster fibroblasts was studied. TPA, mezerein, teleocidin, A23187, DDT and BHT exerted a strong inhibitory effect on cell-to-cell dye transfer. Anthralin uncoupled cells in 3 experiments out of 6. PB appeared to enhance lucifer yellow transfer. Sodium nitrite, a substance with unknown promoting activity, effectively uncoupled cells. All the promoters investigated had a reversible effect on the dye transfer. The value of the dye transfer method for promoter screening is discussed.

  13. Clinical features, tumor biology, and prognosis associated with MYC rearrangement and Myc overexpression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab-CHOP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Wang, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    MYC dysregulation, including MYC gene rearrangement and Myc protein overexpression, is of increasing clinical importance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the roles of MYC and the relative importance of rearrangement vs overexpression remain to be refined. Gaining knowledge about...... the tumor biology associated with MYC dysregulation is important to understand the roles of MYC and MYC-associated biology in lymphomagenesis. In this study, we determined MYC rearrangement status (n=344) and Myc expression (n=535) in a well-characterized DLBCL cohort, individually assessed the clinical...... and pathobiological features of patients with MYC rearrangement and Myc protein overexpression, and analyzed the prognosis and gene expression profiling signatures associated with these MYC abnormalities in germinal center B-cell-like and activated B-cell-like DLBCL. Our results showed that the prognostic importance...

  14. Value of large scale expansion of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in a compartmentalised gas-permeable bag: interests for adoptive immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has emerged as an effective treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma. However, there are several logistical and safety concerns associated with large-scale ex vivo expansion of tumour-specific T lymphocytes for widespread availability of ACT for cancer patients. To address these problems we developed a specific compartmentalised bag allowing efficient expansion of tumour-specific T lymphocytes in an easy handling, closed system. Methods Starting from lymph nodes from eight melanoma patients, we performed a side-by-side comparison of Tumour-Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TIL) produced after expansion in the compartmentalised bag versus TIL produced using the standard process in plates. Proliferation yield, viability, phenotype and IFNγ secretion were comparatively studied. Results We found no differences in proliferation yield and cell viability between both TIL production systems. Moreover, each of the cell products complied with our defined release criteria before being administered to the patient. The phenotype analysis indicated that the compartmentalised bag favours the expansion of CD8+ cells. Finally, we found that TIL stimulated in bags were enriched in reactive CD8+ T cells when co-cultured with the autologous melanoma cell line. Conclusions The stimulation of TIL with feeder cells in the specifically designed compartmentalised bag can advantageously replace the conventional protocol using plates. In particular, the higher expansion rate of reactive CD8+ T cells could have a significant impact for ACT. PMID:21575188

  15. MicroRNA-26a/cyclin-dependent kinase 5 axis controls proliferation, apoptosis and in vivo tumor growth of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Floriana Maria; Inguscio, Alessandra; Kunderfranco, Paolo; Cortesi, Alice; Elia, Leonardo; Quintavalle, Manuela

    2017-06-22

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most frequent type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Despite a favorable therapeutic response to first-line chemo-immunotherapy, still 30-40% of patients is refractory, or relapse after this treatment. Thus, alternative strategies must be sought. Previous studies have indicated that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is involved in tumor development and progression, and it may represent a potential therapeutic target. However, its role in modulating DLBCL growth and progression remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that CDK5 and its activator, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activator 1 (CDK5R1 or p35), are overexpressed in DLBCL cell lines and that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and activity is dependent on CDK5 expression in DLBCL. Using public data sets, we also demonstrate that patients with DLBCL show a higher expression of CDK5 compared with healthy individuals. By using loss-of-function approaches, we demonstrate that CDK5's activity regulates proliferation and survival of DLBCL cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulating gene expression and are involved in cancer initiation and progression. We identify miR-26a as direct regulator of p35 expression and CDK5 activity. We show that miR-26a expression is lower in DLBCL cell lines compared to B lymphocytes and that its ectopic expression leads to a drastic reduction of DLBCL tumor growth in vivo and decreased proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and survival in vitro. Remarkably, concomitant overexpression of a 3'-UTR-truncated form of p35 promoted tumor growth in vivo and cell proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and cell survival in vitro. In conclusion, these results demonstrate an important role for miR-26a and CDK5 together in the survival and growth of DLBCL cells, suggesting the existence of potential novel therapeutic targets for the

  16. SU-E-T-06: 4D Particle Swarm Optimization to Enable Lung SBRT in Patients with Central And/or Large Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modiri, A; Gu, X; Hagan, A; Sawant, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patients presenting with large and/or centrally-located lung tumors are currently considered ineligible for highly potent regimens such as SBRT due to concerns of toxicity to normal tissues and organs-at-risk (OARs). We present a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-based 4D planning technique, designed for MLC tracking delivery, that exploits the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom to significantly improve OAR-sparing and reduce toxicity to levels clinically considered as acceptable for SBRT administration. Methods: Two early-stage SBRT-ineligible NSCLC patients were considered, presenting with tumors of maximum dimensions of 7.4cm (central-right lobe; 1.5cm motion) and 11.9cm (upper-right lobe; 1cm motion). In each case, the target and normal structures were manually contoured on each of the ten 4DCT phases. Corresponding ten initial 3D-conformal plans (Pt#1: 7-beams; Pt#2: 9-beams) were generated using the Eclipse planning system. Using 4D-PSO, fluence weights were optimized over all beams and all phases (70 and 90 apertures for Pt1&2, respectively). Doses to normal tissues and OARs were compared with clinicallyestablished lung SBRT guidelines based on RTOG-0236. Results: The PSO-based 4D SBRT plan yielded tumor coverage and dose—sparing for parallel and serial OARs within the SBRT guidelines for both patients. The dose-sparing compared to the clinically-delivered conventionallyfractionated plan for Patient 1 (Patient 2) was: heart Dmean = 11% (33%); lung V20 = 16% (21%); lung Dmean = 7% (20%); spinal cord Dmax = 5% (16%); spinal cord Dmean = 7% (33%); esophagus Dmax = 0% (18%). Conclusion: Truly 4D planning can significantly reduce dose to normal tissues and OARs. Such sparing opens up the possibility of using highly potent and effective regimens such as lung SBRT for patients who were conventionally considered SBRT non-eligible. Given the large, non-convex solution space, PSO represents an attractive, parallelizable tool to

  17. CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cell numbers in peripheral blood are correlated with higher tumor burden in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Twardosz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the commonest histological type of malignant lymphoma, andremains incurable in many cases. Developing more efficient immunotherapy strategies will require betterunderstanding of the disorders of immune responses in cancer patients. NKT (natural killer-like T cells wereoriginally described as a unique population of T cells with the co-expression of NK cell markers. Apart fromtheir role in protecting against microbial pathogens and controlling autoimmune diseases, NKT cells havebeen recently revealed as one of the key players in the immune responses against tumors. The objective of thisstudy was to evaluate the frequency of CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cells in the peripheral blood of 28 diffuse largeB-cell lymphoma (DLBCL patients in correlation with clinical and laboratory parameters. Median percentagesof CD3+/CD16+CD56+ were significantly lower in patients with DLBCL compared to healthy donors(7.37% vs. 9.01%, p = 0.01; 4.60% vs. 5.81%, p = 0.03, although there were no differences in absolute counts.The frequency and the absolute numbers of CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cells were lower in advanced clinical stagesthan in earlier ones. The median percentage of CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cells in patients in Ann Arbor stages 1–2 was5.55% vs. 3.15% in stages 3–4 (p = 0.02, with median absolute counts respectively 0.26 G/L vs. 0.41 G/L (p == 0.02. The percentage and absolute numbers of CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cells were significantly higher in DL-BCL patients without B-symptoms compared to the patients with B-symptoms, (5.51% vs. 2.46%, p = 0.04;0.21 G/L vs. 0.44 G/L, p = 0.04. The percentage of CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cells correlated adversely with serumlactate dehydrogenase (R= –445; p < 0.05 which might influence NKT count. These figures suggest a relationshipbetween higher tumor burden and more aggressive disease and decreased NKT numbers. But it remains tobe explained whether low NKT cell counts in the peripheral blood of patients with DLBCL are the result

  18. Functional genomic mRNA profiling of a large cancer data base demonstrates mesothelin overexpression in a broad range of tumor types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, Laetitia E.; de Groot, Derk Jan A.; Bense, Rico D.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane bound glycoprotein mesothelin (MSLN) is a highly specific tumor marker, which is currently exploited as target for drugs. There are only limited data available on MSLN expression by human tumors. Therefore we determined overexpression of MSLN across different tumor types with Functional

  19. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  20. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shuo Wang, Wanming Li, Dezheng Yuan, Jindan Song, Jin Fang Department of Cell Biology, Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Ministry of Public Health, and Key Laboratory of Medical Cell Biology, Ministry of Education, China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The large external antigen (LEA is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605 conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05, indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of

  1. Mediastinal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thymoma - mediastinal; Lymphoma - mediastinal ... mediastinal tumors in adults occur in the anterior mediastinum. They are usually cancerous (malignant) lymphomas, germ cell tumors, or thymomas. These tumors are ...

  2. Three year results of enucleation surgery with or without preoperative radiation therapy (PERT) in the prospective randomized collaborative ocular melanoma study (COMS) large tumor trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, John D.; Schachat, Andrew P.; Fine, Stuart L.; Hawkins, Barbara S.; Diener-West, Marie

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the three year results of enucleation surgery following standard enucleation and standard enucleation preceded by preoperative radiation in the COMS. Materials and Methods: The COMS is a prospective randomized multicenter controlled clinical trial. Central Units are charged with carefully defined quality assurance. 1003 patients with large choroidal melanoma were seen at over 40 COMS centers across North America. Members of these centers are required to pass initial and periodic subsequent certification procedures. Patients were randomized to enucleation versus enucleation preceded by 20 Gy external beam radiation followed by enucleation. Enucleation alone was performed in 503 patients, 491 patients received PERT, and 9 patients were not treated as assigned. All patients have been enrolled for two years or longer and 89% for three years or longer. Results: This report summarizes the three year local complications and local recurrences after enucleation surgery with or without PERT. The short term complications of enucleation surgery in this cohort have been previously described. Incidence and prevalence rates will be reported for the following local complications (cumulative incidence over all follow up time). Conclusion: Ptosis was reported in nearly twice as many patients treated with enucleation alone as in patients who received PERT. Tumor recurrence in the orbit was seen in 4 (0.8%) of patients treated with enucleation alone but in only one patient (0.2%) who received PERT. No treatment recommendation will be made by the COMS until mortality data become available

  3. Significance of tumor size and radiation dose to local control in stage I-III diffuse large cell lymphoma treated with CHOP-Bleo and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Lillian M.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Velasquez, William S.; Allen, Pamela K.; McLaughlin, Peter; Rodriguez, M. Alma; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Swan, Forrest; Cabanillas, Fernando; Palmer, Judy L.; Cox, James D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible effect of adjunctive involved field (IF) radiotherapy on long-term local control for patients with Ann Arbor Stage I-III diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) who achieved a complete remission on a combined modality program which included cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and Bleomycin (CHOP-Bleo). Methods and Materials: One hundred and ninety patients with Ann Arbor Stage I-III DLCL were treated with CHOP-Bleo and radiotherapy. Analyses were undertaken to determine (a) response to treatment according to stage, extent of maximum local disease, and irradiation dose either < 40 Gy or ≥ 40 Gy and (b) relapse patterns. Results: A complete remission (CR) was achieved in 162 patients. Among patients who achieved a CR, local control was better for those who received tumor doses of ≥ 40 Gy (97%) than for those who received < 40 Gy (83%) (p = 0.002.) Among those with extensive local disease, the corresponding control rates were 88% and 71%, respectively. A study of distant relapse patterns following a CR showed that the first relapse usually involved an extranodal site. Conclusion: Radiotherapy was an effective adjunctive treatment to CHOP-Bleo for patients with stage I-III DLCL who achieved a CR. Patterns of relapse suggested that total nodal irradiation (TNI) possibly could have benefited a small subset of patients

  4. Prognostic significance of metabolic tumor burden by positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Ukihide; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Terauchi, Takashi; Ando, Kiyoshi; Niitsu, Nozomi; Kim, Won Seog; Suh, Cheolwon; Ogura, Michinori; Tobinai, Kensei

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of measuring metabolic tumor burden using [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with bendamustine-rituximab. Because the standardized uptake value is a critical parameter of tumor characterization, we carried out a phantom study of (18) F-FDG PET/CT to ensure quality control for 28 machines in the 24 institutions (Japan, 17 institutions; Korea, 7 institutions) participating in our clinical study. Fifty-five patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL were enrolled. The (18) F-FDG PET/CT was acquired before treatment, after two cycles, and after the last treatment cycle. Treatment response was assessed after two cycles and after the last cycle using the Lugano classification. Using this classification, remission was complete in 15 patients (27%) and incomplete in 40 patients (73%) after two cycles of therapy, and remission was complete in 32 patients (58%) and incomplete in 23 patients (42%) after the last treatment cycle. The percentage change in all PET/CT parameters except for the area under the curve of the cumulative standardized uptake value-volume histogram was significantly greater in complete response patients than in non-complete response patients after two cycles and the last cycle. The Cox proportional hazard model and best subset selection method revealed that the percentage change of the sum of total lesion glycolysis after the last cycle (relative risk, 5.24; P = 0.003) was an independent predictor of progression-free survival. The percent change of sum of total lesion glycolysis, calculated from PET/CT, can be used to quantify the response to treatment and can predict progression-free survival after the last treatment cycle in patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL treated with bendamustine-rituximab. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science

  5. Possibilities and limitations of combined radio-surgical treatment of large orofacial T3/T4-tumors. Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen der kombiniert radiotherapeutisch-chirurgischen Behandlung grosser orofazialer T3-/T4-Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, K.H. (Universitaetsklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Strahlenbiologie, Vienna (Austria)); Kaercher, H. (Abteilung fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Univ. Graz (Austria))

    1993-05-01

    The possibilities, limits and good cosmetic and functional results of combined radiotherapy-surgical treatment of large orofacial tumors (T3) are prescribed. The pre- and postoperative splitted radiotherapy with operation in between is favoured. The radical en-bloc-resection with radical dissection is the surgical therapy of choice. The defects have been reconstructed with osteomusculocutaneous flaps. (orig.)

  6. Radiation and chemical effects on viral transformation and tumor antigen expression. Annual progress report, August 1, 1978--May 1, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Studies aimed at the biological, biochemical, and immunologic characterization of fetal antigens (EA) in hamsters and mice and locating and determining the distribution of fetal antigens in tumor tissues and in developing fetuses have been underway for several months. Progress has been made in isolating embryonic or fetal antigens from fetuses and from tumor cells. We have developed and reported a reliable lymphocyte transformation assay (LTA) which meets our needs in routinely assaying cell free tumor associated antigen (TAA) preparations from fetal and tumor cells. The assay correlated with transplantation resistance assays and has appropriate specificity. We have also developed the staph-A protein binding assay utilizing anti-serum derived against embryonic antigens present on SV40 tumor cells. In other studies, we have reported increases and perturbations in thymocytes during viral and chemical oncogenesis in hamsters, have developed a simple technique for preserving functional lymphocytes sensitized against TAA by freezing for use in our model system work, have reported the cross-reactivity of tranplantation resistance antigen on a spectrum of chemically induced tumors previously believed to only contain individually specific TSTAs and have recently reported the cross-reactivity of papovavirus induced transplantation resistance antigen in sarcoma cells induced by different viruses. We have concluded our studies of glycosyltransferases in the membranes of developing fetuses and noted no differences in their levels with advancing days of gestation using whold embryo cell populations

  7. p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene Methylation in Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma: A Study of 88 Cases at Two Hospitals in the East Coast of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Ridah, Lailatul Jalilah; A Talib, Norlelawati; Muhammad, Naznin; Hussain, Faezahtul Arbaeyah; Zainuddin, Norafiza

    2017-10-26

    Introduction: p16 gene plays an important role in the normal cell cycle regulation. Methylation of p16 has been reported to be one of the epigenetic events contributing to the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) which occurring at varying frequency. DLBCL is an aggressive and high-grade malignancy which accounts for approximately 30% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases. However, little is known regarding the epigenetic alterations of p16 gene in DLBCL cases in Malaysia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the status of p16 methylation in DLBCL. Methods: A total of 88 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded DLBCL tissues retrieved from two hospitals located in the east coast of Malaysia, namely Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan (HTAA) Pahang and Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) Kelantan, were chosen for this study. DNA specimens were isolated and subsequently subjected to bisulfite treatment prior to methylation specific-PCR. Two pairs of primers were used to amplify methylated and unmethylated regions of p16 gene. The PCR products were then separated using agarose gel electrophoresis and visualised under UV illumination. SPSS version 12.0 was utilised to perform all statistical analysis. Result: p16 methylation was detected in 65 of 88 (74%) samples. There was a significant association between p16 methylation status and patients aged >50 years old (p=0.04). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that methylation of p16 tumor suppressor gene in our DLBCL cases is common and significantly increased among patients aged 50 years and above. Aging is known to be an important risk factor in the development of cancers and we speculate that this might be due to the increased transformation of malignant cells in aging cell population. However, this has yet to be confirmed with further research and correlate the findings with clinicopathological parameters. Creative Commons Attribution License

  8. HLA-A01-, -A03-, and -A024-binding nanomeric epitopes in polyomavirus BK large T antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, Bala; Popescu, Iulia; Macedo, Camila; Metes, Diana; Bueno, Marta; Zeevi, Adriana; Shapiro, Ron; Viscidi, Raphael; Randhawa, Parmjeet S

    2009-09-01

    Polyomavirus BK (BKV) infections are increasingly recognized. The development of immune-monitoring strategies against BKV requires definition of antigenic epitopes. Bioinformatic algorithms were used to identify 60 BKV large T-antigen (LT-Ag) peptides predicted to bind HLA class I alleles. In vitro peptide binding was used to select a subset of 19 peptides for interferon (IFN)-gamma ELISPOT assays in 13 healthy subjects and 12 kidney transplant recipients. Four A01-, nine A03-, and five A24-binding immunogenic peptides were identified in 1 to 3 (14-67%) tested subjects in each group. BKV epitope sequences were identical to homologous JC virus sequences for 3 of 19 peptides and homologous SV40 sequences for 5 of 19 peptides. Homology modeling localized these epitopes to the helicase, origin of DNA binding, or J domains, respectively. In conclusion, we have identified multiple 9-mer BKV LT-Ag-derived immunogenic epitopes that bind HLA-A01, -A03, or -A24 molecules. Sequence alignments indicate that two epitopes, FLICKGVNK and RYWLFKGPI, are common to BKV, JC virus, and SV40 virus.

  9. Genes involved in nonpermissive temperature-induced cell differentiation in Sertoli TTE3 cells bearing temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T-antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Obinata, Masuo

    2005-01-01

    Sertoli TTE3 cells, derived from transgenic mice bearing temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T (tsSV40LT)-antigen, proliferated continuously at a permissive temperature (33 deg C) whereas inactivation of the large T-antigen by a nonpermissive temperature (39 deg C) led to differentiation as judged by elevation of transferrin. To clarify the detailed mechanisms of differentiation, we investigated the time course of changes in gene expression using cDNA microarrays. Of the 865 genes analyzed, 14 genes showed increased levels of expression. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that the mRNA levels of p21 waf1 , milk fat globule membrane protein E8, heat-responsive protein 12, and selenoprotein P were markedly elevated. Moreover, the differentiated condition induced by the nonpermissive temperature significantly increased mRNA levels of these four genes in several cell lines from the transgenic mice bearing the oncogene. The present results regarding changes in gene expression will provide a basis for a further understanding of molecular mechanisms of differentiation in both Sertoli cells and cell lines transformed by tsSV40LT-antigen

  10. [Immunotherapy of uveal melanoma: vaccination against cancer. Multicenter adjuvant phase 3 vaccination study using dendritic cells laden with tumor RNA for large newly diagnosed uveal melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler-Thurner, B; Bartz-Schmidt, K-U; Bornfeld, N; Cursiefen, C; Fuisting, B; Grisanti, S; Heindl, L M; Holbach, L; Keserü, M; Knorr, H; Koch, K; Kruse, F; Meiller, R; Metz, C; Meyer-ter-Vehn, T; Much, M; Reinsberg, M; Schliep, S; Seitz, B; Schuler, G; Süsskind, D; Viestenz, A; Wagenfeld, L; Zeschnigk, M

    2015-12-01

    Uveal melanomas are the most common malignant tumors of the eye. With modern molecular biological diagnostic methods, such as chromosome 3 typing and gene expression analysis, these tumors can be categorized into highly aggressive (monosomy 3, class II) and less aggressive forms. This molecular biological stratification is primarily important for determining the risk of these tumors as no therapy is currently available that is able to prevent or delay metastases. A randomized study of patients with a poor prognosis (monosomy 3) is currently being carried out in order to determine whether a cancer vaccine prepared from autologous (patient's own) dendritic cells and uveal melanoma RNA can prevent or delay progression and further metastases of this extremely aggressive form of cancer. Inclusion in the uveal melanoma study, which hopes to provide a potential therapeutic option for patients, is only possible if patients are referred to an institution that is able to manufacture and provide this vaccination before the patient is operated on or treated with radiation. Untreated tumor material is necessary for producing the vaccine on an individualized patient basis.

  11. Short-term arginine deprivation results in large-scale modulation of hepatic gene expression in both normal and tumor cells: microarray bioinformatic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabo Edmond

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have reported arginine-sensitive regulation of LAT1 amino acid transporter (SLC 7A5 in normal rodent hepatic cells with loss of arginine sensitivity and high level constitutive expression in tumor cells. We hypothesized that liver cell gene expression is highly sensitive to alterations in the amino acid microenvironment and that tumor cells may differ substantially in gene sets sensitive to amino acid availability. To assess the potential number and classes of hepatic genes sensitive to arginine availability at the RNA level and compare these between normal and tumor cells, we used an Affymetrix microarray approach, a paired in vitro model of normal rat hepatic cells and a tumorigenic derivative with triplicate independent replicates. Cells were exposed to arginine-deficient or control conditions for 18 hours in medium formulated to maintain differentiated function. Results Initial two-way analysis with a p-value of 0.05 identified 1419 genes in normal cells versus 2175 in tumor cells whose expression was altered in arginine-deficient conditions relative to controls, representing 9–14% of the rat genome. More stringent bioinformatic analysis with 9-way comparisons and a minimum of 2-fold variation narrowed this set to 56 arginine-responsive genes in normal liver cells and 162 in tumor cells. Approximately half the arginine-responsive genes in normal cells overlap with those in tumor cells. Of these, the majority was increased in expression and included multiple growth, survival, and stress-related genes. GADD45, TA1/LAT1, and caspases 11 and 12 were among this group. Previously known amino acid regulated genes were among the pool in both cell types. Available cDNA probes allowed independent validation of microarray data for multiple genes. Among genes downregulated under arginine-deficient conditions were multiple genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. Expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor was

  12. Aberrant expression of the dendritic cell marker TNFAIP2 by the malignant cells of Hodgkin lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma distinguishes these tumor types from morphologically and phenotypically similar lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratiev, Svetlana; Duraisamy, Sekhar; Unitt, Christine L; Green, Michael R; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Shipp, Margaret A; Kutok, Jeffery L; Drapkin, Ronny I; Rodig, Scott J

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α-inducible protein-2 (TNFAIP2) is a protein upregulated in cultured cells treated with tumor necrosis factor α (TNF), but its expression in normal and neoplastic tissues remains largely unknown. Here, we use standard immunohistochemical techniques to demonstrate that TNFAIP2 is normally expressed by follicular dendritic cells, interdigitating dendritic cells, and macrophages but not by lymphoid cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Consistent with this expression pattern, we found strong TNFAIP2 staining of tumor cells in 4 of 4 cases (100%) of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and in 3 of 3 cases (100%) of histiocytic sarcoma. Although TNFAIP2 is not expressed by the small and intermediate-sized neoplastic B cells comprising follicular lymphoma, small lymphocytic lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, or marginal zone lymphoma, we observed strong TNFAIP2 staining of the large, neoplastic cells in 31 of 31 cases (100%) of classical Hodgkin lymphoma, in 12 of 12 cases (100%) of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma, and in 27 of 31 cases (87%) of primary mediastinal (thymic) large B-cell lymphoma. In contrast, TNFAIP2 was expressed by malignant cells in only 2 of 45 cases (4%) of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, in 2 of 18 cases (11%) of Burkitt lymphoma, and in 1 of 19 cases (5%) of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Further analysis indicates that TNFAIP2, as a single diagnostic marker, is more sensitive (sensitivity=87%) and specific (specificity=96%) than TRAF1, nuclear cRel, or CD23 for distinguishing the malignant B cells of primary mediastinal (thymic) large B-cell lymphoma from those of its morphologic and immunophenotypic mimic, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. Thus, TNFAIP2 may serve as a useful new marker of dendritic and histiocytic sarcomas, the aberrant expression of which in the malignant cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma and primary mediastinal (thymic) large B-cell lymphoma

  13. Evaluation on Usefulness of Abdomen and Chest Motion Control Device (ABCHES) for the Tumor with a Large Respiratory Motion in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yoon Jin; Jeon, Mi Jin; Shin, Dong Bong; Kim, Jong Dae; Kim, Sel Joon; Ha, Jin Sook; Im, Jung Ho; Lee, Ik Jae

    2012-01-01

    It is essential to minimize the respiratory-induced motion of involved organs in the Tomotherapy for tumor located in the chest and abdominal region. However, the application of breathing control system to Tomotherapy is limited. This study was aimed to investigate the possible application of the ABCHES system and its efficacy as a means of breathing control in the tomotherapy treatment. Five subjects who were treated with a Hi-Art Tomotherapy system for lung, liver, gallbladder and pancreatic tumors. All patients undertook trained on two breathing method using an ABCHES, free breathing method and shallow breathing method. When the patients could carry out the breathing control, 4D-CT scan was a total of 10 4D tomographic images were acquired. A radiologist resident manually drew the tumor region, including surrounding normal organs, on each of CT images at the inhalation phase, the exhalation phase and the 40% phase (mid-inhalation) and average CT image. Those CT images were then exported to the Tomotherapy planning station. Data exported from the Tomotherapy planning station was analyzed to quantify characteristics of dose-volume histograms and motion of tumors. Organ motions under free breathing and shallow breathing were examined six directions, respectively. Radiation exposure to the surrounding organs were also measured and compared. Organ motion is in the six directions with more than a 5 mm displacement. A total of 12 Organ motions occurred during free breathing while organ motions decreased to 2 times during shallow breathing under the use of Abches. Based on the quantitative analysis of the dose-volume histograms shallow breathing showed lower resulting values, compared to free breathing, in every measure. That is, treatment volume, the dose of radiation to the tumor and two surrounding normal organs (mean doses), the volume of healthy tissue exposed to radiation were lower at the shallow breathing state. This study proposes that the use of ABCHES is

  14. Aberrant expression of the dendritic cell marker TNFAIP2 by the malignant cells of Hodgkin lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma distinguishes these tumor types from morphologically and phenotypically similar lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratiev, Svetlana; Duraisamy, Sekhar; Unitt, Christine L.; Green, Michael R.; Pinkus, Geraldine; Shipp, Margaret A.; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Drapkin, Ronny I.; Rodig, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    TNFAIP2 is a protein upregulated in response to TNF signaling but its cellular expression and function in normal and neoplastic tissues remains largely unknown. Here we use standard immunohistochemical techniques to demonstrate that TNFAIP2 is normally expressed by follicular dendritic cells, interdigitating dendritic cells, and macrophages but not by lymphoid cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Consistent with this expression pattern, we found strong TNFAIP2 staining of tumor cells in 4/4 cases (100%) of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and in 3/3 cases (100%) of histiocytic sarcoma. Although TNFAIP2 is not expressed by the small and intermediate-size neoplastic B-cells comprising follicular lymphoma, small lymphocytic lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, or marginal zone lymphoma, we observed strong TNFAIP2 staining of the large, neoplastic cells, in 31/31 cases (100%) of classical Hodgkin lymphoma, 12/12 cases (100%) of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma, and 27/31 cases (87%) of primary mediastinal (thymic) large B cell lymphoma. In contrast, TNFAIP2 was expressed by the malignant cells in only 2/45 cases (4%) of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, 2/18 cases (11%) of Burkitt lymphoma, and 1/19 cases (5%) of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Further analysis indicates that TNFAIP2, as a single diagnostic marker, is more sensitive (sensitivity= 87%) and specific (specificity= 96%) than TRAF1, nuclear cRel, or CD23 for distinguishing the malignant B-cells of primary mediastinal (thymic) large B cell lymphoma from those of its morphologic and immunophenotypic mimic, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. Thus, TNFAIP2 may serve as a useful new marker of dendritic and histiocytic sarcomas whose aberrant expression in the malignant cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma and primary mediastinal (thymic) large B cell lymphoma serves to distinguish these tumors from other large cell lymphomas in routine clinical practice. PMID

  15. Species specificity of human RPA in simian virus 40 DNA replication lies in T-antigen-dependent RNA primer synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Park, J S; Ishiai, M; Hurwitz, J; Lee, S H

    2000-12-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a three-subunit protein complex with multiple functions in DNA replication. Previous study indicated that human RPA (h-RPA) could not be replaced by Schizosaccharomyces pombe RPA (sp-RPA) in simian virus 40 (SV40) replication, suggesting that h-RPA may have a specific function in SV40 DNA replication. To understand the specificity of h-RPA in replication, we prepared heterologous RPAs containing the mixture of human and S.pombe subunits and compared these preparations for various enzymatic activities. Heterologous RPAs containing two human subunits supported SV40 DNA replication, whereas those containing only one human subunit poorly supported DNA replication, suggesting that RPA complex requires at least two human subunits to support its function in SV40 DNA replication. All heterologous RPAs effectively supported single-stranded (ss)DNA binding activity and an elongation of a primed DNA template catalyzed by DNA polymerase (pol) alpha and delta. A strong correlation between SV40 DNA replication activity and large tumor antigen (T-ag)-dependent RNA primer synthesis by pol alpha-primase complex was observed among the heterologous RPAs. Furthermore, T-ag showed a strong interaction with 70- and 34-kDa subunits from human, but poorly interacted with their S.pombe counterparts, indicating that the specificity of h-RPA is due to its role in RNA primer synthesis. In the SV40 replication reaction, the addition of increasing amounts of sp-RPA in the presence of fixed amount of h-RPA significantly reduced overall DNA synthesis, but increased the size of lagging strand, supporting a specific role for h-RPA in RNA primer synthesis. Together, these results suggest that the specificity of h-RPA in SV40 replication lies in T-ag-dependent RNA primer synthesis.

  16. Species specificity of human RPA in simian virus 40 DNA replication lies in T-antigen-dependent RNA primer synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mu; Park, Jang-Su; Ishiai, Masamichi; Hurwitz, Jerard; Lee, Suk-Hee

    2000-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a three-subunit protein complex with multiple functions in DNA replication. Previous study indicated that human RPA (h-RPA) could not be replaced by Schizosaccharomyces pombe RPA (sp-RPA) in simian virus 40 (SV40) replication, suggesting that h-RPA may have a specific function in SV40 DNA replication. To understand the specificity of h-RPA in replication, we prepared heterologous RPAs containing the mixture of human and S.pombe subunits and compared these preparations for various enzymatic activities. Heterologous RPAs containing two human subunits supported SV40 DNA replication, whereas those containing only one human subunit poorly supported DNA replication, suggesting that RPA complex requires at least two human subunits to support its function in SV40 DNA replication. All heterologous RPAs effectively supported single-stranded (ss)DNA binding activity and an elongation of a primed DNA template catalyzed by DNA polymerase (pol) α and δ. A strong correlation between SV40 DNA replication activity and large tumor antigen (T-ag)-dependent RNA primer synthesis by pol α–primase complex was observed among the heterologous RPAs. Furthermore, T-ag showed a strong interaction with 70- and 34-kDa subunits from human, but poorly interacted with their S.pombe counterparts, indicating that the specificity of h-RPA is due to its role in RNA primer synthesis. In the SV40 replication reaction, the addition of increasing amounts of sp-RPA in the presence of fixed amount of h-RPA significantly reduced overall DNA synthesis, but increased the size of lagging strand, supporting a specific role for h-RPA in RNA primer synthesis. Together, these results suggest that the specificity of h-RPA in SV40 replication lies in T-ag-dependent RNA primer synthesis. PMID:11095685

  17. Large mediastinal tumor mass as a prognostic factor in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Is the definition on the basis of a chest radiograph in the era of CT obsolete?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mueller, H.; Engert, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Kuhnert, G.; Kobe, C. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The risk factor 'large mediastinal tumor mass' is an internationally accepted unfavorable prognostic factor in the staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The definition of this risk factor varies considerably between large cooperative study groups. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine to which degree data obtained from chest radiograph (CRX) give the same results as those from CT scans (CT). Methods: A total of 145 de novo HL patients in early unfavorable and advanced stages were included in this study. A total of 94 patients had a large mediastinal tumor mass according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), while 51 had mediastinal lymph node involvement only. The size of mediastinal involvement and the thoracic diameter were measured on CRX and CT. Agreement between CRX and CT was determined by sensitivity and specificity analysis as well as descriptive statistics and correlations. Results: The correlation of the diameters on CRX with those of CT was 0.95 for the tumor size and 0.77 for the thoracic diameter. The diagnostic decision - large mediastinal mass or not - correlated with 0.81 between CRX and CT and was identical in 90.3% of cases. The sensitivity was 0.87 and the specificity 0.96 for CRX, which is considered the current standard. Conclusion: The results show that there is a high agreement between the measurements of CRX and CT. Diagnosis of a large mediastinal mass disagreed in 10% of patients. Since the correct diagnosis of this risk factor is decisive for the adequate multimodal treatment choice, CRX should not be omitted. (orig.)

  18. Tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.; Ihan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  19. Endoscopic endonasal approach for the treatment of a large clival giant cell tumor complicated by an intraoperative internal carotid artery rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacoangeli M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Iacoangeli,1 Alessandro Di Rienzo,1 Massimo Re,2 Lorenzo Alvaro,1 Niccolò Nocchi,1 Maurizio Gladi,1 Maurizio De Nicola,3 Massimo Scerrati11Department of Neurosurgery, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, Italy; 2Department of Ear, Nose, and Throat Surgery, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, Italy; 3Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Section, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, ItalyAbstract: Giant cell tumors (GCTs are primary bone neoplasms that rarely involve the skull base. These lesions are usually locally aggressive and require complete removal, including the surrounding apparently healthy bone, to provide the best chance of cure. GCTs, as well as other lesions located in the clivus, can nowadays be treated by a minimally invasive fully endoscopic extended endonasal approach. This approach ensures a more direct route to the craniovertebral junction than other possible approaches (transfacial, extended lateral, and posterolateral approaches. The case reported is a clival GCT operated on by an extended endonasal approach that provides another contribution on how to address one of the most feared complications attributed to this approach: a massive bleed due to an internal carotid artery injury.Keywords: clival giant cell tumor, endoscopic endonasal approach, internal carotid artery injury, minimally invasive surgery

  20. Aggressive malignant phyllodes tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nathan; Runk, Dianne M

    2015-01-01

    Originally described in 1838 by Muller, phyllodes tumor is a rare fibroepithelial neoplasm which represents roughly 0.3-0.9% of all breast cancers. Phyllodes tumor are divided into benign, borderline and malignant histologic categories. Malignant phyllodes tumor represent anywhere from 10-30% of all phyllodes tumors. This group has both the potential to recur locally and metastasize, however not all malignant phyllodes behave this way. The challenge lays in predicting which tumor will recur locally or metastasize. Distinguishing this subset of malignant phyllodes tumor is paramount. We present a case of malignant phyllodes which presented with metastatic disease. What is fascinating about this case is not only the initial presentation but also the aggressiveness of this variation of phyllodes tumor. The patient initially presented with a large mass which encompassed her whole right breast. On surgical pathology the mass measured roughly 31cm in diameter and weighed over 10kg. Within 5 weeks from surgery the patient had suffered brain metastases and also 6 local recurrent tumors. The patient passed roughly 11 weeks after her first visit to our office. Despite biopsy proven malignant phyllodes tumor, it was near impossible to predict such a rapid course of disease progression in our patient. Our case illustrates the unpredictable nature of this disease in general and it possibly sheds light on a variant of the disease which had undergone an aggressive transformation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  2. Mammary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported

  3. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  4. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  6. Dose escalation in large anterior skull-base tumors by means of IMRT. First experience with the Novalis {sup registered} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst-Stecken, A.; Sauer, R.; Grabenbauer, G. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Lambrecht, U.; Mueller, R. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Div. of Medical Physics, Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, O. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the feasibility and tolerance of dose escalation with stereotactic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT) for skull-base tumors. Patients and Methods: between 01/2003 and 12/2004, twelve patients were treated. Nine were exclusively treated at the Novalis {sup registered} site with one planning target volume (PTV) field boost, three were administered boost IMRT treatment (two with each one PTV-shrinking field, one with single PTV) after conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. This resulted in 23 PTVs with a median volume of 93.63 cm{sup 3} (range, 88.58-125.88 cm{sup 3}). Dose calculation was done by the pencil-beam algorithm. Median total doses of 66.6, 77.4, and 63.9 Gy were prescribed for sIMRT alone, sIMRT after 3-D conformal irradiation of the nasopharynx and cervical lymph nodes with 59.4 Gy, and for reirradiation, respectively. Results: 95% isodose PTV coverage was reached in 86.5% (range, 80-93%). Homogeneity (D{sub max}/D{sup ref}) was 1.11, 1.09, and 1.08. Median total doses to 50% of chiasm, right and left optic nerve were 16.21, 16.82 and 10.23 Gy. 11/12 patients are locally controlled with a median follow-up of 11 months (range, 3-23 months), one has died of pulmonary embolism after cerebrospinal dissemination of retinal adenocarcinoma. Conclusion: SIMRT enables dose escalation to tumors located close to critical organs. Inverse planning for micro-multileaf collimator stereotactic irradiation is practicable in the daily routine irradiation program. SIMRT needs special verification and still, the following parameters have to be standardized: IMRT dose specification, dose maxima, length of radiation delivery time. (orig.)

