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Sample records for suz12 deficient mouse

  1. Quantitative mass spectrometry of histones H3.2 and H3.3 in Suz12-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells reveals distinct, dynamic post-translational modifications at Lys-27 and Lys-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Hye Ryung; Pasini, Diego; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    distinct coexisting modifications. In certain cases, high mass accuracy LTQ-Orbitrap MS/MS allowed precise localization of near isobaric coexisting PTMs such as trimethylation and acetylation within individual peptides. ETD MS/MS facilitated sequencing and annotation of phosphorylated histone peptides....... The combined use of ETD and CID MS/MS increased the total number of identified modified peptides. Comparative quantitative analysis of histones from wild type and Suz12-deficient ESCs using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture and LC-MS/MS revealed a dramatic reduction of H3K27me2 and H3K27......me3 and an increase of H3K27ac, thereby uncovering an antagonistic methyl/acetyl switch at H3K27. The reduction in H3K27 methylation and increase in H3K27 acetylation was accompanied by H3K36 acetylation and methylation. Estimation of the global isoform percentage of unmodified and modified histone...

  2. Suz12 is essential for mouse development and for EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Bracken, Adrian P; Jensen, Michael R

    2004-01-01

    SUZ12 is a recently identified Polycomb group (PcG) protein, which together with EZH2 and EED forms different Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC2/3). These complexes contain histone H3 lysine (K) 27/9 and histone H1 K26 methyltransferase activity specified by the EZH2 SET domain. Here we show...

  3. The polycomb group protein Suz12 is required for embryonic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Bracken, Adrian P; Hansen, Jacob Bo Højberg

    2007-01-01

    results in early lethality of mouse embryos. Here, we demonstrate that Suz12(-/-) mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be established and expanded in tissue culture. The Suz12(-/-) ES cells are characterized by global loss of H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and higher expression levels of differentiation......-specific genes. Moreover, Suz12(-/-) ES cells are impaired in proper differentiation, resulting in a lack of repression of ES cell markers as well as activation of differentiation-specific genes. Finally, we demonstrate that the PcGs are actively recruited to several genes during ES cell differentiation, which...... despite an increase in H3K27me3 levels is not always sufficient to prevent transcriptional activation. In summary, we demonstrate that Suz12 is required for the establishment of specific expression programs required for ES cell differentiation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that PcGs have different...

  4. The EZH1-SUZ12 complex positively regulates the transcription of NF-κB target genes through interaction with UXT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shuai-Kun; Li, Chun-Yuan; Lei, Pin-Ji; Wang, Xiang; Zhao, Quan-Yi; Cai, Yang; Wang, Zhen; Li, Lianyun; Wu, Min

    2016-06-15

    Unlike other members of the polycomb group protein family, EZH1 has been shown to positively associate with active transcription on a genome-wide scale. However, the underlying mechanism for this behavior still remains elusive. Here, we report that EZH1 physically interacts with UXT, a small chaperon-like transcription co-activator. UXT specifically interacts with EZH1 and SUZ12, but not EED. Similar to upon knockdown of UXT, knockdown of EZH1 or SUZ12 through RNA interference in the cell impairs the transcriptional activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB target genes induced by TNFα. EZH1 deficiency also increases TNFα-induced cell death. Interestingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation and the following next-generation sequencing analysis show that H3K27 mono-, di- and tri-methylation on NF-κB target genes are not affected in EZH1- or UXT-deficient cells. EZH1 also does not affect the translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB (also known as RELA) from the cytosol to the nucleus. Instead, EZH1 and SUZ12 regulate the recruitment of p65 and RNA Pol II to target genes. Taken together, our study shows that EZH1 and SUZ12 act as positive regulators for NF-κB signaling and demonstrates that EZH1, SUZ12 and UXT work synergistically to regulate pathway activation in the nucleus. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Analysis list: Su(z)12 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Su(z)12 Embryo,Larvae + dm3 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/S...u(z)12.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/Su(z)12.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/Su(z)12.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Su(z)12.Embryo....tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Su(z)12.Larvae.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Embryo.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Larvae.gml ...

  6. lncRNA Functional Networks in Oligodendrocytes Reveal Stage-Specific Myelination Control by an lncOL1/Suz12 Complex in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Danyang; Wang, Jincheng; Lu, Yulan; Deng, Yaqi; Zhao, Chuntao; Xu, Lingli; Chen, Yinhuai; Hu, Yueh-Chiang; Zhou, Wenhao; Lu, Q Richard

    2017-01-18

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as important regulators of cellular functions, but their roles in oligodendrocyte myelination remain undefined. Through de novo transcriptome reconstruction, we establish dynamic expression profiles of lncRNAs at different stages of oligodendrocyte development and uncover a cohort of stage-specific oligodendrocyte-restricted lncRNAs, including a conserved chromatin-associated lncOL1. Co-expression network analyses further define the association of distinct oligodendrocyte-expressing lncRNA clusters with protein-coding genes and predict lncRNA functions in oligodendrocyte myelination. Overexpression of lncOL1 promotes precocious oligodendrocyte differentiation in the developing brain, whereas genetic inactivation of lncOL1 causes defects in CNS myelination and remyelination following injury. Functional analyses illustrate that lncOL1 interacts with Suz12, a component of polycomb repressive complex 2, to promote oligodendrocyte maturation, in part, through Suz12-mediated repression of a differentiation inhibitory network that maintains the precursor state. Together, our findings reveal a key lncRNA epigenetic circuitry through interaction with chromatin-modifying complexes in control of CNS myelination and myelin repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Generation of Humanized Mouse Models with Focus on Antithrombin Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Astrid Bøgh

    2015-01-01

    transgene. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a relatively new and innovative method for targeted mutagenesis. The Cas9 nuclease introduces a double stranded break in the DNA, which can be repaired through homologous recombination of a targeting vector. A mutated Cas9n (Cas9 nickase) has been designed, which only...... cuts one of the DNA strands. With this enzyme, two target sites have to be located close to each other in order to create double strand break. This will lower the risk for off target mutations, but might reduce the efficiency of targeting. In order to control the expression of the human antithrombin...... found that homozygous knockout embryos have a significantly increased level of systemic inflammation, around their time of death. Furthermore, the embryos show signs of hypertension, already at day 12 of gestation, possible due to kidney failure. A humanized mouse model for antithrombin deficiency can...

  8. Detection of coding microsatellite frameshift mutations in DNA mismatch repair-deficient mouse intestinal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerner, Stefan M; Tosti, Elena; Yuan, Yan P; Kloor, Matthias; Bork, Peer; Edelmann, Winfried; Gebert, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Different DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mouse strains have been developed as models for the inherited cancer predisposing Lynch syndrome. It is completely unresolved, whether coding mononucleotide repeat (cMNR) gene mutations in these mice can contribute to intestinal tumorigenesis and whether MMR-deficient mice are a suitable molecular model of human microsatellite instability (MSI)-associated intestinal tumorigenesis. A proof-of-principle study was performed to identify mouse cMNR-harboring genes affected by insertion/deletion mutations in MSI murine intestinal tumors. Bioinformatic algorithms were developed to establish a database of mouse cMNR-harboring genes. A panel of five mouse noncoding mononucleotide markers was used for MSI classification of intestinal matched normal/tumor tissues from MMR-deficient (Mlh1(-/-) , Msh2(-/-) , Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) ) mice. cMNR frameshift mutations of candidate genes were determined by DNA fragment analysis. Murine MSI intestinal tumors but not normal tissues from MMR-deficient mice showed cMNR frameshift mutations in six candidate genes (Elavl3, Tmem107, Glis2, Sdccag1, Senp6, Rfc3). cMNRs of mouse Rfc3 and Elavl3 are conserved in type and length in their human orthologs that are known to be mutated in human MSI colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancer. We provide evidence for the utility of a mononucleotide marker panel for detection of MSI in murine tumors, the existence of cMNR instability in MSI murine tumors, the utility of mouse subspecies DNA for identification of polymorphic repeats, and repeat conservation among some orthologous human/mouse genes, two of them showing instability in human and mouse MSI intestinal tumors. MMR-deficient mice hence are a useful molecular model system for analyzing MSI intestinal carcinogenesis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donehower, Laurence

    1998-01-01

    .... In order to better understand the role of p53 mutation and loss in breast cancer progression, we have developed a mouse model which is genetically programmed to develop mammary cancer in the presence and absence of p53...

  10. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donehower, Lawrence

    1997-01-01

    .... In order to better understand the role of p53 mutation and loss in breast cancer progression, we have developed a mouse model which is genetically programmed to develop mammary cancer in the presence and absence of p53...

  11. Laryngeal Muscles Are Spared in the Dystrophin Deficient "mdx" Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lisa B.; Joseph, Gayle L.; Adkins, Tracey D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: "Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)" is caused by the loss of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. The disease leads to severe and progressive skeletal muscle wasting. Interestingly, the disease spares some muscles. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of dystrophin deficiency on 2 intrinsic laryngeal muscles, the…

  12. Biotin-deficient diet induces chromosome misalignment and spindle defects in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Ai; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Increased abnormal oocytes due to meiotic chromosome misalignment and spindle defects lead to elevated rates of infertility, miscarriage, and trisomic conceptions. Here, we investigated the effect of biotin deficiency on oocyte quality. Three-week-old female ICR mice were fed a biotin-deficient or control diet (0, 0.004 g biotin/kg diet) for 21 days. On day 22, these mouse oocytes were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Due to biotin, undernutrition increased the frequency of abnormal oocytes (the biotin deficient vs. control: 40 vs. 16%). Next, the remaining mice in the biotin-deficient group were fed a control or biotin-deficient diet from day 22 to 42. Although biotin nutritional status in the recovery group was restored, the frequency of abnormal oocytes in the recovery group was still higher than that in the control group (48 vs. 18%). Our results indicate that steady, sufficient biotin intake is required for the production of high-quality oocytes in mice.

  13. Endothelial Function in a Mouse Model of Myeloperoxidase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Golubinskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloperoxidase (MPO activity is suggested to reduce the function of vascular nitric oxide, thereby contributing to endothelial dysfunction, although data in rodents are inconclusive. We examined vascular contractile and relaxant responses in MPO-deficient (MPO-/- and wild-type mice to investigate the role for myeloperoxidase in the development of endothelial dysfunction. Carotid and saphenous arteries were taken from 8-month-old mice and studied in a myograph. Responses of carotid arteries to phenylephrine, high potassium, or acetylcholine (Ach were statistically not different from controls. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; to enhance endothelial dysfunction reduced responses to Ach in MPO-/- but did not affect responses in wild-type. In response to high concentrations of Ach, carotid arteries responded with transient contractions, which were not different between the groups and not affected by LPS treatment. Saphenous arteries from MPO-/- had smaller normalized diameters and developed less contractile force. Vessels from MPO-/- were less sensitive to Ach than controls. These data suggest that mature MPO-deficient mice do not show enhanced endothelial function compared to wild-type mice, even when provoked with LPS treatment. The EDHF response appears to be reduced in MPO deficiency.

  14. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

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    Lore Becker

    Full Text Available Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1 were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  15. Deficiency of merosin in dystrophic dy mouse homologue of congenital muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunada, Y.; Campbell, K.P. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Bernier, S.M. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Merosin (laminin M chain) is the predominant laminin isoform in the basal lamina of striated muscle and peripheral nerve and is a native ligand for {alpha}-dystroglycan, a novel laminin receptor. Merosin is linked to the subsarcolemmal actin cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), which plays an important role for maintenance of normal muscle function. We have mapped the mouse merosin gene, Lamm, to the region containing the dystrophia muscularis (dy) locus on chromosome 10. This suggested the possibility that a mutation in the merosin gene could be responsible for the dy mouse, an animal model for autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy, and prompted us to test this hypothesis. We analyzed the status of merosin expression in dy mouse by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. In dy mouse skeletal and cardiac muscle and peripheral nerve, merosin was reduced greater than 90% as compared to control mice. However, the expression of laminin B1/B2 chains and collagen type IV was smaller to that in control mice. These findings strongly suggest that merosin deficiency may be the primary defect in the dy mouse. Furthermore, we have identified two patients afflicted with congenital muscular dystrophy with merosin deficiency, providing the basis for future studies of molecular pathogenesis and gene therapy.

  16. Deficient Sleep in Mouse Models of Fragile X Syndrome

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    R. Michelle Saré

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In patients with fragile X syndrome (FXS, sleep problems are commonly observed but are not well characterized. In animal models of FXS (dfmr1 and Fmr1 knockout (KO/Fxr2 heterozygote circadian rhythmicity is affected, but sleep per se has not been examined. We used a home-cage monitoring system to assess total sleep time in both light and dark phases in Fmr1 KO mice at different developmental stages. Fmr1 KOs at P21 do not differ from controls, but genotype × phase interactions in both adult (P70 and P180 groups are statistically significant indicating that sleep in Fmr1 KOs is reduced selectively in the light phase compared to controls. Our results show the emergence of abnormal sleep in Fmr1 KOs during the later stages of brain maturation. Treatment of adult Fmr1 KO mice with a GABAB agonist, R-baclofen, did not restore sleep duration in the light phase. In adult (P70 Fmr1 KO/Fxr2 heterozygote animals, total sleep time was further reduced, once again in the light phase. Our data highlight the importance of the fragile X genes (Fmr1 and Fxr2 in sleep physiology and confirm the utility of these mouse models in enhancing our understanding of sleep disorders in FXS.

  17. ACAT1 deficiency increases cholesterol synthesis in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Dwayne E; Su, Yan Ru; Swift, Larry L; Linton, MacRae F; Fazio, Sergio

    2006-06-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) esterifies free cholesterol and stores cholesteryl esters in lipid droplets. Macrophage ACAT1 deficiency results in increased atherosclerotic lesion area in hyperlipidemic mice via disrupted cholesterol efflux, increased lipoprotein uptake, accumulation of intracellular vesicles, and accelerated apoptosis. The objective of this study was to determine whether lipid synthesis is affected by ACAT1. The synthesis, esterification, and efflux of new cholesterol were measured in peritoneal macrophages from ACAT1(-/-) mice. Cholesterol synthesis was increased by 134% (p=0.001) in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages compared to wildtype macrophages. Increased synthesis resulted in a proportional increase in the efflux of newly synthesized cholesterol. Although the esterification of new cholesterol was reduced by 93% (pSREBP1a mRNA was increased 6-fold in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages compared to wildtype macrophages, suggesting an up-regulation of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages. Increased cholesterol synthesis and up-regulation of SREBP in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages suggests that ACAT1 affects the regulation of lipid metabolism in macrophages. This change in cholesterol homeostasis may contribute to the atherogenic potential of ACAT1(-/-) macrophages.

  18. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  19. Insulin deficiency exacerbates cerebral amyloidosis and behavioral deficits in an Alzheimer transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Wei-Ping

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although increasing evidence has indicated that brain insulin dysfunction is a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD, the underlying mechanisms by which insulin deficiency may impact the development of AD are still obscure. Using a streptozotocin (STZ-induced insulin deficient diabetic AD transgenic mouse model, we evaluated the effect of insulin deficiency on AD-like behavior and neuropathology. Results Our data showed that administration of STZ increased the level of blood glucose and reduced the level of serum insulin, and further decreased the phosphorylation levels of insulin receptors, and increased the activities of glycogen synthase kinase-3α/β and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in the APP/PS1 mouse brain. We further showed that STZ treatment promoted the processing of amyloid-β (Aβ precursor protein resulting in increased Aβ generation, neuritic plaque formation, and spatial memory deficits in transgenic mice. Conclusions Our present data indicate that there is a close link between insulin deficient diabetes and cerebral amyloidosis in the pathogenesis of AD.

  20. Magnesium deficiency: effect on bone mineral density in the mouse appendicular skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills Barbara G

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary magnesium (Mg deficiency in the mouse perturbs bone and mineral homeostasis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate bone mineral density of the femur in control and Mg-deficient mice. Methods BALB/c mice aged 28 days at study initiation were maintained on a normal or Mg deficient (0.0002% Mg diet, and at time points 0, 2, 4 or 6 weeks bones were harvested for bone mineral density analysis. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT was used to assess the trabecular metaphyseal compartment and the cortical midshaft. Results Although mean total bone density of the femoral midshaft in Mg deficient mice did not differ significantly from controls throughout the study, the trabecular bone compartment showed significantly decreased mineral content after 4 (p Conclusions This study demonstrates the profound effect of Mg depletion on the trabecular compartment of bone, which, with its greater surface area and turnover, was more responsive to Mg depletion than cortical bone in the appendicular skeleton of the mouse.

  1. HIF-1alpha Deficiency Attenuates the Cardiomyogenesis of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

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    Jana Kudová

    Full Text Available Cardiac cell formation, cardiomyogenesis, is critically dependent on oxygen availability. It is known that hypoxia, a reduced oxygen level, modulates the in vitro differentiation of pluripotent cells into cardiomyocytes via hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α-dependent mechanisms. However, the direct impact of HIF-1α deficiency on the formation and maturation of cardiac-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC in vitro remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that HIF-1α deficiency significantly altered the quality and quantity of mESC-derived cardiomyocytes. It was accompanied with lower mRNA and protein levels of cardiac cell specific markers (myosin heavy chains 6 and 7 and with a decreasing percentage of myosin heavy chain α and β, and cardiac troponin T-positive cells. As to structural aspects of the differentiated cardiomyocytes, the localization of contractile proteins (cardiac troponin T, myosin heavy chain α and β and the organization of myofibrils were also different. Simultaneously, HIF-1α deficiency was associated with a lower percentage of beating embryoid bodies. Interestingly, an observed alteration in the in vitro differentiation scheme of HIF-1α deficient cells was accompanied with significantly lower expression of the endodermal marker (hepatic nuclear factor 4 alpha. These findings thus suggest that HIF-1α deficiency attenuates spontaneous cardiomyogenesis through the negative regulation of endoderm development in mESC differentiating in vitro.

  2. HIF-1alpha Deficiency Attenuates the Cardiomyogenesis of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudová, Jana; Procházková, Jiřina; Vašiček, Ondřej; Perečko, Tomáš; Sedláčková, Miroslava; Pešl, Martin; Pacherník, Jiří; Kubala, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac cell formation, cardiomyogenesis, is critically dependent on oxygen availability. It is known that hypoxia, a reduced oxygen level, modulates the in vitro differentiation of pluripotent cells into cardiomyocytes via hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α)-dependent mechanisms. However, the direct impact of HIF-1α deficiency on the formation and maturation of cardiac-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) in vitro remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that HIF-1α deficiency significantly altered the quality and quantity of mESC-derived cardiomyocytes. It was accompanied with lower mRNA and protein levels of cardiac cell specific markers (myosin heavy chains 6 and 7) and with a decreasing percentage of myosin heavy chain α and β, and cardiac troponin T-positive cells. As to structural aspects of the differentiated cardiomyocytes, the localization of contractile proteins (cardiac troponin T, myosin heavy chain α and β) and the organization of myofibrils were also different. Simultaneously, HIF-1α deficiency was associated with a lower percentage of beating embryoid bodies. Interestingly, an observed alteration in the in vitro differentiation scheme of HIF-1α deficient cells was accompanied with significantly lower expression of the endodermal marker (hepatic nuclear factor 4 alpha). These findings thus suggest that HIF-1α deficiency attenuates spontaneous cardiomyogenesis through the negative regulation of endoderm development in mESC differentiating in vitro.

  3. Microarray data on altered transcriptional program of Phgdh-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts caused by ʟ-serine depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Hamano

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Inherent ʟ-Ser deficiency culminates in intrauterine growth retardation, severe malformation of multiple organs particularly the central nervous system, and perinatal or early postnatal death in human and mouse. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth-arrested phenotypes of l-Ser deficiency, we compared gene expression profiles of mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh, the first enzyme of de novo ʟ-Ser synthetic pathway, between ʟ-Ser-depleted and -supplemented conditions. The datasets (CEL and CHP files from this study are publicly available on the Gene Expression Omnibus repository (accession number GEO: GSE55687.

  4. Alopecia in IL-10-deficient Mouse Pups is c-Kit-Dependent and Can Be Triggered by Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderford, Deborah A.; Greer, Paula K.; Sharp, Julie M.; Chichlowski, Maciej; Rouse, D. Clayburn; Selim, M. Angelica; Hale, Laura P.

    2012-01-01

    Hair loss (alopecia) can result from a variety of metabolic, endocrine, immunologic, and environmental causes. This investigation was undertaken to determine the mechanisms underlying the sporadic development of alopecia in litters from C57BL/6 interleukin-10-deficient (Il10−/−) mice. All pups in affected litters demonstrated alopecia by postnatal days 17–19, with hair loss from their trunks but not from their head, base of tail, or feet. Histopathology revealed distorted hair follicles containing broken hair shafts and prominent dermal infiltrates containing increased numbers of activated mast cells. Hair re-growth began soon after weaning, suggesting that the alopecia was triggered by factors transmitted during lactation. Milk from Il10−/− dams induced macrophage secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro regardless of whether or not their pups developed alopecia. Feeding dams a diet containing 3–6 ppm iron increased the percentage of litters with alopecia to 100% for pups with mast cells, with 0% alopecia in mast cell-deficient pups. When dams were fed diet containing 131 ppm iron, significantly lower hemoglobin and hematocrit values were observed in pups from litters with alopecia (71%; 5 of 7 litters) compared to litters without alopecia. Genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of c-kit that resulted in depletion of mast cells in pups prevented hair loss in at-risk litters. These studies demonstrate that maternal iron-restricted diets enhance the incidence of alopecia in IL-10-deficient mouse pups and suggest mast cells as potential effector cells. Further studies are indicated to further explore the mechanisms involved and to determine how mast cells may contribute to alopecia in humans. PMID:20100190

  5. Muc1 deficiency exacerbates pulmonary fibrosis in a mouse model of silicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kosuke; Zemskova, Marina A; Hanss, Alec D; Kim, Marianne M; Summer, Ross; Kim, Kwang Chul

    2017-11-25

    MUC1 (MUC in human and Muc in animals) is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the apical surface of lung epithelial cells. However, in the lungs of patients with interstitial lung disease, MUC1 is aberrantly expressed in hyperplastic alveolar type II epithelial (ATII) cells and alveolar macrophages (AM), and elevated levels of extracellular MUC1 are found in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the serum of these patients. While pro-fibrotic effects of extracellular MUC1 have recently been described in cultured fibroblasts, the contribution of MUC1 to the pathobiology of pulmonary fibrosis is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that MUC1 deficiency would reduce susceptibility to pulmonary fibrosis in a mouse model of silicosis. We employed human MUC1 transgenic mice, Muc1 deficient mice and wild-type mice on C57BL/6 background in these studies. Some mice received a one-time dose of crystalline silica instilled into their oropharynx in order to induce pulmonary fibrosis and assess the effects of Muc1 deficiency on fibrotic and inflammatory responses in the lung. As previously described in other mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis, we found that extracellular MUC1 levels were markedly increased in whole lung tissues, BALF and serum of human MUC1 transgenic mice after silica. We also detected an increase in total MUC1 levels in the lungs of these mice, indicating that production as well as release contributed to elevated levels after lung injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that increased MUC1 expression was mostly confined to ATII cells and AMs in areas of fibrotic remodeling, illustrating a pattern similar to the expression of MUC1 in human fibrotic lung tissues. However, contrary to our hypothesis, we found that Muc1 deficiency resulted in a worsening of fibrotic remodeling in the mouse lung as judged by an increase in number of silicotic nodules, an increase in lung collagen deposition and an increase in the severity of pulmonary inflammation

  6. Ebola Virus Makona Shows Reduced Lethality in an Immune-deficient Mouse Model.

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    Smither, Sophie J; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O'Brien, Lyn; Phelps, Amanda; Steward, Jackie; Lever, Mark Stephen

    2016-10-15

    Ebola virus Makona (EBOV-Makona; from the 2013-2016 West Africa outbreak) shows decreased virulence in an immune-deficient mouse model, compared with a strain from 1976. Unlike other filoviruses tested, EBOV-Makona may be slightly more virulent by the aerosol route than by the injected route, as 2 mice died following aerosol exposure, compared with no mortality among mice that received intraperitoneal injection of equivalent or higher doses. Although most mice did not succumb to infection, the detection of an immunoglobulin G antibody response along with observed clinical signs suggest that the mice were infected but able to clear the infection and recover. We hypothesize that this may be due to the growth rates and kinetics of the virus, which appear slower than that for other filoviruses and consequently give more time for an immune response that results in clearance of the virus. In this instance, the immune-deficient mouse model is unlikely to be appropriate for testing medical countermeasures against this EBOV-Makona stock but may provide insight into pathogenesis and the immune response to virus. © Crown copyright 2016.

  7. Embryonic Lethality of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 1 Deficient Mouse Can Be Rescued by a Ketogenic Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krznar, Petra; Hörl, Manuel; Ammar, Zeinab; Montessuit, Sylvie; Pierredon, Sandra; Zamboni, Nicola; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial import of pyruvate by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) is a central step which links cytosolic and mitochondrial intermediary metabolism. To investigate the role of the MPC in mammalian physiology and development, we generated a mouse strain with complete loss of MPC1 expression. This resulted in embryonic lethality at around E13.5. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from mutant mice displayed defective pyruvate-driven respiration as well as perturbed metabolic profiles, and both defects could be restored by reexpression of MPC1. Labeling experiments using 13C-labeled glucose and glutamine demonstrated that MPC deficiency causes increased glutaminolysis and reduced contribution of glucose-derived pyruvate to the TCA cycle. Morphological defects were observed in mutant embryonic brains, together with major alterations of their metabolome including lactic acidosis, diminished TCA cycle intermediates, energy deficit and a perturbed balance of neurotransmitters. Strikingly, these changes were reversed when the pregnant dams were fed a ketogenic diet, which provides acetyl-CoA directly to the TCA cycle and bypasses the need for a functional MPC. This allowed the normal gestation and development of MPC deficient pups, even though they all died within a few minutes post-delivery. This study establishes the MPC as a key player in regulating the metabolic state necessary for embryonic development, neurotransmitter balance and post-natal survival. PMID:27176894

  8. Maternal folic acid-deficient diet causes congenital malformations in the mouse eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro-de-las-Casas, Carmen; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; López-Gordillo, Yamila; Maldonado, Estela; Partearroyo, Teresa; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2013-09-01

    The eye is a very complex structure derived from the neural tube, surface ectoderm, and migratory mesenchyme from a neural crest origin. Because structures that evolve from the neural tube may be affected by a folate/folic acid (FA) deficiency, the aim of this work was to investigate whether a maternal folic acid-deficient diet may cause developmental alterations in the mouse eye. Female C57BL/6J mice (8 weeks old) were assigned into two different folic acid groups for periods ranging between 2 and 16 weeks. Animals were killed at gestation day 17. Hepatic folate was analyzed, and the eyes from 287 fetuses were macroscopically studied, sectioned and immunolabeled with anti-transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 and anti-TGF-βRII. Mice exposed to a FA-deficient diet exhibited numerous eye macroscopic anomalies, such as anophthalmia and microphthalmia. Microscopically, the eye was the most affected organ (43.7% of the fetuses). The highest incidence of malformations occurred from the 8th week onward. A statistically significant linear association between the number of maternal weeks on the FA-deficient diet and embryonic microscopic eye malformations was observed. The optic cup derivatives and structures forming the eye anterior segment showed severe abnormalities. In addition, TGF-β2 and TGF-βRII expression in the eye was also altered. This study suggests that an adequate folic acid/folate status plays a key role in the formation of ocular tissues and structures, whereas a vitamin deficiency is negatively associated with a normal eye development even after a short-term exposure. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Gastric Helicobacter infection induces iron deficiency in the INS-GAS mouse.

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    Melanie J Thomson

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence from clinical and population studies for a role of H. pylori infection in the aetiology of iron deficiency. Rodent models of Helicobacter infection are helpful for investigating any causal links and mechanisms of iron deficiency in the host. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gastric Helicobacter infection on iron deficiency and host iron metabolism/transport gene expression in hypergastrinemic INS-GAS mice. INS-GAS mice were infected with Helicobacter felis for 3, 6 and 9 months. At post mortem, blood was taken for assessment of iron status and gastric mucosa for pathology, immunohistology and analysis of gene expression. Chronic Helicobacter infection of INS- GAS mice resulted in decreased serum iron, transferrin saturation and hypoferritinemia and increased Total iron binding capacity (TIBC. Decreased serum iron concentrations were associated with a concomitant reduction in the number of parietal cells, strengthening the association between hypochlorhydria and gastric Helicobacter-induced iron deficiency. Infection with H. felis for nine months was associated with decreased gastric expression of iron metabolism regulators hepcidin, Bmp4 and Bmp6 but increased expression of Ferroportin 1, the iron efflux protein, iron absorption genes such as Divalent metal transporter 1, Transferrin receptor 1 and also Lcn2 a siderophore-binding protein. The INS-GAS mouse is therefore a useful model for studying Helicobacter-induced iron deficiency. Furthermore, the marked changes in expression of gastric iron transporters following Helicobacter infection may be relevant to the more rapid development of carcinogenesis in the Helicobacter infected INS-GAS model.

  10. Galactosylceramidase deficiency causes sperm abnormalities in the mouse model of globoid cell leukodystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luddi, A.; Strazza, M.; Carbone, M.; Moretti, E.; Costantino-Ceccarini, E.

    2005-01-01

    The classical recessive mouse mutant, 'the twitcher,' is one of the several animal models of the human globoid cell leukodystrophy (Krabbe disease) caused by a deficiency in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme galactosylceramidase (GALC). The failure to hydrolyze galactosylceramide (gal-cer) and galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) leads to degeneration of oligodendrocytes and severe demyelination. Substrate for GALC is also the galactosyl-alkyl-acyl-glycerol (GalAAG), precursor of the seminolipid, the most abundant glycolipid in spermatozoa of mammals. In this paper, we report the pathobiology of the testis and sperm in the twitcher mouse and demonstrate the importance of GALC for normal sperm maturation and function. The GALC deficit results in accumulation of GalAAG in the testis of the twitcher mouse. Morphological studies revealed that affected spermatozoa have abnormally swollen acrosomes and angulation of the flagellum mainly at midpiece-principal piece junction. Multiple folding of the principal piece was also observed. Electron microscopy analysis showed that in the twitcher sperm, acrosomal membrane is redundant, detached from the nucleus and folded over. Disorganization and abnormal arrangements of the axoneme components were also detected. These results provide in vivo evidence that GALC plays a critical role in spermiogenesis

  11. Mouse model of GM2 activator deficiency manifests cerebellar pathology and motor impairment.

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    Liu, Y; Hoffmann, A; Grinberg, A; Westphal, H; McDonald, M P; Miller, K M; Crawley, J N; Sandhoff, K; Suzuki, K; Proia, R L

    1997-07-22

    The GM2 activator deficiency (also known as the AB variant), Tay-Sachs disease, and Sandhoff disease are the major forms of the GM2 gangliosidoses, disorders caused by defective degradation of GM2 ganglioside. Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases are caused by mutations in the genes (HEXA and HEXB) encoding the subunits of beta-hexosaminidase A. The GM2 activator deficiency is caused by mutations in the GM2A gene encoding the GM2 activator protein. For degradation of GM2 ganglioside by beta-hexosamindase A, the GM2 activator protein must participate by forming a soluble complex with the ganglioside. In each of the disorders, GM2 ganglioside and related lipids accumulate to pathologic levels in neuronal lysosomes, resulting in clinically similar disorders with an onset in the first year of life, progressive neurodegeneration, and death by early childhood. We previously have described mouse models of Tay-Sachs (Hexa -/-) and Sandhoff (Hexb -/-) diseases with vastly different clinical phenotypes. The Hexa -/- mice were asymptomatic whereas the Hexb -/- mice were severely affected. Through gene disruption in embryonic stem cells we now have established a mouse model of the GM2 activator deficiency that manifests an intermediate phenotype. The Gm2a -/- mice demonstrated neuronal storage but only in restricted regions of the brain (piriform, entorhinal cortex, amygdala, and hypothalamic nuclei) reminiscent of the asymptomatic Tay-Sachs model mice. However, unlike the Tay-Sachs mice, the Gm2a -/- mice displayed significant storage in the cerebellum and defects in balance and coordination. The abnormal ganglioside storage in the Gm2a -/- mice consisted of GM2 with a low amount of GA2. The results demonstrate that the activator protein is required for GM2 degradation and also may indicate a role for the GM2 activator in GA2 degradation.

  12. Mouse model of GM2 activator deficiency manifests cerebellar pathology and motor impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yujing; Hoffmann, Alexander; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; McDonald, Michael P.; Miller, Katherine M.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.; Sandhoff, Konrad; Suzuki, Kinuko; Proia, Richard L.

    1997-01-01

    The GM2 activator deficiency (also known as the AB variant), Tay–Sachs disease, and Sandhoff disease are the major forms of the GM2 gangliosidoses, disorders caused by defective degradation of GM2 ganglioside. Tay–Sachs and Sandhoff diseases are caused by mutations in the genes (HEXA and HEXB) encoding the subunits of β-hexosaminidase A. The GM2 activator deficiency is caused by mutations in the GM2A gene encoding the GM2 activator protein. For degradation of GM2 ganglioside by β-hexosamindase A, the GM2 activator protein must participate by forming a soluble complex with the ganglioside. In each of the disorders, GM2 ganglioside and related lipids accumulate to pathologic levels in neuronal lysosomes, resulting in clinically similar disorders with an onset in the first year of life, progressive neurodegeneration, and death by early childhood. We previously have described mouse models of Tay–Sachs (Hexa −/−) and Sandhoff (Hexb −/−) diseases with vastly different clinical phenotypes. The Hexa −/− mice were asymptomatic whereas the Hexb −/− mice were severely affected. Through gene disruption in embryonic stem cells we now have established a mouse model of the GM2 activator deficiency that manifests an intermediate phenotype. The Gm2a −/− mice demonstrated neuronal storage but only in restricted regions of the brain (piriform, entorhinal cortex, amygdala, and hypothalamic nuclei) reminiscent of the asymptomatic Tay–Sachs model mice. However, unlike the Tay–Sachs mice, the Gm2a −/− mice displayed significant storage in the cerebellum and defects in balance and coordination. The abnormal ganglioside storage in the Gm2a −/− mice consisted of GM2 with a low amount of GA2. The results demonstrate that the activator protein is required for GM2 degradation and also may indicate a role for the GM2 activator in GA2 degradation. PMID:9223328

  13. Food withdrawal lowers energy expenditure and induces inactivity in long-chain fatty acid oxidation-deficient mouse models.

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    Diekman, Eugene F; van Weeghel, Michel; Wanders, Ronald J A; Visser, Gepke; Houten, Sander M

    2014-07-01

    Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is an inherited disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO). Patients with VLCAD deficiency may present with hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, cardiomyopathy, and myopathy. Although several mouse models have been developed to aid in the study of the pathogenesis of long-chain FAO defects, the muscular phenotype is underexposed. To address the muscular phenotype, we used a newly developed mouse model on a mixed genetic background with a more severe defect in FAO (LCAD(-/-); VLCAD(+/-)) in addition to a validated mouse model (LCAD(-/-); VLCAD(+/+)) and compared them with wild-type (WT) mice. We found that both mouse models show a 20% reduction in energy expenditure (EE) and a 3-fold decrease in locomotor activity in the unfed state. In addition, we found a 1.7°C drop in body temperature in unfed LCAD(-/-); VLCAD(+/+) mice compared with WT body temperature. We conclude that food withdrawal-induced inactivity, hypothermia, and reduction in EE are novel phenotypes associated with FAO deficiency in mice. Unexpectedly, inactivity was not explained by rhabdomyolysis, but rather reflected the overall reduced capacity of these mice to generate heat. We suggest that mice are partly protected against the negative consequence of an FAO defect.-Diekman, E. F., van Weeghel, M., Wanders, R. J. A., Visser, G., Houten, S. M. Food withdrawal lowers energy expenditure and induces inactivity in long-chain fatty acid oxidation-deficient mouse models. © FASEB.

  14. Impaired osteoclast homeostasis in the cystatin B-deficient mouse model of progressive myoclonus epilepsy

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    Otto Manninen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Progressive myoclonus epilepsy of Unverricht–Lundborg type (EPM1 is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by incapacitating stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures with onset at the age of 6 to 16 years. EPM1 patients also exhibit a range of skeletal changes, e.g., thickened frontal cranial bone, arachnodactyly and scoliosis. Mutations in the gene encoding cystatin B (CSTB underlie EPM1. CSTB is an inhibitor of cysteine cathepsins, including cathepsin K, a key enzyme in bone resorption by osteoclasts. CSTB has previously been shown to protect osteoclasts from experimentally induced apoptosis and to modulate bone resorption in vitro. Nevertheless, its physiological function in bone and the cause of the bone changes in patients remain unknown. Here we used the CSTB-deficient mouse (Cstb−/− model of EPM1 to evaluate the contribution of defective CSTB protein function on bone pathology and osteoclast differentiation and function. Micro-computed tomography of hind limbs revealed thicker trabeculae and elevated bone mineral density in the trabecular bone of Cstb−/− mice. Histology from Cstb−/− mouse bones showed lower osteoclast count and thinner growth plates in long bones. Bone marrow-derived osteoclast cultures revealed lower osteoclast number and size in the Cstb−/− group. Cstb−/− osteoclasts formed less and smaller resorption pits in an in vitro assay. This impaired resorptive capacity was likely due to a decrease in osteoclast numbers and size. These data imply that the skeletal changes in Cstb−/− mice and in EPM1 patients are a result of CSTB deficiency leading to impaired osteoclast formation and consequently compromised resorptive capacity. These results suggest that the role of CSTB in osteoclast homeostasis and modulation of bone metabolism extends beyond cathepsin K regulation.

  15. Sclerostin inhibition reverses skeletal fragility in an Lrp5-deficient mouse model of OPPG syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedlaya, Rajendra; Veera, Shreya; Horan, Daniel J; Moss, Rachel E; Ayturk, Ugur M; Jacobsen, Christina M; Bowen, Margot E; Paszty, Chris; Warman, Matthew L; Robling, Alexander G

    2013-11-13

    Osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) is a rare genetic disease that produces debilitating effects in the skeleton. OPPG is caused by mutations in LRP5, a WNT co-receptor that mediates osteoblast activity. WNT signaling through LRP5, and also through the closely related receptor LRP6, is inhibited by the protein sclerostin (SOST). It is unclear whether OPPG patients might benefit from the anabolic action of sclerostin neutralization therapy (an approach currently being pursued in clinical trials for postmenopausal osteoporosis) in light of their LRP5 deficiency and consequent osteoblast impairment. To assess whether loss of sclerostin is anabolic in OPPG, we measured bone properties in a mouse model of OPPG (Lrp5(-/-)), a mouse model of sclerosteosis (Sost(-/-)), and in mice with both genes knocked out (Lrp5(-/-);Sost(-/-)). Lrp5(-/-);Sost(-/-) mice have larger, denser, and stronger bones than do Lrp5(-/-) mice, indicating that SOST deficiency can improve bone properties via pathways that do not require LRP5. Next, we determined whether the anabolic effects of sclerostin depletion in Lrp5(-/-) mice are retained in adult mice by treating 17-week-old Lrp5(-/-) mice with a sclerostin antibody for 3 weeks. Lrp5(+/+) and Lrp5(-/-) mice each exhibited osteoanabolic responses to antibody therapy, as indicated by increased bone mineral density, content, and formation rates. Collectively, our data show that inhibiting sclerostin can improve bone mass whether LRP5 is present or not. In the absence of LRP5, the anabolic effects of SOST depletion can occur via other receptors (such as LRP4/6). Regardless of the mechanism, our results suggest that humans with OPPG might benefit from sclerostin neutralization therapies.

  16. Consequence of Menin Deficiency in Mouse Adipocytes Derived by In Vitro Differentiation

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    Vaishali I. Parekh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoma in patients with the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 syndrome is a type of benign fat-cell tumor that has biallelic inactivation of MEN1 that encodes menin and could serve as a model to investigate normal and pathologic fat-cell (adipocyte proliferation and function. The role of menin and its target genes in adipocytes is not known. We used in vitro differentiation to derive matched normal and menin-deficient adipocytes from wild type (WT and menin-null (Men1-KO mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs, respectively, or 3T3-L1 cells without or with menin knockdown to investigate cell size, lipid content, and gene expression changes. Adipocytes derived from Men1-KO mESCs or after menin knockdown in 3T3-L1 cells showed a 1.5–1.7-fold increase in fat-cell size. Global gene expression analysis of mESC-derived adipocytes showed that lack of menin downregulated the expression of many differentially methylated genes including the tumor suppressor long noncoding RNA Meg3 but upregulated gene expression from the prolactin gene family locus. Our results show that menin deficiency leads to fat-cell hypertrophy and provide model systems that could be used to study the regulation of fat-cell size.

