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Sample records for suv rollover tests

  1. Constrained Laboratory vs. Unconstrained Steering-Induced Rollover Crash Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Jason R; Toczyski, Jacek; Roberts, Carolyn; Zhang, Qi; Clauser, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate how well an in-laboratory rollover crash test methodology that constrains vehicle motion can reproduce the dynamics of unconstrained full-scale steering-induced rollover crash tests in sand. Data from previously-published unconstrained steering-induced rollover crash tests using a full-size pickup and mid-sized sedan were analyzed to determine vehicle-to-ground impact conditions and kinematic response of the vehicles throughout the tests. Then, a pair of replicate vehicles were prepared to match the inertial properties of the steering-induced test vehicles and configured to record dynamic roof structure deformations and kinematic response. Both vehicles experienced greater increases in roll-axis angular velocities in the unconstrained tests than in the constrained tests; however, the increases that occurred during the trailing side roof interaction were nearly identical between tests for both vehicles. Both vehicles experienced linear accelerations in the constrained tests that were similar to those in the unconstrained tests, but the pickup, in particular, had accelerations that were matched in magnitude, timing, and duration very closely between the two test types. Deformations in the truck test were higher in the constrained than the unconstrained, and deformations in the sedan were greater in the unconstrained than the constrained as a result of constraints of the test fixture, and differences in impact velocity for the trailing side. The results of the current study suggest that in-laboratory rollover tests can be used to simulate the injury-causing portions of unconstrained rollover crashes. To date, such a demonstration has not yet been published in the open literature. This study did, however, show that road surface can affect vehicle response in a way that may not be able to be mimicked in the laboratory. Lastly, this study showed that configuring the in-laboratory tests to match the leading-side touchdown conditions

  2. Occupant Kinematics in Laboratory Rollover Tests: ATD Response and Biofidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Lessley, David L; Riley, Patrick; Toczyski, Jacek; Lockerby, Jack; Foltz, Patrick; Overby, Brian; Seppi, Jeremy; Crandall, Jeff R; Kerrigan, Jason R

    2014-11-01

    Rollover crashes are a serious public health problem in United States, with one third of traffic fatalities occurring in crashes where rollover occurred. While it has been shown that occupant kinematics affect the injury risk in rollover crashes, no anthropomorphic test device (ATD) has yet demonstrated kinematic biofidelity in rollover crashes. Therefore, the primary goal of this study was to assess the kinematic response biofidelity of six ATDs (Hybrid III, Hybrid III Pedestrian, Hybrid III with Pedestrian Pelvis, WorldSID, Polar II and THOR) by comparing them to post mortem human surrogate (PMHS) kinematic response targets published concurrently; and the secondary goal was to evaluate and compare the kinematic response differences among these ATDs. Trajectories (head, T1, T4, T10, L1 and sacrum), spinal segment (head-to-T1, T1-to-T4, T4-T10, T10-L1, and L1-to-sacrum) rotations relative to the rollover buck, and spinal segment extension/compression were calculated from the collected kinematics data from an optical motion tracking system. Response differences among the ATDs were observed mainly due to the different lateral bending stiffness of the spine from their varied architecture, while the additional thoracic joint in Polar II and THOR did not seem to provide more flexion/extension compliance than the other ATDs. In addition, the ATD response data were compared to PMHS response corridors developed from similar tests for assessing ATD biofidelity. All of the ATDs, generally, drifted outboard and upward during the tests similar to the PMHS. However, accompanied with this upward and outward motion, the ATD head and upper torso pitched forward (~10 degrees) while the PMHS' head and upper torso pitching rearward (~10 to ~15 degrees), due to the absence of flexion/extension compliance in the ATD spine. The differences in these pitch motions resulted in a difference of 130 mm to 160 mm in the longitudinal position of the head at 195 degrees of roll angle. Finally

  3. Development of a Refined Rollover Model That Recognizes the Effects of Suspension and Tire Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle rollover represents one of the most dangerous traffic accidents in the world. To improve the antirollover capability of a vehicle, we established an improved rollover model with a particular focus on the effects of independent suspensions and the lateral deformation of the tire. Based on this model, we further developed a new method to mitigate the rollover occurrence by adjusting the stiffness of the spring and the damping coefficient of the damper. Through simulation tests with a brand of SUV, we demonstrated that these adjustments improved the mitigation control as evidenced by better confined steady value and decreased overshoot of the roll angle.

  4. Field Tests of a Tractor Rollover Detection and Emergency Notification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Koc, A B

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the feasibility of a rollover detection and emergency notification system for farm tractors using field tests. The emergency notification system was developed based on a tractor stability model and implemented on a mobile electronic device with the iOS operating system. A complementary filter was implemented to combine the data from the accelerometer and gyroscope sensors to improve their accuracies in calculating the roll and pitch angles and the roll and pitch rates. The system estimates a stability index value during tractor operation, displays feedback messages when the stability index is lower than a preset threshold value, and transmits emergency notification messages when an overturn happens. Ten tractor rollover tests were conducted on a field track. The developed system successfully monitored the stability of the tractor during all of the tests. The iOS application was able to detect rollover accidents and transmit emergency notifications in the form of a phone call and email when an accident was detected. The system can be a useful tool for training and education in safe tractor operation. The system also has potential for stability monitoring and emergency notification of other on-road and off-road motorized vehicles.

  5. Evaluation Of Isometric Exercise Test And Roll-Over Test As Methods Of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdy Hassanzadeh Delui

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH which is one of the three main causes of maternal-neonatal morbidity and mortality is 5-7%, and prediction of this disorder is very important in maternal and neonatal health. Methods: The type of this study is analytical (comparative-prospective and its purpose is to evaluate the isometric exercise test (lET and roll-over test (ROT as methods ofPIH prediction. 116 nulliparaes, with study characteristics, after filling a questionaire and physical exam, underwent ROT, and then lET after 5 minutes, between 28-32 weeks of their pregnancy. The samples are followed up regularly until24 hr after delivery in Mashad university prenatal clinics and hospitals. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS with a: 0.05. Results: As a result, lET has a higher validity than ROT(sensitivity:78.9% vs. 47.4%, p<0.0001, specificity: 94.80 vs. 83.5%,p: 0.007,positivepredictivevalue: 75% vs. 36%,p: 0.0001, negative predictive value: 95.8% vs. 89%, p: 0.046, also validity of IETandROTtogetheris: sensitivity: 85.7%, specificity: 96.3%,PPV: 66.6% andNPV: 98.8%. Conclusion: The validity of lET in this study was shown to be higher than ROT, and by use of a very simple and cost -effective lET, we are able to predict PIH with the highest validity and if possible, use both tests in order to raise validity.

  6. Factors that influence chest injuries in rollovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digges, Kennerly; Eigen, Ana; Tahan, Fadi; Grzebieta, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    The design of countermeasures to reduce serious chest injuries for belted occupants involved in rollover crashes requires an understanding of the cause of these injuries and of the test conditions to assure the effectiveness of the countermeasures. This study defines rollover environments and occupant-to-vehicle interactions that cause chest injuries for belted drivers. The NASS-CDS was examined to determine the frequency and crash severity for belted drivers with serious (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] 3+) chest injuries in rollovers. Case studies of NASS crashes with serious chest injuries sustained by belted front occupants were undertaken and damage patterns were determined. Vehicle rollover tests with dummies were examined to determine occupant motion in crashes with damage similar to that observed in the NASS cases. Computer simulations were performed to further explore factors that could contribute to chest injury. Finite element model (FEM) vehicle models with both the FEM Hybrid III dummy and THUMS human model were used in the simulations. Simulation of rollovers with 6 quarter-turns or less indicated that increases in the vehicle pitch, either positive or negative, increased the severity of dummy chest loadings. This finding was consistent with vehicle damage observations from NASS cases. For the far-side occupant, the maximum chest loadings were caused by belt and side interactions during the third quarter-turn and by the center console loading during the fourth quarter-turn. The results showed that the THUMS dummy produced more realistic kinematics and improved insights into skeletal and chest organ loadings compared to the Hybrid III dummy. These results suggest that a dynamic rollover test to encourage chest injury reduction countermeasures should induce a roll of at least 4 quarter-turns and should also include initial vehicle pitch and/or yaw so that the vehicle's axis of rotation is not aligned with its inertial roll axis during the initial stage

  7. Improving the Response of a Rollover Sensor Placed in a Car under Performance Tests by Using a RLS Lattice Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmar Hernandez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a sensor to measure the rollover angle of a car under performance testsis presented. Basically, the sensor consists of a dual-axis accelerometer, analog-electronicinstrumentation stages, a data acquisition system and an adaptive filter based on a recursiveleast-squares (RLS lattice algorithm. In short, the adaptive filter is used to improve theperformance of the rollover sensor by carrying out an optimal prediction of the relevant signalcoming from the sensor, which is buried in a broad-band noise background where we have littleknowledge of the noise characteristics. The experimental results are satisfactory and show asignificant improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio at the system output.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of the occupant kinematic response of the THUMS 50th-percentile male model relative to PMHS laboratory rollover tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulard, David; Zhang, Qi; Cochran, Jack Ryan; Gepner, Bronislaw; Kerrigan, Jason

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the whole-body kinematic response of the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) occupant model in controlled laboratory rollover tests by comparing the model response to postmortem human surrogate (PMHS) kinematic response targets published in 2014. A computational model of the parametric vehicle buck environment was developed and the AM50 THUMS occupant model (Ver 4.01) was subjected to a pure dynamic roll at 360°/s in trailing-side front-row seating position. A baseline configuration was defined by a baseline posture representing the average of all PMHS postures, with a friction coefficient of 0.4 for the belt and 0.6 for the seat. To encompass challenges in controlling boundary conditions from the PMHS tests and ensure the robustness of the model evaluation, a total of 12 simulations were performed to investigate the following: 1. The effect of initial posture by adding 3 additional postures representing PMHS extremes. 2. The effect of belt tension by varying tension from the nominal vehicle retractor belt tension of 5 N to the 35 N belt tension used in the PMHS tests. 3. The effect of friction between the environment (belt, seat) and THUMS. Trajectories (head, T1, T4, T10, L1, and sacrum), spinal segment rotations (head-to-T1, T1-to-T4, T4-to-T10, T10-to-L1, and L1-to-sacrum) relative to the rollover buck and spinal segment elongation/compression calculated from the simulations were compared to PMHS corridors using a correlation method (CORA). THUMS baseline response showed lower correlation (overall CORA score = 0.63) with the PMHS response in rollover compared to other crash modes. THUMS and PMHS demonstrated similar kinematic responses in the longitudinal axis and vertical axis but significantly different lateral excursion relative to the seat. In addition, no spinal elongation was observed for THUMS compared to the PMHS. The posture, pretension, and belt frictions were found to alter model kinematics

  9. Study of an image-derived SUV and a modified SUV using mouse FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Xiujuan, E-mail: zhengxj@eie.polyu.edu.h [Department of Electronic Information Engineering, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Yu, Chin-Lung; Sha Wei; Radu, Caius; Huang, Sung-Cheng [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, CA (United States); Feng Dagan [Department of Electronic Information Engineering, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); School of Information Technologies, the University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: Standard uptake value (SUV) is calculated without consideration of the differences in plasma 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) clearance. Its variability can be affected by changes of the amount of excreted FDG by renal function. Moreover, the estimation of SUV is quite sensitive to errors in the measurements of body weight and injected dose. This study aims to develop an image-based method to obtain an image-derived SUV (iSUV) and a modified SUV (mSUV) to overcome these problems. Methods: Thirty-one tumor-planted SCID mice were scanned in micro-positron emission tomography (PET) at {approx}60 min post FDG injection and then scanned in micro-computed tomographic (CT). Using image-based method, the body weight and injected dose were derived from the microPET/CT images to calculate iSUV. The volumes and the total activities of FDG within the bladder and the whole-body were also obtained to calculate mSUV. For the selected targets, the iSUVs and mSUVs were compared against their corresponding SUVs. Results: Compared with SUV factor (injected dose/body weight), iSUV factor had an average percentage error of -0.7%. The linear regressions between SUV and iSUV had a slope of 0.99 with correlation coefficient of 0.95. Compared with SUV and iSUV, coefficient of variation of mSUV decreased while the tumor-to-background separation of mSUV increased. Conclusions: Using this image-based method, the iSUV can replace SUV when the actual measurements were missing or unreliable. The mSUV can reduce the inter-subject variability and enhance the tumor-to-background separation in mouse FDG-PET studies.

  10. Integrated chassis control for vehicle rollover prevention with neural network time-to-rollover warning metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Zhu; Qi Piao; Jian Zhao; Litong Guo

    2016-01-01

    The rollover of road vehicles is one of the most serious problems related to transportation safety. In this article, a novel rollover prevention control system composed of rollover warning and integrated chassis control algorithm is proposed. First, a conventional time-to-rollover warning algorithm was presented based on the 3-degree of freedom vehicle model. In order to improve the precision of vehicle rollover prediction, a back-propagation neural network was adopted to regulate time to rol...

  11. Reconstruction of a Rollover Crash for Thoracic Injury Etiology Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tana Tan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The cause of serious and fatal thoracic injuries in passenger vehicle rollover crashes is currently not well understood. Previous research on thoracic injuries resulting from rollover crashes have focused primarily on statistical analysis of crash data. This study seeks to develop a better understanding of where in the rollover sequence thoracic injuries may occur. To do this, a real-world passenger vehicle rollover crash where the driver sustained serious bilateral thoracic injuries was reconstructed. Multi-body analysis was used to determine the vehicle’s pre-trip trajectory and to obtain the vehicle’s position and kinematics at the point of trip. This information was then used to prescribe the motion of the vehicle in a finite element analysis. A finite element model of the EuroSID-2re anthropomorphic test device was placed in the driver’s seat. Four simulations, each with the anthropomorphic test device positioned in different postures, were performed. Rib deflection, spinal acceleration, and thoracic impact velocity were obtained from the anthropomorphic test device and compared to existing thoracic injury assessment reference values. From the analysis, lateral thoracic impact velocity indicates that a serious thoracic injury is likely to have occurred when the driver impacted the centre console during the vehicle’s fourth quarter-turn.

  12. Vehicle rollover sensor test modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCoy, R.W.; Chou, C.C.; Velde, R. van de; Twisk, D.; Schie, C. van

    2007-01-01

    A computational model of a mid-size sport utility vehicle was developed using MADYMO. The model includes a detailed description of the suspension system and tire characteristics that incorporated the Delft-Tyre magic formula description. The model was correlated by simulating a vehicle suspension

  13. Rollover: a methodology for restraint system development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altamore, P.F.; Ridella, S.A.; Nayef, A.

    2001-01-01

    Concern about crash conditions other than frontal and side crashes has accelerated restraint development with respect to rollover events. Previous analysis of rollover field data indicates the high probability of ejection and consequent serious injury or death to unbelted occupants. Partial ejection

  14. Integrated chassis control for vehicle rollover prevention with neural network time-to-rollover warning metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The rollover of road vehicles is one of the most serious problems related to transportation safety. In this article, a novel rollover prevention control system composed of rollover warning and integrated chassis control algorithm is proposed. First, a conventional time-to-rollover warning algorithm was presented based on the 3-degree of freedom vehicle model. In order to improve the precision of vehicle rollover prediction, a back-propagation neural network was adopted to regulate time to rollover online by considering multi-state parameters of the vehicle. Second, a rollover prevention algorithm based on integrated chassis control was investigated, where the active front steering and the active yaw moment control were coordinated by model predictive control methodology. Finally, the algorithms were evaluated under several typical maneuvers utilizing MATLAB/Simulink and Carsim co-simulation. The results show that the proposed neural network time-to-rollover metrics can be a good measure of the danger of rollover, and the roll stability of the simulated vehicle is improved significantly with reduced side slip angle and yaw rate by the proposed integrated chassis control rollover prevention system.

  15. A study of finite element modeling for simulation of vehicle rollover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhigui; Liu, Changye; Lv, Juncheng; Jia, Ligang; Sun, Haichao; Chen, Tao

    2017-04-01

    At present, the automobile ownership has been a very large figure, and growing rapidly with the social progress and development. Automobile has been one of the most important transportation in people's life. Accordingly, there are a large number of fatalities and serious injuries in traffic accident every year. Vehicle safety has been paid more and more attentions in recent years. There are several kinds of traffic accidents including frontal crash, side crash, etc., while rollover crash is a special kind. The vehicle rollover has the lowest incidence in the all kinds of traffic accidents but has the highest rate of seriously injuries, most of which lead to death. For these reasons, it is very necessary to study the vehicle rollover crash. However, it's so hard that there are a small amount of literatures studying rollover due to its variety, large degree of freedom, and difficulty to repeat and control. The method to investigate rollover crash contains experiment, the finite element method and rigid-body-based models. The finite element method contains many advantages such as low cost, repeatability, detailed data and so on, but the limitation is obvious. A test and simulation has been accomplished to study the FEM for vehicle rollover crash particularly in this paper.

  16. Factors affecting ejection risk in rollover crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Bain, Charles E; Wirth, Jeffrey L; Bonugli, Enrique B; Watson, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Ejection greatly increases the risk of injury and fatality in a rollover crash. The purpose of this study was to determine the crash, vehicle, and occupant characteristics that affect the risk of ejection in rollovers. Information from real world rollover crashes occurring from 2000 - 2010 was obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) in order to analyze the effect of the following parameters on ejection risk: seatbelt use, rollover severity, vehicle type, seating position, roof crush, side curtain airbag deployment, glazing type, and occupant age, gender, and size. Seatbelt use was found to reduce the risk of partial ejection and virtually eliminate the risk of complete ejection. For belted occupants, the risk of partial ejection risk was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, light trucks and vans (LTVs), and larger occupants. For unbelted occupants, the risk of complete ejection was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, LTVs, far side occupants, and higher levels of roof crush. Roof crush was not a significant predictor of ejection after normalizing for rollover severity. Curtain airbag deployment was associated with reduced rates of partial and complete ejection, but the effect was not statistically significant, perhaps due to the small sample size (n = 89 raw cases with curtain deployments). A much greater proportion of occupants who were ejected in spite of curtain airbag deployment passed through the sunroof and other portals as opposed to the adjacent side window compared to occupants who were ejected in rollovers without a curtain airbag deployment. The primary factors that reduce ejection risk in rollover crashes are, in generally decreasing order of importance: seatbelt use, fewer roof inversions, passenger car body type, curtain airbag deployment, near side seating position, and small occupant size.

  17. The MED-SUV Multidisciplinary Interoperability Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Paolo; D'Auria, Luca; Reitano, Danilo; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Roncella, Roberto; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Nativi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    In accordance with the international Supersite initiative concept, the MED-SUV (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes) European project (http://med-suv.eu/) aims to enable long-term monitoring experiment in two relevant geologically active regions of Europe prone to natural hazards: Mt. Vesuvio/Campi Flegrei and Mt. Etna. This objective requires the integration of existing components, such as monitoring systems and data bases and novel sensors for the measurements of volcanic parameters. Moreover, MED-SUV is also a direct contribution to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) as one the volcano Supersites recognized by the Group on Earth Observation (GEO). To achieve its goal, MED-SUV set up an advanced e-infrastructure allowing the discovery of and access to heterogeneous data for multidisciplinary applications, and the integration with external systems like GEOSS. The MED-SUV overall infrastructure is conceived as a three layer architecture with the lower layer (Data level) including the identified relevant data sources, the mid-tier (Supersite level) including components for mediation and harmonization , and the upper tier (Global level) composed of the systems that MED-SUV must serve, such as GEOSS and possibly other global/community systems. The Data level is mostly composed of existing data sources, such as space agencies satellite data archives, the UNAVCO system, the INGV-Rome data service. They share data according to different specifications for metadata, data and service interfaces, and cannot be changed. Thus, the only relevant MED-SUV activity at this level was the creation of a MED-SUV local repository based on Web Accessible Folder (WAF) technology, deployed in the INGV site in Catania, and hosting in-situ data and products collected and generated during the project. The Supersite level is at the core of the MED-SUV architecture, since it must mediate between the disparate data sources in the layer below, and provide a harmonized view to

  18. Analysis list: Suv39h1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Suv39h1 Pluripotent stem cell + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv...39h1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv39h1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bi...osciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv39h1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Suv39h

  19. Analysis list: Suv39h2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Suv39h2 Pluripotent stem cell + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv...39h2.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv39h2.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bi...osciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv39h2.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Suv39h

  20. MED-SUV Data Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangianantoni, Agata; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Spampinato, Letizia; Tulino, Sabrina

    2015-04-01

    The MED-SUV project aims to implement a digital e-infrastructure for data access in order to promote the monitoring and study of key volcanic regions prone to volcanic hazards, and thus improve hazard assessment, according to the rationale of Supersite GEO initiative to Vesuvius- Campi Flegrei and Mt Etna, currently identified as Permanent Supersites. The present study focuses on the life cycle of MED-SUV data generated in the first period of the project and highlights the managing approach, as well as the crucial steps to be implemented for ensuring that data will be properly and ethically managed and can be used and accessed from both MED-SUV and the external community. The process is conceived outlining how research data being handled as the project progresses, describing what data are collected, processed or generated and how these data are going to be shared and made available through Open Access. Data cycle begins with their generation and ends with the deposit in the digital infrastructure, its key series of stages through which MED-SUV data passes are Collection, Data citation, Categorization of data, Approval procedure, Registration of datasets, Application of licensing models, and PID assignment. This involves a combination of procedures and practices taking into account the scientific core mission and the priorities of the project as well as the potential legal issues related to the management and protection of the Intellectual Property. We believe that the implementation of this process constitutes a significant encouragement in MED-SUV data sharing and as a consequence a better understanding on the volcanic processes, hazard assessment and a better integration with other Supersites projects.

  1. Comparison of risk factors for cervical spine, head, serious, and fatal injury in rollover crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Manoogian, Sarah J

    2012-03-01

    Previous epidemiological studies of rollover crashes have focused primarily on serious and fatal injuries in general, while rollover crash testing has focused almost exclusively on cervical spine injury. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the risk factors for cervical spine, head, serious, and fatal injury in real world rollover crashes. Rollover crashes from 1995-2008 in the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) were investigated. A large data set of 6015 raw cases (2.5 million weighted) was generated. Nonparametric univariate analyses, univariate logistic regression, and multivariate logistic regression were conducted. Complete or partial ejection, a lack of seatbelt use, a greater number of roof inversions, and older occupant age significantly increased the risk of all types of injuries studied (pseating position increased the risk of fatal, head, and cervical spine injury (p<0.05), but not serious injury in general. Higher BMI was associated with an increased risk of fatal, serious, and cervical spine injury (p<0.05), but not head injury. Greater roof crush was associated with a higher rate of fatal and cervical spine injury (p<0.05). Vehicle type, occupant height, and occupant gender had inconsistent and generally non-significant effects on injury. This study demonstrates both common and unique risk factors for different types of injuries in rollover crashes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. New TA Index-Based Rollover Prevention System for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In addition to clean transportation and energy savings, electric vehicles can inherently offer better performance in the field of active safety and dynamic stability control, thanks to the superior fast and accurate control characteristics of electric motors. With the novel wheel status parameter TA for electric vehicles proposed by the authors in an earlier publication, a new TA index (TAI-based rollover prevention method is presented in this paper to improve the driving performance of EVs equipped with in-wheel motors. A three-level electric vehicle control structure is used to analyze the effective control steps for rollover prevention with the newly proposed TAI method. The simulation is conducted using an in-house developed electric vehicle dynamic model. The simulation results prove the feasibility of using TAI to detect rollover. The experiment uses an electric vehicle equipped with four in-wheel motors in the authors’ research lab. The vehicle parameter and performance data are imported to CarSim, which is industrial standard vehicle dynamic analysis software to run the rollover test. The experimental results also demonstrate that TAI is an effective method of rollover prevention.

  3. Study on Integrated Control of Vehicle Yaw and Rollover Stability Using Nonlinear Prediction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the integrated controller of the yaw and rollover stability controls based on the prediction model. A nonlinear 3-DoF vehicle model with a piecewise linearization tire model is built up as the rollover predictive model, and its accuracy is verified by vehicle tests. A yaw stability controller and a rollover stability controller are proposed, respectively. Then coordinated control strategy is investigated for the integration of vehicle yaw and roll stability controls. The additional yaw torque and braking torque of each wheel are calculated. The unified command of valves is sent combined with ABS control algorithm. Virtual tests in CarSim are carried out, including slalom condition and double-lane change condition. Results indicate that the coordinated control algorithm improves vehicle yaw and roll stability effectively.

  4. 49 CFR 575.105 - Vehicle rollover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY... are passenger car derivatives) which have a wheelbase of 110 inches or less and special features for... vehicle design features which cause this type of vehicles to be more likely to rollover (e.g., higher...

  5. Analysis of Large Truck Rollover Crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, A. James; Bahouth, George T.

    2008-01-01

    The Large Truck Crash Causation Study undertaken by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration describes 239 crashes in which a truck rolled over. In-depth analysis revealed almost half resulted from failing to adjust speed to curves in the road, (mostly on-and off-ramps), the load being carried, condition of the brakes, road surface, and intersection conditions. A second major crash contributor involved attention: simply being inattentive, dozing or falling asleep, and distraction, all leading to situations where a sudden direction change resulted in a rollover. The third large crash contributor involved steering: over-steering to the point of rolling over, not steering enough to stay in lane, and overcorrecting to the point of having to counter-steer to remain on the road. Finally, loads are a frequent problem when drivers fail to take account of their weight, height or security, or when loading takes place before they are assigned. Instruction in rollover prevention, like most truck driver training, comes through printed publications. The use of video would help drivers recognize incipient rollovers while currently available simulation would allow drivers to experience the consequences of mistakes without risk. PMID:19026244

  6. 77 FR 20442 - Sunwest Rollover Member LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... COMMISSION Sunwest Rollover Member LLC; Notice of Application March 29, 2012. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange... Act of 1940 (the ``Act''). SUMMARY: Summary of Application: Sunwest Rollover Member LLC (``Applicant... members of Applicant.\\2\\ Although Applicant is authorized to exist until December 31, 2020, Applicant...

  7. Safety restraint systems in heavy truck rollover scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaats, P.M.A.; Coo, P.J.A. de

    2003-01-01

    Safety restraint systems have been widely applied in the passenger car industry. The heavy truck industry has followed along, integrating the seat belts in the seat system. The effectiveness of seat belts, in particular in rollover scenarios, was studied for a number of heavy truck rollover

  8. Downregulation of histone methyltransferase genes SUV39H1 and SUV39H2 increases telomere length in embryonic stem-like cells and embryonic fibroblasts in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang-Nguyen, Thanh Quang; Haraguchi, Seiki; Furusawa, Tadashi; Somfai, Tamas; Kaneda, Masahiro; Watanabe, Shinya; Akagi, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Atsushi; Nagai, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Telomere is a nucleoprotein structure at the ends of chromosomes that helps to protect the ends of chromosomes from being fused with other chromosomes. Knockout of histone methyltransferases Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 increases the telomere length in murine cells, whereas downregulation of SUV39H1 and SUV39H2 genes decreases the telomere length in human cells, suggesting that telomere biology is different among mammalian species. However, epigenetic regulation of the telomere has not been studied in mammals other than the human and mouse. In the present study, the effect of knockdown of SUV39H1 and SUV39H2 genes on telomere length was examined in porcine embryonic stem-like cells (pESLCs) and porcine embryonic fibroblasts (PEFs). The telomeres in SUV39H1 and SUV39H2 knockdown (SUV39KD) pESLCs (37.1 ± 0.9 kb) were longer (Ptelomeres (22.1 ± 0.4 kb; Ptelomere elongation in SUV39KD pESLCs and SUV39KD PEFs. Relative levels of trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 9 and expressions of DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B were decreased in SUV39KD cells, suggesting that telomere lengthening in SUV39KD pESLCs and SUV39KD PEFs might be not only related to the loss of histone modification marks but also linked to the decrease in DNA methyltransferase in pigs.

  9. Determination of Selected Crash Parameters in Head-on Vehicle Collision with Rollover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Coufal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents complete results of the head-on small overlap crash test of vehicle with driver moving at a speed of approximately 12 m/s against stationary vehicle with post-crash rollover. When a crash does not involve the main crush-zone structures, the occupant compartment is not well protected. The emphasis in the paper was put on determination and presentation of crash parameters for the application in traffic accident analyses and for simulation with the help of software for accident reconstruction. The experimentally measured data from the crash test were analysed and important crash parameters which are necessary for accident reconstruction were obtained. The crash test was specific because of rollover of the impacting vehicle resulting from small overlap. The results have shown that small overlap accident is extremely dangerous for the crew with the possibility of vehicle rollover and occupant head and neck injury. Also in this case, at relative low speed, the driver suffered light neck and head injury in the following days and the longitudinal damage was relatively large. The input parameters for accident reconstruction software as the result of performed crash test were gained.

  10. Investigations on Vehicle Rollover Prevention Using LQG Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binda Mridula Balakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of an initial investigation into vehicle roll model and control strategies suitable for preventing vehicle untripped rollovers. For vehicles that are deemed to be susceptible to wheel-liftoff, various control strategies are implemented in simulation. In this study, the authors propose a method for rollover prevention that does not require such accurate contact information. The validity of the stability margin is shown, and it is used to realize rollover prevention in the direction of the roll. The primary assumption in their implementation is that the vehicle in question is equipped with a conventional controller system.

  11. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(31)-1 - Requirement to offer direct rollover of eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... rollover distributions; questions and answers. 1.401(a)(31)-1 Section 1.401(a)(31)-1 Internal Revenue... eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers. The following questions and answers relate to the...)? Questions and Answers Q-1: What are the direct rollover requirements under section 401(a)(31)? A-1: (a...

  12. Research and simulation on the rollover system of corn harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shizhuang; Cao, Shukun

    2017-01-01

    The structural characteristics of our country's corn harvester are narrow-track, high centroid and existence of eccentric distance, so rollover accident is easily to occur when driving in mountainous and hilly regions. In order to improve the design quality of corn harvester and enhance the security of operation, it is of great significance to research the rollover prevention system of the corn harvester. Hydro-pneumatic suspension has powerful function of adjusting the balance of automobile body and good shock absorption function. In this paper, hydro-pneumatic suspension is applied to the rollover prevention system of the corn harvester to improve the ability of anti-rollover. At last using ADAMS simulation technology to simulate the roll stability of traditional corn harvester and the corn harvester with hydro pneumatic suspension, then calculating the heeling angle in both cases.

  13. Rollover risk, liquidity, and macro-prudential regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahnert, Toni

    2014-01-01

    I study rollover risk in the wholesale funding market when intermediaries can hold liquidity ex-ante and are subject to fire sales ex-post. I demonstrate that precautionary liquidity restores multiple equilibria in a global rollover game. An intermediate liquidity level supports both the usual run equilibrium and an efficient equilibrium. I provide a uniqueness refinement to characterize the privately optimal liquidity choice. Because of fire sales, liquidity holdings are strategic substitute...

  14. APBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: SUV / Pick-up Truck Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, C; Weber, P; Thornton,M

    2003-08-24

    The objective of this project is to determine the influence of diesel fuel composition on the ability of NOX adsorber catalyst (NAC) technology, in conjunction with diesel particle filters (DPFs), to achieve stringent emissions levels with a minimal fuel economy impact. The test bed for this project was intended to be a light-duty sport utility vehicle (SUV) with a goal of achieving light-duty Tier 2-Bin 5 tail pipe emission levels (0.07 g/mi. NOX and 0.01 g/mi. PM). However, with the current US market share of light-duty diesel applications being so low, no US 2002 model year (MY) light-duty truck (LDT) or SUV platforms equipped with a diesel engine and having a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) less than 8500 lb exist. While the current level of diesel engine use is relatively small in the light-duty class, there exists considerable potential for the diesel engine to gain a much larger market share in the future as manufacturers of heavy light-duty trucks (HLDTs) attempt to offset the negative impact on cooperate average fuel economy (CAFE) that the recent rise in market share of the SUVs and LDTs has caused. The US EPA Tier 2 emission standards also contain regulation to prevent the migration of heavy light-duty trucks and SUV's to the medium duty class. This preventive measure requires that all medium duty trucks, SUV's and vans in the 8,500 to 10,000 lb GVWR range being used as passenger vehicles, meet light-duty Tier 2 standards. In meeting the Tier 2 emission standards, the HLDTs and medium-duty passenger vehicles (MDPVs) will face the greatest technological challenges. Because the MDPV is the closest weight class and application relative to the potential upcoming HLDTs and SUV's, a weight class compromise was made in this program to allow the examination of using a diesel engine with a NAC-DPF system on a 2002 production vehicle. The test bed for this project is a 2500 series Chevrolet Silverado equipped with a 6.6L Duramax diesel engine

  15. The influence of occupant anthropometry and seat position on ejection risk in a rollover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Theresa; Fras, Andrew; Telehowski, Paul

    2010-08-01

    During rollover crashes, ejection increases an occupant's risk of severe to fatal injury as compared to risks for those retained in the vehicle. The current study examined whether occupant anthropometry might influence ejection risk. Factors such as restraint use/disuse, seating position, vehicle type, and roll direction were also considered in the analysis. The current study examined occupant ejections in 10 years of National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) single-event rollovers of passenger vehicles and light trucks. Statistical analysis of unweighted and weighted ejection data was carried out. No statistically significant differences in ejection rates were found based on occupant height, age, or body mass index. Drivers were ejected significantly more frequently than other occupants: 62 percent of unrestrained drivers were ejected vs. 51 percent unrestrained right front occupants. Second row unrestrained occupants were ejected at rates similar to right front-seated occupants. There were no significant differences in ejection rates for near- vs. far-side occupants. These data suggest that assessment of ejection prevention systems using either a 50th or 5th percentile adult anthropomorphic test dummy (ATD) might provide a reasonable measure of system function for a broad range of occupants. They also support the development of ejection mitigation technologies that extend beyond the first row to protect occupants in rear seat positions. Future studies should consider potential interaction effects (i.e., occupant size and vehicle dimensions) and the influence of occupant size on ejection risk in non-single-event rollovers.

  16. The Mediterranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV) Project: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    In response to the EC call ENV.2012.6.4-2 (Long-term monitoring experiments in geologically active regions of Europe prone to natural hazards: the Supersite concept - FP7-ENV-2012-two-stage) a wide community of volcanological institutions proposed the project Mediterranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV), which is in the negotiation phase at the time of writing. The Consortium is composed by 18 European University and research institutes, four Small or Medium Enterprises (SME) and two non-European University and research institutes. MED-SUV will improve the consortium capacity of assessment of volcanic hazards in Supersites of Southern Italy by optimising and integrating existing and new observation/monitoring systems, by a breakthrough in understanding of volcanic processes and by increasing the effectiveness of the coordination between the scientific and end-user communities. More than 3 million of people are exposed to potential volcanic hazards in a large region in the Mediterranean Sea, where two among the largest European volcanic areas are located: Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius. This project will fully exploit the unique detailed long-term in-situ monitoring data sets available for these volcanoes and integrate with Earth Observation (EO) data, setting the basic tools for a significant step ahead in the discrimination of pre-, syn- and post-eruptive phases. The wide range of styles and intensities of volcanic phenomena observed on these volcanoes, which can be assumed as archetypes of 'closed conduit ' and 'open conduit' volcano, together with the long-term multidisciplinary data sets give an exceptional opportunity to improve the understanding of a very wide spectrum of geo-hazards, as well as implementing and testing a large variety of innovative models of ground deformation and motion. Important impacts on the European industrial sector are expected, arising from a partnership integrating the scientific community and SMEs to implement together new

  17. Sensitivity of head and cervical spine injury measures to impact factors relevant to rollover crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, G A; Mcintosh, A S; Grzebieta, R H; Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A

    2015-01-01

    Serious head and cervical spine injuries have been shown to occur mostly independent of one another in pure rollover crashes. In an attempt to define a dynamic rollover crash test protocol that can replicate serious injuries to the head and cervical spine, it is important to understand the conditions that are likely to produce serious injuries to these 2 body regions. The objective of this research is to analyze the effect that impact factors relevant to a rollover crash have on the injury metrics of the head and cervical spine, with a specific interest in the differentiation between independent injuries and those that are predicted to occur concomitantly. A series of head impacts was simulated using a detailed finite element model of the human body, the Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS), in which the impactor velocity, displacement, and direction were varied. The performance of the model was assessed against available experimental tests performed under comparable conditions. Indirect, kinematic-based, and direct, tissue-level, injury metrics were used to assess the likelihood of serious injuries to the head and cervical spine. The performance of the THUMS head and spine in reconstructed experimental impacts compared well to reported values. All impact factors were significantly associated with injury measures for both the head and cervical spine. Increases in impact velocity and displacement resulted in increases in nearly all injury measures, whereas impactor orientation had opposite effects on brain and cervical spine injury metrics. The greatest cervical spine injury measures were recorded in an impact with a 15° anterior orientation. The greatest brain injury measures occurred when the impactor was at its maximum (45°) angle. The overall kinetic and kinematic response of the THUMS head and cervical spine in reconstructed experiment conditions compare well with reported values, although the occurrence of fractures was overpredicted. The trends in predicted

  18. Variability of average SUV from several hottest voxels is lower than that of SUVmax and SUVpeak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laffon, E. [CHU de Bordeaux, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital du Haut-Leveque, Pessac (France); Universite de Bordeaux 2, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique, Bordeaux (France); INSERM U 1045, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique, Bordeaux (France); Lamare, F.; Clermont, H. de [CHU de Bordeaux, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital du Haut-Leveque, Pessac (France); Burger, I.A. [University Hospital of Zurich, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department Medical Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Marthan, R. [Universite de Bordeaux 2, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique, Bordeaux (France); INSERM U 1045, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique, Bordeaux (France)

    2014-08-15

    To assess variability of the average standard uptake value (SUV) computed by varying the number of hottest voxels within an {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG)-positive lesion. This SUV metric was compared with the maximal SUV (SUV{sub max}: the hottest voxel) and peak SUV (SUV{sub peak}: SUV{sub max} and its 26 neighbouring voxels). Twelve lung cancer patients (20 lesions) were analysed using PET dynamic acquisition involving ten successive 2.5-min frames. In each frame and lesion, average SUV obtained from the N = 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 or 30 hottest voxels (SUV{sub max-N}){sub ,} SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak} were assessed. The relative standard deviations (SDrs) from ten frames were calculated for each SUV metric and lesion, yielding the mean relative SD from 20 lesions for each SUV metric (SDr{sub N}, SDr{sub max} and SDr{sub peak}), and hence relative measurement error and repeatability (MEr-R). For each N, SDr{sub N} was significantly lower than SDr{sub max} and SDr{sub peak}. SDr{sub N} correlated strongly with N: 6.471 x N{sup -0.103} (r = 0.994; P < 0.01). MEr-R of SUV{sub max-30} was 8.94-12.63 % (95 % CL), versus 13.86-19.59 % and 13.41-18.95 % for SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak} respectively. Variability of SUV{sub max-N} is significantly lower than for SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}. Further prospective studies should be performed to determine the optimal total hottest volume, as voxel volume may depend on the PET system. (orig.)