  7. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  8. Successful Large-volume Leukapheresis for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Collection in a Very-low-weight Brain Tumor Infant with Coagulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mei Liao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral apheresis has become a safe procedure to collect hematopoietic stem cells, even in pediatric patients and donors. However, the apheresis procedure for small and sick children is more complicated due to difficult venous access, relatively large extracorporeal volume, toxicity of citrate, and unstable hemostasis. We report a small and sick child with refractory medulloblastoma, impaired liver function, and coagulopathy after several major cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. She successfully received large-volume leukapheresis for hematopoietic stem cell collection, although the patient experienced severe coagulopathy during the procedures. Health care providers should be alert to this potential risk.

  9. Clinical features, tumor biology, and prognosis associated with MYC rearrangement and Myc overexpression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab-CHOP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu-Monette, Z.Y.; Dabaja, B.S.; Wang, X.; Tu, M.; Manyam, G.C.; Tzankov, A.; Xia, Y.; Zhang, L.; Sun, R.; Visco, C.; Dybkaer, K.; Yin, L.; Chiu, A.; Orazi, A.; Zu, Y.; Bhagat, G.; Richards, K.L.; Hsi, E.D.; Choi, W.W.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Huh, J.; Ponzoni, M.; Ferreri, A.J.; Moller, M.B.; Parsons, B.M.; Zhao, X.; Winter, J.N.; Piris, M.A.; McDonnell, T.J.; Miranda, R.N.; Li, Y.; Medeiros, L.J.; Young, K.H.

    2015-01-01

    MYC dysregulation, including MYC gene rearrangement and Myc protein overexpression, is of increasing clinical importance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the roles of MYC and the relative importance of rearrangement vs overexpression remain to be refined. Gaining knowledge about

  10. Tumor vaccines:

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Mojca; Ihan, Alojz

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regirrcents. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tccmor aaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which imrrtune tol...

  11. Are tumor-to-tumor differences in oxygenation responsible for the heterogeneity in the response of tumors to therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.; Moulder, J.E.; Martin, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    Individual tumors from the same transplanted tumor line often show very different responses to the same treatments, even when the tumors are implanted into similar sites in similar hosts and studied at the same time. The cause of this heterogeneity is unknown; either tumor or host factors could be responsible. Solid tumors contain large numbers of viable hypoxic cells, which are resistant to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy and limit the response of tumors to intensive treatments. To determine whether differences in the proportion of hypoxic cells in the tumors produce the observed variability in therapeutic sensitivity, the authors compared the radiation responses of normally-aerated tumors and tumors made artificially hypoxic. If large tumor-to-tumor differences in oxygenation exist, data from normally-aerated tumors should be more variable than data from hypoxic tumors (which should all be brought to uniform hypoxia and uniform radioresistance). Analysis of data from several tumor systems revealed the variability in the radiation responses of hypoxic tumors to be at least as great as that for aerobic tumors. Thus, factors other than differences in oxygenation must produce the heterogeneity in tumor radiation response

  12. Tumoral tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Direct tumor tracers are subdivided in the following categories:metabolite tracers, antitumoral tracers, radioactive proteins and cations. Use of 67 Ga-citrate as a clinically important tumoral tracer is emphasized and gallium-67 whole-body scintigraphy is discussed in detail. (M.A.) [pt

  13. Carcinoid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread to other parts of the body. Doctors don't know what causes the mutations that can lead to carcinoid tumors. But they know that carcinoid tumors develop in neuroendocrine cells. Neuroendocrine cells are found in various organs throughout the body. They perform some nerve cell ...

  14. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  15. Adrenocortical tumors in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Ribeiro

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Childhood adrenocortical tumors (ACT are rare. In the USA, only about 25 new cases occur each year. In Southern Brazil, however, approximately 10 times that many cases are diagnosed each year. Most cases occur in the contiguous states of São Paulo and Paraná. The cause of this higher rate has not been identified. Familial genetic predisposition to cancer (p53 mutations and selected genetic syndromes (Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome have been associated with childhood ACT in general but not with the Brazilian counterpart. Most of the affected children are young girls with classic endocrine syndromes (virilizing and/or Cushing. Levels of urinary 17-ketosteroids and plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S, which are abnormal in approximately 90% of the cases, provide the pivotal clue to a diagnosis of ACT. Typical imaging findings of pediatric ACT consist of a large, well-defined suprarenal tumor containing calcifications with a thin capsule and central necrosis or hemorrhage. The pathologic classification of pediatric ACT is troublesome. Even an experienced pathologist can find it difficult to differentiate carcinoma from adenoma. Surgery is the single most important procedure in the successful treatment of ACT. The role of chemotherapy in the management of childhood ACT has not been established although occasional tumors are responsive to mitotane or cisplatin-containing regimens. Because of the heterogeneity and rarity of the disease, prognostic factors have been difficult to establish in pediatric ACT. Patients with incomplete tumor resection or with metastatic disease at diagnosis have a dismal prognosis. In patients with localized and completely resected tumors, the size of the tumor has predictive value. Patients with large tumors have a much higher relapse rate than those with small tumors.

  16. [Large-scale fragmentation of dna and the death of tumor cells by the action of the binary system ascorbic acid-metallocomplexes of cobalt in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, A I; Leshchenko, V V

    2012-01-01

    High-molecular-weight DNA fragments are the markers of the early stage of apoptosis induced in eukaryotic cells by cytotoxins of different nature. The dynamics of the development of large-scale DNA fragmentation in K-562 leukemia cells by the action of the antitumor drug, the binary system ascorbic acid--cobalt phthalocyanine within 48 h of incubation, which correspond to two periods of the doubling of cell number in growing control cultures, have been studied. It was shown that, within the first hours of incubation, hydrogen peroxide generated by the system induces the formation of DNA fragments from 2200 to 50 kbp long. Later on the cell death accompanied by a decrease in the content of fragmented DNA is observed. Within 24 h of incubation, part of fragmented DNA remains unrepaired; after 48 h of incubation, a delay or a slowed down proliferation of K-562 cells, which differ from control cells also by a high level of death and a higher content of high-molecular-weight DNA fragments, is observed.

  17. Large intragenic deletion of CDC73 (exons 4-10) in a three-generation hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT) syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Vito; Seaberg, Raewyn M; Kelly, Catherine; Jean Davidson, M; Raphael, Simon; Shuen, Andrew Y; Baorda, Filomena; Palumbo, Orazio; Scillitani, Alfredo; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Cole, David E C

    2017-08-03

    Inactivating mutations of CDC73 cause Hyperparathyroidism-Jaw Tumour syndrome (HPT-JT), Familial Isolated Hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) and sporadic parathyroid carcinoma. We conducted CDC73 mutation analysis in an HPT-JT family and confirm carrier status of the proband's daughter. The proband had primary hyperparathyroidism (parathyroid carcinoma) and uterine leiomyomata. Her father and daughter had hyperparathyroidism (parathyroid adenoma) but no other manifestations of HPT-JT. CDC73 mutation analysis (sequencing of all 17 exons) and whole-genome copy number variation (CNV) analysis was done on leukocyte DNA of the three affecteds as well as the proband's unaffected sister. A novel deletion of exons 4 to 10 of CDC73 was detected by CNV analysis in the three affecteds. A novel insertion in the 5'UTR (c.-4_-11insG) that co-segregated with the deletion was identified. By in vitro assay the 5'UTR insertion was shown to significantly impair the expression of the parafibromin protein. Screening for the mutated CDC73 confirmed carrier status in the proband's daughter and the biochemistry and ultrasonography led to pre-emptive surgery and resolution of the hyperparathyroidism. A novel gross deletion mutation in CDC73 was identified in a three-generation HPT-JT family emphasizing the importance of including screening for large deletions in the molecular diagnostic protocol.

  18. Tumor Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... only a small number of people will test positive for the disease who do not have it—in other words, it will result in very few false-positive results. Although tumor markers are extremely useful in ...

  19. Tumor Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... may require immediate or more aggressive treatment. The importance of tumor grade in planning treatment and determining ...

  20. Cryoablation for pulmonary tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Masafumi; Izumi, Yotaro; Tsukada, Norimasa; Asakura, Keisuke; Nakatsuka, Seishi; Yashiro, Hideki; Inoue, Masanori; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Kobayashi, Koichi

    2008-01-01

    We have experienced more than 200 sessions for mainly metastatic lung tumor and small number of primary lung cancer since 2002. Cryo-probe is inserted percutaneously with local anesthesia under CT scan guide. Co-axial technique is adopted to prevent from hemorrhage and massive air leakage. The average of hospital stay after treatment is 2.6 days. Although pneumothorax was associated with more than half patients, 5% of them experienced chest tube insertion. Local recurrence 1 year after treatment was found 10% of tumors of 10 mm or less diameter, 30% of 11-20 mm diameter, and 40% of 20-30 mm diameter and 100% of 31 mm or more diameter. In case of large vessels (3 mm or more diameter) running within 4 mm from tumor, recurrence rate was higher compared with the same sized tumors without large vessels running nearby. We are eager for the development of 3D-simulation system considering the distribution of caloric value is strongly requested to improve the local control power of cryoablation for lung tumor. (author)

  1. Delayed chromosomal instability caused by large deletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, M.; Suzuki, K.; Kodama, S.; Watanabe, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: There is accumulating evidence that genomic instability, manifested by the expression of delayed phenotypes, is induced by X-irradiation but not by ultraviolet (UV) light. It is well known that ionizing radiation, such as X-rays, induces DNA double strand breaks, but UV-light mainly causes base damage like pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts. Although the mechanism of radiation-induced genomic instability has not been thoroughly explained, it is suggested that DNA double strand breaks contribute the induction of genomic instability. We examined here whether X-ray induced gene deletion at the hprt locus induces delayed instability in chromosome X. SV40-immortalized normal human fibroblasts, GM638, were irradiated with X-rays (3, 6 Gy), and the hprt mutants were isolated in the presence of 6-thioguanine (6-TG). A 2-fold and a 60-fold increase in mutation frequency were found by 3 Gy and 6 Gy irradiation, respectively. The molecular structure of the hprt mutations was determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction of nine exons. Approximately 60% of 3 Gy mutants lost a part or the entire hprt gene, and the other mutants showed point mutations like spontaneous mutants. All 6 Gy mutants show total gene deletion. The chromosomes of the hprt mutants were analyzed by Whole Human Chromosome X Paint FISH or Xq telomere FISH. None of the point or partial gene deletion mutants showed aberrations of X-chromosome, however total gene deletion mutants induced translocations and dicentrics involving chromosome X. These results suggest that large deletion caused by DNA double strand breaks destabilizes chromosome structure, which may be involved in an induction of radiation-induced genomic instability

  2. Breast Tumor Angiogenesis and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Histopathologist's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewe Seng Ch'ng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Much progress has been made since the conceptualization of tumor angiogenesis—the induction of growth of new blood vessels by tumor—as a salient feature of clinically significant primary or metastatic cancers. From a practicing histopathologist's point of view, we appraise the application of this concept in breast cancer with particular reference to the evaluation of proangiogenic factors and the assessment of new microvessels in histopathological examination. Recently, much focus has also been centered on the active roles played by tumor-associated macrophages in relation to tumor angiogenesis. We review the literature; many data supporting this facet of tumor angiogenesis were derived from the breast cancer models. We scrutinize the large body of clinical evidence exploring the link between the tumor-associated macrophages and breast tumor angiogenesis and discuss particularly the methodology and limitations of incorporating such an assessment in histopathological examination.

  3. Constitutive activation of alternative nuclear factor kappa B pathway in canine diffuse large B-cell lymphoma contributes to tumor cell survival and is a target of new adjuvant therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Davis M; Ito, Daisuke; Forster, Colleen L; Yoon, Una A; Breen, Matthew; Burns, Linda J; Bachanova, Veronika; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; O'Brien, Timothy D; Schmechel, Stephen C; Rizzardi, Anthony E; Modiano, Jaime F; Linden, Michael A

    2017-07-01

    Activation of the classical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) pathway is a common molecular event observed in both human and canine diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Although the oncogenic potential of the alternative NFκB pathway (ANFκBP) has also been recently identified in DLBCL, its precise role in tumor pathogenesis and potential as a treatment target is understudied. We hypothesized that up-regulation of the ANFκBP plays an important role in the proliferation and survival of canine DLBCL cells, and we demonstrate that the ANFκBP is constitutively active in primary canine DLBCL samples and a cell line (CLBL1). We further demonstrate that a small interfering RNA inhibits the activation of the NFκB pathway and induces apoptosis in canine DLBCL cells. In conclusion, the ANFκBP facilitates survival of canine DLBCL cells, and thus, dogs with spontaneous DLBCL can provide a useful large animal model to study therapies targeting the ANFκBP.

  4. Discovery and validation of the tumor-suppressive function of long noncoding RNA PANDA in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma through the inactivation of MAPK/ERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Mingzhi; Xu, Huanan; Wang, Yifei; Li, Zhaoming; Chang, Yu; Wang, Xinhuan; Fu, Xiaorui; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Yang, Siyuan; Wang, Bei; Shang, Yufeng

    2017-09-22

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality, and responds badly to existing treatment. Thus, it is of urgent need to identify novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets of DLBCL. Recent studies have shown that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play an important role in the development of cancer. By using the next generation HiSeq sequencing assay, we determined lncRNAs exhibiting differential expression between DLBCL patients and healthy controls. Then, RT-qPCR was performed for identification in clinical samples and cell materials, and lncRNA PANDA was verified to be down-regulated in DLBCL patients and have considerable diagnostic potential. In addition, decreased serum PANDA level was correlated to poorer clinical outcome and lower overall survival in DLBCL patients. Subsequently, we determined the experimental role of lncRNA PANDA in DLBCL progression. Luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay suggested that lncRNA PANDA was induced by p53 and p53 interacts with the promoter region of PANDA. Cell functional assay further indicated that PANDA functioned as a tumor suppressor gene through the suppression of cell growth by a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in DLBCL. More importantly, Cignal Signal Transduction Reporter Array and western blot assay showed that lncRNA PANDA inactivated the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. In conclusion, our integrated approach demonstrates that PANDA in DLBCL confers a tumor suppressive function through inhibiting cell proliferation and silencing MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. Thus, PANDA may be a promising therapeutic target for patients with DLBCL.

  5. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search Menu Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Instagram LinkedIn Brain Tumor Information | News & Blog Our Mission Our History Mission Leadership & Staff Financials Careers News & Blog Contact Us Donate Now Our Impact Our Impact Recent News News & ...

  6. Mediastinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canizares, Claudio; Araujo, Ivan; Rodriguez, Amparo; Robles, Wilson; Simba, Catalina

    2005-01-01

    In our practice the mediastinal tumors are infrequent. The mediastinum is the portion of the thoracic cavity that contains numerous organs and structures which makes a crossroad for the diagnostic process. Within which congenital cysts, inflammatory and benign tumors, malignant neoplasms may develop. In the superior compartment are found: thymoma and thymic cysts, germ cell tumors, thyroid lesions, parathyroid adenomas, malignant lymphomas, paragangliomas, hemangiomas, lipomas, and inflammatory lesions such as fibrosing mediastinitis. In the middle portion: pericardial cysts, bronchial cysts, malignant lymphomas. In the posterior region: neurogenic tumors such as Shawnomas, neurofibromas, ganglioneuroblastomas, neuroblastomas, paragangliomas, and gastro enteric cysts. We describe two cases. One of a female patient with a prominent tumor in the anterior compartment of the mediastinum, detected by the x-ray films. Initially a cardiac lesion was excluded by echographic, angiographic studies. The biopsy exhibited a prominent fibrosis that suggested fibrosing mediastinitis (sclerosing). Whoever the immunohistochemical phenotype was positive for lambda chains, determining the diagnosis of lymphoma. The other case is of a young male with a thymoma associated to a pure red cell aplasia, which was the initial clinical symptom. Computerized tomography and thyroid scintigraphy was used. (The author)

  7. Imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaensler, E.H.L.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  8. Benign notochordal cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gamarra, C; Bernabéu Taboada, D; Pozo Kreilinger, J J; Tapia Viñé, M

    Benign notochordal cell tumors (TBCN) are lesions with notochordal differentiation which affect the axial skeleton. They are characterized by asymptomatic or non-specific symptomatology and are radiologically unnoticed because of their small size, or because they are mistaken with other benign bone lesions, such as vertebral hemangiomas. When they are large, or symptomatic, can be differential diagnosis with metastases, primary bone tumors and chordomas. We present a case of a TBCN in a 50-year-old woman, with a sacral lesion seen in MRI. A CT-guided biopsy was scheduled to analyze the lesion, finding that the tumor was not clearly recognizable on CT, so the anatomical references of MRI were used to select the appropriate plane. The planning of the approach and the radio-pathological correlation were determinant to reach the definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing tumor progression factors by somatic gene transfer into a mouse model: Bcl-xL promotes islet tumor cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chieh Nancy Du

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumors develop through multiple stages, implicating multiple effectors, but the tools to assess how candidate genes contribute to stepwise tumor progression have been limited. We have developed a novel system in which progression of phenotypes in a mouse model of pancreatic islet cell tumorigenesis can be used to measure the effects of genes introduced by cell-type-specific infection with retroviral vectors. In this system, bitransgenic mice, in which the rat insulin promoter (RIP drives expression of both the SV40 T antigen (RIP-Tag and the receptor for subgroup A avian leukosis virus (RIP-tva, are infected with avian viral vectors carrying cDNAs encoding candidate progression factors. Like RIP-Tag mice, RIP-Tag; RIP-tva bitransgenic mice develop isolated carcinomas by approximately 14 wk of age, after progression through well-defined stages that are similar to aspects of human tumor progression, including hyperplasia, angiogenesis, adenoma, and invasive carcinoma. When avian retroviral vectors carrying a green fluorescent protein marker were introduced into RIP-Tag; RIP-tva mice by intra-cardiac injection at the hyperplastic or early dysplastic stage of tumorigenesis, approximately 20% of the TVA-positive cells were infected and expressed green fluorescent proteins as measured by flow cytometry. Similar infection with vectors carrying cDNA encoding either of two progression factors, a dominant-negative version of cadherin 1 (dnE-cad or Bcl-xL, accelerated the formation of islet tumors with invasive properties and pancreatic lymph node metastasis. To begin studying the mechanism by which Bcl-xL, an anti-apoptotic protein, promotes invasion and metastasis, RIP-Tag; RIP-tva pancreatic islet tumor cells were infected in vitro with RCASBP-Bcl-xL. Although no changes were observed in rates of proliferation or apoptosis, Bcl-xL altered cell morphology, remodeled the actin cytoskeleton, and down-regulated cadherin 1; it also induced cell migration and

  10. Computed tomography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanem, Nadir; Altehoefer, Carsten; Winterer, Jan; Schaefer, Oliver; Springer, Oliver; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Furtwaengler, Alex

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the imaging characteristics of primary and recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in computed tomography with respect to the tumor size. Computed tomography was performed in 35 patients with histologically confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumors and analyzed retrospectively by two experienced and independent radiologist. The following morphologic tumor characteristics of primary (n=20) and (n=16) recurrent tumors were evaluated according to tumor size, shape, homogeneity, density compared with liver, contrast enhancement, presence of calcifications, ulcerations, fistula or distant metastases and the anatomical relationship to the intestinal wall, and the infiltration of adjacent visceral organs. Small GIST ( 5-10 cm) demonstrated an irregular shape, inhomogeneous density on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images, a combined intra- and extraluminal tumor growth with aggressive findings, and infiltration of adjacent organs in 9 primary diagnosed and 2 recurrent tumors. Large GIST (>10 cm), which were observed in 8 primary tumors and 11 recurrent tumors, showed an irregular margin with inhomogeneous density and aggressive findings, and were characterized by signs of malignancy such as distant and peritoneal metastases. Small recurrent tumors had a similar appearance as compared with large primary tumors. Computed tomography gives additional information with respect to the relationship of gastrointestinal stromal tumor to the gastrointestinal wall and surrounding organs, and it detects distant metastasis. Primary and recurrent GIST demonstrate characteristic CT imaging features which are related to tumor size. Aggressive findings and signs of malignancy are found in larger tumors and in recurrent disease. Computed tomography is useful in detection and characterization of primary and recurrent tumors with regard to tumor growth pattern, tumor size, and varied appearances of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and indirectly

  11. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nursing, or cause a man to lose his sex drive or lower his sperm count. Pituitary tumors often go undiagnosed because their symptoms resemble those of so many other more common diseases. × Definition The pituitary is a small, bean-sized gland ...

  12. Nephrogenic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesbauer, P.

    2008-01-01

    Nephroblastomas are the most common malignant renal tumors in childhood. According to the guidelines of the SIOP (Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique) and GPOH (Gesellschaft fuer Paediatrische Onkologie und Haematologie) pre-operative chemotherapy can be started without histological confirmation and thus initial imaging studies, in particular ultrasound, play an outstanding role for diagnostic purposes

  13. Three-dimensional conformal radiation may deliver considerable dose of incidental nodal irradiation in patients with early stage node-negative non-small cell lung cancer when the tumor is large and centrally located

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lujun; Chen Ming; Haken, Randall ten; Chetty, Indrin; Chapet, Olivier; Hayman, James A.; Kong Fengming

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the dose to regional nodal stations in patients with T 1-3 N 0 M 0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) without intentional elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with medically inoperable T 1-3 N 0 M 0 NSCLC were treated with 3DCRT without ENI. Hilar and mediastinal nodal regions were contoured on planning CT. The prescription dose was normalized to 70 Gy. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and other dosimetric parameters (e.g., V 40 ) were calculated for each nodal station. Results: The median EUD for the whole group ranged from 0.4 to 4.4 Gy for all elective nodal regions. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and the relationship between GTV and hilum were significantly correlated with irradiation dose to ipsilateral hilar nodal regions (P 3 (diameter ∼ 4 cm) and or having any overlap with hilum, the median EUDs were 9.6, 22.6, and 62.9 Gy for ipsilateral lower paratracheal, subcarinal, and ipsilateral hilar regions, respectively. The corresponding median V 40 were 32.5%, 39.3%, and 97.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Although incidental nodal irradiation dose is low in the whole group, the dose to high-risk nodal regions is considerable in patients with T 1-3 N 0 NSCLC when the primary is large and/or centrally located

  14. Computed tomography of Krukenberg tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, K.C.; Gold, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of three patients with Kurkenberg tumor was reviewed retrospectively. CT showed large, lobulated, multicystic masses with soft-tissue components, indistinguishable from primary ovarian carcinoma. Much has been written about metastatic ovarian tumor, but this is the first report in the radiologic literature about their CT features. The authors emphasize the importance of recognizing the ovary as a frequent site of metastases and the proper approach to this problem. In patients with a history of colon or gastric carcinoma, the mixed cystic and solid ovarian mass on CT should be regarded as metastatic tumor until proven otherwise. A careful search for gastrointestinal tract signs or symptoms should be done in any patient with a pelvic tumor. When CT is done for evaluation of ovarian tumor, the stomach and colon should be carefully evaluated, and the ovaries routinely examined in the preoperative CT staging of gastric or colon carcinoma

  15. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  16. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood Swings & Cognitive Changes Fatigue Other Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us ...

  17. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  18. Focal midbrain tumors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandertop, W P; Hoffman, H J; Drake, J M; Humphreys, R P; Rutka, J T; Amstrong, D C; Becker, L E

    1992-08-01

    The clinical and neuroradiological features of focal midbrain tumors in 12 children are described, and the results of their surgical management are presented. Patients with a focal midbrain tumor usually exhibit either symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure caused by an obstructive hydrocephalus (50%) or symptoms and signs caused by pressure on the tegmentum and cerebral peduncles. The lesions are confined to the tectal plate or tegmentum with possible extension upward to the thalamus and downward to the pons, displacing but not invading these structures. The edges of the tumor are well defined, and the large majority have a solid consistency with intense regular enhancement after intravenous contrast. Radical resection is hardly ever feasible in brain stem tumors, but in this series, significant reduction of the tumor mass was obtained in 75% of the patients, with no surgical mortality and minimal surgical morbidity and with the majority of patients showing clinical improvement postoperatively. All tumors were nonpilocytic, low-grade astrocytomas. Six patients received adjunctive radiotherapy. The mean follow-up period is 2.5 years, and all patients are alive and doing well. We conclude that focal midbrain tumors in children appear to be a distinct subgroup of brain stem tumors and are very amenable to surgical resection with an excellent long-term prognosis.

  19. The antigen specific composition of melanoma tumor infiltrating lymphocytes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2012-01-01

    Large numbers of tumor associated antigens has been characterized, but only a minor fraction of these are recognized by tumor infiltrating lymphocytes of melanoma, although these have shown the ability to recognize tumor and provide tumor regression upon adoptive transfer. Thus the peptide...

  20. Cryospectrophotometric determination of tumor intravascular oxyhemoglobin saturations: dependence on vascular geometry and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, B M; Rofstad, E K; Degner, F L; Sutherland, R M

    1988-12-21

    To delineate the complex relationships between overall tumor oxygenation and vascular configuration, intravascular oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation distributions were measured with cryospectrophotometric techniques. Four factors related to vascular morphometry and tumor growth were evaluated: a) vessel diameter, b) distance of vessel from the tumor surface, c) tumor volume, and d) vascular density. To measure intertumor heterogeneity, two murine sarcomas (RIF-1 and KHT) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenografts (OWI and MLS) were utilized. In contrast to skeletal muscle, a preponderance of very low HbO2 saturations was observed for both large and small tumors of all lines. Saturations up to about 90% were also generally present, however, even in very large tumors. Variations in vascular configuration were predominantly tumor-line dependent rather than due to inherent characteristics of the host vasculature, and widely disparate HbO2 distributions were found for alternate lines implanted in identical host mice. Although peripheral saturations remained fairly constant with tumor growth, HbO2 values were markedly lower for vessels nearer the tumor center and further decreased with increasing tumor volume. HbO2 saturations did not change substantially with increasing vascular density (except for KHT tumors), although density did decrease with increasing distance from tumor surface. Combined effects of vessel diameter, tumor volume, and vessel location on HbO2 saturations were complex and varied markedly with both tumor line and vessel class. For specific classes, HbO2 distributions correlated closely with radiobiological hypoxic fractions, i.e., for tumor lines in which hypoxic fraction increased substantially with tumor volume, corresponding HbO2 values decreased, while for lines in which hypoxic fraction remained constant, HbO2 values also were unchanged. Although these trends may also be a function of differing oxygen consumption rates between tumor lines

  1. Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisseler-Eckhoff, Annette, E-mail: Annette.Fisseler-Eckhoff@hsk-wiesbaden.de; Demes, Melanie [Department of Pathology und Cytology, Dr. Horst-Schmidt-Kliniken (HSK), Wiesbaden 65199 (Germany)

    2012-07-31

    Neuroendocrine tumors may develop throughout the human body with the majority being found in the gastrointestinal tract and bronchopulmonary system. Neuroendocrine tumors are classified according to the grade of biological aggressiveness (G1–G3) and the extent of differentiation (well-differentiated/poorly-differentiated). The well-differentiated neoplasms comprise typical (G1) and atypical (G2) carcinoids. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas as well as small cell carcinomas (G3) are poorly-differentiated. The identification and differentiation of atypical from typical carcinoids or large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and small cell carcinomas is essential for treatment options and prognosis. Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors are characterized according to the proportion of necrosis, the mitotic activity, palisading, rosette-like structure, trabecular pattern and organoid nesting. The given information about the histopathological assessment, classification, prognosis, genetic aberration as well as treatment options of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors are based on own experiences and reviewing the current literature available. Most disagreements among the classification of neuroendocrine tumor entities exist in the identification of typical versus atypical carcinoids, atypical versus large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas versus small cell carcinomas. Additionally, the classification is restricted in terms of limited specificity of immunohistochemical markers and possible artifacts in small biopsies which can be compressed in cytological specimens. Until now, pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors have been increasing in incidence. As compared to NSCLCs, only little research has been done with respect to new molecular targets as well as improving the classification and differential diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors of the lung.

  2. Strategic management of adrenal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, N

    1994-02-01

    Adrenal tumors--large and small, symptomatic and asymptomatic, benign and malignant--are being diagnosed with increasing frequency. Patients presenting with endocrine syndromes symptomatic of adrenal tumors require meticulous, considerate history taking, thorough physical examination, and careful planning for medical management and/or surgical removal. Adrenal tumors discovered in the absence of endocrine syndromes, and which are greater than 5 cm in diameter, require careful biochemical and imaging investigation before removal, since their rate of malignancy increases with size. Adrenal masses less than 4 cm in diameter present in the absence of endocrine syndromes can, after full endocrine and imaging evaluation, be carefully observed. Even with optimal surgical/medical management, malignant disease of the adrenal glands presents a poor outcome. This paper reviews the broad management of adrenal tumors, including a personal experience with a challenging case of adrenal adenocarcinoma.

  3. CCCT - NCTN Steering Committees - Pediatric and Adolescent Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pediatric and Adolescent Solid Tumor Steering Committee addresses the design, prioritization and evaluation of concepts for large phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials in extracranial solid tumors of children and youth.

  4. Influence of Fractionation Scheme and Tumor Location on Toxicities After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Large (≥5 cm) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Multi-institutional Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Shostrom, Valerie K. [Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Zhen, Weining; Zhang, Mutian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Braunstein, Steve E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Harkenrider, Matthew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Iskhanian, Adrian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Attia, Albert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wang, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Decker, Roy H. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); McGarry, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Simone, Charles B., E-mail: charlessimone@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the impact of fractionation scheme and tumor location on toxicities in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for ≥5-cm non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as part of a multi-institutional analysis. Methods: Patients with primary ≥5-cm N0 M0 NSCLC who underwent ≤5-fraction SBRT were examined across multiple high-volume SBRT centers. Collected data included clinical/treatment parameters; toxicities were prospectively assessed at each institution according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients treated daily were compared with those treated every other day (QOD)/other nondaily regimens. Stratification between central and peripheral tumors was also performed. Results: Ninety-two patients from 12 institutions were evaluated (2004-2016), with median follow-up of 12 months. In total there were 23 (25%) and 6 (7%) grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 toxicities, respectively. Grades 2 and 3 pulmonary toxicities occurred in 9% and 4%, respectively; 1 patient treated daily experienced grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. Of the entire cohort, 46 patients underwent daily SBRT, and 46 received QOD (n=40)/other nondaily (n=6) regimens. Clinical/treatment parameters were similar between groups; the QOD/other group was more likely to receive 3-/4-fraction schemas. Patients treated QOD/other experienced significantly fewer grade ≥2 toxicities as compared with daily treatment (7% vs 43%, P<.001). Patients treated daily also had higher rates of grade ≥2 pulmonary toxicities (P=.014). Patients with peripheral tumors (n=66) were more likely to receive 3-/4-fraction regimens than those with central tumors (n=26). No significant differences in grade ≥2 toxicities were identified according to tumor location (P>.05). Conclusions: From this multi-institutional study, toxicity of SBRT for ≥5-cm lesions is acceptable, and daily treatment was associated with a higher rate of toxicities.

  5. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on the survival rates for people with a ...

  6. Tumors and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  7. DCB - Tumor Metastasis Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor metastasis research examines the mechanisms that allow cancer cells to leave the primary tumor and spread to another part of the body. Learn about recent tumor metastasis research studies supported by the Division of Cancer Biology.

  8. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  9. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  10. Activity of drug-loaded tumor-penetrating microparticles in peritoneal pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ze; Tsai, Max; Wang, Jie; Cole, David J; Wientjes, M Guillaume; Au, Jessie L-S

    2014-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy confers significant survival benefits in cancer patients. However, several problems, including local toxicity and ineffectiveness against bulky tumors, have prohibited it from becoming a standard of care. We have developed drug-loaded, polymeric tumor-penetrating microparticles (TPM) to address these problems. Initial studies showed that TPM provides tumor-selective delivery and is effective against ovarian SKOV3 tumors of relatively small size (TPM activity extends to other tumor types that are more bulky and have different morphologies and disease presentation. We evaluated TPM in mice bearing two IP human pancreatic tumors with different growth characteristics and morphologies (rapidly growing, large and porous Hs766T vs. slowly growing, smaller and densely packed MiaPaCa2), and at different disease stage (early stage with smaller tumors vs. late stage with larger tumors plus peritoneal carcinomatosis). Comparison of treatments with TPM or paclitaxel in Cremophor micelles, at equi-toxic doses, shows, in all tumor types: (a) higher paclitaxel levels in tumors (up to 55-fold) for TPM, (b) greater efficacy for TPM, including significantly longer survival and higher cure rate, and (c) a single dose of TPM was equally efficacious as multiple doses of paclitaxel/Cremophor. The results indicate tumor targeting property and superior antitumor activity of paclitaxel-loaded TPM are generalizable to small and large peritoneal tumors, with or without accompanying carcinomatosis.

  11. Resistance to experimental tumorigenesis in cells of a long-lived mammal, the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sitai; Mele, James; Wu, Yuehong; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Hornsby, Peter J

    2010-08-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber) is a long-lived mammal in which spontaneous cancer has not been observed. To investigate possible mechanisms for cancer resistance in this species, we studied the properties of skin fibroblasts from the NMR following transduction with oncogenes that cause cells of other mammalian species to form malignant tumors. Naked mole-rat fibroblasts were transduced with a retrovirus encoding SV40 large T antigen and oncogenic Ras(G12V). Following transplantation of transduced cells into immunodeficient mice, cells rapidly entered crisis, as evidenced by the presence of anaphase bridges, giant cells with enlarged nuclei, multinucleated cells, and cells with large number of chromosomes or abnormal chromatin material. In contrast, similarly transduced mouse and rat fibroblasts formed tumors that grew rapidly without crisis. Crisis was also observed after > 40 population doublings in SV40 TAg/Ras-expressing NMR cells in culture. Crisis in culture was prevented by additional infection of the cells with a retrovirus encoding hTERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase). SV40 TAg/Ras/hTERT-expressing NMR cells formed tumors that grew rapidly in immunodeficient mice without evidence of crisis. Crisis could also be induced in SV40 TAg/Ras-expressing NMR cells by loss of anchorage, but after hTERT transduction, cells were able to proliferate normally following loss of anchorage. Thus, rapid crisis is a response of oncogene-expressing NMR cells to growth in an in vivo environment, which requires anchorage independence, and hTERT permits cells to avoid crisis and to achieve malignant tumor growth. The unique reaction of NMR cells to oncogene expression may form part of the cancer resistance of this species.