  17. CD44 deficiency enhanced Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus dissemination and inflammation response in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Xiao, Pingping; Chen, Yaosheng; Wei, Zigong; Liu, Xiaohong

    2017-12-01

    Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) is responsible for peritonitis, septicemia, meningitis, arthritis and several other serious diseases in various species. Recent studies have demonstrated that CD44 is implicated in the process of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. In the present study, the role of CD44 in the host response to S. zooepidemicus infection was investigated in a mouse model. Upon intraperitoneal infection with S. zooepidemicus, the expression of CD44 on the peritoneal exudate cells from wild-type (WT) mice was increased. CD44 deficiency accelerated mortality, which was accompanied by increased peritoneal bacterial growth and dissemination to distant body sites. CD44 knock-out (KO) mice showed enhanced early inflammatory cell recruitment into the peritoneal fluid on S. zooepidemicus infection. In line with this, the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines in peritoneal exudate cells and peritoneal macrophages of CD44 KO mice were increased compared with those of WT mice. In addition, CD44 deficiency was associated with reduced expression of A20, a negative regulator in TLR signaling. Overall, the present study suggests that CD44 plays a protective role in antibacterial defense against S. zooepidemicus in mice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Taurine deficiency, synthesis and transport in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jessica R; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2015-09-01

    The amino acid taurine is essential for the function of skeletal muscle and administration is proposed as a treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Taurine homeostasis is dependent on multiple processes including absorption of taurine from food, endogenous synthesis from cysteine and reabsorption in the kidney. This study investigates the cause of reported taurine deficiency in the dystrophic mdx mouse model of DMD. Levels of metabolites (taurine, cysteine, cysteine sulfinate and hypotaurine) and proteins (taurine transporter [TauT], cysteine deoxygenase and cysteine sulfinate dehydrogenase) were quantified in juvenile control C57 and dystrophic mdx mice aged 18 days, 4 and 6 weeks. In C57 mice, taurine content was much higher in both liver and plasma at 18 days, and both cysteine and cysteine deoxygenase were increased. As taurine levels decreased in maturing C57 mice, there was increased transport (reabsorption) of taurine in the kidney and muscle. In mdx mice, taurine and cysteine levels were much lower in liver and plasma at 18 days, and in muscle cysteine was low at 18 days, whereas taurine was lower at 4: these changes were associated with perturbations in taurine transport in liver, kidney and muscle and altered metabolism in liver and kidney. These data suggest that the maintenance of adequate body taurine relies on sufficient dietary intake of taurine and cysteine availability and metabolism, as well as retention of taurine by the kidney. This research indicates dystrophin deficiency not only perturbs taurine metabolism in the muscle but also affects taurine metabolism in the liver and kidney, and supports targeting cysteine and taurine deficiency as a potential therapy for DMD. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Iodine deficiency up-regulates monocarboxylate transporter 8 expression of mouse thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhimei; Zhuo, Xiaohua; Shi, Yanan; Liu, Xin; Yuan, Jihong; Li, Lanying; Sun, Yina

    2014-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a major factor affecting thyroid auto-regulation, the quantity of iodine may greatly influence the synthesis of thyroid hormones (THs). It has long been believed that TH enters the cell through passive diffusion. Recent studies have suggested that several transporters could facilitate transportation of TH. The monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) was identified as a very active and specific TH transporter. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether iodine insufficient affected the expression of MCT8 in the thyroid gland. Sixty BALB/c mice were randomly divided into two groups: control group was fed with standard feed (iodine concentration of 300 µg/kg); while low-iodine (LI) group received iodine-insufficient feed (iodine concentration of 20-40 µg/kg). After 3 months, 10 mice of each group were sacrificed. The remaining 20 mice of each group were kept till 6 months. From the LI group, we randomly selected 15 mice and injected triiodothyronine (T3, 100 µg/kg body weight per day) intraperitoneally for 24, 48 or 72 hours (5 mice for each time-point). Then, all the mice were sacrificed. Mouse serum thyroxine (T4), T3, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were determined by chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA). The protein content or messenger RNA (mRNA) level of thyroid MCT8 was measured by Western blotting analysis or real time RT-PCR respectively. MCT8 subcellular location in thyroid tissues was probed with immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay. We found that mouse serum T3 and T4 levels decreased and TSH level increased by the end of the third month. Consistent with these findings, there was significant goiter and hypothyroidism in the LI group. Meanwhile, the MCT8 mRNA increased to 1.36-fold of the level in the control group at the 3(rd) month. At 6(th) month, the serum T4 level in LI mice remained at a lower level, and MCT8 mRNA expression continued rising to nearly 1.60-fold compared with the control group. The protein content

  20. Acute metabolic decompensation due to influenza in a mouse model of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency

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    Peter J. McGuire

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The urea cycle functions to incorporate ammonia, generated by normal metabolism, into urea. Urea cycle disorders (UCDs are caused by loss of function in any of the enzymes responsible for ureagenesis, and are characterized by life-threatening episodes of acute metabolic decompensation with hyperammonemia (HA. A prospective analysis of interim HA events in a cohort of individuals with ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC deficiency, the most common UCD, revealed that intercurrent infection was the most common precipitant of acute HA and was associated with markers of increased morbidity when compared with other precipitants. To further understand these clinical observations, we developed a model system of metabolic decompensation with HA triggered by viral infection (PR8 influenza using spf-ash mice, a model of OTC deficiency. Both wild-type (WT and spf-ash mice displayed similar cytokine profiles and lung viral titers in response to PR8 influenza infection. During infection, spf-ash mice displayed an increase in liver transaminases, suggesting a hepatic sensitivity to the inflammatory response and an altered hepatic immune response. Despite having no visible pathological changes by histology, WT and spf-ash mice had reduced CPS1 and OTC enzyme activities, and, unlike WT, spf-ash mice failed to increase ureagenesis. Depression of urea cycle function was seen in liver amino acid analysis, with reductions seen in aspartate, ornithine and arginine during infection. In conclusion, we developed a model system of acute metabolic decompensation due to infection in a mouse model of a UCD. In addition, we have identified metabolic perturbations during infection in the spf-ash mice, including a reduction of urea cycle intermediates. This model of acute metabolic decompensation with HA due to infection in UCD serves as a platform for exploring biochemical perturbations and the efficacy of treatments, and could be adapted to explore acute decompensation in other

  1. The renal phenotype of allopurinol-treated HPRT-deficient mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarattini, Paola; Clai, Milan; Corbelli, Alessandro; Carraro, Michele; Marchetti, Marialaura; Ronda, Luca; Paredi, Gianluca; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Percudani, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Excess of uric acid is mainly treated with xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors, also called uricostatics because they block the conversion of hypoxanthine and xanthine into urate. Normally, accumulation of upstream metabolites is prevented by the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) enzyme. The recycling pathway, however, is impaired in the presence of HPRT deficiency, as observed in Lesch-Nyhan disease. To gain insights into the consequences of purine accumulation with HPRT deficiency, we investigated the effects of the XO inhibitor allopurinol in Hprt-lacking (HPRT-/-) mice. Allopurinol was administered in the drinking water of E12-E14 pregnant mothers at dosages of 150 or 75 μg/ml, and mice sacrificed after weaning. The drug was well tolerated by wild-type animals and heterozygous HPRT+/- mice. Instead, a profound alteration of the renal function was observed in the HPRT-/- model. Increased hypoxanthine and xanthine concentrations were found in the blood. The kidneys showed a yellowish appearance, diffuse interstitial nephritis, with dilated tubules, inflammatory and fibrotic changes of the interstitium. There were numerous xanthine tubular crystals, as determined by HPLC analysis. Oil red O staining demonstrated lipid accumulation in the same location of xanthine deposits. mRNA analysis showed increased expression of adipogenesis-related molecules as well as profibrotic and proinflammatory pathways. Immunostaining showed numerous monocyte-macrophages and overexpression of alpha-smooth muscle actin in the tubulointerstitium. In vitro, addition of xanthine to tubular cells caused diffuse oil red O positivity and modification of the cell phenotype, with loss of epithelial features and appearance of mesenchymal characteristics, similarly to what was observed in vivo. Our results indicate that in the absence of HPRT, blockade of XO by allopurinol causes rapidly developing renal failure due to xanthine deposition within the mouse kidney. Xanthine seems

  2. Genome-wide erasure of DNA methylation in mouse primordial germ cells is affected by AID deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Christian; Dean, Wendy; Feng, Suhua; Cokus, Shawn J; Andrews, Simon; Pellegrini, Matteo; Jacobsen, Steven E; Reik, Wolf

    2010-02-25

    Epigenetic reprogramming including demethylation of DNA occurs in mammalian primordial germ cells (PGCs) and in early embryos, and is important for the erasure of imprints and epimutations, and the return to pluripotency. The extent of this reprogramming and its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We previously showed that the cytidine deaminases AID and APOBEC1 can deaminate 5-methylcytosine in vitro and in Escherichia coli, and in the mouse are expressed in tissues in which demethylation occurs. Here we profiled DNA methylation throughout the genome by unbiased bisulphite next generation sequencing in wild-type and AID-deficient mouse PGCs at embryonic day (E)13.5. Wild-type PGCs revealed marked genome-wide erasure of methylation to a level below that of methylation deficient (Np95(-/-), also called Uhrf1(-/-)) embryonic stem cells, with female PGCs being less methylated than male ones. By contrast, AID-deficient PGCs were up to three times more methylated than wild-type ones; this substantial difference occurred throughout the genome, with introns, intergenic regions and transposons being relatively more methylated than exons. Relative hypermethylation in AID-deficient PGCs was confirmed by analysis of individual loci in the genome. Our results reveal that erasure of DNA methylation in the germ line is a global process, hence limiting the potential for transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. AID deficiency interferes with genome-wide erasure of DNA methylation patterns, indicating that AID has a critical function in epigenetic reprogramming and potentially in restricting the inheritance of epimutations in mammals.

  3. Acetylcholine Elevation Relieves Cognitive Rigidity and Social Deficiency in a Mouse Model of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvat, Golan; Kimchi, Tali

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are defined by behavioral deficits in social interaction and communication, repetitive stereotyped behaviors, and restricted interests/cognitive rigidity. Recent studies in humans and animal-models suggest that dysfunction of the cholinergic system may underlie autism-related behavioral symptoms. Here we tested the hypothesis that augmentation of acetylcholine (ACh) in the synaptic cleft by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase may ameliorate autistic phenotypes. We first administered the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) Donepezil systemically by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections. Second, the drug was injected directly into the rodent homolog of the caudate nucleus, the dorsomedial striatum (DMS), of the inbred mouse strain BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR), a commonly-used model presenting all core autism-related phenotypes and expressing low brain ACh levels. We found that i.p. injection of AChEI to BTBR mice significantly relieved autism-relevant phenotypes, including decreasing cognitive rigidity, improving social preference, and enhancing social interaction, in a dose-dependent manner. Microinjection of the drug directly into the DMS, but not into the ventromedial striatum, led to significant amelioration of the cognitive-rigidity and social-deficiency phenotypes. Taken together, these findings provide evidence of the key role of the cholinergic system and the DMS in the etiology of ASD, and suggest that elevated cognitive flexibility may result in enhanced social attention. The potential therapeutic effect of AChEIs in ASD patients is discussed. PMID:24096295

  4. Sod1 deficiency reduces incubation time in mouse models of prion disease.

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    Shaheen Akhtar

    Full Text Available Prion infections, causing neurodegenerative conditions such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep and BSE in cattle are characterised by prolonged and variable incubation periods that are faithfully reproduced in mouse models. Incubation time is partly determined by genetic factors including polymorphisms in the prion protein gene. Quantitative trait loci studies in mice and human genome-wide association studies have confirmed that multiple genes are involved. Candidate gene approaches have also been used and identified App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 as affecting incubation times. In this study we looked for an association between App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 representative SNPs and prion disease incubation time in the Northport heterogeneous stock of mice inoculated with the Chandler/RML prion strain. No association was seen with App, however, significant associations were seen with Il1-r1 (P = 0.02 and Sod1 (P<0.0001 suggesting that polymorphisms at these loci contribute to the natural variation observed in incubation time. Furthermore, following challenge with Chandler/RML, ME7 and MRC2 prion strains, Sod1 deficient mice showed highly significant reductions in incubation time of 20, 13 and 24%, respectively. No differences were detected in Sod1 expression or activity. Our data confirm the protective role of endogenous Sod1 in prion disease.

  5. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency

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    Igor Khalin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI.

  6. G6pd Deficiency Does Not Affect the Cytosolic Glutathione or Thioredoxin Antioxidant Defense in Mouse Cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Karessa; Park, Hyo-Jin; Meneses, Zaimary; Salvi, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway; it catalyzes the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to 6-phosphogluconate and NADP+ to NADPH and is thought to be the principal source of NADPH for the cytosolic glutathione and thioredoxin antioxidant defense systems. We investigated the roles of G6PD in the cytosolic antioxidant defense in the cochlea of G6pd hypomorphic mice that were backcrossed onto normal-hearing CBA/CaJ mice. Young G6pd-deficient mice displayed a significant decrease in cytosolic G6PD protein levels and activities in the inner ears. However, G6pd deficiency did not affect the cytosolic NADPH redox state, or glutathione or thioredoxin antioxidant defense in the inner ears. No histological abnormalities or oxidative damage was observed in the cochlea of G6pd hemizygous males or homozygous females. Furthermore, G6pd deficiency did not affect auditory brainstem response hearing thresholds, wave I amplitudes or wave I latencies in young males or females. In contrast, G6pd deficiency resulted in increased activities and protein levels of cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase 1, an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate and NADP+ to NADPH, in the inner ear. In a mouse inner ear cell line, knockdown of Idh1, but not G6pd, decreased cell growth rates, cytosolic NADPH levels, and thioredoxin reductase activities. Therefore, under normal physiological conditions, G6pd deficiency does not affect the cytosolic glutathione or thioredoxin antioxidant defense in mouse cochlea. Under G6pd deficiency conditions, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 likely functions as the principal source of NADPH for cytosolic antioxidant defense in the cochlea. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway; it catalyzes the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to 6-phosphogluconate and NADP+ to NADPH and is

  7. Reducing small intestinal permeability attenuates colitis in the IL10 gene-deficient mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, M C; Madsen, K; Doyle, J; Meddings, J

    2008-01-01

    Background: Defects in the small intestinal epithelial barrier have been associated with inflammatory bowel disease but their role in the causation of disease is still a matter of debate. In some models of disease increased permeability appears to be a very early event. The interleukin 10 (IL10) gene-deficient mouse spontaneously develops colitis after 12 weeks of age. These mice have been shown to have increased small intestinal permeability that appears early in life. Furthermore, the development of colitis is dependent upon luminal agents, as animals do not develop disease if raised under germ-free conditions. Aims: To determine if the elevated small bowel permeability can be prevented, and if by doing so colonic disease is prevented or attenuated. Methods: IL10 gene-deficient (IL10−/−) mice) were treated with AT-1001 (a zonulin peptide inhibitor), a small peptide previously demonstrated to reduce small intestinal permeability. Small intestinal permeability was measured, in vivo, weekly from 4 to 17 weeks of age. Colonic disease was assessed at 8 weeks in Ussing chambers, and at 17 weeks of age inflammatory cytokines and myeloperoxidase were measured in the colon. Colonic permeability and histology were also endpoints. Results: Treated animals showed a marked reduction in small intestinal permeability. Average area under the lactulose/mannitol time curve: 5.36 (SE 0.08) in controls vs 3.97 (SE 0.07) in the high-dose AT-1001 group, p<0.05. At 8 weeks of age there was a significant reduction of colonic mucosal permeability and increased electrical resistance. By 17 weeks of age, secretion of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) from a colonic explant was significantly lower in the treated group (25.33 (SE 4.30) pg/mg vs 106.93 (SE 17.51) pg/ml in controls, p<0.01). All other markers also demonstrated a clear reduction of colitis in the treated animals. Additional experiments were performed which demonstrated that AT-1001 was functionally active only in the small

  8. Dystrophin- and MLP-deficient mouse hearts: marked differences in morphology and function, but similar accumulation of cytoskeletal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, James R; Schneider, Jürgen E; Sang, A Elizabeth; Davies, Kay E; Neubauer, Stefan; Clarke, Kieran

    2005-01-01

    In humans, cytoskeletal dystrophin and muscle LIM protein (MLP) gene mutations can cause dilated cardiomyopathy, yet these mutations may have different effects in mice, owing to increased accumulation of other, compensatory cytoskeletal proteins. Consequently, we characterized left-ventricular (LV) morphology and function in vivo using high-resolution cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 2- to 3-month old dystrophin-deficient (mdx) and MLP-null mice, and their respective controls. LV passive stiffness was assessed in isolated, perfused hearts, and cytoskeletal protein levels were determined using Western blot analyses. In mdx mouse hearts, LV-to-body weight ratio, cavity volume, ejection fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac output were normal. However, MLP-null mouse hearts had 1.2-fold higher LV-to-body weight ratios (PMLP, and MLP-null mouse hearts accumulated dystrophin and syncoilin. Although the increase in MLP and utrophin in the mdx mouse heart was able to compensate for the loss of dystrophin, accumulation of desmin, syncoilin and dystrophin were unable to compensate for the loss of MLP, resulting in heart failure.

  9. Mouse p53-Deficient Cancer Models as Platforms for Obtaining Genomic Predictors of Human Cancer Clinical Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, Marta; Santos, Mirentxu; Aranda, Juan F.; Bielza, Concha; Martínez-Cruz, Ana B.; Lorz, Corina; Taron, Miquel; Ciruelos, Eva M.; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L.; Martín, Miguel; Larrañaga, Pedro; Dahabreh, Jubrail; Stathopoulos, George P.; Rosell, Rafael; Paramio, Jesús M.; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the TP53 gene are very common in human cancers, and are associated with poor clinical outcome. Transgenic mouse models lacking the Trp53 gene or that express mutant Trp53 transgenes produce tumours with malignant features in many organs. We previously showed the transcriptome of a p53-deficient mouse skin carcinoma model to be similar to those of human cancers with TP53 mutations and associated with poor clinical outcomes. This report shows that much of the 682-gene signature of this murine skin carcinoma transcriptome is also present in breast and lung cancer mouse models in which p53 is inhibited. Further, we report validated gene-expression-based tests for predicting the clinical outcome of human breast and lung adenocarcinoma. It was found that human patients with cancer could be stratified based on the similarity of their transcriptome with the mouse skin carcinoma 682-gene signature. The results also provide new targets for the treatment of p53-defective tumours. PMID:22880004

  10. Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy. Partial genetic correction in two mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuang, W; Xu, H; Vachon, P H

    1998-01-01

    Humans and mice with deficiency of the alpha2 subunit of the basement membrane protein laminin-2/merosin suffer from merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MCMD). We have expressed a human laminin alpha2 chain transgene under the regulation of a muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter...

  11. Genetic Deficiency of Complement Component 3 Does Not Alter Disease Progression in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Paul B.; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Several genes and proteins of the complement cascade are present at elevated levels in brains of patients with Huntington's disease (HD). The complement cascade is well characterized as an effector arm of the immune system, and in the brain it is important for developmental synapse elimination. We hypothesized that increased levels of complement in HD brains contributes to disease progression, perhaps by contributing to synapse elimination or inflammatory signaling. We tested this hypothesis in the R6/2 mouse model of HD by crossing mice deficient in complement component 3 (C3), a crucial complement protein found at increased levels in HD brains, to R6/2 mice and monitoring behavioral and neuropathological disease progression. We found no alterations in multiple behavioral assays, weight or survival in R6/2 mice lacking C3. We also quantified the expression of several complement cascade genes in R6/2 brains and found that the large scale upregulation of complement genes observed in HD brains is not mirrored in R6/2 brains. These data show that C3 deficiency does not alter disease progression in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. PMID:23097680

  12. Mitochondrial Complexes I and II Are More Susceptible to Autophagy Deficiency in Mouse β-Cells

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    Min Joo Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDamaged mitochondria are removed by autophagy. Therefore, impairment of autophagy induces the accumulation of damaged mitochondria and mitochondrial dysfunction in most mammalian cells. Here, we investigated mitochondrial function and the expression of mitochondrial complexes in autophagy-related 7 (Atg7-deficient β-cells.MethodsTo evaluate the effect of autophagy deficiency on mitochondrial function in pancreatic β-cells, we isolated islets from Atg7F/F:RIP-Cre+ mice and wild-type littermates. Oxygen consumption rate and intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP content were measured. The expression of mitochondrial complex genes in Atg7-deficient islets and in β-TC6 cells transfected with siAtg7 was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.ResultsBaseline oxygen consumption rate of Atg7-deficient islets was significantly lower than that of control islets (P<0.05. Intracellular ATP content of Atg7-deficient islets during glucose stimulation was also significantly lower than that of control islets (P<0.05. By Oxygraph-2k analysis, mitochondrial respiration in Atg7-deficient islets was significantly decreased overall, although state 3 respiration and responses to antimycin A were unaffected. The mRNA levels of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V in Atg7-deficient islets were significantly lower than in control islets (P<0.05. Down-regulation of Atg7 in β-TC6 cells also reduced the expression of complexes I and II, with marginal significance (P<0.1.ConclusionImpairment of autophagy in pancreatic β-cells suppressed the expression of some mitochondrial respiratory complexes, and may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. Among the complexes, I and II seem to be most vulnerable to autophagy deficiency.

  13. Vitamin D Deficiency in BALB/c Mouse Pregnancy Increases Placental Transfer of Glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesic, Dijana; Hawes, Jazmin E; Zosky, Graeme R; Wyrwoll, Caitlin S

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is increasing and implicated in adverse consequences for the health of offspring in later life. The aim of this study was to determine whether vitamin D deficiency increases fetal exposure to glucocorticoids, which are known to alter fetal development and result in adverse adult health outcomes. Female BALB/c mice were placed on either a vitamin D control (2195 IU/kg) or deficient (0 IU/kg) diet for 5 weeks before and during pregnancy. Maternal serum, placentas and fetal brains were collected at embryonic day 14.5 or 17.5 for morphological and gene expression analysis. Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy increased maternal corticosterone concentrations and reduced placental weight. Maternal vitamin D deficiency decreased placental expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II, which inactivates glucocorticoids thereby protecting the fetus from inappropriate glucocorticoid exposure. There was a corresponding increase in placental and fetal expression of the highly glucocorticoid-sensitive factor glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper. Furthermore, placental expression of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor-A was reduced in vitamin D-deficient pregnancies, with a corresponding decline in fetal capillary volume within the placenta. Overall, we show that prenatal vitamin D deficiency leads to an increase in maternal corticosterone, alterations in genes indicative of increased fetal glucocorticoid exposure and impairment in placental vascular development. Thus, the long-term adverse health consequences of vitamin D deficiency during early development may not just be due to alteration in direct vitamin D-related pathways but also altered fetal glucocorticoid exposure.

  14. Cerebral Developmental Abnormalities in a Mouse with Systemic Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

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    Lioudmila Pliss

    Full Text Available Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH complex (PDC deficiency is an inborn error of pyruvate metabolism causing a variety of neurologic manifestations. Systematic analyses of development of affected brain structures and the cellular processes responsible for their impairment have not been performed due to the lack of an animal model for PDC deficiency.In the present study we investigated a murine model of systemic PDC deficiency by interrupting the X-linked Pdha1 gene encoding the α subunit of PDH to study its role on brain development and behavioral studies.Male embryos died prenatally but heterozygous females were born. PDC activity was reduced in the brain and other tissues in female progeny compared to age-matched control females. Immunohistochemical analysis of several brain regions showed that approximately 40% of cells were PDH(-. The oxidation of glucose to CO2 and incorporation of glucose-carbon into fatty acids were reduced in brain slices from 15 day-old PDC-deficient females. Histological analyses showed alterations in several structures in white and gray matters in 35 day-old PDC-deficient females. Reduction in total cell number and reduced dendritic arbors in Purkinje neurons were observed in PDC-deficient females. Furthermore, cell proliferation, migration and differentiation into neurons by newly generated cells were reduced in the affected females during pre- and postnatal periods. PDC-deficient mice had normal locomotor activity in a novel environment but displayed decreased startle responses to loud noises and there was evidence of abnormal pre-pulse inhibition of the startle reflex.The results show that a reduction in glucose metabolism resulting in deficit in energy production and fatty acid biosynthesis impairs cellular differentiation and brain development in PDC-deficient mice.

  15. Inhibitory monoclonal antibodies against mouse proteases raised in gene-deficient mice block proteolytic functions in vivo

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    Ida Katrine Lund

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Identification of targets for cancer therapy requires the understanding of the in vivo roles of proteins, which can be derived from studies using gene-targeted mice. An alternative strategy is the administration of inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, causing acute disruption of the target protein function(s. This approach has the advantage of being a model for therapeutic targeting. mAbs for use in mouse models can be obtained through immunization of gene-deficient mice with the autologous protein. Such mAbs react with both species-specific epitopes and epitopes conserved between species. mAbs against proteins involved in extracellular proteolysis, including plasminogen activators (uPA, tPA, their inhibitor PAI-1, the uPA receptor (uPAR, two matrix metalloproteinases (MMP9 and MMP14, as well as the collagen internalization receptor uPARAP, have been developed. The inhibitory mAbs against uPA and uPAR block plasminogen activation and thereby hepatic fibrinolysis in vivo. Wound healing, another plasmin-dependent process, is delayed by an inhibitory mAb against uPA in the adult mouse. Thromboembolism can be inhibited by anti-PAI-1 mAbs in vivo. In conclusion, function-blocking mAbs are well-suited for targeted therapy in mouse models of different diseases, including cancer.

  16. A deficiency of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF in Harlequin mouse heart mitochondria paradoxically reduces ROS generation during ischemia-reperfusion

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    Qun eChen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: AIF (apoptosis inducing factor is a flavin and NADH containing protein located within mitochondria required for optimal function of the respiratory chain. AIF may function as an antioxidant within mitochondria, yet when released from mitochondria it activates caspase-independent cell death. The Harlequin (Hq mouse has a markedly reduced content of AIF, providing an experimental model to query if the main role of AIF in the exacerbation of cell death is enhanced mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS or the activation of cell death programs. We asked if the ROS generation is altered in Hq heart mitochondria at baseline or following ischemia-reperfusion (IR.Methods: Buffer perfused mouse hearts underwent 30 min ischemia and 30 min reperfusion. Mitochondrial function including oxidative phosphorylation and H2O2 generation was measured. Immunoblotting was used to determine the contents of AIF and PAR [poly(ADP-ribose] in cell fractions.Results: There were no differences in the release of H2O2 between wild type (WT and Hq heart mitochondria at baseline. IR increased H2O2 generation from WT but not from Hq mitochondria compared to corresponding time controls. The complex I activity was decreased in WT but not in Hq mice following IR. The relocation of AIF from mitochondria to nucleus was increased in WT but not in Hq mice. IR activated PARP-1 only in WT mice. Cell injury was decreased in Hq mouse heart following in vitro IR.Conclusion: A deficiency of AIF within mitochondria does not increase ROS production during IR, indicating that AIF functions less as an antioxidant within mitochondria. The decreased cardiac injury in Hq mouse heart accompanied by less AIF translocation to the nucleus suggests that AIF relocation, rather than the AIF content within mitochondria, contributes to cardiac injury during IR.

  17. Cadherin-13 Deficiency Increases Dorsal Raphe 5-HT Neuron Density and Prefrontal Cortex Innervation in the Mouse Brain

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    Andrea Forero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: During early prenatal stages of brain development, serotonin (5-HT-specific neurons migrate through somal translocation to form the raphe nuclei and subsequently begin to project to their target regions. The rostral cluster of cells, comprising the median and dorsal raphe (DR, innervates anterior regions of the brain, including the prefrontal cortex. Differential analysis of the mouse 5-HT system transcriptome identified enrichment of cell adhesion molecules in 5-HT neurons of the DR. One of these molecules, cadherin-13 (Cdh13 has been shown to play a role in cell migration, axon pathfinding, and synaptogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of Cdh13 to the development of the murine brain 5-HT system.Methods: For detection of Cdh13 and components of the 5-HT system at different embryonic developmental stages of the mouse brain, we employed immunofluorescence protocols and imaging techniques, including epifluorescence, confocal and structured illumination microscopy. The consequence of CDH13 loss-of-function mutations on brain 5-HT system development was explored in a mouse model of Cdh13 deficiency.Results: Our data show that in murine embryonic brain Cdh13 is strongly expressed on 5-HT specific neurons of the DR and in radial glial cells (RGCs, which are critically involved in regulation of neuronal migration. We observed that 5-HT neurons are intertwined with these RGCs, suggesting that these neurons undergo RGC-guided migration. Cdh13 is present at points of intersection between these two cell types. Compared to wildtype controls, Cdh13-deficient mice display increased cell densities in the DR at embryonic stages E13.5, E17.5, and adulthood, and higher serotonergic innervation of the prefrontal cortex at E17.5.Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence for a role of CDH13 in the development of the serotonergic system in early embryonic stages. Specifically, we indicate that Cdh13 deficiency affects the cell

  18. Functionally deficient neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic neural stem cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balasubramaniyan, [No Value; de Haas, AH; Bakels, R; Koper, A; Boddeke, HWGM; Copray, JM

    Embryonic mouse neural stem cells (NSCs) were isolated from E14 mice, multiplied in medium containing epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and plated in laminin-coated wells in basic serum-free neurobasal medium. After 7 days in vitro, approximately 20% of the

  19. Rationale for a conditional knockout mouse model to study carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, FR; Drijfholt, A; Kuipers, JRG; Quant, PA; Eaton, S

    1999-01-01

    Several severe congenital cardiomyopathies are known to be associated with deficiencies in long-chain fatty acid transport and oxidation. Our studies are focused on a key enzyme in the regulation of intracellular long-chain fatty acid transport: carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1. Of this enzyme, two

  20. Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibodies against Mouse Proteases Raised in Gene-Deficient Mice Block Proteolytic Functions in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K; Rasch, Morten G; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2012-01-01

    Identification of targets for cancer therapy requires the understanding of the in vivo roles of proteins, which can be derived from studies using gene-targeted mice. An alternative strategy is the administration of inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), causing acute disruption of the target...... protein function(s). This approach has the advantage of being a model for therapeutic targeting. mAbs for use in mouse models can be obtained through immunization of gene-deficient mice with the autologous protein. Such mAbs react with both species-specific epitopes and epitopes conserved between species....... mAbs against proteins involved in extracellular proteolysis, including plasminogen activators urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), their inhibitor PAI-1, the uPA receptor (uPAR), two matrix metalloproteinases (MMP9 and MMP14), as well as the collagen...

  1. Galactonojirimycin derivatives restore mutant human beta-galactosidase activities expressed in fibroblasts from enzyme-deficient knockout mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, L; Ogawa, Y; Taniguchi, M; Ohno, K; Matsuda, J; Oshima, A; Suzuki, Y; Nanba, E

    2001-08-01

    Ten low molecular compounds analogous to galactose were screened for inhibition of human beta-galactosidase activity. Among them, 1-deoxy-galactonojirimycin and N-(n-butyl)-deoxy-galactonojirimycin showed an inhibitory effect at high concentrations. However, they restored mutant enzyme activities expressed in enzyme-deficient knockout mouse fibroblasts and human beta-galactosidosis fibroblasts at lower intracellular concentrations. This effect was more remarkable on G(M1)-gangliosidosis mutations (R201C, I51T, R201H, R457Q) than Morquio B disease mutations (W273L, Y83H). These low molecular compounds pass though the blood-brain barrier in mice. We hope that this new therapeutic approach will become clinically applicable in the near future.

  2. Transcriptional regulatory program in wild-type and retinoblastoma gene-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts during adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakim-Weber, Robab; Krogsdam, Anne-M; Jørgensen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Although many molecular regulators of adipogenesis have been identified a comprehensive catalogue of components is still missing. Recent studies showed that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) was expressed in the cell cycle and late cellular differentiation phase during adipogenesis. To investigate...... this dual role of pRb in the early and late stages of adipogenesis we used microarrays to perform a comprehensive systems-level analysis of the common transcriptional program of the classic 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line, wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and retinoblastoma gene-deficient MEFs...... of experimental data and computational analyses pinpointed a feedback-loop between Pparg and Foxo1.To analyze the effects of the retinoblastoma protein at the transcriptional level we chose a perturbated system (Rb-/- MEFs) for comparison to the transcriptional program of wild-type MEFs. Gene ontology analysis...

  3. NAD+ supplementation normalizes key Alzheimer's features and DNA damage responses in a new AD mouse model with introduced DNA repair deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yujun; Lautrup, Sofie; Cordonnier, Stephanie

    2018-01-01

    Emerging findings suggest that compromised cellular bioenergetics and DNA repair contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but their role in disease-defining pathology is unclear. We developed a DNA repair-deficient 3xTgAD/Polβ+/− mouse that exacerbates major features of human AD...

  4. Tenascin-C Deficiency in Apo E−/− Mouse Increases Eotaxin Levels: Implications for Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai; Shah, Prediman K.; Wang, Wei; Song, Lei; Yang, Mingjie; Sharifi, Behrooz G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To investigate the potential role of inflammatory cytokines in apo E−/− mouse in response to deletion of Tenascin-C (TNC) gene. Methods and results We used antibody array and ELISA to compare the profile of circulating inflammatory cytokines in apo E−/− mice and apo E−/− TNC−/− double knockout mice. In addition, tissue culture studies were performed to investigate the activity of cells from each mouse genotype in vitro. Cytokine array analysis and subsequent ELISA showed that circulating eotaxin levels were selectively and markedly increased in response to TNC gene deletion in apo E−/− mice. In addition, considerable variation was noted in the circulating level of eotaxin among the control apo E−/− mouse group. Inbreeding of apo E−/− mice with high or low levels of plasma eotaxin showed that the level of eotaxin per se determines the extent of atherosclerosis in this mouse genotype. While endothelial cells from apo E−/− mice had low level of eotaxin expression, cells derived from apo E−/−TNC−/− mice expressed a high level of eotaxin. Transient transfection of eotaxin promoter-reporter constructs revealed that eotaxin expression is regulated at the transcriptional level by TNC. Histochemical analysis of aortic sections revealed the massive accumulation of mast cells in the adventitia of double KO mice lesions whereas no such accumulation was detected in the control group. Plasma from the apo E−/−TNC−/− mice markedly stimulated mast cell migration whereas plasma from the apo E−/− mice had no such effect. Conclusion These observations support the emerging hypothesis that TNC expression controls eotaxin level in apo E−/− mice and that this chemokine plays a key role in the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:23433402

  5. Subfertility and growth restriction in a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) - deficient mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Manshu; Siddiqi, Anwer; Witt, Benjamin; Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Johnson, Britt; Fraser, Nisa; Chen, Wyman; Rascon, Rafael; Yin, Xue; Goli, Harish; Bodamer, Olaf A; Lai, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The first GalT gene knockout (KO) mouse model for Classic Galactosemia (OMIM 230400) accumulated some galactose and its metabolites upon galactose challenge, but was seemingly fertile and symptom free. Here we constructed a new GalT gene-trapped mouse model by injecting GalT gene-trapped mouse embryonic stem cells into blastocysts, which were later implanted into pseudo-pregnant females. High percentage GalT gene-trapped chimera obtained were used to generate heterozygous and subsequently, homozygous GalT gene-trapped mice. Biochemical assays confirmed total absence of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity in the homozygotes. Although the homozygous GalT gene-trapped females could conceive and give birth when fed with normal chow, they had smaller litter size (P=0.02) and longer time-to-pregnancy (P=0.013) than their wild-type littermates. Follicle-stimulating hormone levels of the mutant female mice were not significantly different from the age-matched, wild-type females, but histological examination of the ovaries revealed fewer follicles in the homozygous mutants (P=0.007). Administration of a high-galactose (40% w/w) diet to lactating homozygous GalT gene-trapped females led to lethality in over 70% of the homozygous GalT gene-trapped pups before weaning. Cerebral edema, abnormal changes in the Purkinje and the outer granular cell layers of the cerebellum, as well as lower blood GSH/GSSG ratio were identified in the galactose-intoxicated pups. Finally, reduced growth was observed in GalT gene-trapped pups fed with normal chow and all pups fed with high-galactose (20% w/w) diet. This new mouse model presents several of the complications of Classic Galactosemia and will be useful to investigate pathogenesis and new therapies. PMID:24549051

  6. Adiponectin-deficiency exaggerates sepsis-induced microvascular dysfunction in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, Vidula; Cunningham, Christie; Yoza, Barbara; Carson, John; Vachharajani, Tushar J; McCall, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Obesity increases circulating cell-endothelial cell interactions; an early marker of inflammation in laboratory model of sepsis, but little is known about the effect of different adipokines. Adiponectin is an anti-inflammatory adipokine secreted by adipocytes. Adiponectin deficiency is implicated in exaggerated proinflammatory phenotype in both obesity and sepsis via increased proinflammatory cytokine expression. However the effect of adiponectin deficiency on circulating cell-endothelial cell interactions in polymicrobial sepsis is unknown. Furthermore although brain dysfunction in septic patients is a known predictor of death, the pathophysiology involved is unknown. In the current study, we examined the effects of adiponectin deficiency on leukocyte (LA) and platelet adhesion (PA) in cerebral microcirculation of septic mice. Adiponectin deficient (Adipoq(-/-): Adko) and background strain C57Bl/6 (wild type (WT)) mice were used. Sepsis was induced using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). We studied LA and PA in the cerebral microcirculation using intravital fluorescent video microscopy (IVM), blood brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction using Evans Blue (EB) leakage method and E-selectin expression using dual radiolabeling technique in different WT and Adko mice with CLP. Adiponectin deficiency significantly exaggerated LA (WT-CLP:201 ± 17; Adko-CLP: ± 53 cells/mm(2); P < 0.05) and PA (WT-CLP:125 ± 17; Adko-CLP:188 ± 20 cells/mm(2); P < 0.05) in cerebral microcirculation, EB leakage (WT-CLP:10 ± 3.7; Adko-CLP:24 ± 4.3 ng/g × µl plasma; P < 0.05) and E-selectin expression (WT-CLP:0.06 ± 0.11; Adko-CLP:0.44 ± 0.053 ng/g; P < 0.05) in the brain tissue of the mice with CLP. Furthermore, E-selectin monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatment attenuated cell adhesion and BBB dysfunction of Adko-CLP mice. Adiponectin deficiency is associated with exaggerated leukocyte and PA in cerebral microcirculation of mice with CLP via modulation of E-selectin expression.

  7. Modafinil attenuates inflammation via inhibiting Akt/NF-κB pathway in apoE-deficient mouse model of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jinxia; Chen, Dongwei; Liu, Dayi; Zhu, Yanan

    2018-04-01

    Modafinil, an FDA approved wakefulness drug prescribed to narcolepsy patients, has recently been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects and provides protection against neuroinflammation. It is unknown if modafinil can also protect against atherosclerosis, pathogenesis of which implicates inflammation. Using an apoE-deficient mouse model, we tried to elucidate the effects of modafinil treatment on the development of atherosclerosis. We tested serum levels of cytokines. We isolated mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), detected effect of modafinil on the viability and proliferation of BMDMs, and on oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced IL-6 and TNF-α, and supernatant level of IFN-γ as well as NF-κB activity in BMDMs. Modafinil inhibited the development of atherosclerosis in apoE -/- mice. Modafinil suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF and IFN-γ, and promoted secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. Modafinil inhibited viability and proliferation of macrophages by negatively regulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, p-Akt, p-IKBα and NF-κB activity in macrophages. Modafinil mitigates inflammation in apoE -/- atherosclerosis mice via inhibiting NF-κB activity in macrophages, and could potentially serve as a therapeutic agent for atherosclerosis.

  8. Metabolic dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamics in the utrophin-dystrophin deficient mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghna Pant

    Full Text Available The utrophin-dystrophin deficient (DKO mouse model has been widely used to understand the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. However, it is unclear as to what extent muscle pathology affects metabolism. Therefore, the present study was focused on understanding energy expenditure in the whole animal and in isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle and to determine changes in metabolic enzymes. Our results show that the 8 week-old DKO mice consume higher oxygen relative to activity levels. Interestingly the EDL muscle from DKO mouse consumes higher oxygen per unit integral force, generates less force and performs better in the presence of pyruvate thus mimicking a slow twitch muscle. We also found that the expression of hexokinase 1 and pyruvate kinase M2 was upregulated several fold suggesting increased glycolytic flux. Additionally, there is a dramatic increase in dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp 1 and mitofusin 2 protein levels suggesting increased mitochondrial fission and fusion, a feature associated with increased energy demand and altered mitochondrial dynamics. Collectively our studies point out that the dystrophic disease has caused significant changes in muscle metabolism. To meet the increased energetic demand, upregulation of metabolic enzymes and regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission is observed in the dystrophic muscle. A better understanding of the metabolic demands and the accompanied alterations in the dystrophic muscle can help us design improved intervention therapies along with existing drug treatments for the DMD patients.