  19. Rollover footwear affects lower limb biomechanics during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghany, Saeed; Nester, Christopher J; Richards, Barry; Hatton, Anna Lucy; Liu, Anmin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of rollover footwear on walking speed, metabolic cost of gait, lower limb kinematics, kinetics, EMG muscle activity and plantar pressure. Twenty subjects (mean age-33.1 years, height-1.71 m, body mass-68.9 kg, BMI 23.6, 12 male) walked in: a flat control footwear; a flat control footwear weighted to match the mass of a rollover shoe; a rollover shoe; MBT footwear. Data relating to metabolic energy and temporal aspects of gait were collected during 6 min of continuous walking, all other data in a gait laboratory. The rollover footwear moved the contact point under the shoe anteriorly during early stance, increasing midfoot pressures. This changed internal ankle dorsiflexion moments to plantarflexion moments earlier, reducing ankle plantarflexion and tibialis anterior activity after initial contact, and increasing calf EMG activity. In mid stance the rollover footwear resulted in a more dorsiflexed ankle position but less ankle movement. During propulsion, the rollover footwear reduced peak ankle dorsiflexion, peak internal plantarflexor ankle moments and the range of ankle plantarflexion. Vertical ground reaction loading rates were increased by the rollover footwear. There were no effects on temporal or energy cost of gait and no effect of elevated shoe weight. Investigating all proposed effects of this footwear concurrently has enabled a more valid investigation of how the footwear effects are interrelated. There were concurrent changes in several aspects of lower limb function, with greatest effects at the foot and ankle, but no change in the metabolic cost of walking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Intermediate Maneuver Induced Rollover Simulation (IMIRS) and Sensitivity Analysis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    This report describes the development of the Intermediate Maneuver Induced Rollover Simulation (IMIRS) which can be used to investigate the phenomenon of maneuver induced rollover of light vehicles. The IMIRS represents an enhancement of the existing...

  1. 49 CFR 571.220 - Standard No. 220; School bus rollover protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... result from failure of the school bus body structure to withstand forces encountered in rollover crashes... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard No. 220; School bus rollover protection... STANDARDS Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards § 571.220 Standard No. 220; School bus rollover protection...

  2. 26 CFR 1.402(c)-2 - Eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... § 1.402(c)-2 Eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers. The following questions and... look-back rollover limitation of section 408(d)(3)(B)? Questions and Answers Q-1: What is the rule... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Eligible rollover distributions; questions and...

  3. Siim Nestor soovitab : DJ Suv. Reaalsessioonid Tartus / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2001-01-01

    DJ Suv esineb koos MC Guyvoriga üritusel Dzhungli kellad 21. detsembril Kunstiakadeemias, hiljaaegu valmis tema soolo debüüt-LP "Desert Rose". 21. detsembril Tartu klubis Illegaard toimuvast CD-kogumiku "Tallinn: psühhedeelne linn" esitlus-kontsert-peost

  4. Comparative roll-over analysis of prosthetic feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtze, Carolin; Hof, At L; van Keeken, Helco G; Halbertsma, Jan P K; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2009-08-07

    A prosthetic foot is a key element of a prosthetic leg, literally forming the basis for a stable and efficient amputee gait. We determined the roll-over characteristics of a broad range of prosthetic feet and examined the effect of a variety of shoes on these characteristics. The body weight of a person acting on a prosthetic foot during roll-over was emulated by means of an inverted pendulum-like apparatus. Parameters measured were the effective radius of curvature, the forward travel of the center of pressure, and the instantaneous radius of curvature of the prosthetic feet. Finally, we discuss how these parameters relate to amputee gait.

  5. PET SUV correlates with radionuclide uptake in peptide receptor therapy in meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenscheid, Heribert; Buck, Andreas K.; Samnick, Samuel; Kreissl, Michael [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Flentje, Michael [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Loehr, Mario [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Wuerzburg (Germany); Verburg, Frederik A. [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    To investigate whether the tumour uptake of radionuclide in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) of meningioma can be predicted by a PET scan with {sup 68}Ga-labelled somatostatin analogue. In this pilot trial, 11 meningioma patients with a PET scan indicating somatostatin receptor expression received PRRT with 7.4 GBq {sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC or {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE, followed by external beam radiotherapy. A second PET scan was scheduled for 3 months after therapy. During PRRT, multiple whole-body scans and a SPECT/CT scan of the head and neck region were acquired and used to determine the kinetics and dose in the voxel with the highest radionuclide uptake within the tumour. Maximum voxel dose and retention of activity 1 h after administration in PRRT were compared to the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) in the meningiomas from the PET scans before and after therapy. The median SUV{sub max} in the meningiomas was 13.7 (range 4.3 to 68.7), and the maximum fractional radionuclide uptake in voxels of size 0.11 cm{sup 3} was a median of 23.4 x 10{sup -6} (range 0.4 x 10{sup -6} to 68.3 x 10{sup -6}). A strong correlation was observed between SUV{sub max} and the PRRT radionuclide tumour retention in the voxels with the highest uptake (Spearman's rank test, P < 0.01). Excluding one patient who showed large differences in biokinetics between PET and PRRT and another patient with incomplete data, linear regression analysis indicated significant correlations between SUV{sub max} and the therapeutic uptake (r = 0.95) and between SUV{sub max} and the maximum voxel dose from PRRT (r = 0.76). Observed absolute deviations from the values expected from regression were a median of 5.6 x 10{sup -6} (maximum 9.3 x 10{sup -6}) for the voxel fractional radionuclide uptake and 0.40 Gy per GBq (maximum 0.85 Gy per GBq) {sup 177}Lu for the voxel dose from PRRT. PET with {sup 68}Ga-labelled somatostatin analogues allows the pretherapeutic assessment of tumour

  6. Determination of Selected Crash Parameters in Head-on Vehicle Collision with Rollover

    OpenAIRE

    Coufal, Tomáš; Semela, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents complete results of the head-on small overlap crash test of vehicle with driver moving at a speed of approximately 12 m/s against stationary vehicle with post-crash rollover. When a crash does not involve the main crush-zone structures, the occupant compartment is not well protected. The emphasis in the paper was put on determination and presentation of crash parameters for the application in traffic accident analyses and for simulation with the help of software for acciden...

  7. Comparative roll-over analysis of prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtze, Carolin; Hof, At L.; van Keeken, Helco G.; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2009-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is a key element of a prosthetic leg, literally forming the basis for a stable and efficient amputee gait. We determined the roll-over characteristics of a broad range of prosthetic feet and examined the effect of a variety of shoes on these characteristics. The body weight of a

  8. Determining asymmetry of roll-over shapes in prosthetic walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtze, C.; Otten, Bert; Hof, A.L.; Postema, K.

    2011-01-01

    How does the inherent asymmetry of the locomotor system in people with lower-limb amputation affect the ankle-foot roll-over shape of prosthetic walking? In a single-case design, we evaluated the walking patterns of six people with lower-limb amputation (3 transtibial and 3 transfemoral) and three

  9. Downregulation of Histone Methyltransferase Genes SUV39H1 and SUV39H2 Increases Telomere Length in Embryonic Stem-like Cells and Embryonic Fibroblasts in Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    DANG-NGUYEN, Thanh Quang; Haraguchi, Seiki; FURUSAWA, Tadashi; SOMFAI, Tamas; Kaneda, Masahiro; Watanabe, Shinya; AKAGI, Satoshi; KIKUCHI, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Atsushi; Nagai, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Telomere is a nucleoprotein structure at the ends of chromosomes that helps to protect the ends of chromosomes from being fused with other chromosomes. Knockout of histone methyltransferases Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 increases the telomere length in murine cells, whereas downregulation of SUV39H1 and SUV39H2 genes decreases the telomere length in human cells, suggesting that telomere biology is different among mammalian species. However, epigenetic regulation of the telomere has not been s...

  10. MEditerranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV) project: from objectives to results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Spampinato, Letizia

    2017-04-01

    The MEditerranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV) was a FP7 3-year lasting project aimed at improving the assessment of volcanic hazards at two of the most active European volcanic areas - Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius and Mt. Etna. More than 3 million people are exposed to potential hazards in the two areas, and the geographic location of the volcanoes increases the number of people extending the impact to a wider region. MED-SUV worked on the (1) optimisation and integration of the existing and new monitoring systems, (2) understanding of volcanic processes, and on the (3) relationship between the scientific and end-user communities. MED-SUV fully exploited the unique multidisciplinary long-term in-situ datasets available for these volcanoes and integrated them with Earth observations. Technological developments and implemented algorithms allowed better constraint of pre-, sin- and post-eruptive phases. The wide range of styles and intensities of the volcanic phenomena observed at the targeted volcanoes - archetypes of 'closed' and 'open' conduit systems - observed by using the long-term multidisciplinary datasets, exceptionally upgraded the understanding of a variety of geo-hazards. Proper experiments and studies were carried out to advance the understanding of the volcanoes' internal structure and processes, and to recognise signals related to impending unrest/eruptive phases. Indeed, the hazard quantitative assessment benefitted from the outcomes of these studies and from their integration with cutting edge monitoring approaches, thus leading to step-changes in hazard awareness and preparedness, and leveraging the close relationship between scientists, SMEs, and end-users. Among the MED-SUV achievements, we can list the (i) implementation of a data policy compliant with the GEO Open Data Principles for ruling the exploitation and shared use of the project outcomes; (ii) MED-SUV e-infrastructure creation as test bed for designing an interoperable infrastructure to

  11. Performance Investigation of an Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator for Military SUV Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Quan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the thermoelectric power generation for sports utility vehicle (SUV application, a novel thermoelectric generator (TEG based on low-temperature Bi2Te3 thermoelectric modules (TEMs and a chaos-shaped brass heat exchanger is constructed. The temperature distribution of the TEG is analyzed based on an experimental setup, and the temperature uniformity optimization method is performed by chipping peak off and filling valley is taken to validate the improved output power. An automobile exhaust thermoelectric generator (AETEG using four TEGs connected thermally in parallel and electrically in series is assembled into a prototype military SUV, its temperature distribution, output voltage, output power, system efficiency, inner resistance, and backpressure is analyzed, and several important influencing factors such as vehicle speed, clamping pressure, engine coolant flow rate, and ambient temperature on its output performance are tested. Experimental results demonstrate that higher vehicle speed, larger clamping pressure, faster engine coolant flow rate and lower ambient temperature can enhance the overall output performance, but the ambient temperature and coolant flow rate are less significant. The maximum output power of AETEG is 646.26 W, the corresponding conversion efficiency is 1.03%, and the increased backpressure changes from 1681 Pa to 1807 Pa when the highest vehicle speed is 125 km/h.

  12. Obtention and application of recovery coefficients in SUV values to quality control in PET equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Cássio Miri; Sá, Lídia V. de; Santana, Priscila do Carmo; Mamede, Marcelo; Silva, Teógenes A. da, E-mail: cassio.miri@unifesp.br, E-mail: lidia@ird.gov.br, E-mail: mamede.mm@gmail.com, E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Departmento de Diagnose por Imagem; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The functional imaging technique Positron Emission Tomography (PET) using the radiopharmaceutical fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) has been demonstrated an important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer tumors. However, the standard uptake values (SUV) quantification of a 'lesion' or a hot spot is influenced by partial volume effects (PVE). This is particularly important for evaluating solid tumour response to therapy, where SUV quantification could indicate treatment efficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake correction in two image quantification modes (SUVmaximum and SUVmedium) through recovery coefficients (RC) application. The NEMA/IEC Body Phantom simulator was used and tested for an activity ratio lesion to background of 4:1, and at different acquisition times. The images quantification was performed with OsiriX® software. The obtained RCs were applied to the phantom images. The obtained SUVmedium values corrected by RCs presented satisfactory results, demonstrating small differences (1.1% a 2.3%) in relation to previously known SUVreference values. This did not occur for corrected SUVmaximum values where differences of up to 27.0% were observed between these and SUVreference values. These results demonstrate that the PVE correction by SUVmedium can more adequate to evaluate tumor's uptake. Therefore, this parameter should be used for equipment quality control in order to evaluate the response and degree of agreement between equipment. (author)

  13. 5 CFR 1600.32 - Methods for transferring eligible rollover distribution to TSP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... rollover distribution to TSP. 1600.32 Section 1600.32 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT... Retirement Plans § 1600.32 Methods for transferring eligible rollover distribution to TSP. (a) Trustee-to... plan transfer any or all of their account directly to the TSP by executing and submitting a Form TSP-60...

  14. 26 CFR 31.3405(c)-1 - Withholding on eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; questions and answers. 31.3405(c)-1 Section 31.3405(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Withholding on eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers. The following questions and answers... received in a direct rollover? Questions and Answers Q-1: What are the withholding requirements under...

  15. Ratio of mediastinal lymph node SUV to primary tumor SUV in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for nodal staging in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Hyuk; Choe, Jae Gol; Pahk, Kisoo; Choi, Sun Ju; Kwon, Hye Ryeong; Kim, Sun Geun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Jae Seon; Seo, Hyo Jung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chul Han [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Following determination of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of the mediastinal lymph nodes (SUV-LN) and of the primary tumor (SUV-T) on 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the aim of the study was to determine the value of the SUV-LN/SUV-T ratio in lymph node staging in comparison with that of SUV-LN. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 289 mediastinal lymph node stations from 98 patients with NSCLC who were examined preoperatively for staging and subsequently underwent pathologic studies of the mediastinal lymph nodes. We determined SUV-LN and SUV-R for each lymph node station on 18F-FDG PET/CT and then classified each station into one of three groups based on SUV-T (low, medium and high SUV-T groups). Diagnostic performance was assessed based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and the optimal cut-off values that would best discriminate metastatic from benign lymph nodes were determined for each method. The average of SUV-R of malignant lymph nodes was significantly higher than that of benign lymph nodes (0.79 ± 0.45 vs. 0.36 ± 0.23, P < 0.0001). In the ROC curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) of SUV-R was significantly higher than that of SUV-LN in the low SUV-T group (0.885 vs. 0.810, P = 0.019). There were no significant differences between the AUCs of SUV-LN and of SUV-R in the medium and high SUV-T groups. The optimal cut-off value for SUV-R in the low SUV-T group was 0.71 (sensitivity 87.5 %, specificity 85.9 %). The SUV-R performed well in distinguishing between metastatic and benign lymph nodes. In particular, SUV-R was found to have a better diagnostic performance than SUV-LN in the low SUV-T group.

  16. Towards a multidisciplinary e-infrastructure for the Mediterranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nativi, Stefano; Mathieu, Pierre Philippe; Cossu, Roberto; Santoto, Mattia; Martini, Marcello; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The MED-SUV European project (http://med-suv.eu/) aims to design and implement a multidisciplinary infrastructure for the volcanic risk management life-cycle in southern Italy. The MED-SUV infrastructure will rely upon the improvements of the understanding of geophysical processes underlying the volcanic systems of Vesuvius / Campi Flegrei and Mt. Etna. It will also achieve the integration of existing components, such as monitoring systems and data bases, novel sensors for the measurements of volcanic parameters, and tools for data analysis and process modelling. This effort will contribute to GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems - http://www.earthobservations.org/geoss.shtml) as one the volcano Supersite recognized by GEO (Group on Earth Observation) -see http://supersites.earthobservations.org/. To achieve its goals, MED-SUV needs an advanced e-infrastructure allowing: (a) heterogeneous data and processing systems to provide and share their resources, and (b) supersite Users to run their workflows and generate significant products. This presentation discusses the general interoperability approach and architecture characterizing the MED-SUV e-infrastructure. The MED-SUV e-infrastructure considered the concepts and solutions adopted by the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI). The architecture requirements and system technologies builds on the experience done by relevant European projects in the framework of GEOSS and ESFRI (e.g. EuroGEOSS, GENESI, GEOWOW). MED-SUV e-infrastructure adopts three-tiers approach distinguishing among: (a) local and distributed Data/Information Providers; (b) the MED-SUV Brokering framework for harmonization and interoperability; (c) the MED-SUV e-collaboration environment for the generation and publication of advanced products. MED-SUV e-infrastructure development considers interoperability with the other two FP7 supersite projects: MARSITE and FUTUREVOLC, as well as EPOS.

  17. Suv39h1 Protects from Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with diabetes are at increased risk of ischemic events. Suv39h1 is a histone methyltransferase that catalyzes the methylation of histone 3 lysine 9, which is associated with the suppression of inflammatory genes in diabetes. However, the role of Suv39h1 in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury under diabetic condition has not been evaluated. Methods: To generate diabetic model, male SD rats were fed with 60% fat diet followed by intraperitoneal injection with 40mg/kg streptozotocin. Adenovirus encoding Suv39h1 gene was used for Suv39h1 overexpression. Each rat received injections of adenovirus at five myocardial sites. Three days after gene transfection, each rat was subjected to left main coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion. After 30 min ischemia and reperfusion for 4 h, the rats were euthanized for real-time PCR, Western blot, immunohistochemical staining, and morphometric analysis. Results: Delivery of Ad-Suv39h1 into the hearts of diabetic rats could markedly increase Suv39h1 expression. Up-regulation of Suv39h1 significantly reduced infarct size and tissue damage after I/R injury, which was associated with protection from apoptosis of cardiac myocytes and reduction of inflammatory response. In addition, compared with injury group, Ad-Suv39h1 led to a decreased activity of mitogen-activated protein kinase family and its down-steam transcriptional factor NF-κB. Conclusion: Overexpression of Suv39h1 results in the de-activation of proinflammatory pathways and reduced apoptosis and myocardial injury. Therefore, Suv39h1 might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce I/R injury under diabetic condition.

  18. Research and simulation of anti - rollover technology of harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shizhuang; Cao, Shukun

    2017-09-01

    The structural characteristics of our country’s corn harvester are narrow-track, high centroid and existence of eccentric distance, so rollover accident is easily to occur when going up and down the hills mountainous and hilly regions for complex terrain. In the previous paper, we introduced the Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension to prevent the roller of the harvester, and took ADAMS simulation on the left and right roller, and obtained that the use of Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension can improve the side angle of the harvester for 5°. At the same time, we continue to use the Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension as the key part of the anti-roller system of the harvester. In the uphill and downhill case of the harvester, we respectively simulated the anti-roller performance on the traditional harvester and the harvester installing the Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension. Finally, we got that the anti-roller angle of the harvester installed Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension is obviously higher than the traditional harvester, which indicates that the anti-rollover performance of the harvester installed Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension is better than the traditional harvester. The data obtained from this experiment will provide technical support for the following structure optimization of the harvester.

  19. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Suv39h1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Suv39h2.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  14. A comprehensive review of rollover accidents involving vehicles equipped with Electronic Stability Control (ESC) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanaban, Jeya; Shields, Leland E; Scheibe, Robert R; Eyges, Vitaly E

    2008-10-01

    This study investigated 478 police accident reports from 9 states to examine and characterize rollover crashes involving ESC-equipped vehicles. The focus was on the sequence of critical events leading to loss of control and rollover, and the interactions between the accident, driver, and environment. Results show that, while ESC is effective in reducing loss of control leading to certain rollover crashes, its effectiveness is diminished in others, particularly when the vehicle departs the roadway or when environmental factors such as slick road conditions or driver factors such as speeding, distraction, fatigue, impairment, or overcorrection are present.

  15. New roles of the human Suv3 helicase in genome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venø, Susanne Trillingsgaard

    During her PhD studies, Susanne Trillingsgaard Venø carried out research into the role of the human Suv3 protein in stabilising the human genome – DNA. Suv3 is a helicase that separates the two strands of the DNA’s double helix. Throughout our lives, the DNA in our cells is constantly exposed to ...... maintenance. Based on these new research results, the Suv3 protein could be a valuable model for genome stability as an important factor in our understanding of why we get old....

  16. Truck Rollover Characterization for Class-8 Tractor-Trailers Utilizing Standard Dual Tires and New-Generation Single Tires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Gary [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Transportation Research Center; Knee, Bill [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Transportation Research Center; Franzese, Oscar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Transportation Research Center; Pollock, Paul [Dana Corporation, Kalamazoo, MI (United States). Commercial Vehicle Systems Division; Coleman, Daniel [Dana Corporation, Kalamazoo, MI (United States). Commercial Vehicle Systems Division; Janajreh, Ibrahim [Michelin Americas Research and Development Corporation, Greenville, SC (United States); Haas, Steven [Michelin Americas Research and Development Corporation, Greenville, SC (United States); Frey, Norm [Michelin Americas Research and Development Corporation, Greenville, SC (United States); Law, Harry [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Fluor Daniel Engineering Innovation Building; Johnson, Eric [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Fluor Daniel Engineering Innovation Building; Lawson, Robert [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Fluor Daniel Engineering Innovation Building; Petrolino, Joe [National Transportation Research Center, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Rice, Dave [National Transportation Research Center, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2005-07-30

    The Heavy Truck Rollover Characterization Project is a major research effort conducted by the National Transportation Research Center, Inc. (NTRCI) in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Dana Corporation (Dana), Michelin Americas Research and Development Corporation (Michelin) and Clemson University (Clemson), under the NTRCIs Heavy Vehicle Safety Research Center (HVSRC) for the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). ORNL provided the day-to-day management of the project. The expertise mix of this team coupled with complementary research needs and interests, and a positive can-do attitude provided an extremely positive experimental research opportunity for all involved. Furthermore, this team supplied significant and valuable resources that provided a strong positive benchmark regarding the ability to conduct research within a public-private partnership. The work conducted by this team focused on initial efforts to generate data and information on heavy truck rollover not currently available in the industry. It reflects efforts within Phases 1 and 2 of a longer-term four-phase research program. A 1999 Peterbilt 379 class-8 tractor and 2004 Wabash dry freight van trailer were the test vehicles utilized in this effort. Both were instrumented with a number of sensors to capture the dynamics of the tractor and trailer as it engaged in various testing maneuvers that included: an evasive maneuver, swept sine, constant radius, and a run-off-the-road maneuver. The run-off-the-road maneuver was discontinued because the test track could not safety accommodate such a maneuver. These maneuvers were carried out utilizing both standard dual tires and new-generation dual tires in six test series. Two test series also included the use of a wider-slider suspension. Outriggers were placed on the test vehicle to assure that an actual rollover would not occur, however, the tests were designed to generate lift-off of tires during the tests. One of the main objectives

  17. Diffusion weighted MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Does the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) correlate with tracer uptake (SUV)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regier, M., E-mail: mregier@uke.uni-hamburg.de [Center for Radiology and Endoscopy, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Derlin, T. [Center for Radiology and Endoscopy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Schwarz, D.; Laqmani, A.; Henes, F.O.; Groth, M.; Buhk, J.-H. [Center for Radiology and Endoscopy, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Kooijman, H. [Philips Healthcare, Clinical Application, Luebeckertordamm 5, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Adam, G. [Center for Radiology and Endoscopy, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Introduction: To investigate the potential correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient assessed by diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and glucose metabolism determined by the standardized uptake value (SUV) at 18F-FDG PET/CT in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: 18F-FDG PET/CT and DWI (TR/TE, 2000/66 ms; b-values, 0 and 500 s/mm{sup 2}) were performed in 41 consecutive patients with histologically verified NSCLC. Analysing the PET-CT data calculation of the mean (SUV{sub mean}) and maximum (SUV{sub max}) SUV was performed. By placing a region-of-interest (ROI) encovering the entire tumor mean (ADC{sub mean}) and minimum ADC (ADC{sub min}) were determined by two independent radiologists. Results of 18F-FDG PET-CT and DWI were compared on a per-patient basis. For statistical analysis Pearson's correlation coefficient, Bland–Altman and regression analysis were assessed. Results: Data analysis revealed a significant inverse correlation of the ADC{sub min} and SUV{sub max} (r = −0.46; p = 0.032). Testing the correlation of the ADC{sub min} and SUV{sub max} for each histological subtype separately revealed that the inverse correlation was good for both adenocarcinomas (r = −0.47; p = 0.03) and squamouscell carcinomas (r = −0.71; p = 0.002), respectively. No significant correlation was found for the comparison of ADC{sub min} and SUV{sub mean} (r = −0.29; p = 0.27), ADC{sub mean} vs. SUV{sub mean} (r = −0.28; p = 0.31) or ADC{sub mean} vs. SUV{sub max} (r = −0.33; p = 0.23). The κ-value of 0.88 indicated a good agreement between both observers. Conclusion: This preliminary study is the first to verify the relation between the SUV and the ADC in NSCLC. The significant inverse correlation of these two quantitative imaging approaches points out the association of metabolic activity and tumor cellularity. Therefore, DWI with ADC measurement might represent a new prognostic marker in NSCLC.

  18. Severity models of cross-median and rollover crashes on rural divided highways in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen; Donnell, Eric T

    2011-10-01

    Crossover and rollover crashes in earth-divided, traversable medians on rural divided highways can lead to severe injury outcomes. This study estimated severity models of these two crash types. Vehicle, driver, roadway, and median cross-section design data were factors considered in the models. A unique aspect of the data used to estimate the models were the availability of median cross-slope data, which are not commonly included in roadway inventory data files. A binary logit model of cross-median crash severity and a multinomial logit model of rollover crash severity were estimated using five years of data from rural divided highways in Pennsylvania. The highest probability of a fatal or major injury in cross-median and rollover crashes was found to occur in cases when a driver was not wearing a seatbelt. While flatter cross-slopes and narrower medians were associated with more severe cross-median crash outcomes, steeper cross-slopes and narrower medians significantly increased rollover crash severity outcomes. The presence of horizontal curves was associated with increased probabilities of high-severity outcomes in a median rollover crash. Modeling results in this study confirmed that cross-median and median rollover crash severity outcomes are associated with median cross-section design characteristics. Based on the estimated models, it appears that flatter and narrower medians lead to more severe injury outcomes in cross-median crashes. Steeper median cross-slopes and narrower medians were associated with higher probabilities of more severe outcomes in median rollover crashes. The results presented in this study suggest that there is a trade-off between median cross-section design and cross-median and rollover crashes in earth-divided, traversable medians on rural divided highways. While the severity models can be included in a framework to develop design guidance in relation to this trade-off, models of crash frequency should also be considered. Copyright

  19. A LQR-Based Controller with Estimation of Road Bank for Improving Vehicle Lateral and Rollover Stability via Active Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Riofrio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR lateral stability and rollover controller has been developed including as the main novelty taking into account the road bank angle and using exclusively active suspension for both lateral stability and rollover control. The main problem regarding the road bank is that it cannot be measured by means of on-board sensors. The solution proposed in this article is performing an estimation of this variable using a Kalman filter. In this way, it is possible to distinguish between the road disturbance component and the vehicle’s roll angle. The controller’s effectiveness has been tested by means of simulations carried out in TruckSim, using an experimentally-validated vehicle model. Lateral load transfer, roll angle, yaw rate and sideslip angle have been analyzed in order to quantify the improvements achieved on the behavior of the vehicle. For that purpose, these variables have been compared with the results obtained from both a vehicle that uses passive suspension and a vehicle using a fuzzy logic controller.

  20. Strategy study of quantification harmonization of SUV in PET/CT images; Estudo da estrategia de harmonizacao da quantificacao do SUV em imagens de PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Andreia Caroline Fischer da Silveira

    2014-07-01

    In clinical practice, PET/CT images are often analyzed qualitatively by visual comparison of tumor lesions and normal tissues uptake; and semi-quantitatively by means of a parameter called SUV (Standardized Uptake Value). To ensure that longitudinal studies acquired on different scanners are interchangeable, and information of quantification is comparable, it is necessary to establish a strategy to harmonize the quantification of SUV. The aim of this study is to evaluate the strategy to harmonize the quantification of PET/CT images, performed with different scanner models and manufacturers. For this purpose, a survey of the technical characteristics of equipment and acquisition protocols of clinical images of different services of PET/CT in the state of Rio Grande do Sul was conducted. For each scanner, the accuracy of SUV quantification, and the Recovery Coefficient (RC) curves were determined, using the reconstruction parameters clinically relevant and available. From these data, harmonized performance specifications among the evaluated scanners were identified, as well as the algorithm that produces, for each one, the most accurate quantification. Finally, the most appropriate reconstruction parameters to harmonize the SUV quantification in each scanner, either regionally or internationally were identified. It was found that the RC values of the analyzed scanners proved to be overestimated by up to 38%, particularly for objects larger than 17mm. These results demonstrate the need for further optimization, through the reconstruction parameters modification, and even the change of the reconstruction algorithm used in each scanner. It was observed that there is a decoupling between the best image for PET/CT qualitative analysis and the best image for quantification studies. Thus, the choice of reconstruction method should be tied to the purpose of the PET/CT study in question, since the same reconstruction algorithm is not adequate, in one scanner, for qualitative

  1. The impact of replacing heavy passenger vehicles (LTVs and SUVs) in the British Columbia fleet with lighter versions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Peter J; Zheng, Yvonne; Andersen, Linda; Pellegrini, Nicole

    2009-10-01

    The study reported in this article addressed the potential safety impact of consumer movement toward smaller vehicle choices by examining the makeup of the full British Columbia (BC) vehicle fleet--from smaller cars to heavy commercial vehicles. The basic assumption made was that some operators of heavy light trucks/vans (LTVs) or sport utility vehicles (SUVs) would, in the short term, be induced to downsize to lighter vehicles of the same type. The 2000-2007 BC crash-claim data at the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) was used to create matrices of average information by culpable and nonculpable entities in two-vehicle collisions in 15 weight categories. Models for the effects of various driver/crash characteristics on injury potential were created and used to adjust the effect calculated solely on the basis of weight change. Levels of heavy LTV/SUV replacement from 0.05 to 0.95 of the current population were tested and the redistribution of vehicles was done in such a way that the relationship between small-large vehicle injury ratio and large-small vehicle mass ratio over the whole fleet remained constant as did the relative proportions of culpable and nonculpable involvements. The net effect of downsizing in the manner assumed for this study was mildly positive in terms of overall injury risk--that is, downsizing resulted in slightly fewer total injuries--but not in the case of fatalities, which tended to be increased by a more substantial margin. However, the results showed that even replacing substantial proportions of the heavy LTV/SUV population would not result in a large impact on safety. Replacing almost all the heavy LTV/SUVs with lighter versions should reduce injuries by less than 1 percent and increase fatalities by 3.5 percent percent. Nevertheless, in terms of persons impacted and the associated costs, the effects would be noticeable. The issue for policy-makers is to judge how the environmental benefits associated with encouraging

  2. Normal SUV values measured from NaF18- PET/CT bone scan studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Zaw; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2014-01-01

    Cancer and metabolic bone diseases can alter the SUV. SUV values have never been measured from healthy skeletons in NaF18-PET/CT bone scans. The primary aim of this study was to measure the SUV values from normal skeletons in NaF18-PET/CT bone scans. A retrospective study was carried out involving NaF18- PET/CT bone scans that were done at our institution between January 2010 to May 2012. Our excluding criteria was patients with abnormal real function and patients with past history of cancer and metabolic bone diseases including but not limited to osteoporosis, osteopenia and Paget's disease. Eleven studies met all the criteria. The average normal SUVmax values from 11 patients were: cervical vertebrae 6.84 (range 4.38-8.64), thoracic vertebrae 7.36 (range 6.99-7.66), lumbar vertebrae 7.27 (range 7.04-7.72), femoral head 2.22 (range 1.1-4.3), humeral head 1.82 (range 1.2-2.9), mid sternum 5.51 (range 2.6-8.1), parietal bone 1.71 (range 1.3-2.4). According to our study, various skeletal sites have different normal SUV values. SUV values can be different between the normal bones and bones with tumor or metabolic bone disease. SUV can be used to quantify NaF-18 PET/CT studies. If the SUV values of the normal skeleton are known, they can be used in the characterization of bone lesions and in the assessment of treatment response to bone diseases.

  3. Normal SUV values measured from NaF18- PET/CT bone scan studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Zaw Win

    Full Text Available Cancer and metabolic bone diseases can alter the SUV. SUV values have never been measured from healthy skeletons in NaF18-PET/CT bone scans. The primary aim of this study was to measure the SUV values from normal skeletons in NaF18-PET/CT bone scans.A retrospective study was carried out involving NaF18- PET/CT bone scans that were done at our institution between January 2010 to May 2012. Our excluding criteria was patients with abnormal real function and patients with past history of cancer and metabolic bone diseases including but not limited to osteoporosis, osteopenia and Paget's disease. Eleven studies met all the criteria.The average normal SUVmax values from 11 patients were: cervical vertebrae 6.84 (range 4.38-8.64, thoracic vertebrae 7.36 (range 6.99-7.66, lumbar vertebrae 7.27 (range 7.04-7.72, femoral head 2.22 (range 1.1-4.3, humeral head 1.82 (range 1.2-2.9, mid sternum 5.51 (range 2.6-8.1, parietal bone 1.71 (range 1.3-2.4.According to our study, various skeletal sites have different normal SUV values. SUV values can be different between the normal bones and bones with tumor or metabolic bone disease. SUV can be used to quantify NaF-18 PET/CT studies. If the SUV values of the normal skeleton are known, they can be used in the characterization of bone lesions and in the assessment of treatment response to bone diseases.

  4. 30 CFR 57.14130 - Roll-over protective structures (ROPS) and seat belts for surface equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... belts for surface equipment. 57.14130 Section 57.14130 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH....14130 Roll-over protective structures (ROPS) and seat belts for surface equipment. (a) Equipment included. Roll-over protective structures (ROPS) and seat belts shall be installed on— (1) Crawler tractors...

  5. Integrating Cost-effective Rollover Protective Structure Installation in High School Agricultural Mechanics: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Joan; Vincent, Stacy; Watson, Jennifer; Westneat, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This study with three Appalachian county agricultural education programs examined the feasibility, effectiveness, and impact of integrating a cost-effective rollover protective structure (CROPS) project into high school agricultural mechanics classes. The project aimed to (1) reduce the exposure to tractor overturn hazards in three rural counties through the installation of CROPS on seven tractors within the Cumberland Plateau in the east region; (2) increase awareness in the targeted rural communities of cost-effective ROPS designs developed by the National Institution for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to encourage ROPS installations that decrease the costs of a retrofit; (3) test the feasibility of integration of CROPS construction and installations procedures into the required agricultural mechanics classes in these agricultural education programs; and (4) explore barriers to the implementation of this project in high school agricultural education programs. Eighty-two rural students and three agricultural educators participated in assembly and installation instruction. Data included hazard exposure demographic data, knowledge and awareness of CROPS plans, and pre-post knowledge of construction and assessment of final CROPS installation. Findings demonstrated the feasibility and utility of a CROPS education program in a professionally supervised secondary educational setting. The project promoted farm safety and awareness of availability and interest in the NIOSH Cost-effective ROPS plans. Seven CROPS were constructed and installed. New curriculum and knowledge measures also resulted from the work. Lessons learned and recommendations for a phase 2 implementation and further research are included.