  12. Unraveling tumor grading and genomic landscape in lung neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Papotti, Mauro; Rindi, Guido; Scarpa, Aldo

    2014-06-01

    Currently, grading in lung neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is inherently defined by the histological classification based on cell features, mitosis count, and necrosis, for which typical carcinoids (TC) are low-grade malignant tumors with long life expectation, atypical carcinoids (AC) intermediate-grade malignant tumors with more aggressive clinical behavior, and large cell NE carcinomas (LCNEC) and small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC) high-grade malignant tumors with dismal prognosis. While Ki-67 antigen labeling index, highlighting the proportion of proliferating tumor cells, has largely been used in digestive NETs for assessing prognosis and assisting therapy decisions, the same marker does not play an established role in the diagnosis, grading, and prognosis of lung NETs. Next generation sequencing techniques (NGS), thanks to their astonishing ability to process in a shorter timeframe up to billions of DNA strands, are radically revolutionizing our approach to diagnosis and therapy of tumors, including lung cancer. When applied to single genes, panels of genes, exome, or the whole genome by using either frozen or paraffin tissues, NGS techniques increase our understanding of cancer, thus realizing the bases of precision medicine. Data are emerging that TC and AC are mainly altered in chromatin remodeling genes, whereas LCNEC and SCLC are also mutated in cell cycle checkpoint and cell differentiation regulators. A common denominator to all lung NETs is a deregulation of cell proliferation, which represents a biological rationale for morphologic (mitoses and necrosis) and molecular (Ki-67 antigen) parameters to successfully serve as predictors of tumor behavior (i.e., identification of pathological entities with clinical correlation). It is envisaged that a novel grading system in lung NETs based on the combined assessment of mitoses, necrosis, and Ki-67 LI may offer a better stratification of prognostic classes, realizing a bridge between molecular alterations

  13. Enhancing Tumor Penetration of Nanomedicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Qingxue; Ojha, Tarun; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan; Shi, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-targeted nanomedicines have been extensively applied to alter the drawbacks and enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. Despite the large number of preclinical nanomedicine studies showing initial success, their therapeutic benefit in the clinic has been rather modest, which is partially

  14. A case of mediastinum tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guariglia, S.N.; Schultz, R.; Funari, M.B.G.; Menezes Neto, J.R. de

    1989-01-01

    A patient with a tumor in the anterior mediastinum is presented. The patient ununderswent chest X-ray studies and thorax CT which demonstrated a large mass involving the heart and compressing the lungs. A malignant teratoma was eventually diagnosed by anatomopathologic examination. (author) [pt

  15. Smoothing waves in array CGH tumor profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wiel, Mark A.; Brosens, Rebecca; Eilers, Paul H. C.; Kumps, Candy; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Menten, Bjorn; Sistermans, Erik; Speleman, Frank; Timmerman, Marieke E.; Ylstra, Bauke

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Many high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization tumor profiles contain a wave bias, which makes accurate detection of breakpoints in such profiles more difficult. Results: An efficient and highly effective algorithm that largely removes the wave bias from tumor profiles by

  16. Biopsy in Musculoskeletal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gharehdaghi

    2014-09-01

    proximity to the skin incision, because this tract is also contaminated and must be excised with the surgical specimen. Imaging-guided core needle biopsy is a well-established technique for the diagnosis of bone and soft tissue tumors and tumor-like lesions in specialized orthopedic oncology centers. Although large lesions of the limbs can easily be biopsied without image guidance, lesions in the spine, para spinal area, and pelvis are difficult to target, therefore taking the advantage of C.T. guidance will improve the accuracy of targeting the lesion for biopsy purposes. We can benefit from image intensifiers for targeting limb lesions rather than C.T. guidance. Also sonographic guide can be applied for soft tissue lesions (Figure D, E, F. In soft tissue tumors, the results of percutaneous CNB are relatively inferior compared to open biopsy whereas almost equal results are expected for bony tumors except for low-grade chondrosarcoma. CNB is a safe, minimally invasive, and cost effective technique for the diagnosis of bone lesions if done by an experienced orthopedic oncologic surgeon and be evaluated by an experienced anatomical bone pathologist (1, 3. For soft tissue tumors, CNB results depend on the size of the lesion, its location and amount of tumor necrosis. Guided needle biopsy have become the standard technique in most orthopedic oncologic centers. The accuracy of this method in our center is more than 90% for bone tumors. Cores should be taken in different directions including areas of central necrotic tissues but from a single well planned entrance. The procedure is quick, especially for bone CNB or soft tissue FNA and CNB, and the diagnosis can be achieved within 24 – 48 hours. The material should be sufficient for immunohistochemistry evaluations as well (1-3. Because I have seen 3 cases of tumor implantation at the towel clips puncture site including 2 chondrosarcomas and a case of malignant schowanoma, so I highly suggest that never crush the skin by towel

  17. Congenital tumors of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severino, Mariasavina; Schwartz, Erin S.; Thurnher, Majda M.; Rydland, Jana; Nikas, Ioannis; Rossi, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Congenital tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) are often arbitrarily divided into ''definitely congenital'' (present or producing symptoms at birth), ''probably congenital'' (present or producing symptoms within the first week of life), and ''possibly congenital'' (present or producing symptoms within the first 6 months of life). They represent less than 2% of all childhood brain tumors. The clinical features of newborns include an enlarged head circumference, associated hydrocephalus, and asymmetric skull growth. At birth, a large head or a tense fontanel is the presenting sign in up to 85% of patients. Neurological symptoms as initial symptoms are comparatively rare. The prenatal diagnosis of congenital CNS tumors, while based on ultrasonography, has significantly benefited from the introduction of prenatal magnetic resonance imaging studies. Teratomas constitute about one third to one half of these tumors and are the most common neonatal brain tumor. They are often immature because of primitive neural elements and, rarely, a component of mixed malignant germ cell tumors. Other tumors include astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors, and medulloblastomas. Less common histologies include craniopharyngiomas and ependymomas. There is a strong predilection for supratentorial locations, different from tumors of infants and children. Differential diagnoses include spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage that can occur in the presence of coagulation factor deficiency or underlying vascular malformations, and congenital brain malformations, especially giant heterotopia. The prognosis for patients with congenital tumors is generally poor, usually because of the massive size of the tumor. However, tumors can be resected successfully if they are small and favorably located. The most favorable outcomes are achieved with choroid plexus tumors, where aggressive surgical treatment leads to disease

  18. Congenital tumors of the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severino, Mariasavina [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Genoa (Italy); Schwartz, Erin S. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Rydland, Jana [MR Center, St. Olav' s Hospital HF, Trondheim (Norway); Nikas, Ioannis [Agia Sophia Children' s Hospital, Imaging Department, Athens (Greece); Rossi, Andrea [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Genoa (Italy); G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Neuroradiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Congenital tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) are often arbitrarily divided into ''definitely congenital'' (present or producing symptoms at birth), ''probably congenital'' (present or producing symptoms within the first week of life), and ''possibly congenital'' (present or producing symptoms within the first 6 months of life). They represent less than 2% of all childhood brain tumors. The clinical features of newborns include an enlarged head circumference, associated hydrocephalus, and asymmetric skull growth. At birth, a large head or a tense fontanel is the presenting sign in up to 85% of patients. Neurological symptoms as initial symptoms are comparatively rare. The prenatal diagnosis of congenital CNS tumors, while based on ultrasonography, has significantly benefited from the introduction of prenatal magnetic resonance imaging studies. Teratomas constitute about one third to one half of these tumors and are the most common neonatal brain tumor. They are often immature because of primitive neural elements and, rarely, a component of mixed malignant germ cell tumors. Other tumors include astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors, and medulloblastomas. Less common histologies include craniopharyngiomas and ependymomas. There is a strong predilection for supratentorial locations, different from tumors of infants and children. Differential diagnoses include spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage that can occur in the presence of coagulation factor deficiency or underlying vascular malformations, and congenital brain malformations, especially giant heterotopia. The prognosis for patients with congenital tumors is generally poor, usually because of the massive size of the tumor. However, tumors can be resected successfully if they are small and favorably located. The most favorable outcomes are achieved with choroid plexus tumors

  19. Malignant phyllodes breast tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa R. Shah-Patel, MD

    2017-01-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare tumor of the breast occurring in females usually between the ages of 35 and 55 years. It is often difficult to distinguish benign from malignant phyllodes tumors from other benign entities such as fibroadenomas. This case presentation demonstrates a woman with malignant phyllodes tumor treated with mastectomy with abdominal skin flap reconstruction.

  20. Malignant phyllodes breast tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R. Shah-Patel, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare tumor of the breast occurring in females usually between the ages of 35 and 55 years. It is often difficult to distinguish benign from malignant phyllodes tumors from other benign entities such as fibroadenomas. This case presentation demonstrates a woman with malignant phyllodes tumor treated with mastectomy with abdominal skin flap reconstruction.

  1. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Liver Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Liver Tumors What's in this article? Types of Tumors ... Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping Print The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  2. Ossifying renal tumor of infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Husseini, Tareq K.; Al-Orf, Ali M.; Egail, Siddig A.; Mostert, C.

    2005-01-01

    Ossifying renal tumor of infancy ORTI is a benign neoplasm, which presents with gross hematuria and less frequently as an abdominal mass, histologically it comprises a large cell with an epithelial nature and osteoid formation. We report a case of a 10-month-old girl who developed ORTI as non-opacified upper calyces of left kidney on excretory urography. We outlined the calcific and tumors nature of the lesion by ultrasound and computed tomography. The macroscopic and histological features were pathognomonic. (author)

  3. Endocrine tumors other than thyroid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Norio; Dohi, Kiyohiko

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the tendency for the occurrence of tumors in the endocrine glands, other than the thyroid gland, in A-bomb survivors using both autopsy and clinical data. ABCC-RERF sample data using 4136 autopsy cases (1961-1977) revealed parathyroid tumors in 13 A-bomb survivors, including 3 with the associated hyperparathyroidism, with the suggestion of dose-dependent increase in the occurrence of tumors. Based on clinical data from Hiroshima University, 7 (46.7%) of 15 parathyroid tumors cases were A-bomb survivors. Data (1974-1987) from the Tumor Registry Committee (TRC) in Hiroshima Prefecture revealed that a relative risk of parathyroid tumors was 5.6 times higher in the entire group of A-bomb survivors and 16.2 times higher in the group of heavily exposed A-bomb survivors, suggesting the dose-dependent increase in their occurrence. Adrenal tumors were detected in 47 of 123 cases from the TRC data, and 15 (31.5%) of these 47 were A-bomb survivors. Particularly, 11 cases of adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome included 6 A-bomb survivors (54.5%). The incidence of multiple endocrine gonadial tumors (MEGT) tended to be higher with increasing exposure doses; and the 1-9 rad group, the 10-99 rad group, and the 100 or more rad group had a risk of developing MEGT of 4.1, 5.7, and 7.1, respectively, relative to both the not-in the city group and the 0 rad group. These findings suggested that there is a correlation between A-bomb radiation and the occurrence of parathyroid tumors (including hyperparathyroidism), adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome and MEGT (especially, the combined thyroid and ovarian tumors and the combined thyroid and parathyroid tumors). (N.K.)

  4. Supratentorial tumors; Supratentorielle Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.; Dillmann, K.; Roth, C.; Backens, M.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Saarland, Homburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie

    2007-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a routine diagnostic measure for a suspected intracerebral mass. Computed tomography is usually also indicated. Further diagnostic procedures as well as the interpretation of the findings vary depending on the tumor location. This contribution discusses the symptoms and diagnostics for supratentorial tumors separated in relation to their intra- or extracranial location. Supratentorial tumors include astrocytoma, differentiated by their circumscribed and diffuse growth, ganglioglioma, ependyoma, neurocytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), oligodendroglioma, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNET), meningoangiomatosis, pineal tumors, hamartoma, lymphoma, craniopharyngeoma and metastases. The supratentorial extracranial tumors include the choroid plexus, colloid cysts, meningeoma, infantile myofibromatosis and lipoma. The most common subforms, especially of astrocytoma, will also be presented. (orig.)

  5. Pulmonary neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caplin, M E; Baudin, E; Ferolla, P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary carcinoids (PCs) are rare tumors. As there is a paucity of randomized studies, this expert consensus document represents an initiative by the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society to provide guidance on their management. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Bibliographical searches were...... carried out in PubMed for the terms 'pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial carcinoid tumors', 'pulmonary carcinoid', 'pulmonary typical/atypical carcinoid', and 'pulmonary carcinoid and diagnosis/treatment/epidemiology/prognosis'. A systematic review...

  6. [Wilms tumor in hemihypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, O; Wemmer, U

    1977-04-07

    The case of a 4-year-old boy with Wilms' tumor and hemihypertrophy is described. Wilms' tumors are frequently associated with congenital malformations of the urinary tract, with aniridia and hemihypertrophy. Hemihypertrophy is a relatively rare malformation (1:14000) in the common population, but in patients with Wilms' tumors its frequency is about 1:49. Besides Wilms' tumors tumors of the adrenal cortex and hepatoblastomas are frequently observed together with hemihypertrophy.

  7. Tumors and tumor-like lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koesling, S.; Stoevesandt, D.; Knipping, S.

    2007-01-01

    Tumors and tumor-like lesions are rare diseases in the paranasal sinuses. There is a great variety of histological types, but only a small number of morphological patterns on imaging. Histology is an important point in therapeutic planning. In most cases it is obtained by sampling, which is not as difficult in the sinonasal area as in other regions of the body. The main task of imaging is an exact estimation of the extent and spread of a lesion. This article discusses the possibilities and limitations of CT and MRI in the assessment of the dignity and spread of paranasal tumors and tumor-like lesions in consideration of necessary therapeutic information. Additionally, an overview of features on imaging of different paranasal tumors and tumor-like lesions is given. (orig.)

  8. Nuclear medicine applications for neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F; Le Bodic, M F; Kraeber-Bodéré, F; Rousseau, C; Resche, I

    2000-11-01

    Sensitive, specific radiopharmaceuticals are available for scintigraphic diagnosis and internal radiotherapy of neuroendocrine tumors. (123)I-MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidine) scintigraphy is the examination of choice for visualizing tumor sites of pheochromocytoma. In the event of malignant pheochromocytoma or carcinoid tumor, this examination allows assessment of the presence or absence of tumor uptake and can guide radiotherapy with (131)I-MIBG. The peptides secreted by neuroendocrine tumors can be radiolabeled for targeting of their specific receptors. Scintigraphy using a (111)In-labeled somatostatin analog (octreotide) is the examination of choice for diagnosis of the spread of gastroenteropancreatic and carcinoid tumors, as it is more sensitive than morphologic imaging techniques. It can also guide radiotherapy performed with the same pharmaceutical vector. These same two agents (MIBG and octreotide) can be used therapeutically by replacing (123)I with (131)I and (111)In by (90)Y. A transient palliative effect is obtained for a variable number of tumors (most often large ones) that take up the radiopharmaceutic agent well. There is general consensus that, for relatively radioresistant solid tumors, this type of radiotherapy is efficient only in the event of small tumor targets (a few millimeters in diameter) whose uptake is maximal, allowing more homogeneous distribution than that achieved with large tumors. Thus for optimal control of the disease it is recommended first to use scintigraphic imaging to confirm that the tumor takes up the radiopharmaceutical agent in question ((123)I-MIBG or (111)In-octreotide) and then reduce the tumor burden surgically before injecting high therapeutic activity (possibly with reinjection of peripheral stem cells). This treatment can be repeated three times every 3 months before evaluating the response. In these conditions, internal radiotherapy can be beneficial or even determinant for controlling disease progression.

  9. A rare neuronal tumor of the cerebellum with myoid features ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report an extremely rare tumor presenting with myoid features in the left cerebellar hemisphere in a 62-year-old man. This tumor consisted of medium to large round cells with focal lipomatous and myoid differentiation. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells expressed synaptophysin, GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein) ...

  10. A rare neuronal tumor of the cerebellum with myloid features ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report an extremely rare tumor presenting with myoid features in the left cerebellar hemisphere in a 62- year-old man. This tumor consisted of medium to large round cells with focal lipomatous and myoid differentiation. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells expressed synaptophysin, GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein) ...

  11. Hepatic tumors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, J T

    2001-02-01

    Although they account for only 1% to 4% of solid tumors in children, hepatic tumors and pseudotumors offer a diagnostic challenge to the clinician seeing only an occasional case. Metastatic lesions such as neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumor, and lymphoma are the most common neoplasm seen in the liver, but 10 distinct primary tumors and pseudotumors of the liver occur with some regularity, and a few others may be seen rarely, including leiomyosarcoma, rhabdoid tumor, and endodermal sinus tumor. Five of these neoplasms--hepatoblastoma, infantile hemangio-endothelioma, mesenchymal hamartoma, undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma, and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the biliary tree--occur only in children and are the major focus of the article.

  12. hnRNP F directs formation of an exon 4 minus variant of tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ENOX2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Kane, Vanessa D; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2011-11-01

    HUVEC or mouse 3T3 cells infected with SV-40 generate within 3 to 5 days post-infection an ENOX2 species corresponding to the exon-4 minus splice variant of a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ENOX2 or tNOX) expressed at the cancer cell surface. This study was to seek evidence for splicing factors that might direct formation of the exon 4 minus ENOX2 splice variant. To determine if silencing of ENOX2 exon 4 occurs because of motifs located in exon 4, transfections were performed on MCF-10A (mammary non-cancer), BT-20 (mammary cancer), and HeLa (cervical cancer) cells using a GFP minigene construct containing either a constitutively spliced exon (albumin exon 2) or the alternatively spliced ENOX2 exon 4 between the two GFP halves. Removal of exon 4 from the processed RNA of the GFP minigene construct occurred with HeLa and to a lesser extent with BT-20 but not in non-cancer MCF-10A cells. The Splicing Rainbow Program was used to identify all of the possible hnRNPs binding sites of exon 4 of ENOX2. There are 8 Exonic Splicing Silencers (ESSs) for hnRNP binding in the exon 4 sequences. Each of these sites were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to test if any were responsible for the splicing skip. Results showed MutG75 ESS mutation changed the GFP expression which is a sign of splicing silence, while other mutations did not. As MutG75 changed the ESS binding site for hnRNP F, this result suggests that hnRNP F directs formation of the exon 4 minus variant of ENOX2.

  13. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels. Also under investigation are ways to improve drug delivery to the tumor and to prevent the side- ... vessels. Also under investigation are ways to improve drug delivery to the tumor and to prevent the side- ...

  14. Aggressive malignant phyllodes tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan Roberts; Dianne M. Runk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Originally described in 1838 by Muller, phyllodes tumor is a rare fibroepithelial neoplasm which represents roughly 0.3–0.9% of all breast cancers. Phyllodes tumor are divided into benign, borderline and malignant histologic categories. Malignant phyllodes tumor represent anywhere from 10–30% of all phyllodes tumors. This group has both the potential to recur locally and metastasize, however not all malignant phyllodes behave this way. The challenge lays in predicting which tumo...

  15. Multiple Primary Tumors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... Multiple primary tumors occur in clinical practice causing diagnostic dilemma. It ... KEYWORDS: Carcinoid, colorectal cancer, metachronous, synchronous .... layer of the colon. The tumor cells are strongly positive to chromagranin and AE1/AE3. Features are those of carcinoid tumor of the colon. She was ...

  16. Granular Cell Tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrosis within the tumor was absent, no mitosis was. Granular cell tumors are seldom diagnosed identified in the section and the edges of the accurately clinically. The lesion in this case was sample were tumor free (Figure 2). mistaken for a sebaceous cyst and following ulceration resembled carcinoma of the vulvar.

  17. Malignant tumors of childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 34 papers about malignant tumors. some of the titles are: Invasive Cogenital Mesoblastic Nephroma, Leukemia Update, Unusual Perinatal Neoplasms, Lymphoma Update, Gonadal Germ Cell Tumors in Children, Nutritional Status and Cancer of Childhood, and Chemotherapy of Brain tumors in Children

  18. Soft tissue mixed tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichi Hiraishi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed tumors are relatively common in the skin and salivary glands, but extremely rare in soft tissues, often resulting in diagnostic problems. The occurrence of these tumors in the hand is especially limited. In this article we report the clinical, radiological, and histological features of a mixed tumor of the hypothenar region of the right hand.

  19. Tumor interstitial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical secr...

  20. Multiple Primary Tumors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Multiple primary tumors occur in clinical practice causing diagnostic dilemma. It ... KEYWORDS: Carcinoid, colorectal cancer, metachronous, synchronous .... layer of the colon. The tumor cells are strongly positive to chromagranin and AE1/AE3. Features are those of carcinoid tumor of the colon. She was ...

  1. Modification of the radiosensitivity of human cells to which Simian virus 40 T-antigen was transfected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Miyakoshi, Junji; Ohtsu, Shuji; Takebe, Hikaru; Day, R.S. III.

    1995-01-01

    Effects of the introduction of the Simian virus 40 T-antigen (SV40 T-Ag) gene to cultured human cells were examined in relation to radiosensitivity. Two relatively radioresistant tumor cell lines (T98 and G361) became significantly radiosensitive after the introduction of SV40 T-Ag, whereas radiosensitive tumor cell lines did not show a change in radiosensitivity. In contrast, a human fibroblast cell line became radioresistant after SV40 T-Ag introduction. T98 cells which have a mutation at codon 237 in the p53 gene were unable to form a complex between p53 protein and SV40 T-Ag, whereas G361, which became radiosensitive by a SV40 T-Ag introduction, formed the complex. This indicates that the status of p53 is independent of the change in radiosensitivity in the cell lines studied. (author)

  2. Tumor-infiltrating B lymphocytes as an efficient source of highly specific immunoglobulins recognizing tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelliccia Angela

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is much evidence that tumor cells elicit a humoral immune response in patients. In most cases, the presence of antibodies in peripheral blood is detected only in small proportion of patients with tumors overexpressing the corresponding antigen. In the present study, we analyzed the significance of local humoral response provided by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer patients. Methods The ability of a patient's immune system to produce specific antibodies inside tumor tissue, capable of recognizing tumor cells, was explored through analysis of the oligoclonality of antibodies derived from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and construction of a series of recombinant antibody libraries in scFv format, derived from breast tumor-infiltrating B lymphocytes. These libraries and one from peripheral blood lymphocytes of a single breast cancer patient were panned against three purified surface tumor antigens, such as CEA, MUC1 and ED-B domain, and against intact MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. Results Application of novel display vector, pKM19, allowed isolation of a large panel of breast cancer-specific antibodies against known tumor antigens, as well as against breast carcinoma cells. Reactivity of novel scFvs was confirmed by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence staining and flow cytometry. We demonstrated that seven of ten primary breast tumor specimens, obtained using discarded surgical material, could be exploited as an appropriate source for generation of phage display libraries, giving highly specific antitumor antibodies which recognize heterologous tumor cells. Conclusion Local humoral immune response within tumor tissue in breast cancer patients frequently has an oligoclonal character. Efficient selection of specific antitumor antibodies from recombinant antibody libraries, derived from such oligoclonal tumor-infiltrated B lymphocytes, indicates the presence of natural immune response against tumor antigens

  3. Maintaining Tumor Heterogeneity in Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, John W; Caldas, Carlos; Bruna, Alejandra

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical models often fail to capture the diverse heterogeneity of human malignancies and as such lack clinical predictive power. Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX) have emerged as a powerful technology: capable of retaining the molecular heterogeneity of their originating sample. However, heterogeneity within a tumor is governed by both cell-autonomous (e.g., genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity) and non-cell-autonomous (e.g., stromal heterogeneity) drivers. Although PDXs can largely recapitulate the polygenomic architecture of human tumors, they do not fully account for heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment. Hence, these models have substantial utility in basic and translational research in cancer biology; however, study of stromal or immune drivers of malignant progression may be limited. Similarly, PDX models offer the ability to conduct patient-specific in vivo and ex vivo drug screens, but stromal contributions to treatment responses may be under-represented. This review discusses the sources and consequences of intratumor heterogeneity and how these are recapitulated in the PDX model. Limitations of the current generation of PDXs are discussed and strategies to improve several aspects of the model with respect to preserving heterogeneity are proposed. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Cholecystokinin expression in tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2016-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a classic gut hormone. CCK is also a complex system of peptides expressed in several molecular forms in enteroendocrine I cells, in cerebral and peripheral neurons, in cardiac myocytes and spermatozoa. CCK gene expression has now been found at protein or peptide level...... in different neuroendocrine tumors; cerebral gliomas and astrocytomas and specific pediatric tumors. Tumor hypersecretion of CCK was recently reported in a patient with a metastatic islet cell tumor and hypercholecystokininemia resulting in a novel tumor syndrome, the cholecystokininoma syndrome. This review...

  5. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  6. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  7. PET and endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.; Belhocine, T.; Hustinx, R.; Foidart-Willems, J.

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the main indications of PET examination, and specifically of 18 FDG, in the assessment of endocrine tumors: of the thyroid, of the parathyroid, of the adrenal and of the pituitary glands. Neuroendocrine tumors, gastro-entero-pancreatic or carcinoid tumors are also under the scope. Usually, the most differentiated tumors show only poor uptake of the FDG as they have a weak metabolic and proliferative activity. In the assessment of endocrine tumors, FDG-PET should be used only after most specific nuclear examinations been performed. (author)

  8. Differentiation of phyllodes tumors versus fibroadenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, E.; Sal, S. [Dokuz Eyluel Univ. Hospital, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology; Lebe, B. [Dokuz Eyluel Univ. Hospital, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Pathology

    2002-04-01

    Purpose: To determine if mammographic and sonographic findings allow discrimination between phyllodes tumor and large sized fibroadenoma, which mimic each other in the clinical, radiologic and histopathologic appearances. Material and Methods: Thirty-one histopathologically proven masses including 12 phyllodes tumors and 19 fibroadenomas 3 cm or greater in diameter were compared. In total 28 women were retrospectively evaluated by mammography and pre-operative sonography. Results: Mammography revealed a high-density mass compared with surrounding fibroglandular breast tissue to be present in 9 of the 12 (75%) phyllodes tumors and 7 of the 19 (37%) fibroadenomas. At sonography a mass, which had a round or lobulated shape, marked posterior acoustic enhancement and intramural cystic areas, were statistically significantly more likely to be phyllodes tumors than fibroadenomas. None of the other mammographic or sonographic characteristics proved to be useful in differentiating phyllodes tumors and fibroadenomas. Conclusion: Although masses of high density at mammography, circumscribed border associated with posterior acoustic enhancement and internal cystic areas at sonography should suggest the diagnosis of phyllodes tumors rather than large sized fibroadenomas, there was a substantial overlap in the mammographic and sonographic characteristics of these two tumors. Therefore, an excisional biopsy would be necessary for equivocal masses.

  9. Differentiation of phyllodes tumors versus fibroadenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, E.; Sal, S.; Lebe, B.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if mammographic and sonographic findings allow discrimination between phyllodes tumor and large sized fibroadenoma, which mimic each other in the clinical, radiologic and histopathologic appearances. Material and Methods: Thirty-one histopathologically proven masses including 12 phyllodes tumors and 19 fibroadenomas 3 cm or greater in diameter were compared. In total 28 women were retrospectively evaluated by mammography and pre-operative sonography. Results: Mammography revealed a high-density mass compared with surrounding fibroglandular breast tissue to be present in 9 of the 12 (75%) phyllodes tumors and 7 of the 19 (37%) fibroadenomas. At sonography a mass, which had a round or lobulated shape, marked posterior acoustic enhancement and intramural cystic areas, were statistically significantly more likely to be phyllodes tumors than fibroadenomas. None of the other mammographic or sonographic characteristics proved to be useful in differentiating phyllodes tumors and fibroadenomas. Conclusion: Although masses of high density at mammography, circumscribed border associated with posterior acoustic enhancement and internal cystic areas at sonography should suggest the diagnosis of phyllodes tumors rather than large sized fibroadenomas, there was a substantial overlap in the mammographic and sonographic characteristics of these two tumors. Therefore, an excisional biopsy would be necessary for equivocal masses

  10. Phyllodes tumor of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubells, M.; Uixera, I.; Miranda, V.; Gil de Ramales, V.; Bulto, J. A.; Mendez, M.; Morcillo, E.

    1999-01-01

    To study the phyllodes tumors of the breast diagnosed in our hospital, assessing the clinical, mammographic, ultrasonographic and color Doppler ultrasound findings. A retrospective study was carried out of 20 histologically diagnosed cases of phyllodes tumor of the breast over a 20-year period, taking into account patient age, clinical signs, mammographic and ultrasonographic findings, surgical treatment and recurrences. The clinical presentation was that of a palpable, usually painless, mass with a firm, elastic consistency. Mammographic images showed a lesion of homogeneous density and well-defined, round or lobulated margins. Two tumors contained large calcifications associated with previous fibroadenoma. Ultrasound revealed a slightly enhanced solid nodule of homogeneous echogenicity. Color Doppler ultrasound disclosed the presence of hypervascularization. The lesions were treated by surgical enucleation with follow-up examination every 6 months. Recurrences were treated by radical mastectomy. The phyllodes tumor of the breast is difficult to diagnose because of its similarity to the fibroadenoma. However, it should be suspected in the presence of a late-developing, rapidly growing mass. Mammography and breast ultrasound are of diagnostic utility, but the definitive diagnosis requires biopsy. (Author) 12 refs

  11. Stages of Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... markers . Most malignant germ cell tumors release tumor markers. The following tumor markers are used to detect extracranial germ cell tumors: ... testicular germ cell tumors, blood levels of the tumor markers help show if the tumor is a seminoma ...

  12. Histopathological studies on the irradiated brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Tadao

    1980-01-01

    Of 43 cases of irradiated brain tumor, histological findings showed extensive necrosis or disappearance of the neoplasm, considered to be attributable to radiation treatment, in 30 (70%). Extensive necrosis of the tumor in areas exposed to radiation was found in 16 treated cases (37.2%). The histopathology of massive necrosis was that of simple coagulative necrosis, sometimes with marked vascular alterations and extravasation of fibrinoid material into the necrotic tissue. Necrosis was almost always incomplete, and foci of residual tumors were found at the periphery of the tumors. The terminal picture in cases of massive necrosis was often that of widespread intra- and extracranial metastasis. Almost complete disappearance of the tumor was observed in some cases with subsequent diffuse degenerative changes in the brain parenchyma exposed to radiation. In 5 cases of irradiated tumors, autopsy findings suggested that the growth of the primary tumor might have been restricted. And in 5 cases tumor cytology revealed the marked presence of a large number of multinucleated, bizarre giant cells with evidence of degeneration in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Multifocal necrosis of the brain, with axonal swelling and sponginess of the tissue, was observed in two patients following combined radiation and antineoplastic chemotherapy. Diffuse loss and degeneration of nerve cells of the cerebral cortex in pseudo-laminar fashion was observed in 7 patients with or without bilateral necrosis of the globus pallidus. Histological findings revealed typical anoxic encephalopathy. (J.P.N.)

  13. Genomic Heterogeneity of Breast Tumor Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Shriver, Craig D.; Ellsworth, Darrell L.

    2009-01-01

    Pathological grade is a useful prognostic factor for stratifying breast cancer patients into favorable (low-grade, well-differentiated tumors) and less favorable (high-grade, poorly-differentiated tumors) outcome groups. Under the current system of tumor grading, however, a large proportion of tumors are characterized as intermediate-grade, making determination of optimal treatments difficult. In an effort to increase objectivity in the pathological assessment of tumor grade, differences in chromosomal alterations and gene expression patterns have been characterized in low-grade, intermediate-grade, and high-grade disease. In this review, we outline molecular data supporting a linear model of progression from low-grade to high-grade carcinomas, as well as contradicting genetic data suggesting that low-grade and high-grade tumors develop independently. While debate regarding specific pathways of development continues, molecular data suggest that intermediate-grade tumors do not comprise an independent disease subtype, but represent clinical and molecular hybrids between low-grade and high-grade tumors. Finally, we discuss the clinical implications associated with different pathways of development, including a new clinical test to assign grade and guide treatment options. PMID:20689613

  14. PET imaging for brain tumor diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchorska, Bogdana; Tonn, Joerg C; Jansen, Nathalie L

    2014-12-01

    Brain tumors differ in histology, biology, prognosis and treatment options. Although structural magnetic resonance is still the gold standard for morphological tumor characterization, molecular imaging has gained an increasing importance in assessment of tumor activity and malignancy. Amino acid PET is frequently used for surgery and biopsy planning as well as therapy monitoring in suspected primary brain tumors as well as metastatic lesions, whereas 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) remains the tracer of choice for evaluation of patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma. Application of somatostatin receptor ligands has improved tumor delineation in skull base meningioma and concurrently opened up new treatment possibilities in recurrent or surgically not assessable tumors.Recent development focuses on the implementation of hybrid PET/MRI as well as on the development of new tracers targeting tumor hypoxia, enzymes involved in neoplastic metabolic pathways and the combination of PET tracers with therapeutic agents. Implementation of molecular imaging in the clinical routine continues to improve management in patients with brain tumors. However, more prospective large sample studies are needed to validate the additional informative value of PET.

  15. Glycan Markers as Potential Immunological Targets in Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong; Wu, Lisa; Liu, Xiaohe

    2017-01-01

    We present here an experimental approach for exploring a new class of tumor biomarkers that are overexpressed by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and are likely targetable in immunotherapy against tumor metastasis. Using carbohydrate microarrays, anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were scanned against a large panel of carbohydrate antigens to identify potential tumor glycan markers. Subsequently, flow cytometry and fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST) were applied to determine whether the identified targets are tumor-specific cell-surface markers and are, therefore, likely suitable for targeted immunotherapy. Finally, the tumor glycan-specific antibodies identified were validated using cancer patients' blood samples for their performance in CTC-detection and immunotyping analysis. In this article, identifying breast CTC-specific glycan markers and targeting mAbs serve as examples to illustrate this tumor biomarker discovery strategy.

  16. [Opportunities and defiance of therapeutic anti-tumoral vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulie, P

    2007-01-01

    Therapeutic anti-cancer vaccines containing tumor-specific antigens recognized by T lymphocytes are thought to stimulate high numbers of anti-vaccine cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) which then can lyse the tumor cells. To understand why these vaccines are followed by tumor regressions in only 10% of the patients, we analysed the tumor-specific immune responses of these patients. Contrary to our expectations, the anti-vaccine CTL responses were of very low level. However, regressing tumors were massively infiltrated by anti-tumor T cells of other specificities, including new anti-tumor CTL clonotypes that emerged following vaccination. We now believe that the role of the anti-vaccine CTL is to activate or restimulate large numbers of other anti-tumor CTL. Their ability to initiate this response is probably more important than their number. These results have important consequences for the improvement of the clinical efficacy of anti-cancer vaccines.

  17. Risk factors for oligodendroglial tumors: a pooled international study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, Bridget J; Rankin, Kristin M; Aldape, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Oligodendroglial tumors are rare subtypes of brain tumors and are often combined with other glial tumors in epidemiological analyses. However, different demographic associations and clinical characteristics suggest potentially different risk factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate p...... that additional factors specific to oligodendroglial tumors have yet to be identified. Large, multi-institution international studies will be necessary to better characterize these etiological risk factors.......Oligodendroglial tumors are rare subtypes of brain tumors and are often combined with other glial tumors in epidemiological analyses. However, different demographic associations and clinical characteristics suggest potentially different risk factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate...... possible risk factors for oligodendroglial tumors (including oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, and mixed glioma). Data from 7 case-control studies (5 US and 2 Scandinavian) were pooled. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals...