  9. A methionine-choline-deficient diet elicits NASH in the immunodeficient mouse featuring a model for hepatic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelz, Sandra; Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Christ, Bruno

    2012-02-01

    Non-alcoholic staetohepatitis (NASH) is associated with fat deposition in the liver favoring inflammatory processes and development of fibrosis, cirrhosis and finally hepatocellular cancer. In Western lifestyle countries, NASH has reached a 20% prevalence in the obese population with escalating tendency in the future. Very often, liver transplantation is the only therapeutic option. Recently, transplantation of hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from mesenchymal stem cells was suggested a feasible alternative to whole organ transplantation to ameliorate donor organ shortage. Hence, in the present work an animal model of NASH was established in immunodeficient mice to investigate the feasibility of human stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cell transplantation. NASH was induced by feeding a methionine/choline-deficient diet (MCD-diet) for up to 5 weeks. Animals developed a fatty liver featuring fibrosis and elevation of the proinflammatory markers serum amyloid A (SAA) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Hepatic triglycerides were significantly increased as well as alanine aminotransferase demonstrating inflammation-linked hepatocyte damage. Elevation of αSMA mRNA and collagen I as well as liver architecture deterioation indicated massive fibrosis. Both short- and long-term post-transplantation human hepatocyte-like cells resided in the mouse host liver indicating parenchymal penetration and most likely functional engraftment. Hence, the NASH model in the immunodeficient mouse is the first to allow for the assessment of the therapeutic impact of human stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. α-Synuclein deficiency and efferent nerve degeneration in the mouse cochlea: a possible cause of early-onset presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S N; Back, S A; Choung, Y H; Kim, H L; Akil, O; Lustig, L R; Park, K H; Yeo, S W

    2011-11-01

    Efferent nerves under the outer hair cells (OHCs) play a role in the protection of these cells from loud stimuli. Previously, we showed that cochlear α-synuclein expression is localized to efferent auditory synapses at the base of the OHCs. To prove our hypothesis that α-synuclein deficiency and efferent auditory deficit might be a cause of hearing loss, we compared the morphology of efferent nerve endings and α-synuclein expression within the cochleae of two mouse models of presbycusis. Comparative animal study of presbycusis. The C57BL/6J(C57) mouse strain, a well-known model of early-onset hearing loss, and the CBA mouse strain, a model of relatively late-onset hearing loss, were examined. Auditory brainstem responses and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were recorded, and cochlear morphology with efferent nerve ending was compared. Western blotting was used to examine α-synuclein expression in the cochlea. Compared with CBA mice, C57 mice showed earlier onset high-frequency hearing loss and decreased function in OHCs, especially within high-frequency regions. C57 mice demonstrated more severe pathologic changes within the cochlea, particularly within the basal turn, than CBA mice of the same age. Weaker α-synuclein and synaptophysin expression in the efferent nerve endings and cochlear homogenates in C57 mice was observed. Our results support the hypothesis that efferent nerve degeneration, possibly due to differential α-synuclein expression, is a potential cause of early-onset presbycusis. Further studies at the cellular level are necessary to verify our results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Brain microsomal fatty acid elongation is increased in abcd1-deficient mouse during active myelination phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masashi; Kawamichi, Misato; Shimura, Yusuke; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Watanabe, Shiro; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2015-12-01

    The dysfunction of ABCD1, a peroxisomal ABC protein, leads to the perturbation of very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) metabolism and is the cause of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Abcd1-deficient mice exhibit an accumulation of saturated VLCFAs, such as C26:0, in all tissues, especially the brain. The present study sought to measure microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain of wild-type (WT) and abcd1-deficient mice during the course of development. The fatty acid elongation activity in the microsomal fraction was measured by the incorporation of [2-(14)C]malonyl-CoA into fatty acids in the presence of C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA. Cytosolic fatty acid synthesis activity was completely inhibited by the addition of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). The microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain was significantly high at 3 weeks after birth and decreased substantially at 3 months after birth. Furthermore, we detected two different types of microsomal fatty acid elongation activity by using C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA as the substrate and found the activity toward C20:0-CoA in abcd1-deficient mice was higher than the WT 3-week-old animals. These results suggest that during the active myelination phase the microsomal fatty acid elongation activity is stimulated in abcd1-deficient mice, which in turn perturbs the lipid composition in myelin.

  12. Global transcriptional response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in mouse liver and duodenum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Rodriguez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential trace element whose absorption is usually tightly regulated in the duodenum. HFE-related hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is characterized by abnormally low expression of the iron-regulatory hormone, hepcidin, which results in increased iron absorption. The liver is crucial for iron homeostasis as it is the main production site of hepcidin. The aim of this study was to explore and compare the genome-wide transcriptome response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in murine liver and duodenum. Illumina arrays containing over 47,000 probes were used to study global transcriptional changes. Quantitative RT-PCR (Q-RT-PCR was used to validate the microarray results. In the liver, the expression of 151 genes was altered in Hfe(-/- mice while dietary iron overload changed the expression of 218 genes. There were 173 and 108 differentially expressed genes in the duodenum of Hfe(-/- mice and mice with dietary iron overload, respectively. There was 93.5% concordance between the results obtained by microarray analysis and Q-RT-PCR. Overexpression of genes for acute phase reactants in the liver and a strong induction of digestive enzyme genes in the duodenum were characteristic of the Hfe-deficient genotype. In contrast, dietary iron overload caused a more pronounced change of gene expression responsive to oxidative stress. In conclusion, Hfe deficiency caused a previously unrecognized increase in gene expression of hepatic acute phase proteins and duodenal digestive enzymes.

  13. Osteoprotegerin deficiency limits angiotensin II-induced aortic dilatation and rupture in the apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Corey S; Jose, Roby J; Biros, Erik; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Mounting evidence links osteoprotegerin with cardiovascular disease. Elevated serum and aortic tissue osteoprotegerin are associated with the presence and growth of abdominal aortic aneurysm in humans; however, a role for osteoprotegerin in abdominal aortic aneurysm pathogenesis remains to be shown. We examined the functional significance of osteoprotegerin in aortic aneurysm using an Opg-deficient mouse model and in vitro investigations. Homozygous deletion of Opg in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (ApoE(-/-)Opg(-/-)) inhibited angiotensin II-induced aortic dilatation. Survival free from aortic rupture was increased from 67% in ApoE(-/-)Opg(+/+) controls to 94% in ApoE(-/-)Opg(-/-) mice (P=0.040). Serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines, and aortic expression for cathepsin S (CTSS), matrix metalloproteinase 2, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 after 7 days (early-phase) of angiotensin II infusion were significantly reduced in ApoE(-/-)Opg(-/-) mice compared with ApoE(-/-)Opg(+/+) controls. In addition, aortic expression of markers for an inflammatory phenotype in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells in response to early-phase of angiotensin II infusion was significantly lower in Opg-deficient mice. In vitro, human abdominal aortic aneurysm vascular smooth muscle cells produced more CTSS and exhibited increased CTSS-derived elastolytic activity than healthy aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas recombinant human osteoprotegerin stimulated CTSS-dependent elastase activity in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. These findings support a role for osteoprotegerin in aortic aneurysm through upregulation of CTSS, matrix metalloproteinase 2, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 within the aorta, promoting an inflammatory phenotype in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells in response to angiotensin II. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Increased apoptosis in differentiating p27-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bryja, Vítězslav; Pacherník, J.; Souček, K.; Horvát, V.; Dvořák, Petr; Hampl, Aleš

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 61, - (2004), s. 1384-1400 ISSN 1420-682X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/01/0905; GA MŠk LN00A065; GA AV ČR KJB5039301; GA ČR GP524/03/P171; GA ČR GA524/03/0766 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : mouse embryonic stem cell * p27 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.812, year: 2004

  15. Genetic Phagocyte NADPH Oxidase Deficiency Enhances Nonviable Candida albicans-Induced Inflammation in Mouse Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Daiki; Fujimoto, Kenta; Hirose, Rika; Yamanaka, Hiroko; Homme, Mizuki; Ishibashi, Ken-Ichi; Miura, Noriko; Ohno, Naohito; Aratani, Yasuaki

    2017-02-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) have mutated phagocyte NADPH oxidase, resulting in reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). While the mechanism underlying hyperinfection in CGD is well understood, the basis for inflammatory disorders that arise in the absence of evident infection has not been fully explained. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of phagocyte NADPH oxidase deficiency on lung inflammation induced by nonviable Candida albicans (nCA). Mice deficient in this enzyme (CGD mice) showed more severe neutrophilic pneumonia than nCA-treated wild-type mice, which exhibited significantly higher lung concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC). Neutralization of these proinflammatory mediators significantly reduced neutrophil infiltration. In vitro, production of IL-1β and TNF-α from neutrophils and that of KC from macrophages was enhanced in nCA-stimulated neutrophils from CGD mice. Expression of IL-1β mRNA was higher in the stimulated CGD neutrophils than in the stimulated wild-type cells, concomitant with upregulation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and its upstream regulator extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Pretreatment with an NADPH oxidase inhibitor significantly enhanced IL-1β production in the wild-type neutrophils stimulated with nCA. These results suggest that lack of ROS production because of NADPH oxidase deficiency results in the production of higher levels of proinflammatory mediators from neutrophils and macrophages, which may at least partly contribute to the exacerbation of nCA-induced lung inflammation in CGD mice.

  16. Altered Metabolism and Lipodystrophy in the Early B-Cell Factor 1-Deficient Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Fretz, Jackie A.; Nelson, Tracy; Xi, Yougen; Adams, Douglas J.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Horowitz, Mark C.

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that mice deficient for the transcription factor early B-cell factor (Ebf1) exhibit markedly increased numbers of osteoblasts, bone formation rate, and serum osteocalcin, but the bone marrow of Ebf1−/− mice is also striking in its increased marrow adiposity. The purpose of this work was to analyze the metabolic phenotype that accompanies the altered bone morphology of Ebf1−/− mice. Whereas marrow adiposity was increased, deposition of white adipose tissue in other regio...

  17. Plasmid deficiency in urogenital isolates of Chlamydia trachomatis reduces infectivity and virulence in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigar, Ira M; Schripsema, Justin H; Wang, Yibing; Clarke, Ian N; Cutcliffe, Lesley T; Seth-Smith, Helena M B; Thomson, Nicholas R; Bjartling, Carina; Unemo, Magnus; Persson, Kenneth; Ramsey, Kyle H

    2014-02-01

    We hypothesized that the plasmid of urogenital isolates of Chlamydia trachomatis would modulate infectivity and virulence in a mouse model. To test this hypothesis, we infected female mice in the respiratory or urogenital tract with graded doses of a human urogenital isolate of C. trachomatis, serovar F, possessing the cognate plasmid. For comparison, we inoculated mice with a plasmid-free serovar F isolate. Following urogenital inoculation, the plasmid-free isolate displayed significantly reduced infectivity compared with the wild-type strain with the latter yielding a 17-fold lower infectious dose to yield 50% infection. When inoculated via the respiratory tract, the plasmid-free isolate exhibited reduced infectivity and virulence (as measured by weight change) when compared to the wild-type isolate. Further, differences in infectivity, but not in virulence were observed in a C. trachomatis, serovar E isolate with a deletion within the plasmid coding sequence 1 when compared to a serovar E isolate with no mutations in the plasmid. We conclude that plasmid loss reduces virulence and infectivity in this mouse model. These findings further support a role for the chlamydial plasmid in infectivity and virulence in vivo. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased susceptibility to otitis media in a Splunc1-deficient mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jennifer A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Naumann, Paul W.; Salzman, Nita H.; McCray, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Otitis media (inflammation of the middle ear) is one of the most common diseases of early childhood. Susceptibility to otitis is influenced by a number of factors, including the actions of innate immune molecules secreted by the epithelia lining the nasopharynx, middle ear and Eustachian tube. The SPLUNC1 (short palate, lung, nasal epithelial clone 1) protein is a highly abundant secretory product of the mammalian nasal, oral and respiratory mucosa that is thought to play a multifunctional role in host defense. In this study we investigated Splunc1 expression in the ear of the mouse, and examined whether this protein contributes to overall host defense in the middle ear and/or Eustachian tube. We found that Splunc1 is highly expressed in both the surface epithelium and in submucosal glands in these regions in wild-type mice. In mice lacking Splunc1, we noted histologically an increased frequency of otitis media, characterized by the accumulation of leukocytes (neutrophils with scattered macrophages), proteinaceous fluid and mucus in the middle ear lumens. Furthermore, many of these mice had extensive remodeling of the middle ear wall, suggesting a chronic course of disease. From these observations, we conclude that loss of Splunc1 predisposes mice to the development of otitis media. The Splunc1−/− mouse model should help investigators to better understand both the biological role of Splunc1 as well as host defense mechanisms in the middle ear. PMID:25765466

  19. Deficiency in plasma protein synthesis caused by x-ray-induced lethal albino alleles in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, R.C.; Satrustegui, J.; Gluecksohn-Waelsch, S.; Cori, C.F.

    1976-01-01

    Plasma protein synthesis was studied in mice bearing x-ray induced lethal mutations at the albino locus. Newborn albino mutants showed a decrease in each of the three principal plasma proteins, albumin, α-fetoprotein, and transferrin, when compared with colored littermate controls. Incorporation of [ 14 C] leucine into plasma proteins of the newborn albinos 30 min after injection was only 1 / 5 that of the controls, but incorporation into total liver protein was only slightly diminished. Incorporation of [ 14 C] leucine into an albumin fraction obtained by immunoprecipitation from livers incubated in vitro in an amino acid mixture was also strongly diminished. Thus, the liver of 18-day-old albino fetuses incorporated into this fraction 1 / 3 and that of newborn albinos 1 / 8 as much as the controls, but in both cases the incorporation into total liver protein was only 25 percent less than in the respective controls. These results indicate that the rather severe structural abnormalities observed in the mutants in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus are not associated with a general deficiency of hepatic protein synthesis. Instead the data from this and previous work show that the progressive deficiency from fetal life to birth involves certain specific proteins represented by several perinatally developing enzymes and by plasma proteins. It is suggested that the mutational effects observed in these mice are due to deletions involving regulatory rather than structural genes at or near the albino locus

  20. NM23 deficiency promotes metastasis in a UV radiation-induced mouse model of human melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Stuart G; Novak, Marian; Harris, Nathan; Merlino, Glenn; Slominski, Andrezj; Kaetzel, David M

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer, with 5-year survival rates of melanoma are not well understood, in part due to a paucity of animal models that accurately recapitulate the disease in its advanced forms. We have employed a transgenic mouse strain harboring a tandem deletion of the nm23-m1 and nm23-m2 genes to assess the combined contribution of these genes to suppression of melanoma metastasis. Crossing of the nm23-h1/nm23-h2 knockout in hemizygous-null form ([m1m2](+/-)) to a transgenic mouse strain (hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor-overexpressing, or HGF(+) strain) vulnerable to poorly-metastatic, UVR-induced melanomas resulted in UVR-induced melanomas with high metastatic potential. Metastasis to draining lymph nodes was seen in almost all cases of back skin melanomas, while aggressive metastasis to lung, thoracic cavity, liver and bone also occurred. Interestingly, no differences were observed in the invasive characteristics of primary melanomas of HGF(+) and HGF(+) × [m1m2](+/-) strains, with both exhibiting invasion into the dermis and subcutis, indicating factors other than simple invasive activity were responsible for metastasis of HGF(+) × [m1m2](+/-) melanomas. Stable cell lines were established from the primary and metastatic melanoma lesions from these mice, with HGF(+) × [m1m2](+/-) lines exhibiting increased single cell migration and genomic instability. These studies demonstrate for the first time in vivo a potent metastasis suppressor activity of NM23 in UVR-induced melanoma, and have provided new tools for identifying molecular mechanisms that underlie melanoma metastasis.

  1. The effect of insulin deficiency on tau and neurofilament in the insulin knockout mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, Ruben; Beju, Delia; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2005-01-01

    Complications of diabetes mellitus within the nervous system are peripheral and central neuropathy. In peripheral neuropathy, defects in neurofilament and microtubules have been demonstrated. In this study, we examined the effects of insulin deficiency within the brain in insulin knockout mice (I(-/-)). The I(-/-) exhibited hyperphosphorylation of tau, at threonine 231, and neurofilament. In addition, we showed hyperphosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK-3 β) at serine 9. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK 1) showed decrease in phosphorylation, whereas ERK 2 showed no changes. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated swollen mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus, and dispersion of the nuclear chromatin. Microtubules showed decrease in the number of intermicrotubule bridges and neurofilament presented as bunches. Thus, lack of insulin brain stimulation induces JNK hyperphosphorylation followed by hyperphosphorylation of tau and neurofilament, and ultrastructural cellular damage, that over time may induce decrease in cognition and learning disabilities

  2. The beta-hexosaminidase deficiency disorders: development of a clinical paradigm in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tifft, C J; Proia, R L

    1997-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease are severe neurodegenerative disorders caused by a deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase A and resultant accumulation of its substrate, GM2 ganglioside, in neuronal lysosomes. The three clinical forms of the disorders (infantile, juvenile and adult) are of varying severity and onset, and have been correlated with the amount of residual GM2 ganglioside-degrading activity present in patients' cells. Through targeted disruption of the murine beta-hexosaminidase genes in embryonic stem cells, we have developed a set of mice that vary in their GM2 ganglioside-degrading capacity and exhibit many of the clinical features of the human diseases. These mice are valuable for the study of pathogenic mechanisms and for devising novel therapeutic strategies in these disorders.

  3. Altered metabolism and lipodystrophy in the early B-cell factor 1-deficient mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretz, Jackie A; Nelson, Tracy; Xi, Yougen; Adams, Douglas J; Rosen, Clifford J; Horowitz, Mark C

    2010-04-01

    We previously reported that mice deficient for the transcription factor early B-cell factor (Ebf1) exhibit markedly increased numbers of osteoblasts, bone formation rate, and serum osteocalcin, but the bone marrow of Ebf1(-/-) mice is also striking in its increased marrow adiposity. The purpose of this work was to analyze the metabolic phenotype that accompanies the altered bone morphology of Ebf1(-/-) mice. Whereas marrow adiposity was increased, deposition of white adipose tissue in other regions of the body was severely reduced (sc 40-50%, abdominally 80-85%). Brown adipose exhibited decreased lipid deposition. Subcutaneous and perigonadal white adipose tissue showed a decrease in mRNA transcripts for peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-gamma2 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-beta in Ebf1(-/-) tissue compared with wild type. Circulating levels of leptin were decreased in Ebf1(-/-) animals compared with their littermate controls (down 65-95%), whereas adiponectin remained comparable after 2 wk of age. Serum analysis also found the Ebf1(-/-) animals were hypoglycemic and hypotriglyceridemic. After ip injection of insulin, the serum glucose levels in Ebf1(-/-) mice took longer to recover, and after a glucose challenge the Ebf1(-/-) animals reached serum glucose levels almost twice that of their wild-type counterparts. Measurement of circulating pancreatic hormones revealed normal or reduced insulin levels in the Ebf1(-/-) mice, whereas glucagon was significantly increased (up 1.7- to 8.5-fold). Metabolically the Ebf1(-/-) mice had increased O(2) consumption, CO(2) production, food and water intake, and activity. Markers for gluconeogenesis, however, were decreased in the Ebf1(-/-) mice compared with controls. In conclusion, the Ebf1-deficient animals exhibit defects in adipose tissue deposition with increased marrow adiposity and impaired glucose mobilization.

  4. Flux balance analysis predicts Warburg-like effects of mouse hepatocyte deficient in miR-122a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Qing Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The liver is a vital organ involving in various major metabolic functions in human body. MicroRNA-122 (miR-122 plays an important role in the regulation of liver metabolism, but its intrinsic physiological functions require further clarification. This study integrated the genome-scale metabolic model of hepatocytes and mouse experimental data with germline deletion of Mir122a (Mir122a-/- to infer Warburg-like effects. Elevated expression of MiR-122a target genes in Mir122a-/-mice, especially those encoding for metabolic enzymes, was applied to analyze the flux distributions of the genome-scale metabolic model in normal and deficient states. By definition of the similarity ratio, we compared the flux fold change of the genome-scale metabolic model computational results and metabolomic profiling data measured through a liquid-chromatography with mass spectrometer, respectively, for hepatocytes of 2-month-old mice in normal and deficient states. The Ddc gene demonstrated the highest similarity ratio of 95% to the biological hypothesis of the Warburg effect, and similarity of 75% to the experimental observation. We also used 2, 6, and 11 months of mir-122 knockout mice liver cell to examined the expression pattern of DDC in the knockout mice livers to show upregulated profiles of DDC from the data. Furthermore, through a bioinformatics (LINCS program prediction, BTK inhibitors and withaferin A could downregulate DDC expression, suggesting that such drugs could potentially alter the early events of metabolomics of liver cancer cells.

  5. Thiamine deficiency activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α to facilitate pro-apoptotic responses in mouse primary astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy Zera

    Full Text Available Thiamine is an essential enzyme cofactor required for proper metabolic function and maintenance of metabolism and energy production in the brain. In developed countries, thiamine deficiency (TD is most often manifested following chronic alcohol consumption leading to impaired mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, inflammation and excitotoxicity. These biochemical lesions result in apoptotic cell death in both neurons and astrocytes. Comparable histological injuries in patients with hypoxia/ischemia and TD have been described in the thalamus and mammillary bodies, suggesting a congruency between the cellular responses to these stresses. Consistent with hypoxia/ischemia, TD stabilizes and activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α under physiological oxygen levels. However, the role of TD-induced HIF-1α in neurological injury is currently unknown. Using Western blot analysis and RT-PCR, we have demonstrated that TD induces HIF-1α expression and activity in primary mouse astrocytes. We observed a time-dependent increase in mRNA and protein expression of the pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory HIF-1α target genes MCP1, BNIP3, Nix and Noxa during TD. We also observed apoptotic cell death in TD as demonstrated by PI/Annexin V staining, TUNEL assay, and Cell Death ELISA. Pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α activity using YC1 and thiamine repletion both reduced expression of pro-apoptotic HIF-1α target genes and apoptotic cell death in TD. These results demonstrate that induction of HIF-1α mediated transcriptional up-regulation of pro-apoptotic/inflammatory signaling contributes to astrocyte cell death during thiamine deficiency.

  6. Microarchitecture, but Not Bone Mechanical Properties, Is Rescued with Growth Hormone Treatment in a Mouse Model of Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Kristensen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH deficiency is related to an increased fracture risk although it is not clear if this is due to compromised bone quality or a small bone size. We investigated the relationship between bone macrostructure, microarchitecture and mechanical properties in a GH-deficient (GHD mouse model undergoing GH treatment commencing at an early (prepubertal or late (postpubertal time point. Microcomputed tomography images of the femur and L4 vertebra were obtained to quantify macrostructure and vertebral trabecular microarchitecture, and mechanical properties were determined using finite element analyses. In the GHD animals, bone macrostructure was 25 to 43% smaller as compared to the GH-sufficient (GHS controls (P<0.001. GHD animals had 20% and 19% reductions in bone volume ratio (BV/TV and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th, respectively. Whole bone mechanical properties of the GHD mice were lower at the femur and vertebra (67% and 45% resp. than the GHS controls (P<0.001. Both early and late GH treatment partially recovered the bone macrostructure (15 to 32 % smaller than GHS controls and the whole bone mechanical properties (24 to 43% larger than GHD animals although there remained a sustained 27–52% net deficit compared to normal mice (P<0.05. Importantly, early treatment with GH led to a recovery of BV/TV and Tb.Th with a concomitant improvement of trabecular mechanical properties. Therefore, the results suggest that GH treatment should start early, and that measurements of microarchitecture should be considered in the management of GHD.

  7. Affective and cognitive behavior in the alpha-galactosidase A deficient mouse model of Fabry disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Hofmann

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked inherited lysosomal storage disorder with intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 due to α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A deficiency. Fabry patients frequently report of anxiety, depression, and impaired cognitive function. We characterized affective and cognitive phenotype of male mice with α-Gal A deficiency (Fabry KO and compared results with those of age-matched male wildtype (WT littermates. Young (3 months and old (≥ 18 months mice were tested in the naïve state and after i.pl. injection of complete Freund`s adjuvant (CFA as an inflammatory pain model. We used the elevated plus maze (EPM, the light-dark box (LDB and the open field test (OF to investigate anxiety-like behavior. The forced swim test (FST and Morris water maze (MWM were applied to assess depressive-like and learning behavior. The EPM test revealed no intergroup difference for anxiety-like behavior in naïve young and old Fabry KO mice compared to WT littermates, except for longer time spent in open arms of the EPM for young WT mice compared to young Fabry KO mice (p<0.05. After CFA injection, young Fabry KO mice showed increased anxiety-like behavior compared to young WT littermates (p<0.05 and naïve young Fabry KO mice (p<0.05 in the EPM as reflected by shorter time spent in EPM open arms. There were no relevant differences in the LDB and the OF test, except for longer time spent in the center zone of the OF by young WT mice compared to young Fabry KO mice (p<0.05. Complementary to this, depression-like and learning behavior were not different between genotypes and age-groups, except for the expectedly lower memory performance in older age-groups compared to young mice. Our results indicate that genetic influences on affective and cognitive symptoms in FD may be of subordinate relevance, drawing attention to potential influences of environmental and epigenetic factors.

  8. Central serotonergic neuron deficiency in a mouse model of Zellweger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, R S; Meedeniya, A C B; Crane, D I

    2014-08-22

    Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is a severe peroxisomal disorder caused by mutations in peroxisome biogenesis, or PEX, genes. A central hallmark of ZS is abnormal neuronal migration and neurodegeneration, which manifests as widespread neurological dysfunction. The molecular basis of ZS neuropathology is not well understood. Here we present findings using a mouse model of ZS neuropathology with conditional brain inactivation of the PEX13 gene. We demonstrate that PEX13 brain mutants display changes that reflect an abnormal serotonergic system - decreased levels of tryptophan hydroxylase-2, the rate-limiting enzyme of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) synthesis, dysmorphic 5-HT-positive neurons, abnormal distribution of 5-HT neurons, and dystrophic serotonergic axons. The raphe nuclei region of PEX13 brain mutants also display increased levels of apoptotic cells and reactive, inflammatory gliosis. Given the role of the serotonergic system in brain development and motor control, dysfunction of this system would account in part for the observed neurological changes of PEX13 brain mutants. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Deficiency of FLCN in mouse kidney led to development of polycystic kidneys and renal neoplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindong Chen

    Full Text Available The Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD disease is a genetic cancer syndrome. The responsible gene, BHD, has been identified by positional cloning and thought to be a novel tumor suppressor gene. BHD mutations cause many types of diseases including renal cell carcinomas, fibrofolliculomas, spontaneous pneumothorax, lung cysts, and colonic polyps/cancers. By combining Gateway Technology with the Ksp-Cre gene knockout system, we have developed a kidney-specific BHD knockout mouse model. BHD(flox/flox/Ksp-Cre mice developed enlarged kidneys characterized by polycystic kidneys, hyperplasia, and cystic renal cell carcinoma. The affected BHD(flox/flox/Ksp-Cre mice died of renal failure at approximate three weeks of age, having blood urea nitrogen levels over tenfold higher than those of BHD (flox/+/Ksp-Cre and wild-type littermate controls. We further demonstrated that these phenotypes were caused by inactivation of BHD and subsequent activation of the mTOR pathway. Application of rapamycin, which inhibits mTOR activity, to the affected mice led to extended survival and inhibited further progression of cystogenesis. These results provide a correlation of kidney-targeted gene inactivation with renal carcinoma, and they suggest that the BHD product FLCN, functioning as a cyst and tumor suppressor, like other hamartoma syndrome-related proteins such as PTEN, LKB1, and TSC1/2, is a component of the mTOR pathway, constituting a novel FLCN-mTOR signaling branch that regulates cell growth/proliferation.

  10. Dietary phosphorus overload aggravates the phenotype of the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Eiji; Yoshida, Mizuko; Kojima, Yoriko; Nonaka, Ikuya; Ohashi, Kazuya; Nagata, Yosuke; Shiozuka, Masataka; Date, Munehiro; Higashi, Tetsuo; Nishino, Ichizo; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked disease with no effective treatment. Progressive muscle degeneration, increased macrophage infiltration, and ectopic calcification are characteristic features of the mdx mouse, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Because dietary phosphorus/phosphate consumption is increasing and adverse effects of phosphate overloading have been reported in several disease conditions, we examined the effects of dietary phosphorus intake in mdx mice phenotypes. On weaning, control and mdx mice were fed diets containing 0.7, 1.0, or 2.0 g phosphorus per 100 g until they were 90 days old. Dystrophic phenotypes were evaluated in cryosections of quadriceps and tibialis anterior muscles, and maximal forces and voluntary activity were measured. Ectopic calcification was analyzed by electron microscopy to determine the cells initially responsible for calcium deposition in skeletal muscle. Dietary phosphorus overload dramatically exacerbated the dystrophic phenotypes of mdx mice by increasing inflammation associated with infiltration of M1 macrophages. In contrast, minimal muscle necrosis and inflammation were observed in exercised mdx mice fed a low-phosphorus diet, suggesting potential beneficial therapeutic effects of lowering dietary phosphorus intake on disease progression. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that dietary phosphorus intake directly affects muscle pathological characteristics of mdx mice. Dietary phosphorus overloading promoted dystrophic disease progression in mdx mice, whereas restricting dietary phosphorus intake improved muscle pathological characteristics and function.

  11. SMN deficiency disrupts brain development in a mouse model of severe spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, Thomas M.; Huang, Jack P.-W.; Murray, Lyndsay M.; Lamont, Douglas J.; Mutsaers, Chantal A.; Ross, Jenny; Geldsetzer, Pascal; Ansorge, Olaf; Talbot, Kevin; Parson, Simon H.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Reduced expression of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene causes the childhood motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Low levels of ubiquitously expressed SMN protein result in the degeneration of lower motor neurons, but it remains unclear whether other regions of the nervous system are also affected. Here we show that reduced levels of SMN lead to impaired perinatal brain development in a mouse model of severe SMA. Regionally selective changes in brain morphology were apparent in areas normally associated with higher SMN levels in the healthy postnatal brain, including the hippocampus, and were associated with decreased cell density, reduced cell proliferation and impaired hippocampal neurogenesis. A comparative proteomics analysis of the hippocampus from SMA and wild-type littermate mice revealed widespread modifications in expression levels of proteins regulating cellular proliferation, migration and development when SMN levels were reduced. This study reveals novel roles for SMN protein in brain development and maintenance and provides the first insights into cellular and molecular pathways disrupted in the brain in a severe form of SMA. PMID:20705736

  12. Limited effects of Muc1 deficiency on mouse adenovirus type 1 respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Y; Procario, Megan C; Ashley, Shanna L; O'Neal, Wanda K; Pickles, Raymond J; Weinberg, Jason B

    2011-09-01

    Muc1 (MUC1 in humans) is a membrane-tethered mucin that exerts anti-inflammatory effects in the lung during bacterial infection. Muc1 and other mucins are also likely to form a protective barrier in the lung. We used mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1, also known as MAdV-1) to determine the role of Muc1 in the pathogenesis of an adenovirus in its natural host. Following intranasal inoculation of wild type mice, we detected increased TNF-α, a cytokine linked to Muc1 production, but no consistent changes in the production of lung Muc1, Muc5ac or overall lung mucus production. Viral loads were modestly higher in the lungs of Muc1(-/-) mice compared to Muc1(+/+) mice at several early time points but decreased to similar levels by 14 days post infection in both groups. However, cellular inflammation and the expression of CXCL1, CCL5, and CCL2 did not significantly differ between Muc1(-/-) and Muc1(+/+) mice. Our data therefore suggest that Muc1 may contribute to a physical barrier that protects against MAV-1 respiratory infection. However, our data do not reveal an anti-inflammatory effect of Muc1 that contributes to MAV-1 pathogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Progression of pathology in PINK1-deficient mouse brain from splicing via ubiquitination, ER stress, and mitophagy changes to neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Odio, Sylvia; Key, Jana; Hoepken, Hans-Hermann; Canet-Pons, Júlia; Valek, Lucie; Roller, Bastian; Walter, Michael; Morales-Gordo, Blas; Meierhofer, David; Harter, Patrick N; Mittelbronn, Michel; Tegeder, Irmgard; Gispert, Suzana; Auburger, Georg

    2017-08-02

    PINK1 deficiency causes the autosomal recessive PARK6 variant of Parkinson's disease. PINK1 activates ubiquitin by phosphorylation and cooperates with the downstream ubiquitin ligase PARKIN, to exert quality control and control autophagic degradation of mitochondria and of misfolded proteins in all cell types. Global transcriptome profiling of mouse brain and neuron cultures were assessed in protein-protein interaction diagrams and by pathway enrichment algorithms. Validation by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunoblots was performed, including human neuroblastoma cells and patient primary skin fibroblasts. In a first approach, we documented Pink1-deleted mice across the lifespan regarding brain mRNAs. The expression changes were always subtle, consistently affecting "intracellular membrane-bounded organelles". Significant anomalies involved about 250 factors at age 6 weeks, 1300 at 6 months, and more than 3500 at age 18 months in the cerebellar tissue, including Srsf10, Ube3a, Mapk8, Creb3, and Nfkbia. Initially, mildly significant pathway enrichment for the spliceosome was apparent. Later, highly significant networks of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and endoplasmic reticulum protein processing occurred. Finally, an enrichment of neuroinflammation factors appeared, together with profiles of bacterial invasion and MAPK signaling changes-while mitophagy had minor significance. Immunohistochemistry showed pronounced cellular response of Iba1-positive microglia and GFAP-positive astrocytes; brain lipidomics observed increases of ceramides as neuroinflammatory signs at old age. In a second approach, we assessed PINK1 deficiency in the presence of a stressor. Marked dysregulations of microbial defense factors Ifit3 and Rsad2 were consistently observed upon five analyses: (1) Pink1 -/- primary neurons in the first weeks after brain dissociation, (2) aged Pink1 -/- midbrain with transgenic A53T-alpha-synuclein overexpression, (3

  14. Heat shock transcription factor 1-deficiency attenuates overloading-associated hypertrophy of mouse soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koya, Tomoyuki; Nishizawa, Sono; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Goto, Ayumi; Ikuta, Akihiro; Suzuki, Miho; Ohira, Tomotaka; Egawa, Tatsuro; Nakai, Akira; Sugiura, Takao; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Beppu, Moroe; Goto, Katsumasa

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs) in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on the left soleus was performed by cutting the distal tendons of gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles for 4 weeks. The right muscle served as the control. Soleus muscles from both hindlimbs were dissected 2 and 4 weeks after the operation. Hypertrophy of soleus muscle in HSF1-null mice was partially inhibited, compared with that in wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice. Absence of HSF1 partially attenuated the increase of muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area of overloaded soleus muscle. Population of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells in HSF1-null mice was significantly less than that in wild-type mice following 2 weeks of overloading (pmuscle hypertrophy might be attributed to the greater and prolonged enhancement of IL-6 expression. HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response may, in part, play a key role in loading-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  15. Metabolic remodeling agents show beneficial effects in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahnke Vanessa E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic disease involving a severe muscle wasting that is characterized by cycles of muscle degeneration/regeneration and culminates in early death in affected boys. Mitochondria are presumed to be involved in the regulation of myoblast proliferation/differentiation; enhancing mitochondrial activity with exercise mimetics (AMPK and PPAR-delta agonists increases muscle function and inhibits muscle wasting in healthy mice. We therefore asked whether metabolic remodeling agents that increase mitochondrial activity would improve muscle function in mdx mice. Methods Twelve-week-old mdx mice were treated with two different metabolic remodeling agents (GW501516 and AICAR, separately or in combination, for 4 weeks. Extensive systematic behavioral, functional, histological, biochemical, and molecular tests were conducted to assess the drug(s' effects. Results We found a gain in body and muscle weight in all treated mice. Histologic examination showed a decrease in muscle inflammation and in the number of fibers with central nuclei and an increase in fibers with peripheral nuclei, with significantly fewer activated satellite cells and regenerating fibers. Together with an inhibition of FoXO1 signaling, these results indicated that the treatments reduced ongoing muscle damage. Conclusions The three treatments produced significant improvements in disease phenotype, including an increase in overall behavioral activity and significant gains in forelimb and hind limb strength. Our findings suggest that triggering mitochondrial activity with exercise mimetics improves muscle function in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

  16. Energy Balance Regulating Neuropeptides Are Expressed through Pregnancy and Regulated by Interleukin-6 Deficiency in Mouse Placenta

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    Patricia Pazos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The placenta produces a number of signaling molecules including metabolic and reproductive hormones as well as several inflammatory mediators. Among them, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, a well-known immune and metabolic regulator, acts peripherally modulating metabolic function and centrally increasing energy expenditure and reducing body fat. IL-6 interacts with key hypothalamic neuropeptidergic systems controlling energy homeostasis such as those producing the orexigenic/anabolic: neuropeptide Y (NPY and agouti-related peptide (AgRP and anorectic/catabolic neuropeptides: proopiomelanocortin (POMC and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART. Human and rat placenta have been identified as source of these neuropeptides, but their expression and regulation in murine placental tissues remain unknown. Therefore, placental mRNA levels of IL-6, NPY, AgRP, POMC, and CART at different pregnancy stages (gestational days 13, 15, and 18 were analyzed by real time PCR, as were the effect of IL-6 deficiency (IL-6 knockout mice on their placental expression. Our results showed that placenta-derived neuropeptides were regulated by gestational age and IL-6 throughout the second half of mouse pregnancy. These data suggest that IL-6 may participate in the fine tune control of energy balance during pregnancy by extending its action as a metabolic signal to the main organ at the fetomaternal interface: the placenta.

  17. Energy Balance Regulating Neuropeptides Are Expressed through Pregnancy and Regulated by Interleukin-6 Deficiency in Mouse Placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Patricia; Lima, Luis; Diéguez, Carlos; García, María C.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta produces a number of signaling molecules including metabolic and reproductive hormones as well as several inflammatory mediators. Among them, Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-known immune and metabolic regulator, acts peripherally modulating metabolic function and centrally increasing energy expenditure and reducing body fat. IL-6 interacts with key hypothalamic neuropeptidergic systems controlling energy homeostasis such as those producing the orexigenic/anabolic: neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorectic/catabolic neuropeptides: proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART). Human and rat placenta have been identified as source of these neuropeptides, but their expression and regulation in murine placental tissues remain unknown. Therefore, placental mRNA levels of IL-6, NPY, AgRP, POMC, and CART at different pregnancy stages (gestational days 13, 15, and 18) were analyzed by real time PCR, as were the effect of IL-6 deficiency (IL-6 knockout mice) on their placental expression. Our results showed that placenta-derived neuropeptides were regulated by gestational age and IL-6 throughout the second half of mouse pregnancy. These data suggest that IL-6 may participate in the fine tune control of energy balance during pregnancy by extending its action as a metabolic signal to the main organ at the fetomaternal interface: the placenta. PMID:24744782

  18. Energy Balance Regulating Neuropeptides Are Expressed through Pregnancy and Regulated by Interleukin-6 Deficiency in Mouse Placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Patricia; Lima, Luis; Diéguez, Carlos; García, María C

    2014-01-01

    The placenta produces a number of signaling molecules including metabolic and reproductive hormones as well as several inflammatory mediators. Among them, Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-known immune and metabolic regulator, acts peripherally modulating metabolic function and centrally increasing energy expenditure and reducing body fat. IL-6 interacts with key hypothalamic neuropeptidergic systems controlling energy homeostasis such as those producing the orexigenic/anabolic: neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorectic/catabolic neuropeptides: proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART). Human and rat placenta have been identified as source of these neuropeptides, but their expression and regulation in murine placental tissues remain unknown. Therefore, placental mRNA levels of IL-6, NPY, AgRP, POMC, and CART at different pregnancy stages (gestational days 13, 15, and 18) were analyzed by real time PCR, as were the effect of IL-6 deficiency (IL-6 knockout mice) on their placental expression. Our results showed that placenta-derived neuropeptides were regulated by gestational age and IL-6 throughout the second half of mouse pregnancy. These data suggest that IL-6 may participate in the fine tune control of energy balance during pregnancy by extending its action as a metabolic signal to the main organ at the fetomaternal interface: the placenta.

  19. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum: cardiac findings in patients and Abcc6-deficient mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Prunier

    Full Text Available Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene, is a rare multiorgan disease characterized by the mineralization and fragmentation of elastic fibers in connective tissue. Cardiac complications reportedly associated with PXE are mainly based on case reports.A cohort of 67 PXE patients was prospectively assessed. Patients underwent physical examination, electrocardiogram, transthoracic echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR, treadmill testing, and perfusion myocardial scintigraphy (SPECT. Additionally, the hearts of a PXE mouse models (Abcc6(-/- and wild-type controls (WT were analyzed.Three patients had a history of proven coronary artery disease. In total, 40 patients underwent exercise treadmill tests, and 28 SPECT. The treadmill tests were all negative. SPECT showed mild perfusion abnormalities in two patients. Mean left ventricular (LV dimension and function values were within the normal range. LV hypertrophy was found in 7 (10.4% patients, though the hypertrophy etiology was unknown for 3 of those patients. Echocardiography revealed frequent but insignificant mitral and tricuspid valvulopathies. Mitral valve prolapse was present in 3 patients (4.5%. Two patients exhibited significant aortic stenosis (3.0%. While none of the functional and histological parameters diverged significantly between the Abcc6(-/- and WT mice groups at age of 6 and 12 months, the 24-month-old Abcc6(-/- mice developed cardiac hypertrophy without contractile dysfunction.Despite sporadic cases, PXE does not appear to be associated with frequent cardiac complications. However, the development of cardiac hypertrophy in the 24-month-old Abcc6(-/- mice suggests that old PXE patients might be prone to developing late cardiopathy.

  20. Heat shock transcription factor 1-deficiency attenuates overloading-associated hypertrophy of mouse soleus muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Koya

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1, and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on the left soleus was performed by cutting the distal tendons of gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles for 4 weeks. The right muscle served as the control. Soleus muscles from both hindlimbs were dissected 2 and 4 weeks after the operation. Hypertrophy of soleus muscle in HSF1-null mice was partially inhibited, compared with that in wild-type (C57BL/6J mice. Absence of HSF1 partially attenuated the increase of muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area of overloaded soleus muscle. Population of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells in HSF1-null mice was significantly less than that in wild-type mice following 2 weeks of overloading (p<0.05. Significant up-regulations of interleukin (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor mRNAs were observed in HSF1-null, but not in wild-type, mice following 2 weeks of overloading. Overloading-related increases of IL-6 and AFT3 mRNA expressions seen after 2 weeks of overloading tended to decrease after 4 weeks in both types of mice. In HSF1-null mice, however, the significant overloading-related increase in the expression of IL-6, not ATF3, mRNA was noted even at 4th week. Inhibition of muscle hypertrophy might be attributed to the greater and prolonged enhancement of IL-6 expression. HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response may, in part, play a key role in loading-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  1. Automated setup for characterization of intact histone tails in Suz12-/- stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidoli, Simone; Schwämmle, Veit; Hansen, Thomas Aarup

    Epigenetics is defined as the study of heritable changes that occur without modifying the DNA sequence. Histone proteins are crucial components of epigenetic mechanisms and regulation, since they are fundamental for chromatin structure. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is already an integrated...... developed a high-resolving and automated LC-MS/MS setup to characterize intact histone tails (middle-down strategy)...

