WorldWideScience

Sample records for susy quantum mechanics

  1. Determination of excited states of quantum systems by finite difference time domain method (FDTD) with supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY-QM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudiarta, I. Wayan; Angraini, Lily Maysari, E-mail: lilyangraini@unram.ac.id [Physics Study Program, University of Mataram, Jln. Majapahit 62 Mataram, NTB (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    We have applied the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method with the supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY-QM) procedure to determine excited energies of one dimensional quantum systems. The theoretical basis of FDTD, SUSY-QM, a numerical algorithm and an illustrative example for a particle in a one dimensional square-well potential were given in this paper. It was shown that the numerical results were in excellent agreement with theoretical results. Numerical errors produced by the SUSY-QM procedure was due to errors in estimations of superpotentials and supersymmetric partner potentials.

  2. Bound State Solution of Dirac Equation for Generalized Pöschl-Teller plus Trigomometric Pöschl-Teller Non- Central Potential Using SUSY Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparmi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The bound state solution of the Dirac equation for generalized PöschlTeller and trigonometric Pöschl-Teller non-central potentials was obtained using SUSY quantum mechanics and the idea of shape invariance potential. The approximate relativistic energy spectrum was expressed in the closed form. The radial and polar wave functions were obtained using raising and lowering of radial and polar operators. The orbital quantum numbers were found from the polar Dirac equation, which was solved using SUSY quantum mechanics and the idea of shape invariance.

  3. Higher dimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics and Dirac ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supersymmetric (SUSY) quantum mechanics, particularly in one-dimension, has been a subject of intensive study in the past [1]. Its generalization to higher space dimensions is an important and interesting problem in its own right. Recently, Das, Okubo and Pernice. [2] while discussing generalization of SUSY quantum ...

  4. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics living on topologically non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In [1], one can find a virtually exhaustive list of reasons of interest in the so-called supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY QM). This list starts with the theory and phenomenology of elementary particles where SUSY QM plays the role of a methodical guide towards our understanding of its various mathematical features.

  5. Exceptional polynomials and SUSY quantum mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Faculty of Science and Technology, ICFAI Foundation for Higher Education, Donthanapally,. Hyderabad 501 203, India ... classical orthogonal polynomial systems (OPS) such as, the Hermite, Laguerre and the. Jacobi satisfy eq. (1). Note that y0 is a constant ..... Ltd., Singapore, 2001). [11] C Quesne, SIGMA 5, 084 (2009), ...

  6. Exceptional polynomials and SUSY quantum mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BITS Pilani, Hyderabad Campus, Jawahar Nagar, Shameerpet Mandal, Hyderabad 500 078, India; Faculty of Science and Technology, ICFAI Foundation for Higher Education, Donthanapally, Hyderabad 501 203, India; Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Kolkata, Mohanpur Campus, Nadia 714 252 ...

  7. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2016-01-01

    A Thorough Update of One of the Most Highly Regarded Textbooks on Quantum Mechanics Continuing to offer an exceptionally clear, up-to-date treatment of the subject, Quantum Mechanics, Sixth Edition explains the concepts of quantum mechanics for undergraduate students in physics and related disciplines and provides the foundation necessary for other specialized courses. This sixth edition builds on its highly praised predecessors to make the text even more accessible to a wider audience. It is now divided into five parts that separately cover broad topics suitable for any general course on quantum mechanics. New to the Sixth Edition * Three chapters that review prerequisite physics and mathematics, laying out the notation, formalism, and physical basis necessary for the rest of the book * Short descriptions of numerous applications relevant to the physics discussed, giving students a brief look at what quantum mechanics has made possible industrially and scientifically * Additional end-of-chapter problems with...

  8. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, John L

    2015-01-01

    Suitable for advanced undergraduates, this thorough text focuses on the role of symmetry operations and the essentially algebraic structure of quantum-mechanical theory. Based on courses in quantum mechanics taught by the authors, the treatment provides numerous problems that require applications of theory and serve to supplement the textual material.Starting with a historical introduction to the origins of quantum theory, the book advances to discussions of the foundations of wave mechanics, wave packets and the uncertainty principle, and an examination of the Schrödinger equation that includ

  9. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chowdhury, Sujaul

    2014-01-01

    This book presents comprehensive account of the course for undergraduate students with thorough and complete calculations. The book has been written with the notion that a wave is associated with a material particle i.e. wave and particle coexist. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle has been described in light of this. A chapter is dedicated to mathematical structure of Quantum Mechanics followed by applications to one-dimensional (1D) problems. Orbital and general angular momentum are treated in two separate chapters, the latter also treats addition of angular momentum. Quantum theory of scattering, matrix formulation of Quantum Mechanics variational method and WKB approximation method have also been discussed.

  10. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, P K

    2014-01-01

    Quantum mechanics, designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of physics, mathematics and chemistry, provides a concise yet self-contained introduction to the formal framework of quantum mechanics, its application to physical problems and the interpretation of the theory. Starting with a review of some of the necessary mathematics, the basic concepts are carefully developed in the text. After building a general formalism, detailed treatment of the standard material - the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, angular momentum theory, symmetry transformations, approximation methods, identical particle and many-particle systems, and scattering theory - is presented. The concluding chapter discusses the interpretation of quantum mechanics. Some of the important topics discussed in the book are the rigged Hilbert space, deformation quantization, path integrals, coherent states, geometric phases, decoherene, etc. This book is characterized by clarity and coherence of presentation.

  11. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2007-01-01

    PREFACESINTRODUCTION The Photoelectric Effect The Compton Effect Line Spectra and Atomic Structure De Broglie Waves Wave-Particle Duality The Rest of This Book THE ONE-DIMENSIONAL SCHRÖDINGER EQUATIONS The Time-Dependent Schrödinger Equation The Time-Independent Schrödinger Equation Boundary ConditionsThe Infinite Square Well The Finite Square Well Quantum Mechanical Tunneling The Harmonic Oscillator THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL SCHRÖDINGER EQUATIONS The Wave Equations Separation in Cartesian Coordinates Separation in Spherical Polar Coordinates The Hydrogenic Atom THE BASIC POSTULATES OF QUANTUM MEC

  12. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zagoskin, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Written by Dr Alexandre Zagoskin, who is a Reader at Loughborough University, Quantum Mechanics: A Complete Introduction is designed to give you everything you need to succeed, all in one place. It covers the key areas that students are expected to be confident in, outlining the basics in clear jargon-free English, and then providing added-value features like summaries of key ideas, and even lists of questions you might be asked in your exam. The book uses a structure that is designed to make quantum physics as accessible as possible - by starting with its similarities to Newtonian physics, ra

  13. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mandl, Franz

    1992-01-01

    The Manchester Physics Series General Editors: D. J. Sandiford; F. Mandl; A. C. Phillips Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester Properties of Matter B. H. Flowers and E. Mendoza Optics Second Edition F. G. Smith and J. H. Thomson Statistical Physics Second Edition F. Mandl Electromagnetism Second Edition I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips Statistics R. J. Barlow Solid State Physics Second Edition J. R. Hook and H. E. Hall Quantum Mechanics F. Mandl Particle Physics Second Edition B. R. Martin and G. Shaw The Physics of Stars Second Edition A. C. Phillips Computing for Scient

  14. Harmonic Oscillator SUSY Partners and Evolution Loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Fernández

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Supersymmetric quantum mechanics is a powerful tool for generating exactly solvable potentials departing from a given initial one. If applied to the harmonic oscillator, a family of Hamiltonians ruled by polynomial Heisenberg algebras is obtained. In this paper it will be shown that the SUSY partner Hamiltonians of the harmonic oscillator can produce evolution loops. The corresponding geometric phases will be as well studied.

  15. Testing Nonassociative Quantum Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin; Brahma, Suddhasattwa; Büyükçam, Umut

    2015-11-27

    The familiar concepts of state vectors and operators in quantum mechanics rely on associative products of observables. However, these notions do not apply to some exotic systems such as magnetic monopoles, which have long been known to lead to nonassociative algebras. Their quantum physics has remained obscure. This Letter presents the first derivation of potentially testable physical results in nonassociative quantum mechanics, based on effective potentials. They imply new effects which cannot be mimicked in usual quantum mechanics with standard magnetic fields.

  16. Problems in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinescu, Florin; Spiers, JA

    1971-01-01

    International Series in Natural Philosophy, Volume 30: Problems in Quantum Mechanics focuses on the processes, principles, reactions, and methodologies involved in quantum mechanics. The publication first elaborates on the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics, simple quantum systems, and mean values and uncertainty relations. Discussions focus on mean values of dynamical variables, uncertainty relations, eigenfunctions and the energy spectrum, motion in a central field, matrix representation of vectors and operators, Hubert spaces, and operators in Hilbert space. The text then takes a l

  17. Engineering quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Doyeol

    2011-01-01

    A clear introduction to quantum mechanics concepts Quantum mechanics has become an essential tool for modern engineering, particularly due to the recent developments in quantum computing as well as the rapid progress in optoelectronic devices. Engineering Quantum Mechanics explains the fundamentals of this exciting field, providing broad coverage of both traditional areas such as semiconductor and laser physics as well as relatively new yet fast-growing areas such as quantum computation and quantum information technology. The book begins with basic quantum mechanics, reviewing measurements and probability, Dirac formulation, the uncertainty principle, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum eigenstates, and perturbation theory. Then, quantum statistical mechanics is explored, from second quantization and density operators to coherent and squeezed states, coherent interactions between atoms and fields, and the Jaynes-Cummings model. From there, the book moves into elementary and modern applications, discussing s...

  18. Advanced Visual Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Thaller, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    Advanced Visual Quantum Mechanics is a systematic effort to investigate and to teach quantum mechanics with the aid of computer-generated animations. It is a self-contained textbook that combines selected topics from atomic physics (spherical symmetry, the hydrogen atom, and particles with spin) with an introduction to quantum information theory (qubits, EPR paradox, teleportation, quantum computers). It explores relativistic quantum mechanics and the strange behavior of Dirac equation solutions. A series of appendices covers important topics from perturbation and scattering theory. The book places an emphasis on ideas and concepts, with a fair to moderate amount of mathematical rigor. Though this book stands alone, it can also be paired with Thaller Visual Quantum Mechanics to form a comprehensive course in quantum mechanics. The software for the first book earned the European Academic Software Award 2000 for outstanding innovation in its field.

  19. Quantum mechanics in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Schatz, George C

    2002-01-01

    Intended for graduate and advanced undergraduate students, this text explores quantum mechanical techniques from the viewpoint of chemistry and materials science. Dynamics, symmetry, and formalism are emphasized. An initial review of basic concepts from introductory quantum mechanics is followed by chapters examining symmetry, rotations, and angular momentum addition. Chapter 4 introduces the basic formalism of time-dependent quantum mechanics, emphasizing time-dependent perturbation theory and Fermi's golden rule. Chapter 5 sees this formalism applied to the interaction of radiation and matt

  20. Quantum mechanics for pedestrians

    CERN Document Server

    Pade, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction into the fundamentals of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. In Part 1, the essential principles are developed. Applications and extensions of the formalism can be found in Part 2. The book includes not only material that is presented in traditional textbooks on quantum mechanics, but also discusses in detail current issues such as interaction-free quantum measurements, neutrino oscillations, various topics in the field of quantum information as well as fundamental problems and epistemological questions, such as the measurement problem, entanglement, Bell's inequality, decoherence, and the realism debate. A chapter on current interpretations of quantum mechanics concludes the book. To develop quickly and clearly the main principles of quantum mechanics and its mathematical formulation, there is a systematic change between wave mechanics and algebraic representation in the first chapters. The required mathematical tools are introduced step by step. Moreover, the appendix coll...

  1. Geometrization of Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Carinena, J. F.; Clemente-Gallardo, J.; Marmo, G.

    2007-01-01

    We show that it is possible to represent various descriptions of Quantum Mechanics in geometrical terms. In particular we start with the space of observables and use the momentum map associated with the unitary group to provide an unified geometrical description for the different pictures of Quantum Mechanics. This construction provides an alternative to the usual GNS construction for pure states.

  2. Problems in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Goldman, Iosif Ilich; Geilikman, B T

    2006-01-01

    This challenging book contains a comprehensive collection of problems in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics of varying degrees of difficulty. It features answers and completely worked-out solutions to each problem. Geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students, it provides an ideal adjunct to any textbook in quantum mechanics.

  3. Lorentz quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Wu, Biao

    2018-01-01

    We present a theoretical framework for the dynamics of bosonic Bogoliubov quasiparticles. We call it Lorentz quantum mechanics because the dynamics is a continuous complex Lorentz transformation in complex Minkowski space. In contrast, in usual quantum mechanics, the dynamics is the unitary transformation in Hilbert space. In our Lorentz quantum mechanics, three types of state exist: space-like, light-like and time-like. Fundamental aspects are explored in parallel to the usual quantum mechanics, such as a matrix form of a Lorentz transformation, and the construction of Pauli-like matrices for spinors. We also investigate the adiabatic evolution in these mechanics, as well as the associated Berry curvature and Chern number. Three typical physical systems, where bosonic Bogoliubov quasi-particles and their Lorentz quantum dynamics can arise, are presented. They are a one-dimensional fermion gas, Bose–Einstein condensate (or superfluid), and one-dimensional antiferromagnet.

  4. Membrane quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Okazaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the multiple M2-branes wrapped on a compact Riemann surface and study the arising quantum mechanics by taking the limit where the size of the Riemann surface goes to zero. The IR quantum mechanical models resulting from the BLG-model and the ABJM-model compactified on a torus are N=16 and N=12 superconformal gauged quantum mechanics. After integrating out the auxiliary gauge fields we find OSp(16|2 and SU(1,1|6 quantum mechanics from the reduced systems. The curved Riemann surface is taken as a holomorphic curve in a Calabi–Yau space to preserve supersymmetry and we present a prescription of the topological twisting. We find the N=8 superconformal gauged quantum mechanics that may describe the motion of two wrapped M2-branes in a K3 surface.

  5. Quantum mechanical Carnot engine

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, C.M.; Brody, D. C.; Meister, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    A cyclic thermodynamic heat engine runs most efficiently if it is reversible. Carnot constructed such a reversible heat engine by combining adiabatic and isothermal processes for a system containing an ideal gas. Here, we present an example of a cyclic engine based on a single quantum-mechanical particle confined to a potential well. The efficiency of this engine is shown to equal the Carnot efficiency because quantum dynamics is reversible. The quantum heat engine has a cycle consisting of a...

  6. Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickl Peter

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The problems of modern physics are man made. The Copenhagen version of quantum mechanics is formulated in a vague prosaic way, inconsistencies and paradoxes are the price. New interpretations try to solve the problem, however a reformulation rather than an interpretation is needed. In this manuscript I will point out, where the Copenhagen formulation of quantum mechanics is flawed and how one can make sense out of it. Then I will show, that it is possible to give a precise formulation of quantum mechanics without losing its compelling ability in describing experiments.

  7. Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickl, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The problems of modern physics are man made. The Copenhagen version of quantum mechanics is formulated in a vague prosaic way, inconsistencies and paradoxes are the price. New interpretations try to solve the problem, however a reformulation rather than an interpretation is needed. In this manuscript I will point out, where the Copenhagen formulation of quantum mechanics is flawed and how one can make sense out of it. Then I will show, that it is possible to give a precise formulation of quantum mechanics without losing its compelling ability in describing experiments.

  8. Supersymmetry in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Fred; Sukhatme, Uday

    2001-01-01

    This invaluable book provides an elementary description of supersymmetric quantum mechanics which complements the traditional coverage found in the existing quantum mechanics textbooks. It gives physicists a fresh outlook and new ways of handling quantum-mechanical problems, and also leads to improved approximation techniques for dealing with potentials of interest in all branches of physics. The algebraic approach to obtaining eigenstates is elegant and important, and all physicists should become familiar with this. The book has been written in such a way that it can be easily appreciated by

  9. Primer of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, Marvin

    2003-01-01

    Introductory text examines the classical quantum bead on a track: its state and representations; operator eigenvalues; harmonic oscillator and bound bead in a symmetric force field; and bead in a spherical shell. Also, spin, matrices and structure of quantum mechanics; simplest atom; indistinguishable particles; and stationary-state perturbation theory.

  10. Supersymmetric grand unified theories from quarks to strings via SUSY GUTs

    CERN Document Server

    Raby, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    These course-tested lectures provide a technical introduction to Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (SUSY GUTs), as well as a personal view on the topic by one of the pioneers in the field. While the Standard Model of Particle Physics is incredibly successful in describing the known universe it is, nevertheless, an incomplete theory with many free parameters and open issues. An elegant solution to all of these quandaries is the proposed theory of SUSY GUTs. In a GUT, quarks and leptons are related in a simple way by the unifying symmetry and their electric charges are quantized, further the relative strength of the strong, weak and electromagnetic forces are predicted. SUSY GUTs additionally provide a framework for understanding particle masses and offer candidates for dark matter. Finally, with the extension of SUSY GUTs to string theory, a quantum-mechanically consistent unification of the four known forces (including gravity) is obtained. The book is organized in three sections: the first section contai...

  11. Lectures on quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Nobel Laureate Steven Weinberg combines his exceptional physical insight with his gift for clear exposition to provide a concise introduction to modern quantum mechanics. Ideally suited to a one-year graduate course, this textbook is also a useful reference for researchers. Readers are introduced to the subject through a review of the history of quantum mechanics and an account of classic solutions of the Schrödinger equation, before quantum mechanics is developed in a modern Hilbert space approach. The textbook covers many topics not often found in other books on the subject, including alternatives to the Copenhagen interpretation, Bloch waves and band structure, the Wigner–Eckart theorem, magic numbers, isospin symmetry, the Dirac theory of constrained canonical systems, general scattering theory, the optical theorem, the 'in-in' formalism, the Berry phase, Landau levels, entanglement and quantum computing. Problems are included at the ends of chapters, with solutions available for instructors at www.cam...

  12. Supersymmetric symplectic quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Miralvo B.; Fernandes, M. C. B.; Martins, Maria das Graças R.; Santana, A. E.; Vianna, J. D. M.

    2018-02-01

    Symplectic Quantum Mechanics SQM considers a non-commutative algebra of functions on a phase space Γ and an associated Hilbert space HΓ to construct a unitary representation for the Galilei group. From this unitary representation the Schrödinger equation is rewritten in phase space variables and the Wigner function can be derived without the use of the Liouville-von Neumann equation. In this article we extend the methods of supersymmetric quantum mechanics SUSYQM to SQM. With the purpose of applications in quantum systems, the factorization method of the quantum mechanical formalism is then set within supersymmetric SQM. A hierarchy of simpler hamiltonians is generated leading to new computation tools for solving the eigenvalue problem in SQM. We illustrate the results by computing the states and spectra of the problem of a charged particle in a homogeneous magnetic field as well as the corresponding Wigner function.

  13. Time in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mayato, R; Egusquiza, I

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of time in quantum mechanics is still an important and challenging open question in the foundation of the theory. This book describes the problems, and the attempts and achievements in defining, formalizing and measuring different time quantities in quantum theory, such as the parametric (clock) time, tunneling times, decay times, dwell times, delay times, arrival times or jump times. This multiauthored book, written as an introductory guide for the non-initiated as well as a useful source of information for the expert, covers many of the open questions. A brief historical overview is to be found in the introduction. It is followed by 12 chapters devoted to conceptual and theoretical investigations as well as experimental issues in quantum-mechanical time measurements. This unique monograph should attract physicists as well as philosophers of science working in the foundations of quantum physics.

  14. Spin-Anisotropy Commensurable Chains: Quantum Group Symmetries and N=2 SUSY

    OpenAIRE

    Berkovich, A.; Gomez, C.; Sierra, G.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we consider a class of the 2D integrable models. These models are higher spin XXZ chains with an extra condition of the commensurability between spin and anisotropy. The mathematics underlying this commensurability is provided by the quantum groups with deformation parameter being an Nth root of unity. Our discussion covers a range of topics including new integrable deformations, thermodynamics, conformal behaviour, S-matrices and magnetization. The emerging picture strongly dep...

  15. Probability in quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Gilson

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available By using a fluid theory which is an alternative to quantum theory but from which the latter can be deduced exactly, the long-standing problem of how quantum mechanics is related to stochastic processes is studied. It can be seen how the Schrödinger probability density has a relationship to time spent on small sections of an orbit, just as the probability density has in some classical contexts.

  16. 𝒩 = 4 supersymmetric quantum mechanical model: Novel symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, S.

    2017-04-01

    We discuss a set of novel discrete symmetry transformations of the 𝒩 = 4 supersymmetric quantum mechanical model of a charged particle moving on a sphere in the background of Dirac magnetic monopole. The usual five continuous symmetries (and their conserved Noether charges) and two discrete symmetries together provide the physical realizations of the de Rham cohomological operators of differential geometry. We have also exploited the supervariable approach to derive the nilpotent 𝒩 = 4 SUSY transformations and provided the geometrical interpretation in the language of translational generators along the Grassmannian directions 𝜃α and 𝜃¯α onto (1, 4)-dimensional supermanifold.

  17. Fundamentals of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    House, J E

    2017-01-01

    Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics, Third Edition is a clear and detailed introduction to quantum mechanics and its applications in chemistry and physics. All required math is clearly explained, including intermediate steps in derivations, and concise review of the math is included in the text at appropriate points. Most of the elementary quantum mechanical models-including particles in boxes, rigid rotor, harmonic oscillator, barrier penetration, hydrogen atom-are clearly and completely presented. Applications of these models to selected “real world” topics are also included. This new edition includes many new topics such as band theory and heat capacity of solids, spectroscopy of molecules and complexes (including applications to ligand field theory), and small molecules of astrophysical interest.

  18. Fundamentals of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Erkoc, Sakir

    2006-01-01

    HISTORICAL EXPERIMENTS AND THEORIESDates of Important Discoveries and Events Blackbody RadiationPhotoelectrice Effect Quantum Theory of Spectra TheComptone Effect Matterwaves, the de Broglie HypothesisThe Davisson -Germer Experiment Heisenberg's Uncertainity PrincipleDifference Between Particles and Waves Interpretation of the Wavefunction AXIOMATIC STRUCTURE OF QUANTUM MECHANICSThe Necessity of Quantum TheoryFunction Spaces Postulates of Quantum Mechanics The Kronecker Delta and the Dirac Delta Function Dirac Notation OBSERVABLES AND SUPERPOSITIONFree Particle Particle In A Box Ensemble Average Hilbert -Space Interpretation The Initial Square Wave Particle Beam Superposition and Uncertainty Degeneracy of States Commutators and Uncertainty TIME DEVELOPMENT AND CONSERVATION THEOREMSTime Development of State Functions, The Discrete Case The Continuous Case, Wave Packets Particle Beam Gaussian Wave Packet Free Particle Propagator The Limiting Cases of the Gaussian Wave Packets Time Development of Expectation Val...

  19. Noncommutative quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, J.; Loewe, M.; Rojas, J. C.

    2001-09-01

    A general noncommutative quantum mechanical system in a central potential V=V(r) in two dimensions is considered. The spectrum is bounded from below and, for large values of the anticommutative parameter θ, we find an explicit expression for the eigenvalues. In fact, any quantum mechanical system with these characteristics is equivalent to a commutative one in such a way that the interaction V(r) is replaced by V=V(HHO,Lz), where HHO is the Hamiltonian of the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator and Lz is the z component of the angular momentum. For other finite values of θ the model can be solved by using perturbation theory.

  20. Quantum mechanics selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Perelomov, Askold Mikhailovich

    1998-01-01

    It can serve as a good supplement to any quantum mechanics textbook, filling the gap between standard textbooks and higher-level books on the one hand and journal articles on the other. This book provides a detailed treatment of the scattering theory, multidimensional quasi-classical approximation, non-stationary problems for oscillators and the theory of unstable particles. It will be useful for postgraduate students and researchers who wish to find new, interesting information hidden in the depths of non-relativistic quantum mechanics.

  1. Elementary quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Saxon, David S

    2012-01-01

    Based on lectures for an undergraduate UCLA course in quantum mechanics, this volume focuses on the formulas of quantum mechanics rather than applications. Widely used in both upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses, it offers a broad self-contained survey rather than in-depth treatments.Topics include the dual nature of matter and radiation, state functions and their interpretation, linear momentum, the motion of a free particle, Schrödinger's equation, approximation methods, angular momentum, and many other subjects. In the interests of keeping the mathematics as simple as possible, m

  2. Problems in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kogan, VI; Gersch, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Written by a pair of distinguished Soviet mathematicians, this compilation presents 160 lucidly expressed problems in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics plus completely worked-out solutions. Some were drawn from the authors' courses at the Moscow Institute of Engineering, but most were prepared especially for this book. A high-level supplement rather than a primary text, it constitutes a masterful complement to advanced undergraduate and graduate texts and courses in quantum mechanics.The mathematics employed in the proofs of the problems-asymptotic expansions of functions, Green's functions, u

  3. Copenhagen quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollowood, Timothy J.

    2016-07-01

    In our quantum mechanics courses, measurement is usually taught in passing, as an ad-hoc procedure involving the ugly collapse of the wave function. No wonder we search for more satisfying alternatives to the Copenhagen interpretation. But this overlooks the fact that the approach fits very well with modern measurement theory with its notions of the conditioned state and quantum trajectory. In addition, what we know of as the Copenhagen interpretation is a later 1950s development and some of the earlier pioneers like Bohr did not talk of wave function collapse. In fact, if one takes these earlier ideas and mixes them with later insights of decoherence, a much more satisfying version of Copenhagen quantum mechanics emerges, one for which the collapse of the wave function is seen to be a harmless book keeping device. Along the way, we explain why chaotic systems lead to wave functions that spread out quickly on macroscopic scales implying that Schrödinger cat states are the norm rather than curiosities generated in physicists' laboratories. We then describe how the conditioned state of a quantum system depends crucially on how the system is monitored illustrating this with the example of a decaying atom monitored with a time of arrival photon detector, leading to Bohr's quantum jumps. On the other hand, other kinds of detection lead to much smoother behaviour, providing yet another example of complementarity. Finally we explain how classical behaviour emerges, including classical mechanics but also thermodynamics.

  4. Time Asymmetric Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno R. Bohm

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The meaning of time asymmetry in quantum physics is discussed. On the basis of a mathematical theorem, the Stone-von Neumann theorem, the solutions of the dynamical equations, the Schrödinger equation (1 for states or the Heisenberg equation (6a for observables are given by a unitary group. Dirac kets require the concept of a RHS (rigged Hilbert space of Schwartz functions; for this kind of RHS a mathematical theorem also leads to time symmetric group evolution. Scattering theory suggests to distinguish mathematically between states (defined by a preparation apparatus and observables (defined by a registration apparatus (detector. If one requires that scattering resonances of width Γ and exponentially decaying states of lifetime τ=h/Γ should be the same physical entities (for which there is sufficient evidence one is led to a pair of RHS's of Hardy functions and connected with it, to a semigroup time evolution t_0≤t<∞, with the puzzling result that there is a quantum mechanical beginning of time, just like the big bang time for the universe, when it was a quantum system. The decay of quasi-stable particles is used to illustrate this quantum mechanical time asymmetry. From the analysis of these processes, we show that the properties of rigged Hilbert spaces of Hardy functions are suitable for a formulation of time asymmetry in quantum mechanics.

  5. Bohmian quantum mechanics with quantum trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeuncheol

    The quantum trajectory method in the hydrodynamical formulation of Madelung-Bohm-Takabayasi quantum mechanics is an example of showing the cognitive importance of scientific illustrations and metaphors, especially, in this case, in computational quantum chemistry and electrical engineering. The method involves several numerical schemes of solving a set of hydrodynamical equations of motion for probability density fluids, based on the propagation of those probability density trajectories. The quantum trajectory method gives rise to, for example, an authentic quantum electron transport theory of motion to, among others, classically-minded applied scientists who probably have less of a commitment to traditional quantum mechanics. They were not the usual audience of quantum mechanics and simply choose to use a non-Copenhagen type interpretation to their advantage. Thus, the metaphysical issues physicists had a trouble with are not the main concern of the scientists. With the advantages of a visual and illustrative trajectory, the quantum theory of motion by Bohm effectively bridges quantum and classical physics, especially, in the mesoscale domain. Without having an abrupt shift in actions and beliefs from the classical to the quantum world, scientists and engineers are able to enjoy human cognitive capacities extended into the quantum mechanical domain.

  6. Spin-anisotropy commensurable chains. Quantum group symmetries and N = 2 SUSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérkovich, Alexander; Gómez, César; Sierra, Germán

    1994-03-01

    In this paper we consider a class of 2D integrable models. These models are higher- spin XXZ-chains with an extra condition of the commensurability between spin ( j) and anisotropy ( γ): sin γ (2 j + 1) = 0. Thus, the mathematics underlying this commensurability is provided by the quantum groups with the deformation parameter being an Nth root of unity. Our discussion covers a range of topics including new integrable deformations, thermodynamics, conformal behaviour, S-matrices and magnetization. The emerging picture strongly depends on the N-parity. For the N-even case at the commensurable point, S- matrices factorize into an N = 2 supersymmetric sine-Gordon matrix and an RSOS piece. The physics of the N-odd case is rather different. Here, there are hints suggesting that supersymmetry is still present, however we did not unravel its nature, yet. In this case, S-matrices factorize into two RSOS pieces. The second RSOS piece has dependence on an extra parameter. Away from the commensurable point, we find an unusual magnetic behaviour. The magnetization of our chains depends on the sign of the external magnetic field.

  7. Split SUSY Radiates Flavor

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgart, Matthew; Zorawski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Radiative flavor models where the hierarchies of Standard Model (SM) fermion masses and mixings are explained via loop corrections are elegant ways to solve the SM flavor puzzle. Here we build such a model in the context of Mini-Split Supersymmetry (SUSY) where both flavor and SUSY breaking occur at a scale of 1000 TeV. This model is consistent with the observed Higgs mass, unification, and WIMP dark matter. The high scale allows large flavor mixing among the sfermions, which provides part of the mechanism for radiative flavor generation. In the deep UV, all flavors are treated democratically, but at the SUSY breaking scale, the third, second, and first generation Yukawa couplings are generated at tree level, one loop, and two loops, respectively. Save for one, all the dimensionless parameters in the theory are O(1), with the exception being a modest and technically natural tuning that explains both the smallness of the bottom Yukawa coupling and the largeness of the Cabibbo angle.

  8. Advanced quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Dyson, Freeman John

    2007-01-01

    Renowned physicist and mathematician Freeman Dyson is famous for his work in quantum mechanics, nuclear weapons policy and bold visions for the future of humanity. In the 1940s, he was responsible for demonstrating the equivalence of the two formulations of quantum electrodynamics Richard Feynman's diagrammatic path integral formulation and the variational methods developed by Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonoga showing the mathematical consistency of QED. This invaluable volume comprises the legendary, never-before-published, lectures on quantum electrodynamics first given by Dyson at Cornell University in 1951. The late theorist Edwin Thompson Jaynes once remarked "For a generation of physicists they were the happy medium: clearer and motivated than Feynman, and getting to the point faster than Schwinger . Future generations of physicists are bound to read these lectures with pleasure, benefiting from the lucid style that is so characteristic of Dyson's exposition.

  9. Quantum mechanics with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Beard, David B

    2014-01-01

    This introductory text emphasizes Feynman's development of path integrals and its application to wave theory for particles. Suitable for undergraduate and graduate students of physics, the well-written, clear, and rigorous text was written by two of the nation's leading authorities on quantum physics. A solid foundation in quantum mechanics and atomic physics is assumed. Early chapters provide background in the mathematical treatment and particular properties of ordinary wave motion that also apply to particle motion. The close relation of quantum theory to physical optics is stressed. Subsequent sections emphasize the physical consequences of a wave theory of material properties, and they offer extensive applications in atomic physics, nuclear physics, solid state physics, and diatomic molecules. Four helpful Appendixes supplement the text.

  10. Quantum mechanics and electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zamastil, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the power and elegance of algebraic methods of solving problems in quantum mechanics. It shows that symmetries not only provide elegant solutions to problems that can be solved exactly, but also substantially simplify problems that must be solved approximately. Furthermore, the book provides an elementary exposition of quantum electrodynamics and its application to low-energy physics, along with a thorough analysis of the role of relativistic, magnetic, and quantum electrodynamic effects in atomic spectroscopy. Included are essential derivations made clear through detailed, transparent calculations. The book’s commitment to deriving advanced results with elementary techniques, as well as its inclusion of exercises will enamor it to advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

  11. Epigenetics: Biology's Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Jorgensen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The perspective presented here is that modern genetics is at a similar stage of development as were early formulations of quantum mechanics theory in the 1920's and that in 2010 we are at the dawn of a new revolution in genetics that promises to enrich and deepen our understanding of the gene and the genome. The interrelationships and interdependence of two views of the gene - the molecular biological view and the epigenetic view - are explored, and it is argued that the classical molecular biological view is incomplete without incorporation of the epigenetic perspective and that in a sense the molecular biological view has been evolving to include the epigenetic view. Intriguingly, this evolution of the molecular view toward the broader and more inclusive epigenetic view of the gene has an intriguing, if not precise, parallel in the evolution of concepts of atomic physics from Newtonian mechanics to quantum mechanics that are interesting to consider.

  12. Concepts in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, Vishnu S

    2008-01-01

    NEED FOR QUANTUM MECHANICS AND ITS PHYSICAL BASIS Inadequacy of Classical Description for Small Systems Basis of Quantum Mechanics Representation of States Dual Vectors: Bra and Ket Vectors Linear Operators Adjoint of a Linear Operator Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors of a Linear Operator Physical Interpretation Observables and Completeness Criterion Commutativity and Compatibility of Observables Position and Momentum Commutation Relations Commutation Relation and the Uncertainty ProductAppendix: Basic Concepts in Classical MechanicsREPRESENTATION THEORY Meaning of Representation How to Set up a Representation Representatives of a Linear Operator Change of Representation Coordinate Representation Replacement of Momentum Observable p by -ih d/dqIntegral Representation of Dirac Bracket A2|F|A1> The Momentum Representation Dirac Delta FunctionRelation between the Coordinate and Momentum RepresentationsEQUATIONS OF MOTIONSchrödinger Equation of Motion Schrödinger Equation in the Coordinate Representation Equation o...

  13. Euclidean Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Philip; Polyzou, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a formulation of exactly Poincar\\'e invariant quantum mechanics where the input is model Euclidean Green functions or their generating functional. We discuss the structure of the models, the construction of the Hilbert space, the construction and transformation properties of single-particle states, and the construction of GeV scale transition matrix elements. A simple model is utilized to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  14. Symmetry and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Corry, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to quantum mechanics for professionals, students, and others in the field of mathematics who have a minimal background in physics with an understanding of linear algebra and group theory. It covers such topics as Lie groups, algebras and their representations, and analysis (Hilbert space, distributions, the spectral Theorem, and the Stone-Von Neumann Theorem). The book emphasizes the role of symmetry and is useful to physicists as it provides a mathematical introduction to the topic.

  15. What is quantum mechanics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    2007-04-01

    We discuss the arguments for suspecting that there exists a classical, i.e. deterministic theory underlying quantum mechanics. A difficulty is that an explanation must be found of the fact that the Hamiltonian, which is defined to be the operator that generates evolution in time, is bounded from below. The mechanism that can produce exactly such a constraint is identified in this paper. It is the fact that not all classical data are registered in the quantum description. Large sets of values of these data are assumed to be indistinguishable, forming equivalence classes. It is argued that this should be attributed to information loss, such as what one might suspect to happen during the formation and annihilation of virtual black holes. The nature of the equivalence classes is further elucidated, as it follows from the positivity of the Hamiltonian. Our world is assumed to consist of a very large number of subsystems that may be regarded as approximately independent, or weakly interacting with one another. As long as two (or more) sectors of our world are treated as being independent, they all must be demanded to be restricted to positive energy states only. What follows from these considerations is a unique definition of energy in the quantum system in terms of the periodicity of the limit cycles of the deterministic model. An example of a deterministic dissipative model producing exact quantum mechanics is provided for the case of a finite-dimensional vector space. These lecture notes have been produced partly from material published earlier, and as such contain more material than what could be presented in the talk.