  18. A tumor cord model for Doxorubicin delivery and dose optimization in solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikenberry Steffen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Doxorubicin is a common anticancer agent used in the treatment of a number of neoplasms, with the lifetime dose limited due to the potential for cardiotoxocity. This has motivated efforts to develop optimal dosage regimes that maximize anti-tumor activity while minimizing cardiac toxicity, which is correlated with peak plasma concentration. Doxorubicin is characterized by poor penetration from tumoral vessels into the tumor mass, due to the highly irregular tumor vasculature. I model the delivery of a soluble drug from the vasculature to a solid tumor using a tumor cord model and examine the penetration of doxorubicin under different dosage regimes and tumor microenvironments. Methods A coupled ODE-PDE model is employed where drug is transported from the vasculature into a tumor cord domain according to the principle of solute transport. Within the tumor cord, extracellular drug diffuses and saturable pharmacokinetics govern uptake and efflux by cancer cells. Cancer cell death is also determined as a function of peak intracellular drug concentration. Results The model predicts that transport to the tumor cord from the vasculature is dominated by diffusive transport of free drug during the initial plasma drug distribution phase. I characterize the effect of all parameters describing the tumor microenvironment on drug delivery, and large intercapillary distance is predicted to be a major barrier to drug delivery. Comparing continuous drug infusion with bolus injection shows that the optimum infusion time depends upon the drug dose, with bolus injection best for low-dose therapy but short infusions better for high doses. Simulations of multiple treatments suggest that additional treatments have similar efficacy in terms of cell mortality, but drug penetration is limited. Moreover, fractionating a single large dose into several smaller doses slightly improves anti-tumor efficacy. Conclusion Drug infusion time has a significant

  19. Tumor detection with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.

    1984-01-01

    The most common primary ocular tumor in adults is malignant melanoma of the choroid. Metastatic tumors to the choroid occur with the same frequency. The radioactive phosphorous uptake test is used most often as a nuclear diagnostic test. The test does not differentiate melanomas from metastases, and it is necessary to perform surgery for proper placement of a detection device within a distance of 1-2 mm of the tumor. These deficiencies leave ophthalmologists with a pressing need for a gamma-emitting radiopharmaceutical that would facilitate noninvasive identification of choroidal melanoma. This need is made more urgent by the fact that recently, radiation therapy has been used to treat these tumors rather than enucleation. Eyes then harbor irradiated melanoma whose status is unknown. The tumor rarely decreases in size more than 25% to 50%. There is thus a need for a specific diagnostic test to assess the nature of the tumor and the effectiveness of therapy

  20. [Immune system and tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  2. Thoracic wall reconstruction after tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran eHarati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment of malignant thoracic wall tumors represents a formidable challenge. In particular, locally advanced tumors that have already infiltrated critical anatomic structures are associated with a high surgical morbidity and can result in full thickness defects of the thoracic wall. Plastic surgery can reduce this surgical morbidity by reconstructing the thoracic wall through various tissue transfer techniques. Sufficient soft tissue reconstruction of the thoracic wall improves life quality and mitigates functional impairment after extensive resection. The aim of this article is to illustrate the various plastic surgery treatment options in the multimodal therapy of patients with malignant thoracic wall tumors.Material und methods: This article is based on a review of the current literature and the evaluation of a patient database.Results: Several plastic surgical treatment options can be implemented in the curative and palliative therapy of patients with malignant solid tumors of the chest wall. Large soft tissue defects after tumor resection can be covered by local, pedicled or free flaps. In cases of large full-thickness defects, flaps can be combined with polypropylene mesh to improve chest wall stability and to maintain pulmonary function. The success of modern medicine has resulted in an increasing number of patients with prolonged survival suffering from locally advanced tumors that can be painful, malodorous or prone to bleeding. Resection of these tumors followed by thoracic wall reconstruction with viable tissue can substantially enhance the life quality of these patients. Discussion: In curative treatment regimens, chest wall reconstruction enables complete resection of locally advanced tumors and subsequent adjuvant radiotherapy. In palliative disease treatment, stadium plastic surgical techniques of thoracic wall reconstruction provide palliation of tumor-associated morbidity and can therefore improve

  3. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative

  4. Central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, W.J. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Intrinsic tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) pose a particularly challenging problem to practicing oncologists. These tumors rarely metastasize outside the CNS, yet even histologically benign tumors can be life-threatening due to their local invasiveness and strategic location. The surrounding normal tissues of the nervous system is often incapable of full functional regeneration, therefore prohibiting aggressive attempts to use either complete surgical resection or high doses of irradiation. Despite these limitations, notable achievements have recently been recorded in the management of these tumors

  5. TUMORES ANEXIALES Y EMBARAZO

    OpenAIRE

    Tapia M.,Mauricio; Orellana H.,Ricardo; Cisterna C.,Patricio; Gazitúa P.,Raimundo; Sepúlveda A.,Rodrigo

    2005-01-01

    Objetivo: Evaluar la frecuencia de tumores anexiales en el embarazo, la histología tumoral y los resultados perinatales. Pacientes y método: Análisis retrospectivo de 33 pacientes con diagnóstico de tumor anexial y embarazo atendidas en el Servicio de Obstetricia del Hospital San Juan de Dios entre febrero de 2001 a julio de 2004. Resultados: La asociación tumor anexial y embarazo fue 1 en 424 embarazos. El tipo histológico más frecuente fue el cistoadenoma seroso (19,2%). La cirugía no alter...

  6. Management of CNS tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of tumors of the CNS has undergone a number of changes based on the impact of CT. The use of intraoperative US for the establishment of tumor location and tumor histology is demonstrated. MR imaging also is beginning to make an impact on the diagnosis and treatment of tumors of the CNS. Examples of MR images are shown. The authors then discuss the important aspects of tumor histology as it affects management and newer concepts in surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy on tumor treatment. The role of intraoperative placement of radioactive sources, the utilization of heavy particle radiation therapy, and the potential role of other experimental radiation therapy techniques are discussed. The role of hyperfractionated radiation and of neutrons and x-ray in a mixed-beam treatment are discussed in perspective with standard radiation therapy. Current chemotherapy techniques, including intraarterial chemotherapy, are discussed. The complications of radiation therapy alone and in combination with chemotherapy in the management of primary brain tumors, brain metastases, and leukemia are reviewed. A summary of the current management of pituitary tumors, including secreting pituitary adenomas and chromophobe adenomas, are discussed. The treatment with heavy particle radiation, transsphenoidal microsurgical removal, and combined radiotherapeutic and surgical management are considered. Tumor metastasis management of lesions of the brain and spinal cord are considered

  7. Renaissance in tumor immunotherapy: possible combination with phototherapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic dyes and harmless visible light to produce highly toxic reactive oxygen species that destroy tumors. The ideal cancer treatment should target both the primary tumor and the metastases with minimal toxicity. This is best accomplished by educating the body's immune system to recognize the tumor as foreign so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. PDT may accomplish this feat and stimulate long-term, specific anti-tumor immunity. PDT causes an acute inflammatory response, the rapid induction of large amounts of necrotic and apoptotic tumor cells, induction of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS) including heat-shock proteins, stimulates tumor antigen presentation to naïve T-cells, and generation of cytotoxic T-cells that can destroy distant tumor metastases. By using various syngeneic mouse tumors in immunocompetent mice, we have studied specific PDT regimens related to tumor type as well as mouse genotype and phenotype. We have investigated the role of tumor-associated antigens in PDT-induced immune response by choosing mouse tumors that express: model defined antigen, naturally-occurring cancer testis antigen, and oncogenic virus-derived antigen. We studied the synergistic combination of low-dose cyclophosphamide and PDT that unmasks the PDT-induced immune response by depleting the immunosuppressive T-regulatory cells. PDT combined with immunostimulants (toll-like receptor ligands) can synergistically maximize the generation of anti-tumor immunity by activating dendritic cells and switching immunosuppressive macrophages to a tumor rejection phenotype. Tumors expressing defined tumor-associated antigens with known MHC class I peptides allows anti-tumor immunity to be quantitatively compared.

  8. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, an uncommon tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Vasudevan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT in the maxilla in a young girl aged 14 years and its surgical management. We also review the literature and variations in the nomenclature and classifications of this interesting tumor. The review of literature gives an interesting picture regarding terminologies in the past and dilemma in classifying this tumor. The introduction of the name adenomatoid odontogenic tumour has resulted in the simpler and fruitful surgical management like enucleation and curettage with no reports of recurrences. In the past, similar lesion with the terminology like adeno ameloblastoma has resulted in unnecessary mutilating surgery. The conflicting views whether the lesion is being neoplasm or an anomalous hamartomatous growth is also being discussed.

  9. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  10. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18–25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume ≥12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED ≥100 Gy (total dose, 50–60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  11. Initiation of simian virus 40 DNA replication in vitro: Pulse-chase experiments identify the first labeled species as topologically unwound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, P.A.; Seo, Yeon Soo; Hurwitz, J.

    1989-01-01

    A distinct unwound form of DNA containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) origin is produced in replication reactions carried out in mixtures containing crude fractions prepared from HeLa cells. This species, termed form U R , comigrates on chloroquine-containing agarose gels with the upper part of the previously described heterogeneous highly unwound circular DNA, form U. As with form U, formation of form U R is dependent upon the SV40 tumor (T) antigen. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrate that the first species to incorporate labeled deoxyribonucleotides comigrates with form U R . Restriction analyses of the products of the pulse-chase experiments show that initiation occurs at the SV40 origin and then proceeds outward in a bidirectional manner. These experiments establish form U R as the earliest detectable substrate for SV40 DNA replication and suggest that SV40 DNA replication initiates on an unwound species

  12. Tumor carcinoide apendicular Appendiceal carcinoid tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Vázquez Palanco

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue dar a conocer un interesante caso de tumor carcinoide que se presentó con cuadro clínico de apendicitis aguda. El paciente fue un varón de 8 años de edad, al cual se realizó apendicectomía a causa de una apendicitis aguda. El resultado anatomopatológico confirmó un tumor de células endocrinas (argentafinoma, tumor carcinoide en el tercio distal del órgano, que infiltraba hasta la serosa, y apendicitis aguda supurada. El paciente fue enviado a un servicio de oncohematología para tratamiento oncoespecífico. Por lo inusual de estos tumores en edades tempranas y por lo que puede representar para el niño una conducta no consecuente, decidimos presentar este caso a la comunidad científica nacional e internacional. Es extremadamente importante el seguimiento de los pacientes con apendicitis aguda y de las conclusiones del examen histológico, por lo que puede representar para el niño una conducta inadecuada en una situación como esta.The objective of this paper was to make known an interesting case of carcinoid tumor that presented a clinical picture of acute appendicitis.The patient was an eight-year-old boy that underwent appendectomy due to an acute appendicitis. The anatomopathological report confirmed an endocrine cell tumor (argentaffinoma, carcinoid tumor in the distal third of the organ that infiltrated up to the serosa, and acute suppurative appendicitis. The patient was referred to an oncohematology service for oncospecific treatment. As it is a rare tumor at early ages, and taking into account what a inconsequent behavior may represent for the child, it was decided to present this case to the national and international scientific community. The follow-up of the patients with acute appendicitis and of the conclusions of the histological examination is extremely important considering what an inadequate conduct may represent for the child in a situation like this.

  13. An exceptional collision tumor: gastric calcified stromal tumor and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors report an exceptional case of collision tumor comprised of a gastric calcified stromal tumor and a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The pancreatic tumor was detected fortuitously on the histological exam of resection specimen. Key words: Collision tumor, stromal tumor, adenocarcinoma ...

  14. Gastrointestinal estromal tumor: Presentation of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Gonzalez, Alexis; Hernandez Perez, Arnaldo; Gonzalez Rodriguez, Diana; Hernandez Fernandez, Diana M; Castanneda Munnoz, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Since the first descriptions made by Golden and Stout, this group of mesenchymal lesions is considered of muscular origin and they were named as leiomyoma, cellular leiomyoma, epithelioid leiomyoma, leiomyoblastoma, bizarre leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma. But Mazur and Clark created the term estromal tumor only after they began to use the inmunohistochemistry and subsequently showed the absence of muscular markers, and the occasional presence of neural markers. Nowadays, gastrointestinal estromal tumors are called the primary mesenchymal CD117 positive, fusiform or epithelioid tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, epiplon, mesenterio, and retroperitoneum. The gastrointestinal estromal tumors appear at the wall of the digestive tube: stomach (50-60 %), small intestine (20-30 %), large intestine (10 %) and esophagus (5 %), and occasionally in epiplon, mesenterio, and retroperineum (5 %). In our work we present a 67 year-old patient, entered in our hospital for presenting high digestive bleeding. We studied the case, and found a 6 cm tumor of the gastric fundus. The tumor was operated and the definitive results of the pathologic anatomy showed a gastrointestinal estromal tumor

  15. Mesothelioma mortality in Europe: impact of asbestos consumption and simian virus 40

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehak Peter

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that asbestos is the most important cause of mesothelioma. The role of simian virus 40 (SV40 in mesothelioma development, on the other hand, remains controversial. This potential human oncogene has been introduced into various populations through contaminated polio vaccines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the possible presence of SV40 in various European countries, as indicated either by molecular genetic evidence or previous exposure to SV40-contaminated vaccines, had any effect on pleural cancer rates in the respective countries. Methods We conducted a Medline search that covered the period from January 1969 to August 2005 for reports on the detection of SV40 DNA in human tissue samples. In addition, we collected all available information about the types of polio vaccines that had been used in these European countries and their SV40 contamination status. Results Our ecological analysis confirms that pleural cancer mortality in males, but not in females, correlates with the extent of asbestos exposure 25 – 30 years earlier. In contrast, neither the presence of SV40 DNA in tumor samples nor a previous vaccination exposure had any detectable influence on the cancer mortality rate in neither in males (asbestos-corrected rates nor in females. Conclusion Using the currently existing data on SV40 prevalence, no association between SV40 prevalence and asbestos-corrected male pleural cancer can be demonstrated.

  16. Expression of the small T antigen of Lymphotropic Papovavirus is sufficient to transform primary mouse embryo fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Tushar; Robles, Maria Teresa Sáenz [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Schowalter, Rachel M.; Buck, Christopher B. [Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-4263 (United States); Pipas, James M., E-mail: pipas@pitt.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Polyomaviruses induce cell proliferation and transformation through different oncoproteins encoded within the early region (ER): large T antigen (LT), small T antigen (sT) and, in some cases, additional components. Each virus utilizes different mechanisms to achieve transformation. For instance, the LTs of Simian virus 40 (SV40), BK and/or JC virus can induce transformation; but Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) requires expression of sT. Lymphotropic Papovavirus (LPV) is closely related to Human Polyomavirus 9 (HuPyV9) and, under similar conditions, mice expressing LPV.ER exhibit higher rates of tumor formation than mice expressing SV40.ER. We have investigated the contributions of individual LPV.ER components to cell transformation. In contrast to SV40, LPV.ER transforms mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), but expression of LPV LT is insufficient to transform MEFs. Furthermore, LPV sT induces immortalization and transformation of MEFs. Thus, in the case of LPV, sT is the main mediator of oncogenesis. - Highlights: • Characterization of early region products from the Lymphotropic Polyomavirus (LPV). • On its own, sT immortalizes and transforms mouse primary cells, and is able to block p53 activation. • Combined LT and sT expression induces a greater rate of proliferation than either LT or sT alone.

  17. Tumor significant dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supe, S.J.; Nagalaxmi, K.V.; Meenakshi, L.

    1983-01-01

    In the practice of radiotherapy, various concepts like NSD, CRE, TDF, and BIR are being used to evaluate the biological effectiveness of the treatment schedules on the normal tissues. This has been accepted as the tolerance of the normal tissue is the limiting factor in the treatment of cancers. At present when various schedules are tried, attention is therefore paid to the biological damage of the normal tissues only and it is expected that the damage to the cancerous tissues would be extensive enough to control the cancer. Attempt is made in the present work to evaluate the concent of tumor significant dose (TSD) which will represent the damage to the cancerous tissue. Strandquist in the analysis of a large number of cases of squamous cell carcinoma found that for the 5 fraction/week treatment, the total dose required to bring about the same damage for the cancerous tissue is proportional to T/sup -0.22/, where T is the overall time over which the dose is delivered. Using this finding the TSD was defined as DxN/sup -p/xT/sup -q/, where D is the total dose, N the number of fractions, T the overall time p and q are the exponents to be suitably chosen. The values of p and q are adjusted such that p+q< or =0.24, and p varies from 0.0 to 0.24 and q varies from 0.0 to 0.22. Cases of cancer of cervix uteri treated between 1978 and 1980 in the V. N. Cancer Centre, Kuppuswamy Naidu Memorial Hospital, Coimbatore, India were analyzed on the basis of these formulations. These data, coupled with the clinical experience, were used for choice of a formula for the TSD. Further, the dose schedules used in the British Institute of Radiology fraction- ation studies were also used to propose that the tumor significant dose is represented by DxN/sup -0.18/xT/sup -0.06/

  18. IMRT in hypopharyngeal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, G.; Luetolf, U.M.; Davis, J.B.; Glanzmann, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-06-15

    Background and purpose: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) data on hypopharyngeal cancer (HC) are scant. In this study, the authors report on early results in an own HC patient cohort treated with IMRT. A more favorable outcome as compared to historical data on conventional radiation techniques was expected. Patients and methods: 29 consecutive HC patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT between 01/2002 and 07/2005 (mean follow-up 16 months, range 4-44 months). Doses of 60-71 Gy with 2.0-2.2 Gy/fraction were applied. 26/29 patients were definitively irradiated, 86% received simultaneous cisplatin-based chemotherapy. 60% presented with locally advanced disease (T3/4 Nx, Tx N2c/3). Mean primary tumor volume measured 36.2 cm{sup 3} (4-170 cm{sup 3}), mean nodal volume 16.6 cm{sup 3} (0-97 cm{sup 3}). Results: 2-year actuarial local, nodal, distant control, and overall disease-free survival were 90%, 93%, 93%, and 90%, respectively. In 2/4 patients with persistent disease (nodal in one, primary in three), salvage surgery was performed. The mean dose to the spinal cord (extension of > 5-15 mm) was 26 Gy (12-38 Gy); the mean maximum (point) dose was 44.4 Gy (26-58.9 Gy). One grade (G) 3 dysphagia and two G4 reactions (laryngeal fibrosis, dysphagia), both following the schedule with 2.2 Gy per fraction, have been observed so far. Larynx preservation was achieved in 25/26 of the definitively irradiated patients (one underwent a salvage laryngectomy); 23 had no or minimal dysphagia (G0-1). Conclusion: excellent early disease control and high patient satisfaction with swallowing function in HC following SIB IMRT were observed; these results need to be confirmed based on a longer follow-up period. In order to avoid G4 reactions, SIB doses of < 2.2 Gy/fraction are recommended for large tumors involving laryngeal structures. (orig.)

  19. GASTROENTEROPANCREATIC NEUROENDOCRINE TUMORS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pavel M.E., Baum U., Hahn E.G., Hensen J. Doxorubucin and streptozocin after failed biotherapy of Neuroendocrine tumors. Int J. Gastrointest Cancer 2005; 35 179-185. 33. Yao J.C., Phan A., Hoff P.M., et al. Targeting vas- cular endothelial growth factor in advanced carci- noid tumors: a random assignment phase II study.

  20. Keratinization in odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Courtney, R M; Kerr, D A

    1975-03-01

    The potential of odontogenic epithelium to keratinize in the form of ghost cells is demonstrated in the histologic variants of a number of odontongic tumors. Although the cells lack keratohyaline granules, they do contain abundant tonofilaments and probably represent an altered form of keratin. The presence of this material in odontogenic tumors does not appear to alter clinical occurence or clinical behavior.

  1. Ewing tumors in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Henk; Dirksen, Uta; Ranft, Andreas; Jürgens, Heribert

    2008-01-01

    Malignancies in infancy are extremely rare. Ewing tumors are hardly ever noted in these children. Since it is generally assumed that malignancies in infancy have an extremely poor outcome, we wanted to investigate whether this was also the case in Ewing tumors. We identified in the Munster data

  2. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Vimal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented.

  3. Children's Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news and announcements in our newsletter: Children’s Tumor Foundation 120 Wall Street, 16th Floor New York, NY 10005-3904 1-800-323-7938 info@ctf.org © Children's Tumor Foundation - All rights reserved Privacy Policy

  4. Brain Tumors - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Brain Tumors URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Brain Tumors - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  5. Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerwagen, S T; Jensen, C; Bagi, P

    2007-01-01

    Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare soft-tissue tumor of controversial etiology with a potential for local recurrence after incomplete surgical resection. The radiological findings in renal IMT are not well described. We report two cases in adults with a renal mass treated...

  6. Atypically localized glomus tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meric Ugurlar

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: When a painful mass is found in the body, glomus tumors should be kept in mind. The consideration of symptoms, including pain, temperature sensitivity, point tenderness, and discoloration, common characteristics of glomus tumors, may aid diagnosis. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(3.000: 112-117

  7. Pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Won-Jong; Mirra, Joseph M.

    2004-01-01

    To discuss the concept of pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone, which pathologically show hyperchromatism and marked pleomorphism with quite enlarged, pleomorphic nuclei, but with no to extremely rare, typical mitoses, and to propose guidelines for their diagnosis. From a database of 4,262 bone tumors covering from 1971 to 2001, 15 cases of pseudoanaplastic bone tumors (0.35% of total) were retrieved for clinical, radiographic and pathologic review. Postoperative follow-up after surgical treatment was at least 3 years and a maximum of 7 years. There were eight male and seven female patients. Their ages ranged from 10 to 64 years with average of 29.7 years. Pathologic diagnoses of pseudoanaplastic variants of benign bone tumors included: osteoblastoma (4 cases), giant cell tumor (4 cases), chondromyxoid fibroma (3 cases), fibrous dysplasia (2 cases), fibrous cortical defect (1 case) and aneurysmal bone cyst (1 case). Radiography of all cases showed features of a benign bone lesion. Six cases, one case each of osteoblastoma, fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, giant cell tumor and osteoblastoma, were initially misdiagnosed as osteosarcoma. The remaining cases were referred for a second opinion to rule out sarcoma. Despite the presence of significant cytologic aberrations, none of our cases showed malignant behavior following simple curettage or removal of bony lesions. Our observation justifies the concept of pseudoanaplasia in some benign bone tumors as in benign soft tissue tumors, especially in their late evolutionary stage when bizarre cytologic alterations strongly mimic a sarcoma. (orig.)

  8. Pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Won-Jong [Uijongbu St. Mary Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyunggido, 480-821 (Korea); Mirra, Joseph M. [Orthopaedic Hospital, Orthopedic Oncology, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2004-11-01

    To discuss the concept of pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone, which pathologically show hyperchromatism and marked pleomorphism with quite enlarged, pleomorphic nuclei, but with no to extremely rare, typical mitoses, and to propose guidelines for their diagnosis. From a database of 4,262 bone tumors covering from 1971 to 2001, 15 cases of pseudoanaplastic bone tumors (0.35% of total) were retrieved for clinical, radiographic and pathologic review. Postoperative follow-up after surgical treatment was at least 3 years and a maximum of 7 years. There were eight male and seven female patients. Their ages ranged from 10 to 64 years with average of 29.7 years. Pathologic diagnoses of pseudoanaplastic variants of benign bone tumors included: osteoblastoma (4 cases), giant cell tumor (4 cases), chondromyxoid fibroma (3 cases), fibrous dysplasia (2 cases), fibrous cortical defect (1 case) and aneurysmal bone cyst (1 case). Radiography of all cases showed features of a benign bone lesion. Six cases, one case each of osteoblastoma, fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, giant cell tumor and osteoblastoma, were initially misdiagnosed as osteosarcoma. The remaining cases were referred for a second opinion to rule out sarcoma. Despite the presence of significant cytologic aberrations, none of our cases showed malignant behavior following simple curettage or removal of bony lesions. Our observation justifies the concept of pseudoanaplasia in some benign bone tumors as in benign soft tissue tumors, especially in their late evolutionary stage when bizarre cytologic alterations strongly mimic a sarcoma. (orig.)

  9. Bilateral carotid body tumor resection in a female patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Burgess

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carotid body tumors also called carotid paragangliomas are rare neuroendocrine neoplasms derived from neural crest cells, approximately 3% of all paragangliomas occur in the head and neck area (Xiao and She, 2015; although they represent 65% of the head and neck paragangliomas (Georgiadis et al., 2008. Presentation of case: We present the therapeutic management of a 65-year-old woman with bilateral carotid body tumors. The patient presented to medical clinic for unrelated signs and symptoms of weight loss, dyspepsia, and epigastric pain. Physical examination showed bilateral non-tender neck masses for which imaging studies were ordered resulting in the diagnosis of bilateral carotid tumor. Surgical resection was staged with one week of distance between each tumor resection. Discussion: Carotid Body Tumors can arise from the paraganglia located within the adventitia of the medial aspect of the carotid bifurcation.Resection is the only curative treatment. Carotid body tumors resection represents a special challenge due to potential neurovascular complications. Conclusions: Surgical resection of carotid body tumors represents a special challenge to the surgeon because of the complex anatomical location of the tumor, including close relationship with the cranial nerves, involvement of the carotid vessels and large vascularization of the tumor. With the advance of diagnosis and improvement in surgical techniques as well as the understanding of biological behavior of tumors, surgical treatment has become a safer alternative for treating these tumors. Keywords: Carotid body tumor, Bilateral, Paraganglioma, Resection

  10. Inhibition of p53 represses E-cadherin expression by increasing DNA methyltransferase-1 and promoter methylation in serous borderline ovarian tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J-C; Auersperg, N; Leung, P C K

    2011-09-15

    The mechanisms underlying the progression of noninvasive serous borderline ovarian tumors (SBOT) to low-grade invasive carcinomas are poorly understood. We recently showed that inhibition of p53 induces SBOT invasion by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway and transcriptionally repressing E-cadherin. In human cancers, aberrant DNA methylation is a common phenomenon, and it is thought to be involved in the progression from noninvasive to invasive ovarian carcinomas. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of p53 downregulates E-cadherin by regulating the methylation of its promoter in SBOT cells. Here, we show that DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1), but not DNMT3a or DNMT3b, was increased in SV40 LT-infected SBOT4 cells, SBOT4-LT and the low-grade invasive serous ovarian carcinoma-derived cell line MPSC1. Treatment with 5-Aza-dC, a DNMT1 inhibitor, restored E-cadherin promoter methylation and expression, and inhibited cell invasion in both invasive SBOT4-LT and MPSC1 cells. Moreover, knockdown of endogenous p53 using siRNA in SBOT3.1 cells induced DNMT1 expression and led to an increase in E-cadherin promoter methylation. Additionally, activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway is required for p53 inhibition-induced DNMT1 expression. The increase in DNMT1 was associated with the inhibition of p53-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and cell invasion. Our findings show an important role for p53 in the progression of SBOT to an invasive carcinoma, and suggest that downregulation of E-cadherin by DNMT1-mediated promoter methylation contributes to this process.

  11. Bronchial carcinoid tumors: A rare malignant tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-03

    Feb 3, 2015 ... Mancini MC, Jeffrey MC. Carcinoid Lung Tumors. Available from: http//www. emedicine.medscape.com/article/426400‑overview. 3. Leotlela PD, Jauch A, Holtgreve‑Grez H, Thakker RV. Genetics of neuroendocrine and carcinoid tumours. Endocr Relat Cancer 2003;10:437‑50. 4. Rea F, Rizzardi G, Zuin A, ...

  12. Wilm's tumor in adulthood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, B.P.; Bukharkin, B.V.; Gotsadze, D.T.

    1984-01-01

    Wilms' tumor occurs extremely rarely in adults. There is no consensus in the literature on the problems of clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of the diseasa. Ten adult patients (aged 16-29) with Wilms' tumor formed the study group. They made up 0.9 per cent of the total number of kidney tumor patients. The peculiarities of the clinical course that distinguish adult nephroblastoma from renal cancer and Wilms' tumor of the infancy were analysed. The latent period appeared to be long. Problems of diagnosis are discussed. Angiography proved to be of the highest diagnostic value. Complex treatment including transperitoneal nephrectory, radiation and chemotherapy was carried out in 7 cases, palliative radiation treatmenchemotherapy andn 3. Unlike pediatric nephroblastomt - i Wilms' tumor in adults was resistant to radiation. Treatment results still remained unsatisfactory: 6 patients died 7-19 months after the beginning of treatment

  13. Radiotherapy of pineal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danoff, B.; Sheline, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiotherapy has universally been used in the treatment of pineal tumors and suprasellar germinomas. Recently however, major technical advances related to the use of the operating microscope and development of microsurgical techniques have prompted a renewed interest in the direct surgical approach for biopsy and/or excision. This interest has resulted in a controversy regarding the role of surgery prior to radiotherapy. Because of the heterogeneity of tumors occurring in the pineal region (i.e., germ cell tumors, pineal parenchymal tumors, glial tumors, and cysts) and their differing biological behavior, controversy also surrounds aspects of radiotherapy such as: the optimal radiation dose, the volume to be irradiated, and indications for prophylactic spinal irradiation. A review of the available data is presented in an attempt to answer these questions

  14. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Varadhan, S R S

    2016-01-01

    The theory of large deviations deals with rates at which probabilities of certain events decay as a natural parameter in the problem varies. This book, which is based on a graduate course on large deviations at the Courant Institute, focuses on three concrete sets of examples: (i) diffusions with small noise and the exit problem, (ii) large time behavior of Markov processes and their connection to the Feynman-Kac formula and the related large deviation behavior of the number of distinct sites visited by a random walk, and (iii) interacting particle systems, their scaling limits, and large deviations from their expected limits. For the most part the examples are worked out in detail, and in the process the subject of large deviations is developed. The book will give the reader a flavor of how large deviation theory can help in problems that are not posed directly in terms of large deviations. The reader is assumed to have some familiarity with probability, Markov processes, and interacting particle systems.

  15. Large N

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, G. 't

    2002-01-01

    In the first part of this lecture, the 1/N expansion technique is illustrated for the case of the large-N sigma model. In large-N gauge theories, the 1/N expansion is tantamount to sorting the Feynman diagrams according to their degree of planarity, that is, the minimal genus of the plane onto which

  16. Recurrent malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinqin; Su, Jing; Lei, Yutao

    2017-12-01

    Phyllodes tumor is a rare fibro epithelial neoplasm of the breast. They resemble fibroadenomas clinically and can be mistakenly ignored sometimes. We report the case of a young woman with her first presentation to hospital due to a hypoglycemia and she underwent 2 excised fibroadenomas in the same breast before diagnosed of malignant phyllodes tumor. She was complaining about 2 masses presented in her right breast 4 months after mastectomy. Recurrent phyllodes tumor of the breast. We conducted an immediate autologous myocutaneous flap transplantation after a wide-excision. Postoperative radiotherapy was recommended. She was in good general condition without tumor relapses during 8 months of follow-up. Recurrent fibroadenomas in the same breast, especially those of large size with rapid growth rate, suggesting a high transformation possibility from fibroadenoma to phyllodes tumor. We recommend an extended tumor resection and immediate or delayed reconstruction of the breast for the recurrent phyllodes tumor with separately multiple relapses.

  17. Analysis of DNA topology of EBV minichromosomes in HEK 293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Castán

    Full Text Available Simian Virus 40 (SV40 and Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV are frequently used as model systems to study DNA replication. Their genomes are both circular duplex DNAs organized in a single replicon where replication initiates at a precise site upon binding of a specific protein: the large tumor (T antigen for SV40 and the Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA-1 for EBV. Despite the abundant information available on the genetics and biochemistry of the replication process in these systems, little is known about the changes in DNA topology that take place as molecules are transfected into eukaryotic cells, assembled into chromatin and bind initiator proteins to start replication. Here we used high-resolution two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis to demonstrate that in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK 293 cells, minichromosomes of almost the same mass carrying either the SV40 or the EBV replication origin showed similar topological features. The patterns were very similar regardless of the initiator proteins. We also showed that in a hybrid minichromosome, pEco3'Δ, that initiates replication from the SV40 origin, the presence of EBNA-1 and its putative binding to the EBV "family of repeats" induces no significant topological change. These observations challenge the idea that binding of EBNA-1 to oriP could induce negative supercoiling and favor a model suggesting that it binds to oriP in a two-step process where only the second step causes structural changes in a transient cell cycle specific manner.

  18. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Hollander, Frank den

    2008-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theory and applications of large deviations, a branch of probability theory that describes the probability of rare events in terms of variational problems. By focusing the theory, in Part A of the book, on random sequences, the author succeeds in conveying the main ideas behind large deviations without a need for technicalities, thus providing a concise and accessible entry to this challenging and captivating subject. The selection of modern applications, described in Part B of the book, offers a good sample of what large deviation theory is able to achieve

  19. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertoli-stromal cell tumor; Arrhenoblastoma; Androblastoma; Ovarian cancer - Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 13. Prat J. Ovarian sex cord - stromal and steroid cell tumors. In: Mutter GL, Prat J, eds. Pathology of ...

  20. The PCa Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottnik, Joseph L; Zhang, Jian; Macoska, Jill A; Keller, Evan T

    2011-12-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) is a very complex niche that consists of multiple cell types, supportive matrix and soluble factors. Cells in the TME consist of both host cells that are present at tumor site at the onset of tumor growth and cells that are recruited in either response to tumor- or host-derived factors. PCa (PCa) thrives on crosstalk between tumor cells and the TME. Crosstalk results in an orchestrated evolution of both the tumor and microenvironment as the tumor progresses. The TME reacts to PCa-produced soluble factors as well as direct interaction with PCa cells. In return, the TME produces soluble factors, structural support and direct contact interactions that influence the establishment and progression of PCa. In this review, we focus on the host side of the equation to provide a foundation for understanding how different aspects of the TME contribute to PCa progression. We discuss immune effector cells, specialized niches, such as the vascular and bone marrow, and several key protein factors that mediate host effects on PCa. This discussion highlights the concept that the TME offers a potentially very fertile target for PCa therapy.

  1. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  2. Central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, P.R.; Fike, J.R.; Hoopes, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors are relatively common in veterinary medicine, with most diagnoses occurring in the canine and feline species. Numerous tumor types from various cells or origins have been identified with the most common tumors being meningiomas and glial cell tumors. Radiation therapy is often used as an aid to control the clinical signs associated with these neoplasms. In general, these tumors have a very low metastatic potential, such that local control offers substantial benefit. Experience in veterinary radiation oncology would indicate that many patients benefit from radiation treatment. Current practice indicates the need for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging studies. These highly beneficial studies are used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and to monitor treatment response. Improvements in treatment planning and radiation delivered to the tumor, while sparing the normal tissues, should improve local control and decrease potential radiation related problems to the CNS. When possible, multiple fractions of 3 Gy or less should be used. The tolerance dose to the normal tissue with this fractionation schedule is 50 to 55 Gy. The most common and serious complications of radiation for CNS tumors is delayed radiation myelopathy and necrosis. Medical management of the patient during radiation therapy requires careful attention to anesthetic protocols, and medications to reduce intracranial pressure that is often elevated in these patients. Canine brain tumors have served as an experimental model to test numerous new treatments. Increased availability of advanced imaging modalities has spawned increased detection of these neoplasms. Early detection of these tumors with appropriate aggressive therapy should prove beneficial to many patients

  3. Does tumor size influence the outcome of laparoscopic adrenalectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazaryan, A M; Mala, T; Edwin, B

    2001-02-01

    Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is safe and effective for small adrenal tumors, but its role for large adrenal tumors and the influence of tumor size on the outcome of laparoscopic adrenalectomy have been questioned. Thirty-one patients with unilateral adrenal tumors operated on between January 1997 and April 2000 were selected for this study. The indications for surgery were Conn's adenoma in 16 patients, pheochromocytoma in 7 patients, Cushing's adenoma in 4 patients, and incidental lesions in 4 patients. The patients were divided in two groups: 19 patients with tumors Group I) and 12 patients with tumors > or = 3.5 cm (Group II). The outcomes of the two groups were compared. None of the laparoscopic procedures was converted to open surgery. The tumor size correlated with operative time (r = 0.434; P = 0.015) and blood loss (r = 0.513; P = 0.003), with both being significantly greater for larger tumors. No patient required a blood transfusion during or after surgery. One preoperative complication occurred in Group I. There was no peroperative complication in Group II. The median postoperative hospital stay and opioid requirement did not differ significantly between the groups. One patient in Group I developed pneumonia, while no postoperative complications were recorded in Group II. Surgery for large adrenal tumors can safely be performed laparoscopically with outcomes comparable to those of surgery for small tumors.

  4. Uterine mesenchymal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil A Sangle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine mesenchymal tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that can frequently be diagnostically challenging. Differentiation between the benign and malignant counterparts of mesenchymal tumors is significant due to differences in clinical outcome, and the role of the surgical pathologist in making this distinction (especially in the difficult cases cannot be underestimated. Although immunohistochemical stains are supportive toward establishing a final diagnosis, the morphologic features trump all the other ancillary techniques for this group of neoplasms. This review therefore emphasizes the key morphologic features required to diagnose and distinguish uterine mesenchymal tumors from their mimics, with a brief description of the relevant immunohistochemical features.