  6. Rollover-free navigation for a mobile agent in an unstructured environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Byung; Lee, Jeong Hee; Lee, Beom Hee

    2006-08-01

    This paper introduces a navigation method for a teleoperated mobile agent (or robot) moving in an unstructured environment that includes unknown obstacles and uneven terrain, based on a guided-navigation algorithm (GNA) and a rollover-prevention algorithm (RPA). Although the mobile agent is primarily driven by an operator at a remote site, it reacts autonomously for avoiding collision with obstacles and for preventing rollover when it suspects/detects possible collision or rollover. The autonomous reactive motion is normally unexpected, thus there exists the inconsistency between the intended motion and the controlled motion of the agent from the operator. A force-reflection technique utilizing a force-feedback joystick is developed to manipulate this inconsistency. To verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed navigation method, experiments with the Robot for Hazardous Application-Double Tracks (ROBHAZ-DT) (actual mobile agent) are successfully carried out.

  7. Rollover Mitigation Controller Development for Three-Wheeled Vehicle Using Active Front Steering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Amer Azim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-wheeled vehicles are agile, less complex, but relatively more prone to rollover. The current study focuses on the rollover mitigation control design using active front steering for such vehicles. A lateral load transfer ratio (LLTR adapted for a three-wheeled platform is presented. Sliding mode control design strategy has been devised which results in pseudo-direct control for roll dynamics of the vehicle. The lag in vehicle roll angle response has been managed using adaptive sliding surface. This concept can be extended for other vehicle configurations. The proposed control scheme is investigated for efficacy using a full vehicle simulation model of CarSim software and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s proposed Fishhook maneuver. The controller is able to limit the rollover propensity even with vehicle parameter uncertainties.

  8. Correlation of SUV-Derived Indices With Tumoral Aggressiveness of Gliomas in Static 18F-FDOPA PET: Use in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Lucile; Olivier, Pierre; Blonski, Marie; Morel, Olivier; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Karcher, Gilles; Taillandier, Luc; Verger, Antoine

    2015-09-01

    Glioma grading is necessary for prognostic evaluation and optimal treatment decisions. The aims of this study were to establish whether a correlation between F-FDOPA uptake with tumor grade was observed and to determine which of the SUV-derived indices was the best correlated. Thirty-one patients were retrospectively included (mean [SD] age, 36.8 [12.1] years) including 21 proven low-grade tumors due to histology, imaging, and clinical follow-up and 10 histologically proven high-grade tumors. Static PET acquisitions were postreconstructed between the 10th and 30th minute after injection of F-FDOPA. Regions of interest of 20 mm were applied to tumors, and isocontoured volumes were defined at levels of 50% and 80% of the peak intensity voxel. Background was quantified with 30-mm-diameter regions of interest on contralateral striatum and centrum semioval. Tumoral uptake was evaluated with the following SUV-derived indices: SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVmax, and SUVmean of isocontoured volume, tumor/striatum ratio (T/S), and tumor/normal brain ratio (T/N). All the SUV-derived indices tested were significantly correlated with tumor grade, considering low-grade and high-grade groups (P < 0.05), except for the SUVmean 50%. The 2 best-correlated indices were SUVmean T/N and SUVmean T/S, with correlation coefficients of 0.561 and 0.522, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic analysis defined optimal thresholds of 1.33 and 1 for sensitivity and specificity of 71% and 100% and 67% and 100%, respectively. F-FDOPA PET SUV-derived indices are routinely available information that enables accurate discrimination of low-grade and high-grade gliomas. The best-correlated indices were SUVmean T/N and SUVmean T/S with thresholds of 1.33 and 1.

  9. SUV420H2 is an epigenetic regulator of epithelial/mesenchymal states in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viotti, Manuel; Wilson, Catherine; McCleland, Mark; Koeppen, Hartmut; Haley, Benjamin; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Klijn, Christiaan; Modrusan, Zora; Arnott, David; Classon, Marie; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Mellman, Ira

    2017-12-11

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition is implicated in metastasis, where carcinoma cells lose sessile epithelial traits and acquire mesenchymal migratory potential. The mesenchymal state is also associated with cancer stem cells and resistance to chemotherapy. It might therefore be therapeutically beneficial to promote epithelial identity in cancer. Because large-scale cell identity shifts are often orchestrated on an epigenetic level, we screened for candidate epigenetic factors and identified the histone methyltransferase SUV420H2 (KMT5C) as favoring the mesenchymal identity in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Through its repressive mark H4K20me3, SUV420H2 silences several key drivers of the epithelial state. Its knockdown elicited mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition on a molecular and functional level, and cells displayed decreased stemness and increased drug sensitivity. An analysis of human pancreatic cancer biopsies was concordant with these findings, because high levels of SUV420H2 correlated with a loss of epithelial characteristics in progressively invasive cancer. Together, these data indicate that SUV420H2 is an upstream epigenetic regulator of epithelial/mesenchymal state control. © 2018 Viotti et al.

  10. Relation between nodule size and 18F-FDG-PET SUV for malignant and benign pulmonary nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Yiping

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The most common semiquantitative method of evaluation of pulmonary lesions using 18F-FDG PET is FDG standardized uptake value (SUV. An SUV cutoff of 2.5 or greater has been used to differentiate between benign and malignant nodules. The goal of our study was to investigate the correlation between the size of pulmonary nodules and the SUV for benign as well as for malignant nodules. Methods Retrospectively, 173 patients were selected from 420 referrals for evaluation of pulmonary lesions. All patients selected had a positive CT and PET scans and histopathology biopsy. A linear regression equation was fitted to a scatter plot of size and SUVmax for malignant and benign nodules together. A dot diagram was created to calculate the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy using an SUVmax cutoff of 2.5. Results The linear regression equations and (R2s as well as the trendlines for malignant and benign nodules demonstrated that the slope of the regression line is greater for malignant than for benign nodules. Twenty-eight nodules of group one (≤ 1.0 cm are plotted in a dot diagram using an SUVmax cutoff of 2.5. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated to be 85%, 36% and 54% respectively. Similarly, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated for an SUVmax cutoff of 2.5 and found to be 91%, 47%, and 79% respectively for group 2 (1.1–2.0 cm; 94%, 23%, and 76%, respectively for group 3 (2.1–3.0 cm; and 100%, 17%, and 82%,, respectively for group 4 (> 3.0 cm. The previous results of the dot diagram indicating that the sensitivity and the accuracy of the test using an SUVmax cutoff of 2.5 are increased with an increase in the diameter of pulmonary nodules. Conclusion The slope of the regression line is greater for malignant than for benign nodules. Although, the SUVmax cutoff of 2.5 is a useful tool in the evaluation of large pulmonary nodules (> 1.0 cm, it has no or minimal value in the evaluation of small

  11. Study on the Rollover Characteristic of In-Wheel-Motor-Driven Electric Vehicles Considering Road and Electromagnetic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For in-wheel-motor-driven electric vehicles, the motor is installed in the wheel directly. Tyre runout and uneven load can cause magnet gap deformation in the motor, which will produce electromagnetic forces that further influence the vehicle rollover characteristics. To study the rollover characteristics, a verified 16-degree-of-freedom rollover dynamic model is introduced. Next, the vehicle rollover characteristics both with and without electromagnetic force are analyzed under conditions of the Fixed Timing Fishhook steering and grade B road excitation. The results show that the electromagnetic force has a certain effect on the load transfer and can reduce the antirollover performance of the vehicle. Therefore, the effect of the electromagnetic force on the rollover characteristic should be considered in the vehicle design. To this end, extensive analysis was conducted on the effect of the road level, vehicle speed, and the road adhesion coefficient on the vehicle rollover stability. The results indicate that vehicle rollover stability worsens when the above-mentioned factors increase, the most influential factor being the road adhesion coefficient followed by vehicle speed and road level. This paper can offer certain theory basis for the design of the in-wheel-motor-driven electric vehicles.

  12. 30 CFR 56.14130 - Roll-over protective structures (ROPS) and seat belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... belts. 56.14130 Section 56.14130 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... protective structures (ROPS) and seat belts. (a) Equipment included. Roll-over protective structures (ROPS) and seat belts shall be installed on— (1) Crawler tractors and crawler loaders; (2) Graders; (3) Wheel...

  13. Comparing SUV values of images at PET-CT console and the RT planning console using identical dataset of a study phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusheel Munshi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study found out that the average difference in the two systems for maximum SUV values was < 0.2 absolute units.Our study suggests good reproducibility of SUV between the two systems. The relevance of these findings would be of seminal importance in current and future SUV-based PET-CT-based contouring in treatment planning systems.

  14. The SUV39H1 Protein Lysine Methyltransferase Methylates Chromatin Proteins Involved in Heterochromatin Formation and VDJ Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Schuhmacher, Maren Kirstin; Kebede, Adam Fiseha; Jeltsch, Albert

    2017-04-21

    SUV39H1 is an H3K9 methyltransferase involved in the formation of heterochromatin. We investigated its substrate specificity profile and show recognition of H3 residues between K4 and G12 with highly specific readout of R8. The specificity profile of SUV39H1 is distinct from its paralog SUV39H2, indicating that they can have different additional substrates. Using the specificity profile, several novel SUV39H1 candidate substrates were identified. We observed methylation of 19 novel substrates at the peptide level and for six of them at the protein level. Methylation of RAG2, SET8, and DOT1L was confirmed in cells, which all have important roles in chromatin regulation. Methylation of SET8 allosterically stimulates its H4K20 monomethylation activity connecting SUV39H1 to the generation of increased H4K20me3 levels, another heterochromatic modification. Methylation of RAG2 alters its subnuclear localization, indicating that SUV39H1 might regulate VDJ recombination. Taken together, our results indicate that beyond the generation of H3K9me3, SUV39H1 has additional roles in chromatin biology by direct stimulation of the establishment of H4K20me3 and the regulation of chromatin binding of RAG2.

  15. Comparison of different SUV-based methods for monitoring cytotoxic therapy with FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, A.; Schwaiger, M.; Weber, W.A. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Ott, K. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) is a promising tool for monitoring cytotoxic therapy in tumours. Due to the limited data available, a standard imaging protocol for the prediction of tumour response has not yet been approved. The aim of this study was to compare commonly applied imaging protocols and calculations of the standardised uptake value (SUV) for the early prediction of histopathological response to chemotherapy. Serial FDG PET scans of 43 patients with gastric carcinomas were retrospectively analysed. All patients received two consecutive scans (one bed position at 40 min p.i. and four bed positions at 90 min p.i.) at baseline and during the first cycle of cisplatinum-based chemotherapy. Reconstruction of the images was performed by filtered back-projection (FBP) and using an iterative algorithm (OSEM). SUVs were calculated with and without correction for the blood glucose level using normalisation by body weight, body surface area and lean body mass. Relative percentage changes between SUVs at baseline and follow-up were calculated and analysed for their potential to predict histopathological response to chemotherapy (ROC analysis). Response was defined as less than 10% viable tumour cells in the tumour specimen obtained by surgery 3-4 weeks after the completion of chemotherapy. Eight of 43 patients were histopathological responders to chemotherapy. The percentage changes in SUV{sub body} {sub weight} for responders and non-responders were -52.2 ({+-}13.2) and -25.2 ({+-}15.2), -54.7 ({+-}18.2) and -24.5 ({+-}16.1), -53.9 ({+-}24.2) and -22.7 ({+-}21.3), and -56.7 ({+-}21.6) and -26.1 ({+-}18.9) for serial scans at 40-min FBP, 40-min OSEM, 90-min FBP and 90-min OSEM, respectively (responders versus non-responders: p <0.01 in each case). According to ROC analysis, neither the scan protocol nor correction for blood glucose significantly influenced the accuracy (approx. 80%) or the cut-off value (approx. -40% change in

  16. Correlation between tumour characteristics, SUV measurements, metabolic tumour volume, TLG and textural features assessed with {sup 18}F-FDG PET in a large cohort of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemarignier, Charles; Groheux, David [Saint-Louis Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); University Sorbonne Paris Cite, INSERM/CNRS UMR944/7212, Paris (France); Martineau, Antoine; Vercellino, Laetitia; Merlet, Pascal [Saint-Louis Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Teixeira, Luis; Espie, Marc [Saint-Louis Hospital, Breast Diseases Unit, Paris (France); University Sorbonne Paris Cite, INSERM/CNRS UMR944/7212, Paris (France)

    2017-07-15

    The study was designed to evaluate 1) the relationship between PET image textural features (TFs) and SUVs, metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and tumour characteristics in a large prospective and homogenous cohort of oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer (BC) patients, and 2) the capability of those parameters to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). 171 consecutive patients with large or locally advanced ER+ BC without distant metastases underwent an {sup 18}F-FDG PET examination before NAC. The primary tumour was delineated with an adaptive threshold segmentation method. Parameters of volume, intensity and texture (entropy, homogeneity, contrast and energy) were measured and compared with tumour characteristics determined on pre-treatment breast biopsy (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). The correlation between PET-derived parameters was determined using Spearman's coefficient. The relationship between PET features and pathological findings was determined using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Spearman's coefficients between SUV{sub max} and TFs were 0.43, 0.24, -0.43 and -0.15 respectively for entropy, homogeneity, energy and contrast; they were higher between MTV and TFs: 0.99, 0.86, -0.99 and -0.87. All TFs showed a significant association with the histological type (IDC vs. ILC; 0.02 < P < 0.03) but didn't with immunohistochemical characteristics. SUV{sub max} and TLG predicted the pathological response (P = 0.0021 and P = 0.02 respectively); TFs didn't (P: 0.27, 0.19, 0.94, 0.19 respectively for entropy, homogeneity, energy and contrast). The correlation of TFs was poor with SUV parameters and high with MTV. TFs showed a significant association with the histological type. Finally, while SUV{sub max} and TLG were able to predict response to NAC, TFs failed. (orig.)

  17. Salt tolerant SUV3 overexpressing transgenic rice plants conserve physicochemical properties and microbial communities of rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Ranjan K; Ansari, Mohammad W; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Key concerns in the ecological evaluation of GM crops are undesirably spread, gene flow, other environmental impacts, and consequences on soil microorganism's biodiversity. Numerous reports have highlighted the effects of transgenic plants on the physiology of non-targeted rhizospheric microbes and the food chain via causing adverse effects. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop transgenics with insignificant toxic on environmental health. In the present study, SUV3 overexpressing salt tolerant transgenic rice evaluated in New Delhi and Cuttack soil conditions for their effects on physicochemical and biological properties of rhizosphere. Its cultivation does not affect soil properties viz., pH, Eh, organic C, P, K, N, Ca, Mg, S, Na and Fe(2+). Additionally, SUV3 rice plants do not cause any change in the phenotype, species characteristics and antibiotic sensitivity of rhizospheric bacteria. The population and/or number of soil organisms such as bacteria, fungi and nematodes were unchanged in the soil. Also, the activity of bacterial enzymes viz., dehydrogenase, invertase, phenol oxidases, acid phosphatases, ureases and proteases was not significantly affected. Further, plant growth promotion (PGP) functions of bacteria such as siderophore, HCN, salicylic acid, IAA, GA, zeatin, ABA, NH3, phosphorus metabolism, ACC deaminase and iron tolerance were, considerably, not influenced. The present findings suggest ecologically pertinent of salt tolerant SUV3 rice to sustain the health and usual functions of the rhizospheric organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Determinan Nilai Pelanggan dan Implikasinya pada Dependensi Pelanggan Bengkel Suv Premium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Wardhana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available he implementation of ASEAN Economic Community (AEC for Indonesia making its big market more capitalized and and grow rapidly. The Indonesian automotive industrial market has become ASEAN’s biggest auto market. Automotive products in Indonesia is divided into two is a variant of commercial vehicles and passenger vehicle. Passenger vehicle is divided into three types namely: sedan, multi purpose vehicle (MPV, sport utility vehicle (SUV. The aim of this study is to investigate the determinants of customer value such as service quality and customer relationship management (CRM and its implications on customer dependence. This research using a method of survey with a number of population 63.015 customers and 400 respondents as customers at premium SUV authorized service station in urban areas in West Java with using slovin formula. Analysis of data using path analysis. The result of this research concluded that the service quality and customer relationship management influenced partially significant on the perceived value of customers of car workshop premium SUV.

  19. Generating harmonized SUV within the EANM EARL accreditation program: software approach versus EARL-compliant reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasnon, Charline; Salomon, Thibault; Desmonts, Cédric; Dô, Pascal; Oulkhouir, Youssef; Madelaine, Jeannick; Aide, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Evolutions in hardware and software PET technology, such as point spread function (PSF) reconstruction, have been shown to improve diagnostic performance, but can also lead to important device-dependent and reconstruction-dependent variations in standardized uptake values (SUVs). This may preclude the multicentre use of SUVs as a prognostic or diagnostic tool or as a biomarker of the early response to antineoplastic treatments. This study compared two SUV harmonization strategies using a newer reconstruction algorithm that improves lesion detection while maintaining comparability with older systems: (1) the use of a second reconstruction compliant with harmonization standards and (2) the use of a proprietary software tool (EQ.PET). PET data from 50 consecutive non-small cell lung cancer patients were reconstructed with PSF reconstruction for optimal tumor detection and an ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM3D) reconstruction to mimic a former generation PET. An additional PSF reconstruction was performed with a 7 mm Gaussian filter (PSF7, first method), and, post-reconstruction, the EQ filter (same Gaussian filter) was applied to the PSF data (PSFEQ, second method) for harmonization purposes. The 7 mm kernel filter was chosen to comply with the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) standards. SUVs for all reconstructions were compared with regression analyses and/or Bland-Altman plots. Overall, 171 lesions were analyzed: 55 lung lesions (32.2%), 87 lymph nodes (50.9%), and 29 metastases (16.9%). In these lesions, the mean PSF7/OSEM3D ratios for SUVmax and SUVpeak were 1.02 (95% CI: 0.93-1.11) and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.95-1.14), respectively. The mean PSFEQ/OSEM3D ratios for SUVmax and SUVpeak were 1.01 (95% CI: 0.91-1.11) and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.94-1.14), respectively. When comparing PSF7 and PSFEQ, Bland-Altman analysis showed that the mean PSF7/PSFEQ ratios for SUVmax and SUVpeak were 1.01 (95% CI: 0.96-1.06) and 1.01 (95% CI: 0.97-1.04), respectively

  20. Seat integrated and conventional restraints: a study of crash injury/fatality rates in rollovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanaban, Jeya; Burnett, Roger A

    2008-10-01

    This study used police-reported motor vehicle crash data from eleven states to determine ejection, fatality, and fatal/serious injury risks for belted drivers in vehicles with conventional seatbelts compared to belted drivers in vehicles with seat integrated restraint systems (SIRS). Risks were compared for 11,159 belted drivers involved in single- or multiple-vehicle rollover crashes. Simple driver ejection (partial and complete), fatality, and injury rates were derived, and logistic regression analyses were used to determine relative contribution of factors (including event calendar year, vehicle age, driver age/gender/alcohol use) that significantly influence the likelihood of fatality and fatal/serious injury to belted drivers in rollovers. Results show no statistically significant difference in driver ejection, fatality, or fatal/serious injury rates between vehicles with conventional belts and vehicles with SIRS.

  1. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Standardized Uptake Value (SUV-shape Scheme for Thyroid Volume Determination in Graves’ Disease: A Comparison with Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yangchun chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of thyroid volume measurement using 99mTc pertechnetate single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT images, acquired by the standardized uptake value (SUV-shape scheme designed by our expert team.Methods: A total of 18 consecutive patients with Graves’ disease (GD were subjected to both ultrasonographic and 99mTc pertechnetate SPECT examinations of thyroid within a five-day interval. The volume of thyroid lobes and isthmus was measured by ultrasonography (US according to the ellipsoid volume equation. The total thyroid volume, determined as the sum of the volume of both lobes and isthmus, was recorded as TV-US (i.e., thyroid volume measured by US and set as the reference. The thyroid volume was defined according to our SUV-shape scheme and was recorded as TV-SS (i.e., thyroid volume determined by the SUV-shape scheme. The data were analyzed using the Bland-Altman plot, linear regression analysis, Spearman’s rank correlation, and paired t-test, if necessary.Results: The values of TV-SS (40.2±29.4 mL and TV-US (43.0±34.7 mL were not significantly different (t=0.813; P=0.43. The linear regression equation of the two values was determined as TV-US= 1.072 × TV-SS − 0.29(r=0.906; P

  2. Thoracolumbar junction injuries after rollover crashes: difference between belted and unbelted front seat occupants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Guiot, Bernard H

    2009-10-01

    Motor vehicle collision (MVC) is one of the most common causes of thoracolumbar junction (TLJ) injury. Although it is of no doubt that the use of seatbelt reduces the incidence and severity of MVC-induced TLJ injury, how it is protective for front-seat occupants of an automobile after rollover crashes is unclear. Among 200 consecutive patients with a major TLJ (Th11-L2) injury due to high-energy trauma admitted from 2000 to 2004, 22 patients were identified as front-seat occupants of a four-wheel vehicle when a rollover crash occurred. The 22 patients were divided into two groups: 10 who were belted, and 12 who were unbelted. Patients' demographics including the mean Injury Severity Score (ISS), incidence of neurologic deficit, level of TLJ injury, and type of TLJ injury according to the AO fracture classification were compared between the two groups. Neurologic deficit was present exclusively in the unbelted group, and the difference in the incidence was statistically significant (P = 0.04). Similarly, AO type B/C injury was present exclusively in the unbelted group. The belted group had a significantly lower mean ISS than the unbelted group (P ejected and non-ejected victims within the unbelted group revealed no statistical difference in the incidence of neurologic deficit or type of injury. It is likely that the high incidence of neurologic deficit in the unbelted group was due to the high incidence of AO type B/C injury. This study indirectly proves the efficacy of seatbelt in reducing the severity of rollover-induced TLJ injury. Because of the limited number of cases, it is uncertain whether ejection from vehicle, which occurs exclusively in the unbelted victims, is a crucial factor in determining the severity or type of injury after rollover crashes.

  3. Seat Integrated and Conventional Restraints: A Study of Crash Injury/Fatality Rates in Rollovers

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanaban, Jeya; Burnett, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This study used police-reported motor vehicle crash data from eleven states to determine ejection, fatality, and fatal/serious injury risks for belted drivers in vehicles with conventional seatbelts compared to belted drivers in vehicles with seat integrated restraint systems (SIRS). Risks were compared for 11,159 belted drivers involved in single- or multiple-vehicle rollover crashes. Simple driver ejection (partial and complete), fatality, and injury rates were derived, and logistic regress...

  4. Timing and ordering decisions under single and dual product rollover strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Aras, Ahmet Korhan

    2011-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Industrial Engineering and the Graduate School of Engineering and Science of Bilkent University, 2011. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2011. Includes bibliographical references leaves 67-69. In many industries, firms replace products that have been introduced to the market and that are in advanced stages of their life cycles. The process of introducing a new product and eventually displacing an old one is referred to as product rollover. ...

  5. New TA Index-Based Rollover Prevention System for Electric Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang Liu; Min Xu; Mian Li

    2015-01-01

    In addition to clean transportation and energy savings, electric vehicles can inherently offer better performance in the field of active safety and dynamic stability control, thanks to the superior fast and accurate control characteristics of electric motors. With the novel wheel status parameter TA for electric vehicles proposed by the authors in an earlier publication, a new TA index (TAI)-based rollover prevention method is presented in this paper to improve the driving performance of EV...

  6. Research on identification method of heavy vehicle rollover based on hidden Markov model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wang, Yeqin; Hu, Xiaoming; Tao, Yukai; Wang, Jinsheng

    2017-07-01

    Aiming at the problem of early warning credibility degradation as the heavy vehicle load and its center of gravity change greatly; the heavy vehicle rollover state identification method based on the Hidden Markov Model (HMM, is introduced to identify heavy vehicle lateral conditions dynamically in this paper. In this method, the lateral acceleration and roll angle are taken as the observation values of the model base. The Viterbi algorithm is used to predict the state sequence with the highest probability in the observed sequence, and the Markov prediction algorithm is adopted to calculate the state transition law and to predict the state of the vehicle in a certain period of time in the future. According to combination conditions of Double lane change and steering, applying Trucksim and Matlab trained hidden Markov model, the model is applied to the online identification of heavy vehicle rollover states. The identification results show that the model can accurately and efficiently identify the vehicle rollover state, and has good applicability. This study provides a novel method and a general strategy for active safety early warning and control of vehicles, which has reference significance for the application of the Hidden Markov theory in collision, rear-end and lane departure warning system.

  7. Research on identification method of heavy vehicle rollover based on hidden Markov model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhiguo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problem of early warning credibility degradation as the heavy vehicle load and its center of gravity change greatly; the heavy vehicle rollover state identification method based on the Hidden Markov Model (HMM, is introduced to identify heavy vehicle lateral conditions dynamically in this paper. In this method, the lateral acceleration and roll angle are taken as the observation values of the model base. The Viterbi algorithm is used to predict the state sequence with the highest probability in the observed sequence, and the Markov prediction algorithm is adopted to calculate the state transition law and to predict the state of the vehicle in a certain period of time in the future. According to combination conditions of Double lane change and steering, applying Trucksim and Matlab trained hidden Markov model, the model is applied to the online identification of heavy vehicle rollover states. The identification results show that the model can accurately and efficiently identify the vehicle rollover state, and has good applicability. This study provides a novel method and a general strategy for active safety early warning and control of vehicles, which has reference significance for the application of the Hidden Markov theory in collision, rear-end and lane departure warning system.

  8. Influence of patellofemoral pain syndrome on plantar pressure in the foot rollover process during gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Aliberti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome is one of the most common knee disorders among physically active young women. Despite its high incidence, the multifactorial etiology of this disorder is not fully understood. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the influence of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome on plantar pressure distribution during the foot rollover process (i.e., the initial heel contact, midstance and propulsion phases of the gait. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-seven young adults, including 22 subjects with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (30 ± 7 years, 165 ± 9 cm, 63 ± 12 kg and 35 control subjects (29 ± 7 years, 164 ± 8 cm, 60 ± 11 kg, volunteered for the study. The contact area and peak pressure were evaluated using the Pedar-X system (Novel, Germany synchronized with ankle sagittal kinematics. RESULTS: Subjects with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome showed a larger contact area over the medial (p = 0.004 and central (p = 0.002 rearfoot at the initial contact phase and a lower peak pressure over the medial forefoot (p = 0.033 during propulsion when compared with control subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome is related to a foot rollover pattern that is medially directed at the rearfoot during initial heel contact and laterally directed at the forefoot during propulsion. These detected alterations in the foot rollover process during gait may be used to develop clinical interventions using insoles, taping and therapeutic exercise to rehabilitate this dysfunction.

  9. Encouraging the installation of rollover protective structures in New York State: the design of a social marketing intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Julie A; May, John; Ostby-Malling, Ronne; Lehmen, Tom; Strand, John; Stenlund, Hans; Weinehall, Lars; Einehall, Lars W; Emmelin, Maria

    2008-11-01

    Increasing the percentage of rollover protective structure (ROPS) equipped tractors has been the focus of many agricultural safety campaigns. Traditionally efforts have attempted to persuade farmers through education or community awareness interventions. These efforts have lead to marginal change. In response, a social marketing approach was tested as a means for increasing interest in ROPS retrofitting in New York. An initial phone survey was conducted with a random sample of New York farmers to identify a potential target population. Following target selection, in-depth interviews were conducted to isolate barriers and motivators to retrofitting. This information was used to develop message prototypes which were tested in small focus group discussions. Selected and revised messages, as well as various other incentives developed in response to feedback from interviews, were then tested in a prospective, quasi-randomized controlled trial. Small crop and livestock farms were selected as the intervention target since they represent 86% of New York farms with none or only one ROPS protected tractor. Barriers to retrofitting which were identified in interviews were: 1) constant exposures normalize risk, 2) risk is modeled by significant others and 3) safety in general and retrofitting in particular requires too much time and money. The piloting of ROPS incentives led to a marked increase in ROPS sales in New York. Social Marketing provides a promising framework for the design of agricultural injury prevention programs. The potential implications for other health initiatives seeking to promote behaviour change are also discussed.

  10. The differentiation of malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors by F-18 FDG PET/CT studies-determination of maxSUV by analysis of ROC curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Eun Jung; Cho, Ihn Ho; Chun, Kyung Ah; Won, Kyu Chang; Lee, Hyung Woo; Choi, Jun Heok; Shin, Duk Seop [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    We evaluated the standard uptake value (SUV) of F-18 FDG at PET/CT for differentiation of benign from malignant tumor in primary musculoskeletal tumors. Forty-six tumors (11 benign and 12 malignant soft tissue tumors, 9 benign and 14 malignant bone tumors) were examined with F-18 FDG PET/CT (Discovery ST, GE) prior to tissue diagnosis. The maxSUV(maximum value of SUV) were calculated and compared between benign and malignant lesions. The lesion analysis was based on the transverse whole body image. The maxSUV with cutoff of 4.1 was used in distinguishing benign from malignant soft tissue tumor and 3.05 was used in bone tumor by ROC curve. There was a statistically significant difference in maxSUV between benign (n = 11; maxSUV 3.4 {+-} 3.2) and malignant (n = 12; maxSUV 14.8 {+-} 12.2) lesion in soft tissue tumor ({rho} = 0.001). Between benign bone tumor (n = 9; maxSUV 5.4 {+-} 4.0) and malignant bone tumor (n = 14; maxSUV 7.3 {+-} 3.2), there was not a significant difference in maxSUV. The sensitivity and specificity for differentiating malignant from benign soft tissue tumor was 83% and 91%, respectively. There were four false positive malignant bone tumor cases to include fibrous dysplasia, Langerhans-cell histiocytosis (n = 2) and osteoid osteoma. Also, one false positive case of malignant soft tissue tumor was nodular fasciitis. The maxSUV was useful for differentiation of benign from malignant lesion in primary soft tissue tumors. In bone tumor, the low maxSUV correlated well with benign lesions but high maxSUV did not always mean malignancy.

  11. DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT OF E-TURBO FOR SUV AND LIGHT TRUCK APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balis, C; Middlemass, C; Shahed, SM

    2003-08-24

    The purpose of the project is to develop an electronically controlled, electrically assisted turbocharging system, e-Turbo, for application to SUV and light truck class of passenger vehicles. Earlier simulation work had shown the benefits of e-Turbo system on increasing low-end torque and improving fuel economy. This paper will present further data from the literature to show that advanced turbocharging can enable diesel engine downsizing of 10-30% with 6-17% improvement in fuel economy. This is in addition to the fuel economy benefit that a turbocharged diesel engine offers over conventional gasoline engines. E-Turbo is necessary to get acceptable driving characteristics with downsized diesel engines. As a first step towards the development of this technology for SUV/light truck sized diesel engines (4-6 litre displacement), design concepts and hardware were evaluated for a smaller engine (2 litre displacement). It was felt that design and developments issues could be minimized, the concept proven progressively on the bench, on a small engine and then applied to a large Vee engine (one on each bank). After successful demonstration of the concept, large turbomachinery could be designed and built specifically for larger SUV sized diesel engines. This paper presents the results of development of e-Turbo for a 2 litre diesel engine. A detailed comparison of several electric assist technologies including permanent magnet, six-phase induction and conventional induction motor/generator technology was done. A comparison of switched reluctance motor technology was also done although detailed design was not carried out.

  12. Relationships of body habitus and SUV indices with signal-to-noise ratio of hepatic (18)F-FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramida, G; Dunford, A; Siddique, M; Cook, G J; Peters, A M

    2016-05-01

    Tissue accumulation of (18)F-FDG is quantified as standardised uptake value (SUV), which may be expressed as the voxel maximum (SUVmax) or mean (SUVmean). SUVmax/SUVmean may be a marker of hepatic steatosis, while the coefficient of variation (CV) of SUV may be a marker of hepatic fat distribution heterogeneity (HFDH). Alternatively, they may reflect low signal-to-noise ratio ('noise') in obese persons in whom hepatic steatosis is common. The study aim was to compare the impact of body size on noise versus SUV and CT density (CTD). Dynamic PET was performed (30×1min frames) following FDG injection in 60 patients undergoing routine PET/CT. Hepatic FDG clearance was measured using Patlak-Rutland graphical analysis with abdominal aorta as input. Noise was quantified as the standard deviation (SD) of the plot residuals (ignoring the first 2 frames), normalised to the intercept (NRMSD). SUVmax, SUVmean and CTD were measured from 60min whole body PET/CT. CV of SUV and SD of CTD were quantified in 28/60 patients using texture analysis. NRMSD correlated with weight (r=0.49; p<0.0001) and BMI (r=0.48; p=0.0001). SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVmax/SUVmean, CV of SUV, CTD, and SD of CTD all correlated strongly with weight and BMI (p<0.0001). However, they correlated weakly with NRMSD, the strongest being SUVmax (r=0.34; p=0.008) and SD of CTD (r=0.42; n=28; p=0.026). Noise is increased in overweight/obese persons but has little effect on SUV indices, CTD and their variabilities. SUVmax/SUVmean and CV of SUV are therefore, to some extent, markers of hepatic steatosis and HFDH, respectively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. FDG dose extravasations in PET/CT: frequency and impact on SUV measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhat M Osman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: PET/CT with 18F-FDG has proven to be effective in detecting and assessing various types of cancers. However, due to cancer and/or its therapy, intravenous (IV FDG injection may be problematic resulting in dose extravasations. In the most frequently used field of view (FOV, arms-up and base of skull to upper-thigh (limited Whole Body (LWB, the injection site may not be routinely imaged. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of dose extravasations in FDG PET and the potential impact on SUV measurements.Methods: True Whole Body (TWB FDG-PET/CT scans (including all extremities of 400 patients were retrospectively reviewed. A log recorded cases of IV dose extravasations. When possible, SUVs were measured in two frequently used reference locations: mediastinum and liver. The SUVs were obtained in the same patients who had studies with and without FDG extravasations within an average of 3 months without interval therapy.Results: Of the 400 scans, 42 (10.5% had extravasations on the maximum intensity projections (MIP images. In scans with or without dose infiltration, FDG injection site was at or distal to the antecubital fossa in 97% of studies. Of those 42 cases, dose infiltration was within the LWB FOV in 29/42 (69% and outside in the remaining 13/42 (31%. Of those 42 patients, 5 had repeat PET studies with no interval therapy. For those 5 patients, liver maximum SUV was 11.7% less in patients with infiltration than those without (2.22 ± 0.54 vs. 2.48 ± 0.6. Mediastinum SUVmax was 9.3% less in patients with infiltration than those without (1.72 ± 0.54 vs. 1.88 ± 0.49.Conclusion: We conclude dose extravasations were commonly encountered (10.5% in PET/CT. However, it is underreported by at least 31% due to omitting injection site from the FOV. When present, extravasations may lead to underestimation of SUVmax. Therefore, it should not only be avoided but also reported in order to avoid false interpretations of the exam.

  14. Biodistribution of the {sup 18}F-FPPRGD{sub 2} PET radiopharmaceutical in cancer patients: an atlas of SUV measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Jamali, Mehran; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam [Stanford University, Stanford, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Barkhodari, Amir; Mosci, Camila; Mittra, Erik; Iagaru, Andrei [Stanford University, Stanford, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Shen, Bin; Chin, Frederick [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biodistribution of 2-fluoropropionyl-labeled PEGylated dimeric arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide (PEG3-E[c{RGDyk}]2) ({sup 18}F-FPPRGD{sub 2}) in cancer patients and to compare its uptake in malignant lesions with {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. A total of 35 patients (11 men, 24 women, mean age 52.1 ± 10.8 years) were enrolled prospectively and had {sup 18}F-FPPRGD{sub 2} PET/CT prior to treatment. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) and mean SUV (SUV{sub mean}) were measured in 23 normal tissues in each patient, as well as in known or suspected cancer lesions. Differences between {sup 18}F-FPPRGD{sub 2} uptake and {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were also evaluated in 28 of the 35 patients. Areas of high {sup 18}F-FPPRGD{sub 2} accumulation (SUV{sub max} range 8.9 - 94.4, SUV{sub mean} range 7.1 - 64.4) included the bladder and kidneys. Moderate uptake (SUV{sub max} range 2.1 - 6.3, SUV{sub mean} range 1.1 - 4.5) was found in the choroid plexus, salivary glands, thyroid, liver, spleen, pancreas, small bowel and skeleton. Compared with {sup 18}F-FDG, {sup 18}F-FPPRGD{sub 2} showed higher tumor-to-background ratio in brain lesions (13.4 ± 8.5 vs. 1.1 ± 0.5, P < 0.001), but no significant difference in body lesions (3.2 ± 1.9 vs. 4.4 ± 4.2, P = 0.10). There was no significant correlation between the uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}) for {sup 18}F FPPRGD{sub 2} and those for {sup 18}F-FDG. The biodistribution of {sup 18}F-FPPRGD{sub 2} in cancer patients is similar to that of other RGD dimer peptides and it is suitable for clinical use. The lack of significant correlation between {sup 18}F-FPPRGD{sub 2} and {sup 18}F-FDG uptake confirms that the information provided by each PET tracer is different. (orig.)