  2. Comparison of pre- and postimplantation development following the application of three artificial activating stimuli in a mouse model with round-headed sperm cells deficient for oocyte activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanden Meerschaut, Frauke; Nikiforaki, D.; De Roo, C.

    2013-01-01

    was significantly lower at weeks 2, 3 and 4 when compared with female pups originating from WT embryos. However, the latter difference was not observed at later time points, nor in the other artificial activating groups. All offspring mated successfully with fertile controls. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION......STUDY QUESTION Does the application of three different artificial activating stimuli lead to a difference in pre- and post-implantation embryo development in the wobbler mouse, a mouse model with oocyte activation deficient round-headed sperm cells similar to human globozoospermia? SUMMARY ANSWER...... No gross differences were found between strontium chloride, electrical pulses or ionomycin with respect to the pre- and post-implantation development in the wobbler mouse. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Fertilization failure following intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) occurs in 1–3% of the ICSI cycles...

  3. Definition of the locus responsible for systemic carnitine deficiency within a 1.6-cM region of mouse chromosome 11 by detailed linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, Kohei; Tokino, Takashi; Nishimori, Hiroyuki [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for oxidation of mitochondrial fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency results in failure of energy production by mitochondria and leads to metabolic encephalopathy, lipid-storage myopathy, and cardiomyopathy. The juvenile visceral steatosis (JVS) mouse, an animal model of systemic carnitine deficiency, inherits the JVS phenotype in autosomal recessive fashion, through a mutant allele mapped to mouse chromosome 11. As a step toward identifying the gene responsible for JVS by positional cloning, we attempted to refine the jvs locus in the mouse by detailed linkage analysis with 13 microsatellite markers, using 190 backcross progeny. Among the 13 loci tested, 5 (defined by markers D11Mit24, D11Mit111,D11Nds9, D11Mit86, and D11Mit23) showed no recombination, with a maximum lod score of 52.38. Our results implied that the jvs gene can be sought on mouse chromosome 11 within a genetic distance no greater than about 1.6 cM. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Deficiency of Mouse CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells in Xenogeneic Pig Thymus-Grafted Nude Mice Suffering from Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baojun; Sun, Chenming; Qu, Yanyan; Zhang, Aijun; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Lianjun; Niu, Zeqing; Zhao, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Xenogeneic thymus transplantation can efficiently induce specific immune tolerance to donor antigens in athymic recipients. However, many nude mice suffer from autoimmune diseases (AID) for over 10 weeks after xenogeneic thymus transplantation. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells were recently determined to play a pivotal role in keeping immune tolerance in humans and mice. Thus, we investigated this subpopulation of Treg cells in the periphery of pig thymus-grafted nude mice suffering from AID. Our results showed that the expression of Foxp3, CTLA-4 and GITR on mouse CD4+CD25+ T cells and the ratio of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells to CD4+ T cells were significantly decreased in the periphery of pig thymus-grafted nude mice suffering from AID, compared with healthy pig or mouse thymus-grafted nude mice. Furthermore, mouse CD4+CD25+ T cells in pig thymus-grafted nude mice suffering from AID showed more severe deficiency in immunosuppressive function compared with the counterpart in xenogeneic pig or syngeneic thymus-grafted nude mice without AID. Thus, the decreased frequency, altered phenotype and functional deficiency of mouse CD4+CD25+ Treg cells in pig thymus-grafted nude mice may contribute to the development of AID in this model. PMID:18954555

  5. Fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force of mouse fast skeletal muscle and ameliorates weakness due to nebulin-deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jeong Lee

    Full Text Available The effect of the fast skeletal muscle troponin activator, CK-2066260, on calcium-induced force development was studied in skinned fast skeletal muscle fibers from wildtype (WT and nebulin deficient (NEB KO mice. Nebulin is a sarcomeric protein that when absent (NEB KO mouse or present at low levels (nemaline myopathy (NM patients with NEB mutations causes muscle weakness. We studied the effect of fast skeletal troponin activation on WT muscle and tested whether it might be a therapeutic mechanism to increase muscle strength in nebulin deficient muscle. We measured tension-pCa relations with and without added CK-2066260. Maximal active tension in NEB KO tibialis cranialis fibers in the absence of CK-2066260 was ∼60% less than in WT fibers, consistent with earlier work. CK-2066260 shifted the tension-calcium relationship leftwards, with the largest relative increase (up to 8-fold at low to intermediate calcium levels. This was a general effect that was present in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. At pCa levels above ∼6.0 (i.e., calcium concentrations <1 µM, CK-2066260 increased tension of NEB KO fibers to beyond that of WT fibers. Crossbridge cycling kinetics were studied by measuring k(tr (rate constant of force redevelopment following a rapid shortening/restretch. CK-2066260 greatly increased k(tr at submaximal activation levels in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. We also studied the sarcomere length (SL dependence of the CK-2066260 effect (SL 2.1 µm and 2.6 µm and found that in the NEB KO fibers, CK-2066260 had a larger effect on calcium sensitivity at the long SL. We conclude that fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force at submaximal activation in both wildtype and NEB KO fiber bundles and, importantly, that this troponin activation is a potential therapeutic mechanism for increasing force in NM and other skeletal muscle diseases with loss of muscle strength.

  6. DSS colitis promotes tumorigenesis and fibrogenesis in a choline-deficient high-fat diet-induced NASH mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achiwa, Koichi; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ishizu, Yoji; Kuzuya, Teiji; Honda, Takashi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Katano, Yoshiaki; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-29

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) patients progress to liver cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several lines of evidence indicate that accumulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and disruption of gut microbiota play contributory roles in HCC. Moreover, in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model in mice, a high-fat diet increases portal LPS level and promotes hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. However, this diet-induced NASH model requires at least 50 weeks for carcinogenesis. In this study, we sought to determine whether increased intestinal permeability would aggravate liver inflammation and fibrosis and accelerate tumorigenesis in a diet-induced NASH model. Mice were fed a choline-deficient high-fat (CDHF) diet for 4 or 12 weeks. The DSS group was fed CDHF and intermittently received 1% DSS in the drinking water. Exposure to DSS promoted mucosal changes such as crypt loss and increased the number of inflammatory cells in the colon. In the DSS group, portal LPS levels were elevated at 4 weeks, and the proportions of Clostridium cluster XI in the fecal microbiota were elevated. In addition, levels of serum transaminase, number of lobular inflammatory cells, F4/80 staining-positive area, and levels of inflammatory cytokines were all elevated in the DSS group. Liver histology in the DSS group revealed severe fibrosis at 12 weeks. Liver tumors were detected in the DSS group at 12 weeks, but not in the other groups. Thus, DSS administration promoted liver tumors in a CDHF diet-induced NASH mouse over the short term, suggesting that the induction of intestinal inflammation and gut disruption of microbiota in NASH promote hepatic tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunization with lipopolysaccharide-deficient whole cells provides protective immunity in an experimental mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

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    Meritxell García-Quintanilla

    Full Text Available The increasing clinical importance of infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii warrants the development of novel approaches for prevention and treatment. In this context, vaccination of certain patient populations may contribute to reducing the morbidity and mortality caused by this pathogen. Vaccines against Gram-negative bacteria based on inactivated bacterial cells are highly immunogenic and have been shown to produce protective immunity against a number of bacterial species. However, the high endotoxin levels present in these vaccines due to the presence of lipopolysaccharide complicates their use in human vaccination. In the present study, we used a laboratory-derived strain of A. baumannii that completely lacks lipopolysaccharide due to a mutation in the lpxD gene (IB010, one of the genes involved in the first steps of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, for vaccination. We demonstrate that IB010 has greatly reduced endotoxin content (<1.0 endotoxin unit/106 cells compared to wild type cells. Immunization with formalin inactivated IB010 produced a robust antibody response consisting of both IgG1 and IgG2c subtypes. Mice immunized with IB010 had significantly lower post-infection tissue bacterial loads and significantly lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 compared to control mice in a mouse model of disseminated A. baumannii infection. Importantly, immunized mice were protected from infection with the ATCC 19606 strain and an A. baumannii clinical isolate. These data suggest that immunization with inactivated A. baumannii whole cells deficient in lipopolysaccharide could serve as the basis for a vaccine for the prevention of infection caused by A. baumannii.

  8. Screen for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes in mouse embryonic stem cells identifies a model for succinyl-CoA ligase deficiency and mtDNA depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraka R. Donti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase/ligase (SCS, a component of the citric acid cycle, are associated with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, elevation of methylmalonic acid (MMA, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depletion. A FACS-based retroviral-mediated gene trap mutagenesis screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES cells for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes identified a gene trap allele of Sucla2 (Sucla2SAβgeo, which was used to generate transgenic mice. Sucla2 encodes the ADP-specific β-subunit isoform of SCS. Sucla2SAβgeo homozygotes exhibited recessive lethality, with most mutants dying late in gestation (e18.5. Mutant placenta and embryonic (e17.5 brain, heart and muscle showed varying degrees of mtDNA depletion (20–60%. However, there was no mtDNA depletion in mutant liver, where the gene is not normally expressed. Elevated levels of MMA were observed in embryonic brain. SCS-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs demonstrated a 50% reduction in mtDNA content compared with wild-type MEFs. The mtDNA depletion resulted in reduced steady state levels of mtDNA encoded proteins and multiple respiratory chain deficiencies. mtDNA content could be restored by reintroduction of Sucla2. This mouse model of SCS deficiency and mtDNA depletion promises to provide insights into the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases with mtDNA depletion and into the biology of mtDNA maintenance. In addition, this report demonstrates the power of a genetic screen that combines gene trap mutagenesis and FACS analysis in mouse ES cells to identify mitochondrial phenotypes and to develop animal models of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  9. Decreased neural precursor cell pool in NADPH oxidase 2-deficiency: From mouse brain to neural differentiation of patient derived iPSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Nayernia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is emerging evidence for the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the regulation of stem cells and cellular differentiation. Absence of the ROS-generating NADPH oxidase NOX2 in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD patients, predominantly manifests as immune deficiency, but has also been associated with decreased cognition. Here, we investigate the role of NOX enzymes in neuronal homeostasis in adult mouse brain and in neural cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC. High levels of NOX2 were found in mouse adult neurogenic regions. In NOX2-deficient mice, neurogenic regions showed diminished redox modifications, as well as decrease in neuroprecursor numbers and in expression of genes involved in neural differentiation including NES, BDNF and OTX2. iPSC from healthy subjects and patients with CGD were used to study the role of NOX2 in human in vitro neuronal development. Expression of NOX2 was low in undifferentiated iPSC, upregulated upon neural induction, and disappeared during neuronal differentiation. In human neurospheres, NOX2 protein and ROS generation were polarized within the inner cell layer of rosette structures. NOX2 deficiency in CGD-iPSCs resulted in an abnormal neural induction in vitro, as revealed by a reduced expression of neuroprogenitor markers (NES, BDNF, OTX2, NRSF/REST, and a decreased generation of mature neurons. Vector-mediated NOX2 expression in NOX2-deficient iPSCs rescued neurogenesis. Taken together, our study provides novel evidence for a regulatory role of NOX2 during early stages of neurogenesis in mouse and human.

  10. Long-term blinded placebo-controlled study of SNT-MC17/idebenone in the dystrophin deficient mdx mouse: cardiac protection and improved exercise performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyse, Gunnar M.; Van der Mieren, Gerry; Erb, Michael; D'hooge, Jan; Herijgers, Paul; Verbeken, Erik; Jara, Alejandro; Van Den Bergh, An; Mertens, Luc; Courdier-Fruh, Isabelle; Barzaghi, Patrizia; Meier, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Aims Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe and still incurable disease, with heart failure as a leading cause of death. The identification of a disease-modifying therapy may require early-initiated and long-term administration, but such type of therapeutic trial is not evident in humans. We have performed such a trial of SNT-MC17/idebenone in the mdx mouse model of DMD, based on the drug’s potential to improve mitochondrial respiratory chain function and reduce oxidative stress. Methods and results In this study, 200 mg/kg bodyweight of either SNT-MC17/idebenone or placebo was given from age 4 weeks until 10 months in mdx and wild-type mice. All evaluators were blinded to mouse type and treatment groups. Idebenone treatment significantly corrected cardiac diastolic dysfunction and prevented mortality from cardiac pump failure induced by dobutamine stress testing in vivo, significantly reduced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, and significantly improved voluntary running performance in mdx mice. Conclusion We have identified a novel potential therapeutic strategy for human DMD, as SNT-MC17/idebenone was cardioprotective and improved exercise performance in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse. Our data also illustrate that the mdx mouse provides unique opportunities for long-term controlled prehuman therapeutic studies. PMID:18784063

  11. Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD-) deficiency-studies on treatment effects and long-term outcomes in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Sara

    2017-05-01

    Very-long-chain-acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase deficiency is the most common disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) oxidation, with an incidence of 1:50,000-1:100,000 in newborns. Catabolic situations contribute to the aggravation of symptoms and induce severe metabolic derangement. Treatment for VLCAD-deficiency includes avoidance of fasting and a long-chain fat-restricted and fat-modified diet in which LCFAs are fully or partially replaced by medium-chain triglycerides (MCT). The aim of this work was to investigate the outcome and the effects of long-term treatment in a mouse model of VLCAD-deficiency. The application of a single MCT bolus in a mouse model of VLCAD-deficiency (VLCAD -/- mice) immediately prior to exercise protected the muscles from the accumulation of acylcarnitines providing the required energy and it did not affect hepatic lipid metabolism. However, when MCT was applied over the course of a year as a regular part of the diet, female VLCAD -/- mice developed a severe clinical phenotype comparable to the human metabolic syndrome. Indeed, they were characterized by massive visceral fat infiltration, hepatosteatosis, disturbed fatty acid composition, hyperlipidemia, and systemic oxidative stress. In contrast, male VLCAD -/- mice seemed to be protected and displayed only signs of insulin resistance. Besides the sex-specific response to MCT supplementation with regard to the lipid metabolism, all VLCAD -/- mice developed progressive cardiac dysfunction over time which worsened when they were treated with regular MCT resulting in severe dilated cardiomyopathy. While long term use of MCT oil in mice has adverse effects, no such effects have been demonstrated in humans, likely reflecting the differences in long chain fatty acid oxidation between the two species.

  12. Involvement of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Maturation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells during Reprogramming of Mouse and Human Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaie, Niusha; Massumi, Mohammad; Wee, Ping; Salimi, Mahdieh; Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a reliable source for the study of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and developmental biology. Despite extensive studies on the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs, the efficiency of reprogramming is still low. Here, we used a bioinformatics and systems biology approach to study the two gene regulatory waves governing the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs. Our results revealed that the maturation phase of reprogramming was regulated by a more complex regulatory network of transcription factors compared to the initiation phase. Interestingly, in addition to pluripotency factors, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) members Ezh2, Eed, Jarid2, Mtf2, and Suz12 are crucially recruited during the maturation phase of reprogramming. Moreover, we found that during the maturation phase of reprogramming, pluripotency factors, via the expression and induction of PRC2 complex members, could silence the lineage-specific gene expression program and maintain a ground state of pluripotency in human and mouse naïve iPSCs. The findings obtained here provide us a better understanding of the gene regulatory network (GRN) that governs reprogramming, and the maintenance of the naïve state of iPSCs.

  13. Effects of LAR and PTP-BL phosphatase deficiency on adult mouse retinal cells activated by lens injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorber, B.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der; Berry, M.; Logan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Using intact and lens-lesioned wildtype, leucocyte common antigen-related phosphatase deficient (LARDeltaP) and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-BAS-like phosphatase deficient (PTP-BLDeltaP) mice, we have evaluated the role of LAR and PTP-BL in retinal ganglion cell survival and neuritogenesis,

  14. A novel mouse model of creatine transporter deficiency [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4zb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Baroncelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the creatine (Cr transporter (CrT gene lead to cerebral creatine deficiency syndrome-1 (CCDS1, an X-linked metabolic disorder characterized by cerebral Cr deficiency causing intellectual disability, seizures, movement  and behavioral disturbances, language and speech impairment ( OMIM #300352. CCDS1 is still an untreatable pathology that can be very invalidating for patients and caregivers. Only two murine models of CCDS1, one of which is an ubiquitous knockout mouse, are currently available to study the possible mechanisms underlying the pathologic phenotype of CCDS1 and to develop therapeutic strategies. Given the importance of validating phenotypes and efficacy of promising treatments in more than one mouse model we have generated a new murine model of CCDS1 obtained by ubiquitous deletion of 5-7 exons in the Slc6a8 gene. We showed a remarkable Cr depletion in the murine brain tissues and cognitive defects, thus resembling the key features of human CCDS1. These results confirm that CCDS1 can be well modeled in mice. This CrT−/y murine model will provide a new tool for increasing the relevance of preclinical studies to the human disease.

  15. A novel mouse model of creatine transporter deficiency [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4f8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Baroncelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the creatine (Cr transporter (CrT gene lead to cerebral creatine deficiency syndrome-1 (CCDS1, an X-linked metabolic disorder characterized by cerebral Cr deficiency causing intellectual disability, seizures, movement  and behavioral disturbances, language and speech impairment ( OMIM #300352. CCDS1 is still an untreatable pathology that can be very invalidating for patients and caregivers. Only two murine models of CCDS1, one of which is an ubiquitous knockout mouse, are currently available to study the possible mechanisms underlying the pathologic phenotype of CCDS1 and to develop therapeutic strategies. Given the importance of validating phenotypes and efficacy of promising treatments in more than one mouse model we have generated a new murine model of CCDS1 obtained by ubiquitous deletion of 5-7 exons in the Slc6a8 gene. We showed a remarkable Cr depletion in the murine brain tissues and cognitive defects, thus resembling the key features of human CCDS1. These results confirm that CCDS1 can be well modeled in mice. This CrT−/y murine model will provide a new tool for increasing the relevance of preclinical studies to the human disease.

  16. Metabolomic profiles are gender, disease and time specific in the interleukin-10 gene-deficient mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor K Tso

    Full Text Available Metabolomic profiling can be used to study disease-induced changes in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in the metabolomic profile of males and females as they developed IBD. Using the IL-10 gene-deficient mouse model of IBD and wild-type mice, urine at age 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks was collected and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis was employed to assess differences in metabolomic profiles that occurred as a consequence of IBD development and severity (at week 20. These changes were contrasted to those that occurred as a consequence of gender. Our results demonstrate that both IL-10 gene-deficient and wild-type mice exhibit gender-related changes in urinary metabolomic profile over time. Some male-female separating metabolites are common to both IL-10 gene-deficient and control wild-type mice and, therefore, appear to be related predominantly to gender maturation. In addition, we were able to identify gender-separating metabolites that are unique for IL-10 gene-deficient and wild-type mice and, therefore, may be indicative of a gender-specific involvement in the development and severity of the intestinal inflammation. The comparison of the gender-separating metabolomic profile from IL-10 gene-deficient mice and wild-type mice during the development of IBD allowed us to identify changes in profile patterns that appear to be imperative in the development of intestinal inflammation, but yet central to gender-related differences in IBD development. The knowledge of metabolomic profile differences by gender and by disease severity has potential clinical implications in the design of both biomarkers of disease as well as the development of optimal therapies.

  17. Metabolomic profiles are gender, disease and time specific in the interleukin-10 gene-deficient mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Victor K; Sydora, Beate C; Foshaug, Rae R; Churchill, Thomas A; Doyle, Jason; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Fedorak, Richard N

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling can be used to study disease-induced changes in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in the metabolomic profile of males and females as they developed IBD. Using the IL-10 gene-deficient mouse model of IBD and wild-type mice, urine at age 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks was collected and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis was employed to assess differences in metabolomic profiles that occurred as a consequence of IBD development and severity (at week 20). These changes were contrasted to those that occurred as a consequence of gender. Our results demonstrate that both IL-10 gene-deficient and wild-type mice exhibit gender-related changes in urinary metabolomic profile over time. Some male-female separating metabolites are common to both IL-10 gene-deficient and control wild-type mice and, therefore, appear to be related predominantly to gender maturation. In addition, we were able to identify gender-separating metabolites that are unique for IL-10 gene-deficient and wild-type mice and, therefore, may be indicative of a gender-specific involvement in the development and severity of the intestinal inflammation. The comparison of the gender-separating metabolomic profile from IL-10 gene-deficient mice and wild-type mice during the development of IBD allowed us to identify changes in profile patterns that appear to be imperative in the development of intestinal inflammation, but yet central to gender-related differences in IBD development. The knowledge of metabolomic profile differences by gender and by disease severity has potential clinical implications in the design of both biomarkers of disease as well as the development of optimal therapies.

  18. TRPC3-mediated Ca2+ influx contributes to Rac1-mediated production of reactive oxygen species in MLP-deficient mouse hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Naoyuki; Watanabe, Kunihiro; Morimoto, Sachio; Sato, Yoji; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Nakaya, Michio; Ide, Tomomi; Mori, Yasuo; Kurose, Hitoshi; Nishida, Motohiro

    2011-05-27

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a myocardial disorder that is characterized by dilation and dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV). Accumulating evidence has implicated aberrant Ca(2+) signaling and oxidative stress in the progression of DCM, but the molecular details are unknown. In the present study, we report that inhibition of the transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3) channels partially prevents LV dilation and dysfunction in muscle LIM protein-deficient (MLP (-/-)) mice, a murine model of DCM. The expression level of TRPC3 and the activity of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) were increased in MLP (-/-) mouse hearts. Acitivity of Rac1, a small GTP-binding protein that participates in NADPH oxidase (Nox) activation, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also increased in MLP (-/-) mouse hearts. Treatment with pyrazole-3, a TRPC3 selective inhibitor, strongly suppressed the increased activities of CaMKII and Rac1, as well as ROS production. In contrast, activation of TRPC3 by 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), or by mechanical stretch, induced ROS production in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that up-regulation of TRPC3 is responsible for the increase in CaMKII activity and the Nox-mediated ROS production in MLP (-/-) mouse cardiomyocytes, and that inhibition of TRPC3 is an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of DCM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. AAV-mediated gene therapy in Dystrophin-Dp71 deficient mouse leads to blood-retinal barrier restoration and oedema reabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, Ophélie; Charles-Messance, Hugo; El Mathari, Brahim; Sene, Abdoulaye; Barbe, Peggy; Fouquet, Stéphane; Aragón, Jorge; Darche, Marie; Giocanti-Aurégan, Audrey; Paques, Michel; Sahel, José-Alain; Tadayoni, Ramin; Montañez, Cecilia; Dalkara, Deniz; Rendon, Alvaro

    2016-07-15

    Dystrophin-Dp71 being a key membrane cytoskeletal protein, expressed mainly in Müller cells that provide a mechanical link at the Müller cell membrane by direct binding to actin and a transmembrane protein complex. Its absence has been related to blood-retinal barrier (BRB) permeability through delocalization and down-regulation of the AQP4 and Kir4.1 channels (1). We have previously shown that the adeno-associated virus (AAV) variant, ShH10, transduces Müller cells in the Dp71-null mouse retina efficiently and specifically (2,3). Here, we use ShH10 to restore Dp71 expression in Müller cells of Dp71 deficient mouse to study molecular and functional effects of this restoration in an adult mouse displaying retinal permeability. We show that strong and specific expression of exogenous Dp71 in Müller cells leads to correct localization of Dp71 protein restoring all protein interactions in order to re-establish a proper functional BRB and retina homeostasis thus preventing retina from oedema. This study is the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies in dealing with diseases with BRB breakdown and macular oedema such as diabetic retinopathy (DR). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Improved fatigue resistance in Gsα-deficient and aging mouse skeletal muscles due to adaptive increases in slow fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S.

    2011-01-01

    Genetically modified mice with deficiency of the G protein α-subunit (Gsα) in skeletal muscle showed metabolic abnormality with reduced glucose tolerance, low muscle mass, and low contractile force, along with a fast-to-slow-fiber-type switch (Chen M, Feng HZ, Gupta D, Kelleher J, Dickerson KE, Wang J, Hunt D, Jou W, Gavrilova O, Jin JP, Weinstein LS. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 296: C930–C940, 2009). Here we investigated a hypothesis that the switching to more slow fibers is an adaptive response with specific benefit. The results showed that, corresponding to the switch of myosin isoforms, the thin-filament regulatory proteins troponin T and troponin I both switched to their slow isoforms in the atrophic soleus muscle of 3-mo-old Gsα-deficient mice. This fiber-type switch involving coordinated changes of both thick- and thin-myofilament proteins progressed in the Gsα-deficient soleus muscles of 18- to 24-mo-old mice, as reflected by the expression of solely slow isoforms of myosin and troponin. Compared with age-matched controls, Gsα-deficient soleus muscles with higher proportion of slow fibers exhibited slower contractile and relaxation kinetics and lower developed force, but significantly increased resistance to fatigue, followed by a better recovery. Gsα-deficient soleus muscles of neonatal and 3-wk-old mice did not show the increase in slow fibers. Therefore, the fast-to-slow-fiber-type switch in Gsα deficiency at older ages was likely an adaptive response. The benefit of higher fatigue resistance in adaption to metabolic deficiency and aging provides a mechanism to sustain skeletal muscle function in diabetic patients and elderly individuals. PMID:21680879

  1. Vitamin D for combination photodynamic therapy of skin cancer in individuals with vitamin D deficiency: Insights from a preclinical study in a mouse model of squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sanjay; Thomas, Erik; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2016-03-01

    Combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in which vitamin D (VD) is given prior to aminolevulinate, a precursor (pro-drug) for protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), is an approach developed in our laboratory. We previously showed that 1α,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol), given prior to PDT, enhances accumulation of PpIX and improves cell death post-PDT in a mouse skin cancer model. However, since calcitriol poses a risk for hypercalcemia, we replaced systemic calcitriol with oral cholecalciferol (D3), administered as a high (tenfold, "10K") diet over a ten-day period. Here, we ask whether VD deficiency might alter the response to cPDT. Nude mice were fed a VD-deficient diet for at least 4 weeks ("deficient"); controls were fed a normal 1,000 IU/kg diet ("1K"). Human A431 cells were implanted subcutaneously and mice were switched to the 10K diet or continued on their baseline diets (controls). In other experiments, mice received a human equivalent dose of 50,000 IU D3 by oral gavage, to simulate administration of a single, high-dose VD pill. At various times, tumors were harvested and serum was collected to measure levels of VD metabolic intermediates. A significant increase in PpIX levels and in the expression of differentiation and proliferation markers in tumor tissue was observed after VD supplementation of both the deficient and 1K mice. Further results describing mechanistic details of PpIX enhancement through alteration of heme- and VD-metabolic enzyme levels will be presented. Based on these results, a clinical study using oral vitamin D prior to PDT for human skin cancer should be performed.

  2. Isoflurane anesthetic hypersensitivity and progressive respiratory depression in a mouse model with isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, S.; Manjeri, G.R.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Smeitink, J.; Driessen, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with mitochondrial disorders are frequently anesthetized for a wide range of operations. These disorders may interfere with the response to surgery and anesthesia. We examined anesthetic sensitivity to and respiratory effects of isoflurane in the Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mouse

  3. Lrit3 deficient mouse (nob6: a novel model of complete congenital stationary night blindness (cCSNB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Neuillé

    Full Text Available Mutations in LRIT3, coding for a Leucine-Rich Repeat, immunoglobulin-like and transmembrane domains 3 protein lead to autosomal recessive complete congenital stationary night blindness (cCSNB. The role of the corresponding protein in the ON-bipolar cell signaling cascade remains to be elucidated. Here we genetically and functionally characterize a commercially available Lrit3 knock-out mouse, a model to study the function and the pathogenic mechanism of LRIT3. We confirm that the insertion of a Bgeo/Puro cassette in the knock-out allele introduces a premature stop codon, which presumably codes for a non-functional protein. The mouse line does not harbor other mutations present in common laboratory mouse strains or in other known cCSNB genes. Lrit3 mutant mice exhibit a so-called no b-wave (nob phenotype with lacking or severely reduced b-wave amplitudes in the scotopic and photopic electroretinogram (ERG, respectively. Optomotor tests reveal strongly decreased optomotor responses in scotopic conditions. No obvious fundus auto-fluorescence or histological retinal structure abnormalities are observed. However, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT reveals thinned inner nuclear layer and part of the retina containing inner plexiform layer, ganglion cell layer and nerve fiber layer in these mice. To our knowledge, this is the first time that SD-OCT technology is used to characterize an animal model for CSNB. This phenotype is noted at 6 weeks and at 6 months. The stationary nob phenotype of mice lacking Lrit3, which we named nob6, confirms the findings previously reported in patients carrying LRIT3 mutations and is similar to other cCSNB mouse models. This novel mouse model will be useful for investigating the pathogenic mechanism(s associated with LRIT3 mutations and clarifying the role of LRIT3 in the ON-bipolar cell signaling cascade.

  4. MicroRNA-155 Deficiency Attenuates Liver Steatosis and Fibrosis without Reducing Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Steatohepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timea Csak

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRs regulate hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis. Fibrosis is the consequence of chronic tissue damage and inflammation. We hypothesized that deficiency of miR-155, a master regulator of inflammation, attenuates steatohepatitis and fibrosis.Wild type (WT and miR-155-deficient (KO mice were fed methionine-choline-deficient (MCD or -supplemented (MCS control diet for 5 weeks. Liver injury, inflammation, steatosis and fibrosis were assessed.MCD diet resulted in steatohepatitis and increased miR-155 expression in total liver, hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. Steatosis and expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism were attenuated in miR-155 KO mice after MCD feeding. In contrast, miR-155 deficiency failed to attenuate inflammatory cell infiltration, nuclear factor κ beta (NF-κB activation and enhanced the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1 in MCD diet-fed mice. We found a significant attenuation of apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3 and reduction in collagen and α smooth muscle actin (αSMA levels in miR-155 KO mice compared to WTs on MCD diet. In addition, we found attenuation of platelet derived growth factor (PDGF, a pro-fibrotic cytokine; SMAD family member 3 (Smad3, a protein involved in transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ signal transduction and vimentin, a mesenchymal marker and indirect indicator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT in miR-155 KO mice. Nuclear binding of CCAAT enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ a miR-155 target involved in EMT was significantly increased in miR-155 KO compared to WT mice.Our novel data demonstrate that miR-155 deficiency can reduce steatosis and fibrosis without decreasing inflammation in steatohepatitis.

  5. IKAP deficiency in an FD mouse model and in oligodendrocyte precursor cells results in downregulation of genes involved in oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheishvili, David; Dietrich, Paula; Maayan, Channa; Even, Aviel; Weil, Miguel; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Razin, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    The splice site mutation in the IKBKAP gene coding for IKAP protein leads to the tissue-specific skipping of exon 20, with concomitant reduction in IKAP protein production. This causes the neurodevelopmental, autosomal-recessive genetic disorder - Familial Dysautonomia (FD). The molecular hallmark of FD is the severe reduction of IKAP protein in the nervous system that is believed to be the main reason for the devastating symptoms of this disease. Our recent studies showed that in the brain of two FD patients, genes linked to oligodendrocyte differentiation and/or myelin formation are significantly downregulated, implicating IKAP in the process of myelination. However, due to the scarcity of FD patient tissues, these results awaited further validation in other models. Recently, two FD mouse models that faithfully recapitulate FD were generated, with two types of mutations resulting in severely low levels of IKAP expression. Here we demonstrate that IKAP deficiency in these FD mouse models affects a similar set of genes as in FD patients' brains. In addition, we identified two new IKAP target genes involved in oligodendrocyte cells differentiation and myelination, further underscoring the essential role of IKAP in this process. We also provide proof that IKAP expression is needed cell-autonomously for the regulation of expression of genes involved in myelin formation since knockdown of IKAP in the Oli-neu oligodendrocyte precursor cell line results in similar deficiencies. Further analyses of these two experimental models will compensate for the lack of human postmortem tissues and will advance our understanding of the role of IKAP in myelination and the disease pathology.

  6. IKAP Deficiency in an FD Mouse Model and in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Results in Downregulation of Genes Involved in Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Myelin Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheishvili, David; Dietrich, Paula; Maayan, Channa; Even, Aviel; Weil, Miguel; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Razin, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    The splice site mutation in the IKBKAP gene coding for IKAP protein leads to the tissue-specific skipping of exon 20, with concomitant reduction in IKAP protein production. This causes the neurodevelopmental, autosomal-recessive genetic disorder - Familial Dysautonomia (FD). The molecular hallmark of FD is the severe reduction of IKAP protein in the nervous system that is believed to be the main reason for the devastating symptoms of this disease. Our recent studies showed that in the brain of two FD patients, genes linked to oligodendrocyte differentiation and/or myelin formation are significantly downregulated, implicating IKAP in the process of myelination. However, due to the scarcity of FD patient tissues, these results awaited further validation in other models. Recently, two FD mouse models that faithfully recapitulate FD were generated, with two types of mutations resulting in severely low levels of IKAP expression. Here we demonstrate that IKAP deficiency in these FD mouse models affects a similar set of genes as in FD patients' brains. In addition, we identified two new IKAP target genes involved in oligodendrocyte cells differentiation and myelination, further underscoring the essential role of IKAP in this process. We also provide proof that IKAP expression is needed cell-autonomously for the regulation of expression of genes involved in myelin formation since knockdown of IKAP in the Oli-neu oligodendrocyte precursor cell line results in similar deficiencies. Further analyses of these two experimental models will compensate for the lack of human postmortem tissues and will advance our understanding of the role of IKAP in myelination and the disease pathology. PMID:24760006

  7. IKAP deficiency in an FD mouse model and in oligodendrocyte precursor cells results in downregulation of genes involved in oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheishvili

    Full Text Available The splice site mutation in the IKBKAP gene coding for IKAP protein leads to the tissue-specific skipping of exon 20, with concomitant reduction in IKAP protein production. This causes the neurodevelopmental, autosomal-recessive genetic disorder - Familial Dysautonomia (FD. The molecular hallmark of FD is the severe reduction of IKAP protein in the nervous system that is believed to be the main reason for the devastating symptoms of this disease. Our recent studies showed that in the brain of two FD patients, genes linked to oligodendrocyte differentiation and/or myelin formation are significantly downregulated, implicating IKAP in the process of myelination. However, due to the scarcity of FD patient tissues, these results awaited further validation in other models. Recently, two FD mouse models that faithfully recapitulate FD were generated, with two types of mutations resulting in severely low levels of IKAP expression. Here we demonstrate that IKAP deficiency in these FD mouse models affects a similar set of genes as in FD patients' brains. In addition, we identified two new IKAP target genes involved in oligodendrocyte cells differentiation and myelination, further underscoring the essential role of IKAP in this process. We also provide proof that IKAP expression is needed cell-autonomously for the regulation of expression of genes involved in myelin formation since knockdown of IKAP in the Oli-neu oligodendrocyte precursor cell line results in similar deficiencies. Further analyses of these two experimental models will compensate for the lack of human postmortem tissues and will advance our understanding of the role of IKAP in myelination and the disease pathology.

  8. Insulin downregulates the expression of the Ca2+-activated nonselective cation channel TRPM5 in pancreatic islets from leptin-deficient mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colsoul, Barbara; Jacobs, Griet; Philippaert, Koenraad; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Segal, Andrei; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas; Schuit, Frans; Vennekens, Rudi

    2014-03-01

    We recently proposed that the transient receptor potential melastatin 5 (TRPM5) cation channel contributes to glucose-induced electrical activity of the β cell and positively influences glucose-induced insulin release and glucose homeostasis. In this study, we investigated Trpm5 expression and function in pancreatic islets from mouse models of type II diabetes. Gene expression analysis revealed a strong reduction of Trpm5 mRNA levels in pancreatic islets of db/db and ob/ob mice. The glucose-induced Ca(2+) oscillation pattern in db/db and ob/ob islets mimicked those of Trpm5 (-/-) islets. Leptin treatment of ob/ob mice not only reversed the diabetic phenotype seen in these mice but also upregulated Trpm5 expression. Leptin treatment had no additional effect on Trpm5 expression levels when plasma insulin levels were comparable to those of the vehicle-injected control group. In murine β cell line, MIN6, insulin downregulated TRPM5 expression in a dose-dependent manner, unlike glucose or leptin. In conclusion, our data show that increased plasma insulin levels downregulate TRPM5 expression in pancreatic islets from leptin-deficient mouse models of type 2 diabetes.

  9. The effects of MSH2 deficiency on spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation rates in the mouse germline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, Karen L-A.; Duyn-Goedhart, Annemarie van; Hickenbotham, Peter; Monger, Karen; Buul, Paul P.W. van; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2007-01-01

    Mutation rates at two expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci were studied in the germline of mismatch repair deficient Msh2 knock-out mice. Spontaneous mutation rates in homozygous Msh2 -/- males were significantly higher than those in isogenic wild-type (Msh2 +/+ ) and heterozygous (Msh2 +/- ) mice. In contrast, the irradiated Msh2 -/- mice did not show any detectable increases in their mutation rate, whereas significant ESTR mutation induction was observed in the irradiated Msh2 +/+ and Msh2 +/- animals. Considering these data and the results of other publications, we propose that the Msh2-deficient mice possess a mutator phenotype in their germline and somatic tissues while the loss of a single Msh2 allele does not affect the stability of heterozygotes

  10. Prophase I Mouse Oocytes Are Deficient in the Ability to Respond to Fertilization by Decreasing Membrane Receptivity to Sperm and Establishing a Membrane Block to Polyspermy1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzak, Cassie A.; Moraine, Maia M.; Kyle, Diane D.; Lee, Hyo J.; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Robinson, Douglas N.; Evans, Janice P.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Changes occurring as the prophase I oocyte matures to metaphase II are critical for the acquisition of competence for normal egg activation and early embryogenesis. A prophase I oocyte cannot respond to a fertilizing sperm as a metaphase II egg does, including the ability to prevent polyspermic fertilization. Studies here demonstrate that the competence for the membrane block to polyspermy is deficient in prophase I mouse oocytes. In vitro fertilization experiments using identical insemination conditions result in monospermy in 87% of zona pellucida (ZP)-free metaphase II eggs, while 92% of ZP-free prophase I oocytes have four or more fused sperm. The membrane block is associated with a postfertilization reduction in the capacity to support sperm binding, but this reduction in sperm-binding capacity is both less robust and slower to develop in fertilized prophase I oocytes. Fertilization of oocytes is dependent on the tetraspanin CD9, but little to no release of CD9 from the oocyte membrane is detected, suggesting that release of CD9-containing vesicles is not essential for fertilization. The deficiency in membrane block establishment in prophase I oocytes correlates with abnormalities in two postfertilization cytoskeletal changes: sperm-induced cortical remodeling that results in fertilization cone formation and a postfertilization increase in effective cortical tension. These data indicate that cortical maturation is a component of cytoplasmic maturation during the oocyte-to-egg transition and that the egg cortex has to be appropriately primed and tuned to be responsive to a fertilizing sperm. PMID:23863404

  11. Time-course microarrays reveal early activation of the immune transcriptome in a choline-deficient mouse model of liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumoto, Koji; Watanabe, Rina; Nakao, Katsuki; Yonenaka, Hisaki; Hashimoto, Takao; Kato, Norihisa; Kumrungsee, Thanutchaporn; Yanaka, Noriyuki

    2017-09-01

    Choline-deficient diet is extensively used as a model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In this study, we explored genes in the liver for which the expression changed in response to the choline-deficient (CD) diet. Male CD-1 mice were divided into two groups and fed a CD diet with or without 0.2% choline bitartrate for one or three weeks. Hepatic levels of choline metabolites were analyzed by using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and hepatic gene expression profiles were examined by DNA microarray analysis. The CD diet lowered liver choline metabolites after one week and exacerbated fatty liver between one and three weeks. We identified >300 genes whose expression was significantly altered in the livers of mice after consumption of this CD diet for one week and showed that liver gene expression profiles could be classified into six distinct groups. This study showed that STAT1 and interferon-regulated genes was up-regulated after the CD diet consumption and that the Stat1 mRNA level was negatively correlated with liver phosphatidylcholine level. Stat1 mRNA expression was actually up-regulated in isolated hepatocytes from the mouse liver with the CD diet. This study provides insight into the genomic effects of the CD diet through the Stat1 expression, which might be involved in NAFLD development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thrombospondin1 deficiency reduces obesity-associated inflammation and improves insulin sensitivity in a diet-induced obese mouse model.