  5. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  6. Tumor-like tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soon Yong

    1975-01-01

    It was known that some of the abdominal tuberculosis can produce tumor-like appearance clinically and radiologically. But these were mainly masses formed in mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The author has experienced the gastrointestinal tuberculosis resembling to a neoplastic process. In the gastric tuberculosis, irregular narrowing and filling defect with mucosal distortion and occasional shoulder effect could be seen in pyloric antrum. Deformity of proximal portion of duodenum was noted in most cases. Difficulty in differential diagnosis from the gastric cancer might be encountered. If duodenum was not involved. No definite sign of mucosal destruction involved area and associated deformity of duodenum was suggestive of an inflammatory lesion. If there is any tuberculous changes in small bowel, than gastric tuberculosis is more likely. There was the tuberculosis of descending duodenum or pancreaticoduodenal group of lymph nodes revealed cancer-like appearance. Long irregular narrowing with nodular filling defect and mucosal distortion or inverted 3 sign was evident. Differential diagnosis from cancer in duodenum or pancreas could not be made radiographically. Short annular stenosis and nodular filling defect with shoulder effect in both ends of stenosis was noted in some of small bowel tuberculosis. The findings were very resemble to malignancy. There was a case of huge hepatoma-like tuberculosis formed a large irregular mass by lymph nodes and adjacent organs. Chest film was not much help in the differential diagnosis. In many cases of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis, radiological findings were resembled to a neoplastic process. Since none of radiologic findings are specific enough to allow one to make a definitive diagnosis of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis and since type of the gastrointestinal tuberculosis could be cured by chemotherapy, careful analyzation of clinical features is emphasized before surgery.

  7. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors.

  8. Relations between radiobiological hypoxia and nuclear magnetic resonance-imaged blood microcirculation in experimental tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Sachiko; Ando, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of hypoxic cells subjected to radiation were investigated and compared with those of microcirculation for two murine fibrosarcomas growing in C3H mice. Small NFSa tumors, growing in air-breathing mice, developed a radioresistant tail on the survival curve. The tail was indistinguishably parallel to a survival curve for an artificially hypoxic tumor. As the NFSa tumors increased in size, the hypoxic tail moved upward with no change of Do, resulting in increase of hypoxic fraction from 3.9% to 40%. The R1137 tumors had no radioresistant tail nor hypoxic fraction regardless of tumor size. However, large-sized R1137 tumors developed a significant number of radioresistant, hypoxic cells with an intermediate Do, and were effectively sensitized by administrating misonidazole before irradiation. Thus, the NFSa tumors were fractionally hypoxic, and the large R1137 tumors had intermediate hypoxia. Measurement of tumor microcirculation by gadolinium-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance indicated that both blood flow and blood volume decreased significantly when the NFSa tumor grew large. Similar reduction in these microcirculation parameters was also observed for the R1137 tumor. The small-sized NFSa tumor had relatively larger blood volume and faster blood flow than the small-sized R1137 tumor. When large-sized tumors were compared to each other, the NFSa again had better blood flow than the R1137. However, the blood volume in the large-sized tumors was significantly (p<0.05) smaller for the NFSa tumor than for the R1137 tumor. It was concluded that blood flow could not be a single determinant for tumor hypoxia, and the difference between fractional hypoxia and intermediate hypoxia would be reflected in the ratio of blood flow to blood volume. (author)

  9. Tumor burden talks in cancer treatment with PEGylated liposomal drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yu Lin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: PEGylated liposomes are important drug carriers that can passively target tumor by enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect in neoplasm lesions. This study demonstrated that tumor burden determines the tumor uptake, and also the tumor response, in cancer treatment with PEGylated liposomal drugs in a C26/tk-luc colon carcinoma-bearing mouse model. METHODS: Empty PEGylated liposomes (NanoX and those encapsulated with VNB (NanoVNB were labeled with In-111 to obtain InNanoX and InVNBL in high labeling yield and radiochemical purity (all >90%. BALB/c mice bearing either small (58.4±8.0 mm(3 or large (102.4±22.0 mm(3 C26/tk-luc tumors in the right dorsal flank were intravenously administered with NanoVNB, InNanoX, InVNBL, or NanoX as a control, every 7 days for 3 times. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by body weight loss, tumor growth inhibition (using calipers and bioluminescence imaging and survival fraction. The scintigraphic imaging of tumor mouse was performed during and after treatment. RESULTS: The biodistribution study of InVNBL revealed a clear inverse correlation (r (2 = 0.9336 between the tumor uptake and the tumor mass ranged from 27.6 to 623.9 mg. All three liposomal drugs showed better therapeutic efficacy in small-tumor mice than in large-tumor mice. Tumor-bearing mice treated with InVNBL (a combination drug showed the highest tumor growth inhibition rate and survival fraction compared to those treated with NanoVNB (chemodrug only and InNanoX (radionuclide only. Specific tumor targeting and significantly increased tumor uptake after periodical treatment with InVNBL were evidenced by scintigraphic imaging, especially in mice bearing small tumors. CONCLUSION: The significant differences in the outcomes of cancer treatment and molecular imaging between animals bearing small and large tumors revealed that tumor burden is a critical and discriminative factor in cancer therapy using PEGylated liposomal drugs.

  10. Granularcelletumor i colon--Abrikossoffs tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jens Ravn; Ibsen, Per; Gyrtrup, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman had a right hemicoletomy due to a large sessile polyp in the ascending colon, inappropriate for polypectomy. Histopathologic examination of the specimen showed a tubulovillous adenoma with moderate dysplasia and an adjacent 1 x 1 cm submucosal tumor classified as a benign GCT...

  11. A GIANT CONGENITAL ORBITAL TUMOR - AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF RETINOBLASTOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZWAAN, CM; DEWAAL, FC; KOOLE, FD; MENKO, FH; VANDERVALK, P; SLATER, RM; SCHEFFER, H; VANWAVEREN, G; MOLL, AC; SCHOUTENVANMEETEREN, AYN; TAN, KEWP

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of an unusual giant congential tumor presenting in a newborn infant as a large exophytic mass emerging from the left orbit. After enucleation orbital recurrence developed within 14 days. No anti-tumor treatment was given and the child died at the age of 4 weeks. The

  12. [Markers of brain tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, R; Pezzotta, S; Bernini, F; Racagni, G

    1984-05-19

    Biological markers of tumors are compounds or enzymatic activities measurable in body fluids. Their presence or concentration must be linked to tumoral growth. The markers of the central nervous system tumors are detected in CSF. Alpha-feto-protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, human chorionic gonadotropin, adenohypophyseal peptide hormones, enzymes, etc., have found some application in the early diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastasis. Other applications involve the early detection and recurrency of primary brain tumors, as well as the evaluation of efficacy of their therapy. The tests based on the CSF content of desmosterol and polyamines have been studied extensively. Their rationale is discussed and specificity, sensitivity, efficiency and predictive value are considered. Experimental results concerning a new possible biochemical marker, based on CSF concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, are reported.

  13. GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMOR (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eTornillo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild-type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other entities, have been discovered (e.g. succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data.

  14. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different types of brain tumors. Some are cancerous (meaning they can spread to parts of the body ... of the face, trunk, arms, or legs slurred speech difficulty standing or walking poor coordination headache in ...

  15. Radioimmunoassays for tumor diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, J.

    1983-01-01

    Aside from imaging techniques several (radio-)immunological analyses are used for tumor diagnosis. Oncofetal antigens, for instance the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), have become the most important substances for many malignancies. However, nearly all of the so-called tumor markers are not suitable for early diagnosis or screening either because of low sensitivity or low tumor specifity. On the other hand follow-up measurements give a very sensitive index of the success of treatment and may indicate tumor progression when other signs are still not present. In some carcinomas and under some clinical circumstances tumorspecific markers are available and mandatory for detection and/or staging: AFP in hepatoma, acid phosphatase in metastasizing carcinoma of the prostate and serum thyreoglobulin in differentiated thyroid cancer. (orig.) [de

  16. Brain Tumors and Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help calm the mind. Meditation, guided imagery, music therapy, and yoga are just a few worth investigating. Home Donor and Privacy Policies Find Resources Disclaimer Donate Subscribe Login American Brain Tumor Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. Ste ...

  17. Benign Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Benign Liver Tumors Back ...

  18. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor.

  19. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kishore; Ahmed, Rafeeq; Bajantri, Bharat; Singh, Amandeep; Abbas, Hafsa; Dejesus, Eddy; Khan, Rana Raheel; Niazi, Masooma; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor. PMID:28553221

  20. Medical Treatment of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gress

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of the clinically and prognostically heterogeneous neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN should be based on a multidisciplinary approach, including surgical, interventional, medical and nuclear medicine-based therapeutic options. Medical therapies include somatostatin analogues, interferon-a, mTOR inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors and systemic chemotherapy. For the selection of the appropriate medical treatment the hormonal activity, primary tumor localization, tumor grading and growth behaviour as well as the extent of the disease must be considered. Somatostatin analogues are mainly indicated in hormonally active tumors for symptomatic relief, but antiproliferative effects have also been demonstrated, especially in well-differentiated intestinal NET. The efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET has been demonstrated in large placebo-controlled clinical trials. pNETs are also chemosensitive. Streptozocin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are regarded as current standard of care. Temozolomide in combination with capecitabine is an alternative that has shown promising results that need to be confirmed in larger trials. Currently, no comparative studies and no molecular markers are established that predict the response to medical treatment. Therefore the choice of treatment for each pNET patient is based on individual parameters taking into account the patient’s preference, expected side effects and established response criteria such as proliferation rate and tumor load. Platin-based chemotherapy is still the standard treatment for poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. Clearly, there is an unmet need for new systemic treatment options in patients with extrapancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  1. Fetal Primary Cardiac Tumors During Perinatal Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetal primary cardiac tumors are rare, but they may cause complications, which are sometimes life threatening, including arrhythmias, hydrops fetalis, ventricular outflow/inflow obstruction, cardiac failure, and even sudden death. Among fetal primary cardiac tumors, rhabdomyomas are most common, followed by teratomas, fibromas, hemangiomas, and myxomas. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, has been reported to be an effective drug to cause tumor remission in three neonates with multiple cardiac rhabdomyomas. Neonatal cardiac surgery for the resection of primary cardiac tumors found by fetal echocardiography has been reported sporadically. However, open fetal surgery for pericardial teratoma resection, which was performed successfully via a fetal median sternotomy in one case report, could be a promising intervention to rescue these patients with large pericardial effusions. These recent achievements undoubtedly encourage further development in early management of fetal cardiac tumors. Owing to the rarity of fetal primary cardiac tumors, relevant information in terms of prenatal diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis remains to be clarified.

  2. Medical Treatment of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinke, Anja, E-mail: sprengea@staff.uni-marburg.de; Michl, Patrick; Gress, Thomas [Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Marburg, Baldinger Strasse, Marburg D-35043 (Germany)

    2012-02-08

    Treatment of the clinically and prognostically heterogeneous neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) should be based on a multidisciplinary approach, including surgical, interventional, medical and nuclear medicine-based therapeutic options. Medical therapies include somatostatin analogues, interferon-α, mTOR inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors and systemic chemotherapy. For the selection of the appropriate medical treatment the hormonal activity, primary tumor localization, tumor grading and growth behaviour as well as the extent of the disease must be considered. Somatostatin analogues are mainly indicated in hormonally active tumors for symptomatic relief, but antiproliferative effects have also been demonstrated, especially in well-differentiated intestinal NET. The efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) has been demonstrated in large placebo-controlled clinical trials. pNETs are also chemosensitive. Streptozocin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are regarded as current standard of care. Temozolomide in combination with capecitabine is an alternative that has shown promising results that need to be confirmed in larger trials. Currently, no comparative studies and no molecular markers are established that predict the response to medical treatment. Therefore the choice of treatment for each pNET patient is based on individual parameters taking into account the patient’s preference, expected side effects and established response criteria such as proliferation rate and tumor load. Platin-based chemotherapy is still the standard treatment for poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. Clearly, there is an unmet need for new systemic treatment options in patients with extrapancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  3. Perlecan and tumor angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) of basement membranes (BMs) and connective tissues. The core protein of perlecan is divided into five domains based on sequence homology to other known proteins. Commonly, the N-terminal domain I of mammalian perlecan is substituted with thr...... have unwanted promoting effects on tumor cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis. Understanding of these attributes at the molecular level may offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention....

  4. Incidental malignant periocular tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thabit Odat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the incidence, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of incidental malignant periocular tumors at the royal medical services hospitals of Jordan.METHODS: Retrospective medical charts of 327 patients with malignant periocular tumor diagnosis at Jordan military hospitals between 2004 and 2015 were reviewed. Study variables included age, gender, city where patient lived, the presenting complaint(not caused by or related to tumor, clinical and histological diagnosis, size of the tumor, location, and surgical procedure.RESULTS:A total of 327 charts reviewed, 46(14.1%patients were found to have incidental malignant periocular tumor. Males where affected more than females with a ratio of 2:1. The average age was 66.39±10.59(22-83y. The most common presenting symptom or disease was blurring of vision secondary to cataract(44%, followed by combined cataract and other associated complaints such as epiphora in 21.7%.Preliminary clinical diagnosis corresponded with histological diagnosis in 95.7% of skin cancer. The average size of the lesions was 1.04×0.85 mm2(0.2×0.2-3.0×3.0 mm2. There was no significant relationship between the maximum diameter of the tumor and age of the patient,(P=0.105. The most frequent location of tumors was the lower eyelid(30.4%followed by the medial canthus(26.1%. The follow up period ranged between 6mo and 3y(average 9.3mo.CONCLUSION: Incidental malignant periocular malignant tumors were relatively common in this study, which urges excision of any suspicious lesion particularly young patients. A prospective study is needed to investigate the reasons why some patients neglect these lesions.

  5. Radioembolization of hepatic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors are a leading cause of cancer mortality and morbidity. This remains a challenging and key task for every oncologist despite significant advances that have been made with selective targeted systemic agents and in technology advances with radiotherapy delivery. Radioembolization (RE) is a technique of permanently implanting microspheres containing Yttrium-90 (90Y), a beta-emitting isotope with a treatment range of 2 mm, into hepatic tumors. This ...

  6. Tumor Penetrating Theranostic Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Targeted and Image-guided Drug Delivery into Peritoneal Tumors following Intraperitoneal Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ning; Bozeman, Erica N; Qian, Weiping; Wang, Liya; Chen, Hongyu; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Staley, Charles A; Wang, Y Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2017-01-01

    The major obstacles in intraperitoneal (i.p.) chemotherapy of peritoneal tumors are fast absorption of drugs into the blood circulation, local and systemic toxicities, inadequate drug penetration into large tumors, and drug resistance. Targeted theranostic nanoparticles offer an opportunity to enhance the efficacy of i.p. therapy by increasing intratumoral drug delivery to overcome resistance, mediating image-guided drug delivery, and reducing systemic toxicity. Herein we report that i.p. delivery of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) led to intratumoral accumulation of 17% of total injected nanoparticles in an orthotopic mouse pancreatic cancer model, which was three-fold higher compared with intravenous delivery. Targeted delivery of near infrared dye labeled IONPs into orthotopic tumors could be detected by non-invasive optical and magnetic resonance imaging. Histological analysis revealed that a high level of uPAR targeted, PEGylated IONPs efficiently penetrated into both the peripheral and central tumor areas in the primary tumor as well as peritoneal metastatic tumor. Improved theranostic IONP delivery into the tumor center was not mediated by nonspecific macrophage uptake and was independent from tumor blood vessel locations. Importantly, i.p. delivery of uPAR targeted theranostic IONPs carrying chemotherapeutics, cisplatin or doxorubicin, significantly inhibited the growth of pancreatic tumors without apparent systemic toxicity. The levels of proliferating tumor cells and tumor vessels in tumors treated with the above theranostic IONPs were also markedly decreased. The detection of strong optical signals in residual tumors following i.p. therapy suggested the feasibility of image-guided surgery to remove drug-resistant tumors. Therefore, our results support the translational development of i.p. delivery of uPAR-targeted theranostic IONPs for image-guided treatment of peritoneal tumors.

  7. Neuroendocrine tumors and smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Miličević

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine cells are dispersed around the body and can be found within the gastrointestinal system, lungs, larynx, thymus, thyroid, adrenal, gonads, skin and other tissues. These cells form the so-called ''diffuse neuroendocrine system'' and tumors arising from them are defined as neuroendocrine tumors (NETs. The traditional classification of NETs based on their embryonic origin includes foregut tumors (lung, thymus, stomach, pancreas and duodenum, midgut tumors (beyond the ligament of Treitz of the duodenum to the proximal transverse colon and hindgut tumors (distal colon and rectum. NETs at each site are biologically and clinically distinct from their counterparts at other sites. Symptoms in patients with early disease are often insidious in onset, leading to a delay in diagnosis. The majority of these tumors are thus diagnosed at a stage at which the only curative treatment, radical surgical intervention, is no longer an option. Due to the increasing incidence and mortality, many studies have been conducted in order to identify risk factors for the development of NETs. Still, little is known especially when it comes to preventable risk factors such as smoking. This review will focus on smoking and its contribution to the development of different subtypes of NETs.

  8. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Deuschel, Jean-Dominique; Deuschel, Jean-Dominique

    2001-01-01

    This is the second printing of the book first published in 1988. The first four chapters of the volume are based on lectures given by Stroock at MIT in 1987. They form an introduction to the basic ideas of the theory of large deviations and make a suitable package on which to base a semester-length course for advanced graduate students with a strong background in analysis and some probability theory. A large selection of exercises presents important material and many applications. The last two chapters present various non-uniform results (Chapter 5) and outline the analytic approach that allow

  9. Extraskeletal osteogenic sarcoma after treatment for Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belasco, J.B.; Meadows, A.T.; Chatten, J.; Borden, S.; Schnaufer, L.

    1982-01-01

    A large proportion of children with Wilms' tumor will become long-term disease-free survivors. A small number of these children are at risk of developing second malignant neoplasms. There have been no previous reports of osteogenic sarcoma of the chest wall following treatment of Wilms' tumor. Our patient was age seven years when he received surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy for Wilms' tumor, eight years when he received radiation and chemotherapy for pulmonary metastases of Wilms' tumor, and 13 years when he developed osteogenic sarcoma of the chest wall

  10. Clinical usefulness of Thallium-201 chloride scintigraphy for evaluation of oral malignant tumors. Relationship between retention index, histological type and tumor involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tsuyoshi; Nagai, Koyu; Morita, Yasuhiko; Indo, Hiroko; Kawano, Kazunori; Noikura, Takenori

    1999-01-01

    In this report we assessed retrospectively the usefulness of Thallium-201 chloride scintigraphy for diagnosing malignant tumors of the maxillofacial region. Thallium-201 chloride scintigraphy was performed on 74 patients with malignant tumors and 8 patients with benign tumors, and a retention index was calculated from the early and delayed scintigrams (delayed accumulation ratio/ early accumulation ratio). This retention index depended on the blood flow of tumors and the affinity of tumors with Thallium-201 chloride. The retention index was large for malignant tumors (avg.: 1.05) and small for benign tumors (avg.: 0.78). Concerning the degree of malignancy (the histological type and the degree of tumor involvement), the retention index was higher in highly malignant tumors (1.20 for poorly-differentiated tumors and 1.19 for aggressive-involvement-type tumors) and lower for tumors of low malignancy (1.02 for well-differentiated tumors and 0.98 for low involvement-type tumors). Thus, our results indicated that the retention index of Thallium-201 chloride is useful for the qualitative diagnosis of malignant tumors. (author)

  11. Thermal and mechanical high-intensity focused ultrasound: perspectives on tumor ablation, immune effects and combination strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijgaart, R.J.E. van den; Eikelenboom, D.C.; Hoogenboom, M.; Futterer, J.J.; Brok, M.H.M.G.M. den; Adema, G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor ablation technologies, such as radiofrequency-, cryo- or high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation will destroy tumor tissue in a minimally invasive manner. Ablation generates large volumes of tumor debris in situ, releasing multiple bio-molecules like tumor antigens and

  12. Computed tomography of the orbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jai Korl; Lee, Hwang Bok; Kang, Eun Young; Seol, Hae Young; Suh, Won Hyuck; Ahn, Byeong Yeob

    1987-01-01

    The development of computed tomography (CT) provided a noninvasive safe technique for imaging the orbit in any plane exquisitely demonstrating its normal anatomy as well as its pathologic process. The orbit is an ideal structure to be examined by CT because of large difference of absorption values between the intraorbital fat, muscle, optic nerve and vessels. In this study, the authors reviewed CT findings of 66 pathologically proven orbital tumors and tumorous conditions among the total of 98 cases who had taken orbital CT scan because if exophthalmos, ocular pain, diplopia and other ophthalmologic symptoms suggesting orbital masses during the period of 3 years. For the analysis of characteristic CT findings of the orbital lesions, all lesions are divided into 4 groups according to the site of origin, i.e., tumors arising in the eyeball (group 1); from intraconal space (group 2); from extraconal space (group 3); and from extraorbital regions (group 4). The results are as follows; 1.Extra tumor detection and localization was possible in 63 cases. Thus the detection rate was 95% with CT scan. 2.Among 36 males and 30 females, their age ranged from 10 months to 72 years. 3.Intraocular tumors (group 1) were 10 cases. Retinoblastoma occurred wholly in the young children under 5 years and combined with calcification in 57%. Choroidal melanoma occurred wholly in adults. 4.Intraconal tumors (group 2) were 9 cases. Vascular tumors (7 cases) were the most frequent and well enhancing mass. 5.The tumors arising in the extraconal region (group 3) were pseudotumor (12 cases), lymphoma (3 cases), dermoid cyst (4 cases), metastasis (2 cases), adenoid cystic carcinoma (1 case) and teratoma (1 case). A case of lymphoma demonstrating retrobulbar ill defined mass with scleral l thickening could not be differentiated from the pseudotumor which showing similar finding. 6.The lesions arising from extraorbital region (group 4) were PNS cancer (9 cases), mucocele (3 cases), lid cancer (4

  13. Tumores neonatales bucomaxilofaciales Neonatal buccomaxillofacial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoila del S. López Díaz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza un estudio descriptivo, lineal y retrospectivo por un período de 10 años, de 11 recién nacidos (edad 0-30 días, quienes al nacer presentan en la región bucomaxilofacial un tumor que les ocasiona de manera determinante compromiso para la ventilación y/o alimentación, por lo que se hace necesario realizarles a todos de manera inmediata, tratamiento quirúrgico para preservarles la vida. Se analizaron las variables edad, sexo, color de la piel, diagnóstico, tumoraciones que se presentaron con mayor frecuencia, compromiso para la ventilación y/o alimentación, procederes y mortalidad. Los datos se recogieron en una planilla confeccionada al efecto, lo que permitió establecer resultados y confeccionar tablas. Se concluye que en nuestro estudio este tipo de tumoración afectó con mayor frecuencia al sexo femenino y a niños de piel blanca; y el tipo de tumoración observada con mayor frecuencia fueron las malformaciones vasculares de tipo linfático (linfangiomas gigantes o higromas quísticos, así como y los teratomas bucofaríngeos, con una mortalidad de alrededor del 27,3 % en estas edades neonatales.A descriptive, lineal and retrospective study of 11 newborn infants aged 0-30 days was conducted. They presented a tumor in the buccomaxillofacial region that compromised their ventilation and/or nutrition, which made necessary to immediately perform surgery to preserve their lives. The following variables were analyzed: age, sex, colour of the skin, diagnosis, the most common tumours, compromise for ventilation and/or nutrition, procedures and mortality. Data were collected in a form that allowed to establish results and to make tables. It was concluded that this type of tumor affected mostly females and white children. The most commonly observed tumors were vascular lymphatic malformations (giant lymphangiomas or cystic hygromas, as well as buccopharyngeal teratomas, with a mortality around 27.3 % at these neonatal ages.

  14. [Enophthalmos in an orbital tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Nicula, Cristina; Popescu, Livia Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Enophtalmus is an unusual sign of the orbital tumors often represented by proptosis. One patient with enophtalmus and intraorbital tumor and aplasy is presented. The treatment of choice of orbital tumor is complete surgical excision and careful follow-up. Considering the more aggressive course followed by recurrent tumor, correct diagnosis and management is essential.

  15. The “Trojan Horse” Approach to Tumor Immunotherapy: Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most anticancer therapies including immunotherapies are given systemically; yet therapies given directly into tumors may be more effective, particularly those that overcome natural suppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment. The “Trojan Horse” approach of intratumoural delivery aims to promote immune-mediated destruction by inducing microenvironmental changes within the tumour at the same time as avoiding the systemic toxicity that is often associated with more “full frontal” treatments such as transfer of large numbers of laboratory-expanded tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or large intravenous doses of cytokine. Numerous studies have demonstrated that intratumoural therapy has the capacity to minimizing local suppression, inducing sufficient “dangerous” tumor cell death to cross-prime strong immune responses, and rending tumor blood vessels amenable to immune cell traffic to induce effector cell changes in secondary lymphoid organs. However, the key to its success is the design of a sound rational approach based on evidence. There is compelling preclinical data for local immunotherapy approaches in tumor immunology. This review summarises how immune events within a tumour can be modified by local approaches, how this can affect systemic antitumor immunity such that distal sites are attacked, and what approaches have been proven most successful so far in animals and patients.

  16. The morphological profile of small bowel tumors - our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mărgăritescu, Nicolae Dragoş; Ciobanu, Mircea Ovidiu; Nemeş, Răducu Nicolae; Ghelase, Ştefan Mugurel; Pleşea, Răzvan Mihail; Georgescu, Ion; Voinea, Bogdan; Pleşea, Iancu Emil; ChiuŢu, LuminiŢa Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The authors assessed the morphological profile of tumor masses belonging to the small bowel discovered in their daily practice. 31 tumor masses located in different segments of small intestine operated between 2002 and 2013 in the 1st Surgical Department, Emergency County Hospital of Craiova, Romania, were analyzed. The investigated parameters were: tumor location and number, tumor dimensions, gross assessment, tumor extension and histological assessment. Tumor masses belonging to small intestine were rare. They usually expressed by their complications. In many cases, they were placed at the extremities of the small intestine. They were usually small but sometimes large and developing outwards intestinal wall. Commonly they had a fungating and ulcerated appearance. They were rather of mesenchymal origin than epithelial. However, some of them were inflammatory pseudotumors. Almost all neoplastic proliferations had a malignant phenotype, most often with regional extension. Our series of tumors had a morphological profile somehow similar with the profile described in the literature but with some particularities: the polarization to the extremities of the intestinal segment, a significant number of large tumors, clinical expression through different complications, the balance inclined in favor of mesenchymal origin of tumors and the clear predominance of malignant aggressive phenotype.

  17. Phyllodes malignant mammary tumors:communication of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beschizza, V.; Rosasco, M.; Episcopo, S.; Dorfman, N.; Centurion, D.

    2003-01-01

    Three cases of phyllode malignant mammary tumors were studied in the Anatomo-Pathology Chair of the Montevideo, Uruguay.The discussion covered epidemiology, morphologic staging and biological significance of phyllode tumor within the broader spectrum of libro-epithelial breast tumors.An overview of literature shows that histo-pathological criteria recommended by world Health Organization(WHO) are the ones which determine the behaviour of phyllode mammary tumors, wheter bening, malignant of borderline.Prognostic factors of metastases are those involved in stroma overgrowth, anaplasia high mitotic index and infiltrative edge of tumor.None of the clinical aspects,including tumor size, are significant from the viewpoint of prognosis.Efective treatment is broad extended surgical excision (adequate margins),mastectomy being reserved for large tummors that are borderline, malignant or recurrent

  18. Pituitary gland tumors; Hypophysentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesser, J.; Schlamp, K.; Bendszus, M. [Radiologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15 % of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65 % of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50 % secrete prolactin, 10 % secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6 % secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10 % of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland. (orig.) [German] Diese Arbeit ist eine Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten Hypophysentumoren und deren Differenzialdiagnosen mit Augenmerk auf die

  19. Thermoradiotherapy of malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Itami, Jun; Arimizu, Noboru; Uno, Takashi; Toita, Takafumi; Shiina, Takeki; Mikuriya, Shuuichi; Yamada, Tsunehisa.

    1991-01-01

    From October 1986 to June 1989, 79 patients with malignant tumors were treated by radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia at National Medical Center Hospital. Seventy two patients (male: 48, female: 23) were evaluable. Average age was 62.4 years old (ranged 20-81 years old). Irradiation was delivered twice to fifth weekly in tumor doses of 50 to 60 Gy (TDF 82-122). We used 3 types of hyperthermic equipment, Thermotron RF8, BSD 1000 System and Endoradiotherm 100A. Hyperthermia was initiated within 30 minutes following irradiation, most of the patients being treated with adequate equipment, 41-44degC, for 60-70 minutes every 72 hours. Fifteen of 71 patients (20.8%) showed a complete response and 36 patients (50%) showed a partial response, so effective rate was 70.8% of all. In superficial tumors, 4 of 21 patients (21.5%) showed a complete response and 8 of 21 patients showed a partial response, effective rate was 63.2% of all. In deep seated tumor, 10 of 46 patients (21.7%) showed a complete response and 25 of all patients showed a partial response, so effective rate was 76.1% of all. Five patients were heated following only intra-tumor injection of OK-432 and its effective rate was 75%. We think that this modality of therapy will be effective in cases which heating area had been irradiated over tolerable doses. CR rate of superficial tumors according to intra-tumor center temperature tends to higher in the cases of higher tumor temperature. In deep seated tumor, 11 patients (23.9%) had reached over 43degC, 29 patients (63.0%) heated 41-43degC, 6 patients (13.0%) heated under 41degC and CR rate of each group were 36.4%, 17.2%, 16.7%, respectively. We think that thermotherapy with irradiation is an effective therapy in the treatment of malignancies but the improvement of heating equipment will be expected. (author)

  20. Tumor scintigram, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Shunichi; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa; Shimura, Kazuo; Ifuka, Keijiro

    1975-01-01

    In various cases of malignant tumors, especially those of lung cancer and liver cancer, scans were made with 57 Co-bleomycin(BLM), and its diagnostic significance was evaluated. Tumors were visualized with 57 Co-BLM in 22 of the 26 cases of lung cancer (84.6%). Concentrations of the RI were noted in all of the cases of squamous epithelium cancer, adenoid cancer and cellule-type undifferentiated cancer. The smallest tumor that could be detected was a 2 x 2 cm adenoid cancer. Tumors were imaged in 19 of the 27 cases of liver cancer (70.4%). This detection rate was increased by a combination of 57 Co-BLM and 198 Au-colloid scanning. The authors believe that 57 Co-BLM will help to establish the diagnosis of lung cancer or liver cancer. Tumors were also imaged in 6 of the 15 cases of breast cancer, but no distinct concentration was noted in the 7 cases of thyroid cancer. (Ueda, J.)

  1. CNS Tumors in Neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campian, Jian; Gutmann, David H

    2017-07-20

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) encompasses a group of distinct genetic disorders in which affected children and adults are prone to the development of benign and malignant tumors of the nervous system. The purpose of this review is to discuss the spectrum of CNS tumors arising in individuals with NF type 1 (NF1) and NF type 2 (NF2), their pathogenic etiologies, and the rational treatment options for people with these neoplasms. This article is a review of preclinical and clinical data focused on the treatment of the most common CNS tumors encountered in children and adults with NF1 and NF2. Although children with NF1 are at risk for developing low-grade gliomas of the optic pathway and brainstem, individuals with NF2 typically manifest low-grade tumors affecting the cranial nerves (vestibular schwannomas), meninges (meningiomas), and spinal cord (ependymomas). With the identification of the NF1 and NF2 genes, molecularly targeted therapies are beginning to emerge, as a result of a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying NF1 and NF2 protein function. As we enter into an era of precision oncology, a more comprehensive awareness of the factors that increase the risk of developing CNS cancers in affected individuals, coupled with a greater appreciation of the cellular and molecular determinants that maintain tumor growth, will undoubtedly yield more effective therapies for these cancer predisposition syndromes.

  2. Tumor Markers: At a Glance

    OpenAIRE

    NS Manikantan; Dhanya Balakrishnan; AD Manoj Kumar; Brijesh Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Tumor markers are biochemical substances elaborated by tumor cells due to either the cause or effect of malignant process. produced by host in response to a tumor that can be used to differentiate a tumor from normal tissue or to determine the presence of a tumor based on measurements in blood or secretions.1 These markers can be normal endogenous products that are produced at a greater rate in cancer cells or the products of newly switched on genes th...

  3. Boron neutron capture therapy for children with malignant brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Komatsu, Hisao; Kageji, Teruyoshi; Tsuji, Fumio; Matsumoto, Keizo; Kitamura, Katsuji; Hatanaka, Hiroshi; Minobe, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    Among the 131 cases with brain tumors treated by boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT), seventeen were children. Eight supratentorial tumors included five astrocytomas(grade 2-4), two primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) and one rhabdomyosarcoma. Seven pontine tumors included one astrocytoma, one PNET and 5 unverified gliomas. Two cerebellar tumors (PNET and astrocytoma) were also treated. All pontine tumors showed remarkable decrease in size after BNCT. However, most of them showed regrowth of the tumors because the neutrons were insufficient due to the depth. Four cases with cerebral tumor died of remote cell dissemination, although they all responded to BNCT. One of them survived 7 years after repeated BNCTs. An 11 years old girl with a large astrocytoma in the right frontal lobe has lived more than 11 years and is now a draftswoman at a civil engineering company after graduating from a technical college. An 8 years old girl with an astrocytoma in the left occipital lobe has no recurrence of the tumor for 2 years and attends on elementary school without mental and physical problems. Two children (one year old girl and four years old boy) with cerebellar tumors have shown showed an excellent growth after BNCT and had no neurological deficits. Mental and physical development in patients treated by BNCT is usually better than that in patients treated by conventional radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Immune Surveillance Against a Solid Tumor Fails because of Immunological Ignorance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsenbein, Adrian F.; Klenerman, Paul; Karrer, Urs; Ludewig, Burkhard; Pericin, Marcus; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1999-03-01

    Many peripheral solid tumors such as sarcomas and carcinomas express tumor-specific antigens that can serve as targets for immune effector T cells. Nevertheless, overall immune surveillance against such tumors seems relatively inefficient. We studied immune surveillance against a s.c. sarcoma expressing a characterized viral tumor antigen. Surprisingly, the tumor cells were capable of inducing a protective cytotoxic T cell response if transferred as a single-cell suspension. However, if they were transplanted as small tumor pieces, tumors readily grew. Tumor growth correlated strictly with (i) failure of tumor cells to reach the draining lymph nodes and (ii) absence of primed cytotoxic T cells. Cytotoxic T cells were not tolerant or deleted because a tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell response was readily induced in lymphoid tissue by immunization with virus or with tumor cells even in the presence of large tumors. Established tumors were rejected by vaccine-induced effector T cells if effector T cells were maintained by prolonged or repetitive vaccination, but not by single-dose vaccination. Thus, in addition to several other tumor-promoting parameters, some antigenic peripheral sarcomas--and probably carcinomas--may grow not because they anergize or tolerize tumor-specific T cells, but because such tumors are immunologically dealt with as if they were in a so-called immunologically privileged site and are ignored for too long.