  16. Lectures on Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Beautifully illustrated and engagingly written, Lectures on Quantum Mechanics presents theoretical physics with a breathtaking array of examples and anecdotes. Basdevant's style is clear and stimulating, in the manner of a brisk classroom lecture that students can follow with ease and enjoyment. Here is a sample of the book's style, from the opening of Chapter 1: "If one were to ask a passer-by to quote a great formula of physics, chances are that the answer would be 'E = mc2'. Nevertheless, the formula 'E=hV' which was written in the same year 1905 by the same Albert Einstein, and which started quantum theory, concerns their daily life considerably more. In fact, of the three watershed years for physics toward the beginning of the 20th century - 1905: the Special Relativity of Einstein, Lorentz and Poincaré; 1915: the General Relativity of Einstein, with its extraordinary reflections on gravitation, space and time; and 1925: the full development of Quantum Mechanics - it is surely the last which has the mos...

  17. Quo Vadis Quantum Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, W G [University of British Columbia (Canada)

    2006-02-21

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most successful theoretical structures in all of science. Developed between 1925-26 to explain the optical spectrum of atoms, the theory over the succeeding 80 years has been extended, first to quantum field theories, gauge field theories, and now even string theory. It is used every day by thousands of physicists to calculate physical phenomena to exquisite precision, with no ambiguity in the results. To claim that this is a theory which is not understood by those physicists is absurd. And yet, as eminent a physicist as Richard Feynman, who did as much as anyone else to extend quantum theory to field theories and was a master at producing those exquisite calculations, could say that anyone who claimed they understood quantum theory clearly did not understand quantum theory. One hundred years ago Einstein postulated one of the most unsettling features of the theory, the wave-particle duality, with his particulate explanation for light of the photoelectric effect, and an explanation which was in direct conflict with Maxwell's brilliant development of a wave, or field, theory of light. Einstein believed that the particulate nature would ultimately be explainable by some sort of non-linear theory of electromagnetism, and was outraged by the acceptance of the community of the probabilistic quantum theory. His programme was of course dealt a (near?) fatal blow by Bell's discovery that the three desiderata - a theory which agrees with experiment, a theory which is local in its effects, and a theory in which nature, at its heart, is not probabilistic - are incompatible. That discomfort felt by Einstein and by Feynman is felt by numerous other people as well. This discomfort is heightened by the fact that the theory of gravity, another of Einstein's great achievements, has resisted all efforts at reconciliation with quantum mechanics. This book explores that discomfort, and tries to pin down what the locus of that discomfort

  18. Scan Quantum Mechanics: Quantum Inertia Stops Superposition

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    A novel interpretation of the quantum mechanical superposition is put forward. Quantum systems scan all possible available states and switch randomly and very rapidly among them. The longer they remain in a given state, the larger the probability of the system to be found in that state during a measurement. A crucial property that we postulate is quantum inertia, that increases whenever a constituent is added, or the system is perturbed with all kinds of interactions. Once the quantum inertia $I_q$ reaches a critical value $I_{cr}$ for an observable, the switching among the different eigenvalues of that observable stops and the corresponding superposition comes to an end. Consequently, increasing the mass, temperature, gravitational force, etc. of a quantum system increases its quantum inertia until the superposition of states disappears for all the observables and the system transmutes into a classical one. The process could be reversible decreasing the size, temperature, gravitational force, etc. leading to...

  19. Bananaworld quantum mechanics for primates

    CERN Document Server

    Bub, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    What on earth do bananas have to do with quantum mechanics? From a modern perspective, quantum mechanics is about strangely counterintuitive correlations between separated systems, which can be exploited in feats like quantum teleportation, unbreakable cryptographic schemes, and computers with enormously enhanced computing power. Schro?dinger coined the term "entanglement" to describe these bizarre correlations. Bananaworld -- an imaginary island with "entangled" bananas -- brings to life the fascinating discoveries of the new field of quantum information without the mathematical machinery of quantum mechanics. The connection with quantum correlations is fully explained in sections written for the non-physicist reader with a serious interest in understanding the mysteries of the quantum world. The result is a subversive but entertaining book that is accessible and interesting to a wide range of readers, with the novel thesis that quantum mechanics is about the structure of information. What we have discovered...

  20. Quantum mechanics theory and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This textbook presents quantum mechanics at the junior/senior undergraduate level. It is unique in that it describes not only quantum theory, but also presents five laboratories that explore truly modern aspects of quantum mechanics. These laboratories include "proving" that light contains photons, single-photon interference, and tests of local realism. The text begins by presenting the classical theory of polarization, moving on to describe the quantum theory of polarization. Analogies between the two theories minimize conceptual difficulties that students typically have when first presented with quantum mechanics. Furthermore, because the laboratories involve studying photons, using photon polarization as a prototypical quantum system allows the laboratory work to be closely integrated with the coursework. Polarization represents a two-dimensional quantum system, so the introduction to quantum mechanics uses two-dimensional state vectors and operators. This allows students to become comfortable with the mat...

  1. Quantum mechanics of leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendizabal Cofre, Sebastian

    2010-08-15

    Leptogenesis is an attractive mechanism that simultaneously explains the matterantimatter asymmetry of the universe as well as the small masses of the standard model neutrinos. This is performed by naturally extending the standard model with the insertion of right handed neutrinos. Leptogenesis is usually studied via the semi-classical Boltzmann equations. However, these equations suffer from basic conceptual problems and they lack to include many quantum phenomena, such as memory effects and coherence oscillations. In order to fully describe leptogenesis, a full quantum treatment is required. In this work we show how to address leptogenesis systematically in a purely quantum way. We start by studying scalar and fermionic excitations in a plasma by solving the Kadanoff-Baym equations of motion for Green's functions, with significant emphasis on the initial and boundary conditions of the solutions. We compute analytically the asymmetry generated from the departure of equilibrium of a particle in a thermal bath. The comparison with the semi-classical Boltzmann approach is also analysed, leading to a qualitative difference between both methods. The non-locality of the Kadanoff-Baym equations shows how off-shell effects can have a huge impact on the generated asymmetry, effects that cannot be studied with the Boltzmann equations. The insertion of standard model interactions like the decay widths for the particles of the bath is also discussed. We explain how with a trivial insertion of these widths we regain locality on the processes, i.e. we regain the Boltzmann equations. (orig.)

  2. Diagrammatic quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Louis H.; Lomonaco, Samuel J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores how diagrams of quantum processes can be used for modeling and for quantum epistemology. The paper is a continuation of the discussion where we began this formulation. Here we give examples of quantum networks that represent unitary transformations by dint of coherence conditions that constitute a new form of non-locality. Local quantum devices interconnected in space can form a global quantum system when appropriate coherence conditions are maintained.

  3. Gamification of Quantum Mechanics Teaching

    CERN Document Server

    Bjælde, Ole Eggers; Sherson, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    In this small scale study we demonstrate how a gamified teaching setup can be used effectively to support student learning in a quantum mechanics course. The quantum mechanics games were research games, which were played during lectures and the learning was measured with a pretest/posttest method with promising results. The study works as a pilot study to guide the planning of quantum mechanics courses in the future at Aarhus University in Denmark.

  4. A Quantum Space behind Simple Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Sheng Chew

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In physics, experiments ultimately inform us about what constitutes a good theoretical model of any physical concept: physical space should be no exception. The best picture of physical space in Newtonian physics is given by the configuration space of a free particle (or the center of mass of a closed system of particles. This configuration space (as well as phase space can be constructed as a representation space for the relativity symmetry. From the corresponding quantum symmetry, we illustrate the construction of a quantum configuration space, similar to that of quantum phase space, and recover the classical picture as an approximation through a contraction of the (relativity symmetry and its representations. The quantum Hilbert space reduces into a sum of one-dimensional representations for the observable algebra, with the only admissible states given by coherent states and position eigenstates for the phase and configuration space pictures, respectively. This analysis, founded firmly on known physics, provides a quantum picture of physical space beyond that of a finite-dimensional manifold and provides a crucial first link for any theoretical model of quantum space-time at levels beyond simple quantum mechanics. It also suggests looking at quantum physics from a different perspective.

  5. Quantum Mechanics for Electrical Engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Dennis M

    2011-01-01

    The main topic of this book is quantum mechanics, as the title indicates.  It specifically targets those topics within quantum mechanics that are needed to understand modern semiconductor theory.   It begins with the motivation for quantum mechanics and why classical physics fails when dealing with very small particles and small dimensions.  Two key features make this book different from others on quantum mechanics, even those usually intended for engineers:   First, after a brief introduction, much of the development is through Fourier theory, a topic that is at

  6. Quantum mechanics the theoretical minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Susskind, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    From the bestselling author of The Theoretical Minimum, an accessible introduction to the math and science of quantum mechanicsQuantum Mechanics is a (second) book for anyone who wants to learn how to think like a physicist. In this follow-up to the bestselling The Theoretical Minimum, physicist Leonard Susskind and data engineer Art Friedman offer a first course in the theory and associated mathematics of the strange world of quantum mechanics. Quantum Mechanics presents Susskind and Friedman’s crystal-clear explanations of the principles of quantum states, uncertainty and time dependence, entanglement, and particle and wave states, among other topics. An accessible but rigorous introduction to a famously difficult topic, Quantum Mechanics provides a tool kit for amateur scientists to learn physics at their own pace.

  7. Decoherence in quantum mechanics and quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, James B.

    1992-01-01

    A sketch of the quantum mechanics for closed systems adequate for cosmology is presented. This framework is an extension and clarification of that of Everett and builds on several aspects of the post-Everett development. It especially builds on the work of Zeh, Zurek, Joos and Zeh, and others on the interactions of quantum systems with the larger universe and on the ideas of Griffiths, Omnes, and others on the requirements for consistent probabilities of histories.

  8. Quantum mechanics II advanced topics

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, S

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Mechanics II: Advanced Topics uses more than a decade of research and the authors’ own teaching experience to expound on some of the more advanced topics and current research in quantum mechanics. A follow-up to the authors introductory book Quantum Mechanics I: The Fundamentals, this book begins with a chapter on quantum field theory, and goes on to present basic principles, key features, and applications. It outlines recent quantum technologies and phenomena, and introduces growing topics of interest in quantum mechanics. The authors describe promising applications that include ghost imaging, detection of weak amplitude objects, entangled two-photon microscopy, detection of small displacements, lithography, metrology, and teleportation of optical images. They also present worked-out examples and provide numerous problems at the end of each chapter.

  9. Quantum Mechanics Genesis and Achievements

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The focus of the present work is nonrelativistic and relativistic quantum mechanics with standard applications to the hydrogen atom. The author has aimed at presenting quantum mechanics in a comprehensive yet accessible for mathematicians and other non-physicists. The genesis of quantum mechanics, its applications to basic quantum phenomena, and detailed explanations of the corresponding mathematical methods are presented. The exposition is formalized (whenever possible) on the basis of the coupled Schroedinger, Dirac and Maxwell equations. Aimed at upper graduate and graduate students in mathematical and physical science studies.

  10. The theoretical foundations of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Baaquie, Belal E

    2013-01-01

    The Theoretical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics addresses fundamental issues that are not discussed in most books on quantum mechanics. This book focuses on analyzing the underlying principles of quantum mechanics and explaining the conceptual and theoretical underpinning of quantum mechanics. In particular, the concepts of quantum indeterminacy, quantum measurement and quantum superposition are analyzed to clarify the concepts that are implicit in the formulation of quantum mechanics. The Schrodinger equation is never solved in the book. Rather, the discussion on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics is treated in a rigorous manner based on the mathematics of quantum mechanics. The new concept of the interplay of empirical and trans-empirical constructs in quantum mechanics is introduced to clarify the foundations of quantum mechanics and to explain the counter-intuitive construction of nature in quantum mechanics. The Theoretical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics is aimed at the advanced undergraduate and a...

  11. PT quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Carl M; DeKieviet, Maarten; Klevansky, S P

    2013-04-28

    PT-symmetric quantum mechanics (PTQM) has become a hot area of research and investigation. Since its beginnings in 1998, there have been over 1000 published papers and more than 15 international conferences entirely devoted to this research topic. Originally, PTQM was studied at a highly mathematical level and the techniques of complex variables, asymptotics, differential equations and perturbation theory were used to understand the subtleties associated with the analytic continuation of eigenvalue problems. However, as experiments on PT-symmetric physical systems have been performed, a simple and beautiful physical picture has emerged, and a PT-symmetric system can be understood as one that has a balanced loss and gain. Furthermore, the PT phase transition can now be understood intuitively without resorting to sophisticated mathematics. Research on PTQM is following two different paths: at a fundamental level, physicists are attempting to understand the underlying mathematical structure of these theories with the long-range objective of applying the techniques of PTQM to understanding some of the outstanding problems in physics today, such as the nature of the Higgs particle, the properties of dark matter, the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, neutrino oscillations and the cosmological constant; at an applied level, new kinds of PT-synthetic materials are being developed, and the PT phase transition is being observed in many physical contexts, such as lasers, optical wave guides, microwave cavities, superconducting wires and electronic circuits. The purpose of this Theme Issue is to acquaint the reader with the latest developments in PTQM. The articles in this volume are written in the style of mini-reviews and address diverse areas of the emerging and exciting new area of PT-symmetric quantum mechanics.

  12. Where is SUSY?

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Recent information from the LHC experiments, the relatively low mass of the new boson and other data coming from experiments looking for dark matter worldwide are placing new constraints on the existence of supersymmetry (SUSY). However, there is a large community of scientists that still believes that SUSY particles are out there. Like lost keys at night, perhaps we have been looking for SUSY under the wrong lamp-posts…   Can you work out this rebus? Source: Caroline Duc. So far, SUSY is “just” a theoretical physics model, which could solve problems beyond the Standard Model by accounting for dark matter and other phenomena in the Universe. However, SUSY has not been spotted so far, and might be hiding because of features different from what physicists previously expected. “Currently, there is no evidence for SUSY, but neither has any experimental data ruled it out. Many searches have focused on simplified versions of the theory but, given the recen...

  13. Quantum mechanics & the big world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezel, Jasper van

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Mechanics is one of the most successful physical theories of the last century. It explains physical phenomena from the smallest to the largest lengthscales. Despite this triumph, quantum mechanics is often perceived as a mysterious theory, involving superposition states that are alien to our

  14. Principles of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landé, Alfred

    2013-10-01

    ödinger's equation for non-conservative systems; 46. Pertubation theory; 47. Orthogonality, normalization and Hermitian conjugacy; 48. General matrix elements; Part IV. The Principle of Correspondence: 49. Contact transformations in classical mechanics; 50. Point transformations; 51. Contact transformations in quantum mechanics; 52. Constants of motion and angular co-ordinates; 53. Periodic orbits; 54. De Broglie and Schrödinger function; correspondence to classical mechanics; 55. Packets of probability; 56. Correspondence to hydrodynamics; 57. Motion and scattering of wave packets; 58. Formal correspondence between classical and quantum mechanics; Part V. Mathematical Appendix: Principle of Invariance: 59. The general theorem of transformation; 60. Operator calculus; 61. Exchange relations; three criteria for conjugacy; 62. First method of canonical transformation; 63. Second method of canonical transformation; 64. Proof of the transformation theorem; 65. Invariance of the matrix elements against unitary transformations; 66. Matrix mechanics; Index of literature; Index of names and subjects.

  15. Non-Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Ravinder R.

    2017-07-01

    Preface; 1. History of quantum mechanics; 2. Vectors and operators; 3. Finite dimensional spaces; 4. Function space; 5. Postulates of quantum mechanics; 6. Density operator; 7. Measurement postulate and paradoxes of quantum mechanics; 8. Position and momentum representations; 9. Schrödinger equation in one dimension; 10. One-dimensional piecewise constant potentials; 11. One-dimensional exactly solvable continuous potentials; 12. Partially and completely periodic potentials; 13. Harmonic oscillator; 14. Three-dimensional central potentials; 15. Symmetry in quantum mechanics; 16. Quantum theory of angular momentum; 17. Approximation methods; 18. Entanglement and local hidden variable theory; Appendix A. Delta function; Appendix B. Second-order ordinary differential equations; Appendix C. Riccati equation; Appendix D. Some mathematical formulas; References; Index.

  16. Quantum mechanics a modern development

    CERN Document Server

    Ballentine, Leslie E

    2015-01-01

    Although there are many textbooks that deal with the formal apparatus of quantum mechanics (QM) and its application to standard problems, none take into account the developments in the foundations of the subject which have taken place in the last few decades. There are specialized treatises on various aspects of the foundations of QM, but none that integrate those topics with the standard material. This book aims to remove that unfortunate dichotomy, which has divorced the practical aspects of the subject from the interpretation and broader implications of the theory. In this edition a new chapter on quantum information is added. As the topic is still in a state of rapid development, a comprehensive treatment is not feasible. The emphasis is on the fundamental principles and some key applications, including quantum cryptography, teleportation of states, and quantum computing. The impact of quantum information theory on the foundations of quantum mechanics is discussed. In addition, there are minor revisions ...

  17. Mathematical foundation of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Parthasarathy, K R

    2005-01-01

    This is a brief introduction to the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics based on lectures given by the author to Ph.D.students at the Delhi Centre of the Indian Statistical Institute in order to initiate active research in the emerging field of quantum probability. The material in the first chapter is included in the author's book "An Introduction to Quantum Stochastic Calculus" published by Birkhauser Verlag in 1992 and the permission of the publishers to reprint it here is acknowledged. Apart from quantum probability, an understanding of the role of group representations in the development of quantum mechanics is always a fascinating theme for mathematicians. The first chapter deals with the definitions of states, observables and automorphisms of a quantum system through Gleason's theorem, Hahn-Hellinger theorem and Wigner's theorem. Mackey's imprimitivity theorem and the theorem of inducing representations of groups in stages are proved directly for projective unitary antiunitary representations ...

  18. Entangled states in quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruža, Jānis

    2010-01-01

    In some circles of quantum physicists, a view is maintained that the nonseparability of quantum systems-i.e., the entanglement-is a characteristic feature of quantum mechanics. According to this view, the entanglement plays a crucial role in the solution of quantum measurement problem, the origin of the “classicality” from the quantum physics, the explanation of the EPR paradox by a nonlocal character of the quantum world. Besides, the entanglement is regarded as a cornerstone of such modern disciplines as quantum computation, quantum cryptography, quantum information, etc. At the same time, entangled states are well known and widely used in various physics areas. In particular, this notion is widely used in nuclear, atomic, molecular, solid state physics, in scattering and decay theories as well as in other disciplines, where one has to deal with many-body quantum systems. One of the methods, how to construct the basis states of a composite many-body quantum system, is the so-called genealogical decomposition method. Genealogical decomposition allows one to construct recurrently by particle number the basis states of a composite quantum system from the basis states of its forming subsystems. These coupled states have a structure typical for entangled states. If a composite system is stable, the internal structure of its forming basis states does not manifest itself in measurements. However, if a composite system is unstable and decays onto its forming subsystems, then the measurables are the quantum numbers, associated with these subsystems. In such a case, the entangled state has a dynamical origin, determined by the Hamiltonian of the corresponding decay process. Possible correlations between the quantum numbers of resulting subsystems are determined by the symmetries-conservation laws of corresponding dynamical variables, and not by the quantum entanglement feature.

  19. Coherent states in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, R D L; Fernandes, D

    2001-01-01

    We present a review work on the coherent states is non-relativistic quantum mechanics analysing the quantum oscillators in the coherent states. The coherent states obtained via a displacement operator that act on the wave function of ground state of the oscillator and the connection with Quantum Optics which were implemented by Glauber have also been considered. A possible generalization to the construction of new coherent states it is point out.

  20. Quantum mechanics and experience

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, David Z

    1992-01-01

    The more science tells us about the world, the stranger it looks. Ever since physics first penetrated the atom, early in this century, what it found there has stood as a radical and unanswered challenge to many of our most cherished conceptions of nature. It has literally been called into question since then whether or not there are always objective matters of fact about the whereabouts of subatomic particles, or about the locations of tables and chairs, or even about the very contents of our thoughts. A new kind of uncertainty has become a principle of science. This book is an original and provocative investigation of that challenge, as well as a novel attempt at writing about science in a style that is simultaneously elementary and deep. It is a lucid and self-contained introduction to the foundations of quantum mechanics, accessible to anyone with a high school mathematics education, and at the same time a rigorous discussion of the most important recent advances in our understanding of that subject, some...

  1. Gravity and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Penrose, R

    1993-01-01

    At a conference in honour of John S. Bell, held in October 1991, the following quotation, from a paper by Bell and Nauenberg (1966), was presented (in a talk by Dipankar Home): “... the quantum mechanical description will be superseded. In this it is like all theories made by man. But to an unusual extent its ultimate fate is apparent in its internal structure. It carries in itself the seeds of its own destruction.” I was struck by a similarity of sentiment, as expressed here, with one that I have myself often expressed, but now in relation to general relativity; e.g. (Penrose 1991): “... in a clear sense, general relativity predicts its own downfall as a complete description of the structure of space—time” There is, indeed, a remarkable parallel, in this regard, between these two great physical theories. Both theories are now known to be exceptionally accurate, within the range of phenomena to which they are applied; yet both present us with profound difficulties. In the case of general relativity...

  2. Quantum mechanics in Hilbert space

    CERN Document Server

    Prugovecki, Eduard

    1981-01-01

    A critical presentation of the basic mathematics of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, this text is suitable for courses in functional analysis at the advanced undergraduate and graduate levels. Its readable and self-contained form is accessible even to students without an extensive mathematical background. Applications of basic theorems to quantum mechanics make it of particular interest to mathematicians working in functional analysis and related areas.This text features the rigorous proofs of all the main functional-analytic statements encountered in books on quantum mechanics. It fills the

  3. Linear operators for quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jordan, Thomas F

    1969-01-01

    This compact treatment highlights the logic and simplicity of the mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. Suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students, it treats the language of quantum mechanics as expressed in the mathematics of linear operators.Originally oriented toward atomic physics, quantum mechanics became a basic language for solid-state, nuclear, and particle physics. Its grammar consists of the mathematics of linear operators, and with this text, students will find it easier to understand and use the language of physics. Topics include linear spaces and linear fun

  4. Quantum Mechanics with Neutral Kaons

    OpenAIRE

    Bramon, A.; Garbarino, G.; Hiesmayr, B. C.

    2007-01-01

    We briefly illustrate a few tests of quantum mechanics which can be performed with entangled neutral kaon pairs at a Phi-factory. This includes a quantitative formulation of Bohr's complementarity principle, the quantum eraser phenomenon and various forms of Bell inequalities.

  5. Stochastic methods in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gudder, Stanley P

    2005-01-01

    Practical developments in such fields as optical coherence, communication engineering, and laser technology have developed from the applications of stochastic methods. This introductory survey offers a broad view of some of the most useful stochastic methods and techniques in quantum physics, functional analysis, probability theory, communications, and electrical engineering. Starting with a history of quantum mechanics, it examines both the quantum logic approach and the operational approach, with explorations of random fields and quantum field theory.The text assumes a basic knowledge of fun

  6. Quantum mechanical irreversibility and measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Grigolini, P

    1993-01-01

    This book is intended as a tutorial approach to some of the techniques used to deal with quantum dissipation and irreversibility, with special focus on their applications to the theory of measurements. The main purpose is to provide readers without a deep expertise in quantum statistical mechanics with the basic tools to develop a critical judgement on whether the major achievements in this field have to be considered a satisfactory solution of quantum paradox, or rather this ambitious achievement has to be postponed to when a new physics, more general than quantum and classical physics, will

  7. Relativistic quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Horwitz, Lawrence P

    2015-01-01

    This book describes a relativistic quantum theory developed by the author starting from the E.C.G. Stueckelberg approach proposed in the early 40s. In this framework a universal invariant evolution parameter (corresponding to the time originally postulated by Newton) is introduced to describe dynamical evolution. This theory is able to provide solutions for some of the fundamental problems encountered in early attempts to construct a relativistic quantum theory. A relativistically covariant construction is given for which particle spins and angular momenta can be combined through the usual rotation group Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. Solutions are defined for both the classical and quantum two body bound state and scattering problems. The recently developed quantum Lax-Phillips theory of semigroup evolution of resonant states is described. The experiment of Lindner and coworkers on interference in time is discussed showing how the property of coherence in time provides a simple understanding of the results. Th...

  8. Analytical mechanics for relativity and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Johns, Oliver Davis

    2011-01-01

    Analytical Mechanics for Relativity and Quantum Mechanics is an innovative and mathematically sound treatment of the foundations of analytical mechanics and the relation of classical mechanics to relativity and quantum theory. It is intended for use at the introductory graduate level. A distinguishing feature of the book is its integration of special relativity into teaching of classical mechanics. After a thorough review of the traditional theory, Part II of the book introduces extended Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods that treat time as a transformable coordinate rather than the fixed parameter of Newtonian physics. Advanced topics such as covariant Langrangians and Hamiltonians, canonical transformations, and Hamilton-Jacobi methods are simplified by the use of this extended theory. And the definition of canonical transformation no longer excludes the Lorenz transformation of special relativity. This is also a book for those who study analytical mechanics to prepare for a critical exploration of quantum...

  9. Quantum mechanics I the fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, S

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Mechanics I: The Fundamentals provides a graduate-level account of the behavior of matter and energy at the molecular, atomic, nuclear, and sub-nuclear levels. It covers basic concepts, mathematical formalism, and applications to physically important systems.

  10. Between Quantum Mechanics and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimasara, Paweł; Król, Jerzy; Bielas, Krzysztof; Asselmeyer-Maluga, Torsten

    2017-08-01

    We present an outline of our attempts to find relations between quantum mechanics and general relativity based on their mathematical formalisms. We indicate the meaning of set-theoretic forcing and smooth exotic R^4 in physics.

  11. Hilbert space and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gallone, Franco

    2015-01-01

    The topics of this book are the mathematical foundations of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and the mathematical theory they require. The main characteristic of the book is that the mathematics is developed assuming familiarity with elementary analysis only. Moreover, all the proofs are carried out in detail. These features make the book easily accessible to readers with only the mathematical training offered by undergraduate education in mathematics or in physics, and also ideal for individual study. The principles of quantum mechanics are discussed with complete mathematical accuracy and an effort is made to always trace them back to the experimental reality that lies at their root. The treatment of quantum mechanics is axiomatic, with definitions followed by propositions proved in a mathematical fashion. No previous knowledge of quantum mechanics is required. This book is designed so that parts of it can be easily used for various courses in mathematics and mathematical physics, as suggested in the Pref...

  12. Quantum mechanics principles and formalism

    CERN Document Server

    McWeeny, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on main principles of quantum mechanics and their immediate consequences, this graduate student-oriented volume develops the subject as a fundamental discipline, opening with review of origins of Schrödinger's equations and vector spaces.

  13. Singular potentials in quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera-Navarro, V.C. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Koo, E. Ley [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Fisica

    1995-10-01

    This paper is a review of some mathematical methods as recently developed and applied to deal with singular potentials in Quantum Mechanics. Regular and singular perturbative methods as well as variational treatments are considered. (author). 25 refs.

  14. Conceptual basis of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Schwindt, Jan-Markus

    2016-01-01

    The book covers the content of a typical higher undergraduate course of the theory of Quantum Mechanics. The focus is on the general principles of quantum mechanics and the clarification of its terminology: What exactly is a Hilbert space? What is a hermitean operator? A tensor product? An entangled state? In what sense does a wave function constitute a vector? A separate chapter discusses the many open questions regarding the interpretation of the postulates.

  15. The physics of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2014-01-01

    The Physics of Quantum Mechanics aims to give students a good understanding of how quantum mechanics describes the material world. It shows that the theory follows naturally from the use of probability amplitudes to derive probabilities. It stresses that stationary states are unphysical mathematical abstractions that enable us to solve the theory's governing equation, the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Every opportunity is taken to illustrate the emergence of the familiarclassical, dynamical world through the quantum interference of stationary states. The text stresses the continuity be

  16. Quantifying Quantum-Mechanical Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Jen-Hsiang; Chen, Shih-Hsuan; Li, Che-Ming

    2017-10-19

    The act of describing how a physical process changes a system is the basis for understanding observed phenomena. For quantum-mechanical processes in particular, the affect of processes on quantum states profoundly advances our knowledge of the natural world, from understanding counter-intuitive concepts to the development of wholly quantum-mechanical technology. Here, we show that quantum-mechanical processes can be quantified using a generic classical-process model through which any classical strategies of mimicry can be ruled out. We demonstrate the success of this formalism using fundamental processes postulated in quantum mechanics, the dynamics of open quantum systems, quantum-information processing, the fusion of entangled photon pairs, and the energy transfer in a photosynthetic pigment-protein complex. Since our framework does not depend on any specifics of the states being processed, it reveals a new class of correlations in the hierarchy between entanglement and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering and paves the way for the elaboration of a generic method for quantifying physical processes.

  17. Quantum Mechanics predicts evolutionary biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torday, J S

    2018-01-11

    Nowhere are the shortcomings of conventional descriptive biology more evident than in the literature on Quantum Biology. In the on-going effort to apply Quantum Mechanics to evolutionary biology, merging Quantum Mechanics with the fundamentals of evolution as the First Principles of Physiology-namely negentropy, chemiosmosis and homeostasis-offers an authentic opportunity to understand how and why physics constitutes the basic principles of biology. Negentropy and chemiosmosis confer determinism on the unicell, whereas homeostasis constitutes Free Will because it offers a probabilistic range of physiologic set points. Similarly, on this basis several principles of Quantum Mechanics also apply directly to biology. The Pauli Exclusion Principle is both deterministic and probabilistic, whereas non-localization and the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle are both probabilistic, providing the long-sought after ontologic and causal continuum from physics to biology and evolution as the holistic integration recognized as consciousness for the first time. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Quantum Mechanics and Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Bryce S.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the quantum theory of measurement and von Neumann's catastrophe of infinite regression." Examines three ways of escapint the von Neumann catastrophe, and suggests that the solution to the dilemma of inteterminism is a universe in which all possible outcomes of an experiment actually occur. Bibliography. (LC)

  19. The Heisenberg-Weyl algebra on the circle and a related quantum mechanical model for hindered rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Donald J; Markovich, Thomas; Maxwell, Nicholas; Bodmann, Bernhard G

    2009-07-02

    We discuss a periodic variant of the Heisenberg-Weyl algebra, associated with the group of translations and modulations on the circle. Our study of uncertainty minimizers leads to a periodic version of canonical coherent states. Unlike the canonical, Cartesian case, there are states for which the uncertainty product associated with the generators of the algebra vanishes. Next, we explore the supersymmetric (SUSY) quantum mechanical setting for the uncertainty-minimizing states and interpret them as leading to a family of "hindered rotors". Finally, we present a standard quantum mechanical treatment of one of these hindered rotor systems, including numerically generated eigenstates and energies.

  20. SUSY Searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mamuzic, Judita; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is considered one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. It postulates a fundamental symmetry between fermions and bosons, and introduces a set of new supersymmetric particles at the electroweak scale. It addresses the hierarchy and naturalness problem, gives a solution to the gauge coupling unification, and offers a cold dark matter candidate. Different aspects of SUSY searches, using strong, electroweak, third generation production, and R-parity violation and long lived particles are being studied at the LHC. An overview of most recent SUSY searches results using the 13 TeV ATLAS RUN2 data will be presented.

  1. SUSY Meets Her Twin

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Andrey; Pokorski, Stefan; Redigolo, Diego; Ziegler, Robert

    2017-01-31

    We investigate the general structure of mirror symmetry breaking in the Twin Higgs scenario. We show, using the IR effective theory, that a significant gain in fine tuning can be achieved if the symmetry is broken hardly. We emphasize that weakly coupled UV completions can naturally accommodate this scenario. We analyze SUSY UV completions and present a simple Twin SUSY model with a tuning of around 10% and colored superpartners as heavy as 2 TeV. The collider signatures of general Twin SUSY models are discussed with a focus on the extended Higgs sectors.

  2. Quantum mechanics in matrix form

    CERN Document Server

    Ludyk, Günter

    2018-01-01

    This book gives an introduction to quantum mechanics with the matrix method. Heisenberg's matrix mechanics is described in detail. The fundamental equations are derived by algebraic methods using matrix calculus. Only a brief description of Schrödinger's wave mechanics is given (in most books exclusively treated), to show their equivalence to Heisenberg's matrix  method. In the first part the historical development of Quantum theory by Planck, Bohr and Sommerfeld is sketched, followed by the ideas and methods of Heisenberg, Born and Jordan. Then Pauli's spin and exclusion principles are treated. Pauli's exclusion principle leads to the structure of atoms. Finally, Dirac´s relativistic quantum mechanics is shortly presented. Matrices and matrix equations are today easy to handle when implementing numerical algorithms using standard software as MAPLE and Mathematica.

  3. The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Nonlocality

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum nonlocality is discussed as an aspect of the quantum formalism that is seriously in need of interpretation. The Transactional Interpretation of quantum mechanics, which describes quantum processes as transactional "handshakes" between retarded $\\psi$ waves and advanced $\\psi*$ waves, is discussed. Examples of the use of the Transactional Interpretation in resolving quantum paradoxes and in understanding the counter-intuitive aspects of the formalism, particularly quantum nonlocality, ...

  4. SUSY Seesaw and FCNC

    CERN Document Server

    Masiero, A; Vives, O

    2004-01-01

    After a quarter of century of intense search for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), two ideas stand out to naturally cope with (i) small neutrino masses and (ii) a light higgs boson : Seesaw and SUSY. The combination of these two ideas, i.e. SUSY seesaw exhibits a potentially striking signature: a strong (or even very strong) enhancement of lepton flavour violation (LFV), which on the contrary remains unobservable in the SM seesaw. Indeed, even when supersymmetry breaking is completely flavour blind, Renormalisation Group running effects are expected to generate large lepton flavour violating entries at the weak scale. In Grand Unified theories, these effects can be felt even in hadronic physics. We explicitly show that in a class of SUSY SO(10) GUTs there exist cases where LFV and CP violation in B-physics can constitute a major road in simultaneously confirming the ideas of Seesaw and low-energy SUSY.

  5. Quantum Mechanical Earth: Where Orbitals Become Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeports, David

    2012-01-01

    Macroscopic objects, although quantum mechanical by nature, conform to Newtonian mechanics under normal observation. According to the quantum mechanical correspondence principle, quantum behavior is indistinguishable from classical behavior in the limit of very large quantum numbers. The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of the…

  6. Non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Puri, Ravinder R

    2017-01-01

    This book develops and simplifies the concept of quantum mechanics based on the postulates of quantum mechanics. The text discusses the technique of disentangling the exponential of a sum of operators, closed under the operation of commutation, as the product of exponentials to simplify calculations of harmonic oscillator and angular momentum. Based on its singularity structure, the Schrödinger equation for various continuous potentials is solved in terms of the hypergeometric or the confluent hypergeometric functions. The forms of the potentials for which the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation is exactly solvable are derived in detail. The problem of identifying the states of two-level systems which have no classical analogy is addressed by going beyond Bell-like inequalities and separability. The measures of quantumness of mutual information in two two-level systems is also covered in detail. Offers a new approach to learning quantum mechanics based on the history of quantum mechanics and its postu...

  7. QUANTUM MECHANICS. Quantum squeezing of motion in a mechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, E E; Lei, C U; Weinstein, A J; Suh, J; Kronwald, A; Marquardt, F; Clerk, A A; Schwab, K C

    2015-08-28

    According to quantum mechanics, a harmonic oscillator can never be completely at rest. Even in the ground state, its position will always have fluctuations, called the zero-point motion. Although the zero-point fluctuations are unavoidable, they can be manipulated. Using microwave frequency radiation pressure, we have manipulated the thermal fluctuations of a micrometer-scale mechanical resonator to produce a stationary quadrature-squeezed state with a minimum variance of 0.80 times that of the ground state. We also performed phase-sensitive, back-action evading measurements of a thermal state squeezed to 1.09 times the zero-point level. Our results are relevant to the quantum engineering of states of matter at large length scales, the study of decoherence of large quantum systems, and for the realization of ultrasensitive sensing of force and motion. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Remarks on osmosis, quantum mechanics, and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Some relations of the quantum potential to Weyl geometry are indicated with applications to the Friedmann equations for a toy quantum cosmology. Osmotic velocity and pressure are briefly discussed in terms of quantum mechanics and superfluids with connections to gravity.