  15. Age-Associated Decrease of the Histone Methyltransferase SUV39H1 in HSC Perturbs Heterochromatin and B Lymphoid Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dounia Djeghloul

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC to generate B lymphocytes declines with age, contributing to impaired immune function in the elderly. Here we show that the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 plays an important role in human B lymphoid differentiation and that expression of SUV39H1 decreases with age in both human and mouse HSC, leading to a global reduction in H3K9 trimethylation and perturbed heterochromatin function. Further, we demonstrate that SUV39H1 is a target of microRNA miR-125b, a known regulator of HSC function, and that expression of miR-125b increases with age in human HSC. Overexpression of miR-125b and inhibition of SUV39H1 in young HSC induced loss of B cell potential. Conversely, both inhibition of miR-125 and enforced expression of SUV39H1 improved the capacity of HSC from elderly individuals to generate B cells. Our findings highlight the importance of heterochromatin regulation in HSC aging and B lymphopoiesis.

  16. Thoracolumbar junction injuries after rollover crashes: difference between belted and unbelted front seat occupants

    OpenAIRE

    Inamasu, Joji; Guiot, Bernard H.

    2009-01-01

    Motor vehicle collision (MVC) is one of the most common causes of thoracolumbar junction (TLJ) injury. Although it is of no doubt that the use of seatbelt reduces the incidence and severity of MVC-induced TLJ injury, how it is protective for front-seat occupants of an automobile after rollover crashes is unclear. Among 200 consecutive patients with a major TLJ (Th11-L2) injury due to high-energy trauma admitted from 2000 to 2004, 22 patients were identified as front-seat occupants of a four-w...

  17. [A Method Research on Environmental Damage Assessment of a Truck Rollover Pollution Incident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Feng; Zhao, Shi-ho; Chen, Gang-cai; Xian, Si-shu; Yang, Qing-ling; Zhou, Xian-jie; Yu, Hai

    2015-05-01

    With high occurrence of sudden water pollution incident, China faces an increasingly severe situation of water environment. In order to deter the acts of environmental pollution, ensure the damaged resources of environment can be restored and compensated, it is very critical to quantify the economic losses caused by the sudden water pollution incident. This paper took truck rollover pollution incidents in Chongqing for an example, established a set of evaluation method for quantifying the environmental damage, and then assessed the environmental damage by the method from four aspects, including the property damage, ecological environment and resources damages, the costs of administrative affairs in emergency disposal, and the costs of investigation and evaluation.

  18. Rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach after cone beam CT-guided lung biopsy: effect on pneumothorax rate in 1,191 consecutive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Im [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Min; Goo, Jin Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To investigate the effect of rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach on the incidence of pneumothorax and drainage catheter placement due to pneumothorax in C-arm Cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB) of lung lesions. From May 2011 to December 2012, 1227 PTNBs were performed in 1191 patients with a 17-gauge coaxial needle. 617 biopsies were performed without (conventional-group) and 610 with rapid-rollover approach (rapid-rollover-group). Overall pneumothorax rates and incidences of pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement were compared between two groups. There were no significant differences in overall pneumothorax rates between conventional and rapid-rollover groups (19.8 % vs. 23.1 %, p = 0.164). However, pneumothorax rate requiring drainage catheter placement was significantly lower in rapid-rollover-group (1.6 %) than conventional-group (4.2 %) (p = 0.010). Multivariate analysis revealed male, age > 60, bulla crossed, fissure crossed, pleura to target distance > 1.3 cm, emphysema along needle tract, and pleural punctures ≥ 2 were significant risk factors of pneumothorax (p < 0.05). Regarding pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement, fissure crossed, bulla crossed, and emphysema along needle tract were significant risk factors (p < 0.05), whereas rapid-rollover approach was an independent protective factor (p = 0.002). The rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach significantly reduced the rate of pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement after CBCT-guided PTNB. (orig.)

  19. Assessment of VCSEL thermal rollover mechanisms from measurements and empirical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baveja, Prashant P; Kögel, Benjamin; Westbergh, Petter; Gustavsson, Johan S; Haglund, Åsa; Maywar, Drew N; Agrawal, Govind P; Larsson, Anders

    2011-08-01

    We use an empirical model together with experimental measurements for studying mechanisms contributing to thermal rollover in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The model is based on extraction of the temperature dependence of threshold current, internal quantum efficiency, internal optical loss, series resistance and thermal impedance from measurements of output power, voltage and lasing wavelength as a function of bias current over an ambient temperature range of 15-100 °C. We apply the model to an oxide-confined, 850-nm VCSEL, fabricated with a 9-μm inner-aperture diameter and optimized for high-speed operation, and show for this specific device that power dissipation due to linear power dissipation (sum total of optical absorption, carrier thermalization, carrier leakage and spontaneous carrier recombination) exceeds power dissipation across the series resistance (quadratic power dissipation) at any ambient temperature and bias current. We further show that the dominant contributors to self-heating for this particular VCSEL are quadratic power dissipation, internal optical loss, and carrier leakage. A rapid reduction of the internal quantum efficiency at high bias currents (resulting in high temperatures) is identified as being the major cause of thermal rollover. Our method is applicable to any VCSEL and is useful for identifying the mechanisms limiting the thermal performance of the device and to formulate design strategies to ameliorate them.

  20. Comparison between CT Net enhancement and PET/CT SUV for N staging of gastric cancer: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amato Antonio Stabile Ianora

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: CT Net enhancement represents an accurate tool for N staging of gastric cancer and could be considered as the CT corresponding quantitative parameter of F-FDG PET/CT SUV. It could be applied in the clinical practice for differentiating reactive lymph nodes from metastatic ones improving accuracy and specificity of CT.

  1. Use of a digital phantom developed by QIBA for harmonizing SUVs obtained from the state-of-the-art SPECT/CT systems: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Tadaki; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Iimori, Takashi; Miyagawa, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Tomoya; Owaki, Yoshiki; Yada, Nobuhiro; Sawada, Koichi; Tokorodani, Ryotaro; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    Although quantitative analysis using standardized uptake value (SUV) becomes realistic in clinical single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, reconstruction parameter settings can deliver different quantitative results among different SPECT/CT systems. This study aims to propose a use of the digital reference object (DRO), which is a National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) phantom-like object developed by the Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance (QIBA) fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography technical committee, for the purpose of harmonizing SUVs in Tc-99m SPECT/CT imaging. The NEMA body phantom with determined Tc-99m concentration was scanned with the four state-of-the-art SPECT/CT systems. SPECT data were reconstructed using different numbers of the product of subset and iteration numbers (SI) and the width of 3D Gaussian filter (3DGF). The mean (SUV mean ), maximal (SUV max ), and peak (SUV peak ) SUVs for six hot spheres (10, 13, 17, 22, 28, and 37 mm) were measured after converting SPECT count into SUV using Becquerel calibration factor. DRO smoothed by 3DGF with a FWHM of 17 mm (DRO 17 mm ) was generated, and the corresponding SUVs were measured. The reconstruction condition to yield the lowest root mean square error (RMSE) of SUV means for all the spheres between DRO 17 mm and actual phantom images was determined as the harmonized condition for each SPECT/CT scanner. Then, inter-scanner variability in all quantitative metrics was measured before (i.e., according to the manufacturers' recommendation or the policies of their own departments) and after harmonization. RMSE was lowest in the following reconstruction conditions: SI of 100 and 3DGF of 13 mm for Brightview XCT, SI of 160 and 3DGF of 3 pixels for Discovery NM/CT, SI of 60 and 3DGF of 2 pixels for Infinia, and SI of 140 and 3DGF of 15 mm for Symbia. In pre-harmonized conditions, coefficient of variations (COVs) among the SPECT

  2. Retrofitting tractors with rollover protective structures: perspective of equipment dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, S M; Donham, K J; Leedom-Larson, K; Sanderson, W; Purschwitz, M

    2009-10-01

    This study was one of a cluster of studies that originated via requests for proposals from the NIOSH National Agricultural Tractor Safety Initiative. The present study design consisted of several steps: (1) formation of an advisory group, (2) development and testing of a standard paper self-responding survey instrument, (3) sample selection of farm equipment dealers, (4) administration of the survey, (5) assessment and analysis of the survey, and (6) in-person response panel of dealers (n = 80) to review results of the questionnaire for further definition and sharpening of the recommendations from the survey. A key finding is that most dealers do not currently sell or install ROPS retrofit kits. Barriers cited by dealers included (1) actual or perceived lack of farmer demand, (2) injury liability, (3) expensive freight for ordering ROPS, (4) lack of dealer awareness of the magnitude of deaths from tractor overturns and the high life-protective factor of ROPS, and (5) difficulty and incursion of non-recoverable expenses in locating and obtaining specific ROPS. Despite not currently selling or installing ROPS, dealers responded favorably about their future potential role in ROPS promotion and sales. Dealers were willing to further promote, sell, and install ROPS if there was demand from farmers. Recommendations include establishing a ROPS "clearing house" that dealers could contact to facilitate locating and obtaining ROPS orders from customers. Additional recommendations include education and social marketing targeting farm machinery dealers as well farmers, manufacturers, and policy makers.

  3. Individual retirement account balances, contributions, and rollovers, 2010: the EBRI IRA database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Craig

    2012-05-01

    In 2010, IRA owners were more likely to be male, especially those whose accounts originated from a rollover or were a SEP/SIMPLE. Among all IRA owners in the database, nearly one-half (45.8 percent) were ages 45-64. The average and median IRA account balance in 2010 was $67,438 and $17,863, respectively, while the average and median IRA individual balance (all accounts from the same person combined) was $91,864 and $25,296. Individuals with a traditional-originating from rollovers had the highest average and median balance of $123,426 and $38,138, respectively. Roth owners had the lowest average and median balance at $22,437 and $11,471. The average and median individual IRA balance increased with age through age 70. The average amount contributed to an IRA in the database was $3,335 in 2010. The average contribution was highest for accounts owned by those ages 65-69, and more contributions were made to Roth accounts than to traditional accounts (both those originating from contributions and rollovers). However, the average contribution to a traditional account was higher, at $3,517, compared with $3,240 to a Roth account. Yet, a higher overall amount was contributed to Roths ($2.3 billion for Roths compared with $1.3 billion for traditional accounts). Focusing on those owning traditional or Roth IRAs, 9.3 percent of the accounts received contributions, and 12.1 percent of the individuals owning these IRA types contributed to them in 2010. Among traditional IRA owners, 5.2 percent contributed, while 24.0 percent of those owning a Roth contributed to it during 2010. Of those individuals contributing to an IRA, 43.5 percent contributed the maximum amount. Of those contributing to a traditional IRA, 48.7 percent maxed out their contribution, while 39.3 percent did so with a Roth. The average and median account balances increased from $54,863 and $15,756 respectively in 2008 to $67,438 and $17,863 in 2010. This represents an increase of 22.9 percent in the average

  4. Major satellite repeat RNA stabilize heterochromatin retention of Suv39h enzymes by RNA-nucleosome association and RNA:DNA hybrid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez Camacho, Oscar; Galan, Carmen; Swist-Rosowska, Kalina; Ching, Reagan; Gamalinda, Michael; Karabiber, Fethullah; De La Rosa-Velazquez, Inti; Engist, Bettina; Koschorz, Birgit; Shukeir, Nicholas; Onishi-Seebacher, Megumi; van de Nobelen, Suzanne; Jenuwein, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    The Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 histone lysine methyltransferases are hallmark enzymes at mammalian heterochromatin. We show here that the mouse Suv39h2 enzyme differs from Suv39h1 by containing an N-terminal basic domain that facilitates retention at mitotic chromatin and provides an additional affinity for major satellite repeat RNA. To analyze an RNA-dependent interaction with chromatin, we purified native nucleosomes from mouse ES cells and detect that Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 exclusively associate with poly-nucleosomes. This association was attenuated upon RNaseH incubation and entirely lost upon RNaseA digestion of native chromatin. Major satellite repeat transcripts remain chromatin-associated and have a secondary structure that favors RNA:DNA hybrid formation. Together, these data reveal an RNA-mediated mechanism for the stable chromatin interaction of the Suv39h KMT and suggest a function for major satellite non-coding RNA in the organization of an RNA-nucleosome scaffold as the underlying structure of mouse heterochromatin.

  5. Which is the Stronger Nucleophile, Platinum or Nitrogen in Rollover Cycloplatinated(II) Complexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niroomand Hosseini, Fatemeh; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2017-12-04

    The rollover cyclometalated platinum(II) complexes [PtMe(2,X'-bpy-H)(PPh3)], (X = 2, 1a; X = 3, 1b; and X = 4, 1c) containing two potential nucleophilic centers have been investigated to elucidate which center is the stronger nucleophile toward methyl iodide. On the basis of DFT calculations, complexes 1b and 1c are predicted reacting with MeI through the free nitrogen donor to form N-methylated platinum(II) complexes, while complex 1a reacts through oxidative addition on platinum to give a platinum(IV) complex, which is in agreement with experimental findings. The reasons for this difference in selectivity for complexes 1a-1c are discussed based on the energy barrier needed for N-methylation versus oxidative addition reactions.

  6. Action Learning: a new method to increase tractor rollover protective structure (ROPS) adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Elyce Anne; Keane, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    Action Learning is a problem-solving process that is used in various industries to address difficult problems. This project applied Action Learning to a leading problem in agricultural safety. Tractor overturns are the leading cause of fatal injury to farmworkers. This cause of injury is preventable using rollover protective structures (ROPS), protective equipment that functions as a roll bar structure to protect the operator in the event of an overturn. For agricultural tractors manufactured after 1976 and employee operated, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulation requires employers to equip them with ROPS and seat belts. By the mid-1980s, US tractor manufacturers began adding ROPS on all farm tractors over 20 horsepower sold in the United States (http://www.nasdonline.org/document/113/d001656/rollover-protection-for-farm-tractor-operators.html). However, many older tractors remain in use without ROPS, putting tractor operators at continued risk for traumatic injury and fatality. For many older tractor models ROPS are available for retrofit, but for a variety of reasons, tractor owners have not chosen to retrofit those ROPS. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) attempted various means to ameliorate this occupational safety risk, including the manufacture of a low-cost ROPS for self-assembly. Other approaches address barriers to adoption. An Action Learning approach to increasing adoption of ROPS was followed in Virginia and New York, with mixed results. Virginia took action to increase the manufacturing and adoption of ROPS, but New York saw problems that would be insurmountable. Increased focus on team composition might be needed to establish effective Action Learning teams to address this problem.

  7. Investigation of factors affecting the injury severity of single-vehicle rollover crashes: A random-effects generalized ordered probit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anarkooli, Alireza Jafari; Hosseinpour, Mehdi; Kardar, Adele

    2017-09-01

    Rollover crashes are responsible for a notable number of serious injuries and fatalities; hence, they are of great concern to transportation officials and safety researchers. However, only few published studies have analyzed the factors associated with severity outcomes of rollover crashes. This research has two objectives. The first objective is to investigate the effects of various factors, of which some have been rarely reported in the existing studies, on the injury severities of single-vehicle (SV) rollover crashes based on six-year crash data collected on the Malaysian federal roads. A random-effects generalized ordered probit (REGOP) model is employed in this study to analyze injury severity patterns caused by rollover crashes. The second objective is to examine the performance of the proposed approach, REGOP, for modeling rollover injury severity outcomes. To this end, a mixed logit (MXL) model is also fitted in this study because of its popularity in injury severity modeling. Regarding the effects of the explanatory variables on the injury severity of rollover crashes, the results reveal that factors including dark without supplemental lighting, rainy weather condition, light truck vehicles (e.g., sport utility vehicles, vans), heavy vehicles (e.g., bus, truck), improper overtaking, vehicle age, traffic volume and composition, number of travel lanes, speed limit, undulating terrain, presence of central median, and unsafe roadside conditions are positively associated with more severe SV rollover crashes. On the other hand, unpaved shoulder width, area type, driver occupation, and number of access points are found as the significant variables decreasing the probability of being killed or severely injured (i.e., KSI) in rollover crashes. Land use and side friction are significant and positively associated only with slight injury category. These findings provide valuable insights into the causes and factors affecting the injury severity patterns of rollover

  8. The effect of rollover footwear on pain, disability and lumbar posture in patients with low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi, Atefe; Forghany, Saeed; Nester, Christopher; pol, Fateme

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders [1]. Exercise therapy is often advised [2, 3] but requires a significant time commitment, can rely on equipment or health professionals and risks low compliance. As an alternative or adjunct, shoes with a curved sole profile are thought to produce beneficial changes in ankle, knee, hip and back position and posture [4]. Therefore, the aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the effect of rollover footwear on pain...

  9. The PET-derived tumor-to-blood standard uptake ratio (SUR) is superior to tumor SUV as a surrogate parameter of the metabolic rate of FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoff, Jörg; Oehme, Liane; Schramm, Georg; Maus, Jens; Lougovski, Alexandr; Petr, Jan; Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina; Hofheinz, Frank

    2013-11-23

    The standard uptake value (SUV) approach in oncological positron emission tomography has known shortcomings, all of which affect the reliability of the SUV as a surrogate of the targeted quantity, the metabolic rate of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), Km. Among the shortcomings are time dependence, susceptibility to errors in scanner and dose calibration, insufficient correlation between systemic distribution volume and body weight, and, consequentially, residual inter-study variability of the arterial input function (AIF) despite SUV normalization. Especially the latter turns out to be a crucial factor adversely affecting the correlation between SUV and Km and causing inter-study variations of tumor SUVs that do not reflect actual changes of the metabolic uptake rate. In this work, we propose to replace tumor SUV by the tumor-to-blood standard uptake ratio (SUR) in order to distinctly improve the linear correlation with Km. Assuming irreversible FDG kinetics, SUR can be expected to exhibit a much better linear correlation to Km than SUV. The theoretical derivation for this prediction is given and evaluated in a group of nine patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer for which 15 fully dynamic investigations were available and Km could thus be derived from conventional Patlak analysis. For any fixed time point T at sufficiently late times post injection, the Patlak equation predicts a linear correlation between SUR and Km under the following assumptions: (1) approximate shape invariance (but arbitrary scale) of the AIF across scans/patients and (2) low variability of the apparent distribution volume Vr (the intercept of the Patlak Plot). This prediction - and validity of the underlying assumptions - has been verified in the investigated patient group. Replacing tumor SUVs by SURs does improve the linear correlation of the respective parameter with Km from r = 0.61 to r = 0.98. SUR is an easily measurable parameter that is highly correlated to Km. In this

  10. Comparative evaluation of SUV, tumor-to-blood standard uptake ratio (SUR), and dual time point measurements for assessment of the metabolic uptake rate in FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofheinz, Frank; Hoff, Jörg van den; Steffen, Ingo G; Lougovski, Alexandr; Ego, Kilian; Amthauer, Holger; Apostolova, Ivayla

    2016-12-01

    We have demonstrated recently that the tumor-to-blood standard uptake ratio (SUR) is superior to tumor standardized uptake value (SUV) as a surrogate of the metabolic uptake rate K m of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), overcoming several of the known shortcomings of the SUV approach: excellent linear correlation of SUR and K m from Patlak analysis was found using dynamic imaging of liver metastases. However, due to the perfectly standardized uptake period used for SUR determination and the comparatively short uptake period, these results are not automatically valid and applicable for clinical whole-body examinations in which the uptake periods (T) are distinctly longer and can vary considerably. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the correlation between SUR derived from clinical static whole-body scans and K m-surrogate derived from dual time point (DTP) measurements. DTP (18)F-FDG PET/CT was performed in 90 consecutive patients with histologically proven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the PET images, the primary tumor was delineated with an adaptive threshold method. For determination of the blood SUV, an aorta region of interest (ROI) was delineated manually in the attenuation CT and transferred to the PET image. Blood SUV was computed as the mean value of the aorta ROI. SUR values were computed as ratio of tumor SUV and blood SUV. SUR values from the early time point of each DTP measurement were scan time corrected to 75 min postinjection (SURtc). As surrogate of K m, we used the SUR(T) slope, K slope, derived from DTP measurements since it is proportional to the latter under the given circumstances. The correlation of SUV and SURtc with K slope was investigated. The prognostic value of SUV, SURtc, and K slope for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was investigated with univariate Cox regression in a homogeneous subgroup (N=31) treated with primary chemoradiation. Correlation analysis revealed for both, SUV and SURtc, a

  11. Improvement of ash plume monitoring, modeling and hazard assessment in the MED-SUV project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltelli, Mauro; Andronico, Daniele; Boselli, Antonella; Corradini, Stefano; Costa, Antonio; Donnadieu, Franck; Leto, Giuseppe; Macedonio, Giovanni; Merucci, Luca; Neri, Augusto; Pecora, Emilio; Prestifilippo, Michele; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Scollo, Simona; Spinelli, Nicola; Spata, Gaetano; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Wang, Xuan; Zanmar Sanchez, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic ash clouds produced by explosive eruptions represent a strong problem for civil aviation, road transportation and other human activities. Since Etna volcano produced in the last 35 years more the 200 explosive eruptions of small and medium size. The INGV, liable for its volcano monitoring, developed since 2006 a specific system for forecasting and monitoring Etna's volcanic ash plumes in collaboration with several national and international institutions. Between 12 January 2011 and 31 December 2013 Etna produced forty-six basaltic lava fountains. Every paroxysm produced an eruption column ranging from a few up to eleven kilometers of height above sea level. The ash cloud contaminated the controlled airspace (CTR) of Catania and Reggio Calabria airports and caused tephra fallout on eastern Sicily sometime disrupting the operations of these airports. In order to give prompt and detailed warnings to the Aviation and Civil Protection authorities, ash plumes monitoring at Osservatorio Etneo, the INGV department in Catania, is carried out using multispectral (from visible to infrared) satellite and ground-based video-surveillance images; seismic and infrasound signals processed in real-time, a Doppler RADAR (Voldorad IIB) able to detect the eruption column in all weather conditions and a LIDAR (AMPLE) for retrieving backscattering and depolarization values of the ash clouds. Forecasting is performed running tephra dispersal models using weather forecast data, and then plotting results on maps published on a dedicated website. 24/7 Control Room operators were able to timely inform Aviation and Civil Protection operators for an effective aviation safety management. A variety of multidisciplinary activities are planned in the MED-SUV project with reference to volcanic ash observations and studies. These include: 1) physical and analogue laboratory experiments on ash dispersal and aggregation; 2) integration of satellite data (e.g. METEOSAT, MODIS) and ground

  12. OsSUV3 dual helicase functions in salinity stress tolerance by maintaining photosynthesis and antioxidant machinery in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. IR64).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Narendra; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Garg, Bharti; Tuteja, Renu

    2013-10-01

    To overcome the salinity-induced loss of crop yield, a salinity-tolerant trait is required. The SUV3 helicase is involved in the regulation of RNA surveillance and turnover in mitochondria, but the helicase activity of plant SUV3 and its role in abiotic stress tolerance have not been reported so far. Here we report that the Oryza sativa (rice) SUV3 protein exhibits DNA and RNA helicase, and ATPase activities. Furthermore, we report that SUV3 is induced in rice seedlings in response to high levels of salt. Its expression, driven by a constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in IR64 transgenic rice plants, confers salinity tolerance. The T1 and T2 sense transgenic lines showed tolerance to high salinity and fully matured without any loss in yields. The T2 transgenic lines also showed tolerance to drought stress. These results suggest that the introduced trait is functional and stable in transgenic rice plants. The rice SUV3 sense transgenic lines showed lesser lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage and H2 O2 production, along with higher activities of antioxidant enzymes under salinity stress, as compared with wild type, vector control and antisense transgenic lines. These results suggest the existence of an efficient antioxidant defence system to cope with salinity-induced oxidative damage. Overall, this study reports that plant SUV3 exhibits DNA and RNA helicase and ATPase activities, and provides direct evidence of its function in imparting salinity stress tolerance without yield loss. The possible mechanism could be that OsSUV3 helicase functions in salinity stress tolerance by improving photosynthesis and antioxidant machinery in transgenic rice. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Dynamic Testing of Buses and their Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Záruba Petr

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of a virtual simulation method under ECE Regulation No. R66 - bus rollover. The first part of the article introduces the process of virtual simulations in terms of homologation. The conclusion is focused on the correlation of physical tests with virtual simulations.

  14. Design of a drying system for a rollover carwash machine using CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed M.M. Sabet

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the design and development of a new drying system for a rollover carwash machine with the support of numerical tools. The drying system is composed of a pair of stationary vertical dryers and a moveable horizontal dryer that can adjust itself to the contour of a vehicle. After the definition of the dryers’ concept, their performance was assessed individually to check their internal flow pattern and to improve their airflow distribution. These issues are expected to provide feedback on redesign and geometric optimization of the dryers. After redesign of the dryers separately, the behaviour of the complete drying system was studied on actual vehicle models, representative of the shortest and tallest dimensions that can be washed with the existing carwash machine sector. The drying efficiency of the whole system was studied by calculation of shear stress distribution on various surfaces of a given vehicle. The results allowed concluding that the overall drying performance of the design system is very good and assure adequate drying on most vehicles surfaces. The results obtained from numerical studies were then validated with experimental measurements and a good agreement was found between the two. The procedure employed in this work can be applied to support the design and analysis of other mechanical drying systems.

  15. Rollover Car Crashes with Ejection: A Deadly Combination—An Analysis of 719 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifat Latifi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rollover car crashes (ROCs are serious public safety concerns worldwide. Objective. To determine the incidence and outcomes of ROCs with or without ejection of occupants in the State of Qatar. Methods. A retrospective study of all patients involved in ROCs admitted to Level I trauma center in Qatar (2011-2012. Patients were divided into Group I (ROC with ejection and Group II (ROC without ejection. Results. A total of 719 patients were evaluated (237 in Group I and 482 in Group II. The mean age in Group I was lower than in Group II (24.3±10.3 versus 29±12.2; P=0.001. Group I had higher injury severity score and sustained significantly more head, chest, and abdominal injuries in comparison to Group II. The mortality rate was higher in Group I (25% versus 7%; P=0.001. Group I patients required higher ICU admission rate (P=0.001. Patients in Group I had a 5-fold increased risk for age-adjusted mortality (OR 5.43; 95% CI 3.11–9.49, P=0.001. Conclusion. ROCs with ejection are associated with higher rate of morbidity and mortality compared to ROCs without ejection. As an increased number of young Qatari males sustain ROCs with ejection, these findings highlight the need for research-based injury prevention initiatives in the country.

  16. Suv4-20h histone methyltransferases promote neuroectodermal differentiation by silencing the pluripotency-associated Oct-25 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Nicetto

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications (PTMs of histones exert fundamental roles in regulating gene expression. During development, groups of PTMs are constrained by unknown mechanisms into combinatorial patterns, which facilitate transitions from uncommitted embryonic cells into differentiated somatic cell lineages. Repressive histone modifications such as H3K9me3 or H3K27me3 have been investigated in detail, but the role of H4K20me3 in development is currently unknown. Here we show that Xenopus laevis Suv4-20h1 and h2 histone methyltransferases (HMTases are essential for induction and differentiation of the neuroectoderm. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of the two HMTases leads to a selective and specific downregulation of genes controlling neural induction, thereby effectively blocking differentiation of the neuroectoderm. Global transcriptome analysis supports the notion that these effects arise from the transcriptional deregulation of specific genes rather than widespread, pleiotropic effects. Interestingly, morphant embryos fail to repress the Oct4-related Xenopus gene Oct-25. We validate Oct-25 as a direct target of xSu4-20h enzyme mediated gene repression, showing by chromatin immunoprecipitaton that it is decorated with the H4K20me3 mark downstream of the promoter in normal, but not in double-morphant, embryos. Since knockdown of Oct-25 protein significantly rescues the neural differentiation defect in xSuv4-20h double-morphant embryos, we conclude that the epistatic relationship between Suv4-20h enzymes and Oct-25 controls the transit from pluripotent to differentiation-competent neural cells. Consistent with these results in Xenopus, murine Suv4-20h1/h2 double-knockout embryonic stem (DKO ES cells exhibit increased Oct4 protein levels before and during EB formation, and reveal a compromised and biased capacity for in vitro differentiation, when compared to normal ES cells. Together, these results suggest a regulatory mechanism, conserved

  17. Fiber Bragg grating sensors for strain changes measurements at volcanic sites (MED-SUV project; WP 2; Sub-Task 2.2.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Fiodor; Beverini, Nicolò; Calamai, Massimo; Carbone, Daniele; Fotino, Nicoletta; Francesconi, Francesco; Gambino, Salvatore; Grassi, Renzo; Messin, Alfio Alex; Maccioni, Enrico; Morganti, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    Stress and strain changes at volcanic areas are recognized among the best indicators of changes in the activity of the system, and its possible evolution towards critical stages. Depending on their time evolution, stress and strain changes have been the focus of either geodetic (static changes) or seismological (dynamical changes) studies. In volcano geodesy, encouraging results have been obtained though borehole strain-meters. However, they are not easy to install and involve high costs. Therefore, the near future of strain observations at volcanoes depends on the development of broad-band sensors which are low-cost and easy to install, even in the form of dense arrays. Advancements in opto-electronics have allowed the development of low-cost sensors, reliable, rugged and compact, which are particularly suitable for on-field application. In the framework of WP 2 (New monitoring and Observing systems) of the MED-SUV project, the sub-task 2.2 involves the development of strain sensors based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology. In comparison with previous implementation of the FBG technology to study rock deformations, the system that is being developed within MED-SUV is expected to offer a significantly higher resolution and accuracy in static measurements. Moreover, a careful study is being carried out in order to obtain a smooth dynamic response up to 100 Hz, thus allowing the observation of seismic waves. Finally, the system under development will allow multi-axial strain sensing. The system performances are tailored to suit the requirements of volcano monitoring, with special attention to the trade-off between resolution and cost, and with special care to power consumption. Here we present the results of a field campaign with a preliminary, single-axis FBG strain sensor prototype on Etna, which was carried out in order to check the system performances in out-of-the-lab conditions and in the hostile volcanic environment (lack of mains electricity for

  18. Measurement of SUVs-Maximum for Normal Region Using VOI in PET/MRI and PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Kyu Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to establish an overall data set associated with the VOI (Volume of Interest, which is available for simultaneous assessment of PET/MRI and PET/CT regardless of the use of contrast media. The participants as objects of this investigation are 26 healthy examinees in Korea, SUV (standardized-uptake-values-maximum evaluation for whole-body F-18 FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose PET/MRI image using VOI of normal region has exhibited very significant difference to that for whole-body F-18 FDG PET/CT image (significant probability value (P0.8. It is shown that one needs to decide SUVs-maximum for PET/MRI with the reduction of 25.0~26.4% from their evaluated value and needs to decide with the reduction of 28.8~29.4% in the same situation but with the use of contrast media. The use of SUVLBM-maximum (SUVLean Body Mass-maximum is very advantageous in reading overall image of PET/CT and PET/MRI to medical doctors and researchers, if we consider its convenience and efficiency. We expect that this research enhances the level of the early stage accurate diagnosis with whole-body images of PET/MRI and PET/CT.

  19. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase targets SUV4-20-mediated histone H4K20 trimethylation to class-switch recombination sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cortez, Virginia C; Martínez-Redondo, Paloma; Català-Moll, Francesc; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Poorani-Subramani, Ganesh; Ciudad, Laura; Hernando, Henar; Pérez-García, Arantxa; Company, Carlos; Urquiza, José M; Ramiro, Almudena R; Di Noia, Javier M; Vaquero, Alejandro; Ballestar, Esteban

    2017-08-08

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) triggers antibody diversification in B cells by catalysing deamination and subsequently mutating immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Association of AID with RNA Pol II and occurrence of epigenetic changes during Ig gene diversification suggest participation of AID in epigenetic regulation. AID is mutated in hyper-IgM type 2 (HIGM2) syndrome. Here, we investigated the potential role of AID in the acquisition of epigenetic changes. We discovered that AID binding to the IgH locus promotes an increase in H4K20me3. In 293F cells, we demonstrate interaction between co-transfected AID and the three SUV4-20 histone H4K20 methyltransferases, and that SUV4-20H1.2, bound to the IgH switch (S) mu site, is replaced by SUV4-20H2 upon AID binding. Analysis of HIGM2 mutants shows that the AID truncated form W68X is impaired to interact with SUV4-20H1.2 and SUV4-20H2 and is unable to bind and target H4K20me3 to the Smu site. We finally show in mouse primary B cells undergoing class-switch recombination (CSR) that AID deficiency associates with decreased H4K20me3 levels at the Smu site. Our results provide a novel link between SUV4-20 enzymes and CSR and offer a new aspect of the interplay between AID and histone modifications in setting the epigenetic status of CSR sites.

  20. Finite element modeling of ROPS in static testing and rear overturns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J R; Mucino, V H; Etherton, J R; Snyder, K A; Means, K H

    2000-08-01

    Even with the technological advances of the last several decades, agricultural production remains one of the most hazardous occupations in the United States. Death due to tractor rollover is a prime contributor to this hazard. Standards for rollover protective structures (ROPS) performance and certification have been developed by groups such as the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE) to combat these problems. The current ROPS certification standard, SAE J2194, requires either a dynamic or static testing sequence or both. Although some ROPS manufacturers perform both the dynamic and static phases of SAE J2194 testing, it is possible for a ROPS to be certified for field operation using static testing alone. This research compared ROPS deformation response from a simulated SAE J2194 static loading sequence to ROPS deformation response as a result of a simulated rearward tractor rollover. Finite element analysis techniques for plastic deformation were used to simulate both the static and dynamic rear rollover scenarios. Stress results from the rear rollover model were compared to results from simulated static testing per SAE J2194. Maximum stress values from simulated rear rollovers exceeded maximum stress values recorded during simulated static testing for half of the elements comprising the uprights. In the worst case, the static model underpredicts dynamic model results by approximately 7%. In the best case, the static model overpredicts dynamic model results by approximately 32%. These results suggest the need for additional experimental work to characterize ROPS stress levels during staged overturns and during testing according to the SAE standard.

  1. Correlation of PUV and SUV in the extremities while using PEM as a high-resolution positron emission scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahim, Sania [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mawlawi, Osama; Taylor, Shree; Millican, Richelle; Swanston, Nancy M.; Rohren, Eric M. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Fox, Patricia [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Biostatistics, Houston, TX (United States); Brown, J.E. [Yale University Hospital, Department of Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Owing to its unique configuration of two adjustable plate detectors positron emission mammography, or PEM, could theoretically also function as a high-resolution positron emission scanner for the extremities or neck. PEM quantitates its activity via a ''PEM uptake value,'' or PUV, and although its relationship to the standardized uptake value, or SUV, has been demonstrated in the breasts, to our knowledge there are no studies validating PUV in other sites such as the extremities. This was a retrospective chart review of two separate protocols of a total of 15 patients. The patients all had hypermetabolic lesions in the extremities or neck on imaging with PET/CT and were sent after their PET/CT to PEM for further imaging. Owing to the sequential nature of these examinations no additional radiotracer was administered. Spearman's rank order correlation was calculated between the PUVmax obtained from PEM images, and the SUVmax for all. Spearman's rank order correlation for all sites was 0.42, which is not significantly different from 0 (p = 0.13). When neck lesions were excluded from the group, there was a strong and statistically significant correlation between PUVmax and SUVmax, with Spearman's rank correlation of 0.73, and significantly different from 0 (p = 0.0068). The correlation of PUV and SUV in the extremities indicates the potential use of PEM as a semiquantitative, high-resolution positron emission scanner and warrants further investigation, especially in the realms of disease processes that often present in the extremities, such as melanoma, osteomyelitis, and arthritis, as well as playing a role in the imaging of patients with metallic hardware post-limb salvage surgery. (orig.)

  2. Genetic examination of SETD7 and SUV39H1/H2 methyltransferases and the risk of diabetes complications in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syreeni, Anna; El-Osta, Assam; Forsblom, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Hyperglycemia plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of vascular complications, which are the major sources of morbidity and mortality in diabetes. Furthermore, these vascular complications often persist and progress despite improved glucose control, possibly as a result of prior......, and SUV39H2 methyltransferases as predictors of risk for micro- and macrovascular complications in type 1 diabetes....

  3. The value of pre operative S-100B and SUV in clinically stage III melanoma patients undergoing therapeutic lymph node dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, S.; Bastiaannet, E.; Speijers, M. J.; Kobold, A. C. M.; Brouwers, A. H.; Hoekstra, H. J.