  5. Tumor radiation responses and tumor oxygenation in aging mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.

    1989-01-01

    EMT6 mouse mammary tumors transplanted into aging mice are less sensitive to radiation than tumors growing in young adult animals. The experiments reported here compare the radiation dose-response curves defining the survivals of tumor cells in aging mice and in young adult mice. Cell survival curves were assessed in normal air-breathing mice and in mice asphyxiated with N 2 to produce uniform hypoxia throughout the tumors. Analyses of survival curves revealed that 41% of viable malignant cells were severely hypoxic in tumors in aging mice, while only 19% of the tumor cells in young adult animals were radiobiologically hypoxic. This did not appear to reflect anaemia in the old animals. Treatment of aging animals with a perfluorochemical emulsion plus carbogen (95% O 2 /5% CO 2 ) increased radiation response of the tumors, apparently by improving tumor oxygenation and decreasing the number of severely hypoxic, radiation resistant cells in the tumors. (author)

  6. Hazard plotting and estimates for the tumor rate and the tumor growth time for radiogenic osteosarcomas in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groer, P.G.; Marshall, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    The tumor rate (hazard rate) and the tumor growth time were estimated from a multiply censored sample of observed tumor appearance times in persons with an initial intake of 226 Ra and 228 Ra larger than about 230 μCi/kg bone. The tumor appearance times in these individuals appear to be exponentially distributed and follow, therefore, a straight line if plotted against the cumulative hazard on linear paper, the hazard paper for an exponential failure time distribution. This implies a constant dose independent tumor rate for osteosarcoma induction in the limit of large radiation doses. An expression for tumor rate from a stochastic model, described earlier in detail showing this behavior, is discussed briefly

  7. Mediastinal tumors. Update 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.E.; Thomas, C.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This volume represents the premier work devoted solely to the complex myriad of mediastinal tumors. The contributors to the state-of-the-art text are clinical investigators of international renown. The diagnosis, natural history, and therapeutic strategies in respect of all mediastinal tumors are thoroughly addressed in a concise and logical manner. An emphasis on the multidisciplinary nature of mediastinal tumors is thematic throughout the text. Moreover, the combined-modality treatment schemes that have been increasingly developed worldwide are analyzed. This textbook will prove of value to all general surgeons, thoracic surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, pulmonologists, and endocrinologists, as well as to nursing and medical students, residents and fellows-in training. (orig.). 55 figs., 21 tabs

  8. Orbital lymphoid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroko; Ueno, Hisayuki

    1994-01-01

    We examined 13 cases of orbital lymphoid tumors (OLT) and 1 of orbital hemangioma (OH), using dynamic MRI, to determine the biological behavior of the tumors before surgery. We measured time-dependent changes in the contrast enhancement of tumors and described time intensity curves (TIC), dividing the cases into 3 architectural types: completes septum (CS), incomplete septum (IS), and diffuse types. The TICs of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH, 2 cases) of CS type and idiopathic orbital inflamation (1), RLH (5) of IS type, atypical lymphoid hyperplasia (4), and malignant lymphoma (1) and OH (1) showed rapid increase with low peak and gradual decrease, rapid increase with high peak and gradual decrease, rapid increase and plateau, and gradual increase type, respectively. In order words, OLT showed various TIC, roughly correlating with pathological findings. These results indicate that dynamic MRI may be useful in the preoperative clinical diagnosis of OLT. (author)

  9. Percutaneous bone tumor management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangi, Afshin; Buy, Xavier

    2010-06-01

    Interventional radiology plays a major role in the management of bone tumors. Many different percutaneous techniques are available. Some aim to treat pain and consolidate a pathological bone (cementoplasty); others aim to ablate tumor or reduce its volume (sclerotherapy, thermal ablation). In this article, image-guided techniques of primary and secondary bone tumors with vertebroplasty, ethanol injection, radiofrequency ablation, laser photocoagulation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ionization (coblation) will be reviewed. For each modality, the principles, the indications, and the results will be presented. The technical choice depends on the therapeutic intent-curative or palliative-and the need for consolidation, but also on the general status of the patient and the other therapeutic options. For the most complex cases, combined treatments can be required. However, the less disabling technique should always be considered first.

  10. Bilateral Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolm, A.W.; Jaffe, N.; Folkman, M.J.; Cassady, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty children with bilateral Wilms' tumor were presented to the Children's Hospital Medical Center and Children's Cancer Research Foundation, Sidney Farber Cancer Institute, and Joint Center for Radiation Therapy (CHMC-CCRF, SFCI, JCRT) from January 1, 1956 to December 31, 1976. Of these 20, 16 had simultaneous and 4 had metachronous disease on presentation. All patients were treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Of the 16 patients with simultaneous disease, 10 (63%) are alive and free of disease 12+ to 175+ months post diagnosis and treatment, with median follow-up of 121 months. There were no long-term survivors in the metachronous group; all were dead of disease within 21 months from initial presentation of original tumor. With these data we relate prognosis to extent of disease and discuss a general approach to the management of bilateral Wilms' tumor

  11. Radiology of neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hako, R.; Hakova, H.; Gulova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors arise in the bronchopulmonary or gastrointestinal tract, but they can arise in almost any organ. The tumors have varied malignant potential depending on the site of their origin. Metastases may be present at the time of diagnosis, which often occurs at a late stage of the disease. Most NETs have nonspecific imaging characteristics. Imaging plays a pivotal role in the localization and staging of neuroendocrine tumors and in monitoring the treatment response. Imaging should involve multi-phase computed tomography, contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and other one. Hepatic metastatic disease in particular lends itself to a wide range of interventional treatment options. Transcatheter arterial embolization may be used alone or in combination with chemo embolization. Ablative techniques, hepatic cryotherapy and percutaneous ethanol injection may then be undertaken. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment and follow-up is important. (author)

  12. Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Lim Suh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT is a benign glioneuronal neoplasm that most commonly occurs in children and young adults and may present with medically intractable, chronic seizures. Radiologically, this tumor is characterized by a cortical topography and lack of mass effect or perilesional edema. Partial complex seizures are the most common presentation. Three histologic subtypes of DNTs have been described. Histologically, the recognition of a unique, specific glioneuronal element in brain tumor samples from patients with medically intractable, chronic epilepsy serves as a diagnostic feature for complex or simple DNT types. However, nonspecific DNT has diagnostic difficulty because its histology is indistinguishable from conventional gliomas and because a specific glioneuronal element and/or multinodularity are absent. This review will focus on the clinical, radiographic, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features as well as the molecular genetics of all three variants of DNTs. The histological and cytological differential diagnoses for this lesion, especially the nonspecific variant, will be discussed.

  13. [Surgery of adrenal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V O; Ermolov, A S; Kovalenko, T I; Kondratiev, A V

    2004-01-01

    From 1983 to 2003 examination and surgical treatment were performed in 463 patients with different adrenal tumors. Hormone-active tumors were revealed in 249 of them, non-active - in 214. Combination of CT or MRT with study of adrenal hormones is the basis of the diagnosis. In different cases multispiral computed tomography, angiography, selected taking of blood from inferior caval vein, US- or CT-guided biopsy were used. Open surgery through thoracofrenolumbotomy was performed in 392 patients, videolaparoscopic surgery - in 71. Expediency of laparoscopic surgery in line with open surgery is demonstrated.

  14. Tumor-induced osteomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan de Beur, Suzanne M

    2005-09-14

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic form of renal phosphate wasting that results in severe hypophosphatemia, a defect in vitamin D metabolism, and osteomalacia. This debilitating disorder is illustrated by the clinical presentation of a 55-year-old woman with progressive fatigue, weakness, and muscle and bone pain with fractures. After a protracted clinical course and extensive laboratory evaluation, tumor-induced osteomalacia was identified as the basis of her clinical presentation. In this article, the distinctive clinical characteristics of this syndrome, the advances in diagnosis of TIO, and new insights into the pathophysiology of this disorder are discussed.

  15. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Florenzano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome clinically characterized by bone pain, fractures and muscle weakness. It is caused by tumoral overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23 that acts primarily at the proximal renal tubule, decreasing phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25 hydroxyvitamin D, thus producing hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia. Lesions are typically small, benign mesenchymal tumors that may be found in bone or soft tissue, anywhere in the body. In up to 60% of these tumors, a fibronectin-1(FN1 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1 fusion gene has been identified that may serve as a tumoral driver. The diagnosis is established by the finding of acquired chronic hypophosphatemia due to isolated renal phosphate wasting with concomitant elevated or inappropriately normal blood levels of FGF23 and decreased or inappropriately normal 1,25-OH2-Vitamin D (1,25(OH2D. Locating the tumor is critical, as complete removal is curative. For this purpose, a step-wise approach is recommended, starting with a thorough medical history and physical examination, followed by functional imaging. Suspicious lesions should be confirmed by anatomical imaging, and if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23. If the tumor is not localized, or surgical resection is not possible, medical therapy with phosphate and active vitamin D is usually successful in healing the osteomalacia and reducing symptoms. However, compliance is often poor due to the frequent dosing regimen and side effects. Furthermore, careful monitoring is needed to avoid complications such us secondary/tertiary hyperparathyroidism, hypercalciuria, and nephrocalcinosis. Novel therapeutical approaches are being developed for TIO patients, such as image-guided tumor ablation and medical treatment with the anti-FGF23 monoclonal antibody KRN23 or anti FGFR medications. The case of a patient with TIO is presented to

  16. Wilms' tumor: past, present and (possibly) future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreafico, Filippo; Bellani, Franca Fossati

    2006-02-01

    Wilms' tumor is one of the successes of pediatric oncology, with an overall cure rate of over 85%, using relatively simple therapies. This excellent outcome has been the result of collaborative efforts among surgeons, pediatricians, pathologists and radiation oncologists. The results that have been achieved in children with Wilms' tumors support the strong value of the multidisciplinary team approach to cancer. The two largest cooperative groups that have studied the optimum treatment for Wilms' tumor are the National Wilms' Tumor Study group in North America and the International Society of Pediatric Oncology, involving European and other countries. The National Wilms' Tumor Study group recommends primary surgery before any adjuvant treatment, whereas the International Society of Pediatric Oncology trials are based on the use of preoperative chemotherapy. The debate on primary chemotherapy versus primary nephrectomy appears to have been overcome, in the sense that the advantages and disadvantages of these two diverse methods have emerged from large and well-performed clinical trials, and comparably low doses of anthracyclines and radiotherapy are now used. Challenges remain in identifying novel molecular, histological and clinical risk factors for stratification of treatment intensity. This could allow a safe reduction in therapy for patients known to have an excellent chance of cure with the current therapy, while identifying, at diagnosis, the minority of children at risk of relapse, who will necessitate more aggressive treatments. Another positive factor is the substantial progress that has been made in the cure for recurrent patients, with long-term survivals shifting from 30 to almost 60% in more recently treated patients with intensive-dose chemotherapy regimens. The combination of lower relapses and higher salvage rates translated into significantly improved overall survival for Wilms' tumor patients as a whole. This review covers current concepts on

  17. Constitutive integrin activation on tumor cells contributes to progression of leptomeningeal metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Dieta; Ulfman, Laurien; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Bracke, Madelon; Taphoorn, Martin J. B.; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Gebbink, Martijn F. B.; de Boer, Hetty; Koenderman, Leo; Voest, Emile E.

    2006-01-01

    Leptomeningeal metastases are a serious neurological complication in cancer patients and associated with a dismal prognosis. Tumor cells that enter the subarachnoid space adhere to the leptomeninges and form tumor deposits. It is largely unknown which adhesion molecules mediate tumor cell adhesion

  18. Examination of venous tumor thrombus with colorectal cancer by enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Kiba, Maki; Tazoe, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Recently, multi detector row CT (MDCT) has been largely used and enabled to detect drainage vessels of tumors. Then we tried examining the ratio, by using enhanced CT, of the cases that has venous tumor thrombus with colorectal cancer, and found the 3 cases out of 176 to be venous tumor thrombus of mesenteric veins in advanced stage. (author)

  19. C2 root nerve sheath tumors management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sissy, Mohamed H; Mahmoud, Mostafa

    2013-05-01

    Upper cervical nerve sheath tumors (NST) arising mainly from C2 root and to lesser extent from C1 root are not uncommon, they constitute approximately 5-12% of spinal nerve sheath tumors and 18-30% of all cervical nerve sheath tumors, unique in presentation and their relationship to neighbouring structures owing to the discrete anatomy at the upper cervical-craniovertebral region, and have atendency for growth reaching large-sized tumors before manifesting clinically due to the capacious spinal canal at this region; accordingly the surgical approaches to such tumors are modified. The aim of this paper is to discuss the surgical strategies for upper cervical nerve sheath tumors. Eleven patients (8 male and 3 females), age range 28-63 years, with C2 root nerve sheath tumors were operated upon based on their anatomical relations to the spinal cord. The magnetic resonance imaging findings were utilized to determine the surgical approach. The tumors had extra- and intradural components in 10 patients, while in one the tumor was purely intradural. The operative approaches included varied from extreme lateral transcondylar approach(n = 1) to laminectomy, whether complete(n = 3) a or hemilaminectomy(n = 7), with partial facetectomy(n = 7), and with suboccipital craniectomy(n = 2). The clinical picture ranged from spasticity (n = 8, 72,72 %), tingling and numbness below neck (n = 6, 54,54 %), weakness (n = 6, 54,54 %), posterior column involvement (n = 4, 26,36 %), and neck pain (n = 4, 36,36 %). The duration of symptoms ranged from 1 to 54 months, total excision was performed in 7 patients; while in 3 patients an extraspinal component, and in 1 patient a small intradural component, were left in situ. Eight patients showed improvement of myelopathy; 2 patients maintained their grades. One poor-grade patient was deteriorated. The surgical approaches for the C2 root nerve sheath tumors should be tailored according to the relationship to the spinal cord, determined by magnetic

  20. "Osseous tumors of the hand "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Farzan M

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The majority of osseous tumors of the hand are benign. The surgeon who evaluates and treats osseous tumors of the hand has to be familiar with limb anatomy, tumor biology, various presentations of the tumors and the range of treatment possibilities and their limitations. Lesions in the hand more often present earlier in their course than those at other sites, just because they are more likely to superficial and easily noticed. A review of all cases of osseous tumors of the hand, seen by a hand surgeon over the last 10 years, at Imam Khomeini hospital was performed. Among 55 cases with osseous tumors of hand, 48 primary benign bone tumors, 3 primary malignant bone tumors, and 4 metastatic bone tumors were found. Enchondroma was the most common benign bone tumor followed by osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, aneurismal bone cyst, giant cell tumor, epidermoid cyst, and osteochondroma. There were two chondrosarcoma and one Ewing’s sarcoma as primary malignant bone tumors. Metastasis to the hand from colon, esophagus, and breast were also found. There were also two cases with Brown tumor secondary to hyperparathyroidism, we conclude that a variety of osseous tumors could occur in the hand, and usually they are benign. Although malignant neoplasms in the hand that arise from tissues other than the skin are very rare, the hand may be the site of distant breast, lung, kidney, esophagus, or colon adenocarcinoma metastases, most of which have a predilection for the distal phalanges.

  1. Mesohepatectomy for Centrally Located Tumors in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amesty, Maria Virginia; Chocarro, Gloria; Vilanova Sánchez, Alejandra; Nuñez Cerezo, Vanesa; de la Torre, C A; Encinas, Jose Luis; Gamez Arance, Manuel; Hernández, Francisco; Lopez Santamaria, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Central hepatectomy or mesohepatectomy (MH) is a complex surgical technique rarely used in children. It is indicated in central tumors to preserve functioning liver mass avoiding an extended right hepatectomy. The purpose of this article is to analyze our experience with this technique. We reviewed five patients who underwent MH in the period from 2008 to 2014. Diagnoses were hepatoblastoma PRETEXT III (two cases), hepatic embryonal sarcoma (one case), focal nodular hyperplasia (one case), and vascular tumor with rapid growth in a newborn causing an acute liver failure, compartment syndrome, and multiple organ failure (one case). In all cases, the tumor was centrally located, including the segment IVb, with large displacement of the hepatic pedicle in two cases. MH was standard in three cases and under total vascular exclusion in two cases. All children are alive with a mean follow-up of 38 (6-70) months. None of the children required reoperation because of bleeding. One child developed a biliary fistula in the cutting area that closed spontaneously. The newborn with the vascular tumor required the placement of a Gore-Tex patch (W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc, Flagstaff, Arizona, United States) to relieve the compartment syndrome. He subsequently underwent partial embolization of the tumor and MH under vascular exclusion. In selected patients, MH is an alternative to trisegmentectomy and should be available in advanced pediatric hepatobiliary units. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Simian virus Large T antigen interacts with the N-terminal domain of the 70 kD subunit of Replication Protein A in the same mode as multiple DNA damage response factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boting Ning

    Full Text Available Simian virus 40 (SV40 serves as an important model organism for studying eukaryotic DNA replication. Its helicase, Large T-antigen (Tag, is a multi-functional protein that interacts with multiple host proteins, including the ubiquitous ssDNA binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA. Tag recruits RPA, actively loads it onto the unwound DNA, and together they promote priming of the template. Although interactions of Tag with RPA have been mapped, no interaction between Tag and the N-terminal protein interaction domain of the RPA 70kDa subunit (RPA70N has been reported. Here we provide evidence of direct physical interaction of Tag with RPA70N and map the binding sites using a series of pull-down and mutational experiments. In addition, a monoclonal anti-Tag antibody, the epitope of which overlaps with the binding site, blocks the binding of Tag to RPA70N. We use NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis to show that Tag uses the same basic cleft in RPA70N as multiple of DNA damage response proteins. Mutations in the binding sites of both RPA70N and Tag demonstrate that specific charge reversal substitutions in either binding partner strongly diminish the interaction. These results expand the known repertoire of contacts between Tag and RPA, which mediate the many critical roles of Tag in viral replication.

  3. Large Nc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Elizabeth E.

    2009-12-01

    The 1/Nc expansion of QCD with Nc = 3 has been successful in explaining a wide variety of QCD phenomenology. Here I focus on the contracted spin-flavor symmetry of baryons in the large-Nc limit and deviations from spin-flavor symmetry due to corrections suppressed by powers of 1/Nc. Baryon masses provide an important example of the 1/Nc expansion, and successful predictions of masses of heavy-quark baryons continue to be tested by experiment. The ground state charmed baryon masses have all been measured, and five of the eight ground state bottom baryon masses have been found. Results of the 1/Nc expansion can aid in the discovery of the remaining bottom baryons. The brand new measurement of the Ωb- mass by the CDF collaboration conflicts with the original D0 discovery value and is in excellent agreement with the prediction of the 1/Nc expansion.

  4. Large Nc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, Elizabeth E.

    2009-01-01

    The 1/N c expansion of QCD with N c = 3 has been successful in explaining a wide variety of QCD phenomenology. Here I focus on the contracted spin-flavor symmetry of baryons in the large-N c limit and deviations from spin-flavor symmetry due to corrections suppressed by powers of 1/N c . Baryon masses provide an important example of the 1/N c expansion, and successful predictions of masses of heavy-quark baryons continue to be tested by experiment. The ground state charmed baryon masses have all been measured, and five of the eight ground state bottom baryon masses have been found. Results of the 1/N c expansion can aid in the discovery of the remaining bottom baryons. The brand new measurement of the Ω b - mass by the CDF collaboration conflicts with the original D0 discovery value and is in excellent agreement with the prediction of the 1/N c expansion.

  5. Aggressive malignant phyllodes tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Roberts

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Despite biopsy proven malignant phyllodes tumor, it was near impossible to predict such a rapid course of disease progression in our patient. Our case illustrates the unpredictable nature of this disease in general and it possibly sheds light on a variant of the disease which had undergone an aggressive transformation.

  6. Surgery for adrenal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamah, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the presentation, localization, pathology, surgical management and outcome of surgery for adrenal gland tumors. Design: Prospective clinico epidemiological study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Department of General Surgery, University Unit, Riyadh medical Complex Kingdom of Saudi Rabia from June, 1991 to may, 2001. Subjects and Methods: A total of 21 cases with adrenal tumors were studied for demographic data, clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, localization, surgical management, pathology and outcome. The outcome of these patients was followed prospectively. Results: The study included 12 female and 9 male patients. The mean age at surgery was 36.7 years. Hypertension (69.%) was the commonest presentation in hypersecretory functional tumors. The localization accuracy for ultrasonography, computerized tomography, MRI and MIBG scan was 95.2%, 98.3% 87.8% and 83.6% respectively. Pheochromocytoma was the most common adrenal pathology observed in 14 (66.6%) cases. The overall morbidity was 19% with no hospital mortality. Complete follow-up of available 19 patients (90.5 %) revealed no tumor recurrence and persistent hypertension in 14.3% cases. Conclusion: surgery on adrenal glands is safe in experienced hands and is recommended in institutes with all backup facilities. (author)

  7. Unmasking circulating tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennenhuis, Joost Franciscus

    2017-01-01

    The number of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) that can be isolated from blood of cancer patients is prognostic for the course of the disease. A higher number of CTCs correlates with a worse prognosis. A change from a higher number to a lower number of CTCs indicates a benefit of the current treatment

  8. Targeting thapsigargin towards tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Brøgger; Doan, Thi Quynh Nhu; Paulsen, Eleonora Sandholdt

    2015-01-01

    substrates for either prostate specific antigen (PSA) or prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) prodrugs were created, which selectively affect prostate cancer cells or neovascular tissue in tumors. One of the prodrug is currently tested in clinical phase II. The prodrug under clinical trial has been...

  9. Study of wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.H.; Yaqub, N.

    2001-01-01

    This study is an effort to bring into light data related to children with Wilms' tumor managed at Islamabad as local literature on this topic is lacking. It was retrospective study. The study was conducted at Children Hospital, Pakistan Institute of Medical Science, Islamabad between January, 1987 and December 1995. All patients managed during the study period were included in the study. In all the patients complete blood count (CBC), urine analysis (D/R),X-ray abdomen and chest, ultrasound abdomen and in selected cases CT scan were performed. National Wilms' Tumor Study Group (NWTS 3) protocol was followed for further management. Fifty patients including 28 males and 22 females with the age range from 9 months to 8 years were managed in 9 years period. Left kidney was involved in 31 patients. Most of the tumors were solid on ultrasound, 76% patients were in stage III and IV. In one case bilateral involvement of kidney was found. Forty patients underwent primary surgery. Only 14 patients received complete course of chemotherapy while 31 radiotherapy. Nineteen patients died and 15 lost to follow-up. The survival and mortality rates are comparable to NWTS-3 results, although, most of the patients were presented in advance stage of Wilms tumor. The survival of these patients can be improved by increasing awareness of society through electronic and print media. (author)

  10. Stages of Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and interleukin-2 (IL-2) are types of biologic therapy used to treat childhood renal cell cancer . Interferon affects the division of cancer cells and ... Tumors Renal Cell Cancer (RCC) Treatment of renal cell cancer usually ... nodes. Biologic therapy ( interferon and interleukin-2 ) for cancer that ...

  11. CT and MRI of sphenoid tumors and pseudo tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaujeux, R.; Dietemann, J.L.; Brun, F.; Bourjat, P.

    1994-01-01

    The radiological features of the main tumors and pseudotumors of the sphenoid bone with CT and MRI are described in detail. The lesions are classified as tumors and pseudotumors of the sphenoid bone and sphenoid sinus and as neighboring tumors and pseudotumors with secondary sphenoid invasion. Metastases, chondromas, fibrous dysplasia, myelomas, plasmocytomas and chordomas are the most frequent sphenoid lesions. Tumors and pseudotumors of the sphenoid sinus mainly include mucoceles and cholesterin granulomas. Neighboring tumors are of intracranial origin (pituitary adenoma, meningioma, aneurysm) or originate in the nasopharynx (nasopharyngeal fibroma, malignant tumors) or the nasosinusal cavities (inverted papillomas, invasive aspergillosis, malignant tumors). The radiological features do no always allow diagnosing the tumoral type. However, the merits of CT and, even more, of MRI for an accurate assessment of extension is indisputable. (authors). 41 refs., 12 figs

  12. Physiologic upper limit of pore size in the blood-tumor barrier of malignant solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Gary L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The existence of large pores in the blood-tumor barrier (BTB of malignant solid tumor microvasculature makes the blood-tumor barrier more permeable to macromolecules than the endothelial barrier of most normal tissue microvasculature. The BTB of malignant solid tumors growing outside the brain, in peripheral tissues, is more permeable than that of similar tumors growing inside the brain. This has been previously attributed to the larger anatomic sizes of the pores within the BTB of peripheral tumors. Since in the physiological state in vivo a fibrous glycocalyx layer coats the pores of the BTB, it is possible that the effective physiologic pore size in the BTB of brain tumors and peripheral tumors is similar. If this were the case, then the higher permeability of the BTB of peripheral tumor would be attributable to the presence of a greater number of pores in the BTB of peripheral tumors. In this study, we probed in vivo the upper limit of pore size in the BTB of rodent malignant gliomas grown inside the brain, the orthotopic site, as well as outside the brain in temporalis skeletal muscle, the ectopic site. Methods Generation 5 (G5 through generation 8 (G8 polyamidoamine dendrimers were labeled with gadolinium (Gd-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid, an anionic MRI contrast agent. The respective Gd-dendrimer generations were visualized in vitro by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Following intravenous infusion of the respective Gd-dendrimer generations (Gd-G5, N = 6; Gd-G6, N = 6; Gd-G7, N = 5; Gd-G8, N = 5 the blood and tumor tissue pharmacokinetics of the Gd-dendrimer generations were visualized in vivo over 600 to 700 minutes by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. One additional animal was imaged in each Gd-dendrimer generation group for 175 minutes under continuous anesthesia for the creation of voxel-by-voxel Gd concentration maps. Results The estimated diameters of Gd-G7 dendrimers were 11 ± 1 nm and those of Gd-G8

  13. Rare and Challenging Tumor Entity: Phyllodes Tumor of the Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bannowsky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic epithelial-stromal tumors of the prostate are rare, with 82 cases reported in literature. These cases have been published under a variety of diagnoses, including phyllodes tumor and prostatic stromal proliferation of uncertain malignant potential as well as a malignant tumor called “prostatic stromal sarcoma”. We report a case of a 60-year-old man with the histological diagnosis of phyllodes tumor of the prostate in transurethral resection specimen.

  14. Mixed odontogenic tumor: Ameloblastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etit Demet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors constitute a group of heterogeneous disease derived from epithelial, mesenchymal and/or ectomesenchymal elements. Ameloblastoma is the best known and the most frequent form of odontogenic tumors. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT, known as Pindborg tumor, is locally invasive lesion which has a characteristic amiloid deposition. Here a case of a peripheral ameloblastoma associated with CEOT is presented with clinical and morphological features.

  15. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of brain tumors for benign and malignant tumors combined is 18.71 per 100,000 persons/year. The most common benign brain tumor in adults is meningioma, which is most present in women, and the most common malignant tumor is glioblastoma, which is most present in adult men. Due to high mortality, especially in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma and significant brain tumor morbidity, there is a constant interest in understanding its etiology in order to possibly prevent tumor occurrence in future and enable more efficient treatment strategies for this fatal brain disease. Despite the continuously growing number of epidemiological studies on possible factors of tumor incidence, the etiology remains unclear. The only established environmental risk factor of gliomas is ionizing radiation exposure. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields via cell phone use has gained a lot of attention as a potential risk factor of brain tumor development. However, studies have been inconsistent and inconclusive, so more definite results are still expected.

  16. A model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with tumor microenvironment in breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Bassem; Bor-Angelier, Catherine; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Breast carcinomas are cancers that arise from the epithelial cells of the breast, which are the cells that line the lobules and the lactiferous ducts. Breast carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer and can be divided into different subtypes based on architectural features and growth patterns, recognized during a histopathological examination. Tumor microenvironment (TME) is the cellular environment in which tumor cells develop. Being composed of various cell types having different biological roles, TME is recognized as playing an important role in the progression of the disease. The architectural heterogeneity in breast carcinomas and the spatial interactions with TME are, to date, not well understood. Developing a spatial model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with TME can advance our understanding of tumor heterogeneity. Furthermore, generating histological synthetic datasets can contribute to validating, and comparing analytical methods that are used in digital pathology. In this work, we propose a modeling method that applies to different breast carcinoma subtypes and TME spatial distributions based on mathematical morphology. The model is based on a few morphological parameters that give access to a large spectrum of breast tumor architectures and are able to differentiate in-situ ductal carcinomas (DCIS) and histological subtypes of invasive carcinomas such as ductal (IDC) and lobular carcinoma (ILC). In addition, a part of the parameters of the model controls the spatial distribution of TME relative to the tumor. The validation of the model has been performed by comparing morphological features between real and simulated images.

  17. Preoperative predictive factors for gastrointestinal stromal tumors: analysis of 375 surgically resected gastric subepithelial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yang Won; Park, Ha Na; Min, Byung-Hoon; Choi, Dongil; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kim, Sung

    2015-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and non-GIST subepithelial tumors (SETs) account for about 75 and 25% of gastric hypoechoic SETs ≥2 cm, respectively. Therefore, identifying preoperative predictive factors for GISTs are required to refine surgical indications. We performed a retrospective review of 375 surgically resected gastric hypoechoic SETs ≥2 cm. Demographic data and tumor characteristics based on upper endoscopy and CT findings were compared between GIST and non-GIST SETs originating from muscularis propria layer (leiomyomas, Schwannomas, glomus tumors, and ectopic pancreas). In cardia, leiomyomas were found twice more frequently than GISTs (63.6 versus 31.8%). Perilesional lymph node enlargement (PLNE) was found only in patients with GIST or Schwannomas. Patients with GIST showed a significantly lower rate of PLNE than those with Schwannomas (3.5 versus 29.0%). In multivariate analysis, tumor site outside cardia (odds ratio, 9.157), absence of PLNE (odds ratio, 11.519), old age, large tumor size, exophytic growth pattern, and ulceration or dimpling were identified as independent preoperative predictive factors for GISTs versus non-GIST SETs. The effort for preoperative pathologic diagnosis such as endosonography-guided tissue sampling might be positively considered for SETs at cardia and SETs with PLNE where the possibility of GIST is low.

  18. Carcinoid tumor of the kidney: An unusual renal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P P Singh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoid tumors are low-grade malignant tumors that arise from neuroendocrine cells. Primary renal carcinoid is extremely rare. We present a case of 57-year-old male with primary renal carcinoid tumor. Presently, the patient is on regular follow up and is doing well.

  19. A seventeenth century mandibular tumor in a North American Indian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelln, E.E.; McMichael, E.V.; Zimmermann, B.

    1967-01-01

    The oldest tumor so far recorded is believed to have been a hemangioma. It occurred in a bone of a dinosaur’s tail1 and thus considerably antedates the historical period. The oldest known human tumor is much younger, dating back only to the middle of the third century after Christ.1 It was found in the catacombs of Kom el Shougafa in Alexandria, Egypt. This bony tumor (believed to be an osteosarcoma) occurred in the ischium and lower part of the ilium of a pelvic bone. Mention also should be made of a sixteenth century Danish skeleton from Noestried, which had 134 osteomas, and the Bovidal skull, in which there was a sinus osteoma weighing over 12 pounds.2Tumorlike lesions were obviously a problem in Egypt and Assyria, as dissecting instruments and instructions for tumor removal have been found.3 Paleopathologic studies have not yet disclosed bony tumors which occurred in these periods when vigorous embalming techniques were in vogue, and it is possible that only soft-tissue tumors were of concern. Such soft-tissue tumors, of course, would not survive to the present day, and relative accounts of prehistoric neoplasms must be largely based on intraosseus or calcified tumors. Roentgenographic bone patterns, correlated with size, site, age, etc., have led archaeologists and paleopathologists to believe that most surviving ossified tumors are osteomas and osteosarcomas.4

  20. Large ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    This essay presents an alternative to the traditional view that ethics means judging individual behavior against standards of right and wrong. Instead, ethics is understood as creating ethical communities through the promises we make to each other. The "aim" of ethics is to demonstrate in our own behavior a credible willingness to work to create a mutually better world. The "game" of ethics then becomes searching for strategies that overlap with others' strategies so that we are all better for intending to act on a basis of reciprocal trust. This is a difficult process because we have partial, simultaneous, shifting, and inconsistent views of the world. But despite the reality that we each "frame" ethics in personal terms, it is still possible to create sufficient common understanding to prosper together. Large ethics does not make it a prerequisite for moral behavior that everyone adheres to a universally agreed set of ethical principles; all that is necessary is sufficient overlap in commitment to searching for better alternatives.

  1. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davies, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  2. Targeting Therapy Resistant Tumor Vessels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2007-01-01

    .... To achieve this, we have developed tumor models for vascular normalization and are using in vivo phage display and isolation of peptides that specifically home to normalized tumor vessels resistant...

  3. Targeting Therapy Resistant Tumor Vessels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2008-01-01

    .... To achieve this, we have developed tumor models for vascular normalization and are using in vivo phage display and isolation of peptides that specifically home to normalized tumor vessels resistant...

  4. Living with a Brain Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Act Living with a Brain Tumor Understanding Emotions Talking About Your Brain Tumor Involving Family and Friends Returning To Work Physical Intimacy Health Insurance Options Financial & Medical Assistance ...

  5. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davies, Karen

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  6. Neurogenic tumors of the stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneton, J.N.; Drouillard, J.; Roux, P.; Ettore, F.; Lecomte, P.

    1983-08-01

    The general and radiologic features of neurogenic tumors of the stomach are reviewed in connection with 18 cases (16 benign and 2 maglignant tumors). Such neurogenic tumors are rare in the stomach, representing less than 0.5% of all tumors. Solitary neurogenic tumors must be differentiated from those encountered during von Recklinghausen's disease. Radiological or endoscopic examination can generally determine the benign or malignant nature of solitary neurogenic tumors, which are essentially represented by schwannomas. Since these tumors are submucosal, a deep biopsy is imperative; furthermore, since such tumors are subject to hemorrhage, prior investigation by CT appears advisable to detect possible hypervascularization after injection of contrast material. For patients with von Recklinghausen's disease, a neurofibroma is usually diagnosed when faced with a digestive hemorrhage. Radiological exploration of the entire digestive tract appears essential to confirm the solitary nature of the gastric lesion and to be sure it is responsible for the clinical symptoms.

  7. Tumor Biology and Microenvironment Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research in this area seeks to understand the role of tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME) in driving cancer initiation, progression, maintenance and recurrence.

  8. Applying unmixing to gene expression data for tumor phylogeny inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shackney Stanley E

    2010-01-01

    methods provide a way to make use of both intra-tumor heterogeneity and large probe sets for tumor phylogeny inference, establishing a new avenue towards the construction of detailed, accurate portraits of common tumor sub-types and the mechanisms by which they develop. These reconstructions are likely to have future value in discovering and diagnosing novel cancer sub-types and in identifying targets for therapeutic development.

  9. Jugular foramen tumors: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramina, Ricardo; Maniglia, Joao Jarney; Fernandes, Yvens Barbosa; Paschoal, Jorge Rizzato; Pfeilsticker, Leopoldo Nizan; Neto, Mauricio Coelho; Borges, Guilherme

    2004-08-15

    %) experienced postoperative CSF leakage, and four (4.2%) died after surgery. Two of them died of aspiration pneumonia complicated with septicemia. Of the remaining two, one died of pulmonary embolism and the other of cerebral hypoxia caused by a large cervical hematoma that led to tracheal deviation. Paragangliomas are the most common tumors of the jugular foramen region. Surgical management of jugular foramen tumors is complex and difficult. Radical removal of benign jugular foramen tumors is the treatment of choice, may be curative, and is achieved with low mortality and morbidity rates. Larger lesions can be radically excised in one surgical procedure by using a multidisciplinary approach. Reconstruction of the skull base with vascularized myofascial flaps reduces postoperative CSF leaks. Postoperative lower cranial nerves deficits are the most dangerous complication.

  10. Photodynamic Treatment of Tumor with Bacteria Expressing KillerRed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Libo; Kanada, Masamitsu; Zhang, Jinyan; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality in which a photosensitizing dye is administered and exposed to light to kill tumor cells via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A fundamental obstacle for PDT is the low specificity for staining solid tumors with dyes. Recently, a tumor targeting system guided by anaerobic bacteria was proposed for tumor imaging and treatment. Here, we explore the feasibility of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed, which is expressed in Escherichia coli, to treat tumors. Using nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), we detected a lengthy ROS diffusion from the bodies of KillerRed-expressing bacteria in vitro, which demonstrated the feasibility of using bacteria to eradicate cells in their surroundings. In nude mice, Escherichia coli (E. coli) expressing KillerRed (KR-E. coli) were subcutaneously injected into xenografts comprising CNE2 cells, a human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line, and HeLa cells, a human cervical carcinoma cell line. KR-E. coli seemed to proliferate rapidly in the tumors as observed under an imaging system. When the intensity of fluorescence increased and the fluorescent area became as large as the tumor one day after KR-E. coli injection, the KR-E. coli-bearing tumor was irradiated with an orange light (λ = 540-580 nm). In all cases, the tumors became necrotic the next day and were completely eliminated in a few days. No necrosis was observed after the irradiation of tumors injected with a vehicle solution or a vehicle carrying the E. coli without KillerRed. In successfully treated mice, no tumor recurrence was observed for more than two months. E. coli genetically engineered for KillerRed expression are highly promising for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors when the use of bacteria in patients is cleared for infection safety.