  9. Quantum mechanics foundations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, Donald Gary

    2006-01-01

    Progressing from the fundamentals of quantum mechanics (QM) to more complicated topics, Quantum Mechanics: Foundations and Applications provides advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a comprehensive examination of many applications that pertain to modern physics and engineering.Based on courses taught by the author, this textbook begins with an introductory chapter that reviews historical landmarks, discusses classical theory, and establishes a set of postulates. The next chapter demonstrates how to find the appropriate wave functions for a variety of physical systems in one dimens

  10. Effective equations for the quantum pendulum from momentous quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Hector H.; Chacon-Acosta, Guillermo [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Ingenieria, Nuevo Campus Universitario, Chihuahua 31125 (Mexico); Departamento de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Artificios 40, Mexico D. F. 01120 (Mexico)

    2012-08-24

    In this work we study the quantum pendulum within the framework of momentous quantum mechanics. This description replaces the Schroedinger equation for the quantum evolution of the system with an infinite set of classical equations for expectation values of configuration variables, and quantum dispersions. We solve numerically the effective equations up to the second order, and describe its evolution.

  11. Quantum transduction with mechanical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Konrad

    In modern information technology, micromechanical oscillators are ubiquitous signal processing elements. Because the speed of sound is so slow compared to the speed of light, mechanical structures create superb compact filters and clocks. Moreover they convert force and acceleration signals into more easily processed electrical signals. Although these humble devices appear manifestly classical, they can exhibit quantum behavior when their vibrations are strongly coupled to optical light or to microwave electricity. I will describe our progress in using this recent result to develop quantum information processing elements. First, we are developing a device that uses a mechanical oscillator to transfer information noiselessly between electrical and optical domains. Second, we prepare propagating microwave fields in superpositions of 0 and 1 photon, and use an electromechanical device to store and amplify these fragile quantum bits. Work supported by AFOSR MURI:FA9550-15-1-0015, NSF under Grant Number 1125844, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  12. Mind, matter and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Stapp, Henry P

    2009-01-01

    "Scientists other than quantum physicists often fail to comprehend the enormity of the conceptual change wrought by quantum theory in our basic conception of the nature of matter," writes Henry Stapp. Stapp is a leading quantum physicist who has given particularly careful thought to the implications of the theory that lies at the heart of modern physics. In this book, which contains several of his key papers as well as new material, he focuses on the problem of consciousness and explains how quantum mechanics allows causally effective conscious thought to be combined in a natural way with the physical brain made of neurons and atoms. The book is divided into four sections. The first consists of an extended introduction. Key foundational and somewhat more technical papers are included in the second part, together with a clear exposition of the "orthodox" interpretation of quantum mechanics. The third part addresses, in a non-technical fashion, the implications of the theory for some of the most profound questi...

  13. Quantum mechanics in phase space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank

    1984-01-01

    A reformulation of quantum mechanics for a finite system is given using twisted multiplication of functions on phase space and Tomita's theory of generalized Hilbert algebras. Quantization of a classical observable h is achieved when the twisted exponential Exp0(-h) is defined as a tempered...

  14. Randomness in Classical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovich, Igor V.

    2011-03-01

    The Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics assumes the existence of the classical deterministic Newtonian world. We argue that in fact the Newton determinism in classical world does not hold and in the classical mechanics there is fundamental and irreducible randomness. The classical Newtonian trajectory does not have a direct physical meaning since arbitrary real numbers are not observable. There are classical uncertainty relations: Δ q>0 and Δ p>0, i.e. the uncertainty (errors of observation) in the determination of coordinate and momentum is always positive (non zero). A "functional" formulation of classical mechanics was suggested. The fundamental equation of the microscopic dynamics in the functional approach is not the Newton equation but the Liouville equation for the distribution function of the single particle. Solutions of the Liouville equation have the property of delocalization which accounts for irreversibility. The Newton equation in this approach appears as an approximate equation describing the dynamics of the average values of the position and momenta for not too long time intervals. Corrections to the Newton trajectories are computed. An interpretation of quantum mechanics is attempted in which both classical and quantum mechanics contain fundamental randomness. Instead of an ensemble of events one introduces an ensemble of observers.

  15. Philosophic foundations of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Reichenbach, Hans

    1998-01-01

    Physics concerns direct analysis of the physical world, while philosophy analyzes knowledge about the physical world. This volume combines both disciplines for a philosophical interpretation of quantum physics - an interpretation free from the imprecision of metaphysics, offering a view of the atomic world and its quantum mechanical results as concrete as the visible everyday world.Written by an internationally renowned philosopher who specialized in symbolic logic and the theory of relativity, this approach consists of three parts. The first section, which requires no background in math or p

  16. Operator methods in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Schechter, Martin

    2003-01-01

    This advanced undergraduate and graduate-level text introduces the power of operator theory as a tool in the study of quantum mechanics, assuming only a working knowledge of advanced calculus and no background in physics. The author presents a few simple postulates describing quantum theory, gradually introducing the mathematical techniques that help answer questions important to the physical theory; in this way, readers see clearly the purpose of the method and understand the accomplishment. The entire book is devoted to the study of a single particle moving along a straight line. By posing q

  17. SUSY Without Prejudice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.F.; Gainer, J.S.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.

    2008-12-11

    We begin an exploration of the physics associated with the general CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation, the pMSSM. The 19 soft SUSY breaking parameters in this scenario are chosen so as to satisfy all existing experimental and theoretical constraints assuming that the WIMP is a thermal relic, i.e., the lightest neutralino. We scan this parameter space twice using both flat and log priors for the soft SUSY breaking mass parameters and compare the results which yield similar conclusions. Detailed constraints from both LEP and the Tevatron searches play a particularly important role in obtaining our final model samples. We find that the pMSSM leads to a much broader set of predictions for the properties of the SUSY partners as well as for a number of experimental observables than those found in any of the conventional SUSY breaking scenarios such as mSUGRA. This set of models can easily lead to atypical expectations for SUSY signals at the LHC.

  18. Aton, Relativity, and Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    2006-03-01

    In the mechanics of the Aton, we have shown that the Davisson-Germer experiments and other crystal based experiments can be modeled without recourse to particle-wave notions. We have also shown that the energy levels of the hydrogen atom and the helium atom can be calculated accurately with Atonic Mechanics, subject to the limits of three-body effects in the latter atom. Using the Aton concept, we now provide a way to unify Einstein's Relativity with what we commonly refer to as quantum mechanics. We note that entanglement is an intrinsic part of the mechanics of the Aton.

  19. Making sense of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Bricmont, Jean

    2016-01-01

    This book explains, in simple terms, with a minimum of mathematics, why things can appear to be in two places at the same time, why  correlations between simultaneous events occurring far apart cannot be explained by local mechanisms, and why, nevertheless, the quantum theory can be understood in terms of matter in motion. No need to worry, as some people do, whether a cat can be both dead and alive, whether the moon is there when nobody looks at it, or whether quantum systems need an observer to acquire definite properties. The author’s inimitable and even humorous style makes the book a pleasure to read while bringing a new clarity to many of the longstanding puzzles of quantum physics.

  20. Holomorphic anomaly and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codesido, Santiago; Mariño, Marcos

    2018-02-01

    We show that the all-orders WKB periods of one-dimensional quantum mechanical oscillators are governed by the refined holomorphic anomaly equations of topological string theory. We analyze in detail the double-well potential and the cubic and quartic oscillators, and we calculate the WKB expansion of their quantum free energies by using the direct integration of the anomaly equations. We reproduce in this way all known results about the quantum periods of these models, which we express in terms of modular forms on the WKB curve. As an application of our results, we study the large order behavior of the WKB expansion in the case of the double well, which displays the double factorial growth typical of string theory.

  1. Visual Tools for Quantum Mechanics Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bernd Thaller

    2006-01-01

    We present the project Visual Quantum Mechanics, which uses computer-generated visualizations and animations to redefine content and quality of quantum-mechanical education at all levels. Main target group have been students of theoretical physics at universities, but more recently, we have developed learning objects for use at high schools. We describe the reasons for a visual approach to quantum mechanics and some specific methods for the visualization of quantum-mechanical objects.

  2. Visual Tools for Quantum Mechanics Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Thaller

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the project Visual Quantum Mechanics, which uses computer-generated visualizations and animations to redefine content and quality of quantum-mechanical education at all levels. Main target group have been students of theoretical physics at universities, but more recently, we have developed learning objects for use at high schools. We describe the reasons for a visual approach to quantum mechanics and some specific methods for the visualization of quantum-mechanical objects.

  3. Quantum communication between remote mechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, S.; Fedortchenko, S.; Rossi, R.; Ducci, S.; Favero, I.; Coudreau, T.; Milman, P.

    2017-02-01

    Mechanical resonators represent one of the most promising candidates to mediate the interaction between different quantum technologies, bridging the gap between efficient quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication. Here, we introduce an interferometric scheme where the interaction of a mechanical resonator with input-output quantum pulses is controlled by an independent classical drive. We design protocols for state teleportation and direct quantum state transfer, between distant mechanical resonators. The proposed device, feasible with state-of-the-art technology, can serve as a building block for the implementation of long-distance quantum networks of mechanical resonators.

  4. Helping Students Learn Quantum Mechanics for Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information science and technology is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field drawing researchers from science and engineering fields. Traditional instruction in quantum mechanics is insufficient to prepare students for research in quantum computing because there is a lack of emphasis in the current curriculum on quantum formalism and dynamics. We are investigating the difficulties students have with quantum mechanics and are developing and evaluating quantum interactive learning tutorials (QuILTs) to reduce the difficulties. Our investigation includes interviews with individual students and the development and administration of free-response and multiple-choice tests. We discuss the implications of our research and development project on helping students learn quantum mechanics relevant for quantum computing.

  5. Quantum mechanics. An introduction; Quantenmechanik. Eine Einfuehrung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, H.

    2008-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The way to quantum mechanics starting from thermal radiation and the stability of matter, Heisenberg's uncertainty relation, the impact of quantum mechanics on technology, the description of the big bang by means of quantum mechanics.

  6. Quantum mechanics of black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Edward

    2012-08-03

    The popular conception of black holes reflects the behavior of the massive black holes found by astronomers and described by classical general relativity. These objects swallow up whatever comes near and emit nothing. Physicists who have tried to understand the behavior of black holes from a quantum mechanical point of view, however, have arrived at quite a different picture. The difference is analogous to the difference between thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. The thermodynamic description is a good approximation for a macroscopic system, but statistical mechanics describes what one will see if one looks more closely.

  7. Relativistic quantum mechanics wave equations

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, Walter

    1990-01-01

    Relativistic Quantum Mechanics - Wave Equations concentrates mainly on the wave equations for spin-0 and spin-12 particles Chapter 1 deals with the Klein-Gordon equation and its properties and applications The chapters that follow introduce the Dirac equation, investigate its covariance properties and present various approaches to obtaining solutions Numerous applications are discussed in detail, including the two-center Dirac equation, hole theory, CPT symmetry, Klein's paradox, and relativistic symmetry principles Chapter 15 presents the relativistic wave equations for higher spin (Proca, Rarita-Schwinger, and Bargmann-Wigner) The extensive presentation of the mathematical tools and the 62 worked examples and problems make this a unique text for an advanced quantum mechanics course

  8. The formalisms of quantum mechanics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    David, Francois

    2015-01-01

    These lecture notes present a concise and introductory, yet as far as possible coherent, view of the main formalizations of quantum mechanics and of quantum field theories, their interrelations and their theoretical foundations. The “standard” formulation of quantum mechanics (involving the Hilbert space of pure states, self-adjoint operators as physical observables, and the probabilistic interpretation given by the Born rule) on one hand, and the path integral and functional integral representations of probabilities amplitudes on the other, are the standard tools used in most applications of quantum theory in physics and chemistry. Yet, other mathematical representations of quantum mechanics sometimes allow better comprehension and justification of quantum theory. This text focuses on two of such representations: the algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics and the “quantum logic” approach. Last but not least, some emphasis will also be put on understanding the relation between quantum physics and ...

  9. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Rasinariu, Constantin

    2017-01-01

    We have written this book in order to provide a single compact source for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as for professional physicists who want to understand the essentials of supersymmetric quantum mechanics. It is an outgrowth of a seminar course taught to physics and mathematics juniors and seniors at Loyola University Chicago, and of our own research over a quarter of a century.

  10. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics with reflections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Sarah; Vinet, Luc [Centre de Recherches Mathematiques, Universite de Montreal, Montreal CP6128 (QC) H3C 3J7 (Canada); Zhedanov, Alexei, E-mail: post@crm.umontreal.ca, E-mail: luc.vinet@umontreal.ca, E-mail: zhedanov@fti.dn.ua [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Technology, Donetsk 83114 (Ukraine)

    2011-10-28

    We consider a realization of supersymmetric quantum mechanics where supercharges are differential-difference operators with reflections. A supersymmetric system with an extended Scarf I potential is presented and analyzed. Its eigenfunctions are given in terms of little -1 Jacobi polynomials which obey an eigenvalue equation of Dunkl type and arise as a q {yields} -1 limit of the little q-Jacobi polynomials. Intertwining operators connecting the wavefunctions of extended Scarf I potentials with different parameters are presented. (paper)

  11. Transfer of Learning in Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the difficulties that undergraduate students in quantum mechanics courses have in transferring learning from previous courses or within the same course from one context to another by administering written tests and conducting individual interviews. Quantum mechanics is abstract and its paradigm is very different from the classical one. A good grasp of the principles of quantum mechanics requires creating and organizing a knowledge structure consistent with the quantum postulate...

  12. SUSY Search at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Da; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk gives an overview of the most recent SUSY searches in ATLAS and CMS experiments using 13 TeV ATLAS Run2 data.

  13. Natural SUSY endures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papucci, Michele; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Weiler, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    The first 1 fb-1 of LHC searches have set impressive limits on new colored particles decaying to missing energy. We address the implication of these searches for naturalness in supersymmetry (SUSY). General bottom-up considerations of natural electroweak symmetry breaking show that higgsinos, stops, and the gluino should not be too far above the weak scale. The rest of the spectrum, including the squarks of the first two generations, can be heavier and beyond the current LHC reach. We have used collider simulations to determine the limits that all of the 1 fb-1 searches pose on higgsinos, stops, and the gluino. We find that stops and the left-handed sbottom are starting to be constrained and must be heavier than about 200-300 GeV when decaying to higgsinos. The gluino must be heavier than about 600-800 GeV when it decays to stops and sbottoms. While these findings point toward scenarios with a lighter third generation split from the other squarks, we do find that moderately-tuned regions remain, where the gluino is just above 1 TeV and all the squarks are degenerate and light. Among all the searches, jets plus missing energy and same-sign dileptons often provide the most powerful probes of natural SUSY. Overall, our results indicate that natural SUSY has survived the first 1 fb-1 of data. The LHC is now on the brink of exploring the most interesting region of SUSY parameter space.

  14. Teaching Quantum Mechanics on an Introductory Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Rainer; Wiesner, Hartmut

    2002-01-01

    Presents a new research-based course on quantum mechanics in which the conceptual issues of quantum mechanics are taught at an introductory level. Involves students in the discovery of how quantum phenomena deviate from classical everyday experiences. (Contains 31 references.) (Author/YDS)

  15. Quantum mechanics as a sociology of matter

    OpenAIRE

    Nakhmanson, Raoul

    2003-01-01

    Analogies between quantum mechanics and sociology lead to the hypothesis that quantum objects are complex products of evolution. Like biological objects they are able to receive, to work on, and to spread semantic information. In general meaning we can name it "consciousness". The important ability of consciousness is ability to predict future. Key words: Evolution, consciousness, information, quantum mechanics, EPR, decoherence.

  16. Quantum-mechanical twin paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J. D.

    2016-10-01

    In the twin paradox of special relativity, an observer that travels along an accelerated trajectory at a high velocity will experience a smaller amount of elapsed time than an observer that remains at rest. This illustrates the fact that time is relative unlike the situation in classical physics where time is absolute. In a recent paper, Bushev et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 093050) showed that the twin paradox can also be demonstrated using a single electron that functions as a quantum-mechanical clock. The wave function of the electron can travel along two different paths simultaneously, which allows a measurement of the difference in proper times along the two trajectories using a single particle. Quantum interference effects show that time cannot be thought of as a classical parameter even when associated with a single clock or observer.

  17. Entropy, Topological Theories and Emergent Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cabrera

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The classical thermostatics of equilibrium processes is shown to possess a quantum mechanical dual theory with a finite dimensional Hilbert space of quantum states. Specifically, the kernel of a certain Hamiltonian operator becomes the Hilbert space of quasistatic quantum mechanics. The relation of thermostatics to topological field theory is also discussed in the context of the approach of the emergence of quantum theory, where the concept of entropy plays a key role.

  18. Multiverse interpretation of quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousso, Raphael; Susskind, Leonard

    2012-02-01

    We argue that the many worlds of quantum mechanics and the many worlds of the multiverse are the same thing, and that the multiverse is necessary to give exact operational meaning to probabilistic predictions from quantum mechanics. Decoherence—the modern version of wave-function collapse—is subjective in that it depends on the choice of a set of unmonitored degrees of freedom, the environment. In fact decoherence is absent in the complete description of any region larger than the future light cone of a measurement event. However, if one restricts to the causal diamond—the largest region that can be causally probed—then the boundary of the diamond acts as a one-way membrane and thus provides a preferred choice of environment. We argue that the global multiverse is a representation of the many worlds (all possible decoherent causal diamond histories) in a single geometry. We propose that it must be possible in principle to verify quantum-mechanical predictions exactly. This requires not only the existence of exact observables but two additional postulates: a single observer within the Universe can access infinitely many identical experiments; and the outcome of each experiment must be completely definite. In causal diamonds with a finite surface area, holographic entropy bounds imply that no exact observables exist, and both postulates fail: experiments cannot be repeated infinitely many times; and decoherence is not completely irreversible, so outcomes are not definite. We argue that our postulates can be satisfied in hats (supersymmetric multiverse regions with vanishing cosmological constant). We propose a complementarity principle that relates the approximate observables associated with finite causal diamonds to exact observables in the hat.

  19. Solvable models in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Albeverio, S; Høegh-Krohn, R; Holden, H; Gesztesy, F

    2004-01-01

    This monograph presents a detailed study of a class of solvable models in quantum mechanics that describe the motion of a particle in a potential having support at the positions of a discrete (finite or infinite) set of point sources. Both situations-where the strengths of the sources and their locations are precisely known and where these are only known with a given probability distribution-are covered. The authors present a systematic mathematical approach to these models and illustrate its connections with previous heuristic derivations and computations. Results obtained by different method

  20. Quantum mechanics for applied physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fromhold, Albert T

    2011-01-01

    This excellent text, directed to upper-level undergraduates and graduate students in engineering and applied physics, introduces the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, emphasizing those aspects of quantum mechanics and quantum statistics essential to an understanding of solid-state theory. A heavy background in mathematics and physics is not required beyond basic courses in calculus, differential equations, and calculus-based elementary physics.The first three chapters introduce quantum mechanics (using the Schrödinger equations), quantum statistics, and the free-electron theory of metals. Ch

  1. The emerging quantum the physics behind quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Pena, Luis de la; Valdes-Hernandez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This monograph presents the latest findings from a long-term research project intended to identify the physics behind Quantum Mechanics. A fundamental theory for quantum mechanics is constructed from first physical principles, revealing quantization as an emergent phenomenon arising from a deeper stochastic process. As such, it offers the vibrant community working on the foundations of quantum mechanics an alternative contribution open to discussion. The book starts with a critical summary of the main conceptual problems that still beset quantum mechanics.  The basic consideration is then introduced that any material system is an open system in permanent contact with the random zero-point radiation field, with which it may reach a state of equilibrium. Working from this basis, a comprehensive and self-consistent theoretical framework is then developed. The pillars of the quantum-mechanical formalism are derived, as well as the radiative corrections of nonrelativistic QED, while revealing the underlying physi...

  2. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics, excited state energies and wave functions, and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle: a proof of principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Donald J; Markovich, Thomas; Maxwell, Nicholas; Bittner, Eric R

    2009-12-31

    In addition to ground state wave functions and energies, excited states and their energies are also obtained in a standard Rayleigh-Ritz variational calculation. However, their accuracy is generally much lower. Using the super-symmetric (SUSY) form of quantum mechanics, we show that better accuracy and more rapid convergence can be obtained by taking advantage of calculations of the ground states of higher sector SUSY Hamiltonians, followed by application of the SUSY "charge operators". Our proof of principle study uses a general family of one-dimensional anharmonic oscillator models. We first obtain the exact, analytic ground states for a general family of anharmonic systems. We give the general, factorized form of the Hamiltonian for the hierarchy that arises in SUSY theory. The "charge" operators can then be used to convert states among the sectors. We illustrate the approach with two specific anharmonic oscillator models. Using the ground state of the second sector Hamiltonian, we show that the corresponding excited state energies and wave functions of the first sector are accurately obtained by applying the charge operators, using significantly smaller basis sets than are required in a standard variational approach applied to the original Schrodinger equation. This is a consequence of the higher accuracy of the Rayleigh-Ritz variational method when applied for ground states.

  3. SCET improved SUSY search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Mantry, Sonny; Petriello, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Supersymmetry has been one of the most popular candidates for physics beyond standard model (SM) for a long time. The fact that we haven't yet discover super particles in nowadays LHC data, pushes the SUSY production nearer and nearer to the LHC machine threshold. In the threshold limit, how well we understand the SM background is crucial for SUSY or other physics beyond SM search. In this talk, we will use the simplest case by considering photon plus two jets events to address the problem and we will talk about how we use the soft collinear effective theory to sum up potentially large logs related to threshold limit to improve our understanding of the SM background.

  4. Quantum mechanics in complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Ross Douglas

    This document should be considered in its separation; there are three distinct topics contained within and three distinct chapters within the body of works. In a similar fashion, this abstract should be considered in three parts. Firstly, we explored the existence of multiply-charged atomic ions by having developed a new set of dimensional scaling equations as well as a series of relativistic augmentations to the standard dimensional scaling procedure and to the self-consistent field calculations. Secondly, we propose a novel method of predicting drug efficacy in hopes to facilitate the discovery of new small molecule therapeutics by modeling the agonist-protein system as being similar to the process of Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy. Finally, we facilitate the instruction in basic quantum mechanical topics through the use of quantum games; this method of approach allows for the generation of exercises with the intent of conveying the fundamental concepts within a first year quantum mechanics classroom. Furthermore, no to be mentioned within the body of the text, yet presented in appendix form, certain works modeling the proliferation of cells types within the confines of man-made lattices for the purpose of facilitating artificial vascular transplants. In Chapter 2, we present a theoretical framework which describes multiply-charged atomic ions, their stability within super-intense laser fields, also lay corrections to the systems due to relativistic effects. Dimensional scaling calculations with relativistic corrections for systems: H, H-, H 2-, He, He-, He2-, He3- within super-intense laser fields were completed. Also completed were three-dimensional self consistent field calculations to verify the dimensionally scaled quantities. With the aforementioned methods the system's ability to stably bind 'additional' electrons through the development of multiple isolated regions of high potential energy leading to nodes of high electron density is shown

  5. Tunneling time in space fractional quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad

    2018-02-01

    We calculate the time taken by a wave packet to travel through a classically forbidden region of space in space fractional quantum mechanics. We obtain the close form expression of tunneling time from a rectangular barrier by stationary phase method. We show that tunneling time depends upon the width b of the barrier for b → ∞ and therefore Hartman effect doesn't exist in space fractional quantum mechanics. Interestingly we found that the tunneling time monotonically reduces with increasing b. The tunneling time is smaller in space fractional quantum mechanics as compared to the case of standard quantum mechanics. We recover the Hartman effect of standard quantum mechanics as a special case of space fractional quantum mechanics.

  6. Emergent quantum mechanics and emergent symmetries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, G. 't

    2007-01-01

    Quantum mechanics is ‘emergent’ if a statistical treatment of large scale phenomena in a locally deterministic theory requires the use of quantum operators. These quantum operators may allow for symmetry transformations that are not present in the underlying deterministic system. Such

  7. Natural SUSY endures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papucci, Michele; Ruderman, Joshua T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theoretical Physics Div.

    2011-10-31

    The first 1 fb{sup -1} of LHC searches have set impressive limits on new colored particles decaying to missing energy. We address the implication of these searches for naturalness in supersymmetry (SUSY). General bottom-up considerations of natural electroweak symmetry breaking show that higgsinos, stops, and the gluino should not be too far above the weak scale. The rest of the spectrum, including the squarks of the first two generations, can be heavier and beyond the current LHC reach. We have used collider simulations to determine the limits that all of the 1 fb{sup -1} searches pose on higgsinos, stops, and the gluino. We find that stops and the left-handed sbottom are starting to be constrained and must be heavier than about 200-300 GeV when decaying to higgsinos. The gluino must be heavier than about 600-800 GeV when it decays to stops and sbottoms. While these findings point toward scenarios with a lighter third generation split from the other squarks, we do find that moderately-tuned regions remain, where the gluino is just above 1 TeV and all the squarks are degenerate and light. Among all the searches, jets plus missing energy and same-sign dileptons often provide the most powerful probes of natural SUSY. Overall, our results indicate that natural SUSY has survived the first 1 fb{sup -1} of data. The LHC is now on the brink of exploring the most interesting region of SUSY parameter space. (orig.)

  8. SUSY: New Perspectives and Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Munoz, C.

    2007-01-01

    Although supersymmetry (SUSY) is thirty five years old, it is still one of the most attractive theories for physics beyond the standard model. Assuming that SUSY will be discovered at the LHC, the key question is: What SUSY model do we expect to be the correct one ? After reviewing briefly the advantages and problems of SUSY, several interesting models that have been proposed in the literature will be discussed. In particular, models such as the MSSM, BRpV, NMSSM, and possible extensions. We ...

  9. Heisenberg and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Kristian

    2011-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; Part I. The Emergence of Quantum Mechanics: 2. Quantum mechanics and the principle of observability; 3. The problem of interpretation; Part II. The Heisenberg-Bohr Dialogue: 4. The wave-particle duality; 5. Indeterminacy and the limits of classical concepts: the turning point in Heisenberg's thought; 6. Heisenberg and Bohr: divergent viewpoints of complementarity; Part III. Heisenberg's Epistemology and Ontology of Quantum Mechanics: 7. The transformation of Kantian philosophy; 8. The linguistic turn in Heisenberg's thought; Conclusion; References; Index.

  10. A Bit of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oss, Stefano; Rosi, Tommaso

    2015-04-01

    We have developed an app for iOS-based smart-phones/tablets that allows a 3-D, complex phase-based colorful visualization of hydrogen atom wave functions. Several important features of the quantum behavior of atomic orbitals can easily be made evident, thus making this app a useful companion in introductory modern physics classes. There are many reasons why quantum mechanical systems and phenomena are difficult both to teach and deeply understand. They are described by equations that are generally hard to visualize, and they often oppose the so-called "common sense" based on the human perception of the world, which is built on mental images such as locality and causality. Moreover students cannot have direct experience of those systems and solutions, and generally do not even have the possibility to refer to pictures, videos, or experiments to fill this gap. Teachers often encounter quite serious troubles in finding out a sensible way to speak about the wonders of quantum physics at the high school level, where complex formalisms are not accessible at all. One should however consider that this is quite a common issue in physics and, more generally, in science education. There are plenty of natural phenomena whose models (not only at microscopic and atomic levels) are of difficult, if not impossible, visualization. Just think of certain kinds of waves, fields of forces, velocities, energy, angular momentum, and so on. One should also notice that physical reality is not the same as the images we make of it. Pictures (formal, abstract ones, as well as artists' views) are a convenient bridge between these two aspects.

  11. A modern approach to quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, John S

    2012-01-01

    Using an innovative approach that students find both accessible and exciting, A Modern Approach to Quantum Mechanics, Second Edition lays out the foundations of quantum mechanics through the physics of intrinsic spin. Written to serve as the primary textbook for an upper-division course in quantum mechanics, Townsend's text gives professors and students a refreshing alternative to the old style of teaching, by allowing the basic physics of spin systems to drive the introduction of concepts such as Dirac notation, operators, eigenstates and eigenvalues, time evolution in quantum mechanics, and entanglement. Chapters 6 through 10 cover the more traditional subjects in wave mechanics-the Schrodinger equation in position space, the harmonic oscillator, orbital angular momentum, and central potentials-but they are motivated by the foundations developed in the earlier chapters. Students using this text will perceive wave mechanics as an important aspect of quantum mechanics, but not necessarily the core of the subj...

  12. Quantum mechanics II a second course in quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Landau, Rubin H

    2004-01-01

    Here is a readable and intuitive quantum mechanics text that covers scattering theory, relativistic quantum mechanics, and field theory. This expanded and updated Second Edition - with five new chapters - emphasizes the concrete and calculable over the abstract and pure, and helps turn students into researchers without diminishing their sense of wonder at physics and nature.As a one-year graduate-level course, Quantum Mechanics II: A Second Course in Quantum Theory leads from quantum basics to basic field theory, and lays the foundation for research-oriented specialty courses. Used selectively, the material can be tailored to create a one-semester course in advanced topics. In either case, it addresses a broad audience of students in the physical sciences, as well as independent readers - whether advanced undergraduates or practicing scientists

  13. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources. PMID:28674011

  14. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-18

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  15. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  16. Ten theorems about quantum mechanical measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, N.G. van

    1988-01-01

    The aim of quantum mechanics is to explain macroscopic, objectively recorded phenomena. Microscopic objects are measured by enabling them to interact with a macroscopic measuring apparatus prepared in a metastable state. Macroscopic objects, such as cats, are not above the laws of quantum mechanics,

  17. Relativity of representations in quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    de la Torre, A C

    2001-01-01

    Only the position representation is used in introductory quantum mechanics and the momentum representation is not usually presented until advanced undergraduate courses. To emphasize the relativity of the representations of the abstract formulation of quantum mechanics, two examples of representations related to the operators aX+(1-a)P and (XP+PX)/2 are presented.

  18. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Quantum Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2013-02-28

    Feb 28, 2013 ... A Refresher Course in Quantum Mechanics for college/university teachers will be held at St. Berchmans College,. Changanacherry, Kottayam, Kerala, from 1 to 14 May 2013. The Course is aimed for college teachers engaging. Quantum Mechanics at the UG./PG level. The Course will cover the basic and ...

  19. SUSY searches at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffre, Michel; /Orsay, LAL

    2012-02-01

    The Tevatron collider has provided the CDF and D0 collaborations with large datasets as input to a rich program of physics beyond the standard model. The results presented here are from recent searches for SUSY particles using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of data. Supersymmetry (SUSY) [1] is one of the most favored theories beyond the standard model (SM). Each SM particle is associated to a sparticle whose spin differs by one half unit. This boson-fermion symmetry is obviously broken by some unknown mechanism. Even in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM (MSSM [2]) there are a large number of free parameters. To reduce this number one can introduce new assumptions on the symmetry breaking mechanism and build models based on minimal supergravity (as mSUGRA [3]) or on a Gauge Mediated Symmetry Breaking scenario (GMSB [4]), a top-down approach. Another possibility is to make phenomenological assumptions to reduce the number of particles accessible to the experiment while keeping some of the properties of the above models (bottom-up approach). As the sparticles are heavy, to produce them one has to make collisions at the highest center of mass energy. The Tevatron was the best place for discovery until the start of LHC. In the near term, Tevatron experiments and their large datasets remain competitive in areas like production of third generation squarks and of non-coloured sparticles. I will report on recent results from the CDF and D0 collaborations, assuming R-parity is conserved, i.e the sparticles are produced in pairs, and the lightest of them (LSP) is stable, neutral, weakly interacting, and detected as missing transverse energy, E{sub T}.

  20. Conference on Mathematical Results in Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Exner, Pavel; Tater, Miloš; QMath-7

    1999-01-01

    At the age of almost three quarters of a century, quantum mechanics is by all accounts a mature theory. There were times when it seemed that it had borne its best fruit already and would give way to investigation of deeper levels of matter. Today this sounds like rash thinking. Modern experimental techniques have led to discoveries of numerous new quantum effects in solid state, optics and elsewhere. Quantum mechanics is thus gradually becoming a basis for many branches of applied physics, in this way entering our everyday life. While the dynamic laws of quantum mechanics are well known, a proper theoretical understanding requires methods which would allow us to de­ rive the abundance of observed quantum effects from the first principles. In many cases the rich structure hidden in the Schr6dinger equation can be revealed only using sophisticated tools. This constitutes a motivation to investigate rigorous methods which yield mathematically well-founded properties of quantum systems.

  1. Naturalness, SUSY heavy higgses and flavor constraints

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    I will demonstrate that supersymmetric (SUSY) higgses provide an important diagnostic for electroweak naturalness in the SUSY paradigm. I first review the naturalness problem of the Standard Model (SM) and SUSY as one of its most promising solutions. I study the masses of heavy Higgses in SUSY theories under broad assumptions, and show how they are constrained by their role in Electroweak symmetry breaking. I then show how Flavor Physics severely constrains large parts of SUSY parameter space, otherwise favored by naturalness. If SUSY Higgses are not discovered at relatively low mass during the next LHC run, this tension will further increase, disfavoring naturalness from SUSY.

  2. Quantum mechanics a comprehensive text for chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, Kishor

    2010-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. The text includes the inadequacy of classical mechanics and covers basic and fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics including concepts of transitional, vibration rotation and electronic energies, introduction to concepts of angular momenta, approximatemethods and their application concepts related to electron spin, symmetery concepts and quantum mechanics and ultimately the book features the theories of chemical bonding and use of softwares in quantum mechanics. the text of the book is presented in a lucid manner with ample examples and illustrations wherever

  3. Prologue to super quantum mechanics something is rotten in the state of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Vaguine, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Since its foundation more than eight decades ago, quantum mechanics has been plagued by enigmas, mysteries and paradoxes and held hostage by quantum positivism. This fact strongly suggests that something is fundamentally wrong with the quantum mechanics paradigm. The best scientific minds, such as Albert Einstein, Louis de Broglie, David Bohm, Richard Feynman and others have spent years of their professional lives attempting to find resolution to the quantum mechanics predicament, with not much success. A shift of the quantum mechanics paradigm toward a deeper physics theory is long overdue.

  4. Strange Bedfellows: Quantum Mechanics and Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Marvin

    2010-02-01

    Last year, in 2008, I gave a talk titled Quantum Calisthenics. This year I am going to tell you about how the work I described then has spun off into a most unlikely direction. What I am going to talk about is how one maps the problem of finding clusters in a given data set into a problem in quantum mechanics. I will then use the tricks I described to let quantum evolution lets the clusters come together on their own.

  5. Strange Bedfellows: Quantum Mechanics and Data Mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Marvin; /SLAC

    2009-12-16

    Last year, in 2008, I gave a talk titled Quantum Calisthenics. This year I am going to tell you about how the work I described then has spun off into a most unlikely direction. What I am going to talk about is how one maps the problem of finding clusters in a given data set into a problem in quantum mechanics. I will then use the tricks I described to let quantum evolution lets the clusters come together on their own.

  6. Strange Bedfellows: Quantum Mechanics and Data Mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Marvin [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Last year, in 2008, I gave a talk titled Quantum Calisthenics. This year I am going to tell you about how the work I described then has spun off into a most unlikely direction. What I am going to talk about is how one maps the problem of finding clusters in a given data set into a problem in quantum mechanics. I will then use the tricks I described to let quantum evolution lets the clusters come together on their own.

  7. The analogue quantum mechanical of plasmonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, R. A.; Silva, Nuno A.; Costa, J. C.; Gomes, M.; Guerreiro, A.

    2017-08-01

    Localized plasmons in metallic nanostructures present strong analogies with Quantum Mechanical problems of particles trapped in potential wells. In this paper we take this analogy further using the Madelung Formalism of Quantum Mechanics to express the fluid equations describing the charge density of the conduction electrons and corresponding interaction with light in terms of an effective generalized Non-linear Schr¨odinger equations. Within this context, it is possible to develop the analogy of a plasmonic atom and molecule that exhibits Rabi oscillations, Stark effect, among other Quantum Mechanical effects.

  8. Theoretical and quantum mechanics fundamentals for chemists

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Provides the basics of theoretical and quantum mechanics in one place and emphasizes the continuity between themUniquely presented to be used for self-taught courses covering theoretical and quantum mechanicsEach chapter includes a detailed outline, a summary, self-assessment questions for which answers can be found in the textInvaluable for chemistry undergraduate and graduate students, chemists, other non-physical scientists, engineering students of modern techniques and technology, specialists who need a better understanding of quantum mechanics.

  9. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Quantum Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in 'Quantum Mechanics' for college/university teachers will be held at the Physics Department of IIT Roorkee, Uttarakhand, from 28 November to 12 December, 2013. The Course is aimed for college teachers engaged in teaching at the UG/PG level as well as those who use and need Quantum ...

  10. Quantum mechanics: why complex Hilbert space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinelli, G.; Lahti, P.