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    Yanzhang Li

    Full Text Available Obesity is prevalent worldwide and is associated with insulin resistance. Advanced studies suggest that obesity-associated low-grade chronic inflammation contributes to the development of insulin resistance and other metabolic complications. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 is a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein that is up-regulated in inflamed adipose tissue. A recent study suggests a positive correlation of TSP1 with obesity, adipose inflammation, and insulin resistance. However, the direct effect of TSP1 on obesity and insulin resistance is not known. Therefore, we investigated the role of TSP1 in mediating obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance by using TSP1 knockout mice.Male TSP1-/- mice and wild type littermate controls were fed a low-fat (LF or a high-fat (HF diet for 16 weeks. Throughout the study, body weight and fat mass increased similarly between the TSP1-/- mice and WT mice under HF feeding conditions, suggesting that TSP1 deficiency does not affect the development of obesity. However, obese TSP1-/- mice had improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin sensitivity compared to the obese wild type mice. Macrophage accumulation and inflammatory cytokine expression in adipose tissue were reduced in obese TSP1-/- mice. Consistent with the local decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, systemic inflammation was also decreased in the obese TSP1-/- mice. Furthermore, in vitro data demonstrated that TSP1 deficient macrophages had decreased mobility and a reduced inflammatory phenotype.TSP1 deficiency did not affect the development of high-fat diet induced obesity. However, TSP1 deficiency reduced macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue and protected against obesity related inflammation and insulin resistance. Our data demonstrate that TSP1 may play an important role in regulating macrophage function and mediating obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. These data suggest that TSP1 may serve as a

  13. Effect of Ku80 deficiency on mutation frequencies and spectra at a LacZ reporter locus in mouse tissues and cells.

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    Rita A Busuttil

    Full Text Available Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is thought to be an important mechanism for preventing the adverse effects of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs and its absence has been associated with premature aging. To investigate the effect of inactivated NHEJ on spontaneous mutation frequencies and spectra in vivo and in cultured cells, we crossed a Ku80-deficient mouse with mice harboring a lacZ-plasmid-based mutation reporter. We analyzed various organs and tissues, as well as cultured embryonic fibroblasts, for mutations at the lacZ locus. When comparing mutant with wild-type mice, we observed a significantly higher number of genome rearrangements in liver and spleen and a significantly lower number of point mutations in liver and brain. The reduced point mutation frequency was not due to a decrease in small deletion mutations thought to be a hallmark of NHEJ, but could be a consequence of increased cellular responses to unrepaired DSBs. Indeed, we found a substantial increase in persistent 53BP1 and gammaH2AX DNA damage foci in Ku80-/- as compared to wild-type liver. Treatment of cultured Ku80-deficient or wild-type embryonic fibroblasts, either proliferating or quiescent, with hydrogen peroxide or bleomycin showed no differences in the number or type of induced genome rearrangements. However, after such treatment, Ku80-deficient cells did show an increased number of persistent DNA damage foci. These results indicate that Ku80-dependent repair of DNA damage is predominantly error-free with the effect of alternative more error-prone pathways creating genome rearrangements only detectable after extended periods of time, i.e., in young adult animals. The observed premature aging likely results from a combination of increased cellular senescence and an increased load of stable, genome rearrangements.

  14. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity exacerbates ultraviolet B radiation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and cell survival signals in ultraviolet B-irradiated mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Som D.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated in several inflammatory diseases and in different types of cancer. Chronic inflammation induced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been implicated in various skin diseases, including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. As the relationship between obesity and susceptibility to UV radiation-caused inflammation is not clearly understood, we assessed the role of obesity on UVB-induced inflammation, and mediators of this inflammatory response, using the genetically obese (leptin-deficient) mouse model. Leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mice and wild-type counterparts (C57/BL6 mice) were exposed to UVB radiation (120 mJ/cm 2 ) on alternate days for 1 month. The mice were then euthanized and skin samples collected for analysis of biomarkers of inflammatory responses using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, ELISA and real-time PCR. Here, we report that the levels of inflammatory responses were higher in the UVB-exposed skin of the ob/ob obese mice than those in the UVB-exposed skin of the wild-type non-obese mice. The levels of UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression, prostaglandin-E 2 production, proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell survival signals (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and p-Akt-Ser 473 ) were higher in the skin of the ob/ob obese mice than the those in skin of their wild-type non-obese counterparts. Compared with the wild-type non-obese mice, the leptin-deficient obese mice also exhibited greater activation of NF-κB/p65 and fewer apoptotic cells in the UVB-irradiated skin. Our study suggests for the first time that obesity in mice is associated with greater susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammatory responses and, therefore, obesity may increase susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammation-associated skin diseases, including the risk of skin cancer.

  15. miR-451 deficiency is associated with altered endometrial fibrinogen alpha chain expression and reduced endometriotic implant establishment in an experimental mouse model.

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    Warren B Nothnick

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is defined as the growth of endometrial glandular and stromal components in ectopic locations and affects as many as 10% of all women of reproductive age. Despite its high prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis remains poorly understood. MicroRNAs, small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, are mis-expressed in endometriosis but a functional role in the disease pathogenesis remains uncertain. To examine the role of microRNA-451 (miR-451 in the initial development of endometriosis, we utilized a novel mouse model in which eutopic endometrial fragments used to induce endometriosis were deficient for miR-451. After induction of the disease, we evaluated the impact of this deficiency on implant development and survival. Loss of miR-451 expression resulted in a lower number of ectopic lesions established in vivo. Analysis of differential protein profiles between miR-451 deficient and wild-type endometrial fragments revealed that fibrinogen alpha polypeptide isoform 2 precursor was approximately 2-fold higher in the miR-451 null donor endometrial tissue and this elevated expression of the protein was associated with altered expression of the parent fibrinogen alpha chain mRNA and protein. As this polypeptide contains RGD amino acid "cell adhesion" motifs which could impact early establishment of lesion development, we examined and confirmed using a cyclic RGD peptide antagonist, that endometrial cell adhesion and endometriosis establishment could be respectively inhibited both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the reduced miR-451 eutopic endometrial expression does not enhance initial establishment of these fragments when displaced into the peritoneal cavity, that loss of eutopic endometrial miR-451 expression is associated with altered expression of fibrinogen alpha chain mRNA and protein, and that RGD cyclic peptide antagonists inhibit establishment of endometriosis

  16. Deficiency of GABAergic synaptic inhibition in the Kölliker-Fuse area underlies respiratory dysrhythmia in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

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    Abdala, Ana Paula; Toward, Marie A; Dutschmann, Mathias; Bissonnette, John M; Paton, Julian F R

    2016-01-01

    Life threatening breathing irregularity and central apnoeas are highly prevalent in children suffering from Rett syndrome. Abnormalities in inhibitory synaptic transmission have been associated with the physiopathology of this syndrome, and may underlie the respiratory disorder. In a mouse model of Rett syndrome, GABAergic terminal projections are markedly reduced in the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) in the dorsolateral pons, an important centre for control of respiratory rhythm regularity. Administration of a drug that augments endogenous GABA localized to this region of the pons reduced the incidence of apnoea and the respiratory irregularity of Rett female mice. Conversely, the respiratory disorder was recapitulated by blocking GABAergic transmission in the KF area of healthy rats. This study helps us understand the mechanism for generation of respiratory abnormality in Rett syndrome, pinpoints a brain site responsible and provides a clear anatomical target for the development of a translatable drug treatment. Central apnoeas and respiratory irregularity are a common feature in Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder most often caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). We used a MECP2 deficient mouse model of RTT as a strategy to obtain insights into the neurobiology of the disease and into mechanisms essential for respiratory rhythmicity during normal breathing. Previously, we showed that, systemic administration of a GABA reuptake blocker in MECP2 deficient mice markedly reduced the occurrence of central apnoeas. Further, we found that, during central apnoeas, post-inspiratory drive (adductor motor) to the upper airways was enhanced in amplitude and duration in Mecp2 heterozygous female mice. Since the pontine Kölliker-Fuse area (KF) drives post-inspiration, suppresses inspiration, and can reset the respiratory oscillator phase, we hypothesized that synaptic inhibition in this area is essential for respiratory rhythm

  17. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL): Mouse and human HL gene (HMGCL) cloning and detection of large gene deletions in two unrelated HL-deficient patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.P.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL, EC 4.1.3.4) catalyzes the cleavage of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA to acetoacetic acid and acetyl CoA, the final reaction of both ketogenesis and leucine catabolism. Autosomal-recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and coma. Using a mouse HL cDNA as a probe, we isolated a clone containing the full-length mouse HL gene that spans about 15 kb of mouse chromosome 4 and contains nine exons. The promoter region of the mouse HL gene contains elements characteristic of a housekeeping gene: a CpG island containing multiple Sp1 binding sites surrounds exon 1, and neither a TATA nor a CAAT box are present. We identified multiple transcription start sites in the mouse HL gene, 35 to 9 bases upstream of the translation start codon. We also isolated two human HL genomic clones that include HL exons 2 to 9 within 18 kb. The mouse and human HL genes (HGMW-approved symbol HMGCL) are highly homologous, with identical locations of intron-exon junctions. By genomic Southern blot analysis and exonic PCR, was found 2 of 33 HL-deficient probands to be homozygous for large deletions in the HL gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Parg deficiency confers radio-sensitization through enhanced cell death in mouse ES cells exposed to various forms of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, Hidenori; Fujimori, Hiroaki [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Gunji, Akemi [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Maeda, Daisuke [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); ADP-Ribosylation in Oncology Project, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Hirai, Takahisa [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Poetsch, Anna R. [ADP-Ribosylation in Oncology Project, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Harada, Hiromi [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Yoshida, Tomoko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Kyoritsu College of Pharmacy, 1-5-30 Shibakoen, Minatoku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Sasai, Keisuke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Okayasu, Ryuichi [International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Science, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Masutani, Mitsuko, E-mail: mmasutan@ncc.go.jp [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); ADP-Ribosylation in Oncology Project, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •Parg{sup −/−} ES cells were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} ES cells. •Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to carbon-ion irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. •Parg{sup −/−} cells showed defects in DSB repair after carbon-ion irradiation. •PAR accumulation was enhanced after carbon-ion irradiation compared to γ-irradiation. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (Parg) is the main enzyme involved in poly(ADP-ribose) degradation. Here, the effects of Parg deficiency on sensitivity to low and high linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation were investigated in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Mouse Parg{sup −/−} and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 deficient (Parp-1{sup −/−}) ES cells were used and responses to low and high LET radiation were assessed by clonogenic survival and biochemical and biological analysis methods. Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. Transient accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) was enhanced in Parg{sup −/−} cells. Augmented levels of phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) from early phase were observed in Parg{sup −/−} ES cells. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was similar in wild-type and Parp-1{sup −/−} cells and apoptotic cell death process was mainly observed in the both genotypes. These results suggested that the enhanced sensitivity of Parg{sup −/−} ES cells to γ-irradiation involved defective repair of DNA double strand breaks. The effects of Parg and Parp-1 deficiency on the ES cell response to carbon-ion irradiation (LET13 and 70 keV/μm) and Fe-ion irradiation (200 keV/μm) were also examined. Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to LET 70 keV/μm carbon-ion irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. Enhanced apoptotic cell death also accompanied augmented levels of γ-H2AX in a biphasic manner peaked at 1 and 24 h. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was

  19. Differential Expression of Claudin Family Proteins in Mouse Ovarian Serous Papillary Epithelial Adenoma in Aging FSH Receptor-Deficient Mutants

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    Jayaprakash Aravindakshan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is a deadly disease with long latency. To understand the consequences of loss of folliclestimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R signaling and to explore why the atrophic and anovulatory ovaries of follitropin receptor knockout (FORKO mice develop different types of ovarian tumors, including serous papillary epithelial adenoma later in life, we used mRNA expression profiling to gain a comprehensive view of misregulated genes. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, protein analysis, and cellular localization, we show, for the first time, in vivo evidence that, in the absence of FSH-R signaling, claudin-3, claudin-4, and claudin-11 are selectively upregulated, whereas claudin-1 decreases in ovarian surface epithelium and tumors in comparison to wild type. In vitro experiments using a mouse ovarian surface epithelial cell line derived from wild-type females reveal direct hormonal influence on claudin proteins. Although recent studies suggest that cell junction proteins are differentially expressed in ovarian tumors in women, the etiology of such changes remains unclear. Our results suggest an altered hormonal environment resulting from FSH-R loss as a cause of early changes in tight junction proteins that predispose the ovary to late-onset tumors that occur with aging. More importantly, this study identifies claudin-11 overexpression in mouse ovarian serous cystadenoma.

  20. Osbpl8 deficiency in mouse causes an elevation of high-density lipoproteins and gender-specific alterations of lipid metabolism.

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    Olivier Béaslas

    Full Text Available OSBP-related protein 8 (ORP8 encoded by Osbpl8 is an endoplasmic reticulum sterol sensor implicated in cellular lipid metabolism. We generated an Osbpl8(-/- (KO C57Bl/6 mouse strain. Wild-type and Osbpl8KO animals at the age of 13-weeks were fed for 5 weeks either chow or high-fat diet, and their plasma lipids/lipoproteins and hepatic lipids were analyzed. The chow-fed Osbpl8KO male mice showed a marked elevation of high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol (+79% and phospholipids (+35%, while only minor increase of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I was detected. In chow-fed female KO mice a less prominent increase of HDL cholesterol (+27% was observed, while on western diet the HDL increment was prominent in both genders. The HDL increase was accompanied by an elevated level of HDL-associated apolipoprotein E in male, but not female KO animals. No differences between genotypes were observed in lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT or hepatic lipase (HL activity, or in the fractional catabolic rate of fluorescently labeled mouse HDL injected in chow-diet fed animals. The Osbpl8KO mice of both genders displayed reduced phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP activity, but only on chow diet. These findings are consistent with a model in which Osbpl8 deficiency results in altered biosynthesis of HDL. Consistent with this hypothesis, ORP8 depleted mouse hepatocytes secreted an increased amount of nascent HDL into the culture medium. In addition to the HDL phenotype, distinct gender-specific alterations in lipid metabolism were detected: Female KO animals on chow diet showed reduced lipoprotein lipase (LPL activity and increased plasma triglycerides, while the male KO mice displayed elevated plasma cholesterol biosynthetic markers cholestenol, desmosterol, and lathosterol. Moreover, modest gender-specific alterations in the hepatic expression of lipid homeostatic genes were observed. In conclusion, we report the first viable OsbplKO mouse model

  1. CHD7 deficiency in "Looper", a new mouse model of CHARGE syndrome, results in ossicle malformation, otosclerosis and hearing impairment.

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    Jacqueline M Ogier

    Full Text Available CHARGE syndrome is a rare human disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7. Characteristics of CHARGE are varied and include developmental ear and hearing anomalies. Here we report a novel mouse model of CHD7 dysfunction, termed Looper. The Looper strain harbours a nonsense mutation (c.5690C>A, p.S1897X within the Chd7 gene. Looper mice exhibit many of the clinical features of the human syndrome, consistent with previously reported CHARGE models, including growth retardation, facial asymmetry, vestibular defects, eye anomalies, hyperactivity, ossicle malformation, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Looper mice display an otosclerosis-like fusion of the stapes footplate to the cochlear oval window and blepharoconjunctivitis but not coloboma. Looper mice are hyperactive and have vestibular dysfunction but do not display motor impairment.

  2. Beneficial renal and pancreatic phenotypes in a mouse deficient in FXYD2 regulatory subunit of Na,K-ATPase

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    Elena eArystarkhova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental role of Na,K-ATPase in eukaryotic cells calls for complex and efficient regulation of its activity. Besides alterations in gene expression and trafficking, kinetic properties of the pump are modulated by reversible association with single span membrane proteins, the FXYDs. Seven members of the family are expressed in a tissue-specific manner, affecting pump kinetics in all possible permutations. This mini-review focuses on functional properties of FXYD2 studied in transfected cells, and on noteworthy and unexpected phenotypes discovered in a Fxyd2-/- mouse. FXYD2, the gamma subunit, reduces activity of Na,K-ATPase either by decreasing affinity for Na+, or reducing Vmax. FXYD2 mRNA splicing and editing provide another layer for regulation of Na,K-ATPase. In kidney of knockouts, there was elevated activity for Na,K-ATPase and for NCC and NKCC2 apical sodium transporters. That should lead to sodium retention and hypertension, however, the mice were in sodium balance and normotensive. Adult Fxyd2-/- mice also exhibited a mild pancreatic phenotype with enhanced glucose tolerance, elevation of circulating insulin, but no insulin resistance. There was an increase in beta cell proliferation and beta cell mass that correlated with activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway. The Fxyd2-/- mice are thus in a highly desirable state: the animals are resistant to Na+ retention, and showed improved glucose control, i.e. they display favorable metabolic adaptations to protect against development of salt-sensitive hypertension and diabetes. Investigation of the mechanisms of these adaptations in the mouse has the potential to unveil a novel therapeutic FXYD2-dependent strategy.

  3. Opposite modifying effects of HR and NHEJ deficiency on cancer risk in Ptc1 heterozygous mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanori, M; Pasquali, E; Leonardi, S; Giardullo, P; Di Majo, V; Taccioli, G; Essers, J; Kanaar, R; Mullenders, L H; Atkinson, M J; Mancuso, M; Saran, A; Pazzaglia, S

    2011-11-24

    Heterozygous Patched1 (Ptc1(+/-)) mice are prone to medulloblastoma (MB), and exposure of newborn mice to ionizing radiation dramatically increases the frequency and shortens the latency of MB. In Ptc1(+/-) mice, MB is characterized by loss of the normal remaining Ptc1 allele, suggesting that genome rearrangements may be key events in MB development. Recent evidence indicates that brain tumors may be linked to defects in DNA-damage repair processes, as various combinations of targeted deletions in genes controlling cell-cycle checkpoints, apoptosis and DNA repair result in MB in mice. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) contribute to genome stability, and deficiencies in either pathway predispose to genome rearrangements. To test the role of defective HR or NHEJ in tumorigenesis, control and irradiated Ptc1(+/-) mice with two, one or no functional Rad54 or DNA-protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) alleles were monitored for MB development. We also examined the effect of Rad54 or DNA-PKcs deletion on the processing of endogenous and radiation-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in neural precursors of the developing cerebellum, the cells of origin of MB. We found that, although HR and NHEJ collaborate in protecting cells from DNA damage and apoptosis, they have opposite roles in MB tumorigenesis. In fact, although Rad54 deficiency increased both spontaneous and radiation-induced MB development, DNA-PKcs disruption suppressed MB tumorigenesis. Together, our data provide the first evidence that Rad54-mediated HR in vivo is important for suppressing tumorigenesis by maintaining genomic stability.

  4. Epithelial barrier disruption allows nondisease-causing bacteria to initiate and sustain IBD in the IL-10 gene-deficient mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydora, Beate C; Macfarlane, Sarah M; Walker, John W; Dmytrash, Andrea L; Churchill, Thomas A; Doyle, Jason; Fedorak, Richard N

    2007-08-01

    In the IL-10 gene-deficient mouse model, development of intestinal inflammation is associated with a defect in epithelial barrier integrity that is thought to allow sufficient passage of bacteria or bacterial antigens to initiate a mucosal immune response. Microbial monoassociation experiments into axenic animals have shown that some, but not all, endogenous bacteria will initiate an intestinal inflammatory response. For instance, Bacteroides vulgatus does not initiate intestinal inflammation in axenic IL-10 gene-deficient mice. We investigated whether B. vulgatus requires concomitant disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in order to initiate an inflammatory response. We first identified a dose of the indomethacin that would cause a primary disruption of the epithelial barrier without causing intestinal inflammation. IL-10 axenic mice were then administered this dose of indomethacin in their drinking water for 7 days and concomitantly monoassociated, by oral gavage, with B. vulgatus. Indomethacin treatment (2 microg/g/d) for 7 days resulted in disruption of epithelial barrier integrity, but it caused neither a systemic inflammatory response nor a mucosal inflammatory response in the colon or cecum. Monoassociation with B. vulgatus alone did not lead to a mucosal inflammatory response, despite a measurable systemic response. In contrast, administration of indomethacin plus B. vulgatus-monoassociation resulted in a marked intestinal inflammatory response in colon and cecum. Our data show that, in a genetically predisposed animal model, the nondisease-causing endogenous bacteria, B. vulgatus, is able to cause an intestinal inflammatory response provided that disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier has occurred.

  5. High-fat diet exacerbates cognitive rigidity and social deficiency in the BTBR mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilkha, N; Kuperman, Y; Kimchi, T

    2017-03-14

    The global increase in rates of obesity has been accompanied by a similar surge in the number of autism diagnoses. Accumulating epidemiological evidence suggest a possible link between overweight and the risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), as well as autism severity. In laboratory animals, several studies have shown a connection between various environmental factors, including diet-induced obesity, and the development of autism-related behaviors. However, the effect of high-fat or imbalanced diet on a pre-existing autism-like phenotype is unclear. In this study, we employed the BTBR inbred mouse strain, a well-established mouse model for autism, to assess the impact of inadequate fattening nutrition on the autism-related behavioral phenotype. Male mice were fed by high-fat diet (HFD) or control balanced diet (control) from weaning onward, and tested in a series of behavioral assays as adults. In addition, we measured the hypothalamic expression levels of several genes involved in oxytocin and dopamine signaling, in search of a possible neurobiological underlying mechanism. As an internal control, we also employed similar metabolic and behavioral measures on neurotypical C57 mice. Compared to control-fed mice, BTBR mice fed by HFD showed marked aggravation in autism-related behaviors, manifested in increased cognitive rigidity and diminished preference for social novelty. Moreover, the total autism composite (severity) score was higher in the HFD group, and positively correlated with higher body weight. Finally, we revealed negative correlations associating dopamine signaling factors in the hypothalamus, to autism-related severity and body weight. In contrast, we found no significant effects of HFD on autism-related behaviors of C57 mice, though the metabolic effects of the diet were similar for both strains. Our results indicate a direct causative link between diet-induced obesity and worsening of a pre-existing autism-related behavior and emphasize the need

  6. Changes in muscle cell metabolism and mechanotransduction are associated with myopathic phenotype in a mouse model of collagen VI deficiency.

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    Sara De Palma

    Full Text Available This study identifies metabolic and protein phenotypic alterations in gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles of Col6a1(-/- mice, a model of human collagen VI myopathies. All three muscles of Col6a1(-/- mice show some common changes in proteins involved in metabolism, resulting in decreased glycolysis and in changes of the TCA cycle fluxes. These changes lead to a different fate of α-ketoglutarate, with production of anabolic substrates in gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior, and with lipotoxicity in diaphragm. The metabolic changes are associated with changes of proteins involved in mechanotransduction at the myotendineous junction/costameric/sarcomeric level (TN-C, FAK, ROCK1, troponin I fast and in energy metabolism (aldolase, enolase 3, triose phosphate isomerase, creatine kinase, adenylate kinase 1, parvalbumin, IDH1 and FASN. Together, these change may explain Ca(2+ deregulation, impaired force development, increased muscle-relaxation-time and fiber damage found in the mouse model as well as in patients. The severity of these changes differs in the three muscles (gastrocnemius

  7. Attenuation of chondrogenic transformation in vascular smooth muscle by dietary quercetin in the MGP-deficient mouse model.

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    Kelly E Beazley

    Full Text Available Cartilaginous metaplasia of vascular smooth muscle (VSM is characteristic for arterial calcification in diabetes and uremia and in the background of genetic alterations in matrix Gla protein (MGP. A better understanding of the molecular details of this process is critical for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to VSM transformation and arterial calcification.This study aimed to identify the effects of bioflavonoid quercetin on chondrogenic transformation and calcification of VSM in the MGP-null mouse model and upon TGF-β3 stimulation in vitro, and to characterize the associated alterations in cell signaling.Molecular analysis revealed activation of β-catenin signaling in cartilaginous metaplasia in Mgp-/- aortae in vivo and during chondrogenic transformation of VSMCs in vitro. Quercetin intercepted chondrogenic transformation of VSM and blocked activation of β-catenin both in vivo and in vitro. Although dietary quercetin drastically attenuated calcifying cartilaginous metaplasia in Mgp-/- animals, approximately one-half of total vascular calcium mineral remained as depositions along elastic lamellae.Quercetin is potent in preventing VSM chondrogenic transformation caused by diverse stimuli. Combined with the demonstrated efficiency of dietary quercetin in preventing ectopic chondrogenesis in the MGP-null vasculature, these findings indicate a potentially broad therapeutic applicability of this safe for human consumption bioflavonoid in the therapy of cardiovascular conditions linked to cartilaginous metaplasia of VSM. Elastocalcinosis is a major component of MGP-null vascular disease and is controlled by a mechanism different from chondrogenic transformation of VSM and not sensitive to quercetin.

  8. Pathoproteomics of testicular tissue deficient in the GARP component VPS54: the wobbler mouse model of globozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jockusch, Harald; Holland, Ashling; Staunton, Lisa; Schmitt-John, Thomas; Heimann, Peter; Dowling, Paul; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2014-04-01

    In human globozoospermia, round-headed spermatozoa lack an acrosome and therefore cannot properly interact with oocytes. In the wobbler (WR) mouse, an L967Q missense mutation in the vesicular protein-sorting factor VPS54 causes motor neuron degeneration and globozoospermia. Although electron microscopy of WR testis shows all major components of spermatogenesis, they appear in a deranged morphology that prevents the formation of the acrosome. In order to determine proteome-wide changes, affected testes were analysed by 2D-DIGE and MS. The concentration of 8 proteins was increased and that of 35 proteins decreased as compared to wild type. Mass spectrometric analysis identified proteins with an altered concentration to be associated with metabolite transport, fatty acid metabolism, cellular interactions, microtubule assembly and stress response (chaperones Hsp70-2 and Hsp90α). Minor changes were observed for proteins involved in cell redox homeostasis, cytoskeleton formation, PTMs, detoxification and metabolism. The most dramatically decreased protein in WR testis was identified as fatty acid binding protein FABP3, as confirmed by immunoblot analysis. We conclude that a missense mutation in VPS54, an essential component of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein complex, not only prevents the formation of an acrosome but also initiates a cascade of metabolic abnormalities and a stress reaction. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Changes in Muscle Cell Metabolism and Mechanotransduction Are Associated with Myopathic Phenotype in a Mouse Model of Collagen VI Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Sara; Leone, Roberta; Grumati, Paolo; Vasso, Michele; Polishchuk, Roman; Capitanio, Daniele; Braghetta, Paola; Bernardi, Paolo; Bonaldo, Paolo; Gelfi, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    This study identifies metabolic and protein phenotypic alterations in gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles of Col6a1−/− mice, a model of human collagen VI myopathies. All three muscles of Col6a1−/− mice show some common changes in proteins involved in metabolism, resulting in decreased glycolysis and in changes of the TCA cycle fluxes. These changes lead to a different fate of α-ketoglutarate, with production of anabolic substrates in gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior, and with lipotoxicity in diaphragm. The metabolic changes are associated with changes of proteins involved in mechanotransduction at the myotendineous junction/costameric/sarcomeric level (TN-C, FAK, ROCK1, troponin I fast) and in energy metabolism (aldolase, enolase 3, triose phosphate isomerase, creatine kinase, adenylate kinase 1, parvalbumin, IDH1 and FASN). Together, these change may explain Ca2+ deregulation, impaired force development, increased muscle-relaxation-time and fiber damage found in the mouse model as well as in patients. The severity of these changes differs in the three muscles (gastrocnemiusmass-to-tendon (myotendineous junction) ratio and to muscle morphology. PMID:23437220

  10. Expression of Nek1 during kidney development and cyst formation in multiple nephron segments in the Nek1-deficient kat2J mouse model of polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Neks, mammalian orthologs of the fungal protein kinase never-in-mitosis A, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease. Among them, Nek1 is the primary protein inactivated in kat2J mouse models of PKD. Result We report the expression pattern of Nek1 and characterize the renal cysts that develop in kat2J mice. Nek1 is detectable in all murine tissues but its expression in wild type and kat2J heterozygous kidneys decrease as the kidneys mature, especially in tubular epithelial cells. In the embryonic kidney, Nek1 expression is most prominent in cells that will become podocytes and proximal tubules. Kidney development in kat2J homozygous mice is aberrant early, before the appearance of gross cysts: developing cortical zones are thin, populated by immature glomeruli, and characterized by excessive apoptosis of several cell types. Cysts in kat2J homozygous mice form postnatally in Bowman’s space as well as different tubular subtypes. Late in life, kat2J heterozygous mice form renal cysts and the cells lining these cysts lack staining for Nek1. The primary cilia of cells lining cysts in kat2J homozygous mice are morphologically diverse: in some cells they are unusually long and in others there are multiple cilia of varying lengths. Conclusion Our studies indicate that Nek1 deficiency leads to disordered kidney maturation, and cysts throughout the nephron. PMID:25030234

  11. Beneficial effects of a pyrroloquinolinequinone-containing dietary formulation on motor deficiency, cognitive decline and mitochondrial dysfunction in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Sawmiller

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is linked to oxidative stress, altered amyloid precursor protein (APP proteolysis, tau hyperphosphorylation and the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT. A growing body of evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction can be a key promoter of all of these pathologies and predicts that restoration of mitochondrial function might be a potential therapeutic strategy for AD. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the beneficial effect of a nutraceutical formulation Nutrastem II (Nutra II, containing NT020 (a mitochondrial restorative and antioxidant proprietary formulation and pyrroloquinolinequinone (PQQ, a stimulator of mitochondria biogenesis in 5XFAD transgenic mice. Animals were fed Nutra II for 12 weeks, starting at 3 months of age, after which behavioral and neuropathological endpoints were determined. The data from behavioral test batteries clearly revealed that dietary supplementation of Nutra II effectively ameliorated the motor deficiency and cognitive impairment of 5XFAD mice. In addition, Nutra II also protected mitochondrial function in 5XFAD mice brain, as evidenced by declined ROS levels and membrane hyperpolarization, together with elevated ATP levels and respiratory states. Interestingly, while Nutra II treatment only slightly reduced soluble Aβ42 levels, this formulation significantly impacted tau metabolism, as shown by reduced total and phosphorylated tau levels of 5XFAD mouse brain. Taken together, these preclinical findings confirm that mitochondrial function may be a key treatment target for AD and that Nutra II should be further investigated as a potential candidate for AD therapy.

  12. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 knockdown exacerbates aging-related neuroinflammation and cognitive deficiency in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Tan, Meng-Shan; Gu, Li-Ze; Zhang, Ying-Dong; Tan, Lan

    2014-06-01

    As a major characteristic of aging process, neuroinflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of several aging-related diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) is a newly identified risk gene for AD, which regulates inflammatory process in peripheral tissues via modulating the release of inflammatory cytokines. However, the role of TREM2 in aging-related neuroinflammation, cognitive deficiency, and AD-like neuropathology is unclear so far. Here, we detected the protein levels of TREM2 in brain of 3-, 7-, and 11-month-old senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice and observed that TREM2 levels were increased during aging process. We then knocked down TREM2 expression in brain of SAMP8 mice by nonviral RNA interference and found a significant increase in proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-6, which was accompanied by a reduction in IL-10. Meanwhile, more obvious neuronal and synaptic losses and cognitive impairment were observed. These findings indicate that TREM2 may play a protective role against aging-related neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Eicosapentaenoic acid ameliorates non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in a novel mouse model using melanocortin 4 receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuma, Kuniha; Itoh, Michiko; Suganami, Takayoshi; Kanai, Sayaka; Nakagawa, Nobutaka; Sakai, Takeru; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Hara, Mitsuko; Kojima, Soichi; Izumi, Yuichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Many attempts have been made to find novel therapeutic strategies for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), while their clinical efficacy is unclear. We have recently reported a novel rodent model of NASH using melanocortin 4 receptor-deficient (MC4R-KO) mice, which exhibit the sequence of events that comprise hepatic steatosis, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma with obesity-related phenotypes. In the liver of MC4R-KO mice, there is a unique histological feature termed hepatic crown-like structures (hCLS), where macrophages interact with dead hepatocytes and fibrogenic cells, thereby accelerating inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we employed MC4R-KO mice to examine the effect of highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a clinically available n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on the development of NASH. EPA treatment markedly prevented the development of hepatocyte injury, hCLS formation and liver fibrosis along with lipid accumulation. EPA treatment was also effective even after MC4R-KO mice developed NASH. Intriguingly, improvement of liver fibrosis was accompanied by the reduction of hCLS formation and plasma kallikrein-mediated transforming growth factor-β activation. Moreover, EPA treatment increased the otherwise reduced serum concentrations of adiponectin, an adipocytokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Collectively, EPA treatment effectively prevents the development and progression of NASH in MC4R-KO mice along with amelioration of hepatic steatosis. This study unravels a novel anti-fibrotic mechanism of EPA, thereby suggesting a clinical implication for the treatment of NASH.

  14. Eicosapentaenoic acid ameliorates non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in a novel mouse model using melanocortin 4 receptor-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuniha Konuma

    Full Text Available Many attempts have been made to find novel therapeutic strategies for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, while their clinical efficacy is unclear. We have recently reported a novel rodent model of NASH using melanocortin 4 receptor-deficient (MC4R-KO mice, which exhibit the sequence of events that comprise hepatic steatosis, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma with obesity-related phenotypes. In the liver of MC4R-KO mice, there is a unique histological feature termed hepatic crown-like structures (hCLS, where macrophages interact with dead hepatocytes and fibrogenic cells, thereby accelerating inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we employed MC4R-KO mice to examine the effect of highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, a clinically available n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on the development of NASH. EPA treatment markedly prevented the development of hepatocyte injury, hCLS formation and liver fibrosis along with lipid accumulation. EPA treatment was also effective even after MC4R-KO mice developed NASH. Intriguingly, improvement of liver fibrosis was accompanied by the reduction of hCLS formation and plasma kallikrein-mediated transforming growth factor-β activation. Moreover, EPA treatment increased the otherwise reduced serum concentrations of adiponectin, an adipocytokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Collectively, EPA treatment effectively prevents the development and progression of NASH in MC4R-KO mice along with amelioration of hepatic steatosis. This study unravels a novel anti-fibrotic mechanism of EPA, thereby suggesting a clinical implication for the treatment of NASH.

  15. HMG-CoA lyase (HL) gene: Cloning and characterization of the 5{prime} end of the mouse gene, gene targeting in ES cells, and demonstration of large deletions in three HL-deficient patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme which catalyzes the last step of leucine catabolism and of ketogenesis. Autosomal recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoglycemia and coma. We are interested in the pathophysiology of HL deficiency as a model for both amino acid and fatty acid inborn errors. We have cloned the human and mouse HL genes. In order to analyze the 5{prime} nontranslated region of mouse HL gene, we cloned and sequenced a 1.8 kb fragment containing the 5{prime} extremity including exon 1 and about 1.6 kb of 5{prime} nontranslated sequence. The region surrounding exon 1 is CpG-rich (66.4%). Using the criteria of West, the Observed/Expected ratio for CpG dinucleotides is 0.7 ({ge}0.6 is consistent with a CpG island). We are carrying out primer extension and RNase protection experiments to determine the transcription initiation site. We constructed a gene targeting vector by introducing the neomycin resistance gene into exon 2 of a 7.5 kb genomic subclone of the mouse HL gene. Targeting was performed by electroporating 10 mg linearized vector into 10{sup 7} ES cells and selecting for 12 days with G418. 5/228 colonies (2.2%) had homologous recombination as shown by PCR screening and Southern analysis. We are microinjecting the 5 targeted clones into blastocysts to create an HL-deficient mouse. To date we have obtained two chimeras with contributions of 95% and 55% from 129, by coat color estimates. Three of 27 (11%) of the HL-deficient patients studied were suggested by genomic Southern analysis to be homozygous for large intragenic deletions. We confirmed this and defined the boundaries using exonic PCR.

  16. Development of a novel mouse model of severe glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficiency for in vitro and in vivo assessment of hemolytic toxicity to red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chun Hay; Li, Karen; Li, Chung Leung; Ng, Pak Cheung; Fung, Kwok Pui; James, Anthony Edward; Wong, Raymond Pui-On; Gu, Goldie Jia-Shi; Fok, Tai Fai

    2011-10-15

    Studies of hemolytic agents on G6PD-deficient subjects have been extensively performed on red blood cells obtained from donors, only using in vitro methods. However, there has been no adequate G6PD-deficient animal model for in vivo assessment of potentially hemolytic agents. The objective of this study is to establish a novel mouse model of severe G6PD-deficiency, with high susceptibility to hemolytic damage upon oxidative agents. To create this model, G6PD mutant Gpdx allele was introduced into the C57L/J mouse strain background by breeding program. The hemolytic toxicity of naphthalene and its metabolite α-naphthol on G6PD-deficient red blood cells was evaluated. Our data showed that the F2 homozygous Gpdx mutant with C57L/J background exhibiting the G6PD activity was 0.9±0.1 U/g Hb, level similar to those of G6PD deficiency in human. A significantly negative correlation was demonstrated between GSH percentage reduction and G6PD activity (r=-0.51, p<0.001) upon challenge of the red blood cells with alpha-naphthol in vitro. Similar correlation was also found between GSSG elevation and G6PD activity. Our in vivo studies showed that the administration of naphthalene at 250 mg/kg inflicted significant oxidative damage to the G6PD-deficient mice, as illustrated by the decrease of the GSH-to-GSSG ratio (by 34.2%, p=0.005) and the increase of the methemoglobin level (by 1.9 fold, p<0.001). Hemolytic anemia was also found in G6PD-deficient mice at this dosage of naphthalene. In summary, this novel mouse model could be utilized as a screening platform to more accurately determine the hemolytic toxicity of pharmacological agents on G6PD-deficient subjects. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. UBR2 Enriched in p53 Deficient Mouse Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Exosome Promoted Gastric Cancer Progression via Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jiahui; Liang, Zhaofeng; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Huan; Li, Xia; Fu, Hailong; Zhang, Xu; Yan, Yongmin; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui

    2017-11-01

    The deficiency or mutation of p53 has been linked to several types of cancers. The mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) is an important component in the tumor microenvironment, and exosomes secreted by MSCs can transfer bioactive molecules, including proteins and nucleic acid, to other cells in the tumor microenvironment to influence the progress of a tumor. However, whether the state of p53 in MSCs can impact the bioactive molecule secretion of exosomes to promote cancer progression and the regulatory mechanism remains elusive. Our study aimed to investigate the regulation of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2 (UBR2) enriched in exosomes secreted by p53 deficient mouse bone marrow MSC (p53 -/- mBMMSC) in gastric cancer progression in vivo and in vitro. We found that the concentration of exosome was significantly higher in p53 -/- mBMMSC than that in p53 wild-type mBMMSC (p53 +/+ mBMMSC). In particular, UBR2 was highly expressed in p53 -/- mBMMSC cells and exosomes. P53 -/- mBMMSC exosomes enriched UBR2 could be internalized into p53 +/+ mBMMSC and murine foregastric carcinoma (MFC) cells and induce the overexpression of UBR2 in these cells which elevated cell proliferation, migration, and the expression of stemness-related genes. Mechanistically, the downregulation of UBR2 in p53 -/- mBMMSC exosomes could reverse these actions. Moreover, a majority of Wnt family members, β-catenin, and its downstream genes (CD44, CyclinD1, CyclinD3, and C-myc) were significantly decreased in MFC knockdown UBR2 and β-catenin depletion, an additional depletion of UBR2 had no significant difference in the expression of Nanog, OCT4, Vimentin, and E-cadherin. Taken together, our findings indicated that p53 -/- mBMMSC exosomes could deliver UBR2 to target cells and promote gastric cancer growth and metastasis by regulating Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Stem Cells 2017;35:2267-2279. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  18. Mouse embryonic stem cells are deficient in type I interferon expression in response to viral infections and double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruoxing; Wang, Jundi; Paul, Amber M; Acharya, Dhiraj; Bai, Fengwei; Huang, Faqing; Guo, Yan-Lin

    2013-05-31

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are considered to be a promising cell source for regenerative medicine because of their unlimited capacity for self-renewal and differentiation. However, little is known about the innate immunity in ESCs and ESC-derived cells. We investigated the responses of mouse (m)ESCs to three types of live viruses as follows: La Crosse virus, West Nile virus, and Sendai virus. Our results demonstrated mESCs were susceptible to viral infection, but they were unable to express type I interferons (IFNα and IFNβ, IFNα/β), which differ from fibroblasts (10T1/2 cells) that robustly express IFNα/β upon viral infections. The failure of mESCs to express IFNα/β was further demonstrated by treatment with polyIC, a synthetic viral dsRNA analog that strongly induced IFNα/β in 10T1/2 cells. Although polyIC transiently inhibited the transcription of pluripotency markers, the stem cell morphology was not significantly affected. However, polyIC can induce dsRNA-activated protein kinase in mESCs, and this activation resulted in a strong inhibition of cell proliferation. We conclude that the cytosolic receptor dsRNA-activated protein kinase is functional, but the mechanisms that mediate type I IFN expression are deficient in mESCs. This conclusion is further supported by the findings that the major viral RNA receptors are either expressed at very low levels (TLR3 and MDA5) or may not be active (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) in mESCs.