    Introduction: High preoperative serum S-100B values and Standardized Uptake Values (SUV) of Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in PET for clinically stage III melanoma patients could be indicators of recurrence after surgical treatment. Aim was to assess the correlation and the prognostic value of these

  4. Incidental colonic focal FDG uptake on PET/CT: can the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) guide us in the timing of colonoscopy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeij, F.B. van; Stadhouders, P.H.G.M.; Weusten, B.L.A.M. [St Antonius Ziekenhuis, Department of Gastroenterology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Keijsers, R.G.M. [St Antonius Ziekenhuis, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Loffeld, B.C.A.J. [Zuwe Hofpoort Ziekenhuis, Department of Internal Medicine, Woerden (Netherlands); Dun, G. [Ziekenhuis Rivierenland, Department of Internal Medicine, Tiel (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    In patients undergoing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, incidental colonic focal lesions can be indicative of inflammatory, premalignant or malignant lesions. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of these lesions, representing the FDG uptake intensity, might be helpful in differentiating malignant from benign lesions, and thereby be helpful in determining the urgency of colonoscopy. The aim of our study was to assess the incidence and underlying pathology of incidental PET-positive colonic lesions in a large cohort of patients, and to determine the usefulness of the SUV{sub max} in differentiating benign from malignant pathology. The electronic records of all patients who underwent FDG PET/CT from January 2010 to March 2013 in our hospital were retrospectively reviewed. The main indications for PET/CT were: characterization of an indeterminate mass on radiological imaging, suspicion or staging of malignancy, and suspicion of inflammation. In patients with incidental focal FDG uptake in the large bowel, data regarding subsequent colonoscopy were retrieved, if performed within 120 days. The final diagnosis was defined using colonoscopy findings, combined with additional histopathological assessment of the lesion, if applicable. Of 7,318 patients analysed, 359 (5 %) had 404 foci of unexpected colonic FDG uptake. In 242 of these 404 lesions (60 %), colonoscopy follow-up data were available. Final diagnoses were: adenocarcinoma in 25 (10 %), adenoma in 90 (37 %), and benign in 127 (53 %). The median [IQR] SUV{sub max} was significantly higher in adenocarcinoma (16.6 [12 - 20.8]) than in benign lesions (8.2 [5.9 - 10.1]; p < 0.0001), non-advanced adenoma (8.3 [6.1 - 10.5]; p < 0.0001) and advanced adenoma (9.7 [7.2 - 12.6]; p < 0.001). The receiver operating characteristic curve of SUV{sub max} for malignant versus nonmalignant lesions had an area under the curve of 0.868 (SD ± 0.038), the optimal cut-off value being 11.4 (sensitivity 80 %, specificity 82

  5. Pretreatment tumor SUV{sub max} predicts disease-specific and overall survival in patients with head and neck soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Seung Cheol; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jungsu S.; Moon, Hyojeong; Kim, Jae Seung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Ja [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Head and neck soft tissue sarcoma (HNSTS) is a rare type of tumor with various histological presentations and clinical behaviors. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is being increasingly used for staging, grading, and predicting treatment outcomes in various types of human cancers, although this modality has been rarely studied in the survival prediction of HNSTS. Here we examined the prognostic value of tumor metabolic parameters measured using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with HNSTS. This study included 36 consecutive patients with HNSTS who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scanning prior to treatment at our institution. Tumor gross total volume (GTV) was measured from pretreatment contrast-enhanced CT scans, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were measured using pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to identify associations between imaging parameters and disease-specific survival (DSS) or overall survival (OS). Univariate analyses showed that SUV{sub max}, MTV, and TLG, but not GTV, were significantly associated with DSS and OS (all P < 0.05). After controlling for clinicopathological factors, SUV{sub max}, MTV, and TLG were significantly associated with DSS and OS (all P < 0.05). Patients with a tumor SUV{sub max} value of >7.0 experienced an approximately fivefold increase in mortality in terms of DSS and OS relative to those with a tumor SUV{sub max} <7.0. Quantitative metabolic measurements on pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT can yield values that are significantly predictive of survival after treatment for HNSTS. (orig.)

  6. MED SUV TASK 6.3 Capacity building and interaction with decision makers: Improving volcanic risk communication through volcanic hazard tools evaluation, Campi Flegrei Caldera case study (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, Rosella; Isaia, Roberto; Sandri, Laura; Cristiani, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    In the communication chain between scientists and decision makers (end users), scientific outputs, as maps, are a fundamental source of information on hazards zoning and the related at risk areas definition. Anyway the relationship between volcanic phenomena, their probability and potential impact can be complex and the geospatial information not easily decoded or understood by not experts even if decision makers. Focusing on volcanic hazard the goal of MED SUV WP6 Task 3 is to improve the communication efficacy of scientific outputs, to contribute in filling the gap between scientists and decision-makers. Campi Flegrei caldera, in Neapolitan area has been chosen as the pilot research area where to apply an evaluation/validation procedure to provide a robust evaluation of the volcanic maps and its validation resulting from end users response. The selected sample involved are decision makers and officials from Campanian Region Civil Protection and municipalities included in Campi Flegrei RED ZONE, the area exposed to risk from to pyroclastic currents hazard. Semi-structured interviews, with a sample of decision makers and civil protection officials have been conducted to acquire both quantitative and qualitative data. The tested maps have been: the official Campi Flegrei Caldera RED ZONE map, three maps produced by overlapping the Red Zone limit on Orthophoto, DTM and Contour map, as well as other maps included a probabilistic one, showing volcanological data used to border the Red Zone. The outcomes' analysis have assessed level of respondents' understanding of content as displayed, and their needs in representing the complex information embedded in volcanic hazard. The final output has been the development of a leaflet as "guidelines" that can support decision makers and officials in understanding volcanic hazard and risk maps, and also in using them as a communication tool in information program for the population at risk. The same evaluation /validation process

  7. Involvement of EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a and associated molecules in pathogenesis of urethane induced mouse lung tumors: Potential targets for cancer control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Manuraj; Sahay, Satya; Tiwari, Prakash [Carcinogenesis Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow –226001 (India); Upadhyay, Daya S. [Laboratory Animals Services, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Sitapur Road, Lucknow (India); Sultana, Sarwat [Dept. Medical Elementology and Toxicology, Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi (India); Gupta, Krishna P., E-mail: krishnag522@yahoo.co.in [Carcinogenesis Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow –226001 (India)

    2014-10-15

    In the present study, we showed the correlation of EZH2, SUV39H1 or G9a expression and histone modifications with the urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis in the presence or absence of antitumor agent, inositol hexaphosphate (IP6). Tumorigenesis and the molecular events involved therein were studied at 1, 4, 12 or 36 weeks after the exposure. There were no tumors at 1 or 4 weeks but tumors started appearing at 12 weeks and grew further till 36 weeks after urethane exposure. Among the molecular events, upregulation of EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions appeared to be time dependent, but G9a expression was altered significantly only at later stages of 12 or 36 weeks. Alteration in miR-138 expression supports the upregulation of its target, EZH2. H3K9me2, H3K27me3 or H4K20me3 was found to be altered at 12 or 36 weeks. However, ChIP analysis of p16 and MLH1 promoters showed their binding with H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 which was maximum at 36 weeks. Thus, histone modification and their interactions with gene promoter resulted in the reduced expression of p16 and MLH1. IP6 prevented the incidence and the size of urethane induced lung tumors. IP6 also prevented the urethane induced alterations in EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a expressions and histone modifications. Our results suggest that the alterations in the histone modification pathways involving EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions are among the early events in urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis and could be exploited for cancer control. - Highlights: • Urethane induces mouse lung tumor in a time dependent manner. • EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a induced by urethane and progress with time • Downregulation of miRNA-138 supports the EZH2 upregulation. • Methylation of histones showed a consequence of upregulated EZH2, SUV39H1 and G9a. • IP6 inhibits urethane induced changes and prevents tumor development.

  8. Correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with the standardized uptake value (SUV) in hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lesions. Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heusch, P.; Buchbender, C. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Koehler, J. [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany). Dept. of Medical Oncology; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in non-small cell lung cancer lesions with standardized uptake values (SUV) derived from combined 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (FDG-PET/MRI) and those derived from FDG-PET/CT. Materials and Methods: In 18 consecutive patients with histologically proven NSCLC (17 men, 1 woman; mean age, 61 {+-} 12 years), whole-body FDG-PET/MRI was performed after whole-body FDG-PET/CT. Regions of interest (ROI) encompassing the entire primary tumor were drawn into FDG-PET/CT and FDG-PET/MR images to determine the maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}; SUV{sub mean}) and into ADC parameter maps to assess mean ADC values. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated to compare SUV and ADC values. Results: The SUV{sub max} of NSCLC was 12.3 {+-} 4.8 [mean {+-} SD], and the SUV{sub mean} was 7.2 {+-} 2.8 as assessed by FDG-PET/MRI. The SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} derived from FDG-PET/CT and FDG-PET/MRI correlated well (R = 0.93; p < 0.001 and R = 0.92; p < 0.001, respectively). The ADC{sub mean} of the pulmonary tumors was 187.9 {+-} 88.8 x 10{sup -5} {sup mm{sup 2/s}} [mean {+-} SD]. The ADC{sub mean} exhibited a significant inverse correlation with the SUV{sub max} (R = -0.72; p < 0.001) as well as with the SUVmean assessed by FDG-PET/MRI (R = -0.71; p < 0.001). Conclusion: This simultaneous PET/MRI study corroborates the assumed significant inverse correlation between increased metabolic activity on FDG-PET and restricted diffusion on DWI in NSCLC. (orig.)

  9. AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF SPORTS UTILITY VEHICLES IN THE UNITED STATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.C.

    2000-08-16

    During the 1990s, sport utility vehicles (SUVs) became the fastest growing segment of the auto industry, especially those in the medium-size category. In 1999, SUV sales reached almost 19% of the total light vehicle market and the mix of SUVs on the road, as measured by registration data, was about 8.7%. This immense popularity has been called by some a passing fad--vehicle purchases based on the SUV ''image''. But the continued yearly increases in SUV sales seem to indicate a more permanent trend. Additional explanations for SUV popularity include the general economic well being in the United States, a perception of safety, and ''utility''. Generally larger and heavier than the typical automobile, SUVs require more fuel per mile to operate and produce greater amounts of pollutants. They are also driven further annually than are automobiles of the same vintage, a fact that exacerbates the fuel-use and emission problems. Although buyers believe that SUVs are safer than automobiles which they are in some cases, SUVs are more prone to roll-overs than are automobiles. In addition, SUVs, with their higher bumpers and greater weight, may be a threat to other vehicles on the highway, especially in side-impact crashes. With sales projected to grow to over 3 million units per year beginning in 2001, SUVs show no sign of decreasing in popularity. These vehicles are used primarily for general mobility, rather than off-road activities. An emphasis on better fuel economy and improved emissions control could address environmental and oil dependency concerns. In fact, recently, two vehicle manufacturers announced intentions of improving the fuel economy of their SUVs in the next few years. Also, tests simulating crashes involving automobiles and SUVs could provide valuable data for identifying potential safety design issues. It is clear that automobiles and SUVs will be sharing the highways for years to come.

  10. Analysis of the economic and ecological performances in the transient regimes of the European driving cycle for a midsize SUV equipped with a DHEP, using the simulation platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancă, Gheorghe; Ivan, Florian; Iozsa, Daniel; Nisulescu, Valentin

    2017-10-01

    Currently, the tendency of the car manufacturers is to continue the expansion of the global production of SUVs (Sport Utility Vehicle), while observing the requirements imposed by the new pollution standards by developing new technologies like DHEP (Diesel Hybrid Electric Powertrain). Experience has shown that the transient regimes are the most difficult to control from an economic and ecological perspective. As a result, this paper will highlight the behaviour of such engines that are provided in a middle class SUV (Sport Utility Vehicle), which operates in such states. We selected the transient regimes characteristic to the NMVEG (New Motor Vehicle Emissions Group) cycle. The investigations using the modelling platform AMESim allowed for rigorous interpretations for the 16 acceleration and 18 deceleration states. The results obtained from the simulation will be validated by experiments.

  11. Experimental investigations of an automotive heat pump prototype for military, SUV and compact cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannavola, M.S.; Murphy, R; Yin, J.M.; Kim, M.H.; Bullard, C.W.; Hrnjak, P.S. [Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Center ACRC, University of Illinios, Urbana (United States)

    2000-11-01

    This article presents the results of the experiments conducted on a prototype R744 (CO2) system operating in a heat pump mode, with the heat rejection path lying entirely within the supercritical region. The prototype system was sized for a compact car, but these experiments were conducted to provide baseline for scale-up to sport utility vehicle size. Data presented here are for a limited range of operation. Further optimization and extension of operating range is underway. To our knowledge this is the first experiment with transcritical CO2 heat pump reported in the open literature. Test facilities for such experiments and systems are described. The prospect of extending the operating range of a mobile a/c system to a mobile heat pump operation appears promising, especially for vehicles with efficient engines, having insufficient waste heat for quick and reliable cabin heating. 8 figs., 16 refs.

  12. SUV2, which encodes an ATR-related cell cycle checkpoint and putative plant ATRIP, is required for aluminium-dependent root growth inhibition in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, Caroline A; Larsen, Paul B

    2017-09-01

    A suppressor mutagenesis screen was conducted in order to identify second site mutations that could reverse the extreme hypersensitivity to aluminium (Al) seen for the Arabidopsis mutant, als3-1. From this screen, it was found that a loss-of-function mutation in the previously described SUV2 (SENSITIVE TO UV 2), which encodes a putative plant ATRIP homologue that is a component of the ATR-dependent cell checkpoint response, reversed the als3-1 phenotype. This included prevention of hallmarks associated with als3-1 including Al-dependent terminal differentiation of the root tip and transition to endoreduplication. From this analysis, SUV2 was determined to be required for halting cell cycle progression and triggering loss of the quiescent centre (QC) following exposure to Al. In conjunction with this, SUV2 was found to have a similar role as ATR, ALT2 and SOG1 in Al-dependent stoppage of root growth, all of which are required for promotion of expression of a suite of genes that likely are part of an Al-dependent DNA damage transcriptional response. This work argues that these Al response factors work together to detect Al-dependent damage and subsequently activate a DNA damage response pathway that halts the cell cycle and subsequently promotes QC differentiation and entrance into endocycling. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. SUV-quantification of physiological lung tissue in an integrated PET/MR-system: Impact of lung density and bone tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Bezrukov, Ilja; Schraml, Christina; Pfannenberg, Christina; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of lung density changes as well as bone proximity on the attenuation correction of lung standardized uptake values (SUVs). Methods and materials 15 patients with mostly oncologic diseases were examined in 18F-FDG-PET/CT and subsequently in a fully integrated PET/MR scanner. From each PET dataset acquired in PET/MR, four different PET reconstructions were computed using different attenuation maps (μ-maps): i) CT-based μ-map (gold standard); ii) CT-based μ-map in which the linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) of the lung tissue was replaced by the lung LAC from the MR-based segmentation method; iii) based on reconstruction ii), the LAC of bone structures was additionally replaced with the LAC from the MR-based segmentation method; iv) the vendor-provided MR-based μ-map (segmentation-based method). Those steps were performed using MATLAB. CT Hounsfield units (HU) and SUVmean was acquired in different levels and regions of the lung. Relative differences between the differently corrected PETs were computed. Results Compared to the gold standard, reconstruction ii), iii) and iv) led to a relative underestimation of SUV in the posterior regions of -9.0%, -13.4% and -14.0%, respectively. Anterior and middle regions were less affected with an overestimation of about 6–8% in reconstructions ii)–iv). Conclusion It could be shown that both, differences in lung density and the vicinity of bone tissue in the μ-map may have an influence on SUV, mostly affecting the posterior lung regions. PMID:28562622

  14. Harmonizing SUVs in multicentre trials when using different generation PET systems: prospective validation in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasnon, Charline; Quak, Elske [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Caen (France); Desmonts, Cedric [Caen University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Caen (France); Gervais, Radj; Do, Pascal; Dubos-Arvis, Catherine [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Thoracic Oncology, Caen (France); Aide, Nicolas [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Caen (France); Centre Francois Baclesse, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Caen cedex 5 (France)

    2013-07-15

    We prospectively evaluated whether a strategy using point spread function (PSF) reconstruction for both diagnostic and quantitative analysis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients meets the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines for harmonization of quantitative values. The NEMA NU-2 phantom was used to determine the optimal filter to apply to PSF-reconstructed images in order to obtain recovery coefficients (RCs) fulfilling the EANM guidelines for tumour positron emission tomography (PET) imaging (PSF{sub EANM}). PET data of 52 consecutive NSCLC patients were reconstructed with unfiltered PSF reconstruction (PSF{sub allpass}), PSF{sub EANM} and with a conventional ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm known to meet EANM guidelines. To mimic a situation in which a patient would undergo pre- and post-therapy PET scans on different generation PET systems, standardized uptake values (SUVs) for OSEM reconstruction were compared to SUVs for PSF{sub EANM} and PSF{sub allpass} reconstruction. Overall, in 195 lesions, Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated that the mean ratio between PSF{sub EANM} and OSEM data was 1.03 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.94-1.12] and 1.02 (95 % CI 0.90-1.14) for SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}, respectively. No difference was noticed when analysing lesions based on their size and location or on patient body habitus and image noise. Ten patients (84 lesions) underwent two PET scans for response monitoring. Using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria, there was an almost perfect agreement between OSEM{sub PET1}/OSEM{sub PET2} (current standard) and OSEM{sub PET1}/PSF{sub EANM-PET2} or PSF{sub EANM-PET1}/OSEM{sub PET2} with kappa values of 0.95 (95 % CI 0.91-1.00) and 0.99 (95 % CI 0.96-1.00), respectively. The use of PSF{sub allpass} either for pre- or post-treatment (i.e. OSEM{sub PET1}/PSF{sub allpass-PET2} or PSF{sub allpass-PET1}/OSEM{sub PET2}) showed

  15. Chores at Times of Fatal or Serious Injuries Associated with Tractor Overturns with and without Rollover Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry P. Cole

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study describes chores when farmers were either fatally or seriously injured and required emergency medical treatment as a result of overturns of tractors with or without rollover protective structures (ROPS. Data from the 2002 Kentucky Farm Tractor Overturn Survey were used for this study. The data were collected by a telephone survey of a population-based random sample of 6063 (7.98% of Kentucky’s 76,017 farm operators as listed in the Kentucky Agricultural Statistics Service database. Of farm operators interviewed, 551 (9.1% reported 603 overturns and 5512 (90.9% reported no overturns in the history of their farm, covering a period from 1925 to February 2002. Only the latest overturn was considered to improve recall accuracy. In addition, since the 1925 to 1959 time period had only 49 (8.1% of the overturns reported, (14 farmers did not provide the year of most recent overturn; only data from the 1960 to 2002 period (approximately 41 years were used. After making these adjustments, incidents evaluated included 25 cases (one fatal and four serious nonfatal injuries that involved ROPS-equipped tractor overturns and 88 cases (24 fatal and 64 serious nonfatal injuries that involved non-ROPS tractor overturns. Chores at highest risk for tractor overturns were identified for which educational and ROPS retrofit interventions could be emphasized. The highest frequency of overturn-related fatalities and nonfatal injuries were associated with hay harvesting, rotary mowing, and on-farm travel chores. These three chores represented 68.2% of fatal events and 50.0% of permanent and 56.6% of temporary disability overturn incidents. Tragically, in countries such as India and China with emerging mechanization, a large majority of tractors are produced without ROPS that can be expected to result in the same overturn-related epidemic of deaths experienced in highly mechanized countries, despite evidence of the protection provided by ROPS.

  16. KAT7/HBO1/MYST2 Regulates CENP-A Chromatin Assembly by Antagonizing Suv39h1-Mediated Centromere Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohzeki, Jun-Ichirou; Shono, Nobuaki; Otake, Koichiro; Martins, Nuno M C; Kugou, Kazuto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagase, Takahiro; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2016-06-06

    Centromere chromatin containing histone H3 variant CENP-A is required for accurate chromosome segregation as a foundation for kinetochore assembly. Human centromere chromatin assembles on a part of the long α-satellite (alphoid) DNA array, where it is flanked by pericentric heterochromatin. Heterochromatin spreads into adjacent chromatin and represses gene expression, and it can antagonize centromere function or CENP-A assembly. Here, we demonstrate an interaction between CENP-A assembly factor M18BP1 and acetyltransferase KAT7/HBO1/MYST2. Knocking out KAT7 in HeLa cells reduced centromeric CENP-A assembly. Mitotic chromosome misalignment and micronuclei formation increased in the knockout cells and were enhanced when the histone H3-K9 trimethylase Suv39h1 was overproduced. Tethering KAT7 to an ectopic alphoid DNA integration site removed heterochromatic H3K9me3 modification and was sufficient to stimulate new CENP-A or histone H3.3 assembly. Thus, KAT7-containing acetyltransferases associating with the Mis18 complex provides competence for histone turnover/exchange activity on alphoid DNA and prevents Suv39h1-mediated heterochromatin invasion into centromeres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 30 CFR 77.403-1 - Mobile equipment; rollover protective structures (ROPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance with the applicable specification listed in paragraph (c)(1) or (2) of this section, or he shall... Protection—Test Procedures and Performance Requirements”; or (vi) J 334a, “Protective Frame Test Procedures... Labor: Safety and Health Regulations for Construction, 29 CFR 1926.1001 and 1926.1002. (f) Field welding...

  18. Repeatability study of replicate crash tests: A signal analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppi, Jeremy; Toczyski, Jacek; Crandall, Jeff R; Kerrigan, Jason

    2017-10-03

    To provide an objective basis on which to evaluate the repeatability of vehicle crash test methods, a recently developed signal analysis method was used to evaluate correlation of sensor time history data between replicate vehicle crash tests. The goal of this study was to evaluate the repeatability of rollover crash tests performed with the Dynamic Rollover Test System (DRoTS) relative to other vehicle crash test methods. Test data from DRoTS tests, deceleration rollover sled (DRS) tests, frontal crash tests, frontal offset crash tests, small overlap crash tests, small overlap impact (SOI) crash tests, and oblique crash tests were obtained from the literature and publicly available databases (the NHTSA vehicle database and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety TechData) to examine crash test repeatability. Signal analysis of the DRoTS tests showed that force and deformation time histories had good to excellent repeatability, whereas vehicle kinematics showed only fair repeatability due to the vehicle mounting method for one pair of tests and slightly dissimilar mass properties (2.2%) in a second pair of tests. Relative to the DRS, the DRoTS tests showed very similar or higher levels of repeatability in nearly all vehicle kinematic data signals with the exception of global X' (road direction of travel) velocity and displacement due to the functionality of the DRoTS fixture. Based on the average overall scoring metric of the dominant acceleration, DRoTS was found to be as repeatable as all other crash tests analyzed. Vertical force measures showed good repeatability and were on par with frontal crash barrier forces. Dynamic deformation measures showed good to excellent repeatability as opposed to poor repeatability seen in SOI and oblique deformation measures. Using the signal analysis method as outlined in this article, the DRoTS was shown to have the same or better repeatability of crash test methods used in government regulatory and consumer evaluation test

  19. A mutation in the SUV39H2 gene in Labrador Retrievers with hereditary nasal parakeratosis (HNPK provides insights into the epigenetics of keratinocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhya Jagannathan

    Full Text Available Hereditary nasal parakeratosis (HNPK, an inherited monogenic autosomal recessive skin disorder, leads to crusts and fissures on the nasal planum of Labrador Retrievers. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS using 13 HNPK cases and 23 controls. We obtained a single strong association signal on chromosome 2 (p(raw = 4.4×10⁻¹⁴. The analysis of shared haplotypes among the 13 cases defined a critical interval of 1.6 Mb with 25 predicted genes. We re-sequenced the genome of one case at 38× coverage and detected 3 non-synonymous variants in the critical interval with respect to the reference genome assembly. We genotyped these variants in larger cohorts of dogs and only one was perfectly associated with the HNPK phenotype in a cohort of more than 500 dogs. This candidate causative variant is a missense variant in the SUV39H2 gene encoding a histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9 methyltransferase, which mediates chromatin silencing. The variant c.972T>G is predicted to change an evolutionary conserved asparagine into a lysine in the catalytically active domain of the enzyme (p.N324K. We further studied the histopathological alterations in the epidermis in vivo. Our data suggest that the HNPK phenotype is not caused by hyperproliferation, but rather delayed terminal differentiation of keratinocytes. Thus, our data provide evidence that SUV39H2 is involved in the epigenetic regulation of keratinocyte differentiation ensuring proper stratification and tight sealing of the mammalian epidermis.

  20. FDG-PET Response Prediction in Pediatric Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Impact of Metabolically Defined Tumor Volumes and Individualized SUV Measurements on the Positive Predictive Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Elsayed M. Hussien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In pediatric Hodgkin’s lymphoma (pHL early response-to-therapy prediction is metabolically assessed by (18F-FDG PET carrying an excellent negative predictive value (NPV but an impaired positive predictive value (PPV. Aim of this study was to improve the PPV while keeping the optimal NPV. A comparison of different PET data analyses was performed applying individualized standardized uptake values (SUV, PET-derived metabolic tumor volume (MTV and the product of both parameters, termed total lesion glycolysis (TLG; Methods: One-hundred-eight PET datasets (PET1, n = 54; PET2, n = 54 of 54 children were analysed by visual and semi-quantitative means. SUVmax, SUVmean, MTV and TLG were obtained the results of both PETs and the relative change from PET1 to PET2 (Δ in % were compared for their capability of identifying responders and non-responders using receiver operating characteristics (ROC-curves. In consideration of individual variations in noise and contrasts levels all parameters were additionally obtained after threshold correction to lean body mass and background; Results: All semi-quantitative SUV estimates obtained at PET2 were significantly superior to the visual PET2 analysis. However, ΔSUVmax revealed the best results (area under the curve, 0.92; p < 0.001; sensitivity 100%; specificity 85.4%; PPV 46.2%; NPV 100%; accuracy, 87.0% but was not significantly superior to SUVmax-estimation at PET2 and ΔTLGmax. Likewise, the lean body mass and background individualization of the datasets did not impove the results of the ROC analyses; Conclusions: Sophisticated semi-quantitative PET measures in early response assessment of pHL patients do not perform significantly better than the previously proposed ΔSUVmax. All analytical strategies failed to improve the impaired PPV to a clinically acceptable level while preserving the excellent NPV.

  1. FDG-PET Response Prediction in Pediatric Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Impact of Metabolically Defined Tumor Volumes and Individualized SUV Measurements on the Positive Predictive Value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussien, Amr Elsayed M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine (KME), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Jülich, 52426 (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 40225 (Germany); Furth, Christian [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical School, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, 39120 (Germany); Schönberger, Stefan [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Clinical Immunology, University Children’s Hospital, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 40225 (Germany); Hundsdoerfer, Patrick [Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Charité Campus Virchow, Humboldt-University Berlin, Berlin, 13353 (Germany); Steffen, Ingo G.; Amthauer, Holger [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical School, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, 39120 (Germany); Müller, Hans-Wilhelm; Hautzel, Hubertus, E-mail: h.hautzel@fz-juelich.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine (KME), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Jülich, 52426 (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 40225 (Germany)

    2015-01-28

    Background: In pediatric Hodgkin’s lymphoma (pHL) early response-to-therapy prediction is metabolically assessed by (18)F-FDG PET carrying an excellent negative predictive value (NPV) but an impaired positive predictive value (PPV). Aim of this study was to improve the PPV while keeping the optimal NPV. A comparison of different PET data analyses was performed applying individualized standardized uptake values (SUV), PET-derived metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the product of both parameters, termed total lesion glycolysis (TLG); Methods: One-hundred-eight PET datasets (PET1, n = 54; PET2, n = 54) of 54 children were analysed by visual and semi-quantitative means. SUVmax, SUVmean, MTV and TLG were obtained the results of both PETs and the relative change from PET1 to PET2 (Δ in %) were compared for their capability of identifying responders and non-responders using receiver operating characteristics (ROC)-curves. In consideration of individual variations in noise and contrasts levels all parameters were additionally obtained after threshold correction to lean body mass and background; Results: All semi-quantitative SUV estimates obtained at PET2 were significantly superior to the visual PET2 analysis. However, ΔSUVmax revealed the best results (area under the curve, 0.92; p < 0.001; sensitivity 100%; specificity 85.4%; PPV 46.2%; NPV 100%; accuracy, 87.0%) but was not significantly superior to SUVmax-estimation at PET2 and ΔTLGmax. Likewise, the lean body mass and background individualization of the datasets did not impove the results of the ROC analyses; Conclusions: Sophisticated semi-quantitative PET measures in early response assessment of pHL patients do not perform significantly better than the previously proposed ΔSUVmax. All analytical strategies failed to improve the impaired PPV to a clinically acceptable level while preserving the excellent NPV.

  2. Tripped rollover (phase A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has expressed interest in learning more about pavement drop-offs at the edge of roadways and their relationship with the roll stability of heavy vehicles. Statistics kept by the National Highway Traffic Safet...

  3. Absolute number of new lesions on 18F-FDG PET/CT is more predictive of clinical response than SUV changes in metastatic melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Hoda; Sachpekidis, Christos; Winkler, Julia; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Haberkorn, Uwe; Hassel, Jessica C; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-11-10

    Evaluation of response to immunotherapy is a matter of debate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the response of metastatic melanoma to treatment with ipilimumab by means of 18F-FDG PET/CT, using the patients' clinical response as reference. The final cohort included in the analyses consisted of 41 patients with metastatic melanoma who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT before and after administration of ipilimumab. After determination of the best clinical response, the PET/CT scans were reviewed and a separate independent analysis was performed, based on the number and functional size of newly emerged 18F-FDG-avid lesions, as well as on the SUV changes after therapy. The median observation time of the patients after therapy was 21.4 months (range 6.3-41.9 months). Based on their clinical response, patients were dichotomized into those with clinical benefit (CB) and those without CB (No-CB). The CB group (31 patients) included those with stable disease, partial remission and complete remission, and the No-CB group (10 patients) included those with progressive disease. The application of a threshold of four newly emerged 18F-FDG-avid lesions on the posttherapy PET/CT scan led to a sensitivity (correctly predicting CB) of 84% and a specificity (correctly predicting No-CB) of 100%. This cut-off was lower for lesions with larger functional diameters (three new lesions larger than 1.0 cm and two new lesions larger than 1.5 cm). SUV changes after therapy did not correlate with clinical response. Based on these findings, we developed criteria for predicting clinical response to immunotherapy by means of 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET Response Evaluation Criteria for Immunotherapy, PERCIMT). Our results show that a cut-off of four newly emerged 18F-FDG-avid lesions on posttherapy PET/CT gives a reliable indication of treatment failure in patients under ipilimumab treatment. Moreover, the functional size of the new lesions plays an important role in predicting the clinical

  4. Crash compatibility between cars and light trucks: benefits of lowering front-end energy-absorbing structure in SUVs and pickups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bryan C; Nolan, Joseph M; O'Neill, Brian; Genetos, Alexander P

    2008-01-01

    Passenger vehicles are designed to absorb crash energy in frontal crashes through deformation or crush of energy-absorbing structures forward of the occupant compartment. In collisions between cars and light trucks (i.e., pickups and SUVs), however, the capacity of energy-absorption structures may not be fully utilized because mismatches often exist between the heights of these structures in the colliding vehicles. In 2003 automakers voluntarily committed to new design standards aimed at reducing the height mismatches between cars and light trucks. By September 2009 all new light trucks will have either the primary front structure (typically the frame rails) or a secondary structure connected to the primary structure low enough to interact with the primary structures in cars, which for most cars is about the height of the front bumper. To estimate the overall benefit of the voluntary commitment, the real-world crash experience of light trucks already meeting the height-matching criteria was compared with that of light trucks not meeting the criteria for 2000-2003 model light trucks in collisions with passenger cars during calendar years 2001-2004. The estimated benefits of lower front energy-absorbing structure were a 19 percent reduction (pcar drivers in front-to-front crashes with light trucks and a 19 percent reduction (pcar drivers in front-to-driver-side crashes with light trucks.

  5. Low Profile and Low Cost Antenna Technology for Satellite TV Reception on Sports Utility Vehicles (SUV) for the US Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, F. Javier; Pearson, Robert A.; Driscoll, Barry G.

    2003-07-01

    A low profile scanning antenna for reception of satellite TV has been developed for the US market compatible with existing DBS Ku band satellite infrastructure. This antenna technology does not require active RF components and it is inherently low cost (in the order of a few hundred dollars even in moderate production volumes). The antenna is able to scan a circularly polarised beam in the range 20 to 69 degrees, covering three DBS satellites in the US including some margin for vehicle tilt. An antenna demonstrator of 115 mm height, including the radome and tracking electronics has been built and measured. Live tests were performed in the US during 2002 to determine realistic link margins and antenna specifications. A product development is currently being undertaken to turn the demonstrator unit into a product for the US market by the end of 2003.

  6. A prospective analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with uveal melanoma: comparison between metabolic rate of glucose (MRglu) and standardized uptake value (SUV) and correlations with histopathological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Maria Lucia; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Rufini, Vittoria; Giordano, Alessandro [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Roma (Italy); Blasi, Maria Antonietta; Sammarco, Maria Grazia [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Institute of Ophthalmology, Roma (Italy); Petrone, Gianluigi; Mule, Antonino [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Department of Pathology, Roma (Italy); Indovina, Luca [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Physics Unit, Roma (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    To evaluate whether standardized uptake value (SUV) and/or metabolic rate of glucose (MRglu) are different among epithelioid, mixed, and spindle cell uveal melanomas, as well as between low and high risk melanomas; to correlate ultrasonographic data and metabolic parameters with histopathological features; and to assess the role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for evaluating prognosis. Of 34 eligible patients prospectively enrolled with clinical suspicion of medium/large uveal melanoma, 26 (15 men, mean age 62.8 {+-} 11.8 years) were evaluated. All patients underwent metastatic work-up, 3-D dynamic brain and whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, and surgery. Of the 26 ocular lesions, 23 showed {sup 18}F-FDG uptake, with a sensitivity of 88 %. MRglu was significantly higher in the epithelioid cell melanomas than in the spindle cell melanomas, as well as in high-risk lesions than in low-risk lesions (p = 0.01, p = 0.02, respectively). SUV and MRglu were correlated with histopathological features while ultrasonographic data were not. MRglu is useful for distinguishing the different cell types in uveal melanoma, as well as high-risk from low-risk lesions, while SUV is not. MRglu provides a more accurate evaluation of glucose consumption, whereas SUV provides only an estimation. In addition, the metabolic parameters correlate with histopathological features, well also reflecting cellular behaviour in ocular malignancy. A longer follow-up is needed to assess the role of {sup 18}F-FDG in evaluating prognosis. (orig.)

  7. Estimation of proliferative potentiality of central neurocytoma: correlational analysis of minimum ADC and maximum SUV with MIB-1 labeling index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ryo; Okada, Tomohisa; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Yamamoto, Akira; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Kakigi, Takahide; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Jun C; Mikami, Yoshiki; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Central neurocytoma was initially believed to be benign tumor type, although atypical cases with more aggressive behavior have been reported. Preoperative estimation for proliferating activity of central neurocytoma is one of the most important considerations for determining tumor management. To investigate predictive values of image characteristics and quantitative measurements of minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin) and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) for proliferative activity of central neurocytoma measured by MIB-1 labeling index (LI). Twelve cases of central neurocytoma including one recurrence from January 2001 to December 2011 were included. Preoperative scans were conducted in 11, nine, and five patients for computed tomography (CT), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), respectively, and ADCmin and SUVmax of the tumors were measured. Image characteristics were investigated using CT, T2-weighted (T2W) imaging and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) imaging, and their differences were examined using the Fisher's exact test between cases with MIB-1 LI below and above 2%, which is recognized as typical and atypical central neurocytoma, respectively. Correlational analysis was conducted for ADCmin and SUVmax with MIB-1 LI. A P value r = -0.91 and 0.74, respectively), but only ADCmin was statistically significant (P = 0.0006). Central neurocytoma had a wide variety of image appearance, and assessment of proliferative potential was considered difficult only by morphological aspects. ADCmin was recognized as a potential marker for differentiation of atypical central neurocytomas from the typical ones. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES an active seismic and passive seismic experiment at Mt. Etna volcano. An integrated marine and onland geophysical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Jesus. M.; Patane, Domenico; Puglisi, Guisseppe; Zuccarello, Lucciano; Bianco, Francesca; Luehr, Birger; Diaz-Moreno, Alejandro; Prudencio, Janire; Koulakov, Ivan; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Cocina, Ornella; Coltelli, Mauro; Scarfi, Lucciano; De Gori, Pascuale; Carrion, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    An active seismic experiment to study the internal structure of Etna Volcano is going to carried out on Sicily and Aeolian islands. The main objective of the TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES experiment, beginning in summer 2014, is to perform a high resolution seismic tomography, in velocity and attenuation, in Southern Italy, by using active and passive seismic data, in an area encompassing outstanding volcanoes as Mt. Etna, and Aeolian volcanoes. The achievement of this objective is based on the integration and sharing of the in-situ marine and land experiments and observations and on the implementation of new instruments and monitoring systems. For the purpose, onshore and offshore seismic stations and passive and active seismic data generated both in marine and terrestrial environment will be used. Additionally, other geophysical data, mainly magnetic and gravimetric data will be considered to obtain a joint Upper Mantle-Crust structure that could permit to make progress in the understanding of the dynamic of the region. This multinational experiment which involves institutions from Spain, Italy, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Malta, Portugal, Russia, USA and Mexico. During the experiment more than 6.600 air gun shots performed by the Spanish Oceanographic vessel "Sarmiento de Gamboa" will be recorder on a dense local seismic network consisting of 100 on land non-permanent stations, 70 on land permanent stations and 20-25 OBSs. Contemporaneously other marine geophysical measures will be performed using a marine Gravimeter LaCoste&Romberg Air-Sea Gravity System II and a Marine Magnetometer SeaSPY. The experiments will provide a unique data set in terms of data quantity and quality, and it will provide a detailed velocity and attenuation structural image of volcano edifice. The results will be essential in the development and interpretation of future volcanic models. It is noteworthy that this project is fully transversal, multidisciplinary and crosses several

  9. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  10. Current knowledge on the sensitivity of the {sup 68}Ga-somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography and the SUV{sub max} reference range for management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgolini, Irene; Gabriel, Michael; Kroiss, Alexander; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Prommegger, Rupert; Warwitz, Boris; Nilica, Bernhard; Roig, Ilanos Geraldo; Rodrigues, Margarida; Uprimny, Christian [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-10-15

    Physiologically increased pancreatic uptake at the head/uncinate process is observed in more than one-third of patients after injection of one of the three {sup 68}Ga-labelled octreotide-based peptides used for somatostatin (sst) receptor (r) imaging. There are minor differences between these {sup 68}Ga-sstr-binding peptides in the imaging setting. On {sup 68}Ga-sstr-imaging the physiological uptake can be diffuse or focal and usually remains stable over time. Differences in the maximal standardised uptake values (SUV{sub max}) reported for the normal pancreas as well as for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PNET) lesions may be related to several factors, including (a) differences in the peptide binding affinities as well as differences in sstr subtype expression of pancreatic α- and β-cells, and heterogeneity / density of tumour cells, (b) differences in scanner resolution, image reconstruction techniques and acquisition protocols, (c) mostly retrospective study designs, (d) mixed patient populations, or (e) interference with medications such as treatment with long-acting sst analogues. The major limitation in most of the studies lies in the lack of histopathological confirmation of abnormal findings. There is a significant overlap between the calculated SUV{sub max}-values for physiological pancreas and PNET-lesions of the head/uncinate process that do not favour the use of quantitative parameters in the clinical setting. Anecdotal long-term follow-up studies have even indicated that increased uptake in the head/uncinate process still can turn out to be malignant over years of follow up. SUV{sub max}-data for the pancreatic body and tail are limited. Therefore, any visible focal tracer uptake in the pancreas must be considered as suspicious for malignancy irrespective of quantitative parameters. In general, sstr-PET/CT has significant implications for the management of NET patients leading to a change in treatment decision in about one-third of patients

  11. Análisis competitivo por parte de los fabricantes de automóviles y camionetas SUV mediante el Uso del Valor Percibido por el cliente como una herramienta para ese propósito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Baby Moreno

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo trata del uso del Valor Percibido por el Cliente como herramienta para el análisis competitivo por parte de ensambladoras y concesionarios de Sports Utility Vehicles (SUV. Se muestra cómo se determinan la importancia relativa de los atributos que los compradores tienen en cuenta para evaluar el desempeño de un concesionario y la evaluación de desempeño de los principales proveedores de este tipo de vehículo. Posteriormente, se ilustra la manera como una marca visualiza su posición competitiva. También muestra la brecha entre los valores ideales esperados por el mercado y el valor percibido por el mercado, lo cual se constituye en un mapa de oportunidades para las firmas actualmente presentes en el mercado y para nuevos participantes.