    2017-10-01

    We outline a programme for an axiomatic reconstruction of quantum mechanics based on the statistical duality of states and effects that combines the use of a theorem of Solér with the idea of symmetry. We also discuss arguments favouring the choice of the complex field. This article is part of the themed issue `Second quantum revolution: foundational questions'.

  11. Problems in Quantum Mechanics with Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    d'Emilio, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    242 solved problems of several degrees of difficulty in nonrelativistic Quantum Mechanics, ranging from the themes of the crisis of classical physics, through the achievements in the framework of modern atomic physics, down to the still alive, more intriguing aspects connected e.g. with the EPR paradox, the Aharonov--Bohm effect, quantum teleportation.

  12. Relativistic quantum mechanics an introduction to relativistic quantum fields

    CERN Document Server

    Maiani, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Written by two of the world's leading experts on particle physics and the standard model - including an award-winning former Director General of CERN - this textbook provides a completely up-to-date account of relativistic quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. It describes the formal and phenomenological aspects of the standard model of particle physics, and is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students studying both theoretical and experimental physics.

  13. Relativistic quantum mechanics; Mecanique quantique relativiste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollitrault, J.Y. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique]|[Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    1998-12-01

    These notes form an introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. The mathematical formalism has been reduced to the minimum in order to enable the reader to calculate elementary physical processes. The second quantification and the field theory are the logical followings of this course. The reader is expected to know analytical mechanics (Lagrangian and Hamiltonian), non-relativistic quantum mechanics and some basis of restricted relativity. The purpose of the first 3 chapters is to define the quantum mechanics framework for already known notions about rotation transformations, wave propagation and restricted theory of relativity. The next 3 chapters are devoted to the application of relativistic quantum mechanics to a particle with 0,1/5 and 1 spin value. The last chapter deals with the processes involving several particles, these processes require field theory framework to be thoroughly described. (A.C.) 2 refs.

  14. Test of quantum mechanics by neutron interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, H.

    2008-06-01

    Interferometry with massive elementary particles combines particle and wave features in a direct way. In this respect, neutrons are proper tools for testing quantum mechanics because they are massive, they couple to electromagnetic fields due to their magnetic moment, and they are subject to all basic interactions, and they are sensitive to topological effects, as well. They play a pionieering role in the development of interferometry with even heavier objects, like atoms, molecules and clusters. Deterministic and stochastic partial absorption experiments can be described by Bell-type inequalities. Recent neutron interferometry experiments based on postselection methods renewed the discussion about quantum nonlocality and the quantum measuring process. It has been shown that interference phenomena can be revived even when the overall interference pattern has lost its contrast. This indicates persisting coupling in phase space even in cases of spatially separated Schrödinger cat-like situations. These states are extremely fragile and sensitive to any kind of fluctuations or other decoherence processes. More complete quantum experiments also show that a complete retrieval of quantum states behind an interaction region becomes impossible in principle. The transition from a quantum world to a classical one is still an open question and will be tackled by means of dedicated decoherence experiments. Recent measurements deal with quantum contextuality and quantum state reconstruction. The observed results agree with quantum mechanical laws and may stimulate further discussions about their interpretations.

  15. Non-Hamiltonian commutators in quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2005-12-01

    The symplectic structure of quantum commutators is first unveiled and then exploited to describe generalized non-Hamiltonian brackets in quantum mechanics. It is easily recognized that quantum-classical systems are described by a particular realization of such a bracket. In light of previous work, this paper explains a unified approach to classical and quantum-classical non-Hamiltonian dynamics. In order to illustrate the use of non-Hamiltonian commutators, it is shown how to define thermodynamic constraints in quantum-classical systems. In particular, quantum-classical Nosé-Hoover equations of motion and the associated stationary density matrix are derived. The non-Hamiltonian commutators for both Nosé-Hoover chains and Nosé-Andersen (constant-pressure, constant-temperature) dynamics are also given. Perspectives of the formalism are discussed.

  16. Progress in post-quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfatti, Jack

    2017-05-01

    Newton's mechanics in the 17th century increased the lethality of artillery. Thermodynamics in the 19th led to the steam-powered industrial revolution. Maxwell's unification of electricity, magnetism and light gave us electrical power, the telegraph, radio and television. The discovery of quantum mechanics in the 20th century by Planck, Bohr, Einstein, Schrodinger, Heisenberg led to the creation of the atomic and hydrogen bombs as well as computer chips, the world-wide-web and Silicon Valley's multibillion dollar corporations. The lesson is that breakthroughs in fundamental physics, both theoretical and experimental, have always led to profound technological wealth-creating industries and will continue to do so. There is now a new revolution brewing in quantum mechanics that can be divided into three periods. The first quantum revolution was from 1900 to about 1975. The second quantum information/computer revolution was from about 1975 to 2015. (The early part of this story is told by Kaiser in his book, How the Hippies Saved Physics, how a small group of Berkeley/San Francisco physicists triggered that second revolution.) The third quantum revolution is how an extension of quantum mechanics may lead to the understanding of consciousness as a natural physical phenomenon that can emerge in many material substrates, not only in our carbon-based biochemistry. In particular, this new post-quantum mechanics may lead to naturally conscious artificial intelligence in nano-electronic machines, as well as perhaps extending human life spans to hundreds of years and more.

  17. Quantum mechanics of a photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Hassan; Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2017-08-01

    A first-quantized free photon is a complex massless vector field A =(Aμ ) whose field strength satisfies Maxwell's equations in vacuum. We construct the Hilbert space H of the photon by endowing the vector space of the fields A in the temporal-Coulomb gauge with a positive-definite and relativistically invariant inner product. We give an explicit expression for this inner product, identify the Hamiltonian for the photon with the generator of time translations in H , determine the operators representing the momentum and the helicity of the photon, and introduce a chirality operator whose eigenfunctions correspond to fields having a definite sign of energy. We also construct a position operator for the photon whose components commute with each other and with the chirality and helicity operators. This allows for the construction of the localized states of the photon with a definite sign of energy and helicity. We derive an explicit formula for the latter and compute the corresponding electric and magnetic fields. These turn out to diverge not just at the point where the photon is localized but on a plane containing this point. We identify the axis normal to this plane with an associated symmetry axis and show that each choice of this axis specifies a particular position operator, a corresponding position basis, and a position representation of the quantum mechanics of a photon. In particular, we examine the position wave functions determined by such a position basis, elucidate their relationship with the Riemann-Silberstein and Landau-Peierls wave functions, and give an explicit formula for the probability density of the spatial localization of the photon.

  18. On the geometrization of quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavernelli, Ivano, E-mail: ita@zurich.ibm.com

    2016-08-15

    Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is commonly formulated in terms of wavefunctions (probability amplitudes) obeying the static and the time-dependent Schrödinger equations (SE). Despite the success of this representation of the quantum world a wave–particle duality concept is required to reconcile the theory with observations (experimental measurements). A first solution to this dichotomy was introduced in the de Broglie–Bohm theory according to which a pilot-wave (solution of the SE) is guiding the evolution of particle trajectories. Here, I propose a geometrization of quantum mechanics that describes the time evolution of particles as geodesic lines in a curved space, whose curvature is induced by the quantum potential. This formulation allows therefore the incorporation of all quantum effects into the geometry of space–time, as it is the case for gravitation in the general relativity.

  19. Where is SUSY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Amitava

    2017-10-01

    The searches for supersymmetry at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have so far yielded only null results and have considerably tightened the bounds on the sparticle masses. This has generated some skepticism in the literature regarding the `naturalness of SUSY' which qualitatively requires some sparticles to be relatively light. Re-examining some of the bounds from LHC searches, it is argued with specific examples that the above skepticism is a red herring because (i) a quantitative and universally accepted definition of `naturalness' is not available and (ii) even if some conventional definitions of naturalness is accepted at their face values, the alleged tension with the apparently stringent LHC bounds wither away once the strong assumptions, by no means compelling, underlying such bounds are relaxed.

  20. Quantum mechanical stabilization of Minkowski signature wormholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, M.

    1989-05-19

    When one attempts to construct classical wormholes in Minkowski signature Lorentzian spacetimes violations of both the weak energy hypothesis and averaged weak energy hypothesis are encountered. Since the weak energy hypothesis is experimentally known to be violated quantum mechanically, this suggests that a quantum mechanical analysis of Minkowski signature wormholes is in order. In this note I perform a minisuperspace analysis of a simple class of Minkowski signature wormholes. By solving the Wheeler-de Witt equation for pure Einstein gravity on this minisuperspace the quantum mechanical wave function of the wormhole is obtained in closed form. The wormhole is shown to be quantum mechanically stabilized with an average radius of order the Planck length. 8 refs.

  1. Quantum mechanical streamlines. I - Square potential barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.; Christoph, A. C.; Palke, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Exact numerical calculations are made for scattering of quantum mechanical particles hitting a square two-dimensional potential barrier (an exact analog of the Goos-Haenchen optical experiments). Quantum mechanical streamlines are plotted and found to be smooth and continuous, to have continuous first derivatives even through the classical forbidden region, and to form quantized vortices around each of the nodal points. A comparison is made between the present numerical calculations and the stationary wave approximation, and good agreement is found between both the Goos-Haenchen shifts and the reflection coefficients. The time-independent Schroedinger equation for real wavefunctions is reduced to solving a nonlinear first-order partial differential equation, leading to a generalization of the Prager-Hirschfelder perturbation scheme. Implications of the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics are discussed, and cases are cited where quantum and classical mechanical motions are identical.

  2. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Markus Reiher; Nathan Wiebe; Krysta M Svore; Dave Wecker; Matthias Troyer

    2017-01-01

    .... Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example...

  3. Special Relativity, Causality and Quantum Mechanics-2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Special Relativity, Causality and Quantum Mechanics - 2. Guruprasad Kar Samir Kunkri Sujit K Choudhary. General Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 43-54 ...

  4. Advanced quantum mechanics materials and photons

    CERN Document Server

    Dick, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    In this updated and expanded second edition of a well-received and invaluable textbook, Prof. Dick emphasizes the importance of advanced quantum mechanics for materials science and all experimental techniques which employ photon absorption, emission, or scattering. Important aspects of introductory quantum mechanics are covered in the first seven chapters to make the subject self-contained and accessible for a wide audience. Advanced Quantum Mechanics, Materials and Photons can therefore be used for advanced undergraduate courses and introductory graduate courses which are targeted towards students with diverse academic backgrounds from the Natural Sciences or Engineering. To enhance this inclusive aspect of making the subject as accessible as possible Appendices A and B also provide introductions to Lagrangian mechanics and the covariant formulation of electrodynamics. This second edition includes an additional 62 new problems as well as expanded sections on relativistic quantum fields and applications of�...

  5. Clocks And Dynamics In Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    York, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We argue that (1) our perception of time through change and (2) the gap between reality and our observation of it are at the heart of both quantum mechanics and the dynamical mechanism of physical systems. We suggest that the origin of quantum uncertainty lies with the absence of infinities or infinitesimals in observational data and that our concept of time derives from observing changing data (events). We argue that the fundamentally important content of the Superposition Principle is not t...

  6. A Relativistic Symmetrical Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Michael B.

    This poster describes a relativistic symmetrical interpretation (RSI) which postulates: quantum mechanics is intrinsically time-symmetric, with no arrow of time; the fundamental objects of quantum mechanics are transitions; a transition is fully described by a complex transition amplitude density with specified initial and final boundary conditions, and; transition amplitude densities never collapse. This RSI is compared to the Copenhagen Interpretation (CI) for the analysis of Einstein's bubble experiment using both the Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations. The RSI has no zitterbewegung in the particle's rest frame, resolves some inconsistencies of the CI, and gives intuitive explanations of some previously mysterious quantum effects.

  7. Relativistic quantum mechanics of a Dirac oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Martines y Romero, R P; Salas-Brito, A L

    1995-01-01

    The Dirac oscillator is an exactly soluble model recently introduced in the context of many particle models in relativistic quantum mechanics. The model has been also considered as an interaction term for modelling quark confinement in quantum chromodynamics. These considerations should be enough for demonstrating that the Dirac oscillator can be an excellent example in relativistic quantum mechanics. In this paper we offer a solution to the problem and discuss some of its properties. We also discuss a physical picture for the Dirac oscillator's non-standard interaction, showing how it arises on describing the behaviour of a neutral particle carrying an anomalous magnetic moment and moving inside a uniformly charged sphere. (author)

  8. Quantum mechanics of charged particle beam optics

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Sameen Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Theory of charged particle beam optics is basic to the design and working of charged particle beam devices from electron microscopes to accelerator machines. Traditionally, the optical elements of the devices are designed and operated based on classical mechanics and classical electromagnetism, and only certain specific quantum mechanical aspects are dealt with separately using quantum theory. This book provides a systematic approach to quantum theory of charged particle beam optics, particularly in the high energy cases such as accelerators or high energy electron microscopy.

  9. Horizon quantum mechanics of rotating black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadio, Roberto [Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Bologna, I.S. FLAG, Bologna (Italy); Giugno, Andrea [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Munich (Germany); Giusti, Andrea [Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Bologna, I.S. FLAG, Bologna (Italy); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Munich (Germany); Micu, Octavian [Institute of Space Science, Bucharest, P.O. Box MG-23, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2017-05-15

    The horizon quantum mechanics is an approach that was previously introduced in order to analyze the gravitational radius of spherically symmetric systems and compute the probability that a given quantum state is a black hole. In this work, we first extend the formalism to general space-times with asymptotic (ADM) mass and angular momentum. We then apply the extended horizon quantum mechanics to a harmonic model of rotating corpuscular black holes. We find that simple configurations of this model naturally suppress the appearance of the inner horizon and seem to disfavor extremal (macroscopic) geometries. (orig.)

  10. Fundamental symmetry principles in quantum mechanics and its philosophical phases

    OpenAIRE

    Arai, Asao

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental symmetry principle in quantum mechanics is formulated in the framework of the standard axiomatic quantum mechanics and a new philosophical interpretation for quantum mechanics, which dissolves "difficulties" in the conventional interpretations for quantum mechanics, is presented. Moreover, philosophical phases of the fundamental symmetry principle are discussed in connection with Plato's philosophy and Oriental philosophies, in particular, Zen Buddhism.

  11. A "Bit" of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oss, Stefano; Rosi, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an app for iOS-based smart-phones/tablets that allows a 3-D, complex phase-based colorful visualization of hydrogen atom wave functions. Several important features of the quantum behavior of atomic orbitals can easily be made evident, thus making this app a useful companion in introductory modern physics classes. There are many…

  12. How to teach quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passon, Oliver [Fachbereich Physik, University of Wuppertal, Postfach 100127, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    In the spirit and style of John S Bell's well-known paper on How to teach special relativity it is argued that a 'Bohmian pedagogy' provides a very useful tool to illustrate the relation between classical and quantum physics and illuminates the peculiar features of the latter.

  13. Nilpotent Quantum Mechanics: Analogues and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcer, Peter; Rowlands, Peter

    2017-07-01

    The most significant characteristic of nilpotent quantum mechanics is that the quantum system (fermion state) and its environment (vacuum) are, in mathematical terms, mirror images of each other. So a change in one automatically leads to corresponding changes in the other. We have used this characteristic as a model for self-organization, which has applications well beyond quantum physics. The nilpotent structure has also been identified as being constructed from two commutative vector spaces. This construction has a number of identifiable characteristics which we can expect to find in systems where self-organization is dominant, and a case presented after the publication of a paper by us on ‘The ‘Logic’ of Self-Organizing Systems’,1 in the organization of the neurons in the visual cortex. We expect to find many more complex systems where our general principles, based, by analogy, on nilpotent quantum mechanics, will apply.

  14. Quantum mechanics: why complex Hilbert space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinelli, G; Lahti, P

    2017-11-13

    We outline a programme for an axiomatic reconstruction of quantum mechanics based on the statistical duality of states and effects that combines the use of a theorem of Solér with the idea of symmetry. We also discuss arguments favouring the choice of the complex field.This article is part of the themed issue 'Second quantum revolution: foundational questions'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Advanced quantum mechanics materials and photons

    CERN Document Server

    Dick, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Quantum Mechanics: Materials and Photons is a textbook which emphasizes the importance of advanced quantum mechanics for materials science and all experimental techniques which employ photon absorption, emission, or scattering. Important aspects of introductory quantum mechanics are covered in the first seven chapters to make the subject self-contained and accessible for a wide audience. The textbook can therefore be used for advanced undergraduate courses and introductory graduate courses which are targeted towards students with diverse academic backgrounds from the Natural Sciences or Engineering. To enhance this inclusive aspect of making the subject as accessible as possible, Appendices A and B also provide introductions to Lagrangian mechanics and the covariant formulation of electrodynamics. Other special features include an introduction to Lagrangian field theory and an integrated discussion of transition amplitudes with discrete or continuous initial or final states. Once students have acquir...

  16. From classical to quantum mechanics through optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoliver, Jaume; Ros, Ana

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we revise the main aspects of the 'Hamiltonian analogy': the fact that optical paths are completely analogous to mechanical trajectories. We follow Schrödinger's original idea and go beyond this analogy by changing over from the Hamilton's principal function S to the wavefunction Ψ. We thus travel from classical to quantum mechanics using optics as a guide. Unfortunately, and despite its mathematical beauty and simplicity, the connection between classical and quantum mechanics through optics is nowadays hardly known and mostly ignored in university education. The present work tries to fill this gap.

  17. The conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenbud, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a clear and logical path to understanding what quantum mechanics is about. It will be accessible to undergraduates with minimal mathematical preparation: all that is required is an open mind, a little algebra, and a first course in undergraduate physics. Quantum mechanics is arguably the most successful physical theory. It makes predictions of incredible accuracy. It provides the structure underlying all of our electronic technology, and much of our mastery over materials. But compared with Newtonian mechanics, or even relativity, its teachings seem obscure-they have no coun

  18. Quantum mechanics and quantum information a guide through the quantum world

    CERN Document Server

    Fayngold, Moses

    2013-01-01

    Alongside a thorough definition of the basic concepts and their interrelations, backed by numerous examples, this textbook features a rare discussion of the quantum information theory. It also deals with other important topics hardly found in the literature, including the Robertson-Schrodinger-relation, angle and angular momentum uncertainties, interaction-free measurements, and the limitations of the no-cloning theorem With its interpretations of quantum mechanics and its discussions of quantum computing, this book is poised to become the standard textbook for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate quantum mechanics courses and as an essential reference for physics students and physics professionals.

  19. Susi astus rektori kohalt tagasi / Sigrid Laev

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laev, Sigrid

    2003-01-01

    Concordia rektor Mart Susi ja prorektor Mari-Ann Susi astusid kooli juhtimisest tagasi ja kuulutasid välja Concordia Varahalduse OÜ pankroti. Concordia töötajate loodud ühing hakkas looma uut õppeasutust

  20. Natural SUSY Endures

    CERN Document Server

    Papucci, Michele; Weiler, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The first 1/fb of LHC searches have set impressive limits on new colored particles decaying to missing energy. We address the implication of these searches for naturalness in supersymmetry (SUSY). General bottom-up considerations of natural electroweak symmetry breaking show that higgsinos, stops, and the gluino should not be too far above the weak scale. The rest of the spectrum, including the squarks of the first two generations, can be heavier and beyond the current LHC reach. We have used collider simulations to determine the limits that all of the 1/fb searches pose on higgsinos, stops, and the gluino. We find that stops and the left-handed sbottom are starting to be constrained and must be heavier than about 200-300 GeV when decaying to higgsinos. The gluino must be heavier than about 600-800 GeV when it decays to stops and sbottoms. While these findings point toward scenarios with a lighter third generation split from the other squarks, we do find that moderately-tuned regions remain, where the gluino ...

  1. Equivalence principle and quantum mechanics: quantum simulation with entangled photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, S

    2018-01-15

    Einstein's equivalence principle (EP) states the complete physical equivalence of a gravitational field and corresponding inertial field in an accelerated reference frame. However, to what extent the EP remains valid in non-relativistic quantum mechanics is a controversial issue. To avoid violation of the EP, Bargmann's superselection rule forbids a coherent superposition of states with different masses. Here we suggest a quantum simulation of non-relativistic Schrödinger particle dynamics in non-inertial reference frames, which is based on the propagation of polarization-entangled photon pairs in curved and birefringent optical waveguides and Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference measurement. The photonic simulator can emulate superposition of mass states, which would lead to violation of the EP.

  2. Equivalence principle and quantum mechanics: quantum simulation with entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, S.

    2018-01-01

    Einstein`s equivalence principle states the complete physical equivalence of a gravitational field and corresponding inertial field in an accelerated reference frame. However, to what extent the equivalence principle remains valid in non-relativistic quantum mechanics is a controversial issue. To avoid violation of the equivalence principle, Bargmann`s superselection rule forbids a coherent superposition of states with different masses. Here we suggest a quantum simulation of non-relativistic Schr\\"odinger particle dynamics in non-inertial reference frames, which is based on propagation of polarization-entangled photon pairs in curved and birefringent optical waveguides and Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference measurement. The photonic simulator can emulate superposition of mass states, which would lead to violation of the EP.

  3. The cellular automaton interpretation of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    't Hooft, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the deterministic view of quantum mechanics developed by Nobel Laureate Gerard 't Hooft. Dissatisfied with the uncomfortable gaps in the way conventional quantum mechanics meshes with the classical world, 't Hooft has revived the old hidden variable ideas, but now in a much more systematic way than usual. In this, quantum mechanics is viewed as a tool rather than a theory. The book presents examples of models that are classical in essence, but can be analysed by the use of quantum techniques, and argues that even the Standard Model, together with gravitational interactions, might be viewed as a quantum mechanical approach to analysing a system that could be classical at its core. He shows how this approach, even though it is based on hidden variables, can be plausibly reconciled with Bell's theorem, and how the usual objections voiced against the idea of ‘superdeterminism' can be overcome, at least in principle. This framework elegantly explains - and automatically cures - the problems of...

  4. Introductory quantum mechanics for applied nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dae Mann

    2015-01-01

    This introductory textbook covers fundamental quantum mechanics from an application perspective, considering optoelectronic devices, biological sensors and molecular imagers as well as solar cells and field effect transistors. The book provides a brief review of classical and statistical mechanics and electromagnetism, and then turns to the quantum treatment of atoms, molecules, and chemical bonds. Aiming at senior undergraduate and graduate students in nanotechnology related areas like physics, materials science, and engineering, the book could be used at schools that offer interdisciplinary but focused training for future workers in the semiconductor industry and for the increasing number of related nanotechnology firms, and even practicing people could use it when they need to learn related concepts. The author is Professor Dae Mann Kim from the Korea Institute for Advanced Study who has been teaching Quantum Mechanics to engineering, material science and physics students for over 25 years in USA and Asia.

  5. Non-locality beyond quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Popescu, Sandu

    2010-01-01

    Quantum mechanics is, without any doubt, a tremendously successful theory: it started by explaining black-body radiation and the photoelectric effect, it explained the spectra of atoms, and then went on to explain chemical bonds, the structure of atoms and of the atomic nucleus, the properties of crystals and the elementary particles, and a myriad of other phenomena. Yet it is safe to say that we still lack a deep understanding of quantum mechanics – surprising and even puzzling new effects continue to be discovered with regularity. That we are surprised and puzzled is the best sign that we still don't understand; however, the veil over the mysteries of quantum mechanics is starting to lift a little.

  6. States of Physical Systems in Classical and Quantum Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    quantum information theory. 3 R Simon research interests are in quantum information science and quantum optics. 4 N Mukunda interests are in classical and quantum ... Introduction. The basic mathematical structures encountered in clas- sical and in quantum mechanics are very different from one another, so it is probably ...

  7. Quantum Mechanical Studies of DNA and LNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Troels; Shim, Irene; Lindow, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) methodology has been employed to study the structure activity relations of DNA and locked nucleic acid (LNA). The QM calculations provide the basis for construction of molecular structure and electrostatic surface potentials from molecular orbitals. The topologies of the e......Quantum mechanical (QM) methodology has been employed to study the structure activity relations of DNA and locked nucleic acid (LNA). The QM calculations provide the basis for construction of molecular structure and electrostatic surface potentials from molecular orbitals. The topologies...

  8. Intrinsic resonance representation of quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carioli, M.; Heller, E.J.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    1997-01-01

    an optimal representation, based purely on classical mechanics. ''Hidden'' constants of the motion and good actions already known to the classical mechanics are thus incorporated into the basis, leaving the quantum effects to be isolated and included by small matrix diagonalizations. This simplifies......The choice of basis states in quantum calculations can be influenced by several requirements, and sometimes a very natural basis suggests itself. However often one retreats to a ''merely complete'' basis, whose coefficients in the eigenstates carry Little physical insight. We suggest here...

  9. Gallilei covariant quantum mechanics in electromagnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Wilhelm

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available A formulation of the quantum mechanics of charged particles in time-dependent electromagnetic fields is presented, in which both the Schroedinger equation and wave equations for the electromagnetic potentials are Galilei covariant, it is shown that the Galilean relativity principle leads to the introduction of the electromagnetic substratum in which the matter and electromagnetic waves propagate. The electromagnetic substratum effects are quantitatively significant for quantum mechanics in reference frames, in which the substratum velocity w is in magnitude comparable with the velocity of light c. The electromagnetic substratum velocity w occurs explicitly in the wave equations for the electromagnetic potentials but not in the Schroedinger equation.

  10. Quantum mechanics new approaches to selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Lipkin, Harry Jeannot

    1973-01-01

    Acclaimed as ""excellent"" (Nature) and ""very original and refreshing"" (Physics Today), this collection of self-contained studies is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Its broad selection of topics includes the Mössbauer effect, many-body quantum mechanics, scattering theory, Feynman diagrams, and relativistic quantum mechanics.Author Harry J. Lipkin, a well-known teacher at Israel's Weizmann Institute, takes an unusual approach by introducing many interesting physical problems and mathematical techniques at a much earlier point than in conventional texts. This meth

  11. The pursuit of locality in quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkin, Malcolm

    The rampant success of quantum theory is the result of applications of the 'new' quantum mechanics of Schrodinger and Heisenberg (1926-7), the Feynman-Schwinger-Tomonaga Quantum Electro-dynamics (1946-51), the electro-weak theory of Salaam, Weinberg, and Glashow (1967-9), and Quantum Chromodynamics (1973-); in fact, this success of 'the' quantum theory has depended on a continuous stream of brilliant and quite disparate mathematical formulations. In this carefully concealed ferment there lie plenty of unresolved difficulties, simply because in churning out fabulously accurate calculational tools there has been no sensible explanation of all that is going on. It is even argued that such an understanding is nothing to do with physics. A long-standing and famous illustration of this is the paradoxical thought-experiment of Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (1935). Fundamental to all quantum theories, and also their paradoxes, is the location of sub-microscopic objects; or, rather, that the specification of such a location is fraught with mathematical inconsistency. This project encompasses a detailed, critical survey of the tangled history of Position within quantum theories. The first step is to show that, contrary to appearances, canonical quantum mechanics has only a vague notion of locality. After analysing a number of previous attempts at a 'relativistic quantum mechanics', two lines of thought are considered in detail. The first is the work of Wan and students, which is shown to be no real improvement on the iisu.al 'nonrelativistic' theory. The second is based on an idea of Dirac's - using backwards-in-time light-cones as the hypersurface in space-time. There remain considerable difficulties in the way of producing a consistent scheme here. To keep things nicely stirred up, the author then proposes his own approach - an adaptation of Feynman's QED propagators. This new approach is distinguished from Feynman's since the propagator or Green's function is not obtained

  12. Quantum mechanics and hidden superconformal symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonezzi, R.; Corradini, O.; Latini, E.; Waldron, A.

    2017-12-01

    Solvability of the ubiquitous quantum harmonic oscillator relies on a spectrum generating osp (1 |2 ) superconformal symmetry. We study the problem of constructing all quantum mechanical models with a hidden osp (1 |2 ) symmetry on a given space of states. This problem stems from interacting higher spin models coupled to gravity. In one dimension, we show that the solution to this problem is the Vasiliev-Plyushchay family of quantum mechanical models with hidden superconformal symmetry obtained by viewing the harmonic oscillator as a one dimensional Dirac system, so that Grassmann parity equals wave function parity. These models—both oscillator and particlelike—realize all possible unitary irreducible representations of osp (1 |2 ).

  13. Practical quantum mechanics modern tools and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Manousakis, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanics forms the foundation of all modern physics, including atomic, nuclear, and molecular physics, the physics of the elementary particles, condensed matter physics. Modern astrophysics also relies heavily on quantum mechanics. Quantum theory is needed to understand the basis for new materials, new devices, the nature of light coming from stars, the laws which govern the atomic nucleus, and the physics of biological systems. As a result the subject of this book is a required course for most physics graduate students. While there are many books on the subject, this book targets specifically graduate students and it is written with modern advances in various fields in mind. Many examples treated in the various chapters as well as the emphasis of the presentation in the book are designed from the perspective of such problems. For example, the book begins by putting the Schrodinger equation on a spatial discrete lattice and the continuum limit is also discussed, inspired by Hamiltonian lattice gauge ...

  14. The planar spectrum in U(N)-invariant quantum mechanics by Fock space methods: I. The bosonic case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pietri, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma (Italy); Mori, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma (Italy); Onofri, Enrico [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma (Italy)

    2007-01-15

    Prompted by recent results on Susy-U(N)-invariant quantum mechanics in the large N limit by Veneziano and Wosiek, we have examined the planar spectrum in the full Hilbert space of U(N)-invariant states built on the Fock vacuum by applying any U(N)-invariant combinations of creation-operators. We present results about 1) the supersymmetric model in the bosonic sector, 2) the standard quartic Hamiltonian. This latter is useful to check our techniques against the exact result of Brezin et al. The SuSy case is where Fock space methods prove to be the most efficient: it turns out that the problem is separable and the exact planar spectrum can be expressed in terms of the single-trace spectrum. In the case of the anharmonic oscillator, on the other hand, the Fock space analysis is quite cumbersome due to the presence of large off-diagonal O(N) terms coupling subspaces with different number of traces; these terms should be absorbed before taking the planar limit and recovering the known planar spectrum. We give analytical and numerical evidence that good qualitative information on the spectrum can be obtained this way.

  15. A new exact quantum mechanical propagator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegel, F.W.; van Andel, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors derive a closed-form expression for the time-dependent propagator for a quantum mechanical particle which is subject to an external force which is the sum of (i) a reflecting half-plane barrier with a straight edge, and (ii) a harmonic force pointing towards a point of the edge. This new

  16. David Bohm’s Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Siqueira-Batista

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Bohm’s interpretation of Quantum Mechanics appears as one of the main alternatives to the hegemonic model proposed by the Copenhagen School. This works aims at making a concise presentation of the outlines and the main conceptual framework of the approach followed by David Bohm.

  17. A time-dependent quantum mechanical approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) is solved numerically to calculate the ground- and first three excited-state energies, expectation values x2 j , j 1,2,...,6, and probability densities of quantum mechanical multiple-well oscillators. An imaginary-time evolution technique, coupled with the minimization of ...

  18. Higher dimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics and Dirac ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We exhibit the supersymmetric quantum mechanical structure of the full 3+1 dimensional Dirac equation considering `mass' as a function of coordinates. Its usefulness in solving potential problems is discussed with specific examples. We also discuss the `physical' significance of the supersymmetric states in this formalism.

  19. Quantum mechanics for two-timers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Extensions of standard quantum mechanics with joint probability distributions for po- sition coordinates and momenta have been proposed in the literature. Time is assumed to be one- dimensional in these studies. In view of recent interest in two-dimensional time, the construction is extended to this situation and ...

  20. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics living on topologically non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supersymmetric quantum mechanics is constructed in a new non-Hermitian representation. Firstly, the map between the partner operators (±) is chosen antilinear. Secondly, both these components of a super-Hamiltonian H are defined along certain topologically non-trivial complex curves r(±)() which spread over ...

  1. The EPR Paradox: Einstein Scrutinises Quantum Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 4. The EPR Paradox: Einstein Scrutinises Quantum Mechanics. Arvind. General Article Volume 5 Issue 4 April 2000 pp 28-36. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/04/0028-0036 ...

  2. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Quantum Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 7. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Quantum Mechanics. Information and Announcements Volume 21 Issue 7 July 2016 pp 669-670. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Quantum Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Science Academies' Refresher Course in Quantum Mechanics. 2–14 December 2013 at J S S Institutions Campus, Suttur, Mysore District. Sponsored by Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi and The National Academy of Sciences, India, Allahabad in collaboration with ...

  4. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Quantum Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 2. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Quantum Mechanics. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 2 February 2017 pp 185-185. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Quantum Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 9. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Quantum Mechanics. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 9 September 2017 pp 899-899. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. The flavor and CP problems in SUSY

    CERN Document Server

    Masiero, A

    2004-01-01

    Although direct searches of supersymmetry (SUSY) constitute the only way we have to clearly verify the existence of a low-energy SUSY extension of the standard model, yet, in particular in our pre-LHC era, it is of utmost importance to study any possible signal where SUSY manifests itself indirectly in discrepancies with the SM expectations in rare processes. In this talk we'll consider a wide range of flavor changing neutral current and/or CP violating phenomena where, indeed, SUSY contributions are comparable to the SM ones. Such analysis provides stringent constraints on different SUSY model parameter spaces and, at the same time, it individuates possible windows for SUSY signals in spite of all the existing constraints. Our attention will focus in particular on the CP violating processes which are the most sensitive place for SUSY effects in the vast class of rare phenomena of the SM.

  7. Supersymmetry in the Fractional Quantum Hall Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Sagi, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is a symmetry transforming bosons to fermions and vice versa. Indications of its existence have been extensively sought after in high-energy experiments. However, signatures of SUSY have yet to be detected. In this manuscript we propose a condensed matter realization of SUSY on the edge of a Read-Rezayi quantum Hall state, given by filling factors of the form $\

  8. On Quantum Mechanics on Noncommutative Quantum Phase Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemaï, A. E. F.; Smail, H.

    2004-06-01

    In this work, we develop a general framework in which Noncommutative Quantum Mechanics (NCQM), characterized by a space noncommutativity matrix parameter θ=ɛ^kijθ_k and a momentum noncommutativity matrix parameter βij=ɛ^kijβ_k, is shown to be equivalent to Quantum Mechanics (QM) on a suitable transformed Quantum Phase Space (QPS). Imposing some constraints on this particular transformation, we firstly find that the product of the two parameters θ and β possesses a lower bound in direct relation with Heisenberg incertitude relations, and secondly that the two parameters are equivalent but with opposite sign, up to a dimension factor depending on the physical system under study. This means that noncommutativity is represented by a unique parameter which may play the role of a fundamental constant characterizing the whole NCQPS. Within our framework, we treat some physical systems on NCQPS : free particle, harmonic oscillator, system of two-charged particles, Hydrogen atom. Among the obtained results, we discover a new phenomenon which consists of a free particle on NCQPS viewed as equivalent to a harmonic oscillator with Larmor frequency depending on β, representing the same particle in presence of a magnetic field B=q-1β. For the other examples, additional correction terms depending on β appear in the expression of the energy spectrum. Finally, in the two-particle system case, we emphasize the fact that for two opposite charges noncommutativity is effectively feeled with opposite sign.

  9. Hitting sbottom in natural SUSY

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyun Min; Trott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We compare the experimental prospects of direct stop and sbottom pair production searches at the LHC. Such searches for stops are of great interest as they directly probe for states that are motivated by the SUSY solution to the hierarchy problem of the Higgs mass parameter - leading to a "Natural" SUSY spectrum. Noting that sbottom searches are less experimentally challenging and scale up in reach directly with the improvement on b-tagging algorithms, we discuss the interplay of small TeV scale custodial symmetry violation with sbottom direct pair production searches as a path to obtaining strong sub-TeV constraints on stops in a natural SUSY scenario. We argue that if a weak scale natural SUSY spectrum does not exist within the reach of LHC, then hopes for such a spectrum for large regions of parameter space should sbottom out. Conversely, the same arguments make clear that a discovery of such a spectrum is likely to proceed in a sbottom up manner.

  10. Quantum mechanical coherence, resonance, and mind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1995-03-26

    Norbert Wiener and J.B.S. Haldane suggested during the early thirties that the profound changes in our conception of matter entailed by quantum theory opens the way for our thoughts, and other experiential or mind-like qualities, to play a role in nature that is causally interactive and effective, rather than purely epiphenomenal, as required by classical mechanics. The mathematical basis of this suggestion is described here, and it is then shown how, by giving mind this efficacious role in natural process, the classical character of our perceptions of the quantum universe can be seen to be a consequence of evolutionary pressures for the survival of the species.