  11. Photodynamic Treatment of Tumor with Bacteria Expressing KillerRed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Yan

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a cancer treatment modality in which a photosensitizing dye is administered and exposed to light to kill tumor cells via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. A fundamental obstacle for PDT is the low specificity for staining solid tumors with dyes. Recently, a tumor targeting system guided by anaerobic bacteria was proposed for tumor imaging and treatment. Here, we explore the feasibility of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed, which is expressed in Escherichia coli, to treat tumors. Using nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT, we detected a lengthy ROS diffusion from the bodies of KillerRed-expressing bacteria in vitro, which demonstrated the feasibility of using bacteria to eradicate cells in their surroundings. In nude mice, Escherichia coli (E. coli expressing KillerRed (KR-E. coli were subcutaneously injected into xenografts comprising CNE2 cells, a human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line, and HeLa cells, a human cervical carcinoma cell line. KR-E. coli seemed to proliferate rapidly in the tumors as observed under an imaging system. When the intensity of fluorescence increased and the fluorescent area became as large as the tumor one day after KR-E. coli injection, the KR-E. coli-bearing tumor was irradiated with an orange light (λ = 540-580 nm. In all cases, the tumors became necrotic the next day and were completely eliminated in a few days. No necrosis was observed after the irradiation of tumors injected with a vehicle solution or a vehicle carrying the E. coli without KillerRed. In successfully treated mice, no tumor recurrence was observed for more than two months. E. coli genetically engineered for KillerRed expression are highly promising for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors when the use of bacteria in patients is cleared for infection safety.

  12. Bednar Tumor: An Uncommon Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonkar, Gayathri P; Rupani, Asha; Shah, Ajay; Deshpande, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Bednar tumor is an uncommon variant of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Also known as pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, this tumor is of intermediate grade. It is seen in adults and has a predisposition to affect the shoulder region. We report a rare case of Bednar tumor in a 40-year-old female patient. The diagnosis of Bednar tumor must be considered while reporting pigmented subcutaneous spindle cell lesions.

  13. Anti-Tumor Effect of Steamed Codonopsis lanceolata in H22 Tumor-Bearing Mice and Its Possible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although previous studies confirmed that steaming and the fermentation process could significantly improve the cognitive-enhancement and neuroprotective effects of Codonopsis lanceolata, the anti-tumor efficacy of steamed C. lanceolata (SCL and what mechanisms are involved remain largely unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-tumor effect in vivo of SCL in H22 tumor-bearing mice. The results clearly indicated that SCL could not only inhibit the tumor growth, but also prolong the survival time of H22 tumor-bearing mice. Besides, the serum levels of cytokines, such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-2 (IL-2, were enhanced by SCL administration. The observations of Hoechst 33258 staining demonstrated that SCL was able to induce tumor cell apoptosis. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that SCL treatment significantly increased Bax expression and decreased Bcl-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression of H22 tumor tissues in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, LC/MS analysis of SCL indicated that it mainly contained lobetyolin and six saponins. Taken all together, the findings in the present study clearly demonstrated that SCL inhibited the H22 tumor growth in vivo at least partly via improving the immune functions, inducing apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis.

  14. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wende; Huang, Peigen; Chen, David J.; Gerweck, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs −/− ) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD 50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  15. Parallel evolution of tumor subclones mimics diversity between tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco

    2013-01-01

    are not present ubiquitously in late stage ccRCC and are likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumor progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumors may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations...... and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumors reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumor sampling bias and impact upon tumor progression and clinical outcome....

  16. Parasellar dermoid tumor with intra-tumoral hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamata, H.; Yanagimachi, N.; Matsuyama, S. [Department of Radiology I, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Matsumae, M.; Takamiya, Y.; Tsugane, R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    We report a case of parasellar dermoid tumor with intra-tumoral hemorrhage. It is rare for a dermoid tumor that hemorrhage was detected as high attenuation on the initial CT. In the present case, the tumor content included a little fat component and mostly cholesterin-rich fluid which resulted in extremely low signal intensity on T2-weighted and high signal on T1-weighted MR images. In addition to this, hemosiderin accumulation in the tumor could be the reason for low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. (orig.) With 3 figs., 19 refs.

  17. Nonodontogenic Tumors of the Jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyalram, Donita; Aslam-Pervez, Nawaf; Lubek, Joshua E

    2016-02-01

    Nonodontogenic tumors of the jaws are common in the pediatric population, accounting for approximately 70% of pediatric jaw tumors. This article focuses on the clinical characteristics and management of the benign nonodontogenic tumors (nonaggressive and aggressive) of the jaws most commonly encountered in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, J.M.; Caceres, J.; Prat, J.; Lopez, J.I.; Velilla, O.

    1991-01-01

    In 1975 Dail and Liebow described the clinical and pathological characteristics of a pulmonary tumor which they dominated intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor (IVBAT). Our aim is to acquaint radiologists with the existence of this tumor by describing the radiologic findings in 2 patients with IVBAT, 1 with hepatic involvement ant the other with pulmonary osteoarthropathy. (author). 7 refs.; 2 figs

  19. Tumor uptake of radioruthenium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.; Meinken, G.E.; Larson, S.M.; Grunbaum, Z.

    1980-01-01

    The use of ruthenium-97 as a scintigraphic agent, particularly for tumor localization, is investigated. The tumor uptake of ruthenium chloride and ruthenium-labelled transferrin is evaluated and their application as tumor-imagine agents is compared to gallium-67 citrate

  20. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch s...

  1. Pituitary tumors containing cholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F; Lindholm, J; Andersen, B N

    1987-01-01

    We found small amounts of cholecystokinin in the normal human adenohypophysis and therefore examined pituitary tumors from 87 patients with acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome, prolactinoma, or inactive pituitary adenomas. Five adenomas associated with Nelson's syndrome contained...... increased amounts of cholecystokinin, the concentrations being extremely high in two: 8281 and 13,453 pmol per gram as compared with less than 30 pmol per gram in normal pituitary glands. The cholecystokinin concentrations were moderately increased in adenomas from another 12 patients, of whom 5 had Cushing......'s disease and 7 acromegaly with adenomas containing ACTH. The cholecystokinin peptides from the tumors were smaller and less sulfated than cholecystokinin from normal pituitary glands. We conclude that ACTH-producing pituitary cells may also produce an altered form of cholecystokinin....

  2. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  3. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Palaskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is an uncommon lesion of unknown cause. It encompasses a spectrum of myofibroblastic proliferation along with varying amount of inflammatory infiltrate. A number of terms have been applied to the lesion, namely, inflammatory pseudotumor, fibrous xanthoma, plasma cell granuloma, pseudosarcoma, lymphoid hamartoma, myxoid hamartoma, inflammatory myofibrohistiocytic proliferation, benign myofibroblatoma, and most recently, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The diverse nomenclature is mostly descriptive and reflects the uncertainty regarding true biologic nature of these lesions. Recently, the concept of this lesion being reactive has been challenged based on the clinical demonstration of recurrences and metastasis and cytogenetic evidence of acquired clonal chromosomal abnormalities. We hereby report a case of inflammatory pseudotumor and review its inflammatory versus neoplastic behavior.

  4. Human brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindel, W.; Luyten, P.R.; Herholz, K.; Marien, J.H.; Kugel, H.; Bunke, J.; Heiss, W.D.; Hollander, J.A. den.

    1990-01-01

    It has been postulated that malignant tumors show increased anaerobic glycolysis. Areas of increased glycolysis could be identified by detection of increased glucose uptake and lactate production. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the most active parts in human brain tumors can be localized by correlating findings of proton (H-1) spectroscopic imaging and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Localized H-1 MR spectroscopy was performed with a clinical 1.5-T whole-body MR system. In 15 patients with CH-1 gliomas, the spatial distribution of choline-containing compounds, creatine, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), and lactate was displayed as spectroscopic images. Those metabolite maps were correlated with conventional MR images and, in five cases, with corresponding PET sections

  5. Tumors of the mediastinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwe, Beau V; Sterman, Daniel H; Musani, Ali I

    2005-10-01

    Tumors of the mediastinum represent a wide diversity of disease states. The location and composition of a mass is critical to narrowing the differential diagnosis. The most common causes of an anterior mediastinal mass include the following: thymoma; teratoma; thyroid disease; and lymphoma. Masses of the middle mediastinum are typically congenital cysts, including foregut and pericardial cysts, while those that arise in the posterior mediastinum are often neurogenic tumors. The clinical sequelae of mediastinal masses can range from being asymptomatic to producing symptoms of cough, chest pain, and dyspnea. This article will review the anatomy of the mediastinum as well as the different clinical, radiographic, and prognostic features, and therapeutic options of the most commonly encountered masses.

  6. CT findings of parotid gland tumors: benign versus malignant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moon Ok; Han, Chun Hwan; Kim, Mie Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Kyung Joo; Lee, Joo Hyuk [Kang Nam General Hospital, Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeung Sook [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of parotid gland tumors to help in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. The CT findings of 22 patients with surgically proven parotid gland tumors were reviewed. Analysis was focused on the density and margin characteristics of the tumors, and the relationship between the tumor and surrounding structures. Those tumors were pleomorphic adenoma (n = 8), Warthin's tumor (n = 5), basal cell adenoma (n = 1), lipoma (n = 1), dermoid cyst (n = 1), adenoid cystic carcinoma (n = 2), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (n 1), epidermoid carcinoma (n = 1), and carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma (n 1). Most of benign and malignant tumors were heterogeneous in density on contrast enhanced CT scans. In 5 of 6 malignant cases, the tumors had irregular or ill-defined margin and a tendancy to involve or cross the superficial layer of deep cervical fascia with obliteration of subcutaneous fat. Two malignant tumors invaded surrounding structures. Although the heterogeneous density of tumor is not a specific finding for malignancy at CT, following findings, such as, irregular or blurred margin of the lesion, the involvement of fascial plane, and the infiltration of surrounding structures may suggest the possibility of malignant parotid tumor.

  7. Combined tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrba, H.

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive survey of current methods and achievements first takes a look at the two basic therapies, devoting a chapter each to the surgery and radiotherapy of tumors. The principal subjects of the book, however, are the systemic, adjuvant therapy, biological therapies, hyperthermia and various other therapies (as e.g. treatment with ozone, oxygen, or homeopathic means), and psychotherapy. (MG) With 54 figs., 86 tabs [de

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals and tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, A.N.; Atkins, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    A number of radiopharmaceuticals are evaluated as to their usefulness for the reliable localization of malignant tumors by radioisotope scanning. Compounds discussed include 75 Se-selenomethionine, 32 P-phosphate, /sup 99m/Tc-phosphate, 67 Ga-citrate, and 111 In-bleomycin. It is pointed out that no ideal agent has yet been found and that considerable difficulties exist in comparing one clinical series with another

  9. TRUS Findings of Prostate Tumor or Tumor Like Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Jong; Jang, Jung Min; Kim, Seung Hyup [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    Tumors or tumor-like lesions in the prostate raise questions concerning their histogenesis and they may have prognoses dissimilar to those of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Several neoplasms involving the prostate have been described and characterized in recent years. In addition to adenocarcinoma, they include mucinous cyst adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine cancer, lymphoma, spindle cell neoplasm, squamous cell carcinoma, transitional cell carcinoma, and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) mimicking malignancy. In addition, infectious conditions such as tuberculosis and some stages of prostatic abscess can also mimic prostate tumors. Radiologic findings overlap and have limited roles in the diagnoses of these entities. However, knowledge of these variable tumors and tumor-like conditions is helpful when making accurate radiologic diagnoses, which have important clinical implications for treatment and prognosis. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and available pathologic images of unusual tumors and tumor- like lesions are demonstrated in this article

  10. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Mankad MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001–0.03% in most autopsy series. They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1 thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2 cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3 primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  11. Neuroendocrine Tumor, diagnostic difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Oliveira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH secretion is a rare disease. A 51 years old woman, with a Cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion, diagnosed in 2009, with mediastinal lymphadenopathy, whose biopsy was compatible with lung small cell carcinoma, staged as IIIB using TNM classification. No other lesions were found in patient study. The patient was submitted to chemotherapy, associated to ketoconazole 200 mg twice daily, with partial remission of both conditions. Three years later was admitted with an aggravation of Cushing syndrome. There was no evidence of progression of pulmonary disease. A cystic lesion in the pancreatic uncinated process was found by abdominal CT scan and with avid uptake by DOTANOC PET discreet in anterior mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of pancreatic mass revealed a neuroendocrine tumor. Pulmonary masses were biopsied again and was in favor of neuroendocrine tumor. It was assumed the diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with mediastinal metastasis. The patient initiated lanreotid (120 mg, monthly, subcutaneous in association with ketoconazole. After 5 months of therapy, patient died with sepsis secondary to pneumonia. Neuroendocrine tumours are rare, difficult to diagnose and with poor prognosis when associated with ectopic ACTH secreting Cushing syndrome.

  12. Mouse Leydig Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Syong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is a natural pure compound extracted from Cordyceps sinensis (CS. We have demonstrated that CS stimulates steroidogenesis in primary mouse Leydig cell and activates apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. It is highly possible that cordycepin is the main component in CS modulating Leydig cell functions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the steroidogenic and apoptotic effects with potential mechanism of cordycepin on MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. Results showed that cordycepin significantly stimulated progesterone production in dose- and time-dependent manners. Adenosine receptor (AR subtype agonists were further used to treat MA-10 cells, showing that A1, A 2A , A 2B , and A3, AR agonists could stimulate progesterone production. However, StAR promoter activity and protein expression remained of no difference among all cordycepin treatments, suggesting that cordycepin might activate AR, but not stimulated StAR protein to regulate MA-10 cell steroidogenesis. Meanwhile, cordycepin could also induce apoptotic cell death in MA-10 cells. Moreover, four AR subtype agonists induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and four AR subtype antagonists could all rescue cell death under cordycepin treatment in MA-10 cells. In conclusion, cordycepin could activate adenosine subtype receptors and simultaneously induce steroidogenesis and apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  13. Wilms′ tumor: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant B Tongaonkar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilms′ tumor (WT is the commonest pediatric renal tumor, predominantly seen in children less than five years of age. The majority of patients present with an abdominal lump and CT scan is the usual imaging modality for determining the extent of disease. With multimodality management, the results of treatment of WT have improved dramatically over the last 50 years. The treatment protocols have been devised and modified repeatedly depending on evidence from randomized trials by several cooperative groups - mainly National Wilms′ Tumor Study Group (NWTSG and the International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP. The NWTSG recommends primary surgery followed by chemotherapy while SIOP advocates four weeks of chemotherapy prior to surgery. The regimen, dose and duration of chemotherapy have been repeatedly modified to reduce toxicity while maintaining efficacy. The role of radiation therapy has also been customized. Most centers have reported excellent survival rates with the modern day treatment protocols, except in patients with an unfavorable histology. The results of treatment of relapsed WT have also improved with newer drugs and combinations being used for the same.

  14. Radiation-induced transformation of SV40-immortalized human thyroid epithelial cells by single and fractionated exposure to γ-irradiation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riches, A.C.; Herceg, Z.; Bryant, P.E.; Wynford-Thomas, D.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation-induced transformation of a human thyroid epithelial cell line (HTori-3) has been investigated following exposure to single and fractionated doses of γ-irradiation. The human epithelial cells were irradiated in vitro and following passaging, transplanted to the athymic nude mouse. Following a single exposure to γ-irradiation in the range 0.5-4Gy, 22 tumours were observed in 45 recipients and following three equal fractions in the range 0.5-4Gy per fraction, 18 tumours were observed in 31 recipients. Tumours were undifferentiated carcinomas and were observed from 7 to 20 weeks after transplantation. They occurred after similar radiation doses to those received by the children in the Belarus region of Ukraine, who developed thyroid tumours. The number of tumours observed, in each group receiving cells irradiated with a single dose of γ-irradiation in the range 0.5-4 Gy, was similar. Cell lines were established from some tumours and the tumorigenicity confirmed by retransplantation. These tumour cell lines were more radiosensitive than the human thyroid epithelial cell line they were derived from. This indicates that transformed cells were not being selected from a subpopulation within the parent cell line but that radiation-induced transformants were being induced de novo. The human origin of the tumours was established by karyotyping, immunocytochemical demonstration of human epithelial cytokeratins and p53 analysis. DNA fingerprinting confirmed that the tumours were derived from the original cell line. (author)

  15. Pilocytic astrocytoma: A rare presentation as intraventricular tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Sidra; Akhunzada, Naveed Z.; Javed, Gohar; Uddin, Zeeshan; Khan, Yasir A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most prevalent central nervous system (CNS) tumor in pediatric population and accounts for an approximate of 5–6% of all gliomas. This neoplasm can occur at all levels of the neuraxis, with majority (67%) arising in the cerebellum and optic pathway. PAs are World Health Organization Grade I tumors and are the most benign of all astrocytomas characterized by an excellent prognosis. Other differentials include subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA), ependymoma, meningioma, and low-grade gliomas such as pilocytic or diffuse astrocytoma; calcification is more commonly regarded as a feature of benign or slow-growing tumors. Case Description: We present a case of a 17-year-old female presenting with an unusual cause of hydrocephalus, a rare case of a calcified pilocytic astrocytoma as an intraventricular tumor. Conclusion: PA rarely presents as an intraventricular tumor and should be included in the differential diagnosis of a large mass with massive intratumoral calcification. PMID:28680735

  16. Air pollution from traffic and risk for brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Sørensen, Mette; Andersen, Zorana J

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Air pollution is an established lung carcinogen, and there is increasing evidence that air pollution also negatively affects the brain. We have previously reported an association between air pollution and risk of brain tumors in a cohort study based on only 95 cases. We set out...... to replicate that finding in a large nationwide case-control study. METHODS: We identified all 4,183 adult brain tumor cases in Denmark in the years 2000-2009 and 8,018 risk set sampled population controls matched on gender and year of birth. We extracted residential address histories and estimated mean...... and risk of brain tumors which was found in our previous study. The suggestion of an increased brain tumor risk at high exposures merits further attention as does the differing results according to tumor morphology....

  17. Microvascular changes in AT17-tumors of mouse during radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Seidl, S

    2000-01-01

    responsible for rising permeability, which contradicts the former hypothesis of leaky vessels caused by apoptosis. Large radiation doses damage tumor cells and blood vessels and cause growth reduction and regression. Tumors exceeding in size 1-2 mm require nutrition by blood vessels for tumor survival. We aimed to record changes in architecture, structure and function of tumor vascularisation after radiation. 12 AT17-mammary-adenocarcinomas of mouse were examined before and immediately after fractionated radiotherapy total dose 42 or 78 Gray. Double intravital perfusion (20 min interval) with fluorochrome-conjugated lectin (HPA-TRITC, HPA-FITC) was used to mark all perfused vessels. Cryostat sections of the tumors were viewed by a laser-scanning-microscope and 2-channel-images shown as mismatch-mosaics. Due to this technique, with labeling lasting 4 hours, it was possible to confirm intermittent perfusion, describe complete microvessel architecture and make statements about endothelial cell function. After 42...

  18. A solitary fibrous tumor of the retroperitoneum: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Lee, Dong Keun; Cho, Baek Hwan [Chonbuk National Univ. College of Medicine, Chunju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Hyun Young [Euljy Mecical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    The solitary fibrous tumor is a rare spindle cell neoplasm of mesodermal origin. It usually arises in the pleura, though has recently been reported in the peritoneum and at nonserosal sites ; it is, however, extremely rare in the retroperitonum. The authors describe one case of a solitary fibrous tumor that occurred as a huge complex mass in the retroperitoneum of an adult. Preenhanced CT scans showed that the mass was sharply delineated from surrounding organs and that tumor density was the same as that of surrounding musculature. Peripheral Calcifications were noted, and postenhanced scans showed intense, gradual enhancement of solid portions of the mass, with nonenhanced cystic portions. Although not specific, solitary fibrous tumors must be included in the differential diagnosis of a large retroperitoneal tumor of complex consistency and with internal calcification.

  19. Congenital peribronchial myofibroblastic tumor: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Jedrzkiewicz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital peribronchial myofibroblastic tumor (CPMT is a rare entity recognized in the WHO classification of pulmonary neoplasms. According to available literature, it is a benign tumor with a high mortality rate exceeding 50%. It is partially attributed to polyhydramnios, hydrops, prematurity, respiratory distress or adverse surgical outcomes due to intraoperative bleeding. Herein we present a case of congenital peribronchial myofibroblastic tumor in a premature male infant who was born at 31 weeks gestation due to polyhydramnios and premature rupture of membranes. Soon after birth, he required intubation due to worsening respiratory distress. Imaging demonstrated a large right chest mass causing mediastinal shift. Surgical intervention was attempted, which was challenging due to intraoperative bleeding and tumor retraction. The patient expired soon after the surgery. Hence, in this report we would like to share our experience with this difficult diagnosis and treatment of this rare tumor.

  20. Mediastinal germ cell tumors: a radiologic-pathologic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelegas, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Aristoteles Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Palladas, P. [Dept. of Radiology, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Scordalaki, A. [Dept. of Pathology, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2001-10-01

    Germ cell tumors of the mediastinum are histologically identical to those found in the testes and ovaries. Early diagnosis and treatment improve the survival rate. Imaging studies of teratoma demonstrate a rounded, often lobulated heterogeneous mass containing soft tissue elements with fluid and fat attenuation. Calcification is present in 20-43% of cases. Seminomas are large masses of homogeneous soft tissue attenuation. Malignant nonseminomatous germ cell tumors are heterogeneous tumors with irregular borders due to invasion of adjacent structures. CT shows the location and extent of the tumors as well as intrinsic elements including soft tissue, fat, fluid, and calcification. CT is the modality of choice for the diagnostic evaluation of these tumors. MRI reveals masses of heterogeneous signal intensity, is more sensitive in depicting infiltration of the adjacent structures by fat plane obliteration, and is performed as an ancillary study. (orig.)

  1. MR findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity, with emphasis on tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi; Saida, Tsukasa Sasaki; Minami, Rie; Yagi, Takako; Tsunoda, Hajime; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Minami, Manabu

    2007-01-01

    Sex cord-stromal tumors including granulosa cell tumor, thecoma, Sertoli stromal cell tumor and steroid cell tumor are noted for their hormonal activity. However, there are many kinds of ovarian tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors and tumor-like conditions with endocrine manifestations. Cross-sectional imaging, especially MR, can provide precise features of ovarian tumors and uterine morphological change even in a clinically latent excess of estrogen. In this article, we demonstrate typical imaging findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity. We also shortly explain the mechanism of the virilization and hyperestrogenism caused by ovarian tumors and tumor-like conditions

  2. Tumor regression patterns in retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, S.N.; Siddique, S.N.; Zaheer, N.

    2016-01-01

    To observe the types of tumor regression after treatment, and identify the common pattern of regression in our patients. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from October 2011 to October 2014. Methodology: Children with unilateral and bilateral retinoblastoma were included in the study. Patients were referred to Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, for chemotherapy. After every cycle of chemotherapy, dilated funds examination under anesthesia was performed to record response of the treatment. Regression patterns were recorded on RetCam II. Results: Seventy-four tumors were included in the study. Out of 74 tumors, 3 were ICRB group A tumors, 43 were ICRB group B tumors, 14 tumors belonged to ICRB group C, and remaining 14 were ICRB group D tumors. Type IV regression was seen in 39.1% (n=29) tumors, type II in 29.7% (n=22), type III in 25.6% (n=19), and type I in 5.4% (n=4). All group A tumors (100%) showed type IV regression. Seventeen (39.5%) group B tumors showed type IV regression. In group C, 5 tumors (35.7%) showed type II regression and 5 tumors (35.7%) showed type IV regression. In group D, 6 tumors (42.9%) regressed to type II non-calcified remnants. Conclusion: The response and success of the focal and systemic treatment, as judged by the appearance of different patterns of tumor regression, varies with the ICRB grouping of the tumor. (author)

  3. Early imaging findings in germ cell tumors arising from the basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Mi [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In-One; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun-Hae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Woman' s University Mokdong Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); You, Sun Kyoung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chungnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is difficult to diagnosis early stage germ cell tumors originating in the basal ganglia, but early recognition is important for better outcome. To evaluate serial MR images of basal ganglia germ cell tumors, with emphasis on the features of early stage tumors. We retrospectively reviewed serial MR images of 15 tumors in 14 children and young adults. We categorized MR images of the tumors as follows: type I, ill-defined patchy lesions (<3 cm) without cyst; type II, small mass lesions (<3 cm) with cyst; and type III, large lesions (≥3 cm) with cyst. We also assessed temporal changes of the MR images. On the initial images, 8 of 11 (73%) type I tumors progressed to types II or III, and 3 of 4 (75%) type II tumors progressed to type III. The remaining 4 tumors did not change in type. All type II tumors (5/5, 100%) that changed from type I had a few tiny cysts. Intratumoral hemorrhage was observed even in the type I tumor. Ipsilateral hemiatrophy was observed in most of the tumors (13/15, 87%) on initial MR images. As tumors grew, cystic changes, intratumoral hemorrhage, and ipsilateral hemiatrophy became more apparent. Early stage basal ganglia germ cell tumors appear as ill-defined small patchy hyperintense lesions without cysts on T2-weighted images, are frequently associated with ipsilateral hemiatrophy, and sometimes show microhemorrhage. Tumors develop tiny cysts at a relatively early stage. (orig.)

  4. Early imaging findings in germ cell tumors arising from the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, So Mi; Kim, In-One; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Cho, Hyun-Hae; You, Sun Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to diagnosis early stage germ cell tumors originating in the basal ganglia, but early recognition is important for better outcome. To evaluate serial MR images of basal ganglia germ cell tumors, with emphasis on the features of early stage tumors. We retrospectively reviewed serial MR images of 15 tumors in 14 children and young adults. We categorized MR images of the tumors as follows: type I, ill-defined patchy lesions (<3 cm) without cyst; type II, small mass lesions (<3 cm) with cyst; and type III, large lesions (≥3 cm) with cyst. We also assessed temporal changes of the MR images. On the initial images, 8 of 11 (73%) type I tumors progressed to types II or III, and 3 of 4 (75%) type II tumors progressed to type III. The remaining 4 tumors did not change in type. All type II tumors (5/5, 100%) that changed from type I had a few tiny cysts. Intratumoral hemorrhage was observed even in the type I tumor. Ipsilateral hemiatrophy was observed in most of the tumors (13/15, 87%) on initial MR images. As tumors grew, cystic changes, intratumoral hemorrhage, and ipsilateral hemiatrophy became more apparent. Early stage basal ganglia germ cell tumors appear as ill-defined small patchy hyperintense lesions without cysts on T2-weighted images, are frequently associated with ipsilateral hemiatrophy, and sometimes show microhemorrhage. Tumors develop tiny cysts at a relatively early stage. (orig.)

  5. Facilitating in vivo tumor localization by principal component analysis based on dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Chen, Maomao; Wu, Junyu; Zhou, Yuan; Cai, Chuangjian; Wang, Daliang; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging has been used to target tumors in mice with xenograft tumors. However, tumor imaging is largely distorted by the aggregation of fluorescent probes in the liver. A principal component analysis (PCA)-based strategy was applied on the in vivo dynamic fluorescence imaging results of three mice with xenograft tumors to facilitate tumor imaging, with the help of a tumor-specific fluorescent probe. Tumor-relevant features were extracted from the original images by PCA and represented by the principal component (PC) maps. The second principal component (PC2) map represented the tumor-related features, and the first principal component (PC1) map retained the original pharmacokinetic profiles, especially of the liver. The distribution patterns of the PC2 map of the tumor-bearing mice were in good agreement with the actual tumor location. The tumor-to-liver ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher on the PC2 map than on the original images, thus distinguishing the tumor from its nearby fluorescence noise of liver. The results suggest that the PC2 map could serve as a bioimaging marker to facilitate in vivo tumor localization, and dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging with PCA could be a valuable tool for future studies of in vivo tumor metabolism and progression.

  6. [Intraductal papillary mucinous pancreas tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maev, I V; Kaziulin, A N; Kucheriavyĭ, Iu A

    2008-01-01

    Data of the literature on the epidemiology, patogenesis, diagnosis, peculiarities of the symptoms and the treatment of the intraduct papillar pancreatic tumor, are analyzed in this review. These tumors are rare, there are up to 1% of the exocrine pancreatic tumors. Intraduct proliferation of the mucin producing cells, that are disposed as papillars is typical of these tumors. There are the symptoms of the acute or chronic pancreatitis, sometimes the diagnosis of this tumor is accidental. The main diagnostic methods are ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT). Endoluminal ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) are the main methods to reveal the intraduct growth. The surgical treatment is necessary for these patients.

  7. Intracranial schwannoma presenting as a subfrontal tumor: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P P; Zagzag, D; Benjamin, V

    1997-01-01

    Intracerebral schwannomas not associated with cranial nerves account for less than 1% of surgically treated schwannomas of the central and peripheral nervous system. Subfrontal schwannomas are extremely rare, with only 15 cases reported to date. A 33-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of progressive headaches and lethargy. Radiographic studies revealed a large subfrontal tumor thought to be a meningioma preoperatively. The patient underwent a craniotomy for resection of his tumor. Intraoperatively, a large extra-axial tumor arising from the floor of the left frontal fossa was encountered. Microscopic examination of the tumor revealed a schwannoma. Several theories on the possible origin of intracerebral schwannomas have been considered. Because of the age of the patient at presentation, many authors have postulated a developmental origin for these lesions. However, extra-axial schwannomas not associated with cranial nerves often present later in life, suggesting a different pathogenesis for this subgroup.

  8. NMR characterization of pituitary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osbakken, M.; Gonzales, J.; Page, R.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve patients (5 male, 7 female, mean age 37.9 +- 20) with pituitary tumors were extensively evaluated with NMR imaging using a 1.5K gauss resistive magnet. Saturation recovery (SR), inversion recovery (IR) and spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used for qualitative characterization of the lesions. T/sub 1/ calculations were also performed for brain and pituitary. Tumor histology and endocrine status were correlated with NMR data. All tumors were large with suprasellar extension (6 with prolactin secretion, 6 without). Pituitary T/sub 1/'s ranged from .2 to .64, the mean T/sub 1/ being longer than that of brain (Brain = .4 +- .04; Pit = .48 +- .14). 3 patients with histological evidence of homogeneous adenomas had long T/sub 1/'s (0.58 +- .05). 3 patients with evidence of recent or old hemorhage into the pituitary had much shorter T/sub 1/'s (0.29 +- .12). There was no relationship between prolactin secretion and T/sub 1/. Qualitative T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ information can be obtained by using a combination of SR, IR, and SE images. Using this method in the patients, homogeneous adenomas had similar T/sub 1/'s and longer T/sub 2/'s compared to the brain, while patients with bleeds had shorter T/sub 1/'s and T/sub 2/'s. Image T/sub 1/ characteristics correlated well with the calculated T/sub 1/ values. The range of T/sub 1/ (and potentially T/sub 2/) values which occur in apparently similar lesions are most likely due to anatomical and pathophysiological variations in these lesions. It may be ultimately possible to separate different types of pathological processes based on NMR image T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ characteristics after careful comparative studies of NMR and histological data are completed. The combination of calculated T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ with image T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ information may also be useful in further characterization of lesions

  9. CT diagnosis of mediastinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Dadong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of CT for diagnosing the mediastinal tumors, in order to improve the accuracy of the diagnosis on mediastinal tumor. Methods: 16 cases of mediastinal tumors proved by surgery or pathology were analyzed retrospectively. Results: There were 6 cases of thymoma, 3 of intrathoracic thyroid, 2 of bronchial cyst, 2 of malignant lymphoma, 2 of neurogenic tumor, and 1 of teratoma. The accuracy rate of CT localization and CT diagnosis were 100% and 93.75% respectively. Conclusion: CT examination is one of the most effective ways in diagnosing mediastinal tumor. According to the mediastinal tumor location, imaging features with proper examining method, closely combing the clinical data and lab examination, generally, mediastinal tumors can be diagnosed accurately. (authors)

  10. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  11. Genetic instability in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raptis, Stavroula; Bapat, Bharati

    2006-01-01

    Genetic, or genomic, instability refers to a series of observed spontaneous genetic changes occurring at an accelerated rate in cell populations derived from the same ancestral precursor. This is far from a new finding, but is one that has increasingly gained more attention in the last decade due to its plausible role(s) in tumorigenesis. The majority of genetic alterations contributing to the malignant transformation are seen in growth regulatory genes, and in genes involved in cell cycle progression and arrest. Genomic instability may present itself through alterations in the length of short repeat stretches of coding and non-coding DNA, resulting in microsatellite instability. Tumors with such profiles are referred to as exhibiting a mutator phenotype, which is largely a consequence of inactivating mutations in DNA damage repair genes. Genomic instability may also, and most commonly, results from gross chromosomal changes, such as translocations or amplifications, which lead to chromosomal instability. Telomere length and telomerase activity, important in maintaining chromosomal structure and in regulating a normal cell's lifespan, have been shown to have a function in both suppressing and facilitating malignant transformation. In addition to such direct sequence and structural changes, gene silencing through the hypermethylation of promoter regions, or increased gene expression through the hypomethylation of such regions, together, form an alternative, epigenetic mechanism leading to instability. Emerging evidence also suggests that dietary and environmental agents can further modulate the contribution of genetic instability to tumorigenesis. Currently, there is still much debate over the distinct classes of genomic instability and their specific roles in the initiation of tumor formation, as well as in the progressive transition to a cancerous state. This review examines the various molecular mechanisms that result in this genomic instability and the potential

  12. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  13. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents.

  14. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents. PMID:29311946

  15. Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors: challenges and search for solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Ahitagni; Kashyap, Lakhan; Kakkar, Aanchal; Sarkar, Chitra; Julka, Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) is a highly malignant embryonal central nervous system tumor commonly affecting children <3 years of age. It roughly constitutes 1%–2% of all pediatric central nervous system tumors. Recent data show that it is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor in children <6 months of age. Management of this aggressive tumor is associated with a myriad of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. On the basis of radiology and histopathology alone, distinction of AT/RT from medulloblastoma or primitive neuroectodermal tumor is difficult, and hence this tumor has been commonly misdiagnosed as primitive neuroectodermal tumor for decades. Presence of a bulky heterogeneous solid-cystic mass with readily visible calcification and intratumor hemorrhage, occurring off-midline in children <3 years of age, should alert the radiologist toward the possibility of AT/RT. Presence of rhabdoid cells on histopathology and polyphenotypic immunopositivity for epithelial, mesenchymal, and neuroectodermal markers along with loss of expression of SMARCB1/INI1 or SMARCA4/BRG1 help in establishing a diagnosis of AT/RT. The optimal management comprises maximal safe resection followed by radiation therapy and multiagent intensive systemic chemotherapy. Gross total excision is difficult to achieve in view of the large tumor size and location and young age at presentation. Leptomeningeal spread is noted in 15%–30% of patients, and hence craniospinal irradiation followed by boost to tumor bed is considered standard in children older than 3 years. However, in younger children, craniospinal irradiation may lead to long-term neurocognitive and neuroendocrine sequel, and hence focal radiation therapy may be a pragmatic approach. In this age group, high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue may also be considered to defer radiation therapy, but this approach is also associated with significant treatment-related morbidity and mortality

  16. Tumor hypoxia and reoxygenation: the yin and yang for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Beom Ju; Kim, Jong Woo; Jeong, Hoi Bin; Bok, Seo Yeon; Kim, Young Eun; Ahn, G One [Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Tumor hypoxia, a common feature occurring in nearly all human solid tumors is a major contributing factor for failures of anticancer therapies. Because ionizing radiation depends heavily on the presence of molecular oxygen to produce cytotoxic effect, the negative impact of tumor hypoxia had long been recognized. In this review, we will highlight some of the past attempts to overcome tumor hypoxia including hypoxic radiosensitizers and hypoxia-selective cytotoxin. Although they were (still are) a very clever idea, they lacked clinical efficacy largely because of ‘reoxygenation’ phenomenon occurring in the conventional low dose hyperfractionation radiotherapy prevented proper activation of these compounds. Recent meta-analysis and imaging studies do however indicate that there may be a significant clinical benefit in lowering the locoregional failures by using these compounds. Latest technological advancement in radiotherapy has allowed to deliver high doses of radiation conformally to the tumor volume. Although this technology has brought superb clinical responses for many types of cancer, recent modeling studies have predicted that tumor hypoxia is even more serious because ‘reoxygenation’ is low thereby leaving a large portion of hypoxic tumor cells behind. Wouldn’t it be then reasonable to combine hypoxic radiosensitizers and/or hypoxia-selective cytotoxin with the latest radiotherapy? We will provide some preclinical and clinical evidence to support this idea hoping to revamp an enthusiasm for hypoxic radiosensitizers or hypoxia-selective cytotoxins as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy.