  12. Test-retest repeatability of quantitative cardiac 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine measurements in rats by small animal positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James T; Renaud, Jennifer M; Kordos, Myra; Klein, Ran; Dekemp, Robert A; Beanlands, Rob S B; DaSilva, Jean N

    2013-07-01

    The norepinephrine analogue (11)C-meta-hydroxyephedrine (HED) has been used to interrogate sympathetic neuronal reuptake in cardiovascular disease. Application for longitudinal studies in small animal models of disease necessitates an understanding of test-retest variability. This study evaluated the repeatability of multiple quantitative cardiac measurements of HED retention and washout and the pharmacological response to reuptake blockade and enhanced norepinephrine levels. Small animal PET images were acquired over 60 min following HED administration to healthy male Sprague Dawley rats. Paired test and retest scans were undertaken in individual animals over . Additional HED scans were conducted following administration of norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desipramine or continuous infusion of exogenous norepinephrine. HED retention was quantified by retention index, standardized uptake value (SUV), monoexponential and one-compartment washout. Plasma and cardiac norepinephrine were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Test retest variability was lower for retention index (15% ± 12%) and SUV (19% ± 15%) as compared to monoexponential washout rates (21% ± 13%). Desipramine pretreatment reduced myocardial HED retention index by 69% and SUV by 85%. Chase treatment with desipramine increased monoexponential HED washout by 197% compared to untreated controls. Norepinephrine infusion dose-dependently reduced HED accumulation, reflected by both retention index and SUV, with a corresponding increase in monoexponential washout. Plasma and cardiac norepinephrine levels correlated with HED quantitative measurements. The repeatability of HED retention index, SUV, and monoexponential washout supports its suitability for longitudinal PET studies in rats. Uptake and washout of HED are sensitive to acute increases in norepinephrine concentration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with the standardized uptake value (SUV) in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients using hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaarschmidt, Benedikt Michael; Buchbender, Christian; Nensa, Felix; Grueneisen, Johannes; Grueneien, Johannes; Gomez, Benedikt; Köhler, Jens; Reis, Henning; Ruhlmann, Verena; Umutlu, Lale; Heusch, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with standardized uptake values (SUV) derived from combined 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (18F-FDG PET/MRI). 38 patients with histopathologically proven NSCLC (mean age 60.1 ± 9.5 y) received whole-body PET/CT (Siemens mCT™) 60 min after injection of a mean dose of 280 ± 50 MBq 18F-FDG and subsequent PET/MRI (mean time after tracer injection: 139 ± 26 min, Siemens Biograph mMR). During PET acquisition, simultaneous diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, b values: 0, 500, 1000 s/mm²) was performed. A maximum of 10 lymph nodes per patient suspicious for malignancy were analyzed. Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn covering the entire lymph node on the attenuation-corrected PET-image and the monoexponential ADC-map. According to histopathology or radiological follow-up, lymph nodes were classified as benign or malignant. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for all lymph node metastases correlating SUVmax and SUVmean with ADCmean. A total of 146 suspicious lymph nodes were found in 25 patients. One hundred lymph nodes were eligible for final analysis. Ninety-one lymph nodes were classified as malignant and 9 as benign according to the reference standard. In malignant lesions, mean SUVmax was 9.1 ± 3.8 and mean SUVmean was 6.0 ± 2.5 while mean ADCmean was 877.0 ± 128.6 x10(-5) mm²/s in PET/MRI. For all malignant lymph nodes, a weak, inverse correlation between SUVmax and ADCmean as well as SUVmean and ADCmean (r = -0.30, pcorrelation between increased glucose-metabolism and cellularity in lymph node metastases of NSCLC patients. 18F-FDG-PET and DWI thus may offer complementary information for the evaluation of treatment response in lymph node metastases of NSCLC.

  14. Correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC with the standardized uptake value (SUV in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients using hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Michael Schaarschmidt

    Full Text Available To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with standardized uptake values (SUV derived from combined 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (18F-FDG PET/MRI.38 patients with histopathologically proven NSCLC (mean age 60.1 ± 9.5 y received whole-body PET/CT (Siemens mCT™ 60 min after injection of a mean dose of 280 ± 50 MBq 18F-FDG and subsequent PET/MRI (mean time after tracer injection: 139 ± 26 min, Siemens Biograph mMR. During PET acquisition, simultaneous diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, b values: 0, 500, 1000 s/mm² was performed. A maximum of 10 lymph nodes per patient suspicious for malignancy were analyzed. Regions of interest (ROI were drawn covering the entire lymph node on the attenuation-corrected PET-image and the monoexponential ADC-map. According to histopathology or radiological follow-up, lymph nodes were classified as benign or malignant. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for all lymph node metastases correlating SUVmax and SUVmean with ADCmean.A total of 146 suspicious lymph nodes were found in 25 patients. One hundred lymph nodes were eligible for final analysis. Ninety-one lymph nodes were classified as malignant and 9 as benign according to the reference standard. In malignant lesions, mean SUVmax was 9.1 ± 3.8 and mean SUVmean was 6.0 ± 2.5 while mean ADCmean was 877.0 ± 128.6 x10(-5 mm²/s in PET/MRI. For all malignant lymph nodes, a weak, inverse correlation between SUVmax and ADCmean as well as SUVmean and ADCmean (r = -0.30, p<0.05 and r = -0.36, p<0.05 existed.The present data show a weak inverse correlation between increased glucose-metabolism and cellularity in lymph node metastases of NSCLC patients. 18F-FDG-PET and DWI thus may offer complementary information for the evaluation of treatment response in lymph node metastases of NSCLC.

  15. Testing of the International Space Station and X-38 Crew Return Vehicle GPS Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, James; Campbell, Chip; Carpenter, Russell; Davis, Ed; Kizhner, Semion; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Davis, George; Jackson, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process and results of the performance testing of the GPS receiver planned for use on the International Space Station (ISS) and the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). The receiver is a Force-19 unit manufactured by Trimble Navigation and Modified in software by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to perform navigation and attitude determination in space. The receiver is the primary source of navigation and attitude information for ISS and CRV. Engineers at GSFC have developed and tested the new receiver with a Global Simulation Systems Ltd (GSS) GPS Signal Generator (GPSSG). This paper documents the unique aspects of ground testing a GPS receiver that is designed for use in space. A discussion of the design and tests using the GPSSG, documentation, data capture, data analysis, and lessons learned will precede an overview of the performance of the new receiver. A description of the challenges of that were overcome during this testing exercise will be presented. Results from testing show that the receiver will be within or near the specifications for ISS attitude and navigation performance. The process for verifying other requirements such as Time to First Fix, Time to First Attitude, selection/deselection of a specific GPS satellite vehicles (SV), minimum signal strength while still obtaining attitude and navigation, navigation and attitude output coverage, GPS week rollover, and Y2K requirements are also given in this paper.

  16. Tazemetostat Rollover Study (TRuST): An Open-Label Rollover Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Malignant Rhabdoid Tumors (MRT); Rhabdoid Tumors of the Kidney (RTK); Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors (ATRT); Synovial Sarcoma; Epitheliod Sarcoma; Mesothelioma; Advanced Solid Tumors

  17. Math-Based Simulation Tools and Methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arepally, Sudhakar

    2007-01-01

    ...: HMMWV 30-mph Rollover Test, Soldier Gear Effects, Occupant Performance in Blast Effects, Anthropomorphic Test Device, Human Models, Rigid Body Modeling, Finite Element Methods, Injury Criteria...

  18. 101-SY waste sample speed of sound/rheology testing for sonic probe program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, N.S.

    1994-07-25

    One problem faced in the clean-up operation at Hanford is that a number of radioactive waste storage tanks are experiencing a periodic buildup and release of potentially explosive gases. The best known example is Tank 241-SY-101 (commonly referred to as 101-SY) in which hydrogen gas periodically built up within the waste to the point that increased buoyancy caused a roll-over event, in which the gas was suddenly released in potentially explosive concentrations (if an ignition source were present). The sonic probe concept is to generate acoustic vibrations in the 101-SY tank waste at nominally 100 Hz, with sufficient amplitude to cause the controlled release of hydrogen bubbles trapped in the waste. The sonic probe may provide a potentially cost-effective alternative to large mixer pumps now used for hydrogen mitigation purposes. Two important parameters needed to determine sonic probe effectiveness and design are the speed of sound and yield stress of the tank waste. Tests to determine these parameters in a 240 ml sample of 101-SY waste (obtained near the tank bottom) were performed, and the results are reported.

  19. Test Architecture, Test Retrofit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Just like buildings, tests are designed and built for specific purposes, people, and uses. However, both buildings and tests grow and change over time as the needs of their users change. Sometimes, they are also both used for purposes other than those intended in the original designs. This paper explores architecture as a metaphor for language…

  20. Testing "Compatibility Testing."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Elliot; Huston, Ted L.

    Most models of marital choice are attempts to explain choices within the field of available eligibles. The essence of compatibility testing is that people select their mates by evaluating the match between psychological characteristics after sorting the available field on the basis of social characteristics. A compatibility model seems to require…

  1. Test plan :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2013-05-01

    This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

  2. Pinworm test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxyuriasis test; Enterobiasis test; Tape test ... diagnose this infection is to do a tape test. The best time to do this is in ... lay their eggs at night. Steps for the test are: Firmly press the sticky side of a ...

  3. Predictive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Predictive testing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... you make the decision. What Is Predictive Genetic Testing Predictive genetic testing searches for genetic changes, or ...

  4. Pharmacogenomic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Pharmacogenomic testing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... to fit your genetic makeup What Is Pharmacogenomic Testing? Pharmacogenomic testing is done before your healthcare provider ...

  5. Mono Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heterophile Test Heterophile Antibody Test Monospot Formal Name Infectious Mononucleosis Rapid Test This article was last reviewed on ... Why Get Tested? To detect and help diagnose infectious mononucleosis (mono) When To Get Tested? When a person, ...

  6. Epidemiology, Causes and Prevention of Car Rollover Crashes with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 4 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. STS-99 Rollover from OPF-2 to VAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-99 mission was to complete high resolution mapping of large sections of the Earth's surface using the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a specially modified radar system. This radar system produced unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's Surface. The mission was launched at 12:31 on February 11, 2000 onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. and led by Commander Kevin Kregel. The crew was Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie and Mission Specialists Janet L. Kavandi, Janice E. Voss, Mamoru Mohri from the National Space Development Agency (Japanese Space Agency), and Gerhard P. J. Thiele from DARA (German Space Agency). This tape shows the Endeavour Space Shuttle being rolled over from the Orbiter Processing Facility to the Vertical Assembly building.

  8. STS-112 Atlantis rollover to VAB from OPF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Atlantis begins turning after leaving the Orbiter Processing Facility to begin the next stage of preparation for launch. Atlantis will be making its 26th flight on mission STS-112, an assembly flight to the International Space Station. The orbiter will carry the first starboard truss segment, S1, which will be attached to the Central truss segment, the S0 Truss, on the Station. Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2.

  9. Epidemiology, Causes and Prevention of Car Rollover Crashes with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By utilizing the search engines PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE by using key words “ROCs” “Ejection” and “vehicle” the initial search yielded 241 abstracts, of which 58 articles were relevant. Most of the articles were either retrospective or experimental studies funded by automobile companies. All vehicles are susceptible ...

  10. U24 : heavy truck rollover characterization (phase C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The effect of changes in the suspension of a cargo tank semitrailer on its roll stability was studied in experiments and modeling. Three configurations were considered: a typical design; a design with a wider track; and a design with wider track and ...

  11. Repeatability of quantitative FDG-PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT in recurrent ovarian carcinoma: test-retest measurements for tumor FDG uptake, diameter, and volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockall, Andrea G; Avril, Norbert; Lam, Raymond; Iannone, Robert; Mozley, P David; Parkinson, Christine; Bergstrom, Donald; Sala, Evis; Sarker, Shah-Jalal; McNeish, Iain A; Brenton, James D

    2014-05-15

    Repeatability of baseline FDG-PET/CT measurements has not been tested in ovarian cancer. This dual-center, prospective study assessed variation in tumor 2[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake, tumor diameter, and tumor volume from sequential FDG-PET/CT and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Patients underwent two pretreatment baseline FDG-PET/CT (n = 21) and CECT (n = 20) at two clinical sites with different PET/CT instruments. Patients were included if they had at least one target lesion in the abdomen with a standardized uptake value (SUV) maximum (SUVmax) of ≥ 2.5 and a long axis diameter of ≥ 15 mm. Two independent reading methods were used to evaluate repeatability of tumor diameter and SUV uptake: on site and at an imaging clinical research organization (CRO). Tumor volume reads were only performed by CRO. In each reading set, target lesions were independently measured on sequential imaging. Median time between FDG-PET/CT was two days (range 1-7). For site reads, concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) for SUVmean, SUVmax, and tumor diameter were 0.95, 0.94, and 0.99, respectively. Repeatability coefficients were 16.3%, 17.3%, and 8.8% for SUVmean, SUVmax, and tumor diameter, respectively. Similar results were observed for CRO reads. Tumor volume CCC was 0.99 with a repeatability coefficient of 28.1%. There was excellent test-retest repeatability for FDG-PET/CT quantitative measurements across two sites and two independent reading methods. Cutoff values for determining change in SUVmean, SUVmax, and tumor volume establish limits to determine metabolic and/or volumetric response to treatment in platinum-sensitive relapsed ovarian cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. 77 FR 33007 - Submission for Review: Rollover Election (RI 38-117), Rollover Information (RI 38-118), and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... Clinger-Cohen Act (Pub. L. 104-106), OPM is soliciting comments for this collection. The Office of... other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES...

  13. 77 FR 66187 - Submission for Review: Rollover Election (RI 38-117), Rollover Information (RI 38-118), and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ... Clinger-Cohen Act (Pub. L. 104-106), OPM is soliciting comments for this collection. This information... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. DATES: Comments are encouraged...

  14. Ham test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acid hemolysin test; Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria - Ham test; PNH - Ham test ... BJ. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  15. Coombs test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direct antiglobulin test; Indirect antiglobulin test; Anemia - hemolytic ... No special preparation is necessary for this test. ... There are 2 types of the Coombs test: Direct Indirect The direct ... that are stuck to the surface of red blood cells. Many diseases ...

  16. Trichomonas Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Tests for Targeted Cancer Therapy Glucose Tests Gonorrhea Testing Gram Stain Growth Hormone Haptoglobin hCG Pregnancy ... With some NAATs, samples collected for testing of gonorrhea and chlamydial infections can also be used to ...

  17. Urodynamic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Urinary Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Urodynamic Testing What is the urinary tract? The urinary tract ... view of the urinary tract What is urodynamic testing? Urodynamic testing is any procedure that looks at ...

  18. Mono Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Mononucleosis (Mono) Test Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic ... Questions Related Content View Sources Also Known As Mononucleosis Spot Test Mononuclear Heterophile Test Heterophile Antibody Test ...

  19. Fungal Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prep Fungal Smear, Culture, Antigen and Antibody Tests Mycology Tests Fungal Molecular Tests Potassium Hydroxide Preparation Calcofluor ... February 7, Modified). Calcofluor White with 10% KOH. Mycology Online [On-line information]. Available online at http:// ...

  20. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age and race What you eat and drink Medicines you take How well you followed pre-test instructions Your doctor may also compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  1. Malnutrition Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LDL-P) Lead Legionella Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus ... Site Tests: Albumin , CBC , CMP , Electrolytes , Iron Tests , Lipid Profile , Urinalysis , Prealbumin , Vitamin D , Vitamin B12 and Folate , ...

  2. Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is responding to gluten. Unlike antibody testing, the HLA gene testing for celiac disease measures the presence or ... found on the surface of some cells. The HLA gene test for celiac disease can be performed at ...

  3. Genomic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Counseling Genomic Testing Pathogen Genomics Epidemiology Resources Genomic Testing Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fact Sheet: ... Page The Need for Reliable Information on Genetic Testing In 2008, the former Secretary’s Advisory Committee on ...

  4. Randomization tests

    CERN Document Server

    Edgington, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Tests That Do Not Require Random Sampling Randomization Tests Numerical Examples Randomization Tests and Nonrandom Samples The Prevalence of Nonrandom Samples in Experiments The Irrelevance of Random Samples for the Typical Experiment Generalizing from Nonrandom Samples Intelligibility Respect for the Validity of Randomization Tests Versatility Practicality Precursors of Randomization Tests Other Applications of Permutation Tests Questions and Exercises Notes References Randomized Experiments Unique Benefits of Experiments Experimentation without Mani

  5. Tissue tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue tests are widely used in horticulture practice and have in comparison with soil or substrate testing advantages as well disadvantages in comparison with soil testing. One of the main advantages of tissue tests is the certainty that analysed nutrients in plant tissues are really present in the

  6. Test chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    A test chamber for measuring electromagnetic radiation emitted by an apparatus to be tested or for exposing an apparatus to be tested to an electromagnetic radiation field. The test chamber includes a reverberation chamber made of a conductive tent fabric. To create a statistically uniform field in

  7. Test chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    1999-01-01

    A test chamber for measuring electromagnetic radiation emitted by an apparatus to be tested or for exposing an apparatus to be tested to an electromagnetic radiation field. The test chamber includes a reverberation chamber made of a conductive tent fabric. To create a statistically uniform field in

  8. Tensile testing

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A complete guide to the uniaxial tensile test, the cornerstone test for determining the mechanical properties of materials: Learn ways to predict material behavior through tensile testing. Learn how to test metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, and plastics to determine strength, ductility and elastic/plastic deformation. A must for laboratory managers, technicians, materials and design engineers, and students involved with uniaxial tensile testing. Tensile Testing , Second Edition begins with an introduction and overview of the test, with clear explanations of how materials properties are determined from test results. Subsequent sections illustrate how knowledge gained through tensile tests, such as tension properties to predict the behavior (including strength, ductility, elastic or plastic deformation, tensile and yield strengths) have resulted in improvements in materals applications. The Second Edition is completely revised and updated. It includes expanded coverage throughout the volume on a variety of ...

  9. Nationale test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Professor Sven Erik Nordenbo og centerleder Niels Egelund, begge DPU, i samtale om nationale test.......Professor Sven Erik Nordenbo og centerleder Niels Egelund, begge DPU, i samtale om nationale test....

  10. Magnesium Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tests G6PD Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) Gastrin Gastrointestinal Pathogens Panel Genetic Tests for Targeted Cancer Therapy Glucose ... as spinach, as well as whole grains and nuts. Foods that have dietary fiber are usually also ...

  11. Copper Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tests G6PD Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) Gastrin Gastrointestinal Pathogens Panel Genetic Tests for Targeted Cancer Therapy Glucose ... hepatic). Copper is found in many foods including nuts, chocolate, mushrooms, shellfish, whole grains, dried fruits, and ...

  12. Osmolality Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Serum Screening, Second Trimester Measles and Mumps Tests Mercury Metanephrines Methotrexate Methylmalonic Acid Mononucleosis (Mono) Test MRSA ... Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis Kidney Disease Lactose Intolerance Lead Poisoning Leukemia Liver Disease Lung Cancer Lung Diseases Lupus ...

  13. Bilirubin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bilirubin test in conjunction with other laboratory tests ( alkaline phosphatase , aspartate aminotransferase , alanine aminotransferase ) when someone shows signs of abnormal liver function. A bilirubin level may be ordered when ...

  14. Gonorrhea Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... can get tested. You can input your zip code and find a local testing site. How can ...

  15. Syphilis Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... can get tested. You can input your zip code and find a local testing site. Should I ...

  16. Trichomonas Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Known As T. vaginalis Wet Prep Formal Name Trichomonas vaginalis testing This article was last reviewed on March ... Tested? To diagnose an infection with the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis , which causes the sexually transmitted disease trichomoniasis When ...

  17. Chymotrypsin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... at http://www.upcmd.com/dot/examples/00218/description.html. Sainato, D., (2002, March). Genetic Testing for ...

  18. ACT Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content View Sources Ask Us Also Known As ACT Activated Coagulation Time Formal Name Activated Clotting Time ... What is being tested? The activated clotting time (ACT) is a test that is used primarily to ...

  19. Rubella Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Rubella Test Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Three-day Measles; 3-day Measles Formal name: Rubella Antibodies, IgM and IgG Related tests: TORCH ; Measles ...

  20. Gonorrhea Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Gonorrhea Testing Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Sources Ask Us Also Known As GC Test Gonorrhea NAAT or NAT Neisseria gonorrhoeae Nucleic Acid Amplification ...

  1. Ferritin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... absorbs too much iron, even on a normal diet. How is the sample collected for testing? A ...

  2. AMA Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... 50% of the cases of PBC will be discovered before a person has noticeable symptoms. What causes ...

  3. Lactate Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D Tests ...

  4. Allergy Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment. These include: allergy screening tests done in supermarkets or drug stores, home testing, applied kinesiology (allergy ... this topic visit the AAAAI Store . Utility navigation Donate Annual meeting Browse your conditions Check pollen counts ...

  5. Progesterone Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Urine Culture Urine Metanephrines Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D Tests Vitamin K VLDL Cholesterol von Willebrand Factor Warfarin Sensitivity Testing ...

  6. Rubella Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the blood testing required to obtain a marriage license. What does the test result mean? Adult ... their joints , especially their hands and wrists. Side effects are rarely seen in young children who get ...

  7. Fungal Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... at http://www.thoracic.org/education/breathing-in-america/resources/chapter-9-fungal-lung-disease.pdf. Accessed ...

  8. VMA Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spasms and rapid eye movements referred to as "dancing eyes, dancing feet." The VMA test may also be ordered ... ratio is associated with a poorer prognosis . A variety of medications can interfere with VMA testing, but ...

  9. DHEAS Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acidosis and Alkalosis Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison Disease Alcoholism Allergies Alzheimer Disease Anemia Angina Ankylosing Spondylitis Anthrax ... for Teens (Ages 13-18) Screening Tests for Young Adults (Ages 19-29) Screening Tests for Adults ( ...

  10. Pregnancy test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003432.htm Pregnancy test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A pregnancy test measures a hormone in the body called human ...

  11. Nationale Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Hvad er egentlig formålet med de nationale test? Bliver eleverne klogere af at blive testet? Og er der en sammenhæng mellem bandekrig og nationale test? Fysisk medie: dpu.dk/tv......Hvad er egentlig formålet med de nationale test? Bliver eleverne klogere af at blive testet? Og er der en sammenhæng mellem bandekrig og nationale test? Fysisk medie: dpu.dk/tv...

  12. HIV Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... All Collapse All Should I get tested for HIV? CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of ...

  13. Testing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Henriksen, Mogens; Nilson, Jesper K.

    1999-01-01

    , destroy the insulation and eventually cause breakdown. It is difficult to make a model of the real-life components that can be used to examine all of these phenomena. Some decisions have to be made on how to approach this problem, how to design a test cell and how the tests should be carried out....... In this paper, four suggestions on test cells are considered....

  14. Trypsinogen test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... like immunoreactivity; Serum trypsinogen; Immunoreactive trypsin Images Blood test References Forsmark CE. Chronic pancreatitis. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal ...

  15. Nationale test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundsgaard, Jeppe; Puck, Morten Rasmus

    Nationale test skubber undervisning i en forkert retning. Det er lærerne og skolelederne enige om. Men særligt skolelederne ser også muligheder for at bruge testen til at få viden om elevernes faglige kompetencer og om undervisningen. Det kommer til udtryk i rapporten Nationale test: Danske lærere...

  16. Chloride Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and bicarbonate , to help regulate the amount of fluid in the body and maintain the acid-base balance . This test measures the level of chloride in ... and bicarbonate , to help regulate the amount of fluid in the body and maintain the acid-base (pH) balance . Chloride and electrolyte tests may also be ordered ...

  17. Runflat Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-09

    the valve cores using a valve core removal tool to simulate a puncture flat. This should be done at the test site, after the tires are warmed up...F), and ideally be as close to the SAE standard temperature of 25 °C (77 °F) as possible. Test conditions should also be dry (no precipitation or

  18. Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the bad things that could happen also fuels test anxiety. For example, someone worrying about doing poorly ... are shaking." Just like other types of anxiety, test anxiety can create a bad cycle: The more a person focuses on the negative ...

  19. Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be a sign of anemia or thalassemia. Blood Chemistry Tests/Basic Metabolic Panel The basic metabolic panel ( ... parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Coronary Heart ...

  20. Pertussis Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Factor Antibody Iron Iron Tests JAK2 Mutation Kidney Stone Analysis Kidney Stone Risk Panel KRAS Mutation Lactate Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) ... whooping cough); when you have symptoms of a cold and have been exposed to someone with pertussis ...

  1. TORCH Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Factor Antibody Iron Iron Tests JAK2 Mutation Kidney Stone Analysis Kidney Stone Risk Panel KRAS Mutation Lactate Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) ... The two most common infections with HSV are "cold sores" affecting the lips and genital herpes. Both ...

  2. Toxoplasmosis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye or brain infection that a health practitioner suspects are due to toxoplasmosis Sample Required? A blood ... to an infection or detects the genetic material ( DNA ) of the parasite in the blood. Testing is ...

  3. RPR test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... later stages of the infection. Some conditions may cause a false-positive test, including: IV drug use Lyme disease Certain types of pneumonia Malaria Pregnancy Systemic lupus erythematosus and some other autoimmune ...

  4. VDRL test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the earlier and later stages. Some conditions may cause a false-positive test, including: HIV Lyme disease Certain types of pneumonia Malaria Systemic lupus erythematosus The body does not always ...

  5. Test Ship

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U. S. Navy dedicated the decommissioned Spruance Class destroyer ex-PAUL F. FOSTER (EDD 964), Test Ship, primarily for at sea demonstration of short range weapon...

  6. HPV Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detects the presence of HPV, the virus that causes cervical cancer, in your system. Certain types of HPV — including ... have any of the types of HPV that cause cervical cancer. Depending on your test results, your doctor may ...

  7. Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... special preparations. For some, you may need to fast (not eat any food) for 8 to 12 hours before the test. ...

  8. Lactate Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Analysis Kidney Stone Risk Panel KRAS Mutation Lactate Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) Lactoferrin Lactose Tolerance Tests LDL Cholesterol LDL ... metabolism) in which pyruvate is not converted to lactate. One example is pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. In these cases, pyruvate will accumulate, the ...

  9. Serotonin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acute myocardial infarction ( heart attack ), cystic fibrosis , and dumping syndrome . The serotonin test is not usually ordered ... Thank you. Contact a Scientist Find Us On Social Media: Facebook Twitter Google Plus Footer Menu Home ...

  10. IQ testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person's talents or future potential. Results of any intelligence test may be culturally biased. The more widely used ... Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence Stanford-Binet Intelligence ... mathematical, analytical, spatial (for example, reading ...

  11. Electrolytes Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/print.php?unit_code=87972. Accessed September 2011. See More See Less ...

  12. VMA Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Total Protein and Albumin/Globulin (A/G) Ratio Toxoplasmosis Testing Trace Minerals Transferrin and Iron-binding Capacity ( ... Blood in Urine (Hematuria) Bone Marrow Disorders Breast Cancer Cancer Cardiovascular Disease Celiac Disease Cervical Cancer Chronic ...

  13. VLDL test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease . This test may be included in a coronary risk profile. ... cholesterol level may be associated with a higher risk for heart disease and stroke. However, VLDL cholesterol level is rarely targeted when treatment for high ...

  14. Test report :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors have supplied their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and a subset of these systems were selected for performance evaluation at the BCIL. The technologies tested were electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. MILSPRAY Military Technologies has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lead acid batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited assessment of the Milspray Scorpion Energy Storage Device.

  15. Iron Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... not enough iron is taken in from the diet, blood levels will drop; thus, over time, the ...

  16. Magnesium Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... bones. It comes into the body through the diet and is absorbed by the small intestine and ...

  17. Phosphorus Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... balance . Phosphorus comes into the body through the diet. It is found in many foods and is ...

  18. Toxoplasmosis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... humid locations and is influenced by the regional diet. It is higher in areas that routinely eat ...

  19. PTT Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... but can occur due to an extremely poor diet, malabsorption disorders , or prolonged use of certain antibiotics, ...

  20. Copper Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... or trying to get more copper in my diet? In most cases, a regular diet satisfies the ...

  1. Chloride Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... 20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/DRI_Electrolytes_Water.pdf?la=en. Accessed Oct 2015. Sources Used in Previous Reviews ...

  2. RSV Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... int/immunization/research/meetings_workshops/rsv_vaccine_development/en/. Accessed November 2016. Sources Used in Previous Reviews ...

  3. Malnutrition Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... www.who.int/vaccine_research/diseases/soa_parasitic/en/index2.html through http://www.who.int . Accessed ...

  4. Knowledge Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Henning

    1998-01-01

    The knowledge test is about competing temporal and spatial expressions of the politics of technological development and national prosperity in contemporary society. The discussion is based on literature of national systems of innovation and industrial networks of various sorts. Similarities...

  5. Electrolytes Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... sometimes reported as total CO 2 ). A person's diet provides sodium, potassium, and chloride. The kidneys help ...

  6. Osmolality Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affecting osmolality; to help determine the cause of chronic diarrhea When To Get Tested? When someone has a ... increased or decreased amounts of urine, or has chronic diarrhea Sample Required? A blood sample drawn from a ...

  7. Lead Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Lead Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... Related Content View Sources Also Known As Blood Lead Test Blood Lead Level BLL Formal Name Lead, ...

  8. Porphyrin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... safe and unsafe drugs, different sites use different classifications and the lists are not the same. Why ... Kathleen D. & Pagana, Timothy J. (2001). M osby's Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference 5th Edition: Mosby, Inc., ...

  9. Tests computarizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fernando Prialé Z.

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available En primer lugar, se considera el impacto de las microcomputadoras en la actualidad, viéndolo como un hecho social destinado a traer profundos cambios: nos orientamos hacia una cultura informática cuyo signo es la posibilidad de tratar grandes cantidades de información. En segundo lugar; se analiza brevemente la importancia de los tests en el desarrollo de la psicología. Finalmente, se discute la posibilidad de aplicar la informática a la psicometría con el ejemplo del test de BARSIT.   The impact of microcomputers is discussed as a cultural fact that will bring profound changes in the near future: a society with an ubiquous capacity for treating big amounts of information. The importance of tests for the development of psychology is then analysed. Finaly, the possibility of applying microcomputers to psychometry is discussed trough a concrete example: The BARSIT test.

  10. Stool Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... stool. Collecting a Stool Specimen Unlike most other lab tests, stool is sometimes collected by the child's ...

  11. Porphyrin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LA Kaplan, AJ Pesce, SC Kazmierczak, Eds), CV Mosby, St. Louis, 2003, pp. 657-674. Pagana, Kathleen ... osby's Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference 5th Edition: Mosby, Inc., Saint Louis, MO. Pp325, 670-672. (2003 ...

  12. Fibrinogen Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an investigation of a possible bleeding disorder or inappropriate blood clot formation ( thrombotic episode ) As a follow- ... More Common Questions See Less Common Questions Related Content On This Site Tests: PT and INR , PTT , ...

  13. ACT Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heparin is used to help prevent and treat inappropriate blood clot formation ( thrombosis or thromboembolism ) and is ... More Common Questions See Less Common Questions Related Content On This Site Tests: Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) , ...

  14. PTH Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases that disrupt this feedback loop can cause inappropriate elevations or decreases in calcium and PTH levels ... More Common Questions See Less Common Questions Related Content On This Site Tests: Calcium ; Phosphorus ; Magnesium ; Vitamin ...

  15. Ferritin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the past few decades, some lab-to-lab variability can occur due to differences in testing equipment, ... Pp 443-444. Clarke, W., Editor (© 2011). Contemporary Practice in Clinical Chemistry 2nd Edition: AACC Press, Washington, ...

  16. AMA Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This Site Tests: ANCA/MPO/PR3 Antibodies , Liver/Kidney Microsomal Antibody , ALP , ALT , Liver Panel , Smooth Muscle Antibody , ANA Conditions: Autoimmune Diseases , Liver Disease , Hepatitis , Cirrhosis Elsewhere On The Web ...

  17. Adaptive test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lars Peter; Eriksen, Mette Rose

    2010-01-01

    Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale.......Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale....

  18. Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/index.htm .) This issue of Alcohol Research & Health highlights some of the most popular screening ... tolerance to more than two drinks (the T question) = 2 points. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) can detect alcohol ...

  19. About testing $\

    CERN Document Server

    Loverre, P F; Spada, F R

    1999-01-01

    We study the feasibility of a long-baseline neutrino experiment from CERN to Gran Sasso LNGS Laboratories using the CERN PS accelerator. Baseline and neutrino energy spectrum are suitable to explore a region of the Dm2 and sin2(thetat) parameters space which is not reached by K2K, the first experiment that will test at accelerator the atmospheric neutrino anomaly put in evidence by Super Kamiokande

  20. Investigation on occupant ejection in high severity rear impact based on post mortem human subject sled tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Philippe; Luet, Carole; Potier, Pascal; Vallancien, Guy

    2011-11-01

    Occupant protection in rear impact involves two competing challenges. On one hand, allowing a deformation of the seat would act as an energy absorber in low severity impacts and would consequently decrease the risk of neck injuries. However, on the other hand, large deformations of the seat may increase the likelihood of occupant ejection in high severity cases. Green et al. 1987 analyzed a total of 919 accidents in Great Britain. They found that occupant ejection resulted in a risk of severe injuries and fatalities between 3.6 and 4.5 times higher than those cases where no ejection was observed. The sample included single front, side and rear impacts as well as multiple impacts and rollover. The rate of belt use in the sample was 50%. While this analysis included all forms of impact scenarios, nevertheless, it highlights the relative injury severity of occupant ejection. Extensive literature search has found no full-scale rear impact tests involving Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS) conducted in a laboratory environment and resulting in ejection. This paper describes a total of 10 sled tests conducted on 3 belted PMHS using a simplified seat design composed of rigid plates assembled such that the angular and linear stiffness of the seatback (including the foam) was modeled. The initial angular position and the range of motion of the seatback, the size of the PMHS, the slack length of the seatbelt, the angular stiffness of the seatback, and the use of headrest were varied in the test matrix while the pulse was kept constant (triangular acceleration with a peak of 17 G at 30 ms and a duration of 95 ms). In the test series, the tests were not run randomly but the likelihood of occupant ejection was increased systematically until ejection occurred. PMHS seat ejection was observed only for the 95th percentile, initially positioned with a seatback angle relative to the vertical equal to 22°, a range of seatback angular motion equal to 44° and no headrest. Repeating

  1. Oedometer Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Grete

    1996-01-01

    . The results, however, tell nothing about the kind of actions, which has caused the overconsolidation. The determined OCR-values might be due to previous ice caps but a big difference in the two values from Solsø indicates a considerable influence from other actions. The sediments from Hollerup and Solsø...... a model set up by Moust Jacobsen in 1992. The test results do not show any significant difference in the determined values of the overconsolidation ratio (OCR) for the samples from Hollerup and Solsø, east and west of the main stationary line for the last ice sheet in Weichselian, respectively...