  19. Elevation of liver endoplasmic reticulum stress in a modified choline-deficient l-amino acid-defined diet-fed non-alcoholic steatohepatitis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Yo; Makita, Yukimasa; Yamasaki, Midori; Amano, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Takanori

    2017-05-06

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by accumulation of misfolded proteins is observed in several kinds of diseases. Since ER stress is reported to be involved in the progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), highly sensitive and simple measurement methods are required for research into developing novel therapy for NASH. To investigate the involvement of ER stress in NASH pathogenesis in a mouse model, an assay for liver ER stress was developed using ER stress activated indicator-luciferase (ERAI-Luc) mice. To establish the assay method for detection of ER stress in the liver, tunicamycin (TM) (0.3 mg/kg i. p.) was administered to ERAI-Luc mice, and the luciferase activity was measured in ex vivo and in vivo. To evaluate ER stress in the NASH model, ERAI-Luc mice were fed a modified choline-deficient l-amino acid-defined (mCDAA) diet for 14 weeks. After measurement of ER stress by luminescence imaging, levels of liver lipids and pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory gene expression were measured as NASH-related indexes. In non-invasive whole-body imaging, TM elevated luciferase activity in the liver, induced by activation of ER stress. The highest luminescence in the liver was confirmed by ex vivo imaging of isolated tissues. In parallel with progression of NASH, elevated luminescence induced by ER stress in liver was observed in mCDAA diet-fed ERAI-Luc mice. Luciferase activity was significantly and positively correlated to levels of triglyceride and free cholesterol in the liver, as well as to the mRNA expression of type 1 collagen α1 chain and tumor necrosis factor α. These data indicated that the use of ERAI-Luc mice was effective in the detection of ER stress in the liver. Moreover, the NASH model using ERAI-Luc mice can be a useful tool to clarify the role of ER stress in pathogenesis of NASH and to evaluate effects of drugs targeted against ER stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of an IRF-3 fusion protein and mouse estrogen receptor, inhibits hepatitis C viral replication in RIG-I-deficient Huh 7.5 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interferon Regulatory Factor-3 (IRF-3 plays a central role in the induction of interferon (IFN production and succeeding interferon-stimulated genes (ISG expression en route for restraining hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Here, we established a stable Huh7.5-IRF3ER cell line expressing a fusion protein of IRF-3 and mouse estrogen receptor (ER to examine IFN production and anti-HCV effects of IRF-3 in retinoic acid inducible-gene-I (RIG-I deficient Huh 7.5 cells. Homodimerization of the IRF-3ER fusion protein was detected by Western blotting after treatment with the estrogen receptor agonist 4-hydrotamoxifen (4-HT in Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells. Expression of IFN-α, IFN-β, and their inhibitory effects on HCV replication were demonstrated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Peak expression of IFN-α and IFN-β was achieved 24-hours post 4-HT treatment, coinciding with the appearance of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT proteins. Additionally, HCV viral replication declined in time-dependent fashion. In previous studies, a novel IFN-mediated pathway regulating expression of 1-8U and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M inhibited HCV internal ribosomal entry site (IRES-dependent translation. When expression of ISGs such as 1-8U and hnRNP M were measured in 4-HT-treated Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells, both genes were positively regulated by activation of the IRF-3ER fusion protein. In conclusion, the anti-HCV effects of IRF-3ER homodimerization inhibited HCV RNA replication as well as HCV IRES-dependent translation in Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells. The results of this study indicate that IRF-3ER homodimerization is a key step to restore IFN expression in Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells and in achieving its anti-HCV effects.

  1. Introduction of the human pro. cap alpha. 1(I) collagen gene into pro. cap alpha. 1(I)-deficient Mov-13 mouse cells leads to formation of functional mouse-human hybrid type I collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnieke, A.; Dziadek, M.; Bateman, J.; Mascara, T.; Harbers, K.; Gelinas, R.; Jaenisch, R.

    1987-02-01

    The Mov-13 mouse strain carries a retroviral insertion in the pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene that prevents transcription of the gene. Cell lines derived from homozygous embryos do not express type I collagen although normal amounts of pro..cap alpha..2 mRNA are synthesized. The authors have introduced genomic clones of either the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene into homozygous cell lines to assess whether the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) chains can associate with the endogenous mouse pro..cap alpha..2(I) chain to form stable type I collagen. The human gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter was efficiently transcribed in the transfected cells. Protein analyses revealed that stable heterotrimers consisting of two human ..cap alpha..1 chains and one mouse ..cap alpha..2 chain were formed and that type I collagen was secreted by the transfected cells at normal rates. However, the electrophoretic migration of both ..cap alpha..1(I) and ..cap alpha..2(I) chains in the human-mouse hybrid molecules were retarded, compared to the ..cap alpha..(I) chains in control mouse cells. Inhibition of the posttranslational hydroxylation of lysine and proline resulted in comigration of human and mouse ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2 chains, suggesting that increased posttranslational modification caused the altered electrophoretic migration in the human-mouse hybrid molecules. Amino acid sequence differences between the mouse and human ..cap alpha.. chains may interfere with the normal rate of helix formation and increase the degree of posttranslational modifications similar to those observed in patients with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The Mov-13 mouse system should allow the authors to study the effect specific mutations introduced in transfected pro..cap alpha..1(I) genes have on the synthesis, assembly, and function of collagen I.

  2. Chronic mild stress impairs latent inhibition and induces region-specific neural activation in CHL1-deficient mice, a mouse model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhusi, Mona; Obray, Daniel; Guercio, Bret; Bartlett, Mitchell J; Buhusi, Catalin V

    2017-08-30

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal processing of information and attentional deficits. Schizophrenia has a high genetic component but is precipitated by environmental factors, as proposed by the 'two-hit' theory of schizophrenia. Here we compared latent inhibition as a measure of learning and attention, in CHL1-deficient mice, an animal model of schizophrenia, and their wild-type littermates, under no-stress and chronic mild stress conditions. All unstressed mice as well as the stressed wild-type mice showed latent inhibition. In contrast, CHL1-deficient mice did not show latent inhibition after exposure to chronic stress. Differences in neuronal activation (c-Fos-positive cell counts) were noted in brain regions associated with latent inhibition: Neuronal activation in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortices and the nucleus accumbens shell was affected solely by stress. Neuronal activation in basolateral amygdala and ventral hippocampus was affected independently by stress and genotype. Most importantly, neural activation in nucleus accumbens core was affected by the interaction between stress and genotype. These results provide strong support for a 'two-hit' (genes x environment) effect on latent inhibition in CHL1-deficient mice, and identify CHL1-deficient mice as a model of schizophrenia-like learning and attention impairments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of 9-cis-retinoic acid on proliferation and differentiation of a spermatogonia and retinoid receptor gene expression in the vitamin A-deficient mouse testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaemers, I. C.; Sonneveld, E.; van Pelt, A. M.; Schrans, B. H.; Themmen, A. P.; van der Saag, P. T.; de rooij, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are key regulators in retinoid signaling. Knowledge about the effects of 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA), the natural ligand for the RXRs, may also provide insight in the functions of RXRs. In this study, the effect of 9-cis-RA on spermatogenesis in vitamin A-deficient

  4. A new immuno- dystrophin-deficient model, the NSG-mdx4Cv mouse, provides evidence for functional improvement following allogeneic satellite cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpke, Robert W.; Darabi, Radbod; Mader, Tara L.; Zhang, Yu; Toyama, Akira; Lonetree, Cara-lin; Nash, Nardina; Lowe, Dawn A.; Perlingeiro, Rita C.R.; Kyba, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of a myogenic cell population into an immunodeficient recipient is an excellent way of assessing the in vivo muscle-generating capacity of that cell population. To facilitate both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantations of muscle-forming cells in mice we have developed a novel immunodeficient muscular dystrophy model, the NSG-mdx4Cv mouse. The IL2Rg mutation, which is linked to the Dmd gene on the X chromosome, simultaneously depletes NK cells and suppresses thymic lymphomas, issues that limit the utility of the SCID/mdx model. The NSG-mdx4Cv mouse presents a muscular dystrophy of similar severity to the conventional mdx mouse. We show that this animal supports robust engraftment of both pig and dog muscle mononuclear cells. The question of whether satellite cells prospectively isolated by flow cytometry can confer a functional benefit upon transplantation has been controversial. Using allogeneic Pax7-ZsGreen donors and NSG-mdx4Cv recipients, we demonstrate definitively that as few as 900 FACS-isolated satellite cells can provide functional regeneration in vivo, in the form of an increased mean maximal force-generation capacity in cell-transplanted muscles, compared to a sham-injected control group. These studies highlight the potency of satellite cells to improve muscle function, and the utility of the NSG-mdx4Cv model for studies on muscle regeneration and Duchenne muscular dystrophy therapy. PMID:23606600

  5. VP1 pseudocapsids, but not a glutathione-S-transferase VP1 fusion protein, prevent polyomavirus infection in a T-cell immune deficient experimental mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Andrea; Andreasson, Kalle; Tegerstedt, Karin; Holländerová, Dana; Heidari, Shirin; Forstová, Jitka; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina

    2003-06-01

    The ability to vaccinate against polyomavirus infection in a T-cell deficient as well as a normal immune context was studied using polyomavirus major capsid protein (VP1) pseudocapsids (VP1-ps) or a glutathione-S-transferase-VP1 (GST-VP1) fusion protein. VP1-ps (1 or 10 microg) were administered subcutaneously, alone or together with Freund's complete and incomplete adjuvant, to CD4(-/-)8(-/-) T-cell deficient or normal C57Bl/6 mice on four occasions. Alternatively, CD4(-/-)8(-/-) and normal mice were inoculated with either GST-VP1 or Py-VP1-ps (5 microg). Following immunisation, antibody titres were tested by ELISA to VP1-ps or GST-VP1 or by haemagglutination inhibition (HAI). Mice were then infected with polyomavirus. Three weeks post-infection, the mice were killed and examined for the presence of polyomavirus DNA by PCR. Viral DNA was not detected in CD4(-/-)8(-/-) mice immunised with either VP1-ps alone or in combination with Freund's complete and incomplete adjuvant, or in any of the normal mice immunised with VP1-ps or GST-VP1. However, viral DNA was detected in 2/5 of the CD4(-/-)8(-/-) mice immunised with GST-VP1 and in non-immunised controls. Greater antibody titres were observed to VP1-ps than to GST-VP1 in CD4(-/-)8(-/-) mice after VP1-ps compared to GST-VP1 immunisation and antibody responses were better in normal than in immune-deficient mice. Only immunisation with VP1-ps resulted in haemagglutination inhibition. Complete protection against polyomavirus infection in the T-cell deficient context was obtained with VP1-ps, but not with GST-VP1, immunisation using the present vaccination protocol. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass on energy and glucose homeostasis are preserved in two mouse models of functional glucagon-like peptide-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokadem, Mohamad; Zechner, Juliet F; Margolskee, Robert F; Drucker, Daniel J; Aguirre, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion is greatly enhanced after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). While intact GLP-1exerts its metabolic effects via the classical GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), proteolytic processing of circulating GLP-1 yields metabolites such as GLP-1(9-36)amide/GLP-1(28-36)amide, that exert similar effects independent of the classical GLP-1R. We investigated the hypothesis that GLP-1, acting via these metabolites or through its known receptor, is required for the beneficial effects of RYGB using two models of functional GLP-1 deficiency - α-gustducin-deficient (α-Gust (-/-)) mice, which exhibit attenuated nutrient-stimulated GLP-1 secretion, and GLP-1R-deficient mice. We show that the effect of RYGB to enhance glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion was greatly attenuated in α-Gust (-/-) mice. In both genetic models, RYGB reduced body weight and improved glucose homeostasis to levels observed in lean control mice. Therefore, GLP-1, acting through its classical GLP-1R or its bioactive metabolites, does not seem to be involved in the effects of RYGB on body weight and glucose homeostasis.

  7. Insulin downregulates the expression of the Ca2+-activated nonselective cation channel TRPM5 in pancreatic islets from leptin-deficient mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Colsoul, Barbara; Jacobs, Griet; Philippaert, Koenraad; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Segal, Andrei; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas; Schuit, Frans; Vennekens, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    We recently proposed that the transient receptor potential melastatin 5 (TRPM5) cation channel contributes to glucose-induced electrical activity of the β cell and positively influences glucose-induced insulin release and glucose homeostasis. In this study, we investigated Trpm5 expression and function in pancreatic islets from mouse models of type II diabetes. Gene expression analysis revealed a strong reduction of Trpm5 mRNA levels in pancreatic islets of db/db and ob/ob mice. The glucose-i...

  8. PTEN Loss in E-Cadherin-Deficient Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells Rescues Apoptosis and Results in Development of Classical Invasive Lobular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Mirjam C; Nethe, Micha; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; de Ruiter, Julian R; Schut, Eva; Bonzanni, Nicola; Zeeman, Amber L; Wientjens, Ellen; van der Burg, Eline; Wessels, Lodewyk; van Amerongen, Renée; Jonkers, Jos

    2016-08-23

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is an aggressive breast cancer subtype with poor response to chemotherapy. Besides loss of E-cadherin, a hallmark of ILC, genetic inactivation of PTEN is frequently observed in patients. Through concomitant Cre-mediated inactivation of E-cadherin and PTEN in mammary epithelium, we generated a mouse model of classical ILC (CLC), the main histological ILC subtype. While loss of E-cadherin induced cell dissemination and apoptosis, additional PTEN inactivation promoted cell survival and rapid formation of invasive mammary tumors that recapitulate the histological and molecular features, estrogen receptor (ER) status, growth kinetics, metastatic behavior, and tumor microenvironment of human CLC. Combined inactivation of E-cadherin and PTEN is sufficient to cause CLC development. These CLCs showed significant tumor regression upon BEZ235-mediated inhibition of PI3K signaling. In summary, this mouse model provides important insights into CLC development and suggests inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy for targeting CLC. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Oral administration of curcumin emulsified in carboxymethyl cellulose has a potent anti-inflammatory effect in the IL-10 gene-deficient mouse model of IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Victoria Y L; Foshaug, Rae R; MacFarlane, Sarah M; Churchill, Thomas A; Doyle, Jason S G; Sydora, Beate C; Fedorak, Richard N

    2010-05-01

    Curcumin is a tumeric-derived, water-insoluble polyphenol with potential beneficial health effects for humans. It has been shown to have preventive as well as therapeutic effects in chemically induced murine models of colitis. To investigate whether curcumin exerts a similar effect on the spontaneous colitis in interleukin (IL)-10 gene-deficient mice, we gavaged these mice daily for 2 weeks with 200 mg/kg per day curcumin emulsified in carboxymethyl cellulose, a food additive generally used as a viscosity modifier. Mice fed the curcumin/carboxymethyl cellulose mixture and those receiving carboxymethyl cellulose alone demonstrated similar reductions in histological injury score and colon weight/length ratio compared to water-fed controls. However, significant reductions in pro-inflammatory cytokine release in intestinal explant cultures were only seen in mice treated with the curcumin mixture. Our data demonstrate that in IL-10 gene-deficient mice, both oral curcumin and carboxymethyl cellulose, appear to have modifying effects on colitis. However, curcumin has additional anti-inflammatory effects mediated through a reduced production of potent pro-inflammatory mucosal cytokines.

  10. Increased anxiety and impaired pain response in puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase gene-deficient mice obtained by a mouse gene-trap method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, T; Ikegami, S; Takiguchi-Hayashi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Katoh-Fukui, Y; Higashinakagawa, T; Sakaki, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1999-07-15

    A mouse mutation, termed goku, was generated by a gene-trap strategy. goku homozygous mice showed dwarfism, a marked increase in anxiety, and an analgesic effect. Molecular analysis indicated that the mutated gene encodes a puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (Psa; EC 3. 4.11.14), whose functions in vivo are unknown. Transcriptional arrest of the Psa gene and a drastic decrease of aminopeptidase activity indicated that the function of Psa is disrupted in homozygous mice. Together with the finding that the Psa gene is strongly expressed in the brain, especially in the striatum and hippocampus, these results suggest that the Psa gene is required for normal growth and the behavior associated with anxiety and pain.

  11. Reduced response of splenocytes after mitogen-stimulation in the prion protein (PrP) gene-deficient mouse: PrPLP/Doppel production and cerebral degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chi-Kyeong; Hirose, Yuko; Sakudo, Akikazu; Takeyama, Natsumi; Kang, Chung-Boo; Taniuchi, Yojiro; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Sakaguchi, Suehiro; Onodera, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Splenocytes of wild-type (Prnp +/+ ) and prion protein gene-deficient (Prnp -/- ) mice were treated with various activation stimuli such as T cell mitogen concanavalin A (ConA), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) + ionomycin (Io), or B cell mitogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cellular prion protein (PrP C ) expression was enhanced following ConA stimulation, but not PMA + Io or LPS in Prnp +/+ splenocytes. Rikn Prnp -/- splenocytes elicited lower cell proliferations than Prnp +/+ or Zrch I Prnp -/- splenocytes after LPS stimulation and showed sporadic nerve cells in the cerebral cortex and deeper structure. Around the degenerated nerve cells, mild vacuolation in the neuropil was observed. This neural alteration correlated well to the suppressed response of B cells in the spleen. The finding that discrete lesions within the central nervous systems induced marked modulation of immune function probably indicates the existence of a delicately balanced neural-endocrine network by PrP C and PrPLP/Doppel

  12. MicroRNA-155 Deficiency Leads to Decreased Atherosclerosis, Increased White Adipose Tissue Obesity, and Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A NOVEL MOUSE MODEL OF OBESITY PARADOX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtue, Anthony; Johnson, Candice; Lopez-Pastraña, Jahaira; Shao, Ying; Fu, Hangfei; Li, Xinyuan; Li, Ya-Feng; Yin, Ying; Mai, Jietang; Rizzo, Victor; Tordoff, Michael; Bagi, Zsolt; Shan, Huimin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2017-01-27

    Obesity paradox (OP) describes a widely observed clinical finding of improved cardiovascular fitness and survival in some overweight or obese patients. The molecular mechanisms underlying OP remain enigmatic partly due to a lack of animal models mirroring OP in patients. Using apolipoprotein E knock-out (apoE -/- ) mice on a high fat (HF) diet as an atherosclerotic obesity model, we demonstrated 1) microRNA-155 (miRNA-155, miR-155) is significantly up-regulated in the aortas of apoE -/- mice, and miR-155 deficiency in apoE -/- mice inhibits atherosclerosis; 2) apoE -/- /miR-155 -/- (double knock-out (DKO)) mice show HF diet-induced obesity, adipocyte hypertrophy, and present with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; 3) DKO mice demonstrate HF diet-induced elevations of plasma leptin, resistin, fed-state and fasting insulin and increased expression of adipogenic transcription factors but lack glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Our results are the first to present an OP model using DKO mice with features of decreased atherosclerosis, increased obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Our findings suggest the mechanistic role of reduced miR-155 expression in OP and present a new OP working model based on a single miRNA deficiency in diet-induced obese atherogenic mice. Furthermore, our results serve as a breakthrough in understanding the potential mechanism underlying OP and provide a new biomarker and novel therapeutic target for OP-related metabolic diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Therapeutic effects of normal cells on ABCD1 deficient cells in vitro and hematopoietic cell transplantation in the X-ALD mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Shinnoh, Nobue; Kikuchi, Hitoshi; Osoegawa, Manabu; Ochi, Hirofumi; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Furuya, Hirokazu

    2004-03-15

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is accepted as an efficient therapy for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). To clarify the mechanisms of this treatment, we examined the effects of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in an ATP-binding cassette, subfamily D, member 1 (ABCD1) knock out mice and co-culture of ALD patient fibroblasts with normal cells. We treated ABCD1 knock out mice with HCT using lacZ-transgenic mice as donors, which enabled us to detect donor-derived cells. We also examined the effects of co-culturing a normal microglia cell line (N9) with ALD fibroblasts. beta-Galactosidase (beta-GAL) activity was higher in spleen, lung and kidney than in liver, brain and spinal cord of the recipient ABCD1 knock out mice. HCT reduced the accumulation of very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) in those tissues. The reduction of the VLCFA ratio was significant in spleen and lung; tissues with higher beta-GAL activity. ABCD1 was detectable in spleen from HCT mice. Co-culture of ALD fibroblasts with normal fibroblast cells reduced VLCFA accumulation in ALD cells. This effect was not observed when the cells were co-cultured while separated by a filter membrane. Our data suggest that supplying normal cells for ABCD1 knockout mouse by HCT corrects metabolic abnormalities in ALD tissues through a cell-mediated process. The correction requires direct cell-to-cell contact for recovering normal cell function.

  14. Androgen receptor-deficient islet β-cells exhibit alteration in genetic markers of insulin secretion and inflammation. A transcriptome analysis in the male mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiwei; Niu, Tianhua; Xu, Beibei; Navarro, Guadalupe; Schipma, Matthew J; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2017-05-01

    Testosterone action is mediated via the androgen receptor (AR). We have reported that male mice lacking AR selectively in β-cells (βARKO -/y ) develop decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), producing glucose intolerance. We showed that testosterone action on AR in β-cells amplifies the insulinotropic action of GLP-1 on its receptor via a cAMP-dependent protein kinase-A pathway. To investigate AR-dependent gene networks in β-cells, we performed a high throughput whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) in islets from male βARKO -/y and control mice. We identified 214 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (158 up- and 56 down-regulated) with a false discovery rate (FDR) 2. Our analysis of individual transcripts revealed alterations in β-cell genes involved in cellular inflammation/stress and insulin secretion. Based on 312 DEGs with an FDR insulin signaling, MAPK signaling, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and pancreatic secretion. The gene ontology analysis confirmed the results of the individual DEGs and the pathway analysis in showing enriched biological processes encompassing inflammation, ion transport, exocytosis and insulin secretion. AR-deficient islets exhibit altered expression of genes involved in inflammation and insulin secretion demonstrating the importance of androgen action in β-cell health in the male with implications for T2D development in men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Constitutive activation of MEK1 in chondrocytes causes Stat1-independent achondroplasia-like dwarfism and rescues the Fgfr3-deficient mouse phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shunichi; Balmes, Gener; McKinney, Sandra; Zhang, Zhaoping; Givol, David; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2004-01-01

    We generated transgenic mice that express a constitutively active mutant of MEK1 in chondrocytes. These mice showed a dwarf phenotype similar to achondroplasia, the most common human dwarfism, caused by activating mutations in FGFR3. These mice displayed incomplete hypertrophy of chondrocytes in the growth plates and a general delay in endochondral ossification, whereas chondrocyte proliferation was unaffected. Immunohistochemical analysis of the cranial base in transgenic embryos showed reduced staining for collagen type X and persistent expression of Sox9 in chondrocytes. These observations indicate that the MAPK pathway inhibits hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and negatively regulates bone growth without inhibiting chondrocyte proliferation. Expression of a constitutively active mutant of MEK1 in chondrocytes of Fgfr3-deficient mice inhibited skeletal overgrowth, strongly suggesting that regulation of bone growth by FGFR3 is mediated at least in part by the MAPK pathway. Although loss of Stat1 restored the reduced chondrocyte proliferation in mice expressing an achondroplasia mutant of Fgfr3, it did not rescue the reduced hypertrophic zone, the delay in formation of secondary ossification centers, and the achondroplasia-like phenotype. These observations suggest a model in which Fgfr3 signaling inhibits bone growth by inhibiting chondrocyte differentiation through the MAPK pathway and by inhibiting chondrocyte proliferation through Stat1. PMID:14871928

  16. Health Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all health deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  17. Brca1/p53 deficient mouse breast tumor hemodynamics during hyperoxic respiratory challenge monitored by a novel wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Tromberg, Bruce; Cerussi, Albert; Choi, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    Current imaging modalities allow precise visualization of tumors but do not enable quantitative characterization of the tumor metabolic state. Such quantitative information would enhance our understanding of tumor progression and response to treatment, and to our overall understanding of tumor biology. To address this problem, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument which combines two optical imaging modalities, spatially modulated imaging (MI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm × 5 cm) field of view. Using MI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are estimated using a Monte Carlo model. From the spatial maps of local absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, tissue composition information is extracted in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. Using LSI, the reflectance of a 785 nm laser speckle pattern on the tissue is acquired and analyzed to compute maps of blood perfusion in the tissue. Tissue metabolism state is estimated from the values of blood perfusion, volume and oxygenation state. We currently are employing the WiFI instrument to study tumor development in a BRCA1/p53 deficient mice breast tumor model. The animals are monitored with WiFI during hyperoxic respiratory challenge. At present, four tumors have been measured with WiFI, and preliminary data suggest that tumor metabolic changes during hyperoxic respiratory challenge can be determined.

  18. Fibromodulin-deficiency alters temporospatial expression patterns of transforming growth factor-β ligands and receptors during adult mouse skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhong; Lee, Kevin S; Zhang, Xinli; Nguyen, Calvin; Hsu, Chingyun; Wang, Joyce Z; Rackohn, Todd Matthew; Enjamuri, Dwarak Reddy; Murphy, Maxwell; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2014-01-01

    Fibromodulin (FMOD) is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan required for scarless fetal cutaneous wound repair. Interestingly, increased FMOD levels have been correlated with decreased transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression in multiple fetal and adult rodent models. Our previous studies demonstrated that FMOD-deficiency in adult animals results in delayed wound closure and increased scar size accompanied by loose package collagen fiber networks with increased fibril diameter. In addition, we found that FMOD modulates in vitro expression and activities of TGF-β ligands in an isoform-specific manner. In this study, temporospatial expression profiles of TGF-β ligands and receptors in FMOD-null and wild-type (WT) mice were compared by immunohistochemical staining and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using a full-thickness, primary intention wound closure model. During the inflammatory stage, elevated inflammatory infiltration accompanied by increased type I TGF-β receptor levels in individual inflammatory cells was observed in FMOD-null wounds. This increased inflammation was correlated with accelerated epithelial migration during the proliferative stage. On the other hand, significantly more robust expression of TGF-β3 and TGF-β receptors in FMOD-null wounds during the proliferative stage was associated with delayed dermal cell migration and proliferation, which led to postponed granulation tissue formation and wound closure and increased scar size. Compared with WT controls, expression of TGF-β ligands and receptors by FMOD-null dermal cells was markedly reduced during the remodeling stage, which may have contributed to the declined collagen synthesis capability and unordinary collagen architecture. Taken together, this study demonstrates that a single missing gene, FMOD, leads to conspicuous alternations in TGF-β ligand and receptor expression at all stages of wound repair in various cell types. Therefore, FMOD critically

  19. Role of Fas and Treg Cells in Fracture Healing as Characterized in the Fas-Deficient (lpr) Mouse Model of Lupus†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sebaei, Maisa O; Daukss, Dana M; Belkina, Anna C; Kakar, Sanjeev; Wigner, Nathan A; Cusher, Daniel; Graves, Dana; Einhorn, Thomas; Morgan, Elise; Gerstenfeld, Louis C

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that loss of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) signaling delayed fracture healing by delaying chondrocyte apoptosis and cartilage resorption. Mechanistic studies showed that TNFα induced Fas expression within chondrocytes; however, the degree to which chondrocyte apoptosis is mediated by TNFα alone or dependent on the induction of Fas is unclear. This question was addressed by assessing fracture healing in Fas-deficient B6.MRL/Faslpr/J mice. Loss of Fas delayed cartilage resorption but also lowered bone fraction in the calluses. The reduced bone fraction was related to elevated rates of coupled bone turnover in the B6.MRL/Faslpr/J calluses, as evidenced by higher osteoclast numbers and increased osteogenesis. Analysis of the apoptotic marker caspase 3 showed fewer positive chondrocytes and osteoclasts in calluses of B6.MRL/Faslpr/J mice. To determine if an active autoimmune state contributed to increased bone turnover, the levels of activated T cells and Treg cells were assessed. B6.MRL/Faslpr/J mice had elevated Treg cells in both spleens and bones of B6.MRL/Faslpr/J but decreased percentage of activated T cells in bone tissues. Fracture led to ∼30% to 60% systemic increase in Treg cells in both wild-type and B6.MRL/Faslpr/J bone tissues during the period of cartilage formation and resorption but either decreased (wild type) or left unchanged (B6.MRL/Faslpr/J) the numbers of activated T cells in bone. These results show that an active autoimmune state is inhibited during the period of cartilage resorption and suggest that iTreg cells play a functional role in this process. These data show that loss of Fas activity specifically in chondrocytes prolonged the life span of chondrocytes and that Fas synergized with TNFα signaling to mediate chondrocyte apoptosis. Conversely, loss of Fas systemically led to increased osteoclast numbers during later periods of fracture healing and increased osteogenesis. These findings suggest that retention

  20. Role of Fas and Treg cells in fracture healing as characterized in the fas-deficient (lpr) mouse model of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sebaei, Maisa O; Daukss, Dana M; Belkina, Anna C; Kakar, Sanjeev; Wigner, Nathan A; Cusher, Daniel; Graves, Dana; Einhorn, Thomas; Morgan, Elise; Gerstenfeld, Louis C

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies showed that loss of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) signaling delayed fracture healing by delaying chondrocyte apoptosis and cartilage resorption. Mechanistic studies showed that TNFα induced Fas expression within chondrocytes; however, the degree to which chondrocyte apoptosis is mediated by TNFα alone or dependent on the induction of Fas is unclear. This question was addressed by assessing fracture healing in Fas-deficient B6.MRL/Fas(lpr) /J mice. Loss of Fas delayed cartilage resorption but also lowered bone fraction in the calluses. The reduced bone fraction was related to elevated rates of coupled bone turnover in the B6.MRL/Fas(lpr) /J calluses, as evidenced by higher osteoclast numbers and increased osteogenesis. Analysis of the apoptotic marker caspase 3 showed fewer positive chondrocytes and osteoclasts in calluses of B6.MRL/Fas(lpr) /J mice. To determine if an active autoimmune state contributed to increased bone turnover, the levels of activated T cells and Treg cells were assessed. B6.MRL/Fas(lpr) /J mice had elevated Treg cells in both spleens and bones of B6.MRL/Fas(lpr) /J but decreased percentage of activated T cells in bone tissues. Fracture led to ∼30% to 60% systemic increase in Treg cells in both wild-type and B6.MRL/Fas(lpr) /J bone tissues during the period of cartilage formation and resorption but either decreased (wild type) or left unchanged (B6.MRL/Fas(lpr) /J) the numbers of activated T cells in bone. These results show that an active autoimmune state is inhibited during the period of cartilage resorption and suggest that iTreg cells play a functional role in this process. These data show that loss of Fas activity specifically in chondrocytes prolonged the life span of chondrocytes and that Fas synergized with TNFα signaling to mediate chondrocyte apoptosis. Conversely, loss of Fas systemically led to increased osteoclast numbers during later periods of fracture healing and increased osteogenesis. These findings

  1. MicroRNA transcriptome analysis identifies miR-365 as a novel negative regulator of cell proliferation in Zmpste24-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Xing-dong [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524023 (China); Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Dongguan 523808 (China); Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Jung, Hwa Jin [Departments of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Gombar, Saurabh [Departments of Systems Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Park, Jung Yoon [Departments of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Zhang, Chun-long; Zheng, Huiling [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524023 (China); Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Dongguan 523808 (China); Ruan, Jie; Li, Jiang-bin [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524023 (China); Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Dongguan 523808 (China); Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Kaeberlein, Matt [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • A comprehensive miRNA transcriptome of MEFs from Zmpste24{sup −/−} and control mice. • Identification of miR-365 as a down-regulated miRNA in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs. • Characterization of miR-365 as a modulator of cellular growth in part by targeting Rasd1. - Abstract: Zmpste24 is a metalloproteinase responsible for the posttranslational processing and cleavage of prelamin A into mature laminA. Zmpste24{sup −/−} mice display a range of progeroid phenotypes overlapping with mice expressing progerin, an altered version of lamin A associated with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Increasing evidence has demonstrated that miRNAs contribute to the regulation of normal aging process, but their roles in progeroid disorders remain poorly understood. Here we report the miRNA transcriptomes of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) established from wild type (WT) and Zmpste24{sup −/−} progeroid mice using a massively parallel sequencing technology. With data from 19.5 × 10{sup 6} reads from WT MEFs and 16.5 × 10{sup 6} reads from Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs, we discovered a total of 306 known miRNAs expressed in MEFs with a wide dynamic range of read counts ranging from 10 to over 1 million. A total of 8 miRNAs were found to be significantly down-regulated, with only 2 miRNAs upregulated, in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs as compared to WT MEFs. Functional studies revealed that miR-365, a significantly down-regulated miRNA in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs, modulates cellular growth phenotypes in MEFs. Overexpression of miR-365 in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs increased cellular proliferation and decreased the percentage of SA-β-gal-positive cells, while inhibition of miR-365 function led to an increase of SA-β-gal-positive cells in WT MEFs. Furthermore, we identified Rasd1, a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, as a functional target of miR-365. While expression of miR-365 suppressed Rasd1 3′ UTR luciferase-reporter activity

  2. Effects of supplementation on food intake, body weight and hepatic metabolites in the citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double-knockout mouse model of human citrin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheki, Takeyori; Inoue, Kanako; Ono, Hiromi; Katsura, Natsumi; Yokogawa, Mana; Yoshidumi, Yukari; Furuie, Sumie; Kuroda, Eishi; Ushikai, Miharu; Asakawa, Akihiro; Inui, Akio; Eto, Kazuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sinasac, David S; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2012-11-01

    The C57BL/6:Slc23a13(-/-);Gpd2(-/-) double-knockout (a.k.a., citrin/mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase double knockout or Ctrn/mGPD-KO) mouse displays phenotypic attributes of both neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis (NICCD) and adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2), making it a suitable model of human citrin deficiency. In the present study, we show that when mature Ctrn/mGPD-KO mice are switched from a standard chow diet (CE-2) to a purified maintenance diet (AIN-93M), this resulted in a significant loss of body weight as a result of reduced food intake compared to littermate mGPD-KO mice. However, supplementation of the purified maintenance diet with additional protein (from 14% to 22%; and concomitant reduction or corn starch), or with specific supplementation with alanine, sodium glutamate, sodium pyruvate or medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), led to increased food intake and body weight gain near or back to that on chow diet. No such effect was observed when supplementing the diet with other sources of fat that contain long-chain fatty acids. Furthermore, when these supplements were added to a sucrose solution administered enterally to the mice, which has been shown previously to lead to elevated blood ammonia as well as altered hepatic metabolite levels in Ctrn/mGPP-KO mice, this led to metabolic correction. The elevated hepatic glycerol 3-phosphate and citrulline levels after sucrose administration were suppressed by the administration of sodium pyruvate, alanine, sodium glutamate and MCT, although the effect of MCT was relatively small. Low hepatic citrate and increased lysine levels were only found to be corrected by sodium pyruvate, while alanine and sodium glutamate both corrected hepatic glutamate and aspartate levels. Overall, these results suggest that dietary factors including increased protein content, supplementation of specific amino acids like alanine and sodium glutamate, as well as sodium pyruvate and MCT all show beneficial

  3. CD40 Ligand Deficient C57BL/6 Mouse Is a Potential Surrogate Model of Human X-Linked Hyper IgM (X-HIGM Syndrome for Characterizing Immune Responses against Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Lopez-Saucedo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with X-HIGM syndrome fail to express functional CD40 ligand; consequently they cannot mount effective protective antibody responses against pathogenic bacteria. We evaluated, compared, and characterized the humoral immune response of wild type (WT and C57-CD40L deficient (C57-CD40L−/− mice infected with Citrobacter rodentium. Basal serum isotype levels were similar for IgM and IgG3 among mice, while total IgG and IgG2b concentrations were significantly lower in C57-CD40L−/− mice compared with WT. Essentially IgG1 and IgG2c levels were detectable only in WT mice. C57-CD40L−/− animals, orally inoculated with 2×109 CFU, presented several clinical manifestations since the second week of infection and eventually died. In contrast at this time point no clinical manifestations were observed among C57-CD40L−/− mice infected with 1×107 CFU. Infection was subclinical in WT mice inoculated with either bacterial dose. The serum samples from infected mice (1×107 CFU, collected at day 14 after infection, had similar C. rodentium-specific IgM titres. Although C57-CD40L−/− animals had lower IgG and IgG2b titres than WT mice, C57-CD40L−/− mice sera displayed complement-mediated bactericidal activity against C. rodentium. C. rodentium-infected C57-CD40L−/− mice are capable of producing antibodies that are protective. C57-CD40L−/− mouse is a useful surrogate model of X-HIGM syndrome for studying immune responses elicited against pathogens.

  4. Differential regulation by agonist and phorbol ester of cloned m1 and m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in Y1 cells deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, N.M.; Nathanson, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    Cloned muscarinic acetylcholine m1 and m2 receptors were expressed in stably transfected mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in a variant Y1 line, Kin-8, which is deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (PKA - ). m1 and m2 receptors were rapidly internalized following exposure of transfected PKA + or PKA - cells to the muscarinic agonist carbachol. Thus, agonist-dependent internalization of m1 and m2 did not require PKA activity. A differential effect of PKA on regulation by agonist of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor, was unmasked in PKA - cells. These data indicate that the basal activity of PKA may modulate the agonist-dependent internalization of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor. The internalization of the m1 and m2 receptors in both PKA + and PKA - cells was accompanied by desensitization of functional responses. Exposure of PKA + cells to 10 -7 M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C, resulted in a 30 ± 9% decrease in the number of m1 receptors on the cell surface. The m2 receptor was not internalized following treatment of either PKA + or PKA - cells with PMA. Thus, the m1 and m2 receptors show differential sensitivity to internalization by PMA. Agonist-dependent internalization of the m1 receptor appeared to be independent of activation of PKC because (1) agonist-dependent internalization of m1 was not attenuated in PKA - cells, (2) the rate and extent of internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA were less than those in cells exposed to agonist, and (3) treatment of cells with concanavalin A selectivity blocked internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA, but not to agonist. The effects of agonist and PMA on receptor internalization were not additive. Exposure of PKA + or PKA - cells to PMA reduced the magnitude of pilocarpine-stimulated PI hydrolysis by about 25%

  5. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  6. Utrophin Compensates dystrophin Loss during Mouse Spermatogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hung-Chih; Chin, Yu-Feng; Lundy, David J.; Liang, Chung-Tiang; Chi, Ya-Hui; Kuo, Paolin; Hsieh, Patrick C. H.

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the dystrophin gene. The mdx/utrn ?/? mouse, lacking in both dystrophin and its autosomal homologue utrophin, is commonly used to model the clinical symptoms of DMD. Interestingly, these mice are infertile but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. Using dystrophin deficient mdx mouse and utrophin haplodeficient mdx/utrn +/? mouse models, we demonstrate the contribution of Dp427 (f...

  7. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    2006-01-01

    We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood sa...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  9. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  15. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack ... vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia called pernicious anemia. Vitamin C deficiency anemia risk factors include: Smoking. Smoking ...

  16. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  17. Effects of endotoxin on the lactating mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of endogenous mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) sequences in trans by a host gene, the Lps locus on mouse chromosome 4, was suspected from a genetic linkage analysis. The Lps locus mediates the mouse's response to the injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the responder mouse while mice with the deficient allele are incapable of responding. Others have found that endotoxin exposure reduces milk production in lactating animals. This observation was confirmed in mice and extended by examining 125 I-prolactin binding to liver membranes of lactating mice. Endotoxin treatment of responder mice increases liver prolactin binding within 15 minutes, followed by a decline over 6 hours. Scatchard analysis shows that the immediate increase comes from both increased affinity and abundance of the prolactin receptor. No such change in prolactin binding is seen in the non-responder following endotoxin treatment nor in 125 I-insulin binding in responders

  18. Rescue of Deficient Amygdala Tonic γ-Aminobutyric Acidergic Currents in the Fmr−/y Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome by a Novel γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptor-Positive Allosteric Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brandon S.; Martinez-Botella, Gabriel; Loya, Carlos M.; Salituro, Francesco G.; Robichaud, Albert J.; Huntsman, Molly M.; Ackley, Mike A.; Doherty, James J.; Corbin, Joshua G.

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory transmission are emerging as a common component of many nervous system disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Tonic γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission provided by peri- and extrasynaptic GABA type A (GABAA) receptors powerfully controls neuronal excitability and plasticity and, therefore, provides a rational therapeutic target for normalizing hyperexcitable networks across a variety of disorders, including ASDs. Our previous studies revealed tonic GABAergic deficits in principal excitatory neurons in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the Fmr1−/y knockout (KO) mouse model fragile X syndrome. To correct amygdala deficits in tonic GABAergic neurotransmission in Fmr1−/y KO mice, we developed a novel positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors, SGE-872, based on endogenously active neurosteroids. This study shows that SGE-872 is nearly as potent and twice as efficacious for positively modulating GABAA receptors as its parent molecule, allopregnanolone. Furthermore, at submicromolar concentrations (≤1 µM), SGE-872 is selective for tonic, extrasynaptic α4β3δ-containing GABAA receptors over typical synaptic α1β2γ2 receptors. We further find that SGE-872 strikingly rescues the tonic GABAergic transmission deficit in principal excitatory neurons in the Fmr1−/y KO BLA, a structure heavily implicated in the neuropathology of ASDs. Therefore, the potent and selective action of SGE-872 on tonic GABAA receptors containing α4 subunits may represent a novel and highly useful therapeutic avenue for ASDs and related disorders involving hyperexcitability of neuronal networks. PMID:26308557

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for iron-deficiency anemia, especially if they have: A history of iron-deficiency anemia Heavy blood loss during ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood ... iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition because they need twice ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... and is recruiting by invitation only. View more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science ... deficiency anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia ... periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and ... of the mouth, an enlarged spleen, and frequent infections. People who have iron-deficiency anemia may have ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and paler than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency ... if you have iron-deficiency anemia or another type of anemia. You may be diagnosed with iron- ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and ... Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... much of the transferrin in your blood isn't carrying iron. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... Treatment may need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ... iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you may get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is ...