  11. Quantum mechanics of 4-derivative theories

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A renormalizable theory of gravity is obtained if the dimension-less 4-derivative kinetic term of the graviton, which classically suffers from negative unbounded energy, admits a sensible quantisation. We find that a 4-derivative degree of freedom involves a canonical coordinate with unusual time-inversion parity, and that a correspondingly unusual representation must be employed for the relative quantum operator. The resulting theory has positive energy eigenvalues, normalisable wave functions, unitary evolution in a negative-norm configuration space. We present a formalism for quantum mechanics with a generic norm.

  12. Quantum mechanics of 4-derivative theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvio, Alberto [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid and Instituto de Fisica Teorica IFT-UAM/CSIC, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Strumia, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN, Pisa (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    A renormalizable theory of gravity is obtained if the dimension-less 4-derivative kinetic term of the graviton, which classically suffers from negative unbounded energy, admits a sensible quantization. We find that a 4-derivative degree of freedom involves a canonical coordinate with unusual time-inversion parity, and that a correspondingly unusual representation must be employed for the relative quantum operator. The resulting theory has positive energy eigenvalues, normalizable wavefunctions, unitary evolution in a negative-norm configuration space. We present a formalism for quantum mechanics with a generic norm. (orig.)

  13. Bohmian mechanics and quantum theory an appraisal

    CERN Document Server

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Cushing, James T

    1996-01-01

    We are often told that quantum phenomena demand radical revisions of our scientific world view and that no physical theory describing well defined objects, such as particles described by their positions, evolving in a well defined way, let alone deterministically, can account for such phenomena. The great majority of physicists continue to subscribe to this view, despite the fact that just such a deterministic theory, accounting for all of the phe­ nomena of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, was proposed by David Bohm more than four decades ago and has arguably been around almost since the inception of quantum mechanics itself. Our purpose in asking colleagues to write the essays for this volume has not been to produce a Festschrift in honor of David Bohm (worthy an undertaking as that would have been) or to gather together a collection of papers simply stating uncritically Bohm's views on quantum mechanics. The central theme around which the essays in this volume are arranged is David Bohm's vers...

  14. The emergent Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollowood, Timothy J.

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a new and conceptually simple interpretation of quantum mechanics based on reduced density matrices of sub-systems from which the standard Copenhagen interpretation emerges as an effective description of macroscopically large systems. This interpretation describes a world in which definite measurement results are obtained with probabilities that reproduce the Born rule. Wave function collapse is seen to be a useful but fundamentally unnecessary piece of prudent book keeping which is only valid for macro-systems. The new interpretation lies in a class of modal interpretations in that it applies to quantum systems that interact with a much larger environment. However, we show that it does not suffer from the problems that have plagued similar modal interpretations like macroscopic superpositions and rapid flipping between macroscopically distinct states. We describe how the interpretation fits neatly together with fully quantum formulations of statistical mechanics and that a measurement process can be viewed as a process of ergodicity breaking analogous to a phase transition. The key feature of the new interpretation is that joint probabilities for the ergodic subsets of states of disjoint macro-systems only arise as emergent quantities. Finally we give an account of the EPR-Bohm thought experiment and show that the interpretation implies the violation of the Bell inequality characteristic of quantum mechanics but in a way that is rather novel. The final conclusion is that the Copenhagen interpretation gives a completely satisfactory phenomenology of macro-systems interacting with micro-systems.

  15. A mathematical theory for deterministic quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    2007-05-01

    Classical, i.e. deterministic theories underlying quantum mechanics are considered, and it is shown how an apparent quantum mechanical Hamiltonian can be defined in such theories, being the operator that generates evolution in time. It includes various types of interactions. An explanation must be found for the fact that, in the real world, this Hamiltonian is bounded from below. The mechanism that can produce exactly such a constraint is identified in this paper. It is the fact that not all classical data are registered in the quantum description. Large sets of values of these data are assumed to be indistinguishable, forming equivalence classes. It is argued that this should be attributed to information loss, such as what one might suspect to happen during the formation and annihilation of virtual black holes. The nature of the equivalence classes follows from the positivity of the Hamiltonian. Our world is assumed to consist of a very large number of subsystems that may be regarded as approximately independent, or weakly interacting with one another. As long as two (or more) sectors of our world are treated as being independent, they all must be demanded to be restricted to positive energy states only. What follows from these considerations is a unique definition of energy in the quantum system in terms of the periodicity of the limit cycles of the deterministic model.

  16. Geophysical field disturbances and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    Quantum processes impact into physics of geophysical field disturbances is discussed here in examples of phenomena such as an earthquake with processes preceding and accompanying it, volcanoes eruptions and diamond exploding pipes. Physics of shock waves generation in ionosphere and atmosphere, mechanism of atmosphere phenomena in supercooled clouds recorded by a stormglass is considered. The report treats of physics of ball and dark lightning, of generating in atmosphere the high-energy particles involved in sprites occurrence, and so on. Geophysical phenomena considered here have no clear and consistent interpretation in the context of classical physics. We attempt to involve the recent achievements of quantum physics namely the quantum entanglement between elementary particles implicated in considered phenomena.

  17. ``the Human BRAIN & Fractal quantum mechanics''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    In mtDNA ever retrieved from Iman Tuassoly, et.al:Multifractal analysis of chaos game representation images of mtDNA''.Enhances the price & valuetales of HE. Prof. Dr-Ing. B.J. HABIBIE's N-219, in J. Bacteriology, Nov 1973 sought:'' 219 exist as separate plasmidDNA species in E.coli & Salmonella panama'' related to ``the brain 2 distinct molecular forms of the (Na,K)-ATPase..'' & ``neuron maintains different concentration of ions(charged atoms'' thorough Rabi & Heisenber Hamiltonian. Further, after ``fractal space time are geometric analogue of relativistic quantum mechanics''[Ord], sought L.Marek Crnjac: ``Chaotic fractals at the root of relativistic quantum physics''& from famous Nottale: ``Scale relativity & fractal space-time:''Application to Quantum Physics , Cosmology & Chaotic systems'',1995. Acknowledgements to HE. Mr. H. TUK SETYOHADI, Jl. Sriwijaya Raya 3, South-Jakarta, INDONESIA.

  18. Virtual learning environment for interactive engagement with advanced quantum mechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mads Kock Pedersen; Birk Skyum; Robert Heck; Romain Müller; Mark Bason; Andreas Lieberoth; Jacob F. Sherson

    2016-01-01

    ... to illustrate the basic concepts of quantum mechanics. The first test of this new virtual learning environment was a 2014 course in advanced quantum mechanics at Aarhus University with 47 enrolled students...

  19. Theoretical physics 6 quantum mechanics : basics

    CERN Document Server

    Nolting, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    This textbook offers a clear and comprehensive introduction to the basics of quantum mechanics, one of the core components of undergraduate physics courses. It follows on naturally from the previous volumes in this series, thus developing the physical understanding further on to quantized states. The first part of the book introduces wave equations while exploring the Schrödinger equation and the hydrogen atom. More complex themes are covered in the second part of the book, which describes the Dirac formulism of quantum mechanics. Ideally suited to undergraduate students with some grounding in classical mechanics and electrodynamics, the book is enhanced throughout with learning features such as boxed inserts and chapter summaries, with key mathematical derivations highlighted to aid understanding. The text is supported by numerous worked examples and end of chapter problem sets. About the Theoretical Physics series Translated from the renowned and highly successful German editions, the eight volumes of this...

  20. The Picture Book of Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Siegmund

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this book is to explain the basic concepts and phenomena of quantum mechanics by means of visualization. Computer-generated illustrations in color are used extensively throughout the text, helping to establish the relation between quantum mechanics—wave functions, interference, atomic structure, and so forth—and classical physics—point mechanics, statistical mechanics, and wave optics. Even more important, by studying the pictures in parallel with the text, readers develop an intuition for such notoriously abstract phenomena as • the tunnel effect • excitation and decay of metastable states • wave-packet motion within a well • systems of distinguishable and indistinguishable particles • free wave packets and scattering in 3 dimensions • angular-momentum decomposition • stationary bound states in various 3-dimensional potentials • hybrid states • Kepler motion of wave packets in the Coulomb field • spin and magnetic resonance Illustrations from experiments in a variety of f...

  1. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics for two-dimensional disk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supersymmetric quantum mechanics; SWKB, disk billiard; flux lines. PACS Nos 12.60.Jv; 03.65.Ge. 1. Introduction. During the last three decades, the algebra of supersymmetry has been profitably applied to many non-relativistic quantum mechanical problems [1–8]. In supersym- metric quantum mechanics (SUSYQM), one ...

  2. Schrodinger Equation and Phase Space in Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kiyoung

    1997-01-01

    Using classical statistics, Schrodinger equation in quantum mechanics is derived from complex space model. Phase-space probability amplitude, that can be defined on classical point of view, has connections to probability amplitude in internal space and to wave function in quantum mechanics. In addition, the physical entity of wave function in quantum mechanics is confirmed once again.

  3. Introduction to quantum mechanics a time-dependent perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Tannor, David J

    2007-01-01

    "Introduction to Quantum Mechanics" covers quantum mechanics from a time-dependent perspective in a unified way from beginning to end. Intended for upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses this text will change the way people think about and teach quantum mechanics in chemistry and physics departments.

  4. Fast method for quantum mechanical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Cawkwell, Marc J.

    2012-11-01

    As the processing power available for scientific computing grows, first-principles Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations are becoming increasingly popular for the study of a wide range of problems in materials science, chemistry, and biology. Nevertheless, the computational cost of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics still remains prohibitively large for many potential applications. Here we show how to avoid a major computational bottleneck: the self-consistent-field optimization prior to force calculations. The optimization-free quantum mechanical molecular dynamics method gives trajectories that are almost indistinguishable from an “exact” microcanonical Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulation even when low-prefactor linear scaling sparse matrix algebra is used. Our findings show that the computational gap between classical and quantum mechanical molecular dynamics simulations can be significantly reduced.

  5. Quantum mechanical theory behind "dark energy"?

    CERN Multimedia

    Colin Johnson, R

    2007-01-01

    "The mysterious increase in the acceleration of the universe, when intuition says it should be slowing down, is postulated to be caused by dark energy - "dark" because it is undetected. Now a group of scientists in the international collaboration Essence has suggested that a quantum mechanical interpretation of Einstein's proposed "cosmological constant" is the simplest explanation for dark energy. The group measured dark energy to within 10 percent." (1,5 page)

  6. Quantum mechanical evolution towards thermal equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Linden, Noah; Popescu, Sandu; Short, Anthony J.; Winter, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The circumstances under which a system reaches thermal equilibrium, and how to derive this from basic dynamical laws, has been a major question from the very beginning of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Despite considerable progress, it remains an open problem. Motivated by this issue, we address the more general question of equilibration. We prove, with virtually full generality, that reaching equilibrium is a universal property of quantum systems: Almost any subsystem in interacti...

  7. The geometric semantics of algebraic quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Morales, John Alexander; Zilber, Boris

    2015-08-06

    In this paper, we will present an ongoing project that aims to use model theory as a suitable mathematical setting for studying the formalism of quantum mechanics. We argue that this approach provides a geometric semantics for such a formalism by means of establishing a (non-commutative) duality between certain algebraic and geometric objects. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Mathematical model I. Electron and quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Nitin Ramchandra Gadre

    2011-01-01

    The basic particle electron obeys various theories like electrodynamics, quantum mechanics and special relativity. Particle under different experimental conditions behaves differently, allowing us to observe different characteristics which become basis for these theories. In this paper, we have made an attempt to suggest a classical picture by studying the requirements of these three modern theories. The basic presumption is: There must be certain structural characteristics in a particle like...

  9. Mona Lisa - ineffable smile of quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Prvanovic, Slobodan

    2003-01-01

    The portrait of Mona Lisa is scrutinized with reference to quantum mechanics. The elements of different expressions are firstly recognized on her face. The contradictory details are then classified in two pictures that, undoubtedly representing distinct moods, confirm dichotomous character of the original. Consecutive discussion has lead to conclusion that the mysterious state Mona Lisa is in actually is coherent mixture - superposition, of cheerfulness and sadness.

  10. Hunting for Snarks in Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestenes, David

    2009-12-01

    A long-standing debate over the interpretation of quantum mechanics has centered on the meaning of Schroedinger's wave function Ψ for an electron. Broadly speaking, there are two major opposing schools. On the one side, the Copenhagen school (led by Bohr, Heisenberg and Pauli) holds that Ψ provides a complete description of a single electron state; hence the probability interpretation of ΨΨ* expresses an irreducible uncertainty in electron behavior that is intrinsic in nature. On the other side, the realist school (led by Einstein, de Broglie, Bohm and Jaynes) holds that Ψ represents a statistical ensemble of possible electron states; hence it is an incomplete description of a single electron state. I contend that the debaters have overlooked crucial facts about the electron revealed by Dirac theory. In particular, analysis of electron zitterbewegung (first noticed by Schroedinger) opens a window to particle substructure in quantum mechanics that explains the physical significance of the complex phase factor in Ψ. This led to a testable model for particle substructure with surprising support by recent experimental evidence. If the explanation is upheld by further research, it will resolve the debate in favor of the realist school. I give details. The perils of research on the foundations of quantum mechanics have been foreseen by Lewis Carroll in The Hunting of the Snark!

  11. Status of SUSY searches at the LHC (including SUSY Higgs bosons)

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Zach; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We review the status of SUSY searches at the LHC, including searches for SUSY Higgs Bosons. ATLAS and CMS have both prepared a large number of search results on the full 2015+2016 dataset, pushing the bounds on SUSY further than ever before.

  12. A quantum-mechanical relaxation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomski, R.; Kashyap, A.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    The atomic origin of micromagnetic damping is investigated by developing and solving a quantum-mechanical relaxation model. A projection-operator technique is used to derive an analytical expression for the relaxation time as a function of the heat-bath and interaction parameters. The present findings are consistent with earlier research beyond the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation and show that the underlying relaxation mechanism is very general. Zermelo's recurrence paradox means that there is no true irreversibility in non-interacting nanoparticles, but the corresponding recurrence times are very long and can be ignored in many cases.

  13. Undergraduate quantum mechanics: lost opportunities for engaging motivated students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anders

    2018-03-01

    Quantum mechanics is widely recognised as an important and difficult subject, and many studies have been published focusing on students’ conceptual difficulties. However, the sociocultural aspects of studying such an emblematic subject have not been researched to any large extent. This study explores students’ experiences of undergraduate quantum mechanics using qualitative analysis of semi-structured interview data. The results inform discussions about the teaching of quantum mechanics by adding a sociocultural dimension. Students pictured quantum mechanics as an intriguing subject that inspired them to study physics. The study environment they encountered when taking their first quantum mechanics course was however not always as inspiring as expected. Quantum mechanics instruction has commonly focused on the mathematical framework of quantum mechanics, and this kind of teaching was also what the interviewees had experienced. Two ways of handling the encounter with a traditional quantum mechanics course were identified in the interviews; either students accept the practice of studying quantum mechanics in a mathematical, exercise-centred way or they distance themselves from these practices and the subject. The students who responded by distancing themselves experienced a crisis and disappointment, where their experiences did not match the way they imagined themselves engaging with quantum mechanics. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to efforts to reform the teaching of undergraduate quantum mechanics.

  14. Using Experimental Data To Test And Improve Susy Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T

    2004-01-01

    There are several pieces of evidence that our world is described by a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. In this thesis, I assume this is the case and study how to use experimental data to test and improve supersymmetric standard models. Several experimental signatures and their implications are covered in this thesis: the result of the branching ratio of b → sγ is used to put constraints on SUSY models; the measured time-dependent CP asymmetry in the B → &phis;KS process is used to test unification scale models; the excess of positrons from cosmic rays helps us to test the property of the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle and the Cold Dark Matter production mechanisms; the LEP higgs search results are used to classify SUSY models; SUSY signatures at the Tevatron are used to distinguish different unification scale models; by considering the μ problem, SUSY theories are improved. Due to the large unknown parameter space, all of the above inputs should be used ...

  15. Nonlinear quantum mechanics, the superposition principle, and the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 76; Issue 1. Nonlinear quantum mechanics, the superposition principle, and the quantum measurement problem. Kinjalk Lochan ... There are four reasons why our present knowledge and understanding of quantum mechanics can be regarded as incomplete. (1) The ...

  16. Is Quantum Mechanics a Complete Theory?: A Philosophical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1935, Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen published their thought experiment I a paper entitled, “Can QuantumMechanical Description of Physical Reality be considered complete?”. At that time, Bohr, Heisenberg, and the proponents of the Copenhagen interpretation of Quantum mechanics, were saying that Quantum ...

  17. The EPR Paradox: Einstein Scrutinises Quantum Mechanics -28 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    he detailed the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. He argued that the EPR paradox does not prove the incompleteness of quantum theory and that the statement "in no way disturbing the system" has to be interpreted differently in quantum mechanics. A measurement on particle P1 changes the very circum-.

  18. The Mathematical Basis for Deterministic Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hooft, G.

    2007-09-01

    If there exists a classical, i.e. deterministic theory underlying quantum mechanics, an explanation must be found of the fact that the Hamiltonian, which is defined to be the operator that generates evolution in time, is bounded from below. The mechanism that can produce exactly such a constraint is identified in this paper. It is the fact that not all classical data are registered in the quantum description. Large sets of values of these data are assumed to be indistinguishable, forming equivalence classes. It is argued that this should be attributed to information loss, such as what one might suspect to happen during the formation and annihilation of virtual black holes. The nature of the equivalence classes is further elucidated, as it follows from the positivity of the Hamiltonian. Our world is assumed to consist of a very large number of subsystems that may be regarded as approximately independent, or weakly interacting with one another. As long as two (or more) sectors of our world are treated as being independent, they all must be demanded to be restricted to positive energy states only. What follows from these considerations is a unique definition of energy in the quantum system in terms of the periodicity of the limit cycles of the deterministic model.

  19. Quantum mechanics with coordinate dependent noncommutativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupriyanov, V. G. [CMCC, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    Noncommutative quantum mechanics can be considered as a first step in the construction of quantum field theory on noncommutative spaces of generic form, when the commutator between coordinates is a function of these coordinates. In this paper we discuss the mathematical framework of such a theory. The noncommutativity is treated as an external antisymmetric field satisfying the Jacobi identity. First, we propose a symplectic realization of a given Poisson manifold and construct the Darboux coordinates on the obtained symplectic manifold. Then we define the star product on a Poisson manifold and obtain the expression for the trace functional. The above ingredients are used to formulate a nonrelativistic quantum mechanics on noncommutative spaces of general form. All considered constructions are obtained as a formal series in the parameter of noncommutativity. In particular, the complete algebra of commutation relations between coordinates and conjugated momenta is a deformation of the standard Heisenberg algebra. As examples we consider a free particle and an isotropic harmonic oscillator on the rotational invariant noncommutative space.

  20. Multidimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics: a scalar Hamiltonian approach to excited states by the imaginary time propagation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Kouri, Donald J

    2013-04-25

    Supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY-QM) is shown to provide a novel approach to the construction of the initial states for the imaginary time propagation method to determine the first and second excited state energies and wave functions for a two-dimensional system. In addition, we show that all calculations are carried out in sector one and none are performed with the tensor sector two Hamiltonian. Through our tensorial approach to multidimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics, we utilize the correspondence between the eigenstates of the sector one and two Hamiltonians to construct appropriate initial sector one states from sector two states for the imaginary time propagation method. The imaginary time version of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is integrated to obtain the first and second excited state energies and wave functions using the split operator method for a two-dimensional anharmonic oscillator system and a two-dimensional double well potential. The computational results indicate that we can obtain the first two excited state energies and wave functions even when a quantum system does not exhibit any symmetry. Moreover, instead of dealing with the increasing computational complexity resulting from computations in the tensor sector two Hamiltonian, this study presents a new supersymmetric approach to calculations of accurate excited state energies and wave functions by directly using the scalar sector one Hamiltonian.

  1. Problems in quantum mechanics with solutions

    CERN Document Server

    d'Emilio, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    This second edition of an extremely well-received book presents more than 250 nonrelativistic quantum mechanics problems of varying difficulty with the aim of providing students didactic material of proven value, allowing them to test their comprehension and mastery of each subject. The coverage is extremely broad, from themes related to the crisis of classical physics through achievements within the framework of modern atomic physics to lively debated, intriguing aspects relating to, for example, the EPR paradox, the Aharonov-Bohm effect, and quantum teleportation. Compared with the first edition, a variety of improvements have been made and additional topics of interest included, especially focusing on elementary potential scattering. The problems themselves range from standard and straightforward ones to those that are complex but can be considered essential because they address questions of outstanding importance or aspects typically overlooked in primers. The book offers students both an excellent tool f...

  2. Group Theoretical Approach for Controlled Quantum Mechanical Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research is the study of controllability of quantum mechanical systems and feedback control of de-coherence in order to gain an insight on the structure of control of quantum systems...

  3. A Rosetta Stone for Quantum Mechanics with an Introduction to Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Lomonaco, Samuel J.; jr

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of these lecture notes is to provide readers, who have some mathematical background but little or no exposure to quantum mechanics and quantum computation, with enough material to begin reading the research literature in quantum computation and quantum information theory. This paper is a written version of the first of eight one hour lectures given in the American Mathematical Society (AMS) Short Course on Quantum Computation held in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the AMS ...

  4. Reality in quantum mechanics, Extended Everett Concept, and consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Mensky, Michael B.

    2006-01-01

    Conceptual problems in quantum mechanics result from the specific quantum concept of reality and require, for their solution, including the observer's consciousness into quantum theory of measurements. Most naturally this is achieved in the framework of Everett's "many-worlds interpretation" of quantum mechanics. According to this interpretation, various classical alternatives are perceived by consciousness separately from each other. In the Extended Everett Concept (EEC) proposed by the pres...

  5. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Modeling of Drug Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonsdale, Richard; Fort, Rachel M; Rydberg, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    )-mexiletine in CYP1A2 with hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, providing a more detailed and realistic model. Multiple reaction barriers have been calculated at the QM(B3LYP-D)/MM(CHARMM27) level for the direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound mechanisms. Our calculated barriers......The mechanism of cytochrome P450(CYP)-catalyzed hydroxylation of primary amines is currently unclear and is relevant to drug metabolism; previous small model calculations have suggested two possible mechanisms: direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound. We have modeled the N-hydroxylation of (R...... indicate that the direct N-oxidation mechanism is preferred and proceeds via the doublet spin state of Compound I. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of an ordered water molecule in the active site assists in the binding of mexiletine in the active site...

  6. The metaphysics of quantum mechanics: Modal interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Stuart Murray

    2004-11-01

    This dissertation begins with the argument that a preferred way of doing metaphysics is through philosophy of physics. An understanding of quantum physics is vital to answering questions such as: What counts as an individual object in physical ontology? Is the universe fundamentally indeterministic? Are indiscernibles identical? This study explores how the various modal interpretations of quantum mechanics answer these sorts of questions; modal accounts are one of the two classes of interpretations along with so-called collapse accounts. This study suggests a new alternative within the class of modal views that yields a more plausible ontology, one in which the Principle of the Identity of Indisceribles is necessarily true. Next, it shows that modal interpretations can consistently deny that the universe must be fundamentally indeterministic so long as they accept certain other metaphysical commitments: either a perfect initial distribution of states in the universe or some form of primitive dispositional properties. Finally, the study sketches out a future research project for modal interpretations based on developing quantified quantum logic.

  7. Entanglement, Information, and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2009-01-01

    This book explores the nature of quantum entanglement and quantum information and their role in the quantum world. Their relations to a number of key experiments and thought experiments in the history of quantum physics are considered, as is a range of interpretations of quantum mechanics that have been put forward as a means of understanding the fundamental nature of microphysics - the traditionally accepted domain of quantum mechanics - and in some cases, the universe as a whole. In this way, the book reveals the deep significance of entanglement and quantum information for our understanding of the physical world. This book is a major accomplishment and invaluable contribution -- Arkady Plotnitsky An encyclopedic treatment of conceptual quantum mechanics as seen from a very up-to-date point of view --Tom Toffoli A mine of ideas for physicists, philosophers, and all intellectuals interested in this scientific revolution -- Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano

  8. Hidden geometric character of relativistic quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, José B.

    2007-01-01

    Geometry can be an unsuspected source of equations with physical relevance, as everybody is aware since Einstein formulated the general theory of relativity. However, efforts to extend a similar type of reasoning to other areas of physics, namely, electrodynamics, quantum mechanics, and particle physics, usually had very limited success; particularly in quantum mechanics the standard formalism is such that any possible relation to geometry is impossible to detect; other authors have previously trod the geometric path to quantum mechanics, some of that work being referred to in the text. In this presentation we will follow an alternate route to show that quantum mechanics has indeed a strong geometric character. The paper makes use of geometric algebra, also known as Clifford algebra, in five-dimensional space-time. The choice of this space is given the character of first principle, justified solely by the consequences that can be derived from such choice and their consistency with experimental results. Given a metric space of any dimension, one can define monogenic functions, the natural extension of analytic functions to higher dimensions; such functions have null vector derivative and have previously been shown by other authors to play a decisive role in lower dimensional spaces. All monogenic functions have null Laplacian by consequence; in a hyperbolic space this fact leads inevitably to a wave equation with planelike solutions. This is also true for five-dimensional space-time and we will explore those solutions, establishing a parallel with the solutions of the free particle Dirac equation. For this purpose we will invoke the isomorphism between the complex algebra of 4×4 matrices, also known as Dirac's matrices. There is one problem with this isomorphism, because the solutions to Dirac's equation are usually known as spinors (column matrices) that do not belong to the 4×4 matrix algebra and as such are excluded from the isomorphism. We will show that a

  9. Elements of non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Sobrino, Luis

    1996-01-01

    This book presents the basic structure of quantum mechanics, the elements needed to properly understand the subject and its applications. It is written at a level which is intermediate between the standard graduate textbooks, which it intends to supplement, and the more advanced mathematical writings in the subject. Particular attention is given to the concepts of kinematical and dynamical symmetries. The unifying thread that links the study of particles and systems of particles is the connection between Galilean invariance and the fundamental observables of a system. The mathematical appendic

  10. Classical and quantum Fisher information in the geometrical formulation of quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facchi, Paolo [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Bari, I-70125 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); MECENAS, Universita Federico II di Napoli and Universita di Bari (Italy); Kulkarni, Ravi [Vivekananda Yoga Research Foundation, Bangalore 560 080 (India); Man' ko, V.I., E-mail: manko@na.infn.i [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninskii Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Marmo, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , I-80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); MECENAS, Universita Federico II di Napoli and Universita di Bari (Italy); Sudarshan, E.C.G. [Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Ventriglia, Franco [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , I-80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); MECENAS, Universita Federico II di Napoli and Universita di Bari (Italy)

    2010-11-01

    The tomographic picture of quantum mechanics has brought the description of quantum states closer to that of classical probability and statistics. On the other hand, the geometrical formulation of quantum mechanics introduces a metric tensor and a symplectic tensor (Hermitian tensor) on the space of pure states. By putting these two aspects together, we show that the Fisher information metric, both classical and quantum, can be described by means of the Hermitian tensor on the manifold of pure states.

  11. Mart Susi tegevust uurib keskkriminaalpolitsei / Sigrid Laev

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laev, Sigrid

    2003-01-01

    Keskkriminaalpolitsei algatas Concordia ülikooliga seotu uurimiseks kaks kriminaalasja, millest üks käsitleb endise rektori Mart Susi ja endise prorektori Mari-Ann Susi võimalikku ametiseisundi kuritarvitamist, teise sisuks on Concordia varade ilmne varjamine

  12. SUSY with ATLAS Leptonic Signatures, Coannihilation Region

    CERN Document Server

    Comune, G

    2004-01-01

    In this work we present an initial study on how leptonic signatures can be used at ATLAS to constrain SUSY particle masses combinations for the first time in the so called "coannihilation region''. The analysis is carried out in the framework of mSUGRA constrained SUSY model using fast detector simulation and reconstruction exploiting an invariant mass endpoint technique.

  13. Reflections on Friction in Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Rezek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal and external quantum friction over and beyond the classical frictional contributions.

  14. Thermo-mechanical challenges for quantum devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, A.W.J.; McKenzie, F.V.

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years Technical University of Delft, under leadership of Prof.dr.ir. Leo Kouwenhoven, has developed several successful concepts for quantum devices that are suitable for quantum computing and quantum communication. From a quantum research point of view we are still in a very

  15. The wave function essays on the metaphysics of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, David Z

    2013-01-01

    This is a new volume of original essays on the metaphysics of quantum mechanics. The essays address questions such as: What fundamental metaphysics is best motivated by quantum mechanics? What is the ontological status of the wave function? Does quantum mechanics support the existence of any other fundamental entities, e.g. particles? What is the nature of the fundamental space (or space-time manifold) of quantum mechanics? What is the relationship between the fundamental ontology of quantum mechanics and ordinary, macroscopic objects like tables, chairs, and persons? This collection includes a comprehensive introduction with a history of quantum mechanics and the debate over its metaphysical interpretation focusing especially on the main realist alternatives.

  16. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-12

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from 'electrochemical' to 'mechanical', which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  17. Differentiability of correlations in realistic quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, Alejandro [Instituto de Matemática, UFRJ, CEP 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Faria, Edson de [Instituto de Matemática e Estatística, USP, Rua do Matão 1010, SP 05508-090 São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Pujals, Enrique [IMPA, Estrada Dona Castorina 110, 22460-320 Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tresser, Charles [IBM, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We prove a version of Bell’s theorem in which the locality assumption is weakened. We start by assuming theoretical quantum mechanics and weak forms of relativistic causality and of realism (essentially the fact that observable values are well defined independently of whether or not they are measured). Under these hypotheses, we show that only one of the correlation functions that can be formulated in the framework of the usual Bell theorem is unknown. We prove that this unknown function must be differentiable at certain angular configuration points that include the origin. We also prove that, if this correlation is assumed to be twice differentiable at the origin, then we arrive at a version of Bell’s theorem. On the one hand, we are showing that any realistic theory of quantum mechanics which incorporates the kinematic aspects of relativity must lead to this type of rough correlation function that is once but not twice differentiable. On the other hand, this study brings us a single degree of differentiability away from a relativistic von Neumann no hidden variables theorem.

  18. Mathematical model I. Electron and quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Ramchandra Gadre

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic particle electron obeys various theories like electrodynamics, quantum mechanics and special relativity. Particle under different experimental conditions behaves differently, allowing us to observe different characteristics which become basis for these theories. In this paper, we have made an attempt to suggest a classical picture by studying the requirements of these three modern theories. The basic presumption is: There must be certain structural characteristics in a particle like electron which make it obey postulates of modern theories. As it is ‘difficult’ to find structure of electron experimentally, we make a mathematical attempt. For a classical approach, we require well defined systems and we have studied a system with two charged particles, proton and electron in a hydrogen atom. An attempt has been made to give a model to describe electron as seen by the proton. We then discuss how the model can satisfy the requirements of the three modern theories in a classical manner. The paper discusses basic aspects of relativity and electrodynamics. However the focus of the paper is on quantum mechanics.

  19. Mathematical model I. Electron and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadre, Nitin Ramchandra

    2011-03-01

    The basic particle electron obeys various theories like electrodynamics, quantum mechanics and special relativity. Particle under different experimental conditions behaves differently, allowing us to observe different characteristics which become basis for these theories. In this paper, we have made an attempt to suggest a classical picture by studying the requirements of these three modern theories. The basic presumption is: There must be certain structural characteristics in a particle like electron which make it obey postulates of modern theories. As it is `difficult' to find structure of electron experimentally, we make a mathematical attempt. For a classical approach, we require well defined systems and we have studied a system with two charged particles, proton and electron in a hydrogen atom. An attempt has been made to give a model to describe electron as seen by the proton. We then discuss how the model can satisfy the requirements of the three modern theories in a classical manner. The paper discusses basic aspects of relativity and electrodynamics. However the focus of the paper is on quantum mechanics.

  20. Quantum Mechanical Study of Nanoscale MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    The steady state characteristics of MOSFETS that are of practical Interest are the drive current, off-current, dope of drain current versus drain voltage, and threshold voltage. In this section, we show that quantum mechanical simulations yield significantly different results from drift-diffusion based methods. These differences arise because of the following quantum mechanical features: (I) polysilicon gate depletion in a manner opposite to the classical case (II) dependence of the resonant levels in the channel on the gate voltage, (III) tunneling of charge across the gate oxide and from source to drain, (IV) quasi-ballistic flow of electrons. Conclusions dI/dV versus V does not increase in a manner commensurate with the increase in number of subbands. - The increase in dI/dV with bias is much smaller then the increase in the number of subbands - a consequence of bragg reflection. Our calculations show an increase in transmission with length of contact, as seen in experiments. It is desirable for molecular electronics applications to have a small contact area, yet large coupling. In this case, the circumferential dependence of the nanotube wave function dictates: - Transmission in armchair tubes saturates around unity - Transmission in zigzag tubes saturates at two.

  1. The formal path integral and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Freyd, Theo

    2010-12-01

    Given an arbitrary Lagrangian function on {R}^d and a choice of classical path, one can try to define Feynman's path integral supported near the classical path as a formal power series parameterized by "Feynman diagrams," although these diagrams may diverge. We compute this expansion and show that it is (formally, if there are ultraviolet divergences) invariant under volume-preserving changes of coordinates. We prove that if the ultraviolet divergences cancel at each order, then our formal path integral satisfies a "Fubini theorem" expressing the standard composition law for the time evolution operator in quantum mechanics. Moreover, we show that when the Lagrangian is inhomogeneous quadratic in velocity such that its homogeneous-quadratic part is given by a matrix with constant determinant, then the divergences cancel at each order. Thus, by "cutting and pasting" and choosing volume-compatible local coordinates, our construction defines a Feynman-diagrammatic "formal path integral" for the nonrelativistic quantum mechanics of a charged particle moving in a Riemannian manifold with an external electromagnetic field.

  2. Student Understanding of Time Dependence in Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emigh, Paul J.; Passante, Gina; Shaffer, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The time evolution of quantum states is arguably one of the more difficult ideas in quantum mechanics. In this article, we report on results from an investigation of student understanding of this topic after lecture instruction. We demonstrate specific problems that students have in applying time dependence to quantum systems and in recognizing…

  3. Quantum mechanics of a free particle beyond differential equations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With Feynman's path- integral method we can obtain the quantum mechanics of a quantum system like a free particle outside Schroedinger's method of differential equations and Heisenberg's method of algebra. The work involves obtaining the quantum propagator Kf, of the system which leads to summation over infinite ...

  4. Bhomian Mechanics vs. Standard Quantum Mechanics: a Difference in Experimental Predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Szczepanski, Artur

    2010-01-01

    Standard Quantum Mechanics (QM) predicts an anti-intuitive fenomenon here referred to as "quantum autoscattering", which is excluded by Bhomian Mechanics. The scheme of a gedanken experiment testing the QM prediction is briefly discussed.

  5. On the foundation of equilibrium quantum-statistical mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casati, G. (International Center for the Study of Dynamical Systems, Como (Italy) INFM-INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy))

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the condition for the validity of equilibrium quantum-statistical mechanics in the light of recent developments in the understanding of classical and quantum-chaotic motion. In particular, the ergodicity parameter introduced by Casati and Chirikov is shown to provide the conditions under which quantum-statistical distributions can be derived from the quantum dynamics of a classical ergodic Hamiltonian system.

  6. Surveying Instructors' Attitudes and Approaches to Teaching Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Siddiqui, Shabnam

    2016-01-01

    Understanding instructor attitudes and approaches to teaching quantum mechanics can be helpful in developing research-based learning tools. Here we discuss the findings from a survey in which 13 instructors reflected on issues related to quantum mechanics teaching. Topics included opinions about the goals of a quantum mechanics course, general challenges in teaching the subject, student preparation for the course, comparison between their own learning of quantum mechanics vs. how they teach it and the extent to which contemporary topics are incorporated into the syllabus.