  2. Prediction of pathologic grade and prognosis in mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lung using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Joon; KIm, Hong Kwan; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Jhing Ook; Zo, Jae Il; Choi, Joon Young; Shim, Young Mog [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma (PMEC) in fluorine-18fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) was evaluated as a preoperative predictor of pathologic grade and survival rate. Twenty-three patients who underwent preoperative PET/CT and complete resection for PMEC were enrolled. The optimal cut-off SUV{sub max} for tumor grade was calculated as 6.5 by receiver operating characteristic curve. The patients were divided into a high SUV group (n = 7) and a low SUV group (n = 16). Clinicopathologic features were compared between the groups by χ2 test and overall survival was determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The mean SUV{sub max} was 15.4 ± 11.5 in the high SUV group and 3.9 ± 1.3 in the low SUV group. All patients except one from the low SUV group had low grade tumors and all had no nodal metastasis. The sensitivity and specificity of SUV{sub max} from PET/CT for predicting tumor grade was 85.7% and 93.8%, respectively. During the follow-up period (mean, 48.6 ± 38.7 months), four patients from the high SUV group experienced cancer recurrence, and one died of cancer. In contrast, none of the low SUV group had recurrence or mortality. Five-year overall survival rate was significantly higher in the low SUV group (100% vs. 71.4%, p = 0.031). Pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma patients with high SUV{sub max} in PET/CT had higher tumor grade, more frequent lymph node metastasis and worse long-term outcome. Therefore, PMEC patients with high uptake on PET/CT imaging might require aggressive mediastinal lymph node dissection and adjuvant therapies.

  3. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  4. Cholesterol testing and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholesterol test results; LDL test results; VLDL test results; HDL test results; Coronary risk profile results; Hyperlipidemia-results; Lipid disorder test results; Heart disease - cholesterol results

  5. Nuclear stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  6. Heliostat tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    An enormous glint of sunlight darted over gently sloping summits and the hairpin curves of the mountain road. Mirrors concentrated this glint into a single beam, which then shot through a thick sheet of aluminum. Such was the result of the first test run on heliostats of the unique Solntse scientific-production complex being erected in Tashkent Oblast. There will be 62 such heliostats, each with an area of 50 square meters. Hot beams will be transmitted to the concave mirror of a concentrator (2,000 square meters). And the glint that shoots from it effortlessly melts not only aluminum but also almost all known materials. A special melting furnace toward which the concentractor directs hundreds of kilowatts of energy, burns brighter than a thousand suns. The complex presently under construction is intended for acquisition of ultrahigh-heat and concurrently ultrapure materials needed by many industrial sectors. This is extremely difficult to do by traditional chemical methods and even by the most modern methods--ultrahigh frequency and cathode ray methods.

  7. The Detroit Diesel DELTA Engine for Light Trucks and SUVs - Year 2000 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabil S. Hakim; Charles E. Freese; Stanley P. Miller

    2000-06-19

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) is developing the DELTA 4.0L V6 engine, specifically for the North American light truck market. This market poses unique requirements for a diesel engine, necessitating a clean sheet engine design. DELTA was developed from a clean sheet of paper, with the first engine firing just 228 days later. The process began with a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis, which prioritized the development criteria. The development process integrated a co-located, fully cross-functional team. Suppliers were fully integrated and maintained on-site representation. The first demonstration vehicle moved under its own power 12 weeks after the first engine fired. It was demonstrated to the automotive press 18 days later. DELTA has repeatedly demonstrated its ability to disprove historical North American diesel perceptions and compete directly with gasoline engines. This paper outlines the Generation 0.0 development process and briefly defines the engine. A brief indication of the Generation 0.5 development status is given.

  8. Mononucleosis spot test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monospot test; Heterophile antibody test; Heterophile agglutination test; Paul-Bunnell test; Forssman antibody test ... The mononucleosis spot test is done when symptoms of mononucleosis are ... Fatigue Fever Large spleen (possibly) Sore throat Tender ...

  9. Coccidioides precipitin test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccidioidomycosis antibody test; Coccidioides blood test; Valley fever blood test ... There is no special preparation for the test. ... The precipitin test is one of several tests that can be done to determine if you are infected with coccidioides, which ...

  10. Myoglobin urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine myoglobin; Heart attack - myoglobin urine test; Myositis - myoglobin urine test; Rhabdomyolysis - myoglobin urine test ... The test involves only normal urination, which should cause no discomfort.

  11. Prognostic importance of lymph node-to-primary tumor standardized uptake value ratio in invasive squamous cell carcinoma of uterine cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hyun Hoon; Kim, Jae-Weon; Park, Noh-Hyun; Song, Yong Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Using integrated PET/CT, we evaluated the prognostic value of [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake ratio between pelvic lymph node (LN) and primary tumor in invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) of the uterine cervix. We retrospectively reviewed patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages IB to IIA cervical SCCA who underwent preoperative [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scans. PET/CT parameters such as maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) of the primary cervical cancer (SUV{sub cervix}) and LN (SUV{sub LN}), and the LN-to-cervical cancer SUV ratio (SUV{sub LN}/SUV{sub cervix}) were assessed. Prognostic values of PET/CT-derived metabolic and volumetric variables and clinicopathology parameters were analyzed to predict progression-free survival (PFS) in regression analyses. Clinical data, treatment modalities, and results were reviewed for 103 eligible patients. Median post-surgical follow-up was 29 months (range, 6-89), and 19 (18.5%) patients experienced recurrence. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that SUV{sub LN} / SUV{sub cervix} > 0.1747(P = 0.048) was the independent risk factor of recurrence. Patient group categorized by SUV{sub LN}/SUV{sub cervix} showed significant difference in PFS (log-rank test, P < 0.001). Preoperative SUV{sub LN}/SUV{sub cervix} measured by [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT was significantly associated with recurrence, and has an incremental prognostic value for PFS in patients with cervical SCCA. (orig.)

  12. Prognostic implication of the metastatic lesion-to-ovarian cancer standardised uptake value ratio in advanced serous epithelial ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hyun Hoon; Lee, Maria; Kim, Hee-Seung; Kim, Jae-Weon; Park, Noh-Hyun; Song, Yong Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of metabolic activity of metastatic lesions measured by {sup 18}F-flurodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake on preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with advanced serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Clinico-pathological variables and PET/CT parameters such as the maximum standardised uptake value of the ovarian cancer (SUV{sub ovary}), metastatic lesions (SUV{sub meta}), and the metastatic lesion-to-ovarian cancer standardised uptake value ratio (SUV{sub meta}/SUV{sub ovary}) were assessed in International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage III, IV patients. Clinico-pathological data were retrospectively reviewed for 94 eligible patients. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 18.5 months (range, 6-90 months), and 57 (60.6%) patients experienced recurrence. Older age [P = 0.017, hazard ratio (HR) 1.036, 95% CI 1.006-1.066], residual disease after surgery (P = 0.024, HR 1.907, 95% CI 1.087-3.346), and high SUV{sub meta}/SUV{sub ovary} (P = 0.019, HR 2.321, 95% CI 1.148-4.692) were independent risk factors of recurrence. Patients with high SUV{sub meta}/SUV{sub ovary} showed a significantly worse PFS than those with low SUV{sub meta}/SUV{sub ovary} (P = 0.007, log-rank test). Preoperative SUV{sub meta}/SUV{sub ovary} was significantly associated with recurrence and has an incremental prognostic value for PFS in patients with advanced serous EOC. (orig.)

  13. Test Review: TestDaF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, John; Drackert, Anastasia

    2018-01-01

    The Test of German as a Foreign Language (TestDaF) plays a critical role as a standardized test of German language proficiency. Developed and administered by the Society for Academic Study Preparation and Test Development (g.a.s.t.), TestDaF was launched in 2001 and has experienced persistent annual growth, with more than 44,000 test takers in…

  14. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Related Images View Sources Also Known As H. pylori antibody test, stool antigen, breath tests Urea breath test CLO test Rapid urease test (RUT) for H. pylori Formal Name Helicobacter pylori This article was last ...

  15. What Is Diagnostic Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Diagnostic testing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... help you make the decision. What Is Diagnostic Testing? Diagnostic genetic testing can usually work out if ...

  16. Tests Related to Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... what you want to learn. Search form Search Tests related to pregnancy You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... Genes: A Guide to Genetic Counseling . What Are Tests Related to Pregnancy? Pregnancy related testing is done before or during ...

  17. HCG blood test - quantitative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood test - quantitative; Beta-HCG blood test - quantitative; Pregnancy test - blood - quantitative ... of a screening test for Down syndrome. This test is also done to diagnose abnormal conditions not related to pregnancy that can raise HCG level.

  18. Design Driven Testing Test Smarter, Not Harder

    CERN Document Server

    Stephens, M

    2010-01-01

    The groundbreaking book Design Driven Testing brings sanity back to the software development process by flipping around the concept of Test Driven Development (TDD) - restoring the concept of using testing to verify a design instead of pretending that unit tests are a replacement for design. Anyone who feels that TDD is "Too Damn Difficult" will appreciate this book. Design Driven Testing shows that, by combining a forward-thinking development process with cutting-edge automation, testing can be a finely targeted, business-driven, rewarding effort. In other words, you'll learn how to test

  19. Learning software testing with Test Studio

    CERN Document Server

    Madi, Rawane

    2013-01-01

    Learning Software Testing with Test Studio is a practical, hands-on guide that will help you get started with Test Studio to design your automated solution and tests. All through the book, there are best practices and tips and tricks inside Test Studio which can be employed to improve your solution just like an experienced QA.If you are a beginner or a professional QA who is seeking a fast, clear, and direct to the point start in automated software testing inside Test Studio, this book is for you. You should be familiar with the .NET framework, mainly Visual Studio, C#, and SQL, as the book's

  20. Compositional Testing with ioco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrenko, A.; van der Bijl, H.M.; Rensink, Arend; Ulrich, A.; Tretmans, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract. Compositional testing concerns the testing of systems that consist of communicating components which can also be tested in isolation. Examples are component based testing and interoperability testing. We show that, with certain restrictions, the ioco-test theory for conformance testing is

  1. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  2. Myoglobin blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum myoglobin; Heart attack - myoglobin blood test; Myositis - myoglobin blood test; Rhabdomyolysis - myoglobin blood test ... too high, it can damage the kidneys. This test is ordered when your health care provider suspects ...

  3. Ketones urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test ... Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that ...

  4. Blood Test: Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Test: Glucose What's in ... liver or kidneys) is working. What Is a Glucose Test? A glucose test measures how much glucose ...

  5. PT and INR Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Normalized Ratio Related tests: Activated Clotting Time ; Partial Thromboplastin Time ; Prothrombin Consumption Time; Fibrinogen ; Coagulation Factors ; Platelet Count ; Platelet Function Tests ; Thrombin Time ; Warfarin Sensitivity Testing All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  6. Heart Health Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is easier to treat. Blood tests and heart health tests can help find heart diseases or identify ... diseases. There are several different types of heart health tests. Your doctor will decide which test or ...

  7. Genetic Testing (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Genetic Testing KidsHealth / For Parents / Genetic Testing What's in ... blood, skin, bone, or other tissue is needed. Genetic Testing During Pregnancy For genetic testing before birth, ...

  8. Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal ... Screening Tests FAQ165, July 2017 PDF Format Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Pregnancy What is prenatal genetic testing? ...

  9. To test or not to test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rochon, Justine; Gondan, Matthias; Kieser, Meinhard

    2012-01-01

    Background: Student's two-sample t test is generally used for comparing the means of two independent samples, for example, two treatment arms. Under the null hypothesis, the t test assumes that the two samples arise from the same normally distributed population with unknown variance. Adequate...... control of the Type I error requires that the normality assumption holds, which is often examined by means of a preliminary Shapiro-Wilk test. The following two-stage procedure is widely accepted: If the preliminary test for normality is not significant, the t test is used; if the preliminary test rejects...... the null hypothesis of normality, a nonparametric test is applied in the main analysis. Methods: Equally sized samples were drawn from exponential, uniform, and normal distributions. The two-sample t test was conducted if either both samples (Strategy I) or the collapsed set of residuals from both samples...

  10. Survey of Testing Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarkey, Cynthia J.; Aiken, Lewis R.

    The Survey of Testing Practices was administered to 470 undergraduate students at Pepperdine University and the Univesity of California Los Angeles. The items concerned testing practices in three or four classes taken the previous term: type of test, test administration, class size, procedures for returning tests, test difficulty, and observed…

  11. IIHS side crash test ratings and occupant death risk in real-world crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Eric R; Lund, Adrian K

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate how well the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) side crash test ratings predict real-world occupant death risk in side-impact crashes. The IIHS has been evaluating passenger vehicle side crashworthiness since 2003. In the IIHS side crash test, a vehicle is impacted perpendicularly on the driver's side by a moving deformable barrier simulating a typical sport utility vehicle (SUV) or pickup. Injury ratings are computed for the head/neck, torso, and pelvis/leg, and vehicles are rated based on their ability to protect occupants' heads and resist occupant compartment intrusion. Component ratings are combined into an overall rating of good, acceptable, marginal, or poor. A driver-only rating was recalculated by omitting rear passenger dummy data. Data were extracted from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) and National Automotive Sampling System/General Estimates System (NASS/GES) for the years 2000-2009. Analyses were restricted to vehicles with driver side air bags with head and torso protection as standard features. The risk of driver death was computed as the number of drivers killed (FARS) divided by the number involved (NASS/GES) in left-side impacts and was modeled using logistic regression to control for the effects of driver age and gender and vehicle type and curb weight. Death rates per million registered vehicle years were computed for all outboard occupants and compared by overall rating. Based on the driver-only rating, drivers of vehicles rated good were 70 percent less likely to die when involved in left-side crashes than drivers of vehicles rated poor, after controlling for driver and vehicle factors. Compared with vehicles rated poor, driver death risk was 64 percent lower for vehicles rated acceptable and 49 percent lower for vehicles rated marginal. All 3 results were statistically significant. Among components, vehicle structure rating exhibited the strongest relationship with driver death risk. The vehicle

  12. Boilerplate Test Article (BTA) Modal Test Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Corliss, James M.; Mark, Stephen D.

    2017-01-01

    Modal testing of the Boilerplate Test Article (BTA) was performed to obtain data to determine the accuracy of the BTA LS- DYNA model in determining the structural response. The BTA is a full-scale steel and aluminum test article that is representative of the Orion Crew Module (CM), with similar outer-mold-line geometry, mass properties, and some similar structural features, including an internal pressure vessel connected to a backshell and heatshield via longerons, Retention and Release (R&R) brackets, and an aft ring. The structural design of the Orion CM is being developed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. To obtain data to evaluate the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact landing simulations, a series of BTA water impacts was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Discrepancies between test and simulation data are attributed to three causes:(1) Test data variability and uncertainty, (2) LS-DYNA water model and fluid-structure coupling approximations; and (3) LS-DYNA structural modeling approximations. Two activities have been undertaken to assess the accuracy of the BTA LS-DYNA structural model separately from the fluid-structure coupling portion of the water landing simulations: 1) modal testing, and 2) static load testing. The results from the static load tests are documented in a separate report. For the modal test series, the following tests were performed: (1) BTA Fully-Assembled Model Test, (2) BTA Backshell Removed Modal Test, (3) Standalone Heatshield Modal Test, (4) Standalone Windward Backshell Panel Modal Test; and (5) Standalone Leeward Backshell Panel Modal Test. This report documents findings from correlation of modal test data with LS-DYNA modal analysis results. The following figures illustrate the correlation of the modal frequencies. Where multiple closely spaced modes have been identified, the points representing the upper and lower frequencies are shown connected by a dotted line.

  13. From Test Takers to Test Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kari

    2009-01-01

    As a classroom teacher, Kari Smith realized that traditional objective tests don't always assess what students actually know. But tests are so deeply embedded in the education system that it would be difficult to do away with them entirely. Smith decided to make tests into learning tools. In this article, Smith describes three strategies for…

  14. Test Bias and Ability Level Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Bernard

    1979-01-01

    The average grade equivalent reading comprehension scores of students in Black schools are compared to those of students in White schools under two forms of test administration. Concludes that use of grade level testing with the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills is biased in favor of low scoring subgroups. (Author)

  15. Testing and Tests: Pedagogical Versus Public Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Scarvia B.; Dobbin, John E.

    Public uses of tests and testing include all those materials and practices in observation of human behavior that are intended to help administrators, school boards, legislatures, taxpayers, and others to evaluate their educational systems. Pedagogical uses of tests, on the other hand, cover all those materials and practices in observation of human…

  16. AUTOMATED API TESTING APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    SUNIL L. BANGARE; SEEMA BORSE; PALLAVI S. BANGARE; SHITAL NANDEDKAR

    2012-01-01

    Software testing is an investigation conducted to provide stakeholders with information about the quality of the product or service under test. With the help of software testing we can verify or validate the software product. Normally testing will be done after development of software but we can perform the software testing at the time of development process also. This paper will give you a brief introduction about Automated API Testing Tool. This tool of testing will reduce lots of headache ...

  17. Web Security Testing Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Hope, Paco

    2008-01-01

    Among the tests you perform on web applications, security testing is perhaps the most important, yet it's often the most neglected. The recipes in the Web Security Testing Cookbook demonstrate how developers and testers can check for the most common web security issues, while conducting unit tests, regression tests, or exploratory tests. Unlike ad hoc security assessments, these recipes are repeatable, concise, and systematic-perfect for integrating into your regular test suite.

  18. Growth hormone stimulation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arginine test; Arginine-GHRH test ... of re-inserting the needle each time. The test takes between 2 to 5 hours. The procedure ... eat for 10 to 12 hours before the test. Eating food can change the test results. Some ...

  19. Blood Test: Lipid Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advertisement Featured ContentPap Smear (Pap Test)Read Article >>Pap Smear (Pap Test)Preconception Carrier ScreeningsRead Article >>Preconception Carrier ... Article >>Tests and ProceduresPap Smear (Pap Test)A Pap smear (Pap test) is a medical exam used to ...

  20. Vendor System Vulnerability Testing Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James R. Davidson

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared this generic test plan to provide clients (vendors, end users, program sponsors, etc.) with a sense of the scope and depth of vulnerability testing performed at the INL’s Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed and to serve as an example of such a plan. Although this test plan specifically addresses vulnerability testing of systems applied to the energy sector (electric/power transmission and distribution and oil and gas systems), it is generic enough to be applied to control systems used in other critical infrastructures such as the transportation sector, water/waste water sector, or hazardous chemical production facilities. The SCADA Test Bed is established at the INL as a testing environment to evaluate the security vulnerabilities of SCADA systems, energy management systems (EMS), and distributed control systems. It now supports multiple programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, other government agencies, and private sector clients. This particular test plan applies to testing conducted on a SCADA/EMS provided by a vendor. Before performing detailed vulnerability testing of a SCADA/EMS, an as delivered baseline examination of the system is conducted, to establish a starting point for all-subsequent testing. The series of baseline tests document factory delivered defaults, system configuration, and potential configuration changes to aid in the development of a security plan for in depth vulnerability testing. The baseline test document is provided to the System Provider,a who evaluates the baseline report and provides recommendations to the system configuration to enhance the security profile of the baseline system. Vulnerability testing is then conducted at the SCADA Test Bed, which provides an in-depth security analysis of the Vendor’s system.b a. The term System Provider replaces the name of the company/organization providing the system

  1. Tractor accelerated test on test rig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mattetti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The experimental tests performed to validate a tractor prototype before its production, need a substantial financial and time commitment. The tests could be reduced using accelerated tests able to reproduce on the structural part of the tractor, the same damage produced on the tractor during real life in a reduced time. These tests were usually performed reproducing a particular harsh condition a defined number of times, as for example using a bumpy road on track to carry out the test in any weather condition. Using these procedures the loads applied on the tractor structure are different with respect to those obtained during the real use, with the risk to apply loads hard to find in reality. Recently it has been demonstrated how, using the methodologies designed for cars, it is possible to also expedite the structural tests for tractors. In particular, automotive proving grounds were recently successfully used with tractors to perform accelerated structural tests able to reproduce the real use of the machine with an acceleration factor higher than that obtained with the traditional methods. However, the acceleration factor obtained with a tractor on proving grounds is in any case reduced due to the reduced speed of the tractors with respect to cars. In this context, the goal of the paper is to show the development of a methodology to perform an accelerated structural test on a medium power tractor using a 4 post test rig. In particular, several proving ground testing conditions have been performed to measure the loads on the tractor. The loads obtained were then edited to remove the not damaging portion of signals, and finally the loads obtained were reproduced in a 4 post test rig. The methodology proposed could be a valid alternative to the use of a proving ground to reproduce accelerated structural tests on tractors.

  2. Dexamethasone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medicine. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  3. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis - BMD ... need to undress. This scan is the best test to predict your risk of fractures, especially of ...

  4. Ketones blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acetone bodies; Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood; Ketoacidosis - ketones blood test ... fat cells break down in the blood. This test is used to diagnose ketoacidosis . This is a ...

  5. Campylobacter serology test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003530.htm Campylobacter serology test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Campylobacter serology test is a blood test to look ...

  6. Mark 1 Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mark I Test Facility is a state-of-the-art space environment simulation test chamber for full-scale space systems testing. A $1.5M dollar upgrade in fiscal year...

  7. Testing for normality

    CERN Document Server

    Thode, Henry C

    2002-01-01

    Describes the selection, design, theory, and application of tests for normality. Covers robust estimation, test power, and univariate and multivariate normality. Contains tests ofr multivariate normality and coordinate-dependent and invariant approaches.

  8. Large Rotor Test Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This test apparatus, when combined with the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, produces a thorough, full-scale test capability. The Large Rotor Test Apparatus...

  9. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  10. Kidney function tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney function tests are common lab tests used to evaluate how well the kidneys are working. Such tests include: ... Oh MS, Briefel G. Evaluation of renal function, water, electrolytes ... and Management by Laboratory Methods . 23rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  11. ALP isoenzyme test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme test ... anything for 10 to 12 hours before the test, unless your health care provider tells you to do so. Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you ...

  12. Methylene blue test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methemoglobinemia - methylene blue test ... No special preparation is required for this test. ... which are genetic (problem with your genes). This test is used to tell the difference between methemoglobinemia ...

  13. Blood Test: Estradiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels of estradiol, which are produced by the testes and adrenal glands. In young girls, estradiol levels ... to check for damage or disease of the testes, ovaries, or adrenal glands. Testing estradiol levels also ...

  14. Aviation Flight Test

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Redstone Test Center provides an expert workforce and technologically advanced test equipment to conduct the rigorous testing necessary for U.S. Army acquisition and...

  15. Blood sugar test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fasting blood sugar; Glucose test; Diabetic screening - blood sugar test; Diabetes - blood sugar test ... to screen a person for diabetes. High blood sugar and diabetes may not cause symptoms in the early stages. ...

  16. Strep Throat Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... 2012 guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), confirmatory testing on adults is not usually ...

  17. Solving Leak Testing Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John Sprovieri

    2007-01-01

    .... InterTech provided two Model 1075 pressure-decay leak detectors to perform the three tests-a leak test at 220 inches of water column, a leak test at 5 inches of water column, and a forward direction...

  18. Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal ... Pamphlets - Spanish FAQ164, September 2016 PDF Format Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests Pregnancy What is prenatal genetic testing? ...

  19. Structural Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides a wide variety of testing equipment, fixtures and facilities to perform both unique aviation component testing as well as common types of materials testing...

  20. Glucagon blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type I - glucagon test; Hypoglycemia - glucagon test; Low blood sugar - glucagon test ... A blood sample is needed . ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel ... Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This ...

  1. Prolactin blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003718.htm Prolactin blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... test measures the amount of prolactin in the blood. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed . How ...

  2. BUN - blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003474.htm BUN - blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... for the Test Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you ...

  3. Chloride Blood Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/chloridebloodtest.html Chloride Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Chloride Blood Test? A chloride blood test measures the amount of ...

  4. Potassium Blood Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/potassiumbloodtest.html Potassium Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Potassium Blood Test? A potassium blood test measures the amount of ...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.1000 - Rollover protective structures (ROPS) for material handling equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR...) Remounting. ROPS removed for any reason, shall be remounted with equal quality, or better, bolts or welding...: Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. Part II (September 1971). ...

  6. Effect of Wheel/Rail Loads on Concrete Tie Stresses and Rail Rollover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    As a result of vertical and lateral wheel/rail forces, high contact stresses can develop at the interface between the rail base and tie. Under certain conditions, these stresses can exceed the strength of the concrete tie and result in deterioration ...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1001 - Minimum performance criteria for rollover protective structures for designated scrapers, loaders...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-tired dozers, and motor graders; and Figure W-4 for crawler tractors and crawler-type loaders. (2) Table... tractors and crawler-type loaders; and Figure W-9 for motor graders). For purposes of this section, force... loaders; and in Figure W-13 for motor graders. (iii) The load magnitude for purposes of compliance with...

  8. 78 FR 55124 - Submission for Review: Death Benefit Payment Rollover Election, RI 94-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35) as amended by the Clinger-Cohen Act (Pub. L..., mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g...

  9. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(9)-7 - Rollovers and transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... transferred in a distribution calendar year with respect to that employee, in order to satisfy section 401(a... the employee's second distribution calendar year but on or before the employee's required beginning... minimum distribution requirement for the employee's first distribution calendar year based on the employee...

  10. Numeraire-invariant option pricing and american, bermudan, trigger stream rollover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidian, F.

    2004-01-01

    Part I proposes a numeraire-invariant option pricing framework. It defines an option, its price process, and such notions as option indistinguishability and equivalence, domination, payoff process, trigger option, and semipositive option. It develops some of their basic properties, including price

  11. Heavy vehicle simulation and validation for handling and roll-over using integrated development tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupker, H.A.; Vink, W.J.; Besselink, I.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A systematic modelling approach to vehicle dynamics simulation, validation and optimization is presented using an effective link between a multibody solver and a mathematical analysis package. In particular, a heavy vehicle tractor/trailer combination which is common on European roads is modelled

  12. 78 FR 13853 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Denial of Petition for Rulemaking; Vehicle Rollover...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    .... Further, it might create conflicts with existing standard and consumer information metrics. Therefore...; Email: [email protected] . For legal issues: David Jasinski, NHTSA Office of Chief Counsel, NCC-112, Telephone: (202) 366-2992; Facsimile: 202-366-3820; Email: [email protected] . Both officials can be...

  13. 26 CFR 1.402(f)-1 - Required explanation of eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... distributions; questions and answers. 1.402(f)-1 Section 1.402(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... answers. The following questions and answers concern the written explanation requirement imposed by... administrator post the section 402(f) notice as a means of providing it to distributees? Questions and Answers Q...

  14. Small test SDHW systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejen, Niels Kristian

    1999-01-01

    Three small test SDHW systems was tested in a laboratory test facility.The three SDHW systems where all based on the low flow principe and a mantle tank but the design of the systems where different.......Three small test SDHW systems was tested in a laboratory test facility.The three SDHW systems where all based on the low flow principe and a mantle tank but the design of the systems where different....

  15. Guidelines for Statistical Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Strigini, L.; Littlewood, B.; European Space Agency

    1997-01-01

    This document provides an introduction to statistical testing. Statistical testing of software is here defined as testing in which the test cases are produced by a random process meant to produce different test cases with the same probabilities with which they would arise in actual use of the software. Statistical testing of software has these main advantages: for the purpose of reliability assessment and product acceptance, it supports directly estimates of reliability, and thus decisions on...

  16. Mobile Test Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrical Power Mobile Test capabilities are utilized to conduct electrical power quality testing on aircraft and helicopters. This capability allows that the...

  17. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  18. Electromagnetic Interface Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electromagnetic Interface Testing facilitysupports such testing asEmissions, Field Strength, Mode Stirring, EMP Pulser, 4 Probe Monitoring/Leveling System, and...

  19. FOOD SAFETY TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory develops screening assays, tests and modifies biosensor equipment, and optimizes food safety testing protocols for the military and civilian sector...

  20. GPS Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  1. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  2. Role of test motivation in intelligence testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Angela Lee; Quinn, Patrick D.; Lynam, Donald R.; Loeber, Rolf; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda

    2011-01-01

    Intelligence tests are widely assumed to measure maximal intellectual performance, and predictive associations between intelligence quotient (IQ) scores and later-life outcomes are typically interpreted as unbiased estimates of the effect of intellectual ability on academic, professional, and social life outcomes. The current investigation critically examines these assumptions and finds evidence against both. First, we examined whether motivation is less than maximal on intelligence tests administered in the context of low-stakes research situations. Specifically, we completed a meta-analysis of random-assignment experiments testing the effects of material incentives on intelligence-test performance on a collective 2,008 participants. Incentives increased IQ scores by an average of 0.64 SD, with larger effects for individuals with lower baseline IQ scores. Second, we tested whether individual differences in motivation during IQ testing can spuriously inflate the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes. Trained observers rated test motivation among 251 adolescent boys completing intelligence tests using a 15-min “thin-slice” video sample. IQ score predicted life outcomes, including academic performance in adolescence and criminal convictions, employment, and years of education in early adulthood. After adjusting for the influence of test motivation, however, the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes was significantly diminished, particularly for nonacademic outcomes. Collectively, our findings suggest that, under low-stakes research conditions, some individuals try harder than others, and, in this context, test motivation can act as a third-variable confound that inflates estimates of the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes. PMID:21518867

  3. Role of test motivation in intelligence testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Angela Lee; Quinn, Patrick D; Lynam, Donald R; Loeber, Rolf; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda

    2011-05-10

    Intelligence tests are widely assumed to measure maximal intellectual performance, and predictive associations between intelligence quotient (IQ) scores and later-life outcomes are typically interpreted as unbiased estimates of the effect of intellectual ability on academic, professional, and social life outcomes. The current investigation critically examines these assumptions and finds evidence against both. First, we examined whether motivation is less than maximal on intelligence tests administered in the context of low-stakes research situations. Specifically, we completed a meta-analysis of random-assignment experiments testing the effects of material incentives on intelligence-test performance on a collective 2,008 participants. Incentives increased IQ scores by an average of 0.64 SD, with larger effects for individuals with lower baseline IQ scores. Second, we tested whether individual differences in motivation during IQ testing can spuriously inflate the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes. Trained observers rated test motivation among 251 adolescent boys completing intelligence tests using a 15-min "thin-slice" video sample. IQ score predicted life outcomes, including academic performance in adolescence and criminal convictions, employment, and years of education in early adulthood. After adjusting for the influence of test motivation, however, the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes was significantly diminished, particularly for nonacademic outcomes. Collectively, our findings suggest that, under low-stakes research conditions, some individuals try harder than others, and, in this context, test motivation can act as a third-variable confound that inflates estimates of the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes.

  4. Testing the independence of two diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y; Wu, D; Zelen, M

    2001-12-01

    Consider two diagnostic procedures having binary outcomes. If one of the tests results in a positive finding, a more definitive diagnostic procedure will be administered to establish the presence or absence of a disease. The use of both tests will improve the overall screening sensitivity when the two tests are independent, compared with employing two tests that are positively correlated. We estimate the correlation coefficient of the two tests and derive statistical methods for testing the independence of the two diagnostic procedures conditional on disease status. The statistical tests are used to investigate the independence of mammography and clinical breast exams aimed at establishing the benefit of early detection of breast cancer. The data used in the analysis are obtained from periodic screening examinations of three randomized clinical trials of breast cancer screening. Analysis of each of these trials confirms the independence of the clinical breast and mammography examinations. Based on these three large clinical trials, we conclude that a clinical breast exam considerably increases the overall sensitivity relative to screening with mammography alone and should be routinely included in early breast cancer detection programs.

  5. Nationale test i naturfag

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal; Jensen, Lars Bang

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet rummer en analyse og diskussion af test inden for naturfagsområdet og de fagforståelser de afspejler med fokus på de nationale test.......Kapitlet rummer en analyse og diskussion af test inden for naturfagsområdet og de fagforståelser de afspejler med fokus på de nationale test....

  6. Sweat electrolytes test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweat test; Sweat chloride; Iontophoretic sweat test; CF - sweat test; Cystic fibrosis - sweat test ... A colorless, odorless chemical that causes sweating is applied to a small area on an arm or leg. An electrode is then attached to the spot. A weak electrical ...

  7. CO2 blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum; Acidosis - CO2; Alkalosis - CO2 ... The CO2 test is most often done as part of an electrolyte or basic metabolic panel. Changes in your ...

  8. PSEUDOEXHAUSTIVE RAM TESTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Yarmolik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern RAM tests and methods for their generation are analyzed and investigated. The wide application of pseudoexhaustive tests as the main test procedure for modern computer systems has been proved. The main estimates and metrics for so kind of tests are obtained. The values of analytical estimates have been validated by the experimental investigations.

  9. Tests for H. pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic ulcer disease - H. pylori ; PUD - H. pylori ... There are several methods to test for H. pylori infection. Breath Test (Carbon Isotope-urea Breath Test, or UBT) Up to 2 weeks before the test, you need to stop taking antibiotics, ...

  10. Color identification testing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

    1970-01-01

    Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

  11. Pre-Test Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Pre-tests are a non-graded assessment tool used to determine pre-existing subject knowledge. Typically pre-tests are administered prior to a course to determine knowledge baseline, but here they are used to test students prior to topical material coverage throughout the course. While counterintuitive, the pre-tests cover material the student is…

  12. Displacement compressors - acceptance tests

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    ISO 1217:2009 specifies methods for acceptance tests regarding volume rate of flow and power requirements of displacement compressors. It also specifies methods for testing liquid-ring type compressors and the operating and testing conditions which apply when a full performance test is specified.

  13. Load testing circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A load testing circuit a circuit tests the load impedance of a load connected to an amplifier. The load impedance includes a first terminal and a second terminal, the load testing circuit comprising a signal generator providing a test signal of a defined bandwidth to the first terminal of the load...

  14. Refactoring test code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Deursen (Arie); L.M.F. Moonen (Leon); A. van den Bergh; G. Kok

    2001-01-01

    textabstractTwo key aspects of extreme programming (XP) are unit testing and merciless refactoring. Given the fact that the ideal test code / production code ratio approaches 1:1, it is not surprising that unit tests are being refactored. We found that refactoring test code is different from

  15. What Is Stress Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... However, your doctor may want to use a stress test to screen for CHD if you have diabetes. This disease increases your risk of CHD. Currently, though, no evidence shows that having a stress test will improve your outcome if you have diabetes. What To Expect Before Stress Testing Stress testing ...

  16. Blood Test: Bilirubin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Important? Top 10 Homework Tips Raising Confident Kids Blood Test: Bilirubin KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Bilirubin Print ... español Análisis de sangre: bilirrubina What Is a Blood Test? A blood test is when a sample of ...

  17. Lyme disease blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. The test is used to help ... specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . If the ELISA test is positive, it must ...

  18. Lactose tolerance tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than 12 parts per million over your fasting (pre-test) level. The blood test is considered normal if your glucose level ... of 12 parts per million (ppm) over your pre-test level is considered positive, ... lactose. The blood test is considered abnormal if your glucose level ...

  19. Dtest Testing Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Cameron, Jonathan M.; Myint, Steven

    2013-01-01

    This software runs a suite of arbitrary software tests spanning various software languages and types of tests (unit level, system level, or file comparison tests). The dtest utility can be set to automate periodic testing of large suites of software, as well as running individual tests. It supports distributing multiple tests over multiple CPU cores, if available. The dtest tool is a utility program (written in Python) that scans through a directory (and its subdirectories) and finds all directories that match a certain pattern and then executes any tests in that directory as described in simple configuration files.

  20. Numeracy Tests For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Beveridge, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The easy way to get practice and excel at numeracy tests Whether you're looking for a new job, applying to certain university courses, or attempting to join the military, you're increasingly likely to face a numeracy test as part of the screening process. And the only way to prepare for a numeracy test is practise. Numeracy Tests For Dummies is an accessible one-stop guide to pass these test. Featuring expert advice, instruction, review, and plenty of practise, Numeracy Tests For Dummies will help you succeed. Numeracy Tests For Dummies contains instruction and revision on:Basic mathematical k

  1. Skylab vibroacoustic test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Vibroacoustic testing was performed on the orbital workshop dynamic test article and the payload assembly, the two major elements of the Skylab payload. The testing was conducted on each of the Skylab elements separately in the reverberation chamber at the Johnson Space Center. The two test configurations were high fidelity flight article simulations. The testing was conducted in two phases; in the first phase, acoustic tests were performed at levels simulating the lift-off and atmospheric flight acoustic criteria. In the second phase, low frequency sinusoidal vibration tests were conducted to obtain modal response data. The objectives of the Skylab vibroacoustic test program were to: verify the vibration design and test criteria; qualify selected flight components to the vibroacoustic criteria; and verify analytical models used for dynamic load analyses. This paper describes the vibroacoustic testing and discusses the results.