  2. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  8. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  9. Effects of cyclosporin A and FK506 on Fc epsilon receptor type I-initiated increases in cytokine mRNA in mouse bone marrow-derived progenitor mast cells: resistance to FK506 is associated with a deficiency in FK506-binding protein FKBP12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, R E; Fruman, D A; Bierer, B E; Albers, M W; Zydowsky, L D; Ho, S I; Jin, Y J; Castells, M C; Schreiber, S L; Walsh, C T

    1992-09-15

    The inhibitory effects of cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506 on Fc epsilon receptor type I-initiated increases in cytokine mRNA and the expression of their intracellular binding proteins were studied in interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent, mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). In BMMCs sensitized with IgE anti-trinitrophenyl, CsA inhibited trinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin-induced increases in mRNA for IL-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and IL-6 in a dose-related manner (IC50 values of 4, 65, and 130 nM, respectively). FK506 did not inhibit hapten-specific increases of mRNA for TNF-alpha or IL-6, and for IL-1 beta the IC50 was greater than 50-fold higher than that of CsA. Neither agent inhibited exocytosis of the endogenous secretory granule mediators beta-hexosaminidase and histamine at the IC50 values for inhibition of increases in cytokine mRNA. BMMCs expressed cyclophilin, and CsA inhibited the phosphatase activity of cellular calcineurin with an IC50 of approximately 8 nM. That CsA inhibited IL-1 beta mRNA accumulation in IgE-activated BMMCs with an IC50 similar to that for inhibition of calcineurin activity, whereas the IC50 values were approximately 20-fold higher for the inhibition of TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNA, suggests that the induction of TNF-alpha and IL-6 is less dependent upon calcineurin activity than is the induction of IL-1 beta. BMMCs were deficient in the 12-kDa FK506-binding protein FKBP12, but not FKBP13, as assessed by RNA and protein blot analyses. FK506 did not inhibit calcineurin phosphatase activity in BMMCs, even at drug concentrations of 1000 nM. The resistance of BMMCs to inhibition of Fc epsilon receptor type I-mediated increases in cytokine mRNA by FK506 is most likely due to their deficiency of FKBP12 and the related inability to inhibit the activity of calcineurin.

  10. Colour vision deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, M P

    2010-05-01

    Colour vision deficiency is one of the commonest disorders of vision and can be divided into congenital and acquired forms. Congenital colour vision deficiency affects as many as 8% of males and 0.5% of females--the difference in prevalence reflects the fact that the commonest forms of congenital colour vision deficiency are inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. Until relatively recently, our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of colour vision deficiency largely rested on behavioural data; however, modern molecular genetic techniques have helped to elucidate its mechanisms. The current management of congenital colour vision deficiency lies chiefly in appropriate counselling (including career counselling). Although visual aids may be of benefit to those with colour vision deficiency when performing certain tasks, the evidence suggests that they do not enable wearers to obtain normal colour discrimination. In the future, gene therapy remains a possibility, with animal models demonstrating amelioration following treatment.

  11. LACTASE DEFICIENCY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Shcherbak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the article is the lactase deficiency in children. The most frequent clinical manifestations — diarrhea and flatulence —are not specific to this pathology. Symptoms, typical for the majority of the diseases nosologies of the digestive system, lack of timely laboratory diagnosis, and, often, lack of pediatricians awareness about the specifics of this disease are the cause of lactase deficiency under-diagnostics. The article describes in detail the physiopathological mechanisms, clinical picture, diagnosis and dietary correction of lactase deficiency, the data concerning the prevalence of this disease are cited.Key words: lactose, lactase deficiency, children, health food.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  13. Iodine deficiency disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Iodine deficiency (IDD) is one of the common problem in the diet. Iodine deficiency as prevalence of goiter in population occurs in the mountainous areas. There is consensus that 800 million people are at risk of IDD from living in iodine deficient area and 190 million from goiter. Very high prevalence of IDD in different parts of the world are striking. It has generally observed that in iodine-deficient areas about 50% are affected with goiter, 1-5% from cretinsim and 20% from impaired mental and/or mortor function. (A.B.)

  14. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    , subclinical deficiency affects between 2.5% and 26% of the general population depending on the definition used, although the clinical relevance is unclear. B12 deficiency can affect individuals at all ages, but most particularly elderly individuals. Infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age...... are also at high risk of deficiency in populations where dietary intake of B12-containing animal-derived foods is restricted. Deficiency is caused by either inadequate intake, inadequate bioavailability or malabsorption. Disruption of B12 transport in the blood, or impaired cellular uptake or metabolism...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  16. Centralized mouse repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Leah Rae; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K C Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T

    2012-10-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children. Talk with your child's doctor ... and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young children and women are the two ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... term but can't take iron supplements by mouth. This therapy also is given to people who need immediate treatment for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With If you have iron-deficiency anemia, get ongoing care to make sure your iron levels are improving. ...

  19. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  20. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  1. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough Iron Even if you have enough iron in your ...

  4. G6PD Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich foods to help treat your iron-deficiency anemia. See Prevention strategies to learn about foods ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español What Is ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  8. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart- ... infections Motor or cognitive development delays in ... with chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition ... for the fetus' growth. About half of all pregnant women develop iron-deficiency anemia. The condition can increase ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition ... symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common ...

  16. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you ... get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is a safe, common procedure in which blood ...

  18. Loss of 53BP1 causes PARP inhibitor resistance in Brca1-mutated mouse mammary tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, Janneke E.; Kersbergen, Ariena; Boon, Ute; Sol, Wendy; van Deemter, Liesbeth; Zander, Serge A.; Drost, Rinske; Wientjens, Ellen; Ji, Jiuping; Aly, Amal; Doroshow, James H.; Cranston, Aaron; Martin, Niall M. B.; Lau, Alan; O'Connor, Mark J.; Ganesan, Shridar; Borst, Piet; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of PARP is a promising therapeutic strategy for homologous recombination-deficient tumors, such as BRCA1-associated cancers. We previously reported that BRCA1-deficient mouse mammary tumors may acquire resistance to the clinical PARP inhibitor (PARPi) olaparib through activation of the

  19. A critical role of hypocretin deficiency in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianini, Stefano; Berteotti, Chiara; Lo Martire, Viviana; Silvani, Alessandro; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2014-04-01

    Hypocretin/orexin peptides are known for their role in the control of the wake–sleep cycle and narcolepsy–cataplexy pathophysiology. Recent studies suggested that hypocretin peptides also have a role in pregnancy. We tested this hypothesis by conducting a retrospective analysis on pregnancy complications in two different mouse models of hypocretin deficiency. We recorded 85 pregnancies of mice lacking either hypocretin peptides (knockout) or hypocretin-releasing neurons (transgenic) and their wild-type controls. Pregnancy was associated with unexplained dam death before delivery in 3/15 pregnancies in knockout mice, and in 3/23 pregnancies in transgenic mice. No casualties occurred in wild-type pregnant dams (P hypocretin-deficient mice as a whole). Hypocretin deficiency did not impact either on litter size or the number of weaned pups per litter. These data provide preliminary evidence of a critical role of hypocretin deficiency in pregnancy.

  20. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Vogelstein, B. and Fornace, A.J., Jr. (1992). Cell 71:587-597. (6) Yonish-Rouach, E., Resnitsky, D., Lotem, J., Sachs, L., Kimchi , A., and Oren, M. (1991...Cell 70: 937-948. Yonish-Rouach, E., D. Resnitzky, J. Lotem, L. Sachs, A. Kimchi , and M. Oren. 1991. Wild-type p53 induces apoptosis of my- eloid

  1. PPARgamma Deficiency Counteracts Thymic Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ernszt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thymic senescence contributes to increased incidence of infection, cancer and autoimmunity at senior ages. This process manifests as adipose involution. As with other adipose tissues, thymic adipose involution is also controlled by PPARgamma. This is supported by observations reporting that systemic PPARgamma activation accelerates thymic adipose involution. Therefore, we hypothesized that decreased PPARgamma activity could prevent thymic adipose involution, although it may trigger metabolic adverse effects. We have confirmed that both human and murine thymic sections show marked staining for PPARgamma at senior ages. We have also tested the thymic lobes of PPARgamma haplo-insufficient and null mice. Supporting our working hypothesis both adult PPARgamma haplo-insufficient and null mice show delayed thymic senescence by thymus histology, thymocyte mouse T-cell recombination excision circle qPCR and peripheral blood naive T-cell ratio by flow-cytometry. Delayed senescence showed dose–response with respect to PPARgamma deficiency. Functional immune parameters were also evaluated at senior ages in PPARgamma haplo-insufficient mice (null mice do not reach senior ages due to metabolic adverse affects. As expected, sustained and elevated T-cell production conferred oral tolerance and enhanced vaccination efficiency in senior PPARgamma haplo-insufficient, but not in senior wild-type littermates according to ELISA IgG measurements. Of note, humans also show increased oral intolerance issues and decreased protection by vaccines at senior ages. Moreover, PPARgamma haplo-insufficiency also exists in human known as a rare disease (FPLD3 causing metabolic adverse effects, similar to the mouse. When compared to age- and metabolic disorder-matched other patient samples (FPLD2 not affecting PPARgamma activity, FPLD3 patients showed increased human Trec (hTrec values by qPCR (within healthy human range suggesting delayed thymic senescence, in accordance with

  2. Gaze beats mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Julio C.; San Agustin, Javier; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    Facial EMG for selection is fast, easy and, combined with gaze pointing, it can provide completely hands-free interaction. In this pilot study, 5 participants performed a simple point-and-select task using mouse or gaze for pointing and a mouse button or a facial-EMG switch for selection. Gaze...... pointing was faster than mouse pointing, while maintaining a similar error rate. EMG and mouse-button selection had a comparable performance. From analyses of completion time, throughput and error rates, we concluded that the combination of gaze and facial EMG holds potential for outperforming the mouse....

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Blood Loss When you lose blood, you lose ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also can cause internal bleeding. Other At-Risk Groups People who get kidney dialysis treatment may develop ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order a blood test called a complete blood count ( ... your risk factors , do a physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, ... while checking for other problems. Specialists Involved Primary care doctors often diagnose and treat iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heavy blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in which your blood has a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells ... cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all ... growth and development, and behavioral problems. Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Signs and symptoms of iron ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ... body can damage your organs. You may have fatigue (tiredness) and other symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... because your need for iron increases during these times of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming ... iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to select: the entire site, the Health ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ...

  1. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ... National Institute of Health Department of Health and Human Services OIG USA.gov

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... explain tests and procedures that your doctor may use to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who ... heavy menstrual flow, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to help reduce your monthly blood flow. ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to get the ... iron-deficiency anemia, red blood cells will be small in size with an MCV of less than ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special measures can help prevent the condition in these groups. ... is a complete blood count (CBC). The CBC measures many parts of your blood. This test checks ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... test called a complete blood count (CBC) to see if you have lower than normal red blood ... iron-deficiency anemia: Check for bleeding. Look to see whether your tongue, nails, or inner lining of ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ... to your doctor if you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Learn more about participating in a clinical ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting less than the recommended daily ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Grants & Training Grants and Training Home Policies and Guidelines Funding Opportunities and Contacts Training and Career Development ... Study - Red Blood Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend to prevent your iron- ... colon under sedation to view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less ... deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... people who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This urge to move often occurs with strange ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach. Treatment To Stop Bleeding If blood loss is causing ... flow. In some cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... size of your liver and spleen Do a pelvic and rectal exam to check for internal bleeding ... bleeding in the stomach, upper intestines, colon, or pelvic organs. Treatment Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen ... mean corpuscular volume (MCV) that would suggest anemia. Different tests help your doctor screen for iron-deficiency ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron- ... deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who should be ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... mouth Pale skin Swelling or soreness of the tongue Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest ... Check for bleeding. Look to see whether your tongue, nails, or inner lining of your eyelids are ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... specialists also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk ... upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended ...

  19. Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflammation) • Some lymphomas, a type of cancer Other risk factors for vitamin D deficiency ... medications • Frequent falls in older adults, or a non-traumatic fracture (bone break without ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ... deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed only breast ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... can cause complications and may be life-threatening. Signs and Symptoms Common signs of iron-deficiency anemia ... abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and have a plan Tell ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through research and ... blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... to iron-deficiency anemia. We are interested in studying in more detail how iron levels are regulated ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Are you curious about how ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... some stages of life, such as pregnancy and childhood, it may be hard to get enough iron ... supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain health, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends testing all ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... disease also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for ... be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who ... other dark green leafy vegetables Prune juice The Nutrition Facts labels on packaged foods will show how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treat iron-deficiency anemia. These doctors include pediatricians, family doctors, gynecologists/obstetricians, and internal medicine specialists. A hematologist (a blood disease specialist), a gastroenterologist (a digestive system specialist), and ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing age ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... stomach also can interfere with iron absorption. Risk Factors Infants and Young Children Infants and young children ... blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... bleeding in the GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... All News NHLBI News NHLBI in the Press Research Features All Events Past Events Upcoming Events About ... NHLBI Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the likelihood of bleeding in the GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Are you ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... Reticulocytes are young, immature red blood cells. Over time, reticulocytes become mature red blood cells that carry ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ... frequently. This study is located in New York City, and is recruiting by invitation only. View more ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Older adults, especially those over age 65. Unhealthy environments Children who have lead in their blood from ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  18. The Knockout Mouse Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Christopher P; Battey, James F; Bradley, Allan; Bucan, Maja; Capecchi, Mario; Collins, Francis S; Dove, William F; Duyk, Geoffrey; Dymecki, Susan; Eppig, Janan T; Grieder, Franziska B; Heintz, Nathaniel; Hicks, Geoff; Insel, Thomas R; Joyner, Alexandra; Koller, Beverly H; Lloyd, K C Kent; Magnuson, Terry; Moore, Mark W; Nagy, Andras; Pollock, Jonathan D; Roses, Allen D; Sands, Arthur T; Seed, Brian; Skarnes, William C; Snoddy, Jay; Soriano, Philippe; Stewart, David J; Stewart, Francis; Stillman, Bruce; Varmus, Harold; Varticovski, Lyuba; Verma, Inder M; Vogt, Thomas F; von Melchner, Harald; Witkowski, Jan; Woychik, Richard P; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yancopoulos, George D; Young, Stephen G; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Mouse knockout technology provides a powerful means of elucidating gene function in vivo, and a publicly available genome-wide collection of mouse knockouts would be significantly enabling for biomedical discovery. To date, published knockouts exist for only about 10% of mouse genes. Furthermore, many of these are limited in utility because they have not been made or phenotyped in standardized ways, and many are not freely available to researchers. It is time to harness new technologies and efficiencies of production to mount a high-throughput international effort to produce and phenotype knockouts for all mouse genes, and place these resources into the public domain. PMID:15340423

  19. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  20. Mouse models for dengue vaccines and antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Emily M; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-08-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has substantial global impact, with an estimated 390million people infected each year. In spite of this, there is currently no approved DENV-specific vaccine or antiviral. One reason for this is the difficulty involved with development of an adequate animal model. While non-human primates support viral replication, they do not exhibit signs of clinical disease. A mouse model is an ideal alternative; however, wild-type mice are resistant to DENV-induced disease. Infection of interferon receptor-deficient mice results in disease that recapitulates key features of severe dengue disease in humans. For the development of vaccines, interferon receptor-deficient mice provide a stringent model for testing vaccine-induced immune components from vaccinated wild-type mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Factor XI deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme Diamant

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with a prolonged aPTT who was diagnosedas having factor XI deficiency after a rather large hematoma wasformed after angiography. Factor XI deficiency affects 1 in 1 millionpeople, but it is more common in Ashkenazim with a gene frequencyof 5% to 11%, being 0.3% homozygotes. These individuals usuallydo not present hemorrhagic events, except in cases of trauma orsurgery. These patients should be identified by routine coagulationscreening; bleeding could be prevented by use of fresh humanplasma or plasma concentrates.

  2. Vitamin Excess and Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Liliane; Krebs, Nancy F

    2018-04-01

    The published literature supports the high prevalence of supplement use in children and adolescents in the United States. Pediatricians today are faced with questions from parents and patients about the benefits, safety, efficacy, and correct dose of vitamins and minerals. In this article, we review 7 vitamins with the most clinical relevance as judged by abundance in food, risks and symptoms of deficiency, and potential for toxicity. Specifically, we focus on possible clinical scenarios that can be indicative of nutritional deficiency. We synthesize and summarize guidelines from nutrition experts, various medical societies, the World Health Organization, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2018. All rights reserved.

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who have heavy periods ... because blood is lost during dialysis. Also, the kidneys are no longer able to make ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  4. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes participants with anemia, which may help us understand how genes contribute to differences in disease severity and how patients respond to treatment. The ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... woman's risk for a premature or low-birth-weight baby. Adults Who Have Internal Bleeding Adults who have internal bleeding, such as intestinal bleeding, can develop iron-deficiency anemia due to blood loss. Certain conditions, such as colon cancer and bleeding ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Follow a high-fiber diet. Large amounts of fiber can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron-rich foods may help you prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Taking ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially harmful donations and protect individuals from needing iron supplementation. Advancing research for improved health In support of our mission , we are committed ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... proof packages for supplements can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency ... within months. Supplements come in pill form or in drops for children. Large amounts of iron can be harmful, so ...

  10. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaemia is a worldwide health problem affecting developed and developing countries. Children <5 years of age and women of child-bearing age are the most vulnerable. Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) ranked 15th and 14th in the global disability-adjusted life-years in. 1990 and 2010, respectively.[1] Globally, the ...

  11. Diagnosing oceanic nutrient deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. Mark

    2016-11-01

    The supply of a range of nutrient elements to surface waters is an important driver of oceanic production and the subsequent linked cycling of the nutrients and carbon. Relative deficiencies of different nutrients with respect to biological requirements, within both surface and internal water masses, can be both a key indicator and driver of the potential for these nutrients to become limiting for the production of new organic material in the upper ocean. The availability of high-quality, full-depth and global-scale datasets on the concentrations of a wide range of both macro- and micro-nutrients produced through the international GEOTRACES programme provides the potential for estimation of multi-element deficiencies at unprecedented scales. Resultant coherent large-scale patterns in diagnosed deficiency can be linked to the interacting physical-chemical-biological processes which drive upper ocean nutrient biogeochemistry. Calculations of ranked deficiencies across multiple elements further highlight important remaining uncertainties in the stoichiometric plasticity of nutrient ratios within oceanic microbial systems and caveats with regards to linkages to upper ocean nutrient limitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ages of 14 and 50 years need more iron than boys and men of the same age. Women are at higher ... anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another ... may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  14. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as if you are following a ... unhealthy environments, or other factors that increase your risk of developing iron-deficiency ... to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for and strategies ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Frequent blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia ... iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research ... Is Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, ...

  1. Anemia - B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lack (deficiency) of vitamin B12 . Causes Your body needs vitamin B12 to make red blood cells. In order ... rest of your life. Some people may also need to take vitamin B12 supplements by mouth. Treatment may no longer ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways that NHLBI continues to translate ... Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z ... usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another condition. Finally, the CBC looks at mean corpuscular (kor-PUS-kyu-lar) volume (MCV). MCV is a measure of the average size of your red blood cells. The results may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or advise you to eat more iron-rich foods. This not only will help you avoid iron-deficiency anemia, but also may lower your risk of having a low-birth-weight baby. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications The signs and ...

  8. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha One International Registry (AIR), a multinational research program focused on alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, was formed in response to a World Health Organization recommendation. Each of the nearly 20 participating countries maintains a national registry of patients with AAT defic...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may ask whether you might be pregnant. Physical Exam Your doctor will do a physical exam to look for signs of iron-deficiency anemia. ... liver and spleen Do a pelvic and rectal exam to check for internal bleeding Diagnostic Tests and ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron added). If you don't eat these foods regularly, or if you don't take an iron supplement, you're more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... body. People with severe iron-deficiency anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor about delayed clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and low-birth-weight babies (weighing less than 5.5 pounds) are at even greater risk for iron- ... loss during their monthly periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other ... poorly because of money, social, health, or other problems. Follow a very low-fat diet over a ...

  4. MCAD deficiency in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Brage Storstein; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common defect of fatty acid oxidation. Many countries have introduced newborn screening for MCADD, because characteristic acylcarnitines can easily be identified in filter paper blood spot samples by tandem mass spectrometry (MS...

  5. Gaze beats mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Julio C.; San Agustin, Javier; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    Facial EMG for selection is fast, easy and, combined with gaze pointing, it can provide completely hands-free interaction. In this pilot study, 5 participants performed a simple point-and-select task using mouse or gaze for pointing and a mouse button or a facial-EMG switch for selection. Gaze po...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: prolidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... instructions for making the enzyme prolidase, also called peptidase D. Prolidase helps divide certain dipeptides, which are ... Names for This Condition hyperimidodipeptiduria imidodipeptidase deficiency PD peptidase deficiency Related Information How are genetic conditions and ...

  7. ALPHA,·ANTITRYPSIN DEFICIENCY*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-02-06

    Feb 6, 1971 ... Lieberman," in fact, found that 15·2% of 66 patients hospitalized with pulmonary emphysema had heterozygous alpha,-antitrypsin deficiency. The over-all incidence of the deficiency was 25'8% in this group. Of patients under the age of 50 years, 47·8% had deficient levels. If such observations are confirmed ...

  8. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  9. Premature aging in telomerase-deficient zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Anchelin

    2013-09-01

    The study of telomere biology is crucial to the understanding of aging and cancer. In the pursuit of greater knowledge in the field of human telomere biology, the mouse has been used extensively as a model. However, there are fundamental differences between mouse and human cells. Therefore, additional models are required. In light of this, we have characterized telomerase-deficient zebrafish (Danio rerio as the second vertebrate model for human telomerase-driven diseases. We found that telomerase-deficient zebrafish show p53-dependent premature aging and reduced lifespan in the first generation, as occurs in humans but not in mice, probably reflecting the similar telomere length in fish and humans. Among these aging symptoms, spinal curvature, liver and retina degeneration, and infertility were the most remarkable. Although the second-generation embryos died in early developmental stages, restoration of telomerase activity rescued telomere length and survival, indicating that telomerase dosage is crucial. Importantly, this model also reproduces the disease anticipation observed in humans with dyskeratosis congenita (DC. Thus, telomerase haploinsufficiency leads to anticipation phenomenon in longevity, which is related to telomere shortening and, specifically, with the proportion of short telomeres. Furthermore, p53 was induced by telomere attrition, leading to growth arrest and apoptosis. Importantly, genetic inhibition of p53 rescued the adverse effects of telomere loss, indicating that the molecular mechanisms induced by telomere shortening are conserved from fish to mammals. The partial rescue of telomere length and longevity by restoration of telomerase activity, together with the feasibility of the zebrafish for high-throughput chemical screening, both point to the usefulness of this model for the discovery of new drugs able to reactivate telomerase in individuals with DC.

  10. [Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Alicja; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class A is the main protein of the mucosal immune system. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (sIgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. sIGAD is strongly associated with the certain major histocompatibility complex region. Most individuals with sIgAD are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections, allergic disorders and autoimmune manifestations. Several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes mellitus type 1, Graves disease and celiac disease, are associated with an increased prevalence of sIgAD. Screening for sIgAD in coeliac disease is essential. Patients need treatment of associated diseases. It is also known that IgA deficiency may progress into a common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Pathogenesis and molecular mechanism involved in sIgAD should be elucidated in the future.

  11. Deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thus, R/I is a Cohen–. Macaulay algebra of Type 1, and hence R/I is Gorenstein. In view of Theorem 2.1, R/I is a nearly (or 1-deficient) extremal Gorenstein algebra. We now shall describe a result of Bruns and Hibi [1] which characterizes the Stanley–. Reisner rings having 2-pure but not 2-linear resolutions. Theorem 2.3.

  12. Iron deficiency anaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Barragán-Ibañez, G.; Santoyo-Sánchez, A.; Ramos-Peñafiel, C.O.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is a public health problem that affects all age groups. In Mexico, it is a common cause of morbidity, and accounts for 50% of cases of anaemia worldwide. It is more prevalent during the first 2 years of life, during adolescence and pregnancy. It is characterised by fatigue, weakness, pallor and koilonychia. Treatment is based on dietary recommendations and oral and intravenous iron supplements. In this review article, we summarise the characteristics of iron efficiency...

  13. Biotin and biotinidase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Zempleni, Janos; Hassan, Yousef I; Wijeratne, Subhashinee SK

    2008-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as an essential coenzyme for five carboxylases in mammals. Biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze the fixation of bicarbonate in organic acids and play crucial roles in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Carboxylase activities decrease substantially in response to biotin deficiency. Biotin is also covalently attached to histones; biotinylated histones are enriched in repeat regions in the human genome and appear to play a role...

  14. Orexin deficiency and narcolepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Orexin deficiency results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy in many mammalian species, including mice, dogs, and humans, suggesting that the orexin system is particularly important for normal regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, and especially for maintenance of wakefulness. This review discusses animal models of narcolepsy; the contribution of each orexin receptor subtype to the narcoleptic phenotypes; and the etiology of orexin neuronal death. It also raises the possibility of novel thera...

  15. Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurecka, Agnieszka; Zikanova, Marie; Kmoch, Stanislav; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Adenylosuccinate lyase ADSL) deficiency is a defect of purine metabolism affecting purinosome assembly and reducing metabolite fluxes through purine de novo synthesis and purine nucleotide recycling pathways. Biochemically this defect manifests by the presence in the biologic fluids of two dephosphorylated substrates of ADSL enzyme: succinylaminoimidazole carboxamide riboside (SAICAr) and succinyladenosine (S-Ado). More than 80 individuals with ADSL deficiency have been identified, but incidence of the disease remains unknown. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The fatal neonatal form has onset from birth and presents with fatal neonatal encephalopathy with a lack of spontaneous movement, respiratory failure, and intractable seizures resulting in early death within the first weeks of life. Patients with type I (severe form) present with a purely neurologic clinical picture characterized by severe psychomotor retardation, microcephaly, early onset of seizures, and autistic features. A more slowly progressing form has also been described (type II, moderate or mild form), as having later onset, usually within the first years of life, slight to moderate psychomotor retardation and transient contact disturbances. Diagnosis is facilitated by demonstration of SAICAr and S-Ado in extracellular fluids such as plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and/or followed by genomic and/or cDNA sequencing and characterization of mutant proteins. Over 50 ADSL mutations have been identified and their effects on protein biogenesis, structural stability and activity as well as on purinosome assembly were characterized. To date there is no specific and effective therapy for ADSL deficiency.

  16. Strategies to rescue the consequences of inducible arginase-1 deficiency in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel L Ballantyne

    Full Text Available Arginase-1 catalyzes the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, which is the final step of the urea cycle used to remove excess ammonia from the body. Arginase-1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia in mice and man with severe lethal consequences in the former and progressive neurological impairment to varying degrees in the latter. In a tamoxifen-induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model, mice succumb to the enzyme deficiency within 2 weeks after inducing the knockout and retain <2 % enzyme in the liver. Standard clinical care regimens for arginase-1 deficiency (low-protein diet, the nitrogen-scavenging drug sodium phenylbutyrate, ornithine supplementation either failed to extend lifespan (ornithine or only minimally prolonged lifespan (maximum 8 days with low-protein diet and drug. A conditional, tamoxifen-inducible arginase-1 transgenic mouse strain expressing the enzyme from the Rosa26 locus modestly extended lifespan of neonatal mice, but not that of 4-week old mice, when crossed to the inducible arginase-1 knockout mouse strain. Delivery of an arginase-1/enhanced green fluorescent fusion construct by adeno-associated viral delivery (rh10 serotype with a strong cytomegalovirus-chicken β-actin hybrid promoter rescued about 30% of male mice with lifespan prolongation to at least 6 months, extensive hepatic expression and restoration of significant enzyme activity in liver. In contrast, a vector of the AAV8 serotype driven by the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter led to weaker liver expression and did not rescue arginase-1 deficient mice to any great extent. Since the induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model displays a much more severe phenotype when compared to human arginase-1 deficiency, these studies reveal that it may be feasible with gene therapy strategies to correct the various manifestations of the disorder and they provide optimism for future clinical studies.

  17. Expression of mouse agrin in normal, denervated and dystrophic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebio, Alexander; Oliveri, Filippo; Barzaghi, Patrizia; Ruegg, Markus A

    2003-06-01

    Agrin is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is required for the development of postsynaptic specializations at the neuromuscular junction. An alternatively spliced isoform of agrin that lacks this activity is found in basement membranes of several tissues including embryonic muscle. Overexpression of a miniaturized form of this agrin isoform ameliorates the severe muscle dystrophy of laminin alpha2-deficient mice, a mouse model for merosin-deficient congenital muscle dystrophy. Several lines of evidence indicate that this amelioration is based on the high-affinity binding of the mini-agrin to the laminins and to alpha-dystroglycan. Here, we used antibodies raised against mouse agrin to evaluate protein expression in adult muscle of normal and dystrophic mice. We find that expression of agrin in non-synaptic region varies greatly between different muscles in wild-type mice and that its levels are altered in dystrophic muscle.

  18. FXN Promoter Silencing in the Humanized Mouse Model of Friedreich Ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh K Chutake

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia is caused by an expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence in intron 1 of the FXN gene that results in epigenetic silencing of the FXN promoter. This silencing mechanism is seen in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells but it remains unknown if it is a widespread phenomenon affecting multiple cell types and tissues.The humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia (YG8sR, which carries a single transgenic insert of the human FXN gene with an expanded GAA triplet-repeat in intron 1, is deficient for FXN transcript when compared to an isogenic transgenic mouse lacking the expanded repeat (Y47R. We found that in YG8sR the deficiency of FXN transcript extended both upstream and downstream of the expanded GAA triplet-repeat, suggestive of deficient transcriptional initiation. This pattern of deficiency was seen in all tissues tested, irrespective of whether they are known to be affected or spared in disease pathogenesis, in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and in cultured primary fibroblasts. FXN promoter function was directly measured via metabolic labeling of newly synthesized transcripts in fibroblasts, which revealed that the YG8sR mouse was significantly deficient in transcriptional initiation compared to the Y47R mouse.Deficient transcriptional initiation accounts for FXN transcriptional deficiency in the humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia, similar to patient-derived cells, and the mechanism underlying promoter silencing in Friedreich ataxia is widespread across multiple cell types and tissues.

  19. Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human...

  20. Mouse Phenome Database (MPD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD) has characterizations of hundreds of strains of laboratory mice to facilitate translational discoveries and to assist in selection...

  1. Mechanisms of gender-specific regulation of mouse sulfotransferases (Sults)

    OpenAIRE

    Alnouti, Yazen; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2010-01-01

    Marked gender differences in the expression of sulfotransferases (Sults) are known to exist in several species including rats, mice and hamsters. However, the mechanism for this gender difference is not known. Therefore, in the present study, it was determined whether sex and/or growth hormone (GH) are responsible for the gender difference in the expression of Sults using gonadectomized (GNX), hypophysectomized (HX) and GH-releasing hormone receptor-deficient little (lit/lit) mouse models.Sul...

  2. Enhanced response to radiotherapy in tumours deficient in the function of hypoxia-inducible factor-1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, K.J.; Telfer, B.A.; Xenaki, D.; Sheridan, M.R.; Desbaillets, I.; Peters, H.J.; Honess, D.; Harris, A.L.; Dachs, G.U.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Stratford, I.J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that deficiency in expression of the transcription factor, HIF-1, renders tumours more radioresponsive than HIF-1 proficient tumours. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Tumours comprising mouse hepatoma cells lacking HIF-1beta (and thereby HIF-1 function) were grown

  3. Regression of Copper-Deficient Heart Hypertrophy: Reduction in the Size of Hypertrophic Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary copper deficiency causes cardiac hypertrophy and its transition to heart failure in a mouse model. Copper repletion results in a rapid regression of cardiac hypertrophy and prevention of heart failure. The present study was undertaken to understand dynamic changes of cardiomyocytes in the hy...

  4. NAD Deficiency, Congenital Malformations, and Niacin Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongjun; Enriquez, Annabelle; Rapadas, Melissa; Martin, Ella M M A; Wang, Roni; Moreau, Julie; Lim, Chai K; Szot, Justin O; Ip, Eddie; Hughes, James N; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Humphreys, David T; McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Leo, Paul J; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Halliday, Jake; Smith, Janine; Colley, Alison; Mark, Paul R; Collins, Felicity; Sillence, David O; Winlaw, David S; Ho, Joshua W K; Guillemin, Gilles J; Brown, Matthew A; Kikuchi, Kazu; Thomas, Paul Q; Stocker, Roland; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Chapman, Gavin; Duncan, Emma L; Sparrow, Duncan B; Dunwoodie, Sally L

    2017-08-10

    Congenital malformations can be manifested as combinations of phenotypes that co-occur more often than expected by chance. In many such cases, it has proved difficult to identify a genetic cause. We sought the genetic cause of cardiac, vertebral, and renal defects, among others, in unrelated patients. We used genomic sequencing to identify potentially pathogenic gene variants in families in which a person had multiple congenital malformations. We tested the function of the variant by using assays of in vitro enzyme activity and by quantifying metabolites in patient plasma. We engineered mouse models with similar variants using the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 system. Variants were identified in two genes that encode enzymes of the kynurenine pathway, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid 3,4-dioxygenase (HAAO) and kynureninase (KYNU). Three patients carried homozygous variants predicting loss-of-function changes in the HAAO or KYNU proteins (HAAO p.D162*, HAAO p.W186*, or KYNU p.V57Efs*21). Another patient carried heterozygous KYNU variants (p.Y156* and p.F349Kfs*4). The mutant enzymes had greatly reduced activity in vitro. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is synthesized de novo from tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway. The patients had reduced levels of circulating NAD. Defects similar to those in the patients developed in the embryos of Haao-null or Kynu-null mice owing to NAD deficiency. In null mice, the prevention of NAD deficiency during gestation averted defects. Disruption of NAD synthesis caused a deficiency of NAD and congenital malformations in humans and mice. Niacin supplementation during gestation prevented the malformations in mice. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and others.).

  5. Primary Carnitine Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan; Hougaard, David M; Sandhu, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) causes low levels of carnitine in patients potentially leading to metabolic and cardiac symptoms. Newborn screening for PCD is now routine in many countries by measuring carnitine levels in infants. In this study we report Apgar scores, length and weight...... in newborns with PCD and newborns born to mothers with PCD compared to controls. Furthermore we report how effective different screening algorithms have been to detect newborns with PCD in the Faroe Islands. RESULTS: Newborns with PCD and newborns born to mothers with PCD did not differ with regard to Apgar...

  6. Pseudoachondroplasia with immune deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kultursay, N.; Taneli, B.; Cavusoglu, A.

    1988-01-01

    A 5-year old boy was admitted to the hospital with failure to thrive since he was 2 years old, with weakness in his legs and a waddling gait. He has normal mental development. His parents are normal phenotypically and are unrelated. In analysing his pedigree only a grandfather is described to have waddling gait. He has a normal craniofacial appearance but a disproportionate body with normal trunk and short extremities with height below the 3rd percentile. The diagnosis of pseudoachondroplasia was made on clinical, radiological and laboratory findings. He also had immune deficiency characterised by low T-lymphocyte populations and a low level of serum immunoglobulin A. (orig.)

  7. Morbidity and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Laursen, Torben; Green, Anders

    2008-01-01

    identified in the National Patient Registry. Lag time until first admission was used as a measure of morbidity. Patients were divided into childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cut-off of 18 years at onset of GHD. METHOD: Sex- and cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) in CO and AO......OBJECTIVE: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...

  8. Iron deficiency anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Barragán-Ibañez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anaemia is a public health problem that affects all age groups. In Mexico, it is a common cause of morbidity, and accounts for 50% of cases of anaemia worldwide. It is more prevalent during the first 2 years of life, during adolescence and pregnancy. It is characterised by fatigue, weakness, pallor and koilonychia. Treatment is based on dietary recommendations and oral and intravenous iron supplements. In this review article, we summarise the characteristics of iron efficiency anaemia, its metabolism, epidemiology, symptoms and diagnosis, and explore different therapeutic approaches.

  9. Orexin deficiency and narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    Orexin deficiency results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy in many mammalian species, including mice, dogs, and humans, suggesting that the orexin system is particularly important for normal regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, and especially for maintenance of wakefulness. This review discusses animal models of narcolepsy; the contribution of each orexin receptor subtype to the narcoleptic phenotypes; and the etiology of orexin neuronal death. It also raises the possibility of novel therapies targeting the orexin system for sleep disorders including insomia and narcolepsy-cataplexy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein–deficient (MOG-deficient) mice reveal lack of immune tolerance to MOG in wild-type mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarasse, Cécile; Daubas, Philippe; Mars, Lennart T.; Vizler, Csaba; Litzenburger, Tobias; Iglesias, Antonio; Bauer, Jan; Della Gaspera, Bruno; Schubart, Anna; Decker, Laurence; Dimitri, Dalia; Roussel, Guy; Dierich, Andrée; Amor, Sandra; Dautigny, André; Liblau, Roland; Pham-Dinh, Danielle

    2003-01-01

    We studied the immunological basis for the very potent encephalitogenicity of myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a minor component of myelin in the CNS that is widely used to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). For this purpose, we generated a mutant mouse lacking a functional mog gene. This MOG-deficient mouse presents no clinical or histological abnormalities, permitting us to directly assess the role of MOG as a target autoantigen in EAE. In contrast to WT mice, which developed severe EAE following immunization with whole myelin, MOG-deficient mice had a mild phenotype, demonstrating that the anti-MOG response is a major pathogenic component of the autoimmune response directed against myelin. Moreover, while MOG transcripts are expressed in lymphoid organs in minute amounts, both MOG-deficient and WT mice show similar T and B cell responses against the extracellular domain of MOG, including the immunodominant MOG 35–55 T cell epitope. Furthermore, no differences in the fine specificity of the T cell responses to overlapping peptides covering the complete mouse MOG sequence were observed between MOG+/+ and MOG–/– mice. In addition, upon adoptive transfer, MOG-specific T cells from WT mice and those from MOG-deficient mice are equally pathogenic. This total lack of immune tolerance to MOG in WT C57BL/6 mice may be responsible for the high pathogenicity of the anti-MOG immune response as well as the high susceptibility of most animal strains to MOG-induced EAE. PMID:12925695

  11. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into chil......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided...... in CO and AO GHD in both genders, when compared with controls. The hazard ratio (HR) for CO males was 8.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.5-15.1) and for females 9.4 (CI 4.6-19.4). For AO males, HR was 1.9 (CI 1.7-2.2) and for females 3.4 (CI 2.9-4.0). We found a significantly higher HR in AO females...... a significantly increased mortality in GHD patients when compared with controls, possibly due to their hypopituitary status. Mortality was increased in AO female patients when compared with males. For CO and AO GHD, different causes of significantly increased mortality were identified...

  12. Vitamin A deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, D S

    1999-08-01

    The major cause of blindness in children worldwide is xerophthalmia caused by vitamin A deficiency. In addition it has other adverse effects, including increased mortality and the term vitamin A deficiency disorders (VADD) has been introduced to cover the whole clinical spectrum of disease. The ocular manifestations of xerophthalmia have been classified and a set of prevalence criteria for the detection of a problem of public health magnitude has been in use for more than two decades. The global prevalence of VADD is now well documented and World Health Organisation (WHO) receives information continuously for updating its data base on the subject. The pathogenesis of the disease is still imperfectly understood, it is not at all clear precisely why certain subjects in vulnerable communities develop xerophthalmia, while the majority are spared. A schedule for treatment of the established case has been available for a long time, but at both clinic and hospital level concentrated sources of vitamin A for treatment are frequently not available. More emphasis needs to be laid on prevention and a choice of methods consisting of large dose supplementation, fortification of food, control of precipitating infections and dietary improvement. The advantages and drawbacks of each are discussed.

  13. Lead toxicity and nutritional deficiencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levander, O.A.

    1979-04-01

    Recent data concerning lead toxicity and nutritional deficiencies are summarized. Lead poisoning can be exacerbated by consumption of either deficient or excessive levels of protein. Mineral deficiencies also exaggerate lead poisoning. Evidence for antagonism between lead and nutritional levels of selenium is inconclusive. Vitamin E deficiency and lead poisoning interact to produce an anemia in rats that is more severe than that caused by either treatment alone. A pro-oxidant stress of lead on red blood cells is hypothesized to cause their accelerated destruction. In addition, disruption of normal membrane structure, leading to peroxidative damage, may occur. Calcium deficiencies in children are negatively correlated with lead concentrations in their blood. Other examples of interactions between minerals and lead poisoning are provided. Nutritional deficiencies have been shown to have an additive effect in potentiating lead toxicity in some cases. (112 references, 4 tables)

  14. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  15. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froissart, Roseline; Piraud, Monique; Boudjemline, Alix Mollet; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Petit, François; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Eberschweiler, Pascale Trioche; Gajdos, Vincent; Labrune, Philippe

    2011-05-20

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  16. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    J?uregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life aft...

  17. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. mouseTube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torquet, Nicolas; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Faure, Philippe; Bourgeron, Thomas; Ey, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic vocalisation is a broadly used proxy to evaluate social communication in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. The efficacy and robustness of testing these models suffer from limited knowledge of the structure and functions of these vocalisations as well as of the way to analyse the data. We created mouseTube , an open database with a web interface, to facilitate sharing and comparison of ultrasonic vocalisations data and metadata attached to a recording file. Metadata describe 1) the acquisition procedure, e.g ., hardware, software, sampling frequency, bit depth; 2) the biological protocol used to elicit ultrasonic vocalisations; 3) the characteristics of the individual emitting ultrasonic vocalisations ( e.g. , strain, sex, age). To promote open science and enable reproducibility, data are made freely available. The website provides searching functions to facilitate the retrieval of recording files of interest. It is designed to enable comparisons of ultrasonic vocalisation emission between strains, protocols or laboratories, as well as to test different analysis algorithms and to search for protocols established to elicit mouse ultrasonic vocalisations. Over the long term, users will be able to download and compare different analysis results for each data file. Such application will boost the knowledge on mouse ultrasonic communication and stimulate sharing and comparison of automatic analysis methods to refine phenotyping techniques in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: transcobalamin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) CLIMB: Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases ( ...