  7. John S. Bell on the foundations of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, John S; Gottfried, Kurt; Veltman, Martinus J G

    2001-01-01

    This book is the most complete collection of John S Bell's research papers, review articles and lecture notes on the foundations of quantum mechanics. Some of this material has hitherto been difficult to access. The book also appears in a paperback edition, aimed at students and young researchers. This volume will be very useful to researchers in the foundations and applications of quantum mechanics. Contents: (1) On the Problem of Hidden Variables in Quantum Mechanics; (2) On the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox; (3) The Moral Aspect of Quantum Mechanics; (4) Introduction to the Hidden-Variabl

  8. {{{ N}}=2} SUSY gauge theories on S4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomichi, Kazuo

    2017-11-01

    We review exact results in {{ N}}=2 supersymmetric gauge theories defined on S 4 and its deformation. We first summarize the construction of rigid SUSY theories on curved backgrounds based on off-shell supergravity, then explain how to apply the localization principle to supersymmetric path integrals. Closed formulae for partition function as well as expectation values of non-local BPS observables are presented. This is a contribution to the review issue ‘Localization techniques in quantum field theories’ (ed V Pestun and M Zabzine) which contains 17 chapters available at [1].

  9. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from ‘electrochemical’ to ‘mechanical’, which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  10. Exact and Optimal Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiming; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-09-09

    Motivated by recent work in density matrix embedding theory, we define exact link orbitals that capture all quantum mechanical (QM) effects across arbitrary quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) boundaries. Exact link orbitals are rigorously defined from the full QM solution, and their number is equal to the number of orbitals in the primary QM region. Truncating the exact set yields a smaller set of link orbitals optimal with respect to reproducing the primary region density matrix. We use the optimal link orbitals to obtain insight into the limits of QM/MM boundary treatments. We further analyze the popular general hybrid orbital (GHO) QM/MM boundary across a test suite of molecules. We find that GHOs are often good proxies for the most important optimal link orbital, although there is little detailed correlation between the detailed GHO composition and optimal link orbital valence weights. The optimal theory shows that anions and cations cannot be described by a single link orbital. However, expanding to include the second most important optimal link orbital in the boundary recovers an accurate description. The second optimal link orbital takes the chemically intuitive form of a donor or acceptor orbital for charge redistribution, suggesting that optimal link orbitals can be used as interpretative tools for electron transfer. We further find that two optimal link orbitals are also sufficient for boundaries that cut across double bonds. Finally, we suggest how to construct "approximately" optimal link orbitals for practical QM/MM calculations.

  11. Are quantum-mechanical-like models possible, or necessary, outside quantum physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2014-12-01

    This article examines some experimental conditions that invite and possibly require recourse to quantum-mechanical-like mathematical models (QMLMs), models based on the key mathematical features of quantum mechanics, in scientific fields outside physics, such as biology, cognitive psychology, or economics. In particular, I consider whether the following two correlative features of quantum phenomena that were decisive for establishing the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics play similarly important roles in QMLMs elsewhere. The first is the individuality and discreteness of quantum phenomena, and the second is the irreducibly probabilistic nature of our predictions concerning them, coupled to the particular character of the probabilities involved, as different from the character of probabilities found in classical physics. I also argue that these features could be interpreted in terms of a particular form of epistemology that suspends and even precludes a causal and, in the first place, realist description of quantum objects and processes. This epistemology limits the descriptive capacity of quantum theory to the description, classical in nature, of the observed quantum phenomena manifested in measuring instruments. Quantum mechanics itself only provides descriptions, probabilistic in nature, concerning numerical data pertaining to such phenomena, without offering a physical description of quantum objects and processes. While QMLMs share their use of the quantum-mechanical or analogous mathematical formalism, they may differ by the roles, if any, the two features in question play in them and by different ways of interpreting the phenomena they considered and this formalism itself. This article will address those differences as well.

  12. Extending quantum mechanics entails extending special relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravinda, S.; Srikanth, R.

    2016-05-01

    The complementarity between signaling and randomness in any communicated resource that can simulate singlet statistics is generalized by relaxing the assumption of free will in the choice of measurement settings. We show how to construct an ontological extension for quantum mechanics (QMs) through the oblivious embedding of a sound simulation protocol in a Newtonian spacetime. Minkowski or other intermediate spacetimes are ruled out as the locus of the embedding by virtue of hidden influence inequalities. The complementarity transferred from a simulation to the extension unifies a number of results about quantum non-locality, and implies that special relativity has a different significance for the ontological model and for the operational theory it reproduces. Only the latter, being experimentally accessible, is required to be Lorentz covariant. There may be certain Lorentz non-covariant elements at the ontological level, but they will be inaccessible at the operational level in a valid extension. Certain arguments against the extendability of QM, due to Conway and Kochen (2009) and Colbeck and Renner (2012), are attributed to their assumption that the spacetime at the ontological level has Minkowski causal structure.

  13. Internal clock formulation of quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małkiewicz, Przemysław; Miroszewski, Artur

    2017-08-01

    The basic tenet of the present work is the assumption of the lack of external and fixed time in the Universe. This assumption is best embodied by general relativity, which replaces the fixed space-time structure with the gravitational field, which is subject to dynamics. The lack of time does not imply the lack of evolution but rather brings to the forefront the role of internal clocks which are some largely arbitrary internal degrees of freedom with respect to which the evolution of timeless systems can be described. We take this idea seriously and try to understand what it implies for quantum mechanics when the fixed external time is replaced by an arbitrary internal clock. We put the issue in a solid, mathematically rigorous framework. We find that the dynamical interpretation of a quantum state of a timeless system depends on the employed internal clock. In particular, we find that the continuous spectra of well-known dynamical observables like the position of a free particle on the real line may turn discrete if measured in unusual clocks. We discuss the meaning of our result for attempts at quantization of global gravitational degrees of freedom.

  14. Statistical origin of classical mechanics and quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, S. (Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States))

    1993-11-01

    The classical action for interacting strings, obtained by generalizing the time-symmetric electrodynamics of Wheeler and Feynman, is exactly additive. The additivity of the string action suggests a connection between the area of the string world sheets and entropy. We find that the action principle of classical mechanics is the condition that the total entropy of the strings be at an extremum, and the path-integral representation of the quantum density matrix element is an approximation to the partition function of the string theory.

  15. Geophysical field disturbances and quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical phenomena considered here have no clear and consistent interpretation in the context of classical physics. We attempt to involve the recent achievements of quantum physics namely the quantum entanglement between elementary particles implicated in considered phenomena.

  16. Lectures on quantum mechanics with problems, exercises and their solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    The new edition of this remarkable text offers the reader a conceptually strong introduction to quantum mechanics, but goes beyond this to present a fascinating tour of modern theoretical physics. Beautifully illustrated and engagingly written, it starts with a brief overview of diverse topics across physics including nanotechnology, statistical physics, materials science, astrophysics, and cosmology. The core of the book covers both established and emerging aspects of quantum mechanics. A concise introduction to traditional quantum mechanics covers the Schrödinger equation, Hilbert space, the algebra of observables, hydrogen atom, spin and Pauli principle. Modern features of the field are presented by exploring entangled states, Bell's inequality, quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation and quantum mechanics in the universe. This new edition has been enchanced through the addition of numerous problems with detailed solutions, an introduction to the mathematical tools needed and expanded discussion of th...

  17. On eigenvalue problems in quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Aparna; Talukdar, B [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Das, Umapada, E-mail: binoy123@bsnl.in [Department of Physics, Abhedananda College, Sainthia 731234 (India)

    2011-06-01

    To solve quantum mechanical eigenvalue problems using the algorithmic methods recently derived by Nikiforov and Uvarov (1988 Special Functions of Mathematical Physics (Basel: Birkhaeuser)) and Ciftci et al (2003 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 36 11807), one needs to first convert the associated wave equation into hypergeometric or closely related forms. We point out that once such forms are obtained, the eigenvalue problem can be satisfactorily solved by only imposing the condition that the regular infinite series solutions of the equations should become polynomials, and one need not take recourse to the use of the algorithmic methods. We first demonstrate the directness and simplicity of our approach by dealing with a few case studies and then present new results for the Woods-Saxon potential.

  18. Waveform information from quantum mechanical entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, Scott; Suski, William; Winn, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Although the entropy of a given signal-type waveform is technically zero, it is nonetheless desirable to use entropic measures to quantify the associated information. Several such prescriptions have been advanced in the literature but none are generally successful. Here, we report that the Fourier-conjugated 'total entropy' associated with quantum-mechanical probabilistic amplitude functions (PAFs) is a meaningful measure of information in non-probabilistic real waveforms, with either the waveform itself or its (normalized) analytic representation acting in the role of the PAF. Detailed numerical calculations are presented for both adaptations, showing the expected informatic behaviours in a variety of rudimentary scenarios. Particularly noteworthy are the sensitivity to the degree of randomness in a sequence of pulses and potential for detection of weak signals.

  19. Quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker-Szendy, R.; Keller, L.; Niemi, G.; Perl, M.; Rochester, L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Anthony, P. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bosted, P. [American Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Kelley, L.; Klein, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    The authors have studied quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung of low-energy 1-500 MeV photons from high-energy 25 GeV electrons. They have measured the LPM effect, where multiple scattering of the radiating electron destroys coherence required for the emission of low-energy photons, and the dielectric effect, where the emitted photon traveling in the radiator medium interferes with itself. For the experiment, the collaboration developed a novel method of extracting a parasitic low-intensity high-energy electron beam into the fixed target area during normal SLC operation of the accelerator. The results agree quantitatively with Migdal`s calculation of the LPM effect. Surface effects, for which there is no satisfactory theoretical prediction, are visible at low photon energies. For very thin targets, the suppression disappears, as expected. Preliminary results on dielectric suppression of bremsstrahlung are in qualitative agreement with the expectation.

  20. Quantum mechanical evolution towards thermal equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Noah; Popescu, Sandu; Short, Anthony J; Winter, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    The circumstances under which a system reaches thermal equilibrium, and how to derive this from basic dynamical laws, has been a major question from the very beginning of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Despite considerable progress, it remains an open problem. Motivated by this issue, we address the more general question of equilibration. We prove, with virtually full generality, that reaching equilibrium is a universal property of quantum systems: almost any subsystem in interaction with a large enough bath will reach an equilibrium state and remain close to it for almost all times. We also prove several general results about other aspects of thermalization besides equilibration, for example, that the equilibrium state does not depend on the detailed microstate of the bath.

  1. Current algebra, statistical mechanics and quantum models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela Mendes, R.

    2017-11-01

    Results obtained in the past for free boson systems at zero and nonzero temperatures are revisited to clarify the physical meaning of current algebra reducible functionals which are associated to systems with density fluctuations, leading to observable effects on phase transitions. To use current algebra as a tool for the formulation of quantum statistical mechanics amounts to the construction of unitary representations of diffeomorphism groups. Two mathematical equivalent procedures exist for this purpose. One searches for quasi-invariant measures on configuration spaces, the other for a cyclic vector in Hilbert space. Here, one argues that the second approach is closer to the physical intuition when modelling complex systems. An example of application of the current algebra methodology to the pairing phenomenon in two-dimensional fermion systems is discussed.

  2. Coulomb branch localization in quiver quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Kazutoshi; Sasai, Yuya [Institute of Physics, Meiji Gakuin University,1518 Kamikurata-cho, Yokohama, 244-8539 (Japan)

    2016-02-16

    We show how to exactly calculate the refined indices of N=4U(1)×U(N) supersymmetric quiver quantum mechanics in the Coulomb branch by using the localization technique. The Coulomb branch localization is discussed from the viewpoint of both non-linear and gauged linear sigma models. A classification of fixed points in the Coulomb branch differs from one in the Higgs branch, but the derived indices completely agree with the results which were obtained by the localization in the Higgs branch. In the Coulomb branch localization, the refined indices can be written as a summation over different sets of the Coulomb branch fixed points. We also discuss a space-time picture of the fixed points in the Coulomb branch.

  3. Waveform information from quantum mechanical entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, Scott; Suski, William; Winn, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Although the entropy of a given signal-type waveform is technically zero, it is nonetheless desirable to use entropic measures to quantify the associated information. Several such prescriptions have been advanced in the literature but none are generally successful. Here, we report that the Fourier-conjugated `total entropy' associated with quantum-mechanical probabilistic amplitude functions (PAFs) is a meaningful measure of information in non-probabilistic real waveforms, with either the waveform itself or its (normalized) analytic representation acting in the role of the PAF. Detailed numerical calculations are presented for both adaptations, showing the expected informatic behaviours in a variety of rudimentary scenarios. Particularly noteworthy are the sensitivity to the degree of randomness in a sequence of pulses and potential for detection of weak signals.

  4. Quantum mechanics of a generalised rigid body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripaios, Ben; Sutherland, Dave

    2016-05-01

    We consider the quantum version of Arnold’s generalisation of a rigid body in classical mechanics. Thus, we quantise the motion on an arbitrary Lie group manifold of a particle whose classical trajectories correspond to the geodesics of any one-sided-invariant metric. We show how the derivation of the spectrum of energy eigenstates can be simplified by making use of automorphisms of the Lie algebra and (for groups of type I) by methods of harmonic analysis. We show how the method can be extended to cosets, generalising the linear rigid rotor. As examples, we consider all connected and simply connected Lie groups up to dimension 3. This includes the universal cover of the archetypical rigid body, along with a number of new exactly solvable models. We also discuss a possible application to the topical problem of quantising a perfect fluid.

  5. BBGKY hierarchy underlying many-particle quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaniadakis, G

    2003-04-28

    Recently, the one-particle quantum mechanics has been obtained in the framework of an entirely classical subquantum kinetics. In the present Letter we argue that, within the same scheme and without any additional assumption, it is possible to obtain also the n-particle non-relativistic quantum mechanics. The main goal of the present effort is to show that the classical BBGKY hierarchical equation, for the n-particle reduced distribution function, is the ancestor of the n-particle Schroedinger equation. On the other hand we show that within the scenario of the subquantum structure of quantum particle, the Fisher information measure emerges naturally in quantum mechanics.

  6. Special Relativity, Causality and Quantum Mechanics - 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss the aspects of non-locality and non- separability of states of composite quantum sys- tems. The probabilistic nature of quantum mech- anical predictions, and the impossibility of clon- ing, are shown to safeguard causality in the quan- tum world. An example of a game which can be won exploiting quantum ...

  7. New methods for quantum mechanical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Ward Hugh [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-12-01

    Quantum mechanical methods are developed to describe the dynamics of bimolecular chemical reactions. We focus on developing approaches for directly calculating the desired quantity of interest. Methods for the calculation of single matrix elements of the scattering matrix (S-matrix) and initial state-selected reaction probabilities are presented. This is accomplished by the use of absorbing boundary conditions (ABC) to obtain a localized (L2) representation of the outgoing wave scattering Green`s function. This approach enables the efficient calculation of only a single column of the S-matrix with a proportionate savings in effort over the calculation of the entire S-matrix. Applying this method to the calculation of the initial (or final) state-selected reaction probability, a more averaged quantity, requires even less effort than the state-to-state S-matrix elements. It is shown how the same representation of the Green`s function can be effectively applied to the calculation of negative ion photodetachment intensities. Photodetachment spectroscopy of the anion ABC- can be a very useful method for obtaining detailed information about the neutral ABC potential energy surface, particularly if the ABC- geometry is similar to the transition state of the neutral ABC. Total and arrangement-selected photodetachment spectra are calculated for the H3O- system, providing information about the potential energy surface for the OH + H2 reaction when compared with experimental results. Finally, we present methods for the direct calculation of the thermal rate constant from the flux-position and flux-flux correlation functions. The spirit of transition state theory is invoked by concentrating on the short time dynamics in the area around the transition state that determine reactivity. These methods are made efficient by evaluating the required quantum mechanical trace in the basis of eigenstates of the

  8. Mechanical properties of thermoelectric lanthanum telluride from quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guodong; Aydemir, Umut; Wood, Max; Goddard, William A., III; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2017-07-01

    Lanthanum telluride (La3Te4) is an n-type high-performance thermoelectric material in the high temperature range, but its mechanical properties remain unknown. Since we want robust mechanical properties for their integration into industrial applications, we report here quantum mechanics (QM) simulations to determine the ideal strength and deformation mechanisms of La3Te4 under pure shear deformations. Among all plausible shear deformation paths, we find that shearing along the (0 0 1)/text{1} 0 0> slip system has the lowest ideal shear strength of 0.99 GPa, making it the most likely slip system to be activated under pressure. We find that the long range La-Te ionic interactions play the predominant role in resisting shear deformation. To enhance the mechanical strength, we suggest improving the long ionic La-Te bond stiffness to strengthen the ionic La-Te framework in La3Te4 by a defect-engineering strategy, such as partial substitution of La by Ce or Pr having isotypic crystal structures. This work provides the fundamental information to understand the intrinsic mechanics of La3Te4.

  9. Faithful conversion of propagating quantum information to mechanical motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, A. P.; Mayer, K. H.; Teufel, J. D.; Burkhart, L. D.; Pfaff, W.; Reagor, M.; Sletten, L.; Ma, X.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Knill, E.; Lehnert, K. W.

    2017-12-01

    The motion of micrometre-sized mechanical resonators can now be controlled and measured at the fundamental limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These resonators have been prepared in their motional ground state or in squeezed states, measured with quantum-limited precision, and even entangled with microwave fields. Such advances make it possible to process quantum information using the motion of a macroscopic object. In particular, recent experiments have combined mechanical resonators with superconducting quantum circuits to frequency-convert, store and amplify propagating microwave fields. But these systems have not been used to manipulate states that encode quantum bits (qubits), which are required for quantum communication and modular quantum computation. Here we demonstrate the conversion of propagating qubits encoded as superpositions of zero and one photons to the motion of a micromechanical resonator with a fidelity in excess of the classical bound. This ability is necessary for mechanical resonators to convert quantum information between the microwave and optical domains or to act as storage elements in a modular quantum information processor. Additionally, these results are an important step towards testing speculative notions that quantum theory may not be valid for sufficiently massive systems.

  10. Categorization of Quantum Mechanics Problems by Professors and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by physics professors and undergraduate students from two honours-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty…

  11. Theory of “Weak Value" and Quantum Mechanical Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Shikano, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Comment: to be published from "Measurements in Quantum Mechanics", edited by M. R. Pahlavani (InTech, 2012) Chapter 4 page 75. Yutaka Shikano (2012). ISBN: 978-953-51-0058-4 Available from: http://www.intechopen.com/articles/show/title/theory-of-weak-value-and-quantum-mechanical-measurement

  12. Inner-shell physics after fifty years of quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzbacher, E.

    1976-01-01

    A historical view is given of how the development of quantum mechanics has been affected by the information relating to inner shells, gathered by physicists since the early days of atomic physics, and of the impact of quantum mechanics on the physics of inner atomic shells. 25 refs. (GHT)

  13. Interactive Simulations to Support Quantum Mechanics Instruction for Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnle, Antje; Benfield, Cory; Hahner, Georg; Paetkau, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The QuVis Quantum Mechanics Visualization Project provides freely available research-based interactive simulations with accompanying activities for the teaching and learning of quantum mechanics across a wide range of topics and levels. This article gives an overview of some of the simulations and describes their use in an introductory physical…

  14. Students' Epistemological Framing in Quantum Mechanics Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modir, Bahar; Thompson, John D.; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2017-01-01

    Students' difficulties in quantum mechanics may be the result of unproductive framing and not a fundamental inability to solve the problems or misconceptions about physics content. We observed groups of students solving quantum mechanics problems in an upper-division physics course. Using the lens of epistemological framing, we investigated four…

  15. Design and Validation of the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKagan, S. B.; Perkins, K. K.; Wieman, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    The Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey (QMCS) is a 12-question survey of students' conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics. It is intended to be used to measure the relative effectiveness of different instructional methods in modern physics courses. In this paper, we describe the design and validation of the survey, a process that included…

  16. Students' Conceptual Difficulties in Quantum Mechanics: Potential Well Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Ozgur; Didis, Nilufer; Tasar, Mehmet Fatih

    2009-01-01

    In this study, students' conceptual difficulties about some basic concepts in quantum mechanics like one-dimensional potential well problems and probability density of tunneling particles were identified. For this aim, a multiple choice instrument named Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Test has been developed by one of the researchers of this study…

  17. In Defense of a Heuristic Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2010-01-01

    Although the presentation of quantum mechanics found in traditional textbooks is intellectually well founded, it suffers from a number of deficiencies. Specifically introducing quantum mechanics as a solution to the arcane dilemma, the ultraviolet catastrophe, does little to impress a nonscientific audience of the tremendous paradigmatic shift…

  18. Developing and Evaluating Animations for Teaching Quantum Mechanics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnle, Antje; Douglass, Margaret; Edwards, Tom J.; Gillies, Alastair D.; Hooley, Christopher A.; Sinclair, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe animations and animated visualizations for introductory and intermediate-level quantum mechanics instruction developed at the University of St Andrews. The animations aim to help students build mental representations of quantum mechanics concepts. They focus on known areas of student difficulty and misconceptions by…

  19. An overview of the transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    We summarize the transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics (TI) and consider various points concerning the TI and its relation to the Copenhagen interpretation (CI). Questions concerning mapping the TI onto the CI, of advanced waves as solutions to proper wave equations, of collapse and the QM formalism, and of the relation of quantum mechanical interpretations to experimental tests and results are discussed. 12 refs.

  20. The black hole S-Matrix from quantum mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Betzios, Panagiotis; Gaddam, Nava; Papadoulaki, Olga

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the old black hole S-Matrix construction and its new partial wave expansion of 't Hooft. Inspired by old ideas from non-critical string theory \\& $c=1$ Matrix Quantum Mechanics, we reformulate the scattering in terms of a quantum mechanical model\\textemdash of waves scattering off

  1. Quantum mechanical effects analysis of nanostructured solar cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badea Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum mechanical effects resulted from the inclusion of nanostructures, represented by quantum wells and quantum dots, in the i-layer of an intermediate band solar cell will be analyzed. We will discuss the role of these specific nanostructures in the increasing of the solar cells efficiency. InAs quantum wells being placed in the i-layer of a gallium arsenide (GaAs p-i-n cell, we will analyze the quantum confined regions and determine the properties of the eigenstates located therein. Also, we simulate the electroluminescence that occurs due to the nanostructured regions.

  2. The Quantum Mechanics Solver How to Apply Quantum Theory to Modern Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    The Quantum Mechanics Solver grew from topics which are part of the final examination in quantum theory at the Ecole Polytechnique at Palaiseau near Paris, France. The aim of the text is to guide the student towards applying quantum mechanics to research problems in fields such as atomic and molecular physics, condensed matter physics, and laser physics. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students will find a rich and challenging source for improving their skills in this field.

  3. Quantum mechanics. Mechanically detecting and avoiding the quantum fluctuations of a microwave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, J; Weinstein, A J; Lei, C U; Wollman, E E; Steinke, S K; Meystre, P; Clerk, A A; Schwab, K C

    2014-06-13

    Quantum fluctuations of the light field used for continuous position detection produce stochastic back-action forces and ultimately limit the sensitivity. To overcome this limit, the back-action forces can be avoided by giving up complete knowledge of the motion, and these types of measurements are called "back-action evading" or "quantum nondemolition" detection. We present continuous two-tone back-action evading measurements with a superconducting electromechanical device, realizing three long-standing goals: detection of back-action forces due to the quantum noise of a microwave field, reduction of this quantum back-action noise by 8.5 ± 0.4 decibels (dB), and measurement imprecision of a single quadrature of motion 2.4 ± 0.7 dB below the mechanical zero-point fluctuations. Measurements of this type will find utility in ultrasensitive measurements of weak forces and nonclassical states of motion. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Quantum mechanics in an evolving Hilbert space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artacho, Emilio; O'Regan, David D.

    2017-03-01

    Many basis sets for electronic structure calculations evolve with varying external parameters, such as moving atoms in dynamic simulations, giving rise to extra derivative terms in the dynamical equations. Here we revisit these derivatives in the context of differential geometry, thereby obtaining a more transparent formalization, and a geometrical perspective for better understanding the resulting equations. The effect of the evolution of the basis set within the spanned Hilbert space separates explicitly from the effect of the turning of the space itself when moving in parameter space, as the tangent space turns when moving in a curved space. New insights are obtained using familiar concepts in that context such as the Riemann curvature. The differential geometry is not strictly that for curved spaces as in general relativity, a more adequate mathematical framework being provided by fiber bundles. The language used here, however, will be restricted to tensors and basic quantum mechanics. The local gauge implied by a smoothly varying basis set readily connects with Berry's formalism for geometric phases. Generalized expressions for the Berry connection and curvature are obtained for a parameter-dependent occupied Hilbert space spanned by nonorthogonal Wannier functions. The formalism is applicable to basis sets made of atomic-like orbitals and also more adaptative moving basis functions (such as in methods using Wannier functions as intermediate or support bases), but should also apply to other situations in which nonorthogonal functions or related projectors should arise. The formalism is applied to the time-dependent quantum evolution of electrons for moving atoms. The geometric insights provided here allow us to propose new finite-difference time integrators, and also better understand those already proposed.

  5. SUSY decays of Higgs particles

    CERN Document Server

    Djouadi, Abdelhak; Kalinowski, Jan; Zerwas, Peter M

    1996-01-01

    Among the possible decay modes of Higgs particles into supersymmetric states, neutralino and chargino decays play a prominent rôle. The experimental opportunities of observing such decay modes at LEP2 and at future $\\ee$ linear colliders are analyzed within the frame of the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. For heavy Higgs particles, the chargino/neutralino decay modes can be very important, while only a small window is open for the lightest CP--even Higgs particle. If charginos/neutralinos are found at LEP2, such decay modes can be searched for in a small area of the parameter space, and invisible decays may reduce the exclusion limits of the lightest CP-even Higgs particle slightly; if charginos/neutralinos are not found at LEP2 in direct searches, the Higgs search will not be affected by the SUSY particle sector.

  6. Statistical mechanics of quantum-classical systems with holonomic constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2006-01-14

    The statistical mechanics of quantum-classical systems with holonomic constraints is formulated rigorously by unifying the classical Dirac bracket and the quantum-classical bracket in matrix form. The resulting Dirac quantum-classical theory, which conserves the holonomic constraints exactly, is then used to formulate time evolution and statistical mechanics. The correct momentum-jump approximation for constrained systems arises naturally from this formalism. Finally, in analogy with what was found in the classical case, it is shown that the rigorous linear-response function of constrained quantum-classical systems contains nontrivial additional terms which are absent in the response of unconstrained systems.

  7. From Quantum Mechanics to Quantum Field Theory: The Hopf route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, A I [Physics and Astronomy Department, Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Duchamp, G H E [Institut Galilee, LIPN, CNRS UMR 7030 99 Av. J.-B. Clement, F-93430 Villetaneuse (France); Blasiak, P; Horzela, A [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Division of Theoretical Physics, ul. Eliasza-Radzikowskiego 152, PL 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Penson, K A, E-mail: a.i.solomon@open.ac.uk, E-mail: gduchamp2@free.fr, E-mail: pawel.blasiak@ifj.edu.pl, E-mail: andrzej.horzela@ifj.edu.pl, E-mail: penson@lptl.jussieu.fr [Lab.de Phys.Theor. de la Matiere Condensee, University of Paris VI (France)

    2011-03-01

    We show that the combinatorial numbers known as Bell numbers are generic in quantum physics. This is because they arise in the procedure known as Normal ordering of bosons, a procedure which is involved in the evaluation of quantum functions such as the canonical partition function of quantum statistical physics, inter alia. In fact, we shall show that an evaluation of the non-interacting partition function for a single boson system is identical to integrating the exponential generating function of the Bell numbers, which is a device for encapsulating a combinatorial sequence in a single function. We then introduce a remarkable equality, the Dobinski relation, and use it to indicate why renormalisation is necessary in even the simplest of perturbation expansions for a partition function. Finally we introduce a global algebraic description of this simple model, giving a Hopf algebra, which provides a starting point for extensions to more complex physical systems.

  8. Emergent Quantum Mechanics and the Origin of Quantum Non-local Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torromé, Ricardo Gallego

    2017-10-01

    A geometric interpretation for quantum correlations and entanglement according to a particular framework of emergent quantum mechanics is developed. The mechanism described is based on two ingredients: 1. At an hypothetical sub-quantum level description of physical systems, the dynamics has a regime where it is partially ergodic and 2. A formal projection from a two-dimensional time mathematical formalism of the emergent quantum theory to the usual one-dimensional time formalism of quantum dynamics. Observable consequences of the theory are obtained. Among them we show that quantum correlations must be instantaneous from the point of view of the spacetime description, but the spatial distance up to which they can be observed must be bounded. It is argued how our mechanism avoids Bell theorem and Kochen-Specken theorem. Evidence for non-signaling faster than the speed of light in our proposal is discussed.

  9. SUSY Searches in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lee JR, Lawrence; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles. Weak and strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures.

  10. Inclusive SUSY searches at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sekmen, Sezen

    2014-01-01

    I summarize the status of the inclusive SUSY searches conducted by the ATLAS and CMS experiments using the 20 fb-1 of 8 TeV LHC data in the all inclusive, 0 lepton, >=1 lepton and >=2 lepton final states. Current searches show that data are consistent with the SM. The impact of this consistency was explored on a rich variety of SUSY scenarios and simplified models, examples of which I present here.

  11. Biological Applications of Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Kang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since in most cases biological macromolecular systems including solvent water molecules are remarkably large, the computational costs of performing ab initio calculations for the entire structures are prohibitive. Accordingly, QM calculations that are jointed with MM calculations are crucial to evaluate the long-range electrostatic interactions, which significantly affect the electronic structures of biological macromolecules. A UNIX-shell-based interface program connecting the quantum mechanics (QMs and molecular mechanics (MMs calculation engines, GAMESS and AMBER, was developed in our lab. The system was applied to a metalloenzyme, azurin, and PU.1-DNA complex; thereby, the significance of the environmental effects on the electronic structures of the site of interest was elucidated. Subsequently, hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamics (MD simulation using the calculation system was employed for investigation of mechanisms of hydrolysis (editing reaction in leucyl-tRNA synthetase complexed with the misaminoacylated tRNALeu, and a novel mechanism of the enzymatic reaction was revealed. Thus, our interface program can play a critical role as a powerful tool for state-of-the-art sophisticated hybrid ab initio QM/MM MD simulations of large systems, such as biological macromolecules.

  12. PT-symmetry, indefinite metric, and nonlinear quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Dorje C.

    2017-12-01

    If a Hamiltonian of a quantum system is symmetric under space-time reflection, then the associated eigenvalues can be real. A conjugation operation for quantum states can then be defined in terms of space-time reflection, but the resulting Hilbert space inner product is not positive definite and gives rise to an interpretational difficulty. One way of resolving this difficulty is to introduce a superselection rule that excludes quantum states having negative norms. It is shown here that a quantum theory arising in this way gives an example of Kibble’s nonlinear quantum mechanics, with the property that the state space has a constant negative curvature. It then follows from the positive curvature theorem that the resulting quantum theory is not physically viable. This conclusion also has implications to other quantum theories obtained from the imposition of analogous superselection rules.

  13. The problem of time quantum mechanics versus general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Edward

    2017-01-01

    This book is a treatise on time and on background independence in physics. It first considers how time is conceived of in each accepted paradigm of physics: Newtonian, special relativity, quantum mechanics (QM) and general relativity (GR). Substantial differences are moreover uncovered between what is meant by time in QM and in GR. These differences jointly source the Problem of Time: Nine interlinked facets which arise upon attempting concurrent treatment of the QM and GR paradigms, as is required in particular for a background independent theory of quantum gravity. A sizeable proportion of current quantum gravity programs - e.g. geometrodynamical and loop quantum gravity approaches to quantum GR, quantum cosmology, supergravity and M-theory - are background independent in this sense. This book's foundational topic is thus furthermore of practical relevance in the ongoing development of quantum gravity programs. This book shows moreover that eight of the nine facets of the Problem of Time already occur upon ...

  14. Quantum Mechanics A Modern and Concise Introductory Course

    CERN Document Server

    Bes, Daniel R

    2007-01-01

    Starting from basic principles, the book systematically covers both Heisenberg and Schrödinger realizations of quantum mechanics (in this order). The material traditionally presented in quantum textbooks is illustrated with applications which are (or will become) cornestones of future technologies. The emphasis in the matrix formulation focus the atention on the spin, the most important quantum observable, and paves the way to chapters on quantum information (including crytography, teleportation and computation), on recent tests of quantum physics and on decoherence. Additions and changes found in the second edition include; a more friendly presentation to Hilbert spaces; more practical applications e.g. scanning tunneling microscope (potential barrier); quantum dots (single-particle states in semiconductors); lasers and masers (induced emission); real experiments that have recently provided a qualitative change in the foundations of quantum physics; and an outline of the density matrix formalism as applied ...

  15. Is string interaction the origin of quantum mechanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzhak Bars

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available String theory was developed by demanding consistency with quantum mechanics. In this paper we wish to reverse the reasoning. We pretend that open string field theory is a fully consistent definition of the theory – it is at least a self-consistent sector. Then we find in its structure that the rules of quantum mechanics emerge from the non-commutative nature of the basic string joining/splitting interactions. Thus, rather than assuming the quantum commutation rules among the usual canonical variables we derive them from the physical process of string interactions. Morally we could apply such an argument to M-theory to cover quantum mechanics for all physics. If string or M-theory really underlies all physics, it seems that the door has been opened to an explanation of the origins of quantum mechanics from the physical processes point of view.

  16. Quantum Mechanics is Incomplete but it is Consistent with Locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, H. S.

    2017-10-01

    Quantum mechanics is seen to be incomplete not because it cannot explain the correlations that characterize entanglement without invoking either non-locality or realism, both of which, despite special relativity or no-go theorems, are at least conceivable. Quantum mechanics is incomplete, in a perhaps broader than hidden variable sense, because it fails to address within its theoretical structure the question of how even a single particle, by being in a given quantum state, causes the frequency distribution of measurement values specified by the state. This incompleteness of quantum mechanics as it is currently conceived is both fundamental and indefeasible. Failure to address the question of how the states of entangled particles are given effect to yield the correlations they specify is simply a particular albeit attention arresting instance of this incompleteness. But if that is so then quantum mechanics cannot be held to be inconsistent with locality.

  17. Fritz London and the scale of quantum mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaldi, Daniela

    2017-11-01

    Fritz London's seminal idea of ;quantum mechanisms of macroscopic scale;, first articulated in 1946, was the unanticipated result of two decades of research, during which London pursued quantum-mechanical explanations of various kinds of systems of particles at different scales. He started at the microphysical scale with the hydrogen molecule, generalized his approach to chemical bonds and intermolecular forces, then turned to macrophysical systems like superconductors and superfluid helium. Along this path, he formulated a set of concepts-the quantum mechanism of exchange, the rigidity of the wave function, the role of quantum statistics in multi-particle systems, the possibility of order in momentum space-that eventually coalesced into a new conception of systems of equal particles. In particular, it was London's clarification of Bose-Einstein condensation that enabled him to formulate the notion of superfluids, and led him to the recognition that quantum mechanics was not, as it was commonly assumed, relevant exclusively as a micromechanics.

  18. Quantum mechanics and the particles of nature. An outline for mathematicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudbery, Anthony

    1986-01-01

    The book gives the basic theoretical concepts of quantum mechanics and particle physics, and is aimed at the final year undergraduates in mathematics or physics. The contents contain seven chapters on:-particles and forces, quantum statics, quantum dynamics, quantum systems, quantum metaphysics, quantum numbers and quantum fields.

  19. High Spin Baryons in Quantum Mechanical Chromodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchbach, M.; Compean, C. B.