  17. Modeling measurement error in tumor characterization studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjoram Paul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Etiologic studies of cancer increasingly use molecular features such as gene expression, DNA methylation and sequence mutation to subclassify the cancer type. In large population-based studies, the tumor tissues available for study are archival specimens that provide variable amounts of amplifiable DNA for molecular analysis. As molecular features measured from small amounts of tumor DNA are inherently noisy, we propose a novel approach to improve statistical efficiency when comparing groups of samples. We illustrate the phenomenon using the MethyLight technology, applying our proposed analysis to compare MLH1 DNA methylation levels in males and females studied in the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Results We introduce two methods for computing empirical weights to model heteroscedasticity that is caused by sampling variable quantities of DNA for molecular analysis. In a simulation study, we show that using these weights in a linear regression model is more powerful for identifying differentially methylated loci than standard regression analysis. The increase in power depends on the underlying relationship between variation in outcome measure and input DNA quantity in the study samples. Conclusions Tumor characteristics measured from small amounts of tumor DNA are inherently noisy. We propose a statistical analysis that accounts for the measurement error due to sampling variation of the molecular feature and show how it can improve the power to detect differential characteristics between patient groups.

  18. Lacrimal Sac Tumors--A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Yamini; Coupland, Sarah E

    2017-01-01

    Tumors of the lacrimal sac are rare but their recognition and early management are imperative, as they are locally invasive and potentially life-threatening. Because of their rarity, large clinical studies with statistically significant data on the natural course, management, and prognosis of these neoplasms are unavailable. Current practices are therefore based on a few case series and a small number of isolated case reports. Most tumors are primary and of epithelial origin (60-94%), of which 55% are malignant. Lacrimal sac tumors typically present with epiphora and a palpable mass over the medial canthus and are thus often erroneously diagnosed as chronic dacryocystitis. A full history with clinical and diagnostic workup is essential to plan treatment, which is often multi-disciplinary. Statistically significant associations have been shown with higher tumor staging and size with increased metastatic risk and lower survival rates. Management usually involves complete surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy for malignant lesions. Long-term follow-up is required, as recurrences and metastases can occur many years after initial treatment. Copyright 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  19. Circulating Tumor Cells Versus Circulating Tumor DNA in Colorectal Cancer: Pros and Cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Carlyn Rose C; Zhou, Lanlan; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) are emerging noninvasive multifunctional biomarkers in liquid biopsy allowing for early diagnosis, accurate prognosis, therapeutic target selection, spatiotemporal monitoring of metastasis, as well as monitoring response and resistance to treatment. CTCs and ctDNA are released from different tumor types at different stages and contribute complementary information for clinical decision. Although big strides have been taken in technology development for detection, isolation and characterization of CTCs and sensitive and specific detection of ctDNA, CTC-, and ctDNA-based liquid biopsies may not be widely adopted for routine cancer patient care until the suitability, accuracy, and reliability of these tests are validated and more standardized protocols are corroborated in large, independent, prospectively designed trials. This review covers CTC- and ctDNA-related technologies and their application in colorectal cancer. The promise of CTC-and ctDNA-based liquid biopsies is envisioned.

  20. CT and MRI in malignant peripheral neuroectodermal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitzewitz, H. v.; Dueber, C.; Gutjahr, P.; Kersjes, W.; Rieker, O.; Thelen, M.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT and MRI in the diagnosis of malignant peripheral neuroectodermal tumors (MPNT), the imaging data of nine patients with immunehistochemically proven MPNT were retrospectively analyzed. The average age was 24 years (ranging from 5 to 63 years). MRI and CT of all patients showed large tumors with direct infiltration of the surrounding structures. Intratumoral calcifications were not identified. All tumors showed equal to less high signal intensity in T 1 - and high signal intensity in T 2 -weighted images. (orig.) [de

  1. A case of solitary fibrous tumor of the kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H N Naveen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A solitary fibrous tumor (SFT is an unusual spindle cell neoplasm that usually occurs in the pleura but has recently been described in diverse extrapleural sites. Urogenital localization is rare and to our knowledge, only 39 cases of SFT of the kidney have been described. Although SFT of the kidney is extremely rare, this tumor must be included in the differential diagnosis, whenever a renal tumor consisting of mesenchymal elements is encountered. We report a case of a large SFT of the right kidney which was clinically and radiologically thought to be renal cell carcinoma and a final diagnosis of SFT was made only after immunohistochemical study.

  2. Treatment Options for Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... markers . Most malignant germ cell tumors release tumor markers. The following tumor markers are used to detect extracranial germ cell tumors: ... testicular germ cell tumors, blood levels of the tumor markers help show if the tumor is a seminoma ...

  3. General Information about Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... markers . Most malignant germ cell tumors release tumor markers. The following tumor markers are used to detect extracranial germ cell tumors: ... testicular germ cell tumors, blood levels of the tumor markers help show if the tumor is a seminoma ...

  4. Osteogenic tumors of bone; Osteogene Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobke, B. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abtl. Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Werner, M. [MVZ des HELIOS Klinikum Emil von Behring, Orthopaedische Pathologie - Referenzzentrum, Institut fuer Gewebediagnostik Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Osteogenic tumors include malignant and benign tumors that produce tumor osteoid and/or bone tissue. Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant bone tumor, especially in children and young adults. The entities with their characteristic morphological features are described to enable the reader to come to a diagnosis and differential diagnosis on the basis of patient age, history and predominant location of the tumor. For this review we selectively used mainly large published patient cohorts. Our own and externally published data on widely accepted tumor criteria were also compared. Detection is the initial diagnostic step for an osseous lesion, and is determined by the sensitivity of the method applied. Plain X-ray films in two planes and CT are the basics in the radiological toolkit for osteogenic tumors. For evaluation of local tumor extension and biopsy planning MRI or scintigraphy should be combined. MRI as a stand-alone diagnostic tool is insufficient. For malignant bone tumors staging should be performed, applying a variable combination of thoracic CT, MRI, scintigraphy, and positron emission tomography (PET). Osteosarcoma, along with Ewing sarcoma and chondrosarcoma, are the most common malignant bone tumors; all sub-entities are significantly rarer. Among benign bone tumors, osteoid osteomas have the highest incidence, presenting with typical pain, location, and age predilection. Diagnostics and treatment of malignant bone tumors should preferably be performed in specialized centers because of significant therapeutic implications for patients. In uncertain cases, a second opinion should always be obtained. (orig.) [German] Osteogene Tumoren umfassen maligne und benigne Tumoren, die eine tumoreigene Produktion von Osteoid und/oder Knochengewebe aufweisen. Das Osteosarkom ist der haeufigste maligne Knochentumor v. a. bei Kindern und jungen Erwachsenen. Es werden die Entitaeten mit ihren morphologischen Charakteristika beschrieben, um anhand wichtiger

  5. Tumor therapy with radionuclides; assessment of progress and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, J.

    2003-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy is a promising modality for treatment of tumors of hematopoietic origin while the success for treatment of solid tumors so far has been limited. The authors consider radionuclide therapy mainly as a method to eradicate disseminated tumor cells and small metastases while bulky tumors and large metastases have to be treated surgically or by external radiation therapy. The promising therapeutic results for hematological tumors give hope that radionuclide therapy will have a breakthrough also for treatment of disseminated cells from solid tumors. New knowledge is continuously emerging related to this since new molecular target structures are being characterized and the knowledge on pharmacokinetics and cellular processing of different types of targeting agents increases. There is also improved understanding of the factors of importance for the choice of appropriate radionuclides with respect to their decay properties and the therapeutic applications. Furthermore, new methods to modify the uptake of radionuclides in tumor cells and normal tissues are emerging. However, we still need improvements regarding dosimetry and treatment planning as well as an increased knowledge about the tolerance doses for normal tissues and the radiobiological effects on tumor cells. This is especially important in targeted radionuclide therapy where the dose rates often are low

  6. A case of retroperitoneal carcinoid tumor which was radioeffective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kazuo; Ogawa, Osamu; Yoshimura, Naoki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Takahashi, Rei; Sasaki, Miharu.

    1984-01-01

    A 51-year-old man was referred to our hospital on May, 24, 1978, with complaints of lower abdominal pain, lower abdominal mass, constipation and pollakisuria. Physical examination revealed a lower abdominal tumor which was smooth, elastic soft and of childs' head size. IVP and urethrography revealed left nonvisualizing kidney, right hydronephrosis and deformity of bladder. CT scan revealed a large intrapelvic mass. Under the diagnosis of retroperitoneal tumor, operation was done on June, 29, 1978. Adhesive changes between the tumor, sacrococcyx and left internal iliac artery was so severe that the tumor could not be resected, and only biopsy-specimen was taken. Pathohistological diagnosis of the tumor was carcinoid tumor. He received postoperative radiation therapy with total dosis of 5000 rad in 5 weeks, and complete remission was obtained. Now, more than 5 years have passed after operation, no recurrence was detected. Carcinoid tumors are rare and generally are not radioeffective, but some cases without carcinoid syndrome, including our case, are radioeffective. So radiation therapy should be the second choice of treatment for carcinoid tumor. (author)

  7. Promoting the accumulation of tumor-specific T cells in tumor tissues by dendritic cell vaccines and chemokine-modulating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermajer, Nataša; Urban, Julie; Wieckowski, Eva; Muthuswamy, Ravikumar; Ravindranathan, Roshni; Bartlett, David L; Kalinski, Pawel

    2018-02-01

    This protocol describes how to induce large numbers of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) in the spleens and lymph nodes of mice receiving dendritic cell (DC) vaccines and how to modulate tumor microenvironments (TMEs) to ensure effective homing of the vaccination-induced CTLs to tumor tissues. We also describe how to evaluate the numbers of tumor-specific CTLs within tumors. The protocol contains detailed information describing how to generate a specialized DC vaccine with augmented ability to induce tumor-specific CTLs. We also describe methods to modulate the production of chemokines in the TME and show how to quantify tumor-specific CTLs in the lymphoid organs and tumor tissues of mice receiving different treatments. The combined experimental procedure, including tumor implantation, DC vaccine generation, chemokine-modulating (CKM) approaches, and the analyses of tumor-specific systemic and intratumoral immunity is performed over 30-40 d. The presented ELISpot-based ex vivo CTL assay takes 6 h to set up and 5 h to develop. In contrast to other methods of evaluating tumor-specific immunity in tumor tissues, our approach allows detection of intratumoral T-cell responses to nonmanipulated weakly immunogenic cancers. This detection method can be performed using basic laboratory skills, and facilitates the development and preclinical evaluation of new immunotherapies.

  8. Effects of oxygen on the metabolism of murine tumors using in-vivo P-31 NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunieff, P.; Willett, C.; Suit, H.D.; McFarland, E.; Neuringer, L.; Hitzig, B.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of 100% inspired oxygen on in vivo tumor metabolism was examined using /sup 31p/. Isotransplants of murine tumors, MCaIV (mammary adenocarcinoma) and FSaII, (fibrosarcoma), were used. Tumor volumes ranged from 30 to 1800 mm/sup 3/. Both tumors have a high hypoxic cell fraction at >250mm/sup 3/. NMR spectra were obtained using a narrow bore superconducting magnet operating at 145.587 MHz for Phosphorus-31. Tumors were implanted in the hind food dorsum to assure all detected mobile phosphates were of tumor origin. PCr/Pi ratios of tumors >250mm/sup 3/ were reduced compared with tumors <250mm/sup 3/ of the same histology. Response to 100% inspired oxygen was greater for large tumors, and for tumors with lower baseline PCr/Pi ratios. Respiration of 10% oxygen increased Pi and decreased PCr and ATP. The response to 10% oxygen was observed in both large and small tumors of both histologies. The fractional increase in PCr/Pi ratio after 100% oxygen breathing appears to be a non-invasive method of detecting tumor hypoxia

  9. Large twisted ovarian fibroma in menopausal women: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ovarian fibroma is the most common benign solid tumors of the ovary, commonly misdiagnosed as uterine fibromaor as malignant ovarian tumors. It occurs generally in older perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Occasionally large fibromas may undergo torsion causing acute abdominal pain. Doppler ...

  10. Migration inhibition of immune mouse spleen cells by serum from x-irradiated tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroson, H.

    1978-01-01

    Tumor-specific antigens of the chemically induced MC 429 mouse fibrosarcoma were detected in a 3 M KCl extract of tumor by the inhibition of migration of specifically immune spleen cells. Using this assay with serum from tumor-bearing mice no tumor antigen was detected in serum of mice bearing small tumors, unless the tumor was exposed to local x irradiation (3000 R) 1 day prior to collection of serum. It was concluded that local x irradiation of tumor caused increased concentration of tumor antigen in the serum. When the tumor was allowed to grow extremely large, with necrosis, then host serum did cause migration inhibition of both nonimmune and immune spleen cells. This migration-inhibition effect was not associated with tumor antigen, but with a nonspecific serum factor

  11. Hypofractionation results in reduced tumor cell kill compared to conventional fractionation for tumors with regions of hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, David J; Keall, Paul J; Loo, Billy W; Chen, Zhe J; Brown, J Martin

    2011-03-15

    Tumor hypoxia has been observed in many human cancers and is associated with treatment failure in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of different radiation fractionation schemes on tumor cell killing, assuming a realistic distribution of tumor oxygenation. A probability density function for the partial pressure of oxygen in a tumor cell population is quantified as a function of radial distance from the capillary wall. Corresponding hypoxia reduction factors for cell killing are determined. The surviving fraction of a tumor consisting of maximally resistant cells, cells at intermediate levels of hypoxia, and normoxic cells is calculated as a function of dose per fraction for an equivalent tumor biological effective dose under normoxic conditions. Increasing hypoxia as a function of distance from blood vessels results in a decrease in tumor cell killing for a typical radiotherapy fractionation scheme by a factor of 10(5) over a distance of 130 μm. For head-and-neck cancer and prostate cancer, the fraction of tumor clonogens killed over a full treatment course decreases by up to a factor of ∼10(3) as the dose per fraction is increased from 2 to 24 Gy and from 2 to 18 Gy, respectively. Hypofractionation of a radiotherapy regimen can result in a significant decrease in tumor cell killing compared to standard fractionation as a result of tumor hypoxia. There is a potential for large errors when calculating alternate fractionations using formalisms that do not account for tumor hypoxia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tumors and tumor-like lesions; Tumoren und tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, S.; Stoevesandt, D. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany); Knipping, S. [Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenheilkunde, Kopf- und Halschirurgie, Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Tumors and tumor-like lesions are rare diseases in the paranasal sinuses. There is a great variety of histological types, but only a small number of morphological patterns on imaging. Histology is an important point in therapeutic planning. In most cases it is obtained by sampling, which is not as difficult in the sinonasal area as in other regions of the body. The main task of imaging is an exact estimation of the extent and spread of a lesion. This article discusses the possibilities and limitations of CT and MRI in the assessment of the dignity and spread of paranasal tumors and tumor-like lesions in consideration of necessary therapeutic information. Additionally, an overview of features on imaging of different paranasal tumors and tumor-like lesions is given. (orig.)

  13. Imaging tumors of the patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadei, R., E-mail: roberto.casadei@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Kreshak, J., E-mail: j.kreshak@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Rinaldi, R. [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Rimondi, E., E-mail: eugenio.rimondi@ior.it [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Bianchi, G., E-mail: giuseppe.bianchi@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, M., E-mail: marco.alberghini@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Ruggieri, P. [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D., E-mail: daniel.vanel@ior.it [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Patellar tumors are rare; only a few series have been described in the literature and radiographic diagnosis can be challenging. We reviewed all patellar tumors at one institution and reviewed the literature. Materials and methods: In an evaluation of the database at one institution from 1916 to 2009, 23,000 bone tumors were found. Of these, 41 involved the patella. All had imaging studies and microscopic diagnostic confirmation. All medical records, imaging studies, and pathology were reviewed. Results: There were 15 females and 26 males, ranging from 8 to 68 years old (average 30). There were 30 benign tumors; eight giant cell tumors, eight chondroblastomas, seven osteoid osteomas, two aneurysmal bone cysts, two ganglions, one each of chondroma, exostosis, and hemangioma. There were 11 malignant tumors: five hemangioendotheliomas, three metastases, one lymphoma, one plasmacytoma, and one angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Patellar tumors are rare and usually benign. As the patella is an apophysis, the most frequent lesions are giant cell tumor in the adult and chondroblastoma in children. Osteoid osteomas were frequent in our series and easily diagnosed. Metastases are the most frequent malignant diagnoses in the literature; in our series malignant vascular tumors were more common. These lesions are often easily analyzed on radiographs. CT and MR define better the cortex, soft tissue extension, and fluid levels. This study presents the imaging patterns of the more common patellar tumors in order to help the radiologist when confronted with a lesion in this location.

  14. What is a pediatric tumor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jaume Mora1,21Department of Oncology, 2Developmental Tumor Biology Laboratory, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Fundacio Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Working together with medical oncologists, the question of whether a Ewing sarcoma in a 25-year-old is a pediatric tumor comes up repeatedly. Like Ewing's, some tumors present characteristically at ages that cross over what has been set as the definition of pediatrics (15 years, 18 years, or 21 years?. Pediatric oncology textbooks, surprisingly, do not address the subject of defining a pediatric tumor. They all begin with an epidemiology chapter defining the types of tumors appearing at distinct stages of childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Describing the epidemiology of tumors in relation to age, it becomes clear that the disease is related to the phenomenon of aging. The question, however, remains: is there a biological definition of what pediatric age is? And if so, will tumors occurring during this period of life have anything to do with such biological definition? With the aim of finding an objective definition, the fundamental concepts of what defines "pediatrics" was reviewed and then the major features of tumors arising during development were analyzed. The tumors were explored from the perspective of a host immersed in the normal process of growth and development. This physiological process, from pluripotential and undifferentiated cells, makes possible the differentiation, maturation, organization, and function of tissues, organs, and apparatus. A biological definition of pediatric tumors and the infancy–childhood–puberty classification of developmental tumors according to the infancy–childhood–puberty model of normal human development are proposed.Keywords: growth and development, pediatric tumor, infant, childhood and adolescence, pubertal tumors

  15. Effects of the proteasome inhibitor PS-341 on tumor growth in HTLV-1 Tax transgenic mice and Tax tumor transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra-Kaushik, Shibani; Harding, John C; Hess, Jay L; Ratner, Lee

    2004-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) regulates critical survival pathways in a variety of cancers, including human T-cell leukemia/lymphotrophic virus 1 (HTLV-1)-transformed CD4 T cells. The activation of NF-kappaB is controlled by proteasome-mediated degradation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha). We investigated the effects of PS-341, a peptide boronate inhibitor of the proteasome in HTLV-1 Tax transgenic tumors in vitro and in vivo. In Tax transgenic mice, PS-341 administered thrice weekly inhibited tumor-associated NF-kappaB activity. Quantitation of proliferation, apoptosis, and interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-10 secretion by tumor cells in culture revealed that the effects of PS-341 on cell growth largely correlated with inhibition of pathways mediated by NF-kappaB. However, the effect of PS-341 on the growth of tumors in Tax transgenic mice revealed heterogeneity in drug responsiveness. The tumor tissues treated with PS-341 show no consistent inhibition of NFkappaB activation in vivo. Annexin V staining indicated that PS-341 response in vivo correlated with sensitivity to apoptosis induced by gamma irradiation. On the other hand, transplanted Tax tumors in Rag-1 mice showed consistent inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival in response to the same drug regimen. TUNEL staining indicated that PS-341 treatment sensitizes Tax tumors to DNA fragmentation.

  16. Technical Note: Simulation of 4DCT tumor motion measurement errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Tai H; Thomas, David H; O'Connell, Dylan; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Lamb, James M; Low, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    , respectively, 37% overestimation and 61% underestimation. The simulation indicates that commercial low-pitch helical 4DCT processes potentially yield large tumor motion measurement errors, both over- and underestimating the tumor motion.

  17. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

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    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  18. Aquaporins and Brain Tumors

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    Rosario Maugeri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain primary tumors are among the most diverse and complex human cancers, and they are normally classified on the basis of the cell-type and/or the grade of malignancy (the most malignant being glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, grade IV. Glioma cells are able to migrate throughout the brain and to stimulate angiogenesis, by inducing brain capillary endothelial cell proliferation. This in turn causes loss of tight junctions and fragility of the blood–brain barrier, which becomes leaky. As a consequence, the most serious clinical complication of glioblastoma is the vasogenic brain edema. Both glioma cell migration and edema have been correlated with modification of the expression/localization of different isoforms of aquaporins (AQPs, a family of water channels, some of which are also involved in the transport of other small molecules, such as glycerol and urea. In this review, we discuss relationships among expression/localization of AQPs and brain tumors/edema, also focusing on the possible role of these molecules as both diagnostic biomarkers of cancer progression, and therapeutic targets. Finally, we will discuss the possibility that AQPs, together with other cancer promoting factors, can be exchanged among brain cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs.

  19. Synchronous meningioma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

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    Colen, Chaim B; Rayes, Mahmoud; Kupsky, William J; Guthikonda, Murali

    2010-06-01

    Synchronous primary brain tumors are exceedingly rare. When they occur, most cases are associated with metastatic disease. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of an atypical meningioma infiltrated by a T-cell-primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), specifically anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). We present a novel, unifying, plausible mechanism for its origin based on theories in the current literature. A 65-year-old man with a history of near-total resection of atypical meningioma presented with a complaint of progressive headaches. Imaging revealed recurrent tumor. Left frontal-temporal craniotomy with near-total tumor resection followed by radiation was performed. Recurrent symptomatic tumor led to repeat left frontotemporal craniotomy with tumor resection and partial anterior temporal lobectomy. Part of the specimen showed predominantly fibrotic neoplasm composed of nests and whorls of meningothelial cells, highlighted by epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) staining. The remainder of the specimen consisted of densely cellular neoplasm centered in connective tissue, including areas involved by meningioma. This tumor was composed of moderately large lymphoid cells with large nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and amphophilic cytoplasm. These cells were strongly immunoreactive for CD3 and CD30 but remained unstained with EMA, anaplastic lymphoma kinase-1 (ALK-1), CD15 or cytotoxic associated antigen TIA-1. Smaller mature lymphocytes, chiefly T-cells, were intermixed. The morphologic and immunohistochemical features were considered typical of anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma. The pathogenesis of this association may have been due to radiation-mediated breakdown of the blood-brain barrier with subsequent T-cell infiltration and proliferation. We advocate aggressive resection and long-term surveillance for individuals with metastasis, especially higher-grade neoplasms that receive radiotherapy.

  20. Dependence of radiotherapeutic results on tumor size in patients with cervix uteri carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelov, A.A.; Zharinov, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    A method is suggested that permits specifying the primary tumor size on the basis of clinical examination of patients with cervix uteri carcinoma. The values of tumor size have been correlated with long-term results of concomitant radiotherapy in 1358 patients with cervix uteri carcinoma. The data obtained have shown that the primary tumor size is a factor that determines to a large extent radiotherapeutic results in patients with cervix uteri carcinoma. The specification of tumor size values makes it possible to considerably lessen prognostic uncertainty of present-day staging classifications. The structure of radiotherapeutic failures also turned out to be closely associated with the primary tumor size

  1. Tumors of the foot skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, K.

    2007-01-01

    About 3-4% of all tumors and tumor-like lesions of the skeleton are located in the foot. Many of these lesions have a predilection for certain locations, so that the spectrum of entities occurring in the foot differs from the rest of the skeleton. Despite the fact that practically any entity can occur in the foot in rare cases, taken together the ten most frequent lesions make up for the vast majority of tumors and tumor-like lesions of the foot. The differential diagnosis of these lesions follows the general principles that apply in the rest of the skeleton. It is based on the analysis of the lesion's X-ray morphology and location, the patient's age, and in certain entities, the MR morphology. This article describes the most important tumors and tumor-like lesions of the foot, their differential diagnosis, and the principles of local staging. (orig.) [de

  2. Vasculogenic mimicry and tumor metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingxin; Qiao, Lili; Liang, Ning; Xie, Jian; Luo, Hui; Deng, Guodong; Zhang, Jiandong

    2016-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a microvascular channel made up of nonendothelial cells, has been accepted as a new model of neovascularization in aggressive tumors, owning to the specific capacity of malignant cells to form vessel-like networks which provide sufficient blood supply for tumor growth. Multiple molecular mechanisms, especially vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptor A2 (EphA2), phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR1), and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1a, have been reported to participate in VM formation which is associated with tumor migration and invasion. In addition, hypoxia, cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-mesenehymal transition (EMT) are regarded as significant factors in VM formation and tumor metastasis. Due to the important effects of VM on tumor progression, a review was carried out in the present study, to synthetically analyze the relationship between VM and tumor metastasis.

  3. Tumor markers in clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, S.

    2004-01-01

    The subtle differences between normal and tumor cells are exploited in the detection and treatment of cancer. These differences are designated as tumor markers and can be either qualitative or quantitative in their nature. That means that both the structures that are produced by tumor cells as well as the structures that are produced in excessive amounts by host tissues under the influence of tumor cells can function as tumor markers. Speaking in general, the tumor markers are the specific molecules appearing in the blood or tissues and the occurrence of which is associated with cancer. According to their application, tumor markers can be roughly divided as markers in clinical oncology and markers in pathology. In this review, only tumor markers in clinical oncology are going to be discussed. Current tumor markers in clinical oncology include (i) oncofetal antigens, (ii) placental proteins, (iii) hormones, (iv) enzymes, (v) tumor-associated antigens, (vi) special serum proteins, (vii) catecholamine metabolites, and (viii) miscellaneous markers. As to the literature, an ideal tumor marker should fulfil certain criteria - when using it as a test for detection of cancer disease: (1) positive results should occur in the early stages of the disease, (2) positive results should occur only in the patients with a specific type of malignancy, (3) positive results should occur in all patients with the same malignancy, (4) the measured values should correlate with the stage of the disease, (5) the measured values should correlate to the response to treatment, (6) the marker should be easy to measure. Most tumor markers available today meet several, but not all criteria. As a consequence of that, some criteria were chosen for the validation and proper selection of the most appropriate marker in a particular malignancy, and these are: (1) markers' sensitivity, (2) specificity, and (3) predictive values. Sensitivity expresses the mean probability of determining an elevated tumor

  4. Pericytes limit tumor cell metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Previously we observed that neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) deficiency in beta tumor cells facilitates metastasis into distant organs and local lymph nodes. Here, we show that NCAM-deficient beta cell tumors grew leaky blood vessels with perturbed pericyte-endothelial cell-cell interactions...... and deficient perivascular deposition of ECM components. Conversely, tumor cell expression of NCAM in a fibrosarcoma model (T241) improved pericyte recruitment and increased perivascular deposition of ECM molecules. Together, these findings suggest that NCAM may limit tumor cell metastasis by stabilizing...... the microvessel wall. To directly address whether pericyte dysfunction increases the metastatic potential of solid tumors, we studied beta cell tumorigenesis in primary pericyte-deficient Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. This resulted in beta tumor cell metastases in distant organs and local lymph nodes, demonstrating a role...

  5. Stereotactic radiation therapy for large vestibular schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, Ellen S.; Meijer, Otto W.M.; Slotman, Ben J.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Peerdeman, Saskia M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the morbidity and tumor-control rate in the treatment of large vestibular schwannomas (VS) after stereotactic radiation therapy in our institution. Material and methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients (17 men, 8 women) with large VS (diameter 3.0 cm or larger), treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) between 1992 and 2007, were retrospectively studied after a mean follow-up period of three years with respect to tumor-control rate and complications. Results: Actuarial 5-year maintenance of pre-treatment hearing level probability of 30% was achieved. Five of 17 patients suffered permanent new facial nerve dysfunction. The actuarial 5-year facial nerve preservation probability was 80%. Permanent new trigeminal nerve neuropathy occurred in two of 15 patients, resulting in an actuarial 5-year trigeminal nerve preservation probability of 85%. Tumor progression occurred in four of 25 (16%) patients. The overall 5-year tumor control probability was 82%. Conclusion: Increased morbidity rates were found in patients with large VS treated with SRT or SRS compared to the published series on regular sized VS and other smaller retrospective studies on large VS.

  6. Simian virus 40 and malignant mesothelioma (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrano, Paolo Giuseppe; Jasani, Bharat; Filiberti, Rosangela; Neri, Monica; Merlo, Franco; De Flora, Silvio; Mutti, Luciano; Puntoni, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) was recognized as a contaminant of early poliovirus vaccines that were provided to millions of individuals in Europe and in the USA between 1955 and 1963. SV40, a DNA virus of the family of papovaviridae, was proven to be oncogenic in rodents and able to transform human and animal cells in vitro. In 1993 SV40 was accidentally discovered to produce mesotheliomas in hamsters when it was injected in visceral cavities. Afterwards, SV40 DNA sequences were detected with significative frequency in human pleural mesotheliomas by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and then SV40 DNA oncogenicity was associated with its large T antigen (Tag). This finding was confirmed by many laboratories, while a few research groups failed to replicate these data and argued that the SV40 DNA detection might be a PCR contamination artefact. In this review the dispute is examined in the light of recent experiments performed to identify molecular and cellular aspects of carcinogenicity and/or co-carcinogenicity of SV40 in human mesothelioma.

  7. Quantitative MR Image Analysis for Brian Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shboul, Zeina A; Reza, Sayed M S; Iftekharuddin, Khan M

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated quantitative MR image analysis framework to include all necessary steps such as MRI inhomogeneity correction, feature extraction, multiclass feature selection and multimodality abnormal brain tissue segmentation respectively. We first obtain mathematical algorithm to compute a novel Generalized multifractional Brownian motion (GmBm) texture feature. We then demonstrate efficacy of multiple multiresolution texture features including regular fractal dimension (FD) texture, and stochastic texture such as multifractional Brownian motion (mBm) and GmBm features for robust tumor and other abnormal tissue segmentation in brain MRI. We evaluate these texture and associated intensity features to effectively delineate multiple abnormal tissues within and around the tumor core, and stroke lesions using large scale public and private datasets.

  8. Conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines demonstrate enhanced proliferation and migration in response to IGF-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl, Ann H., E-mail: ann.rosendahl@med.lu.se [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Division of Surgery, Lund (Sweden); Lund University and Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Division of Oncology and Pathology, Lund (Sweden); Gundewar, Chinmay; Said Hilmersson, Katarzyna [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Division of Surgery, Lund (Sweden); Ni, Lan; Saleem, Moin A. [University of Bristol, School of Clinical Sciences, Children' s Renal Unit and Academic Renal Unit, Bristol (United Kingdom); Andersson, Roland [Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Division of Surgery, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-01-15

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a key role in the dense desmoplastic stroma associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Studies on human PSCs have been minimal due to difficulty in maintaining primary PSC in culture. We have generated the first conditionally immortalized human non-tumor (NPSC) and tumor-derived (TPSC) pancreatic stellate cells via transformation with the temperature-sensitive SV40 large T antigen and human telomerase (hTERT). These cells proliferate at 33°C. After transfer to 37°C, the SV40LT is switched off and the cells regain their primary PSC phenotype and growth characteristics. NPSC contained cytoplasmic vitamin A-storing lipid droplets, while both NPSC and TPSC expressed the characteristic markers αSMA, vimentin, desmin and GFAP. Proteome array analysis revealed that of the 55 evaluated proteins, 27 (49%) were upregulated ≥3-fold in TPSC compared to NPSC, including uPA, pentraxin-3, endoglin and endothelin-1. Two insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) were inversely expressed. Although discordant IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 levels, IGF-I was found to stimulate proliferation of both NPSC and TPSC. Both basal and IGF-I stimulated motility was significantly enhanced in TPSC compared to NPSC. In conclusion, these cells provide a unique resource that will facilitate further study of the active stroma compartment associated with pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • Generation of human conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines. • Temperature-sensitive SV40LT allows switch to primary PSC phenotype characteristics. • Proteome profiling revealed distinct expression patterns between TPSC and NPSC. • Enhanced IGF-I-stimulated proliferation and motility by TPSC compared to NPSC.

  9. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...... signaling plays a fundamental role during development. Recent findings have shown that Notch signaling is dysregulated, and contributes to the malignant potential of these tumors. Growing evidence point towards an important role for cancer stem cells in the initiation and maintenance of glioma...

  10. Surgical Treatment in Uveal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Gündüz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment in uveal tumors can be done via iridectomy, partial lamellar sclerouvectomy (PLSU and endoresection. Iridectomy is done in iris tumors without angle and ciliary body involvement. PLSU is performed in tumors with ciliary body and choroidal involvement. For this operation, a partial thickness scleral flap is dissected, the intraocular tumor is excised, and the flap is sutured back in position. PLSU surgery is done in iridociliary and ciliary body tumors with less than 3 clock hours of iris and ciliary body involvement and in choroidal tumors with a base diameter less than 15 mm. However, it can be employed in any size tumor for biopsy purposes. Potential complications of PLSU surgery include vitreous hemorrhage, cataract, retinal detachment, and endophthalmitis. Endoresection is a technique whereby the intraocular tumor is excised using vitrectomy techniques. The rationale for performing endoresection is based on the fact that irradiated uveal melanomas may be associated with exudation and neovascular glaucoma and removing the dead tumor tissue may contribute to better visual outcome. There are some centers where endoresection is done without prior radiotherapy. Allegedly, avoidance of radiation retinopathy and papillopathy are the main advantages of using endoresection without prior radiotherapy. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: Supplement 29-34

  11. Desmoid tumor within lesser sac

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    Čolović Radoje

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumors or fibromatoses comprise a number of benign fibrous proliferative lesions that have local infiltrative growth and tendency to recur after incomplete excision. They never metastasize. The authors present a 31-year old woman who, due to epigastric pain and palpable mass detected on presentation, underwent the excision of firm tumorous mass, 210x140x115mm in diameter, from the lesser sac. Compressing the splenic vein, the tumor caused left-sided portal hypertension which subsided after the mass was removed. The recovery was uneventful. The histological examination verified typical desmoid tumor. Twelve years after surgery, the patient remained symptom-free with no signs of recurrence.

  12. Tumor-associated macrophages: Oblivious confederates in invasive mammary carcinoma

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    Imtiaz Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The infiltrating margins of carcinomas are associated with presence of inflammatory cell infiltrate which are an integral part of the tumor microenvironment. Amongst the inflammatory cells, Tumor Associated Macrophages (TAMs play a key role in the tumorigenesis. This study elucidates the density of TAMs in invasive mammary carcinomas and attempts to establish aa association with the following pathological variables: tumor size, histological grade, nodal status, hormonal expression status and Her2Neu overexpression. Materials and Methods: 90 diagnosed archival cases of invasive mammary carcinomas at a tertiary care centre were included. Density of TAMs was assessed by using CD68 which is a pan-macrophage marker by immunohistochemistry on the archival tissue blocks. The density TAMs (CD68 positive cells was dichotomised into high (>50 CD68 positive cells/ HPF and low (<5050 CD68 positive cells/ HPF and compared with the above mentioned pathological variables using appropriate statistical tests. Results: The density of TAMs was significantly higher around the infiltrating edge of the carcinoma in comparison to the adjoining normal terminal duct lobular units. The density of TAMs was more in the infiltrating edge of the tumor than within the tumor nodule/nests. A higher TAM density showed a significant association in tumors having large tumor size, higher histological grade, nodal metastasis, absence of ER and PR expression and Her2Neu overexpression (p value <0.05. Conclusion: TAMs play an important role in tumor progression in invasive mammary carcinomas. This is as a result of the multiple roles enacted by TAMs in the various stages of tumor development starting from tumor growth, invasion, angiogenesis and metastases. Targeted therapy against TAMs has great potential in the being important components of future treatment strategies against breast carcinomas.

  13. Multifocal Abrikossoff's granular cell tumor of the oesophagus: Case report

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    Ranđelović Tomislav D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Granular cell tumors, relatively uncommon soft tissue tumors, have been a matter of debate among pathologists regarding histogenesis for a long time. Less common locations are in the aerodigestive tract including the oesophagus. CASE OUTLINE We have recently treated a rare case,