  2. Testing unconstrained optimization software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, J.J.; Garbow, B.S.; Hillstrom, K.E.

    1978-07-01

    Much of the testing of optimization software is inadequate because the number of test functions is small or the starting points are close to the solution. In addition, there has been too much emphasis on measuring the efficiency of the software and not enough on testing reliability and robustness. To address this need, a relatively large but easy-to-use collection of test functions was produced and guidelines for testing the reliability and robustness of unconstrained optimization software were designed. 9 tables.

  3. Role of test motivation in intelligence testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Angela Lee Duckworth; Patrick D. Quinn; Donald R. Lynam; Rolf Loeber; Magda Stouthamer-Loeber; Edward E. Smith

    2011-01-01

    .... The current investigation critically examines these assumptions and finds evidence against both. First, we examined whether motivation is less than maximal on intelligence tests administered in the context of low-stakes research situations...

  4. Wolf Testing: Open Source Testing Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, P.; Gay, P. L.

    2004-12-01

    Wolf Testing is software for easily creating and editing exams. Wolf Testing allows the user to create an exam from a database of questions, view it on screen, and easily print it along with the corresponding answer guide. The questions can be multiple choice, short answer, long answer, or true and false varieties. This software can be accessed securely from any location, allowing the user to easily create exams from home. New questions, which can include associated pictures, can be added through a web-interface. After adding in questions, they can be edited, deleted, or duplicated into multiple versions. Long-term test creation is simplified, as you are able to quickly see what questions you have asked in the past and insert them, with or without editing, into future tests. All tests are archived in the database. Written in PHP and MySQL, this software can be installed on any UNIX / Linux platform, including Macintosh OS X. The secure interface keeps students out, and allows you to decide who can create tests and who can edit information already in the database. Tests can be output as either html with pictures or rich text without pictures, and there are plans to add PDF and MS Word formats as well. We would like to thank Dr. Wolfgang Rueckner and the Harvard University Science Center for providing incentive to start this project, computers and resources to complete this project, and inspiration for the project's name. We would also like to thank Dr. Ronald Newburgh for his assistance in beta testing.

  5. Fairness Testing: Testing Software for Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Galhotra, Sainyam; Brun, Yuriy; Meliou, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    This paper defines software fairness and discrimination and develops a testing-based method for measuring if and how much software discriminates, focusing on causality in discriminatory behavior. Evidence of software discrimination has been found in modern software systems that recommend criminal sentences, grant access to financial products, and determine who is allowed to participate in promotions. Our approach, Themis, generates efficient test suites to measure discrimination. Given a sche...

  6. Trends in software testing

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, J; Balakrishnan, Arunkumar

    2017-01-01

    This book is focused on the advancements in the field of software testing and the innovative practices that the industry is adopting. Considering the widely varied nature of software testing, the book addresses contemporary aspects that are important for both academia and industry. There are dedicated chapters on seamless high-efficiency frameworks, automation on regression testing, software by search, and system evolution management. There are a host of mathematical models that are promising for software quality improvement by model-based testing. There are three chapters addressing this concern. Students and researchers in particular will find these chapters useful for their mathematical strength and rigor. Other topics covered include uncertainty in testing, software security testing, testing as a service, test technical debt (or test debt), disruption caused by digital advancement (social media, cloud computing, mobile application and data analytics), and challenges and benefits of outsourcing. The book w...

  7. Pragmatics of Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Fırat ALTAY

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Teaching of a language is a very complicated issue and testing is anindispensable part of this matter. Thanks to testing teachers can assess efficiency ofteaching and learning atmosphere, and can get feedback about their learners. In order torealize this, a test should have some qualifications. One of these qualifications is aboutpragmatics. This paper aims at explaining what makes a test pragmatic and howpragmatic tests can be formed. So, examples of pragmatic tests of different types arepresented with explanations. Their pragmatic components and nature are focused on bygiving example test items on the problematic area of test questions prepared. Finally,the writer states his last words by making further comments and explanations onpragmatics of testing in the conclusion part.

  8. The Danish National Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beuchert, Louise Voldby; Nandrup, Anne Brink

    working with the first four rounds of the test data. We provide a brief introduction to adaptive testing, the available data and general data issues including missing data, test participation and data transformations. Additionally, we construct a standardized measure of the raw pupil ability estimate......In 2010, the Danish National Tests were implemented in the public compulsory schools as a mean of evaluating the performance of the public school system. The extensive test program consists of ten mandatory tests in six subjects in grades 2 through 8. In this paper, we share our insights from...... within each test and argue that this is often a more feasible measure for data analyses compared to the transformed test score presented to pupils and teachers. We provide the reader with preliminary analyses of the relation between pupils' national test results and a wide range of pupil background...

  9. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  10. Comparative Test Case Specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

     This document includes a definition of the comparative test cases DSF200_3 and DSF200_4, which previously described in the comparative test case specification for the test cases DSF100_3 and DSF200_3 [Ref.1]....... This document includes a definition of the comparative test cases DSF200_3 and DSF200_4, which previously described in the comparative test case specification for the test cases DSF100_3 and DSF200_3 [Ref.1]....

  11. Metamorphic Testing for Cybersecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsong Yueh; Kuo, Fei-Ching; Ma, Wenjuan; Susilo, Willy; Towey, Dave; Voas, Jeffrey; Zhou, Zhi Quan

    2016-06-01

    Testing is a major approach for the detection of software defects, including vulnerabilities in security features. This article introduces metamorphic testing (MT), a relatively new testing method, and discusses how the new perspective of MT can help to conduct negative testing as well as to alleviate the oracle problem in the testing of security-related functionality and behavior. As demonstrated by the effectiveness of MT in detecting previously unknown bugs in real-world critical applications such as compilers and code obfuscators, we conclude that software testing of security-related features should be conducted from diverse perspectives in order to achieve greater cybersecurity.

  12. Materials Test Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Test Branch resides at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processing laboratory and has a long history of supporting NASA programs from Mercury to the recently retired Space Shuttle. The Materials Test Branch supports its customers by supplying materials testing expertise in a wide range of applications. The Materials Test Branch is divided into three Teams, The Chemistry Team, The Tribology Team and the Mechanical Test Team. Our mission and goal is to provide world-class engineering excellence in materials testing with a special emphasis on customer service.

  13. Cold Flow Propulsion Test Complex Pulse Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougal, Kris

    2016-01-01

    When the propellants in a liquid rocket engine burn, the rocket not only launches and moves in space, it causes forces that interact with the vehicle itself. When these interactions occur under specific conditions, the vehicle's structures and components can become unstable. One instability of primary concern is termed pogo (named after the movement of a pogo stick), in which the oscillations (cycling movements) cause large loads, or pressure, against the vehicle, tanks, feedlines, and engine. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a unique test technology to understand and quantify the complex fluid movements and forces in a liquid rocket engine that contribute strongly to both engine and integrated vehicle performance and stability. This new test technology was established in the MSFC Cold Flow Propulsion Test Complex to allow injection and measurement of scaled propellant flows and measurement of the resulting forces at multiple locations throughout the engine.

  14. EMI Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports electromagnetic interference/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) testing of flight hardware. It is also used to support custom RF testing up to...

  15. Ballistic Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ballistic Test Facility is comprised of two outdoor and one indoor test ranges, which are all instrumented for data acquisition and analysis. Full-size aircraft...

  16. Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart (Infographic) Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart (Infographic) PFSI010 ››› Weeks 1–4 Weeks 5–8 ...

  17. Urine Tests (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TOPIC Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR) Blood in the Urine (Hematuria) Urine Test: Creatinine Urine Test: Microalbumin-to-Creatinine ... Video) Urinary Tract Infections Blood in the Urine (Hematuria) Kidneys and Urinary Tract Contact Us Print Resources ...

  18. Urine specific gravity test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003587.htm Urine specific gravity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration ...

  19. Tilt Table Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure (the bottom number in a blood pressure reading), lowers peripheral vascular resistance, increases your heart rate ... mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/tilt-table-test/basics/definition/PRC-20019879 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  20. Visual acuity test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003396.htm Visual acuity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The visual acuity test is used to determine the smallest ...

  1. Pleural Fluid Analysis Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Analysis Kidney Stone Risk Panel KRAS Mutation Lactate Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) Lactoferrin Lactose Tolerance Tests LDL Cholesterol LDL ... set of tests (cell count, protein, albumin, and lactate dehydrogenase (LD) level, and appearance of the fluid) to ...

  2. Learning Python testing

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuckle, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This book is ideal if you want to learn about the testing disciplines and automated testing tools from a hands-on, conversational guide. You should already know Python and be comfortable with Python 3.

  3. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that may be present in rare strains of HIV. The test may not detect a drug-resistant strain of ... Less Common Questions Related Content On This Site Tests: HIV Viral Load ; CD4 Count ; HIV Antibody and HIV ...

  4. Blood Gases Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LDL Particle Testing (LDL-P) Lead Legionella Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver ... such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is suspected. Blood gases may also be used ...

  5. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LDL Particle Testing (LDL-P) Lead Legionella Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver ... 40; when you have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or unexplained liver disease at any age; when ...

  6. Learning Android application testing

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    If you are an Android developer looking to test your applications or optimize your application development process, then this book is for you. No previous experience in application testing is required.

  7. Uric acid test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... for testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  8. Pulmonary Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you have difficulty with being in closed spaces (claustrophobia), mention this to your provider ordering the test. ... 4 If you have difficulty with closed spaces (claustrophobia), let the test center know in case one ...

  9. USA Hire Testing Platform

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The USA Hire Testing Platform delivers tests used in hiring for positions in the Federal Government. To safeguard the integrity of the hiring processes and ensure...

  10. HPV DNA test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test; Cancer of cervix - HPV DNA test References Hacker NF. Cervical dysplasia and cancer. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ...

  11. Test Preparation: Your Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... the "At a Glance" section of our test descriptions. However, be sure to check with your healthcare ...

  12. Atlantic Test Range (ATR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATR controls fully-instrumented and integrated test ranges that provide full-service support for cradle-to-grave testing. Airspace and surface target areas are used...

  13. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  14. Environmental Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Test Facility (ETF) provides non-isolated shock testing for stand-alone equipment and full size cabinets under MIL-S-901D specifications. The ETF...

  15. Platelet Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Platelet Function Tests Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Also Known As Platelet Aggregation Studies PFT Platelet Function Assay PFA Formal Name Platelet Function Tests This ...

  16. Extraocular muscle function testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003397.htm Extraocular muscle function testing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Extraocular muscle function testing examines the function of the eye muscles. ...

  17. Integrated Usability Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Ternauciuc

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is essential to regularly test the usability of a learning management system, in order to ensure a fast adoption by new users and rapidly shift the focus from the platform to the content and the learning experience. Quantitative testing yields the most reliable results due to the large number of data points acquired, but lacks the in-depth analysis of the qualitative research from a controlled testing setup. We are proposing in this paper an integrated usability testing tool, which can replace a certain type of laboratory testing, where the users’ actions on the real platform are measured and analyzed. We conducted tests with the tool and compared the results with a small scale laboratory test using the same scenarios. The results seem to confirm the proposed tool as a viable alternative to the laboratory test.

  18. ADH (Antidiuretic Hormone) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D Tests ...

  19. von Willebrand Factor Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D Tests ...

  20. ACTH (Adrenocorticotropic Hormone) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D Tests ...

  1. Reticulocyte Count Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D Tests ...

  2. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D Tests ...

  3. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid ...

  4. Collecting Samples for Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acidosis and Alkalosis Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison Disease Alcoholism Allergies Alzheimer Disease Anemia Angina Ankylosing Spondylitis Anthrax ... through Their Medical Tests Tips to Help the Elderly through Their Medical Tests Related Video View More × ...

  5. Growth hormone test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone in ...

  6. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  7. Lung diffusion testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003854.htm Lung diffusion testing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lung diffusion testing measures how well the lungs exchange gases. This ...

  8. Cord blood testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003403.htm Cord blood testing To use the sharing features on this page, ... the baby to the mother's womb. Cord blood testing can be done to evaluate a newborn's health. ...

  9. Urine concentration test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003608.htm Urine concentration test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A urine concentration test measures the ability of the kidneys to ...

  10. Flexseal Insulator Test Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Eric

    1995-01-01

    Small-scale version of solid-fuel rocket motor flexseal nozzle bearing assembly instrumented and tested in compression-testing fixture simulating conditions during rocket motor operation described in report.

  11. Vitamin A blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003570.htm Vitamin A blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The vitamin A test measures the level of vitamin A ...

  12. Home blood sugar testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes - home glucose testing; Diabetes - home blood sugar testing ... day Your blood sugar level The amount of carbohydrates you ate The type and dose of your diabetes medicine The type of any exercise you do ...

  13. Insensitive Munitions Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Insensitive Munitions Testing at RTC is conducted (IAW MILSTD-2105) at Test Area 4. Our engineers and technicians obtain data for hazards classification and safety...

  14. Hepatitis C Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... common cause of chronic liver disease in North America. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ...

  15. ANA (Antinuclear Antibody Test)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... Scleroderma Elsewhere On The Web Lupus Foundation of America American College of Rheumatology: Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA) American ...

  16. Aldosterone and Renin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... and other forms of licorice sold in North America do not actually contain licorice. Check the package ...

  17. T3 (Triiodothyronine) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... For more information, see the Thyroid Foundation of America's web page Thyroid Problems During and After Pregnancy - ...

  18. Pap and HPV Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... endocervical canal itself but also, in some cases, endometrial, extrauterine, and other cancers. What follow-up tests ... cancer risk for women undergoing concurrent testing for human papillomavirus and cervical cytology: A population-based study ...

  19. Leukocyte esterase urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003584.htm Leukocyte esterase urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Leukocyte esterase is a urine test to look for ...

  20. Static Loads Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides the capability to perform large-scale structural loads testing on spacecraft and other structures. Results from these tests can be used to verify...

  1. Understanding Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the development and marketing of all laboratory tests that use test kits ... Cancer.gov en español Multimedia Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy ...

  2. Variable Attitude Test Stand

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Variable Attitude Test Stand designed and built for testing of the V-22 tilt rotor aircraft propulsion system, is used to evaluate the effect of aircraft flight...

  3. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  4. Latex agglutination test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003334.htm Latex agglutination test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The latex agglutination test is a laboratory method to check ...

  5. Cross cultural usability testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Goyal, Shivam

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a pilot study in Denmark of cross cultural effects on Think Aloud usability testing. We provide an overview of previous research on cross cultural usability evaluation with a special focus on the relationship between the evaluator and the test user....... This relation was studied in an experiment with usability testing of a localized clipart application in which eight participants from Denmark and India formed pairs of evaluator-test user. The test users were asked to think aloud and the evaluators' role were to facilitate the test users thinking aloud...... and hereby identify usability problems with the clipart application. Data on the evaluators' and test users' behaviour were recorded and analyzed by coding and summarizing statistics on these behavioural events. The results show that Think Aloud Usability Test of a localized application is most effectively...

  6. Strep Throat Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Strep Throat Test Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Tested? To determine if your sore throat is "strep throat" that is caused by group A streptococcus (GAS) ...

  7. Home vision tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or eye disease and you should have a professional eye examination. Amsler grid test: If the grid appears distorted or broken, there may be a problem with the retina . Distance vision test: If you do not read the ...

  8. Ethylene glycol blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003564.htm Ethylene glycol blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... risk any time the skin is broken) Images Blood test References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Ethylene glycol - serum ...

  9. Haptoglobin blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003634.htm Haptoglobin blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The haptoglobin blood test measures the level of haptoglobin in your blood. ...

  10. HCG blood test - qualitative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003509.htm HCG blood test - qualitative To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A qualitative HCG blood test checks if there is a hormone called human ...

  11. ACTH blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003695.htm ACTH blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... the adrenal gland . It regulates blood pressure and blood sugar. This test can help find the causes of certain hormone ...

  12. ACE blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003567.htm ACE blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... Alternative Names Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme; SACE Images Blood test References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Angiotensin-converting enzyme ( ...

  13. Pyruvate kinase blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003357.htm Pyruvate kinase blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... energy when oxygen levels are low. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. In the laboratory, white blood ...

  14. Calcitonin blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003699.htm Calcitonin blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcitonin blood test measures the level of the hormone calcitonin in ...

  15. Fibrinopeptide A blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003373.htm Fibrinopeptide A blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... measure the level of this substance in your blood. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. How ...

  16. ALP - blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003470.htm ALP - blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... include the liver, bile ducts, and bone. A blood test can be done to measure the level of ...

  17. Aldosterone blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003704.htm Aldosterone blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The aldosterone blood test measures the level of the hormone aldosterone in ...

  18. Phosphorus blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003478.htm Phosphorus blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The phosphorus blood test measures the amount of phosphate in the blood. ...

  19. Anthrax - blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003534.htm Anthrax blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The anthrax blood test looks for antibodies against Bacillus anthracis , the bacteria ...

  20. Ferritin blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003490.htm Ferritin blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The ferritin blood test measures the level of ferritin in the blood. ...

  1. Calcium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003477.htm Calcium blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcium blood test measures the level of calcium in the blood. ...

  2. Leucine aminopeptidase blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003559.htm Leucine aminopeptidase blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... Alternative Names Serum leucine aminopeptidase; LAP - serum Images Blood test References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) - ...

  3. Antidiuretic hormone blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003702.htm Antidiuretic hormone blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antidiuretic blood test measures the level of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) in ...

  4. LDH isoenzyme blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003499.htm LDH isoenzyme blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... Names LD; LDH; Lactic (lactate) dehydrogenase isoenzymes Images Blood test References Carty RP, Pincus MR, Sarafraz-Yazdi E. ...

  5. Aldolase blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003566.htm Aldolase blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... risk any time the skin is broken) Images Blood test References Berridge BR, Van Vleet JF, Herman E. ...

  6. Ammonia blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003506.htm Ammonia blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... Encephalopathy - ammonia; Cirrhosis - ammonia; Liver failure - ammonia Images Blood test References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Ammonia (NH3) - blood ...

  7. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibody Blood Tests Researchers have discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of ... do I do if I have a negative blood test (or panel) but I’m still having symptoms? ...

  8. Antithrombin III blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003661.htm Antithrombin III blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of AT III present ...

  9. Flight Testing and Test Instrumentation of PHOENIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovsky, R.; Behr, R.

    2005-02-01

    Within the frame of the German national ASTRA program, the need for in-flight experimentation as a key element in the development of the next generation launcher was addressed by the Phoenix project. The Phoenix 1 flight test vehicle was designed to demonstrate the un-powered horizontal landing of a representative, winged RLV configuration. The Phoenix 1 flight test vehicle is downscaled from the reference RLV shape "Hopper", with the dimensions of 7.8m overall length, 3.8m span, and 1200kg mass. In order to be representative of a full scale RLV, the scaling method preserves all features challenging the automatic landing from the flight control point of view. These are in particular the poor flying qualities of the static unstable vehicle and the high landing velocity of 71m/s, which is same as for the full scale vehicle. The landing demonstration scenario comprises a drop from the helicopter approximately 6km ahead of the runway threshold at 2.4km above runway level. The subsequent free flight includes an accelerating dive to merge with a steep final approach path representative of an RLV, followed by a long flare, touch down on the runway, and rollout to standstill. Besides its mandatory avionics system, the vehicle is also equipped with an additional flight test instrumentation to identify local aerodynamic flow and structural stress. This FTI system is designed to collect data by recording about 130 sensor signals during flight. This test instrumentation system was operated during a test campaign dedicated to verify the aerodynamic data base of Phoenix in the Dutch-German Wind-tunnel (DNW) in August 2003 and during three automatic landing flight tests after helicopter drop in May 2004. Post flight analysis of these data allows to validate the design models and the development tools in order to establish a flight validated data base for future work. This paper gives an overview on the Phoenix system including the flight test instrumentation, the test program and

  10. Test Equipment Specifications Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Didiek Andiana Ramadan; Drs. Linga Hermanto, MMSI Drs. Linga Hermanto, MMSI

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we design a test apparatus Transistor Specification. Specification is atype of transistor is a transistor and common emitter current reinforcement value ( βDC ). The system will provide information in the form of an LED display emits greenlight when the tested types of NPN transistor and the second LED emits blue lightwhen the tested types of PNP transistors.To test the value of β, whose value is proportional to the display used by the collectorcurrent Ic.

  11. Tests in Print II: An Index to Tests, Test Reviews, and the Literature on Specific Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buros, Oscar K., Ed.

    Tests in Print II is a comprehensive, annotated bibliography of all in-print tests published as separates for use with English-speaking subjects. The 1,155 two-column pages list 2,467 tests in print as of early 1974; 16,574 references through 1971 on specific tests; a reprinting of the 1974 APA-AERA-NCME Standards for Educational andPsychological…

  12. AMSD Cryo Actuator Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullette, Mark; Matthews, Gary; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The actuator technology required for AMSD and subsequently NGST are critical in the successful development for future cryogenic systems. Kodak has undertaken an extensive test plan to determine the performance of the force actuators developed under the AMSD program. These actuators are currently in testing at MSFC and are expected to finish this test cycle in early June 2002.

  13. Turing Test and After

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    'intelligence' just like a human being. The Turing test provides an unbiased method of comparing intelligent behaviour of humans with that of computers. The. Turing test is repeatable and objective. Turing did not regard his test as a necessary condition for attributing intelligence to machines but only as a sufficient condition.

  14. Testing Vocational English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendlebury, A. C.

    1970-01-01

    Defining vocational English as a specific vocabulary of individual words and phases connected with a certain occupation, the author outlines principles of testing, lists types of vocational English tests, and attempts to show that in constructing such tests a whole range of types of question can be used. (FB)

  15. Testing Backbone.js

    CERN Document Server

    Roemer, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    This book is packed with the step by step tutorial and instructions in recipe format helping you setup test infrastructure and gradually advance your skills to plan, develop, and test your backbone applications.If you are a JavaScript developer looking for recipes to create and implement test support for your backbone application, then this book is ideal for you.

  16. Follow-Up Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follow-up Testing Follow-up testing is conducted to ensure that antibody levels are returning to normal, indicating that the intestine is healing on the ... has entered the diet. How often should follow-up testing occur? New celiacs should receive follow-up ...

  17. On Statistical Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Carl J.

    An approach to statistical testing, which combines Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing and Fisher significance testing, is recommended. The use of P-values in this approach is discussed in some detail. The author also discusses some problems which are often found in introductory statistics textbooks. The problems involve the definitions of…

  18. Language Testing in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Dean, Ed.; Yamashita, Sayoko Okada, Ed.

    Papers on second language testing in Japan include: "Differences Between Norm-Referenced and Criterion-Referenced Tests" (James Dean Brown); "Criterion-Referenced Test Construction and Evaluation" (Dale T. Griffe); "Behavioral Learning Objectives as an Evaluation Tool" (Judith A. Johnson); "Developing Norm-…

  19. Dismantling the Mantel tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillot, Gilles

    The simple and partial Mantel tests are routinely used in many areas of evolutionary biology to assess the significance of the association between two or more matrices of distances relative to the same pairs of individuals or demes. Partial Mantel tests rather than simple Mantel tests are widely ...... as supporting material....

  20. Usability testing for dummies

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Usability testing seems complicated and time-consuming. Is it though? In fact, it is the best way to understand how real users experience your product. In this interactive session, we will do a live usability test and you will get advice on how to conduct your own usability tests.

  1. Barron's SAT subject test

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, MA, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Includes one diagnostic test and three complete tests, all questions answered and explained, self-assessment guides, and subject reviews. Also features test strategies, QR codes to short instructional videos, and a detailed appendix with equations, physical constants, and a basic math review.

  2. About Instruction Sequence Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Software testing is presented as a so-called theme within which different authors and groups have defined different subjects each of these subjects having a different focus on testing. A uniform concept of software testing is non-existent and the space of possible coherent perspectives on software

  3. Blood Test: Testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Voice in Health Care Decisions Blood Test: Testosterone KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Testosterone Print A A A What's in this article? ... Análisis de sangre: testosterona What It Is A testosterone test measures the blood level of the male ...

  4. Automated Web Applications Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Dan CĂPRIŢĂ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Unit tests are a vital part of several software development practicesand processes such as Test-First Programming, Extreme Programming andTest-Driven Development. This article shortly presents the software quality andtesting concepts as well as an introduction to an automated unit testingframework for PHP web based applications.

  5. Computerized Mastery Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charles; Sheehan, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    Introduces a theoretical framework for mastery testing, using Item Response Theory and Bayesian Decision Theory. The idea of sequential testing is developed, with the goal of providing longer or shorter tests as needed, and a computerized application to a hypothetical professional knowledge examination is discussed. (Author/LRW)

  6. Testing for central symmetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einmahl, John; Gan, Zhuojiong

    Omnibus tests for central symmetry of a bivariate probability distribution are proposed. The test statistics compare empirical measures of opposite regions. Under rather weak conditions, we establish the asymptotic distribution of the test statistics under the null hypothesis; it follows that they

  7. Dynamic Testing: Toward a Multiple Exciter Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    complex electronics and munitions that are more susceptible to fatigue failure increased the potential for vibration to cause catastrophic failures... fatigue equiva- lent laboratory vibration specifications based on measured field data were also advancing. This led to the inclusion of the first fatigue ...critical vibration testing element. The field vibration environment may be described as the simultaneous vibration in three translational and three

  8. 100 statistical tests

    CERN Document Server

    Kanji, Gopal K

    2006-01-01

    This expanded and updated Third Edition of Gopal K. Kanji's best-selling resource on statistical tests covers all the most commonly used tests with information on how to calculate and interpret results with simple datasets. Each entry begins with a short summary statement about the test's purpose, and contains details of the test objective, the limitations (or assumptions) involved, a brief outline of the method, a worked example, and the numerical calculation. 100 Statistical Tests, Third Edition is the one indispensable guide for users of statistical materials and consumers of statistical information at all levels and across all disciplines.

  9. Combining standardized uptake value of FDG-PET and apparent diffusion coefficient of DW-MRI improves risk stratification in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preda, Lorenzo; Summers, Paul E. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Conte, Giorgio; Bonello, Luke; Giannitto, Caterina; Ruju, Francesca [University of Milan, Specialisation School of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Travaini, Laura L.; Grana, Chiara [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Raimondi, Sara [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milan (Italy); Mohssen, Ansarin [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Milan (Italy); Alterio, Daniela [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiotherapy, Milan (Italy); Cossu Rocca, Maria [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Urogenital Cancer Medical Treatment, Milan (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Oncology and Haematology-Oncology, Milan (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    To assess the independent prognostic value of standardized uptake value (SUV) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), separately and combined, in order to evaluate if the combination of these two variables allows further prognostic stratification of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Pretreatment SUV and ADC were calculated in 57 patients with HNSCC. Mean follow-up was 21.3 months. Semiquantitative analysis of primary tumours was performed using SUV{sub maxT/B}, ADC{sub mean}, ADC{sub min} and ADC{sub max}. The prognostic value of SUV{sub maxT/B}, ADC{sub mean}, ADC{sub min} and ADC{sub max} in predicting disease-free survival (DFS) was evaluated with log-rank test and Cox regression models. Patients with SUV{sub maxT/B} ≥5.75 had an overall worse prognosis (p = 0.003). After adjusting for lymph node status and diameter, SUV{sub maxT/B} and ADC{sub min} were both significant predictors of DFS with hazard ratio (HR) = 10.37 (95 % CI 1.22-87.95) and 3.26 (95 % CI 1.20-8.85) for SUV{sub maxT/B} ≥5.75 and ADC{sub min} ≥0.58 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, respectively. When the analysis was restricted to subjects with SUV{sub maxT/B} ≥5.75, high ADC{sub min} significantly predicted a worse prognosis, with adjusted HR = 3.11 (95 % CI 1.13-8.55). The combination of SUV{sub maxT/B} and ADC{sub min} improves the prognostic role of the two separate parameters; patients with high SUV{sub maxT/B} and high ADC{sub min} are associated with a poor prognosis. (orig.)

  10. A Digital Reference Object to Analyze Calculation Accuracy of PET Standardized Uptake Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Larry A; Elston, Brian F; Clunie, David A; Nelson, Dennis; Kinahan, Paul E

    2015-11-01

    To determine the extent of variations in computing standardized uptake value (SUV) by body weight (SUV(BW)) among different software packages and to propose a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) reference test object to ensure the standardization of SUV computation between medical image viewing workstations. Research ethics board approval was not necessary because this study only evaluated images of a phantom. A synthetic set of positron emission tomographic (PET)/computed tomographic (CT) image data, called a digital reference object (DRO), with known SUV was created. The DRO was sent to 16 sites and evaluated on 21 different PET/CT display software packages. Users were asked to draw various regions of interest (ROIs) on specific features and report the maximum, minimum, mean, and standard deviation of the SUVs for each ROI. Numerical tolerances were defined for each metric, and the fraction of reported values within the tolerance was recorded, as was the mean, standard deviation, and range of the metrics. The errors in reported maximum SUV ranged from -37.8% to 0% for an isolated voxel with 4.11:1 target-to-background activity level, and errors in the reported mean SUV ranged from -1.6% to 100% for a region with controlled noise. There was also a range of errors in the less commonly used metrics of minimum SUV and standard deviation SUV. The variability of computed SUV(BW) between different software packages is substantial enough to warrant the introduction of a reference standard for medical image viewing workstations. © RSNA, 2015

  11. Noninvasive prenatal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Jamie O; Cori D, Feist; Norton, Mary E; Caughey, Aaron B

    2014-02-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) refers to recently developed genetic tests of the maternal serum that allow higher detection rates of trisomy 21 and other chromosomal aneuploidies in high-risk pregnancies. Noninvasive prenatal test analyzes cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in the maternal serum. Approximately 3% to 15% of cfDNA in the maternal blood is of fetal origin. Analysis of cfDNA can help identify fetuses affected with trisomy 21 and several other fetal aneuploidies. Testing can be performed after 9 to 10 weeks' gestation and has a higher sensitivity and specificity for trisomy 21 than other aneuploidy screening test. Noninvasive prenatal test has been studied and validated in singleton pregnancies at risk for trisomy 21 secondary to advanced maternal age, an abnormal serum screen, personal or family history of aneuploidy, or abnormal ultrasound findings, if these are suggestive of trisomy 13, 18, or 21. The utilization of NIPT for genetic screening has increased rapidly since introduction of the first clinical test in October 2011. Currently, there are limitations to NIPT including the possibility of test failure (2.6%-5.4%) and the focus on only the common trisomies. Noninvasive prenatal test is a screening test, and both false-positive (0.2%-1%) and false-negative results can occur. As the technology for NIPT is further evaluated, this test is likely to be increasingly used for prenatal screening. This review provides the obstetric clinician with an update of the current issues concerning NIPT.

  12. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  13. Pilocarpine iontophoresis test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif; Nielsen, B

    1995-01-01

    The pilocarpine iontophoresis test (P-test) is used as a predictor of the capacity to produce sweat. Therefore, we studied the reproducibility of this test in 12 normal subjects on 10 consecutive days. Furthermore, we determined whether the P-test reflects whole-body and regional sweat secretion...... during exercise in the heat. Finally, we determined whether the P-test stimulates the eccrine sweat glands to maximal sweat secretion. Six growth hormone-deficient (GHD) patients who are known to have decreased sweating, and 11 healthy control subjects were studied. To induce maximal sweat secretion......-to-day variation of 20.8% between individual subjects. There was a significant positive correlation between the P-test and regional sweat secretion (r2 = 0.74). The correlation coefficient (r2) was 0.50 for the correlation between the P-test and whole-body sweat secretion, and 0.52 for the correlation between...

  14. Pilocarpine iontophoresis test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif; Nielsen, B

    1995-01-01

    regional sweat secretion and whole-body sweat secretion. We conclude that the pilocarpine iontophoresis test reflects heat- and exercise-induced sweating capacity. However, this test does not induce maximal sweating, and it cannot be used as a single reliable predictor of whole-body sweating, due......The pilocarpine iontophoresis test (P-test) is used as a predictor of the capacity to produce sweat. Therefore, we studied the reproducibility of this test in 12 normal subjects on 10 consecutive days. Furthermore, we determined whether the P-test reflects whole-body and regional sweat secretion...... during exercise in the heat. Finally, we determined whether the P-test stimulates the eccrine sweat glands to maximal sweat secretion. Six growth hormone-deficient (GHD) patients who are known to have decreased sweating, and 11 healthy control subjects were studied. To induce maximal sweat secretion...

  15. Testing and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Kristine

    This presentation will explore how educational standardized testing becomes meaningful/not meaningful for children and teachers and at the same time how testing becomes part of everyday differentiation and categorization processes. The presentation is based on a 3 year long post doc project...... concerning the practice of standardized testing in the Danish primary and lower secondary school (Folkeskole). The empirical material consists of qualitative interviews of pupils and teachers and participative observations both in and outside test situations in 5 school classes. The theoretical basis...... with regard to; 1) how the technology of testing and children in communities co-constitute the practice in which children take part and becomes measured, 2) the ongoing reproduction and transformation of testing practice and 3) the contradictions and conflicts of testing practice. This theoretical outset...

  16. Sperm function test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Talwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation. They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation. Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count, structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology. Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test, should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test. They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test. Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test to the oocyte during fertilization.

  17. Nemesis Autonomous Test System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barltrop, Kevin J.; Lee, Cin-Young; Horvath, Gregory A,; Clement, Bradley J.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized framework has been developed for systems validation that can be applied to both traditional and autonomous systems. The framework consists of an automated test case generation and execution system called Nemesis that rapidly and thoroughly identifies flaws or vulnerabilities within a system. By applying genetic optimization and goal-seeking algorithms on the test equipment side, a "war game" is conducted between a system and its complementary nemesis. The end result of the war games is a collection of scenarios that reveals any undesirable behaviors of the system under test. The software provides a reusable framework to evolve test scenarios using genetic algorithms using an operation model of the system under test. It can automatically generate and execute test cases that reveal flaws in behaviorally complex systems. Genetic algorithms focus the exploration of tests on the set of test cases that most effectively reveals the flaws and vulnerabilities of the system under test. It leverages advances in state- and model-based engineering, which are essential in defining the behavior of autonomous systems. It also uses goal networks to describe test scenarios.

  18. Testing On Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Russell

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Russell and Haney (1997 reported that open-ended test items administered on paper may underestimate the achievement of students accustomed to writing on computers. This study builds on Russell and Haney's work by examining the effect of taking open-ended tests on computers and on paper for students with different levels of computer skill. Using items from the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP, this study focuses on language arts, science and math tests administered to eighth grade students. In addition, information on students' prior computer use and keyboarding speed was collected. Unlike the previous study that found large effects for open-ended writing and science items, this study reports mixed results. For the science test, performance on computers had a positive group effect. For the two language arts tests, an overall group effect was not found. However, for students whose keyboarding speed is at least 0.5 or one-half of a standard deviation above the mean, performing the language arts test on computer had a moderate positive effect. Conversely, for students whose keyboarding speed was 0.5 standard deviations below the mean, performing the tests on computer had a substantial negative effect. For the math test, performing the test on computer had an overall negative effect, but this effect became less pronounced as keyboarding speed increased. Implications are discussed in terms of testing policies and future research.

  19. Teacher Test Accountability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry H. Ludlow

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the high stakes of teacher testing, there is no doubt that every teacher test should meet the industry guidelines set forth in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. Unfortunately, however, there is no public or private business or governmental agency that serves to certify or in any other formal way declare that any teacher test does, in fact, meet the psychometric recommendations stipulated in the Standards. Consequently, there are no legislated penalties for faulty products (tests nor are there opportunities for test takers simply to raise questions about a test and to have their questions taken seriously by an impartial panel. The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the psychometric results reported by National Evaluation Systems (NES in their 1999 Massachusetts Educator Certification Test (MECT Technical Report, and more specifically, to identify those technical characteristics of the MECT that are inconsistent with the Standards. A second purpose of this article is to call for the establishment of a standing test auditing organization with investigation and sanctioning power. The significance of the present analysis is twofold: a psychometric results for the MECT are similar in nature to psychometric results presented as evidence of test development flaws in an Alabama class-action lawsuit dealing with teacher certification (an NES-designed testing system; and b there was no impartial enforcement agency to whom complaints about the Alabama tests could be brought, other than the court, nor is there any such agency to whom complaints about the Massachusetts tests can be brought. I begin by reviewing NES's role in Allen v. Alabama State Board of Education, 81-697-N. Next I explain the purpose and interpretation of standard item analysis procedures and statistics. Finally, I present results taken directly from the 1999 MECT Technical Report and compare them to procedures, results, and consequences of

  20. Standard Test Method for Sandwich Corrosion Test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method defines the procedure for evaluating the corrosivity of aircraft maintenance chemicals, when present between faying surfaces (sandwich) of aluminum alloys commonly used for aircraft structures. This test method is intended to be used in the qualification and approval of compounds employed in aircraft maintenance operations. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information. 1.3 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific hazard statements appear in Section 9.