    2009-04-01

    A framework of quantum mechanical chromodynamics (QMCD) is developed with the aim to place the description of the nucleon on a comparable footing with Schrödinger's quantum mechanical treatment of the hydrogen atom. Such indeed turns out to be possible upon replacing the (e--p) by a (q-qq) system, on the one hand, and the Coulomb potential by the recently reported by us exactly solvable trigonometric extension of the Cornell (TEC) potential, on the other. The TEC potential translates the inverse distance potential in ordinary flat space to a space of constant positive curvature, the 3D hypersphere, a reason for which both potentials have the SO(4) and SO(2, 1) symmetries in common. In effect, the nucleon spectrum, inclusive its Δ branch, acquire the degeneracy patterns of the electron excitations with spin in 1H without copying them, however. There are two essential differences between the N(Δ) and H atom spectra. The first concerns the parity of the states which can be unnatural for the N and Δ excitations due to compositeness of the diquark, the second refers to the level splittings in the baryon spectra which contain besides the Balmer term also its inverse of opposite sign. Our scheme reproduces the complete number of states (except the hybrid Δ(1600)), predicts a total of 33 new resonances, and explains the splittings of the N and Δ levels containing high-spin resonances. It also describes accurately the proton electric charge form factor. We here calculate the potential in momentum space (instantaneous effective gluon propagator) as a Fourier transform of the TEC potential and show that the concept of curvature allows to avoid the integral divergences suffered by schemes based on power potentials. We find a propagator that is finite at origin, likely to produce confinement. The advocated new potential picture allows for deconfinement too as effect of space flattening in the limit of infinite radius of the 3D hypersphere. The potential's SO(4)/SO(2, 1

  20. Review of student difficulties in upper-level quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandralekha Singh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] Learning advanced physics, in general, is challenging not only due to the increased mathematical sophistication but also because one must continue to build on all of the prior knowledge acquired at the introductory and intermediate levels. In addition, learning quantum mechanics can be especially challenging because the paradigms of classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are very different. Here, we review research on student reasoning difficulties in learning upper-level quantum mechanics and research on students’ problem-solving and metacognitive skills in these courses. Some of these studies were multiuniversity investigations. The investigations suggest that there is large diversity in student performance in upper-level quantum mechanics regardless of the university, textbook, or instructor, and many students in these courses have not acquired a functional understanding of the fundamental concepts. The nature of reasoning difficulties in learning quantum mechanics is analogous to reasoning difficulties found via research in introductory physics courses. The reasoning difficulties were often due to overgeneralizations of concepts learned in one context to another context where they are not directly applicable. Reasoning difficulties in distinguishing between closely related concepts and in making sense of the formalism of quantum mechanics were common. We conclude with a brief summary of the research-based approaches that take advantage of research on student difficulties in order to improve teaching and learning of quantum mechanics.

  1. Coherent states in quantum mechanics; Estados coerentes em mecanica quantica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R. de Lima [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: rafaelr@cbpf.br; Fernandes Junior, Damasio; Batista, Sheyla Marques [Paraiba Univ., Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica

    2001-12-01

    We present a review work on the coherent states is non-relativistic quantum mechanics analysing the quantum oscillators in the coherent states. The coherent states obtained via a displacement operator that act on the wave function of ground state of the oscillator and the connection with Quantum Optics which were implemented by Glauber have also been considered. A possible generalization to the construction of new coherent states it is point out. (author)

  2. Simulation with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbault, Florent; Maurel, François

    2015-10-01

    Biological macromolecules, such as proteins or nucleic acids, are (still) molecules and thus they follow the same chemical rules that any simple molecule follows, even if their size generally renders accurate studies unhelpful. However, in the context of drug discovery, a detailed analysis of ligand association is required for understanding or predicting their interactions and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computations are relevant tools to help elucidate this process. In this review, the authors explore the use of QM/MM for drug discovery. After a brief description of the molecular mechanics (MM) technique, the authors describe the subtractive and additive techniques for QM/MM computations. The authors then present several application cases in topics involved in drug discovery. QM/MM have been widely employed during the last decades to study chemical processes such as enzyme-inhibitor interactions. However, despite the enthusiasm around this area, plain MM simulations may be more meaningful than QM/MM. To obtain reliable results, the authors suggest fixing several keystone parameters according to the underlying chemistry of each studied system.

  3. Quantum mechanical model for Maya Blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María E.; Peña, Brisa; Contreras, César; Montero, Ana L.; Chianelli, Russell; Alvarado, Manuel; Olivas, Ramón; Rodríguez, Luz M.; Camacho, Héctor; Montero-Cabrera, Luis A.

    This work is about Maya Blue (MB), a pigment developed by Mesoamerican civilizations between the 5th and 16th centuries from an aluminosilicate mineral (palygorskite) and an organic dye (indigo). Two different supramolecular quantum-mechanical models afford explanations for the unusual stability of MB based on the oxidation of the indigo molecule during the heating process and its interaction with palygorskite. A model considering indigo derivatives attached to several aluminates shows the principal features of the experimental visible spectrum of MB within the TD-DFT methodology. Another model of an indigo oxidized species confined within an inorganic supramolecular cavity system, that involves about 170 atoms, was calculated after a large configuration interaction of single excited determinants within the NDOL approximation (Montero-Cabrera et al., J Chem Phys, 2007, 127, 145102). It allows a correct reproduction and interpretation of the corresponding spectrum. This second methodology provides the most satisfactory results, being able to manage very big molecular systems at a QM level. Structural explanation for the unusual stability of MB is also provided.

  4. Yes Virginia, quantum mechanics can be understood

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, John P

    2017-01-01

    Virginia, B. W. Wooster, and Jeeves take up physics with the hope of understanding quantum mechanics. In the process they take a rather grand tour on an old sailing ship and aid a sow in distress. On their journey they discover that physics is not as difficult a subject as they imagined. When they dismantled physics and reassembled it in a form where gravity, strong, electromagnetic and the weak forces all stem from understanding the gaming strategy known as the fair-game. That great cultural divide first expounded by the novelist C.P.Snow was found to be a mere ditch that can be stepped over. The sins of the past were violations of energy conservation and strange notions about what mass actually represents. Now mass is defined without the assistance of the Standard Model. Things will not be the same. Singularities have been banished. The electron now has a scale and is no longer captive in a point. The gluon is no longer essential along with the single virtual photon.

  5. Observation and superselection in quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsman, N. P.

    We attempt to clarify the main conceptual issues in approaches to 'objectification' or 'measurement' in quantum mechanics which are based on superselection rules. Such approaches venture to derive the emergence of classical 'reality' relative to a class of observers; those believing that the classical world exists intrinsically and absolutely are advised against reading this paper. The prototype approach (K. Hepp, Helv. Phys. Acta 45 (1972), 237-248) where superselection sectors are assumed in the state space of the apparatus is shown to be untenable. Instead, one should couple system and apparatus to an environment, and postulate superselection rules for the latter. These are motivated by the locality of any observer or other (actual or virtual) monitoring system. In this way 'environmental' solutions to the measurement problem (H.D. Zeh, Found. Phys. 1 (1970), 69-76; W. H. Zurek, Phys. Rev. D26 (1982), 1862-1880 and Progr. Theor. Phys. 89 (1993), 281-312) become consistent and acceptable, too. Points of contact with the modal interpretation are briefly discussed. We propose a minimal value attribution to observables in theories with superselection rules, in which only central observables have properties. In particular, the eigenvector-eigenvalue link is dropped. This is mainly motivated by Ockham's razor.

  6. Observation and superselection in quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landsman, N.P. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    1994-08-01

    We attempt to clarify the main conceptual issues in approaches to `objectification` or `measurement` in quantum mechanics which are based on superselection rules. Such approaches venture to derive the emergence of classical `reality` relative to a class of observers; those believing that the classical world exists intrinsically and absolutely are advised against reading this paper. The prototype approach (Hepp) where superselection sectors are assumed in the state space of the apparatus is shown to be untenable. Instead, one should couple system and apparatus to an environment, and postulate superselection rules for the latter. These are motivated by the locality of any observer or other (actual or virtual) monitoring system. In this way `environmental` solutions to the measurement problem (Zeh, Zurek) become consistent and acceptable, too. Points of contact with the modal interpretation are briefly discussed. We propose a minimal value attribution to observables in theories with superselection rules, in which only central observables have properties. In particular, the eigenvalue link is dropped. This is mainly motivated by Ockham`s razor. (orig.)

  7. Development and validation of an achievement test in introductory quantum mechanics: The Quantum Mechanics Visualization Instrument (QMVI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataloglu, Erdat

    The purpose of this study was to construct a valid and reliable multiple-choice achievement test to assess students' understanding of core concepts of introductory quantum mechanics. Development of the Quantum Mechanics Visualization Instrument (QMVI) occurred across four successive semesters in 1999--2001. During this time 213 undergraduate and graduate students attending the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) at University Park and Arizona State University (ASU) participated in this development and validation study. Participating students were enrolled in four distinct groups of courses: Modern Physics, Undergraduate Quantum Mechanics, Graduate Quantum Mechanics, and Chemistry Quantum Mechanics. Expert panels of professors of physics experienced in teaching quantum mechanics courses and graduate students in physics and science education established the core content and assisted in the validating of successive versions of the 24-question QMVI. Instrument development was guided by procedures outlined in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing (AERA-APA-NCME, 1999). Data gathered in this study provided information used in the development of successive versions of the QMVI. Data gathered in the final phase of administration of the QMVI also provided evidence that the intended score interpretation of the QMVI achievement test is valid and reliable. A moderate positive correlation coefficient of 0.49 was observed between the students' QMVI scores and their confidence levels. Analyses of variance indicated that students' scores in Graduate Quantum Mechanics and Undergraduate Quantum Mechanics courses were significantly higher than the mean scores of students in Modern Physics and Chemistry Quantum Mechanics courses (p < 0.05). That finding is consistent with the additional understanding and experience that should be anticipated in graduate students and junior-senior level students over sophomore physics majors and majors in another field. The moderate

  8. Investigating learners' epistemological framings of quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Vesal

    Classical mechanics challenges students to use their intuitions and experiences as a basis for understanding, in effect to approach learning as "a refinement of everyday thinking'' (Einstein, 1936). Moving on to quantum mechanics (QM), students, like physicists, need to adjust this approach, in particular with respect to the roles that intuitive knowledge and mathematics play in the pursuit of coherent understanding (these are adjustments to aspects of their epistemologies). In this dissertation, I explore how some students manage the epistemological transition. I began this work by recruiting both graduate and undergraduate students, interviewing each subject several times as they moved through coursework in QM. The interviews featured, among other things, how students tried to fit ideas together in mutually consistent ways, including with respect to intuitive knowledge, mathematics and experiment, if at all. I modeled these dynamic cognitive processes as different epistemological framings (i.e., tacit, in-the-moment responses to the question "How should I approach knowledge?''). Through detailed qualitative analyses of students' reasoning and a systematic coding of their interviews, I explored how these coherence seeking related framings impacted their learning. The dissertation supports three main findings: (1) students' patterns of epistemological framing are mostly stable within a given course; (2) students who profess epistemologies aligned with the coordination of coherence seeking framings tend to be more stable in demonstrating them; and (3) students aware that their understanding of QM ultimately anchors in its mathematics tend to produce more coherent explanations and perform better in their courses. These findings are consistent with existing research on student epistemologies in QM and imply that epistemologies, in particular whether and how students seek coherence, require greater attention and emphasis in instruction.

  9. Bohmian mechanics, open quantum systems and continuous measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Nassar, Antonio B

    2017-01-01

    This book shows how Bohmian mechanics overcomes the need for a measurement postulate involving wave function collapse. The measuring process plays a very important role in quantum mechanics. It has been widely analyzed within the Copenhagen approach through the Born and von Neumann postulates, with later extension due to Lüders. In contrast, much less effort has been invested in the measurement theory within the Bohmian mechanics framework. The continuous measurement (sharp and fuzzy, or strong and weak) problem is considered here in this framework. The authors begin by generalizing the so-called Mensky approach, which is based on restricted path integral through quantum corridors. The measuring system is then considered to be an open quantum system following a stochastic Schrödinger equation. Quantum stochastic trajectories (in the Bohmian sense) and their role in basic quantum processes are discussed in detail. The decoherence process is thereby described in terms of classical trajectories issuing from th...

  10. Ruling out multi-order interference in quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Urbasi; Couteau, Christophe; Jennewein, Thomas; Laflamme, Raymond; Weihs, Gregor

    2010-07-23

    Quantum mechanics and gravitation are two pillars of modern physics. Despite their success in describing the physical world around us, they seem to be incompatible theories. There are suggestions that one of these theories must be generalized to achieve unification. For example, Born's rule--one of the axioms of quantum mechanics--could be violated. Born's rule predicts that quantum interference, as shown by a double-slit diffraction experiment, occurs from pairs of paths. A generalized version of quantum mechanics might allow multipath (i.e., higher-order) interference, thus leading to a deviation from the theory. We performed a three-slit experiment with photons and bounded the magnitude of three-path interference to less than 10(-2) of the expected two-path interference, thus ruling out third- and higher-order interference and providing a bound on the accuracy of Born's rule. Our experiment is consistent with the postulate both in semiclassical and quantum regimes.

  11. Phase space picture of quantum mechanics group theoretical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the theory and applications of the Wigner phase space distribution function and its symmetry properties. The book explains why the phase space picture of quantum mechanics is needed, in addition to the conventional Schrödinger or Heisenberg picture. It is shown that the uncertainty relation can be represented more accurately in this picture. In addition, the phase space picture is shown to be the natural representation of quantum mechanics for modern optics and relativistic quantum mechanics of extended objects.

  12. Berkelian Idealism Regarding Properties in Orthodox Quantum Mechanics, and Implications for Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cabbolet, Marcoen J T F

    2015-01-01

    This note shows that orthodox quantum mechanics (OQM) entails a Berkelian idealism regarding properties (BIRP): a quantum only `has' a quantitative property upon observation of that property. It is argued that this BIRP poses an issue for the development of a theory of gravitation in the framework of OQM, for how can a quantum curve space-time if it doesn't have the property energy in absence of observation to begin with?

  13. Mathematics and quantum mechanics; Matematicas y mecanica cuantica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santander, M.

    2000-07-01

    Several episodes in the relation between Mathematics and Quantum Mechanics are discussed; and the emphasis is put in the existence of multiple and sometimes unexpected connections between ideas originating in Mathematics and in Quantum Physics. The question of the unresasonable effectiveness of Mathematics in Physics is also presented in the same light. (Author) 3 refs.

  14. Classical and quantum mechanics of complex Hamiltonian systems ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Certain aspects of classical and quantum mechanics of complex Hamiltonian systems in one dimension ... collected by a conscious observer (for example, as is the case in the quantum mea- surement problem or the ..... property of a function is bound to break down, say for an open system or in the presence of subjectivity.

  15. On quantum mechanical phase-space wave functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wlodarz, Joachim J.

    1994-01-01

    An approach to quantum mechanics based on the notion of a phase-space wave function is proposed within the Weyl-Wigner-Moyal representation. It is shown that the Schrodinger equation for the phase-space wave function is equivalent to the quantum Liouville equation for the Wigner distribution...

  16. New Potentials for Old: The Darboux Transformation in Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian Wesley; Celius, Tevye C.

    2008-01-01

    The Darboux transformation in quantum mechanics is reviewed at a basic level. Examples of how this transformation leads to exactly solvable potentials related to the "particle in a box" and the harmonic oscillator are shown in detail. The connection between the Darboux transformation and some modern operator based approaches to quantum mechanics…

  17. Predicting the sparticle spectrum from GUTs via SUSY threshold corrections with SusyTC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antusch, Stefan [Department of Physics, University of Basel,Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany); Sluka, Constantin [Department of Physics, University of Basel,Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-07-21

    Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) can feature predictions for the ratios of quark and lepton Yukawa couplings at high energy, which can be tested with the increasingly precise results for the fermion masses, given at low energies. To perform such tests, the renormalization group (RG) running has to be performed with sufficient accuracy. In supersymmetric (SUSY) theories, the one-loop threshold corrections (TC) are of particular importance and, since they affect the quark-lepton mass relations, link a given GUT flavour model to the sparticle spectrum. To accurately study such predictions, we extend and generalize various formulas in the literature which are needed for a precision analysis of SUSY flavour GUT models. We introduce the new software tool SusyTC, a major extension to the Mathematica package REAP http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2005/03/024, where these formulas are implemented. SusyTC extends the functionality of REAP by a full inclusion of the (complex) MSSM SUSY sector and a careful calculation of the one-loop SUSY threshold corrections for the full down-type quark, up-type quark and charged lepton Yukawa coupling matrices in the electroweak-unbroken phase. Among other useful features, SusyTC calculates the one-loop corrected pole mass of the charged (or the CP-odd) Higgs boson as well as provides output in SLHA conventions, i.e. the necessary input for external software, e.g. for performing a two-loop Higgs mass calculation. We apply SusyTC to study the predictions for the parameters of the CMSSM (mSUGRA) SUSY scenario from the set of GUT scale Yukawa relations ((y{sub e})/(y{sub d}))=−(1/2), ((y{sub μ})/(y{sub s}))=6, and ((y{sub τ})/(y{sub b}))=−(3/2), which has been proposed recently in the context of SUSY GUT flavour models.

  18. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics dual Hamiltonian free energy perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Iakov; Benighaus, Tobias; Boulanger, Eliot; Thiel, Walter

    2013-08-14

    The dual Hamiltonian free energy perturbation (DH-FEP) method is designed for accurate and efficient evaluation of the free energy profile of chemical reactions in quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. In contrast to existing QM/MM FEP variants, the QM region is not kept frozen during sampling, but all degrees of freedom except for the reaction coordinate are sampled. In the DH-FEP scheme, the sampling is done by semiempirical QM/MM molecular dynamics (MD), while the perturbation energy differences are evaluated from high-level QM/MM single-point calculations at regular intervals, skipping a pre-defined number of MD sampling steps. After validating our method using an analytic model potential with an exactly known solution, we report a QM/MM DH-FEP study of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by chorismate mutase. We suggest guidelines for QM/MM DH-FEP calculations and default values for the required computational parameters. In the case of chorismate mutase, we apply the DH-FEP approach in combination with a single one-dimensional reaction coordinate and with a two-dimensional collective coordinate (two individual distances), with superior results for the latter choice.

  19. Quantum causality conceptual issues in the causal theory of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Riggs, Peter J; French, Steven RD

    2009-01-01

    This is a treatise devoted to the foundations of quantum physics and the role that causality plays in the microscopic world governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. The book is controversial and will engender some lively debate on the various issues raised.

  20. Probability in the Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidman, Lev

    It is argued that, although in the Many-Worlds Interpretation of quantum mechanics there is no "probability" for an outcome of a quantum experiment in the usual sense, we can understand why we have an illusion of probability. The explanation involves: (a) A "sleeping pill" gedanken experiment which makes correspondence between an illegitimate question: "What is the probability of an outcome of a quantum measurement?" with a legitimate question: "What is the probability that `I' am in the world corresponding to that outcome?"; (b) A gedanken experiment which splits the world into several worlds which are identical according to some symmetry condition; and (c) Relativistic causality, which together with (b) explain the Born rule of standard quantum mechanics. The Quantum Sleeping Beauty controversy and "caring measure" replacing probability measure are discussed.

  1. Berkelian Idealism Regarding Properties in Orthodox Quantum Mechanics, and Implications for Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Cabbolet, Marcoen J. T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Referring to the 18th century idealism of George Berkeley in which an object exists if and only if it is observed, this note shows that orthodox quantum mechanics (OQM) entails a Berkelian idealism regarding properties (BIRP): a quantum `has' a property X with quantitative value x if and only if the property X has just been measured with outcome x. It is then impossible to recontextualize GR's principle of curvature in any quantum framework that implies this BIRP, for a quantum cannot curve s...

  2. DEMYSTIFYING QUANTUM MECHANICS: Will there be hints from LHC?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    All modern theories for particles, forces and even space-time itself, use the framework provided by quantum mechanics. The Standard Model is a quantized field theory. Even superstring theory is based on quantum mechanics. There is something odd about quantum mechanics: it brilliantly allows us to predict the outcome of experiments, yet it gives confusing statements about what really is going on inside particles and fields. Suppose we would be asking for a theory that allows us to describe what actually happens in less ambiguous terms, without destroying the magnificent successes of quantum mechanics, would this help us to answer some of the great mysteries of theoretical elementary particle physics?Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  3. Assessing and improving student understanding of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    We developed a survey to probe student understanding of quantum mechanics concepts at the beginning of graduate instruction. The survey was administered to 202 graduate students in physics enrolled in first-year quantum mechanics courses from seven different universities at the beginning of the first semester. We also conducted one-on-one interviews with fifteen graduate students or advanced undergraduate students who had just finished a course in which all the content on the survey was covered. We find that students share universal difficulties about fundamental quantum mechanics concepts. The difficulties are often due to over-generalization of concepts learned in one context to other contexts where they are not directly applicable and difficulty in making sense of the abstract quantitative formalism of quantum mechanics. Instructional strategies that focus on improving student understanding of these concepts should take into account these difficulties. The results from this study can sensitize instructors ...

  4. Out-of-time-order correlators in quantum mechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hashimoto, Koji; Murata, Keiju; Yoshii, Ryosuke

    2017-01-01

    .... We formulate how to calculate the OTOC for quantum mechanics with a general Hamiltonian. We demonstrate explicit calculations of OTOCs for a harmonic oscillator, a particle in a one-dimensional box, a circle billiard and stadium billiards...

  5. Non-commutative spheres and numerical quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Arveson, W

    1992-01-01

    We discuss some basic issues that arise when one attempts to model quantum mechanical systems on a computer, and we describe the mathematical structure of the resulting discretized cannonical commutation relations.

  6. Multiscale Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations with Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Wu, Jingheng; Yang, Weitao

    2016-10-11

    Molecular dynamics simulation with multiscale quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods is a very powerful tool for understanding the mechanism of chemical and biological processes in solution or enzymes. However, its computational cost can be too high for many biochemical systems because of the large number of ab initio QM calculations. Semiempirical QM/MM simulations have much higher efficiency. Its accuracy can be improved with a correction to reach the ab initio QM/MM level. The computational cost on the ab initio calculation for the correction determines the efficiency. In this paper we developed a neural network method for QM/MM calculation as an extension of the neural-network representation reported by Behler and Parrinello. With this approach, the potential energy of any configuration along the reaction path for a given QM/MM system can be predicted at the ab initio QM/MM level based on the semiempirical QM/MM simulations. We further applied this method to three reactions in water to calculate the free energy changes. The free-energy profile obtained from the semiempirical QM/MM simulation is corrected to the ab initio QM/MM level with the potential energies predicted with the constructed neural network. The results are in excellent accordance with the reference data that are obtained from the ab initio QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation or corrected with direct ab initio QM/MM potential energies. Compared with the correction using direct ab initio QM/MM potential energies, our method shows a speed-up of 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. It demonstrates that the neural network method combined with the semiempirical QM/MM calculation can be an efficient and reliable strategy for chemical reaction simulations.

  7. Supersymmetry and eigensurface topology of the planar quantum pendulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard eSchmidt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We make use of supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY QM to find three sets of conditions under which the problem of a planar quantum pendulum becomes analytically solvable. The analytic forms of the pendulum's eigenfuntions make it possible to find analytic expressions for observables of interest, such as the expectation values of the angular momentum squared and of the orientation and alignment cosines as well as of the eigenenergy. Furthermore, we find that the topology of the intersections of the pendulum's eigenenergy surfaces can be characterized by a single integer index whose values correspond to the sets of conditions under which the analytic solutions to the quantum pendulum problem exist.

  8. On the hypothesis that quantum mechanism manifests classical mechanics: Numerical approach to the correspondence in search of quantum chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Bong [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Quantum manifestation of classical chaos has been one of the extensively studied subjects for more than a decade. Yet clear understanding of its nature still remains to be an open question partly due to the lack of a canonical definition of quantum chaos. The classical definition seems to be unsuitable in quantum mechanics partly because of the Heisenberg quantum uncertainty. In this regard, quantum chaos is somewhat misleading and needs to be clarified at the very fundamental level of physics. Since it is well known that quantum mechanics is more fundamental than classical mechanics, the quantum description of classically chaotic nature should be attainable in the limit of large quantum numbers. The focus of my research, therefore, lies on the correspondence principle for classically chaotic systems. The chaotic damped driven pendulum is mainly studied numerically using the split operator method that solves the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. For classically dissipative chaotic systems in which (multi)fractal strange attractors often emerge, several quantum dissipative mechanisms are also considered. For instance, Hoover`s and Kubo-Fox-Keizer`s approaches are studied with some computational analyses. But the notion of complex energy with non-Hermiticity is extensively applied. Moreover, the Wigner and Husimi distribution functions are examined with an equivalent classical distribution in phase-space, and dynamical properties of the wave packet in configuration and momentum spaces are also explored. The results indicate that quantum dynamics embraces classical dynamics although the classicalquantum correspondence fails to be observed in the classically chaotic regime. Even in the semi-classical limits, classically chaotic phenomena would eventually be suppressed by the quantum uncertainty.

  9. The instrumentalist aspects of quantum mechanics stem from probability theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, Louis

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the article is to argue that the interpretations of quantum mechanics and of probability are much closer than usually thought. Indeed, a detailed analysis of the concept of probability (within the standard frequency interpretation of R. von Mises) reveals that this notion always refers to an observing system. Therefore the instrumentalist aspects of quantum mechanics, and in particular the enigmatic role of the observer in the Copenhagen interpretation, derive from a precise understanding of probability.

  10. Bohmian mechanics with complex action: a new trajectory-based formulation of quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Yair; Degani, Ilan; Tannor, David J

    2006-12-21

    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in Bohmian mechanics as a numerical tool because of its local dynamics, which suggest the possibility of significant computational advantages for the simulation of large quantum systems. However, closer inspection of the Bohmian formulation reveals that the nonlocality of quantum mechanics has not disappeared-it has simply been swept under the rug into the quantum force. In this paper we present a new formulation of Bohmian mechanics in which the quantum action, S, is taken to be complex. This leads to a single equation for complex S, and ultimately complex x and p but there is a reward for this complexification-a significantly higher degree of localization. The quantum force in the new approach vanishes for Gaussian wave packet dynamics, and its effect on barrier tunneling processes is orders of magnitude lower than that of the classical force. In fact, the current method is shown to be a rigorous extension of generalized Gaussian wave packet dynamics to give exact quantum mechanics. We demonstrate tunneling probabilities that are in virtually perfect agreement with the exact quantum mechanics down to 10(-7) calculated from strictly localized quantum trajectories that do not communicate with their neighbors. The new formulation may have significant implications for fundamental quantum mechanics, ranging from the interpretation of non-locality to measures of quantum complexity.

  11. Mathematical theory of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jaksic, V

    2001-01-01

    We review and further develop a mathematical framework for non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics recently proposed in [JP4, JP5, JP6, Ru3, Ru4, Ru5, Ru6]. In the algebraic formalism of quantum statistical mechanics we introduce notions of non-equilibrium steady states, entropy production and heat fluxes, and study their properties. Our basic paradigm is a model of a small (finite) quantum system coupled to several independent thermal reservoirs. We exhibit examples of such systems which have strictly positive entropy production.

  12. BMN gauge theory as a quantum mechanical system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beisert, N.; Kristjansen, C.; Plefka, J.

    2003-01-01

    We rigorously derive an effective quantum mechanical Hamiltonian from N = 4 gauge theory in the BMN limit. Its eigenvalues yield the exact one-loop anomalous dimensions of scalar two-impurity BMN operators for all genera. It is demonstrated that this reformulation vastly simplifies computations. E.......g., the known anomalous dimension formula for genus one is reproduced through a one-line calculation. We also efficiently evaluate the genus two correction, finding a non-vanishing result. We comment on multi-trace two-impurity operators and we conjecture that our quantum-mechanical reformulation could...... be extended to higher quantum loops and more impurities....

  13. Global and local aspects of causality in quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoica Cristinel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanics forces us to reconsider certain aspects of classical causality. The ‘central mystery’ of quantum mechanics manifests in different ways, depending on the interpretation. This mystery can be formulated as the possibility of selecting part of the initial conditions of the Universe ‘retroactively’. This talk aims to show that there is a global, timeless, ‘bird’s view’ of the spacetime, which makes this mystery more reasonable. We will review some well-known quantum effects from the perspective of global consistency.

  14. Lectures in quantum mechanics a two-term course

    CERN Document Server

    Picasso, Luigi E

    2016-01-01

    Based on a series of university lectures on nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, this textbook covers a wide range of topics, from the birth of quantum mechanics to the fine-structure levels of heavy atoms. The author sets out from the crisis in classical physics and explores the seminal ideas of Einstein, Bohr, and de Broglie and their vital importance for the development of quantum mechanics. There follows a bottom-up presentation of the postulates of quantum mechanics through real experiments (such as those of neutron interferometry), with consideration of their most important consequences, including applications in the field of atomic physics. A final chapter is devoted to the paradoxes of quantum mechanics, and particularly those aspects that are still open and hotly debated, to end up with a mention to Bell's theorem and Aspect's experiments. In presenting the principles of quantum mechanics in an inductive way, this book has already proved very popular with students in its Italian language version.It c...

  15. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study of the Sialyltransferase Reaction Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yojiro; Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2016-10-11

    The sialyltransferase is an enzyme that transfers the sialic acid moiety from cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (CMP-NeuAc) to the terminal position of glycans. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of sialyltransferase, we explored the potential energy surface along the sialic acid transfer reaction coordinates by the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method on the basis of the crystal structure of sialyltransferase CstII. Our calculation demonstrated that CstII employed an S N 1-like reaction mechanism via the formation of a short-lived oxocarbenium ion intermediate. The computational barrier height was 19.5 kcal/mol, which reasonably corresponded with the experimental reaction rate. We also found that two tyrosine residues (Tyr156 and Tyr162) played a vital role in stabilizing the intermediate and the transition states by quantum mechanical interaction with CMP.

  16. Evading Quantum Mechanics: Engineering a Classical Subsystem within a Quantum Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mankei Tsang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanics is potentially advantageous for certain information-processing tasks, but its probabilistic nature and requirement of measurement backaction often limit the precision of conventional classical information-processing devices, such as sensors and atomic clocks. Here we show that, by engineering the dynamics of coupled quantum systems, it is possible to construct a subsystem that evades the measurement backaction of quantum mechanics, at all times of interest, and obeys any classical dynamics, linear or nonlinear, that we choose. We call such a system a quantum-mechanics-free subsystem (QMFS. All of the observables of a QMFS are quantum-nondemolition (QND observables; moreover, they are dynamical QND observables, thus demolishing the widely held belief that QND observables are constants of motion. QMFSs point to a new strategy for designing classical information-processing devices in regimes where quantum noise is detrimental, unifying previous approaches that employ QND observables, backaction evasion, and quantum noise cancellation. Potential applications include gravitational-wave detection, optomechanical-force sensing, atomic magnetometry, and classical computing. Demonstrations of dynamical QMFSs include the generation of broadband squeezed light for use in interferometric gravitational-wave detection, experiments using entangled atomic-spin ensembles, and implementations of the quantum Toffoli gate.

  17. Twenty-first century quantum mechanics Hilbert space to quantum computers mathematical methods and conceptual foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Fano, Guido

    2017-01-01

    This book is designed to make accessible to nonspecialists the still evolving concepts of quantum mechanics and the terminology in which these are expressed. The opening chapters summarize elementary concepts of twentieth century quantum mechanics and describe the mathematical methods employed in the field, with clear explanation of, for example, Hilbert space, complex variables, complex vector spaces and Dirac notation, and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. After detailed discussion of the Schrödinger equation, subsequent chapters focus on isotropic vectors, used to construct spinors, and on conceptual problems associated with measurement, superposition, and decoherence in quantum systems. Here, due attention is paid to Bell’s inequality and the possible existence of hidden variables. Finally, progression toward quantum computation is examined in detail: if quantum computers can be made practicable, enormous enhancements in computing power, artificial intelligence, and secure communication will result...

  18. Virtual learning environment for interactive engagement with advanced quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Kock Pedersen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment StudentResearcher, which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum mechanics at the advanced university level. StudentResearcher is built upon the experiences gathered from workshops with the citizen science game Quantum Moves at the high-school and university level, where the games were used extensively to illustrate the basic concepts of quantum mechanics. The first test of this new virtual learning environment was a 2014 course in advanced quantum mechanics at Aarhus University with 47 enrolled students. We found increased learning for the students who were more active on the platform independent of their previous performances.

  19. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-06-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment StudentResearcher, which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum mechanics at the advanced university level. StudentResearcher is built upon the experiences gathered from workshops with the citizen science game Quantum Moves at the high-school and university level, where the games were used extensively to illustrate the basic concepts of quantum mechanics. The first test of this new virtual learning environment was a 2014 course in advanced quantum mechanics at Aarhus University with 47 enrolled students. We found increased learning for the students who were more active on the platform independent of their previous performances.

  20. Strategy for early SUSY searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, S

    2007-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is scheduled to commence operation in 2008 and inclusive searches for supersymmetry (SUSY) will be one of our primary tasks in the first days of LHC operation. It is certain that the final state of â€ワmultijets + missing transverse energy” will provide a superior performance in SUSY searches. As yet, well-considered strategies for the understanding of instrumental effects of detectors and the realistic estimations of the Standard Model (SM) backgrounds would not be clear: they are urgent issues for the coming data. We describe the strategy for early SUSY searches at the ATLAS experiment using the fist data corresponding to the integrated luminosity up to 1fb−1, which comprises many progresses in the data-driven technique for the SM background estimations.

  1. Strategy for early SUSY searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Shimpei

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is scheduled to commence operation in 2008 and inclusive searches for supersymmetry (SUSY) will be one of our primary tasks in the first days of LHC operation. It is certain that the final state of multijets plus missing transverse energy will provide a superior performance in SUSY searches. As yet, well-considered strategies for the understanding of instrumental effects of detectors and the realistic estimations of the Standard Model (SM) backgrounds would not be clear: they are urgent issues for the coming data. We describe the strategy for early SUSY searches at the ATLAS experiment using the fist data corresponding to the integrated luminosity up to 1fb^-1, which comprises many progresses in the data-driven technique for the SM background estimations.

  2. Strategy for early SUSY searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, S

    2007-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is scheduled to commence operation in 2008 and inclusive searches for supersymmetry (SUSY) will be one of our primary tasks in the first days of LHC operation. It is certain that the final state of multijets plus missing transverse energy will provide a superior performance in SUSY searches. As yet, well-considered strategies for the understanding of instrumental effects of detectors and the realistic estimations of the Standard Model (SM) backgrounds would not be clear: they are urgent issues for the coming data. We describe the strategy for early SUSY searches at the ATLAS experiment using the fist data corresponding to the integrated luminosity up to 1fb^-1, which includes many progresses in the data-driven technique for the SM background estimations.

  3. Quantum Sensing of Mechanical Motion with a Single InAs Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Wenner, J. M. Martinis, and A. N. Cleland, “ Quantum ground state and single- phonon control of a mechanical resonator.,” Nature, vol. 464, no...G. Nogues, S. Seidelin, J. Poizat, O. Arcizet, and M. Richard, “Strain-mediated coupling in a quantum dot- mechanical oscillator hybrid system...Pos 4 Dep 5 School of N upling quantu ctive for funda dded a semico nical resonat vances in thi es large ch ell as the spin for quantum s antum Dots

  4. Quantum mechanics as classical statistical mechanics with an ontic extension and an epistemic restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiyono, Agung; Rohrlich, Daniel

    2017-11-03

    Where does quantum mechanics part ways with classical mechanics? How does quantum randomness differ fundamentally from classical randomness? We cannot fully explain how the theories differ until we can derive them within a single axiomatic framework, allowing an unambiguous account of how one theory is the limit of the other. Here we derive non-relativistic quantum mechanics and classical statistical mechanics within a common framework. The common axioms include conservation of average energy and conservation of probability current. But two axioms distinguish quantum mechanics from classical statistical mechanics: an "ontic extension" defines a nonseparable (global) random variable that generates physical correlations, and an "epistemic restriction" constrains allowed phase space distributions. The ontic extension and epistemic restriction, with strength on the order of Planck's constant, imply quantum entanglement and uncertainty relations. This framework suggests that the wave function is epistemic, yet it does not provide an ontic dynamics for individual systems.

  5. Can the photosynthesis first step quantum mechanism be explained?

    OpenAIRE

    Sacilotti, Marco; Almeida, Euclides; Mota, Claudia C. B. O.; Nunes, Frederico Dias; Gomes,Anderson S. L.

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthesis first step mechanism concerns the sunlight absorption and both negative and positive charges separation. Recent and important photosynthesis literature claims that this mechanism is quantum mechanics controlled, however without presenting qualitative or quantitative scientifically based mechanism. The present accepted and old-fashioned photosynthesis mechanism model suffers from few drawbacks and an important issue is the absence of driving force for negative and positive charg...

  6. When quantum mechanics interacts with cognitive science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blutner, R.

    2010-01-01

    I reflect on several aspects of the general claim that a quantum-like approach to Cognitive Science is advantageous over classical approaches. The classical approaches refer to the symbolic approaches including models using a classical (Kolmogorov) probability calculus. The general claim seems to be

  7. The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Ruth E.

    2017-06-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: quantum peculiarities; 2. The map vs the territory; 3. The original TI: fundamentals; 4. The new possibilist TI: fundamentals; 5. Challenges, replies, and applications; 6. PTI and relativity; 7. The metaphysics of possibility; 8. PTI and 'spacetime'; 9. Epilogue: more than meets the eye; Appendixes; References; Index.