  20. Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Bikram S; Finelli, Frederick C; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2012-09-01

    Lifestyle intervention programmes often produce insufficient weight loss and poor weight loss maintenance. As a result, an increasing number of patients with obesity and related comorbidities undergo bariatric surgery, which includes approaches such as the adjustable gastric band or the 'divided' Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This Review summarizes the current knowledge on nutrient deficiencies that can develop after bariatric surgery and highlights follow-up and treatment options for bariatric surgery patients who develop a micronutrient deficiency. The major macronutrient deficiency after bariatric surgery is protein malnutrition. Deficiencies in micronutrients, which include trace elements, essential minerals, and water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins, are common before bariatric surgery and often persist postoperatively, despite universal recommendations on multivitamin and mineral supplements. Other disorders, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, can promote micronutrient deficiencies, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus. Recognition of the clinical presentations of micronutrient deficiencies is important, both to enable early intervention and to minimize long-term adverse effects. A major clinical concern is the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the development of metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis or osteomalacia; metabolic bone diseases may explain the increased risk of hip fracture in patients after RYGB. Further studies are required to determine the optimal levels of nutrient supplementation and whether postoperative laboratory monitoring effectively detects nutrient deficiencies. In the absence of such data, clinicians should inquire about and treat symptoms that suggest nutrient deficiencies.

  1. Cloning, structure, and chromosome localization of the mouse glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeller, D.M.; DiGiulio, A.; Frerman, F.E. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    Glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) is a nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial matrix enzyme. In humans, deficiency of GCDH leads to glutaric acidemia type I, and inherited disorder of amino acid metabolism characterized by a progressive neurodegenerative disease. In this report we describe the cloning and structure of the mouse GCDH (Gcdh) gene and cDNA and its chromosomal localization. The mouse Gcdh cDNA is 1.75 kb long and contains and open reading frame of 438 amino acids. The amino acid sequences of mouse, human, and pig GCDH are highly conserved. The mouse Gcdh gene contains 11 exons and spans 7 kb of genomic DNA. Gcdh was mapped by backcross analysis to mouse chromosome 8 within a region that is homologous to a region of human chromosome 19, where the human gene was previously mapped. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Megalin-deficiency causes high myopia, retinal pigment epithelium-macromelanosomes and abnormal development of the ciliary body in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Tina; Heegaard, Steffen; Christensen, Erik Ilsø

    2014-01-01

    of megalin-deficient mice were examined with immunological techniques using light, confocal and electron microscopy. We identified megalin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and non-pigmented ciliary body epithelium (NPCBE) in normal mouse eyes. Immunocytochemical investigations furthermore showed...... that megalin localizes to vesicular structures in the RPE and NPCBE cells. Histological investigations of ocular mouse tissue also identified a severe myopia phenotype as well as enlarged RPE melanosomes and abnormal ciliary body development in the megalin-deficient mice. In conclusion, the complex ocular...

  3. Immunostimulatory mouse granuloma protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontan, E; Fauve, R M; Hevin, B; Jusforgues, H

    1983-10-01

    Earlier studies have shown that from subcutaneous talc-induced granuloma in mice, a fraction could be extracted that fully protected mice against Listeria monocytogenes. Using standard biochemical procedures--i.e., ammonium sulfate fractionation, preparative electrophoresis, gel filtration chromatography, isoelectric focusing, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis--we have now purified an active factor to homogeneity. A single band was obtained in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel with an apparent Mr of 55,000. It migrated with alpha 1-globulins and the isoelectric point was 5 +/- 0.1. The biological activity was destroyed with Pronase but not with trypsin and a monospecific polyclonal rabbit antiserum was obtained. The intravenous injection of 5 micrograms of this "mouse granuloma protein" fully protects mice against a lethal inoculum of L. monocytogenes. Moreover, after their incubation with 10 nM mouse granuloma protein, mouse peritoneal cells became cytostatic against Lewis carcinoma cells.

  4. 1Restoration of ATM expression in DNA-PKcs deficient cells inhibits signal end joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Jessica A.; Xu, Yao; Abe, Masumi; Hendrickson, Eric; Meek, Katheryn

    2016-01-01

    Unlike most DNA-PKcs deficient mouse cell strains, we show here that targeted deletion of DNA-PKcs in two different human cell lines abrogates VDJ signal end joining in episomal assays. Although the mechanism is not well defined, DNA-PKcs deficiency results in spontaneous reduction of ATM expression in many cultured cell lines (including those studied here) and in DNA-PKcs deficient mice. We considered that varying loss of ATM expression might explain differences in signal end joining in different cell strains and animal models, and we investigated the impact of ATM and/or DNA-PKcs loss on VDJ recombination in cultured human and rodent cell strains. To our surprise, in DNA-PKcs deficient mouse cell strains that are proficient in signal end joining, restoration of ATM expression markedly inhibits signal end joining. In contrast, in DNA-PKcs deficient cells that are deficient in signal end joining, complete loss of ATM enhances signal (but not coding) joint formation. We propose that ATM facilitates restriction of signal ends to the “classical” non-homologous end-joining pathway. PMID:26921311

  5. Argininosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Lee, Brendan

    2012-05-01

    The urea cycle consists of six consecutive enzymatic reactions that convert waste nitrogen into urea. Deficiencies of any of these enzymes of the cycle result in urea cycle disorders (UCDs), a group of inborn errors of hepatic metabolism that often result in life-threatening hyperammonemia. Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) catalyzes the fourth reaction in this cycle, resulting in the breakdown of argininosuccinic acid to arginine and fumarate. ASL deficiency (ASLD) is the second most common UCD, with a prevalence of ~1 in 70,000 live births. ASLD can manifest as either a severe neonatal-onset form with hyperammonemia within the first few days after birth or as a late-onset form with episodic hyperammonemia and/or long-term complications that include liver dysfunction, neurocognitive deficits, and hypertension. These long-term complications can occur in the absence of hyperammonemic episodes, implying that ASL has functions outside of its role in ureagenesis and the tissue-specific lack of ASL may be responsible for these manifestations. The biochemical diagnosis of ASLD is typically established with elevation of plasma citrulline together with elevated argininosuccinic acid in the plasma or urine. Molecular genetic testing of ASL and assay of ASL enzyme activity are helpful when the biochemical findings are equivocal. However, there is no correlation between the genotype or enzyme activity and clinical outcome. Treatment of acute metabolic decompensations with hyperammonemia involves discontinuing oral protein intake, supplementing oral intake with intravenous lipids and/or glucose, and use of intravenous arginine and nitrogen-scavenging therapy. Dietary restriction of protein and dietary supplementation with arginine are the mainstays in long-term management. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is best considered only in patients with recurrent hyperammonemia or metabolic decompensations resistant to conventional medical therapy.

  6. Effects of Vitamin B6 Deficiency on the Composition and Functional Potential of T Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Bingjun; Shen, Shanqi; Zhang, Jianhua; Jing, Pu

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is critical in preventing infection and cancer, and malnutrition can weaken different aspects of the immune system to undermine immunity. Previous studies suggested that vitamin B6 deficiency could decrease serum antibody production with concomitant increase in IL4 expression. However, evidence on whether vitamin B6 deficiency would impair immune cell differentiation, cytokines secretion, and signal molecule expression involved in JAK/STAT signaling pathway to regulate immune response remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of vitamin B6 deficiency on the immune system through analysis of T lymphocyte differentiation, IL-2, IL-4, and INF- γ secretion, and SOCS-1 and T-bet gene transcription. We generated a vitamin B6-deficient mouse model via vitamin B6-depletion diet. The results showed that vitamin B6 deficiency retards growth, inhibits lymphocyte proliferation, and interferes with its differentiation. After ConA stimulation, vitamin B6 deficiency led to decrease in IL-2 and increase in IL-4 but had no influence on IFN- γ . Real-time PCR analysis showed that vitamin B6 deficiency downregulated T-bet and upregulated SOCS-1 transcription. This study suggested that vitamin B6 deficiency influenced the immunity in organisms. Meanwhile, the appropriate supplement of vitamin B6 could benefit immunity of the organism.

  7. Effects of Vitamin B6 Deficiency on the Composition and Functional Potential of T Cell Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingjun Qian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system is critical in preventing infection and cancer, and malnutrition can weaken different aspects of the immune system to undermine immunity. Previous studies suggested that vitamin B6 deficiency could decrease serum antibody production with concomitant increase in IL4 expression. However, evidence on whether vitamin B6 deficiency would impair immune cell differentiation, cytokines secretion, and signal molecule expression involved in JAK/STAT signaling pathway to regulate immune response remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of vitamin B6 deficiency on the immune system through analysis of T lymphocyte differentiation, IL-2, IL-4, and INF-γ secretion, and SOCS-1 and T-bet gene transcription. We generated a vitamin B6-deficient mouse model via vitamin B6-depletion diet. The results showed that vitamin B6 deficiency retards growth, inhibits lymphocyte proliferation, and interferes with its differentiation. After ConA stimulation, vitamin B6 deficiency led to decrease in IL-2 and increase in IL-4 but had no influence on IFN-γ. Real-time PCR analysis showed that vitamin B6 deficiency downregulated T-bet and upregulated SOCS-1 transcription. This study suggested that vitamin B6 deficiency influenced the immunity in organisms. Meanwhile, the appropriate supplement of vitamin B6 could benefit immunity of the organism.

  8. Accelerated microglial pathology is associated with Aβ plaques in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Rona; Babcock, Alicia A; Nemirovsky, Anna

    2014-01-01

    with a chronic proinflammatory reaction in the brain, aging causes a significant reduction in the capacity of microglia to scan their environment. This type of pathology is markedly accelerated in mouse models of AD, resulting in a severe microglial process deficiency, and possibly contributing to enhanced...... cognitive decline....

  9. Mouse models of cataract

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-12-31

    Dec 31, 2009 ... Mutations affecting the mouse lens can be identified easily by visual inspection, and a remarkable number of mutant lines ..... out mutants do not show an ocular phenotype, the two Bfsp genes are important for lens ... The more severe mutants have in addition to the ocular symptoms some more clinical ...

  10. Mouse Leydig Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Syong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is a natural pure compound extracted from Cordyceps sinensis (CS. We have demonstrated that CS stimulates steroidogenesis in primary mouse Leydig cell and activates apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. It is highly possible that cordycepin is the main component in CS modulating Leydig cell functions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the steroidogenic and apoptotic effects with potential mechanism of cordycepin on MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. Results showed that cordycepin significantly stimulated progesterone production in dose- and time-dependent manners. Adenosine receptor (AR subtype agonists were further used to treat MA-10 cells, showing that A1, A 2A , A 2B , and A3, AR agonists could stimulate progesterone production. However, StAR promoter activity and protein expression remained of no difference among all cordycepin treatments, suggesting that cordycepin might activate AR, but not stimulated StAR protein to regulate MA-10 cell steroidogenesis. Meanwhile, cordycepin could also induce apoptotic cell death in MA-10 cells. Moreover, four AR subtype agonists induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and four AR subtype antagonists could all rescue cell death under cordycepin treatment in MA-10 cells. In conclusion, cordycepin could activate adenosine subtype receptors and simultaneously induce steroidogenesis and apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  11. Colonization, mouse-style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Searle Jeremy B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several recent papers, including one in BMC Evolutionary Biology, examine the colonization history of house mice. As well as background for the analysis of mouse adaptation, such studies offer a perspective on the history of movements of the humans that accidentally transported the mice. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/10/325

  12. Interactions between copper deficiency, selenium deficiency and adriamycin toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J.; Tackett, R.; Johnson, M.A. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are interactions between copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) status, and adriamycin (ADR) toxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed Cu,Se adequate; Cu deficient, Se adequate ({minus}Cu); Cu adequate, Se deficient; or Cu,Se deficient diets for 38-41 days. ADR or saline (SAL) were administered weekly for the last 4 weeks of the study. Cu deficiency was confirmed by a 3-fold decrease in liver Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and liver Cu, and a 5-fold decrease in RBC Cu,Zn-SOD. Se deficiency was confirmed by a 10-fold decrease in liver glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). ADR, Cu deficiency and Se deficiency all caused EKG abnormalities. However, Cu and Se deficiencies did not enhance ADR's influence on EKGs. ADR increased lipid peroxidation in liver by 15% and in heart by 18% (NS). Cu deficiency decreased ADR-induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissue by 25%. ADR influenced Se status by significantly increasing heart GSH-Px, and Cu status by increasing liver Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin and liver Cu, Zn-SOD. These elevations in Cu,Zn-SOD and GSH-Px may be a consequence of the increased lipid peroxidation initiated by ADR. In {minus}Cu rats, ADR caused severe hemolytic anemia characterized by a 19% decrease in hematocrit and a 17-fold increase in splenic Fe. These data suggest that there are numerous interactions between ADR toxicity and Cu and Se status.

  13. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  14. Mouse models for disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, A Michele; Wood, Philip A

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids is vital for energy production in periods of fasting and other metabolic stress. Human patients have been identified with inherited disorders of mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids with enzyme deficiencies identified at many of the steps in this pathway. Although these patients exhibit a range of disease processes, Reye-like illness (hypoketotic-hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia and fatty liver) and cardiomyopathy are common findings. There have been several mouse models developed to aid in the study of these disease conditions. The characterized mouse models include inherited deficiencies of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, mitochondrial trifunctional protein-alpha, and medium-/short-chain hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Mouse mutants developed, but presently incompletely characterized as models, include carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1a and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies. In general, the mouse models of disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation have shown clinical signs that include Reye-like syndrome and cardiomyopathy, and many are cold intolerant. It is expected that these mouse models will provide vital contributions in understanding the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis of fatty acid oxidation disorders and the development of appropriate treatments and supportive care.

  15. Localization and regulation of mouse pantothenate kinase 2 [The PanK2 Genes of Mouse and Human Specify Proteins with Distinct Subcellular Locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonardi, Roberta [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Zhang, Yong-Mei [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Lykidis, Athanasios [DOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Rock, Charles O. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Jackowski, Suzanne [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2007-09-07

    Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis is initiated by pantothenatekinase (PanK) and CoA levels are controlled through differentialexpression and feedback regulation of PanK isoforms. PanK2 is amitochondrial protein in humans, but comparative genomics revealed thatacquisition of a mitochondrial targeting signal was limited to primates.Human and mouse PanK2 possessed similar biochemical properties, withinhibition by acetylCoA and activation by palmitoylcarnitine. Mouse PanK2localized in the cytosol, and the expression of PanK2 was higher in humanbrain compared to mouse brain. Differences in expression and subcellularlocalization should be considered in developing a mouse model for humanPanK2 deficiency.

  16. Metastasis of transgenic breast cancer in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almholt, Kasper; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Frandsen, Thomas Leth

    2003-01-01

    of metastasizing breast cancer. In these tumors, the expression pattern of uPA and PAI-1 resembles that of human ductal breast cancer and plasminogen is required for efficient metastasis. In a cohort of 63 transgenic mice that were either PAI-1-deficient or wild-type sibling controls, primary tumor growth......, high levels of PAI-1 as well as uPA are equally associated with poor prognosis in cancer patients. PAI-1 is thought to play a vital role for the controlled extracellular proteolysis during tumor neovascularization. We have studied the effect of PAI-1 deficiency in a transgenic mouse model...... and vascular density were unaffected by PAI-1 status. PAI-1 deficiency also did not significantly affect the lung metastatic burden. These results agree with the virtual lack of spontaneous phenotype in PAI-1-deficient mice and humans and may reflect that the plasminogen activation reaction is not rate...

  17. Shape analysis of the basioccipital bone in Pax7-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Joshua; Nevell, Lisa; Prajapati, Suresh I; Nelon, Laura D; Chang, Jerry Y; Randolph, Matthew E; Wood, Bernard; Keller, Charles; Whitaker, Ross T

    2017-12-20

    We compared the cranial base of newborn Pax7-deficient and wildtype mice using a computational shape modeling technology called particle-based modeling (PBM). We found systematic differences in the morphology of the basiooccipital bone, including a broadening of the basioccipital bone and an antero-inferior inflection of its posterior edge in the Pax7-deficient mice. We show that the Pax7 cell lineage contributes to the basioccipital bone and that the location of the Pax7 lineage correlates with the morphology most effected by Pax7 deficiency. Our results suggest that the Pax7-deficient mouse may be a suitable model for investigating the genetic control of the location and orientation of the foramen magnum, and changes in the breadth of the basioccipital.

  18. Impairment of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP pathway in cerebellar slices prepared from the hph-1 mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M P; Briddon, A; Land, J M; Clark, J B; Heales, S J

    1996-09-30

    In this study, the effect of tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency on the nitric oxide/cGMP pathway has been investigated in cerebellar slices derived from the hph-1 mouse. This animal displays a partial deficiency of tetrahydrobiopterin. Basal levels of cGMP were significantly reduced (-29.5%) in the hph-1 mouse cerebellum compared to controls. Following kainate stimulation (500 microM) cGMP levels increased in both control and hph-1 preparations but were again significantly lower (-29.1%) in the hph-1 mouse. Exposure of slices to the nitric oxide donors, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine and S-nitroso-glutathione, revealed no difference in cGMP accumulation between the two groups. These findings suggest that the cerebellar nitric oxide/cGMP pathway may be impaired in partial tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency states due to diminished nitric oxide formation.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome is a rare movement disorder. ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this condition: lactate dehydrogenase-A deficiency (sometimes called glycogen storage disease XI) and lactate dehydrogenase-B deficiency. People with ... Resources Genetic Testing (2 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Glycogen storage disease XI Genetic Testing Registry: Lactate dehydrogenase B deficiency ...

  1. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  2. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disorder associated with the development of liver and lung disease. AAT is a 52-kD glycoprotein, produced mainly by hepatocytes and secreted into the blood. Agglomeration of the AAT-protein in hepatocytes can result in liver disease. Exposure to smoke is the major risk factor for the development of lung disease characterised as early chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). Diagnosis is based on the analysis of the AAT genotype and phenotype. The measurement of the AAT serum level is useful as screening test. Liver biopsy is not necessary to establish the diagnosis. Therapy for AAT-related liver disease is supportive, a specific therapy is not available. AATD is a rare condition (1:5000-10000) and, as a consequence, data and information on diagnosis and treatment are not easily accessible. This chapter provides a comprehensive overview on AATD, covering basic biology, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effects of congenital brain serotonin deficiency on responses to chronic fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, B D; Jacobsen, J P R; Thomas, T L; Siesser, W B; Roberts, W L; Caron, M G

    2013-08-13

    The importance of reversing brain serotonin (5-HT) deficiency and promoting hippocampal neurogenesis in the mechanisms of action for antidepressants remain highly controversial. Here we examined the behavioral, neurochemical and neurogenic effects of chronic fluoxetine (FLX) in a mouse model of congenital 5-HT deficiency, the tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (R439H) knock-in (Tph2KI) mouse. Our results demonstrate that congenital 5-HT deficiency prevents a subset of the signature molecular, cellular and behavioral effects of FLX, despite the fact that FLX restores the 5-HT levels of Tph2KI mice to essentially the levels observed in wild-type mice at baseline. These results suggest that inducing supra-physiological levels of 5-HT, not merely reversing 5-HT deficiency, is required for many of the antidepressant-like effects of FLX. We also demonstrate that co-administration of the 5-HT precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), along with FLX rescues the novelty suppressed feeding (NSF) anxiolytic-like effect of FLX in Tph2KI mice, despite still failing to induce neurogenesis. Thus, our results indicate that brain 5-HT deficiency reduces the efficacy of FLX and that supplementation with 5-HTP can restore some antidepressant-like responses in the context of 5-HT deficiency. Our findings also suggest that feeding latency reductions in the NSF induced by chronic 5-HT elevation are not mediated by drug-induced increments in neurogenesis in 5-HT-deficient animals. Overall, these findings shed new light on the impact of 5-HT deficiency on responses to FLX and may have important implications for treatment selection in depression and anxiety disorders.

  4. Iron deficiency - a global problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Iron deficiency is an important nutritional global problem. This paper contains summery of information gathered from a dietary survey as iron deficiency anaemia is major public health problem in many developing countries including Pakistan. Comparison of anaemia in different age group and sex versus various regions in the world are given. In Pakistan also anaemia is widespread. According to the report of Micro-Nutrient survey of Pakistan 40% of the population are found to have low level of haemoglobin, more than half of pregnant women suffered from marginal or deficient haemoglobin. (A.B.)

  5. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors.

  6. Primer for non-immunologists on immune-deficient mice and their applications in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, B A; Linder, K E; Yager, J A

    2001-08-01

    Studies of immune deficiencies have a history as long as that of immunology. However, reports of two key spontaneous recessive mutations in mice (nude in 1966-1968 and scid in 1983) laid the foundations for widespread application of immune-deficient rodents to a broad range of research topics. More recently, technologies modifying the mouse genome by transgenesis, gene ablation and crossbreeding for lines with multiple immune deficits have provided a large number of new types of immunologically impaired mice. The primary goals of this overview are to help non-immunologists understand key differences between some of the immunodeficient strains, develop an appreciation for the value of information derived from immunodeficient mouse-based research and to encourage expanded, creative use of these specialized research animals. Secondary goals are to promote greater awareness of unexpected outcomes that can arise when working with genetically immune-deficient mice, the need for vigilance in maintaining these research animals, and the care required in interpretation of the data that immune-deficient modeling provides. Two illustrations on developing appropriate immune deficient animal models for a new research application conclude the review.

  7. Iron deficiency among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigas, A S; Pedersen, O B; Magnussen, K

    2017-01-01

    and menopausal status are the strongest predictors of iron deficiency. Only little information on the health effects of iron deficiency in blood donors exits. Possibly, after a standard full blood donation, a temporarily reduced physical performance for women is observed. However, iron deficiency among blood...... donors is not reflected in a reduced self-perceived mental and physical health. In general, the high proportion of iron-deficient donors can be alleviated either by extending the inter-donation intervals or by guided iron supplementation. The experience from Copenhagen, the Capital Region of Denmark......, is that routine ferritin measurements and iron supplementation are feasible and effective ways of reducing the proportion of donors with low haemoglobin levels....

  8. Evolutionary Processes and Mental Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1973-01-01

    The author hypothesizes that central nervous system damage of deficiency associated with mental retardation affects primarily those cortical processes which developed at a late stage in man's evolutionary history. (Author)

  9. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  10. Selective IgA Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Yel, Leman

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency is the most common primary immunodeficiency defined as decreased serum level of IgA in the presence of normal levels of other immunoglobulin isotypes. Most individuals with IgA deficiency are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, allergic disorders, and autoimmune manifestations. IgA and Its Functions: Although IgA is the most abund...

  11. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with...

  12. Impaired neurotransmission in ether lipid-deficient nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodde, Alexander; Teigler, Andre; Brugger, Britta; Lehmann, Wolf D; Wieland, Felix; Berger, Johannes; Just, Wilhelm W

    2012-06-15

    Isolated defects of ether lipid (EL) biosynthesis in humans cause rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 2 and type 3, serious peroxisomal disorders. Using a previously described mouse model [Rodemer, C., Thai, T.P., Brugger, B., Kaercher, T., Werner, H., Nave, K.A., Wieland, F., Gorgas, K., and Just, W.W. (2003) Inactivation of ether lipid biosynthesis causes male infertility, defects in eye development and optic nerve hypoplasia in mice. Hum. Mol. Genet., 12, 1881-1895], we investigated the effect of EL deficiency in isolated murine nerve terminals (synaptosomes) on the pre-synaptic release of the neurotransmitters (NTs) glutamate and acetylcholine. Both Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and Ca(2+)-independent efflux of the transmitters were affected. EL-deficient synaptosomes respire at a reduced rate and exhibit a lowered adenosin-5'-triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (ATP/ADP) ratio. Consequently, ATP-driven processes, such as synaptic vesicle cycling and maintenance of Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) homeostasis, might be disturbed. Analyzing reactive oxygen species in EL-deficient neural and non-neural tissues revealed that plasmalogens (PLs), the most abundant EL species in mammalian central nervous system, considerably contribute to the generation of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde. Although EL-deficient tissue contains less lipid peroxidation products, fibroblasts lacking ELs are more susceptible to induced oxidative stress. In summary, these results suggest that due to the reduced energy state of EL-deficient tissue, the Ca(2+)-independent efflux of NTs increases while the Ca(2+)-dependent release declines. Furthermore, lack of PLs is mainly compensated for by an increase in the concentration of phosphatidylethanolamine and results in a significantly lowered level of lipid peroxidation products in the brain cortex and cerebellum.

  13. ASC deficiency suppresses proliferation and prevents medulloblastoma incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, E R W; Patel, E Y; Flowers, C A; Crowther, A J; Ting, J P; Miller, C R; Gershon, T R; Deshmukh, M

    2015-01-15

    Apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC) is silenced by promoter methylation in many types of tumors, yet ASC's role in most cancers remains unknown. Here, we show that ASC is highly expressed in a model of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant pediatric brain cancer; ASC is also expressed in human medulloblastomas. Importantly, while ASC deficiency did not affect normal cerebellar development, ASC knockout mice on the Smoothened (ND2:SmoA1) transgenic model of medulloblastoma exhibited a profound reduction in medulloblastoma incidence and a delayed tumor onset. A similar decrease in tumorigenesis with ASC deficiency was also seen in the hGFAP-Cre:SmoM2 mouse model of medulloblastoma. Interestingly, hyperproliferation of the external granule layer (EGL) was comparable at P20 in both wild-type and ASC-deficient SmoA1 mice. However, while the apoptosis and differentiation markers remained unchanged at this age, proliferation makers were decreased, and the EGL was reduced in thickness and area by P60. This reduction in proliferation with ASC deficiency was also seen in isolated SmoA1 cerebellar granule precursor cells in vitro, indicating that the effect of ASC deletion on proliferation was cell autonomous. Interestingly, ASC-deficient SmoA1 cerebella exhibited disrupted expression of genes in the transforming growth factor-β pathway and increased level of nuclear Smad3. Taken together, these results demonstrate an unexpected role for ASC in Sonic hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma tumorigenesis, thus identifying ASC as a promising novel target for antitumor therapy.

  14. Tongue Abnormalities Are Associated to a Maternal Folic Acid Deficient Diet in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Estela Maldonado; Yamila López-Gordillo; Teresa Partearroyo; Gregorio Varela-Moreiras; Concepción Martínez-Álvarez; Juliana Pérez-Miguelsanz

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that maternal folic acid (FA) deficiency during pregnancy is a risk factor for abnormal development. The tongue, with multiple genes working together in a coordinated cascade in time and place, has emerged as a target organ for testing the effect of FA during development. A FA-deficient (FAD) diet was administered to eight-week-old C57/BL/6J mouse females for 2–16 weeks. Pregnant dams were sacrificed at gestational day 17 (E17). The tongues and heads of 15 control and 21...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Iron-Deficiency Anemia ... anemia, a common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the ...

  16. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency: lessons from mice and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, P L; Gibson, K M; Cortez, M A; Wu, Y; Carter Snead, O; Knerr, I; Forester, K; Pettiford, J M; Jakobs, C; Theodore, W H

    2009-06-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, a disorder of GABA degradation with subsequent elevations in brain GABA and GHB, is a neurometabolic disorder with intellectual disability, epilepsy, hypotonia, ataxia, sleep disorders, and psychiatric disturbances. Neuroimaging reveals increased T2-weighted MRI signal usually affecting the globus pallidus, cerebellar dentate nucleus, and subthalamic nucleus, and often cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. EEG abnormalities are usually generalized spike-wave, consistent with a predilection for generalized epilepsy. The murine phenotype is characterized by failure-to-thrive, progressive ataxia, and a transition from generalized absence to tonic-clonic to ultimately fatal convulsive status epilepticus. Binding and electrophysiological studies demonstrate use-dependent downregulation of GABA(A) and (B) receptors in the mutant mouse. Translational human studies similarly reveal downregulation of GABAergic activity in patients, utilizing flumazenil-PET and transcranial magnetic stimulation for GABA(A) and (B) activity, respectively. Sleep studies reveal decreased stage REM with prolonged REM latencies and diminished percentage of stage REM. An ad libitum ketogenic diet was reported as effective in the mouse model, with unclear applicability to the human condition. Acute application of SGS-742, a GABA(B) antagonist, leads to improvement in epileptiform activity on electrocorticography. Promising mouse data using compounds available for clinical use, including taurine and SGS-742, form the framework for human trials.

  17. SWAP-70 contributes to spontaneous transformation of mouse embryo fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yu-Tzu; Shu, Chung-Li; Lai, Jing-Yang; Lin, Ching-Yu; Chuu, Chih-Pin [Institute of Cellular and System Medicine National Health Research Institute, Zhunan Town 35053, Miaoli County, Taiwan, ROC (China); Morishita, Kazuhiro; Ichikawa, Tomonaga [Division of Tumor and Cellular Biochemistry Department of Medical Sciences Faculty of Medicine University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki-shi, Miyazaki 889-1692 Japan (Japan); Jessberger, Rolf [Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Fukui, Yasuhisa, E-mail: 990412@nhri.org.tw [Institute of Cellular and System Medicine National Health Research Institute, Zhunan Town 35053, Miaoli County, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-07-15

    Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) grow slowly after cultivation from animals, however, after an extended period of cultivation, their growth accelerates. We found that SWAP-70 deficient MEFs failed to increase growth rates. They maintain normal growth rates and proliferation cycles for at least 5 years. Complementing SWAP-70 deficiency in one of these MEF clones, MEF1F2, by expressing human SWAP-70 resulted in fast growth of the cells after further cultivation for a long period. The resulting cells show a transformation phenotype, since they grow on top of each other and do not show contact inhibition. This phenotype was reverted when sanguinarine, a putative SWAP-70 inhibitor, was added. Two SWAP-70 expressing clones were examined in detail. Even after cell density became very high their cdc2 and NFκB were still activated suggesting that they do not stop growing. One of the clones formed colonies in soft agar and formed tumors in nude mice. Lately, one more clone became transformed being able to make colonies in soft agar. We maintain 4 human SWAP-70 expressing MEF1F2 cell lines. Three out of 4 clones exhibited transforming phenotypes. The mouse SWAP-70 gene also promoted transformation of MEFs. Taken together our data suggest that SWAP-70 is not a typical oncogene, but is required for spontaneous transformation of MEFs. - Highlights: • Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking SWAP-70 do not cause spontaneous transform. • Adding back of SWAP-70 to SWAP-70-deficient MEFs induces spontaneous transformation. • SWAP-70 is required for spontaneous transformation of MEFs.

  18. The mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar) maps to chromosome 2 in a region homologous to human 9q33-q34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunialti, A.L.B.; Guenet, J.L. [Institut Pasteur a Paris (France); Harding, C.O.; Wolff, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-08-15

    The autosomal recessive mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar), which was discovered segregating in the progeny of a male whose premeiotic germ cells had been treated with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea, is characterized by a deficiency in sarcosine dehydrogenase activity. Using an intersubspecific cross, we mapped the sar locus to mouse chromosome 2, approximately 15-18 cM from the centromere. The genetic localization of this locus in the mouse allows the identification of a candidate region in human (9q33-q34) where the homologous disease should map. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Iron deficiency and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-05-15

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients' outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron), before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented.

  20. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients’ outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron, before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented.

  1. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keitaro Tanoi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium ions (Mg2+ are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency.

  2. Normal social seeking behavior, hypoactivity and reduced exploratory range in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiter Lawrence T

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angelman syndrome (AS is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by severe developmental delay with mental retardation, a generally happy disposition, ataxia and characteristic behaviors such as inappropriate laughter, social-seeking behavior and hyperactivity. The majority of AS cases are due to loss of the maternal copy of the UBE3A gene. Maternal Ube3a deficiency (Ube3am-/p+, as well as complete loss of Ube3a expression (Ube3am-/p-, have been reproduced in the mouse model used here. Results Here we asked if two characteristic AS phenotypes - social-seeking behavior and hyperactivity - are reproduced in the Ube3a deficient mouse model of AS. We quantified social-seeking behavior as time spent in close proximity to a stranger mouse and activity as total time spent moving during exploration, movement speed and total length of the exploratory path. Mice of all three genotypes (Ube3am+/p+, Ube3am-/p+, Ube3am-/p- were tested and found to spend the same amount of time in close proximity to the stranger, indicating that Ube3a deficiency in mice does not result in increased social seeking behavior or social dis-inhibition. Also, Ube3a deficient mice were hypoactive compared to their wild-type littermates as shown by significantly lower levels of activity, slower movement velocities, shorter exploratory paths and a reduced exploratory range. Conclusions Although hyperactivity and social-seeking behavior are characteristic phenotypes of Angelman Syndrome in humans, the Ube3a deficient mouse model does not reproduce these phenotypes in comparison to their wild-type littermates. These phenotypic differences may be explained by differences in the size of the genetic defect as ~70% of AS patients have a deletion that includes several other genes surrounding the UBE3A locus.

  3. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third......-degree burn injury was induced with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear...... neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization of the skin showed an increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes dominated inflammation in the group of mice...

  4. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  5. Compensation for dystrophin-deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Guo, Ling T

    2003-01-01

    Mouse models for genetic diseases are among the most powerful tools available for developing and testing new treatment strategies. ADAM12 is a disintegrin and metalloprotease, previously demonstrated to significantly alleviate the pathology of mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy...

  6. [Nutritional deficiencies associated with bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folope, Vanessa; Coëffier, Moïse; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2007-04-01

    Morbidly obese patients often have nutritional deficiencies, particularly in fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid and zinc. After bariatric surgery, these deficiencies may increase and others can appear, especially because of the limitation of food intake in gastric reduction surgery and of malabsorption in by-pass procedures. The latter result in more important weight loss but also increase the risk of more severe deficiencies. The protein deficiency associated with a decrease in the fat-free mass has been described in both procedures. It can sometimes require an enteral or parenteral support. Anemia can be secondary to iron deficiency, folic acid deficiency and even to vitamin B12 deficiency. Neurological disorders such as Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy due to thiamine deficiency, or peripheral neuropathies may also be observed. Malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins and other nutrients, especially if diagnosed after by-pass surgery, rarely cause clinical symptoms. However, some complications have been reported such as bone demineralization due to vitamin D deficiency, hair loss secondary to zinc deficiency or hemeralopia from vitamin A deficiency. A careful nutritional follow-up should be performed during pregnancy after obesity surgery, because possible deficiencies can affect the health of both the mother and child. In conclusion, increased awareness of the risk of deficiency and the systematic dosage of micronutrients are needed in the pre- and postoperative period in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The case by case correction of these deficiencies is mandatory, and their systematic prevention should be evaluated.

  7. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Carol F.; Ratliff, Michelle L.; Powell, Rebecca; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development

  8. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Carol F., E-mail: carol-webb@omrf.org [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Immunobiology and Cancer Research, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ratliff, Michelle L., E-mail: michelle-ratliff@omrf.org [Immunobiology and Cancer Research, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Powell, Rebecca, E-mail: rebeccapowell@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R., E-mail: celeste-wirsig@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Lakiza, Olga, E-mail: olga-lakiza@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Obara, Tomoko, E-mail: tomoko-obara@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  9. Ageing Fxr deficient mice develop increased energy expenditure, improved glucose control and liver damage resembling NASH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Bjursell

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4 (Nr1h4, FXR is a bile acid activated nuclear receptor mainly expressed in the liver, intestine, kidney and adrenal glands. Upon activation, the primary function is to suppress cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the classic or neutral bile acid synthesis pathway. In the present study, a novel Fxr deficient mouse line was created and studied with respect to metabolism and liver function in ageing mice fed chow diet. The Fxr deficient mice were similar to wild type mice in terms of body weight, body composition, energy intake and expenditure as well as behaviours at a young age. However, from 15 weeks of age and onwards, the Fxr deficient mice had almost no body weight increase up to 39 weeks of age mainly because of lower body fat mass. The lower body weight gain was associated with increased energy expenditure that was not compensated by increased food intake. Fasting levels of glucose and insulin were lower and glucose tolerance was improved in old and lean Fxr deficient mice. However, the Fxr deficient mice displayed significantly increased liver weight, steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning degeneration and lobular inflammation together with elevated plasma levels of ALT, bilirubin and bile acids, findings compatible with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and cholestasis. In conclusion, ageing Fxr deficient mice display late onset leanness associated with elevated energy expenditure and improved glucose control but develop severe NASH-like liver pathology.

  10. Ageing Fxr deficient mice develop increased energy expenditure, improved glucose control and liver damage resembling NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjursell, Mikael; Wedin, Marianne; Admyre, Therése; Hermansson, Majlis; Böttcher, Gerhard; Göransson, Melker; Lindén, Daniel; Bamberg, Krister; Oscarsson, Jan; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4 (Nr1h4, FXR) is a bile acid activated nuclear receptor mainly expressed in the liver, intestine, kidney and adrenal glands. Upon activation, the primary function is to suppress cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the classic or neutral bile acid synthesis pathway. In the present study, a novel Fxr deficient mouse line was created and studied with respect to metabolism and liver function in ageing mice fed chow diet. The Fxr deficient mice were similar to wild type mice in terms of body weight, body composition, energy intake and expenditure as well as behaviours at a young age. However, from 15 weeks of age and onwards, the Fxr deficient mice had almost no body weight increase up to 39 weeks of age mainly because of lower body fat mass. The lower body weight gain was associated with increased energy expenditure that was not compensated by increased food intake. Fasting levels of glucose and insulin were lower and glucose tolerance was improved in old and lean Fxr deficient mice. However, the Fxr deficient mice displayed significantly increased liver weight, steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning degeneration and lobular inflammation together with elevated plasma levels of ALT, bilirubin and bile acids, findings compatible with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cholestasis. In conclusion, ageing Fxr deficient mice display late onset leanness associated with elevated energy expenditure and improved glucose control but develop severe NASH-like liver pathology.

  11. Parkin-deficient mice are not more sensitive to 6-hydroxydopamine or methamphetamine neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmiter Richard D

    2005-12-01

    -JP. Alternatively, it remains possible that the absence of parkinsonism in Parkin-deficient mice could reflect fundamental differences between the function of human and mouse Parkin, or the existence of a redundant E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase in mouse that is not found in humans. Therefore, additional studies are necessary to understand why Parkin-deficient mice do not display robust signs of parkinsonism.

  12. TIMP-1 gene deficiency increases tumour cell sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Marie Louise; Würts, S.Ø.; Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed

    2006-01-01

    in cancer. In this regard, several studies have demonstrated an antiapoptotic effect of TIMP-1 in a number of different cell types. Since chemotherapy works by inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, we raised the hypothesis that TIMP-1 promotes resistance against chemotherapeutic drugs. In order to investigate...... this hypothesis, we have established TIMP-1 gene-deficient and TIMP-1 wild-type fibrosarcoma cells from mouse lung tissue. We have characterised these cells with regard to TIMP-1 genotype, TIMP-1 expression, malignant transformation and sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. We show that TIMP-1 gene...... deficiency increases the response to chemotherapy considerably, confirming that TIMP-1 protects the cells from apoptosis. This is to our knowledge the first study investigating TIMP-1 and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis employing a powerful model system comprising TIMP-1 gene-deficient cells...

  13. The effect of DNA repair defects on reproductive performance in nucleotide excision repair (NER) mouse models: an epidemiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsai, P.S.; Nielen, M.; Horst, G.T.J. van der; Colenbrander, B.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Fentener van Vlissingen, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we used an epidemiological approach to analyze an animal database of DNA repair deficient mice on reproductive performance in five Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) mutant mouse models on a C57BL/6 genetic background, namely CSA, CSB, XPA, XPC [models for the human DNA repair disorders

  14. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  15. Preventing Iron Deficiency and Anaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Siegal_D

    Anaemia, often due to iron deficiency, is one of the most widespread causes of mortality and morbidity in ... Pregnant women must make many new red blood cells, provide iron for the foetus and may lose much blood during .... Do not give tea and coffee to children. • Eat fermented porridges and germinate/malt cereals and ...

  16. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been described as being pandemic, but serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] distribution data for the European Union are of very variable quality. The NIH-led international Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing existi...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: proopiomelanocortin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individuals are prone to weight-related conditions like cardiovascular disease or type 2 diabetes . Low levels of ACTH ... to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency POMC deficiency is a rare ...

  18. Iron deficiency anemia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pochinok T.V.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article the role of iron in the human body is highlighted. The mechanism of development of iron deficiency states, their consequences and the basic principles of diagnosis and correction of children of different ages are shown.

  19. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA

  20. Iron deficiency in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Augusto Naoum

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anemia is a frequent complication in cancer patients, both at diagnosis and during treatment, with a multifactorial etiology in most cases. Iron deficiency is among the most common causes of anemia in this setting and can develop in nearly half of patients with solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Surprisingly, this fact is usually neglected by the attending physician in a way that proper and prompt investigation of the iron status is either not performed or postponed. In cancer patients, functional iron deficiency is the predominant mechanism, in which iron availability is reduced due to disease or the therapy-related inflammatory process. Hence, serum ferritin is not reliable in detecting iron deficiency in this setting, whereas transferrin saturation seems more appropriate for this purpose. Besides, lack of bioavailable iron can be further worsened by the use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents that increase iron utilization in the bone marrow. Iron deficiency can cause anemia or worsen pre-existing anemia, leading to a decline in performance status and adherence to treatment, with possible implications in clinical outcome. Due to its frequency and importance, treatment of this condition is already recommended in many specialty guidelines and should be performed preferably with intravenous iron. The evidences regarding the efficacy of this treatment are solid, with response gain when combined with erythropoiesis stimulating agents and significant increments in hemoglobin as monotherapy. Among intravenous iron formulations, slow release preparations present more favorable pharmacological characteristics and efficacy in cancer patients.