  8. Towards a Quantum Mechanical Interpretation of Homeopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    1999-01-01

    A quantum interpretation of the homeopathic method is presented. It is shown that provided neither the medication itself, nor the patient is observed, a net effect is expected, even at homeopathic dilutions. The temporal dilution in homeopathic exercise is explained in terms of Heisenberg's theory

  9. Classical and Quantum-Mechanical State Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, F. C.; Mello, P. A.; Revzen, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the subject of state reconstruction in classical and in quantum physics, a subject that deals with the experimentally acquired information that allows the determination of the physical state of a system. Our first purpose is to explain a method for retrieving a classical state in phase space, similar to that…

  10. Macroscopic quantum coherence and mechanical squeezing of a graphene sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiyun; Nie, Wenjie; Chen, Aixi; Lan, Yueheng

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the macroscopic quantum coherence and the mechanical squeezing of a mechanical oscillator in a hybrid optomechanical system consisting of a suspended graphene sheet and an ultracold atomic ensemble trapped inside a Fabry-Pérot cavity. In the study the vacuum is used to mediate an effective optomechanical coupling between the graphene oscillator and the cavity field driven by an external laser beam. We find that in the presence of this coupling, the macroscopic quantum coherence and the mechanical squeezing of the graphene sheet can be attained in a certain range of driving power. In particular, the quantum coherence in the optomechanical system can be transferred from the optical field to the mechanical oscillator. We also investigate in detail the spectrum and the squeezing of the output field and the attained results may be used to study the mechanical squeezing of a graphene sheet.

  11. SUSY searches with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles, with focus on those obtained using proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 13 \\TeV. Strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, as well as long-lived particle signatures.

  12. SUSY searches with the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIANCHI Riccardo Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY particles, with focus on those obtained using proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV. Strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, as well as long-lived particle signatures.

  13. SUSY searches at LHC and Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Barberio, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Supersymmetric models with R-parity conservation provide an excellent can- didate for Dark Matter, the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle, which will be searched for with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Based on recent simulation studies, we present the discovery potential for Su- persymmetry (SUSY) with the first few fb−1 of ATLAS data, as well as studies of the techniques used to reconstruct decays of SUSY particles at the LHC. We further discuss how such measurements can be used to constrain the underly- ing Supersymmetric model and hence to extract information about the nature of Dark Matter.

  14. SUSY searches with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ventura, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles, with focus on those obtained using proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV. Strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, as well as long-lived particle signatures.

  15. Quantum mechanics with applications to nanotechnology and information science

    CERN Document Server

    Band, Yehuda B

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics transcends and supplants classical mechanics at the atomic and subatomic levels. It provides the underlying framework for many subfields of physics, chemistry and materials science, including condensed matter physics, atomic physics, molecular physics, quantum chemistry, particle physics, and nuclear physics. It is the only way we can understand the structure of materials, from the semiconductors in our computers to the metal in our automobiles. It is also the scaffolding supporting much of nanoscience and nanotechnology. The purpose of this book is to present the fundamentals of quantum theory within a modern perspective, with emphasis on applications to nanoscience and nanotechnology, and information-technology. As the frontiers of science have advanced, the sort of curriculum adequate for students in the sciences and engineering twenty years ago is no longer satisfactory today. Hence, the emphasis on new topics that are not included in older reference texts, such as quantum information th...

  16. Student understanding of time dependence in quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Emigh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] The time evolution of quantum states is arguably one of the more difficult ideas in quantum mechanics. In this article, we report on results from an investigation of student understanding of this topic after lecture instruction. We demonstrate specific problems that students have in applying time dependence to quantum systems and in recognizing the key role of the energy eigenbasis in determining the time dependence of wave functions. Through analysis of student responses to a set of four interrelated tasks, we categorize some of the difficulties that underlie common errors. The conceptual and reasoning difficulties that have been identified are illustrated through student responses to four sets of questions administered at different points in a junior-level course on quantum mechanics. Evidence is also given that the problems persist throughout undergraduate instruction and into the graduate level.

  17. Advances in quantum mechanics contemporary trends and open problems

    CERN Document Server

    Dell'Antonio, Gianfausto

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects recent contributions on the contemporary trends in the mathematics of quantum mechanics, and more specifically in mathematical problems arising in quantum many-body dynamics, quantum graph theory, cold atoms, unitary gases, with particular emphasis on the developments of the specific mathematical tools needed, including: linear and non-linear Schrödinger equations, topological invariants, non-commutative geometry, resonances and operator extension theory, among others. Most of contributors are international leading experts or respected young researchers in mathematical physics, PDE, and operator theory. All their material is the fruit of recent studies that have already become a reference in the community. Offering a unified perspective of the mathematics of quantum mechanics, it is a valuable resource for researchers in the field.

  18. Mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics: An advanced short course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Valter

    2016-08-01

    This paper collects and extends the lectures I gave at the “XXIV International Fall Workshop on Geometry and Physics” held in Zaragoza (Spain) during September 2015. Within these lectures I review the formulation of Quantum Mechanics, and quantum theories in general, from a mathematically advanced viewpoint, essentially based on the orthomodular lattice of elementary propositions, discussing some fundamental ideas, mathematical tools and theorems also related to the representation of physical symmetries. The final step consists of an elementary introduction the so-called (C∗-) algebraic formulation of quantum theories.

  19. Quantum mechanics from an equivalence principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraggi, A.E. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Inst. for Fundamental Theory; Matone, M. [Univ. of Padova (Italy)

    1997-05-15

    The authors show that requiring diffeomorphic equivalence for one-dimensional stationary states implies that the reduced action S{sub 0} satisfies the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the Planck constant playing the role of a covariantizing parameter. The construction shows the existence of a fundamental initial condition which is strictly related to the Moebius symmetry of the Legendre transform and to its involutive character. The universal nature of the initial condition implies the Schroedinger equation in any dimension.

  20. Towards a Quantum Mechanical Interpretation of Homeopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    1999-01-01

    A quantum interpretation of the homeopathic method is presented. It is shown that provided neither the medication itself, nor the patient is observed, a net effect is expected, even at homeopathic dilutions. The temporal dilution in homeopathic exercise is explained in terms of Heisenberg's theory of energy-time indeterminacy. The results are fully compatible with thought experiments of the eminent physicist and cat specialist Erwin Schrödinger.

  1. Categorization of Quantum Mechanics Problems by Professors and Students

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by physics professors and undergraduate students from two honors-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty members' categorizations were overall rated higher than those of students by three faculty members who evaluated all of the categorizations. The categories created by faculty members were more diverse compared to the categories they created for a set of introductory mechanics problems. Some faculty members noted that the categorization of introductory physics problems often involves identifying fundamental principles relevant for the problem, whereas in upper-level undergraduate quantum mechanics problems, it mainly involves identifying concepts and procedures required to solve the problem. Moreover, physics faculty members who evaluated others' categorizations express...

  2. A Brief Introduction to Classical, Statistical and Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Bühler, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a rapid overview of the basic methods and concepts in mechanics for beginning Ph.D. students and advanced undergraduates in applied mathematics or related fields. It is based on a graduate course given in 2006-07 at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. Among other topics, the book introduces Newton's law, action principles, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, geometric wave theory, analytical and numerical statistical mechanics, discrete and continuous quantum mechanics, and quantum path-integral methods. The focus is on fundamental mathematical methods that provide connectio

  3. Design and validation of the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. McKagan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey (QMCS is a 12-question survey of students’ conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics. It is intended to be used to measure the relative effectiveness of different instructional methods in modern physics courses. In this paper, we describe the design and validation of the survey, a process that included observations of students, a review of previous literature and textbooks and syllabi, faculty and student interviews, and statistical analysis. We also discuss issues in the development of specific questions, which may be useful both for instructors who wish to use the QMCS in their classes and for researchers who wish to conduct further research of student understanding of quantum mechanics. The QMCS has been most thoroughly tested in, and is most appropriate for assessment of (as a posttest only, sophomore-level modern physics courses. We also describe testing with students in junior quantum courses and graduate quantum courses, from which we conclude that the QMCS may be appropriate for assessing junior quantum courses, but is not appropriate for assessing graduate courses. One surprising result of our faculty interviews is a lack of faculty consensus on what topics should be taught in modern physics, which has made designing a test that is valued by a majority of physics faculty more difficult than expected.

  4. Investigating Learners' Epistemological Framings of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Vesal

    2017-01-01

    Classical mechanics challenges students to use their intuitions and experiences as a basis for understanding, in effect to approach learning as "a refinement of everyday thinking'' (Einstein, 1936). Moving on to quantum mechanics (QM), students, like physicists, need to adjust this approach, in particular with respect to the roles that…

  5. Mathematical sense-making in quantum mechanics: An initial peek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Elby, Andrew; Gupta, Ayush; Sohr, Erin Ronayne

    2017-12-01

    Mathematical sense-making—looking for coherence between the structure of the mathematical formalism and causal or functional relations in the world—is a core component of physics expertise. Some physics education research studies have explored what mathematical sense-making looks like at the introductory physics level, while some historians and "science studies" have explored how expert physicists engage in it. What is largely missing, with a few exceptions, is theoretical and empirical work at the intermediate level—upper division physics students—especially when they are learning difficult new mathematical formalism. In this paper, we present analysis of a segment of video-recorded discussion between two students grappling with a quantum mechanics question to illustrate what mathematical sense-making can look like in quantum mechanics. We claim that mathematical sense-making is possible and productive for learning and problem solving in quantum mechanics. Mathematical sense-making in quantum mechanics is continuous in many ways with mathematical sense-making in introductory physics. However, in the context of quantum mechanics, the connections between formalism, intuitive conceptual schema, and the physical world become more compound (nested) and indirect. We illustrate these similarities and differences in part by proposing a new symbolic form, eigenvector eigenvalue, which is composed of multiple primitive symbolic forms.

  6. PREFACE: Progress in supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref'eva, I.; Fernández, D. J.; Hussin, V.; Negro, J.; Nieto, L. M.; Samsonov, B. F.

    2004-10-01

    The theory of integrable systems is grounded in the very beginning of theoretical physics: Kepler's system is an integrable system. This field of dynamical systems, where one looks for exact solutions of the equations of motion, has attracted most of the great figures in mathematical physics: Euler, Lagrange, Jacobi, etc. Liouville was the first to formulate the precise mathematical conditions ensuring solvability `by quadrature' of the dynamical equations, and his theorem still lies at the heart of the recent developments. The modern era started about thirty years ago with the systematic formulation of soliton solutions to nonlinear wave equations. Since then, impressive developments arose both for the classical and the quantum theory. Subtle mathematical techniques were devised for the resolution of these theories, relying on algebra (group theory), analysis and algebraic geometry (Riemann theory of surfaces). We therefore clearly see that the theory of integrable systems lies ab initio at a crossing of physics and mathematics, and that the developments of these last thirty years have strengthened this dual character, which makes it into an archetypal domain of mathematical physics. As regards the classical theory, beyond the direct connections to the various domains of classical soliton physics (hydrodynamics, condensed matter physics, laser optics, particle physics, plasma, biology or information coding), one has witnessed in these recent years more unexpected (and for some of them not yet well understood) connections to a priori farther fields of theoretical physics: string theory (through matrix models), topological field theories (two dimensional Yang--Mills, three dimensional Chern--Simons--Witten), or supersymmetric field theories (for instance the correspondence discovered by Seiberg and Witten between classical integrable models and quantum potentials). Quantum integrable theories provide examples of exactly (non perturbatively) solvable physical models

  7. Kepribadian Dan Komunikasi Susi Pudjiastuti Dalam Membentuk Personal Branding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The life story of Susi Pudjiastuti is admired by many people for her hard work, until becoming successful by having so much company in the field of aviation and fisheries. Susi Pudjiastuti is also well known to the public for his work in the ministry. Good performance makes Susi Pudjiastuti popular among Jokowi's working cabinet. Currently, the Brand Name in humans is personal branding which is the trend of the formation of self-image and the creation of good perception from others to us. This research will discuss about personality, communication and personal branding Susi Pudjiastuti with qualitative research method. Good personality makes Susi Pudjiastuti has the ability to communicate well and liked by the community. Personality and communication can form a personal branding Susi Pudjiastuti a natural. By exposing the personality and communication of Susi Pudjiastuti in forming personal branding, then people will realize the importance of personality and Communication in forming a natural personal branding. Kisah hidup Susi Pudjiastuti banyak dikagumi oleh banyak orang atas kerja kerasnya hingga menjadi sukses dengan memiliki banyak perusahaan di bidang penerbangan dan perikanan. Susi Pudjiastuti juga dikenal baik oleh masyarakat akan kinerjanya dalam bekerja di kementerian. Kinerja yang baik menjadikan Susi Pudjiastuti popular diantara kabinet kerja Jokowi. Saat ini, Sebutan merek pada manusia adalah personal branding yang merupakan trend dari pembentukan pencitraan diri dan penciptaan persepsi yang baik dari orang lain kepada kita. Penelitian ini akan membahas mengenai kepribadian, komunikasi serta personal branding Susi Pudjiastuti dengan metode penelitian kualitatif. Kepribadian yang baik menjadikan Susi Pudjiastuti memiliki kemampuan berkomunikasi dengan baik dan disenangi oleh masyarakat. Kepribadian dan komunikasi tersebut dapat membentuk personal branding Susi Pudjiastuti yang alami. Dengan memaparkan kepribadian dan komunikasi Susi

  8. Neutrino masses from SUSY breaking in radiative seesaw models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Antonio J.R. [University of Lisbon, Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2015-03-01

    Radiatively generated neutrino masses (m{sub ν}) are proportional to supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking, as a result of the SUSY non-renormalisation theorem. In this work, we investigate the space of SUSY radiative seesaw models with regard to their dependence on SUSY breaking (SUSY). In addition to contributions from sources of SUSY that are involved in electroweak symmetry breaking (SUSY{sub EWSB} contributions), and which are manifest from left angle F{sub H}{sup †} right angle = μ left angle anti H right angle ≠ 0 and left angle D right angle = g sum {sub H} left angle H{sup †} x {sub H} H right angle ≠ 0, radiatively generated m{sub ν} can also receive contributions from SUSY sources that are unrelated to EWSB (SUSY{sub EWS} contributions). We point out that recent literature overlooks pure-SUSY{sub EWSB} contributions (∝ μ/M) that can arise at the same order of perturbation theory as the leading order contribution from SUSY{sub EWS}. We show that there exist realistic radiative seesaw models in which the leading order contribution to m{sub ν} is proportional to SUSY{sub EWS}. To our knowledge no model with such a feature exists in the literature. We give a complete description of the simplest model topologies and their leading dependence on SUSY. We show that in one-loop realisations LLHH operators are suppressed by at least μ m{sub soft}/M{sup 3} or m{sub soft}{sup 2}/M{sup 3}. We construct a model example based on a oneloop type-II seesaw. An interesting aspect of these models lies in the fact that the scale of soft-SUSY effects generating the leading order m{sub ν} can be quite small without conflicting with lower limits on the mass of new particles. (orig.)

  9. Reality, Causality, and Probability, from Quantum Mechanics to Quantum Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2015-10-01

    These three lectures consider the questions of reality, causality, and probability in quantum theory, from quantum mechanics to quantum field theory. They do so in part by exploring the ideas of the key founding figures of the theory, such N. Bohr, W. Heisenberg, E. Schrödinger, or P. A. M. Dirac. However, while my discussion of these figures aims to be faithful to their thinking and writings, and while these lectures are motivated by my belief in the helpfulness of their thinking for understanding and advancing quantum theory, this project is not driven by loyalty to their ideas. In part for that reason, these lectures also present different and even conflicting ways of thinking in quantum theory, such as that of Bohr or Heisenberg vs. that of Schrödinger. The lectures, most especially the third one, also consider new physical, mathematical, and philosophical complexities brought in by quantum field theory vis-à-vis quantum mechanics. I close by briefly addressing some of the implications of the argument presented here for the current state of fundamental physics.

  10. Protective measurement and quantum reality towards a new understanding of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Protective measurements offer an intriguing method for measuring the wave function of a single quantum system. With contributions from leading physicists and philosophers of physics - including two of the original discoverers of this important method - this book explores the concept of protective measurement, investigating its broad applications and deep implications. Addressing both physical and philosophical aspects, it covers a diverse range of topics, including experimental possibility of protective measurements, connections with the PBR theorem, and the implications of protective measurements for understanding the nature of quantum reality. Including a clear and concise introduction to standard quantum mechanics, conventional measurements, and the fundamentals of protective measurements, this is a valuable resource for graduate students and researchers interested in the conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics.

  11. Kantian Causality and Quantum Quarks: The Compatibility between Quantum Mechanics and Kant’s Phenomenal World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Palmquist

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantum indeterminism seems incompatible with Kant’s defense of causality in his Second Analogy. The Copenhagen interpretation also takes quantum theory as evidence for anti-realism. This first article of a two-part series argues that the law of causality, as transcendental, applies only to the world as observable, not to hypothetical (unobservable objects such as quarks, detectable only by high energy accelerators. Taking Planck’s constant and the speed of light as the lower and upper bounds of observability provides a way of interpreting the observables of quantum mechanics as empirically real even though they are transcendentally (i.e., pre-observationally ideal.

  12. Susi lubab Concordiale investorit / Sigrid Laev

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laev, Sigrid

    2003-01-01

    Mart Susi teatas Concordia ülikoolile, et tal on kaks võimalikku investorit, kes on huvitatud kooli tegevuses osalemisest. Üks neist on Läti kõrgem ärikool Turiba, teine võimalik investor on Ameerika päritolu

  13. Concordia soovib Susi lahkumist / Sigrid Laev

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laev, Sigrid

    2003-01-01

    Concordia eraülikooli töötajad andsid 5. märtsil pärast ametiühingu koosolekut rektor Mart Susile üle ametliku palve tagasi astuda. Plaanid rektori umbusaldamiseks algasid nädala eest, kui selgus M. Susi tegevus kooli ja oma isiklike varade ühendamisel

  14. Quantum mechanics two volumes bound as one

    CERN Document Server

    Messiah, Albert

    2014-01-01

    ""Strongly recommended"" by the American Journal of Physics, this volume serves as a text for advanced undergraduates and graduate students of physics as well as a reference for professionals. Clear in its presentation and scrupulous in its attention to detail, the treatment originally appeared in a two-volume French edition. This convenient single-volume translation begins with formalism and its interpretation, starting with the origins of quantum theory and examinations of matter waves and the Schrödinger equation, one-dimensional quantized systems, the uncertainty relations, and the mathema

  15. Thermalization and its mechanism for generic isolated quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Marcos; Dunjko, Vanja; Olshanii, Maxim

    2008-04-17

    An understanding of the temporal evolution of isolated many-body quantum systems has long been elusive. Recently, meaningful experimental studies of the problem have become possible, stimulating theoretical interest. In generic isolated systems, non-equilibrium dynamics is expected to result in thermalization: a relaxation to states in which the values of macroscopic quantities are stationary, universal with respect to widely differing initial conditions, and predictable using statistical mechanics. However, it is not obvious what feature of many-body quantum mechanics makes quantum thermalization possible in a sense analogous to that in which dynamical chaos makes classical thermalization possible. For example, dynamical chaos itself cannot occur in an isolated quantum system, in which the time evolution is linear and the spectrum is discrete. Some recent studies even suggest that statistical mechanics may give incorrect predictions for the outcomes of relaxation in such systems. Here we demonstrate that a generic isolated quantum many-body system does relax to a state well described by the standard statistical-mechanical prescription. Moreover, we show that time evolution itself plays a merely auxiliary role in relaxation, and that thermalization instead happens at the level of individual eigenstates, as first proposed by Deutsch and Srednicki. A striking consequence of this eigenstate-thermalization scenario, confirmed for our system, is that knowledge of a single many-body eigenstate is sufficient to compute thermal averages-any eigenstate in the microcanonical energy window will do, because they all give the same result.

  16. Assessing and improving student understanding of quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2006-02-01

    We developed a survey to probe student understanding of quantum mechanics concepts at the beginning of graduate instruction. The survey was administered to 202 graduate students in physics enrolled in first-year quantum mechanics courses from seven different universities at the beginning of the first semester. We also conducted one-on-one interviews with fifteen graduate students or advanced undergraduate students who had just finished a course in which all the content on the survey was covered. We find that students share universal difficulties about fundamental quantum mechanics concepts. The difficulties are often due to over-generalization of concepts learned in one context to other contexts where they are not directly applicable and difficulty in making sense of the abstract quantitative formalism of quantum mechanics. Instructional strategies that focus on improving student understanding of these concepts should take into account these difficulties. The results from this study can sensitize instructors of first-year graduate quantum physics to the conceptual difficulties students are likely to face.

  17. Quantum mechanics. Symmetries. 5. corr. ed.; Quantenmechanik. Symmetrien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, Walter [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Frankfurt Inst. for Advanced Studies; Mueller, Berndt [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2014-07-01

    The volume quantum mechanics treats the as elegant as mighty theory of the symmetry groups and their application in quantum mechanics and the theory of the elementary particles. By means of many examples and problems with worked-out solutions the application of the fundamental principles to realistic problems is elucidated. The themes are symmetries in quantum mechanics, representations of the algebra of the angular momentum operators as generators of the SO(3) group. fundamental properties of Lie groups as mathematical supplement, symmetry groups and their physical meaning, thr isospin group, the hypercharge, quarks and the symmetry group SU(3), representations of the permutation group and Young diagrams, group characters as mathematical supplement, charm and the symmetry group SU(4), Cartan-Weyl claasification as mathematical supplement, special discrete symmetries, dynamical symmetries and the hydrogen atom, non-compact Lie groups as mathematical supplement, a proof of Racah's theorem.

  18. Hypotheses on the a priori rational necessity of quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Gouesbet

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a huge number of laments concerning the lack of intelligibility of quantum mechanics. Some ingredients of quantum mechanics may however be possibly understood by referring to first principles, that is to say to basic principles (or postulates which are clear and distinct to the intuition. In particular, if we rely on a first principle called non-singularity principle, which may be viewed as a hypothesis, we claim that quantum mechanics can be viewed as the a priori consequence of a rational demand. The status of the non-singularity principle, obvious to most physicists, may however be criticized, on the basis that there is no universal intuition and that any statement is in principle revisable.

  19. Reality in quantum mechanics, Extended Everett Concept, and consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensky, M. B.

    2007-09-01

    Conceptual problems in quantum mechanics result from the specific quantum concept of reality and require, for their solution, including the observer’s consciousness into the quantum theory of measurements. Most naturally, this is achieved in the framework of Everett’s “many-world interpretation” of quantum mechanics. According to this interpretation, various classical alternatives are perceived by consciousness separately from each other. In the Extended Everett Concept (EEC) proposed by the present author, the separation of the alternatives is identified with the phenomenon of consciousness. This explains the classical character of the alternatives and unusual manifestations of consciousness arising “at the edge of consciousness” (i.e., in sleep or trance) when its access to “other alternative classical realities” (other Everett’s worlds) becomes feasible. Because of reversibility of quantum evolution in EEC, all time moments in the quantum world are equivalent, while the impression of flow of time appears only in consciousness. If it is assumed that consciousness may influence the probabilities of alternatives (which is consistent in case of infinitely many Everett’s worlds), EEC explains free will, “probabilistic miracles” (observing low-probability events), and decreasing entropy in the sphere of life.

  20. Spatial evolution of quantum mechanical states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, N. D.; Unger, J. E.; Pinto, S.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.

    2018-02-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved traditionally as an initial-time value problem, where its solution is obtained by the action of the unitary time-evolution propagator on the quantum state that is known at all spatial locations but only at t = 0. We generalize this approach by examining the spatial evolution from a state that is, by contrast, known at all times t, but only at one specific location. The corresponding spatial-evolution propagator turns out to be pseudo-unitary. In contrast to the real energies that govern the usual (unitary) time evolution, the spatial evolution can therefore require complex phases associated with dynamically relevant solutions that grow exponentially. By introducing a generalized scalar product, for which the spatial generator is Hermitian, one can show that the temporal integral over the probability current density is spatially conserved, in full analogy to the usual norm of the state, which is temporally conserved. As an application of the spatial propagation formalism, we introduce a spatial backtracking technique that permits us to reconstruct any quantum information about an atom from the ionization data measured at a detector outside the interaction region.

  1. Mechanically controlled quantum interference in individual π-stacked dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Janssen, Vera A E C; Grozema, Ferdinand C; van der Zant, Herre S J; Renaud, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Recent observations of destructive quantum interference in single-molecule junctions confirm the role of quantum effects in the electronic conductance properties of molecular systems. These effects are central to a broad range of chemical and biological processes and may be beneficial for the design of single-molecule electronic components to exploit the intrinsic quantum effects that occur at the molecular scale. Here we show that destructive interference can be turned on or off within the same molecular system by mechanically controlling its conformation. Using a combination of ab initio calculations and single-molecule conductance measurements, we demonstrate the existence of a quasiperiodic destructive quantum-interference pattern along the breaking traces of π-stacked molecular dimers. The results demonstrate that it is possible to control the molecular conductance over more than one order of magnitude and with a sub-ångström resolution by exploiting the subtle structure-property relationship of π-stacked dimers.

  2. Model of the physical space from quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Otto C. W.

    2017-08-01

    The physical world is quantum. However, our description of the quantum physics still relies much on concepts in classical physics and in some cases with ‘quantized’ interpretations. The most important case example is that of spacetime. We examine the picture of the physical space as described by simple, so-called non-relativisitic, quantum mechanics instead of assuming the Newtonian model. The key perspective is that of (relativity) symmetry representation, and the idea that the physical space is to be identified as the configuration space for a free particle. Parallel to the case of the phase space, we have a model of the quantum physical space which reduces to the Newtonian classical model under the classical limit. The latter is to be obtained as a contraction limit of the relativity symmetry.

  3. Conceptual and mathematical barriers to students learning quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaghiani, Homeyra R.

    Quantum mechanics has revolutionized the way we view the physical world. This theory has required a dramatic revision in the structure of the laws of mechanics governing the behavior of the particles and led to the discovery of macroscopic quantum effects ranging from lasers and superconductivity to neutron stars and radiation from black holes. Though its validity is well confirmed by the experimental evidence available, quantum mechanics remains somewhat of a mystery. The purpose of this study is to identify students' conceptual and mathematical difficulties in learning the core concepts of introductory quantum mechanics, with the eventual goal of developing instructional material to help students with these difficulties. We have investigated student understanding of several core topics in the introductory courses, including quantum measurement, probability, Uncertainty Principle, wave functions, energy eigenstates, recognizing symmetry in physical systems, and mathematical formalism. Student specific difficulties with these topics are discussed throughout this dissertation. In addition, we have studied student difficulties in learning, applying, and making sense out of complex mathematical processes in the physics classroom. We found students' achievement in quantum courses is not independent of their math backgrounds (correlation coefficient 0.547 for P631 and 0.347 for P263). In addition, there is a large jump in the level of mathematics at which one needs to succeed in physics courses after the sophomore level in The Ohio State University's physics curriculum. Many students do not have a functional understanding of probability and its related terminologies. For example, many students confuse the "expectation value" with "probability density" in measurement and some students confuse "probability density" with "probability amplitude" or describe the probability amplitude as a "place" or "area." Our data also suggested that students tend to use classical models

  4. Quantum-mechanical treatment of an electron undergoing synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of an electron moving perpendicular to an intense magnetic field is approached from the framework of quantum mechanics. A numerical solution to the related rate equations describing the probabilities of occupation of the electron's energy states is put forth along with the expected errors involved. The quantum-mechanical approach is found to predict a significant amount of energy broadening with time for an initially monoenergetic electron beam entering a region of an intense magnetic field as long as the product of initial energy and magnetic field is of order 50 MG BeV or larger.

  5. The Britannica Guide to Relativity and Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gregersen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    The oft-referenced "E = mc2" may perhaps be one of the world's most famous equations, but it actually represents only one aspect of the complex branch of physics known as relativity. Together, relativity and quantum mechanics explain both the most cosmic and most elementary relationships and processes of the universe. The profound place that relativity and quantum mechanics occupy in subverting longstanding notions about space, time, matter, and more and the brilliant individuals who advanced study in these fields are the subjects of this volume.

  6. Quantum mechanics, common sense and the black hole information paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Danielsson, U H; Danielsson, Ulf H.; Schiffer, Marcelo

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse, in the light of information theory and with the arsenal of (elementary) quantum mechanics (EPR correlations, copying machines, teleportation, mixing produced in sub-systems owing to a trace operation, etc.) the scenarios available on the market to resolve the so-called black-hole information paradox. We shall conclude that the only plausible ones are those where either the unitary evolution of quantum mechanics is given up, in which information leaks continuously in the course of black-hole evaporation through non-local processes, or those in which the world is polluted by an infinite number of meta-stable remnants.

  7. Consciousness and quantum mechanics life in parallel worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Mensky, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of consciousness includes mysterious aspects providing a basis for many spiritual doctrines (including religions) and psychological practices. These directions of human knowledge are usually considered to contradict the laws of science. However, quantum mechanics - in a sense, the mysterious direction of science - allows us to include the phenomena of consciousness and life as well as the relevant phenomena in the sphere of science. Wolfgang Pauli, one of the pioneers of quantum mechanics, together with great psychologist Carl Gustav Jung, guessed about the relation between quan

  8. Does an Emphasis on the Concept of Quantum States Enhance Students' Understanding of Quantum Mechanics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greca, Ileana Maria; Freire, Olival

    Teaching physics implies making choices. In the case of teaching quantum physics, besides an educational choice - the didactic strategy - another choice must be made, an epistemological one, concerning the interpretation of quantum theory itself. These two choices are closely connected. We have chosen a didactic strategy that privileges the phenomenological-conceptual approach, with emphasis upon quantum features of the systems, instead of searching for classical analogies. This choice has led us to present quantum theory associated with an orthodox, yet realistic, interpretation of the concept of quantum state, considered as the key concept of quantum theory, representing the physical reality of a system, independent of measurement processes. The results of the mplementation of this strategy, with three groups of engineering students, showed that more than a half of them attained a reasonable understanding of the basics of quantum mechanics (QM) for this level. In addition, a high degree of satisfaction was attained with the classes as 80% of the students of the experimental groups claimed to have liked it and to be interested in learning more about QM.

  9. Measurable signatures of quantum mechanics in a classical spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, Bassam; Luo, Jun; Yeh, Hsien-Chi; Shao, Cheng-gang; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; McClelland, David E.; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-08-01

    We propose an optomechanics experiment that can search for signatures of a fundamentally classical theory of gravity and in particular of the many-body Schrödinger-Newton (SN) equation, which governs the evolution of a crystal under a self-gravitational field. The SN equation predicts that the dynamics of a macroscopic mechanical oscillator's center-of-mass wave function differ from the predictions of standard quantum mechanics [H. Yang, H. Miao, D.-S. Lee, B. Helou, and Y. Chen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 170401 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.170401]. This difference is largest for low-frequency oscillators, and for materials, such as tungsten or osmium, with small quantum fluctuations of the constituent atoms around their lattice equilibrium sites. Light probes the motion of these oscillators and is eventually measured in order to extract valuable information on the pendulum's dynamics. Due to the nonlinearity contained in the SN equation, we analyze the fluctuations of measurement results differently than standard quantum mechanics. We revisit how to model a thermal bath, and the wave-function collapse postulate, resulting in two prescriptions for analyzing the quantum measurement of the light. We demonstrate that both predict features, in the outgoing light's phase fluctuations' spectrum, which are separate from classical thermal fluctuations and quantum shot noise, and which can be clearly resolved with state of the art technology.

  10. Quantum mechanics concept assessment: Development and validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homeyra R. Sadaghiani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available As part of an ongoing investigation of students’ learning in first semester upper-division quantum mechanics, we needed a high-quality conceptual assessment instrument for comparing outcomes of different curricular approaches. The process of developing such a tool started with converting a preliminary version of a 14-item open-ended quantum mechanics assessment tool (QMAT to a multiple-choice (MC format. Further question refinement, development of effective distractors, adding new questions, and robust statistical analysis has led to a 31-item quantum mechanics concept assessment (QMCA test. The QMCA is used as post-test only to assess students’ knowledge about five main topics of quantum measurement: the time-independent Schrödinger equation, wave functions and boundary conditions, time evolution, and probability density. During two years of testing and refinement, the QMCA has been given in alpha (N=61 and beta versions (N=263 to students in upper division quantum mechanics courses at 11 different institutions with an average post-test score of 54%. By allowing for comparisons of student learning across different populations and institutions, the QMCA provides instructors and researchers a more standard measure of effectiveness of different curricula or teaching strategies on student conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics. In this paper, we discuss the construction of effective distractors and the use of student interviews and expert feedback to revise and validate both questions and distractors. We include the results of common statistical tests of reliability and validity, which suggest the instrument is presently in a stable, usable, and promising form.

  11. Quantum mechanics concept assessment: Development and validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaghiani, Homeyra R.; Pollock, Steven J.

    2015-06-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation of students' learning in first semester upper-division quantum mechanics, we needed a high-quality conceptual assessment instrument for comparing outcomes of different curricular approaches. The process of developing such a tool started with converting a preliminary version of a 14-item open-ended quantum mechanics assessment tool (QMAT) to a multiple-choice (MC) format. Further question refinement, development of effective distractors, adding new questions, and robust statistical analysis has led to a 31-item quantum mechanics concept assessment (QMCA) test. The QMCA is used as post-test only to assess students' knowledge about five main topics of quantum measurement: the time-independent Schrödinger equation, wave functions and boundary conditions, time evolution, and probability density. During two years of testing and refinement, the QMCA has been given in alpha (N =61 ) and beta versions (N =263 ) to students in upper division quantum mechanics courses at 11 different institutions with an average post-test score of 54%. By allowing for comparisons of student learning across different populations and institutions, the QMCA provides instructors and researchers a more standard measure of effectiveness of different curricula or teaching strategies on student conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics. In this paper, we discuss the construction of effective distractors and the use of student interviews and expert feedback to revise and validate both questions and distractors. We include the results of common statistical tests of reliability and validity, which suggest the instrument is presently in a stable, usable, and promising form.

  12. Quantum mechanics, gravity and modified quantization relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Xavier

    2015-08-06

    In this paper, we investigate a possible energy scale dependence of the quantization rules and, in particular, from a phenomenological point of view, an energy scale dependence of an effective [Formula: see text] (reduced Planck's constant). We set a bound on the deviation of the value of [Formula: see text] at the muon scale from its usual value using measurements of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Assuming that inflation has taken place, we can conclude that nature is described by a quantum theory at least up to an energy scale of about 10(16) GeV. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. The quantum dissidents rebuilding the foundations of quantum mechanics (1950-1990)

    CERN Document Server

    Freire Junior, Olival

    2015-01-01

    This book tells the fascinating story of the people and events behind the turbulent changes in attitudes to quantum theory in the second half of the 20th century. The huge success of quantum mechanics as a predictive theory has been accompanied, from the very beginning, by doubts and controversy about its foundations and interpretation. This book looks in detail at how research on foundations evolved after WWII, when it was revived, until the mid 1990s, when most of this research merged into the technological promise of quantum information. It is the story of the quantum dissidents, the scientists who brought this subject from the margins of physics into its mainstream. It is also a history of concepts, experiments, and techniques, and of the relationships between physics and the world at large, touching on  themes such as the Cold War, McCarthyism, Zhdanovism, and the unrest of the late 1960s.

  14. Tests of Quantum Gravity induced non-locality via opto-mechanical quantum oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Belenchia, Alessio; Liberati, Stefano; Marin, Francesco; Marino, Francesco; Ortolan, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Several quantum gravity scenarios lead to physics below the Planck scale characterised by nonlocal, Lorentz invariant equations of motion. We show that such non-local effective field theories lead to a modified Schr\\"odinger evolution in the nonrelativistic limit. In particular, the nonlocal evolution of opto-mechanical quantum oscillators is characterised by a spontaneous periodic squeezing that cannot be generated by environmental effects. We discuss constraints on the nonlocality obtained by past experiments, and show how future experiments (already under construction) will either see such effects or otherwise cast severe bounds on the non-locality scale (well beyond the current limits set by the Large Hadron Collider). This paves the way for table top, high precision experiments on massive quantum objects as a promising new avenue for testing some quantum gravity phenomenology.

  15. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  16. The Classical and Quantum Mechanics of lazy baker Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayan, A

    1993-01-01

    We introduce and study the classical and quantum mechanics of certain non hyperbolic maps on the unit square. These maps are modifications of the usual baker's map and their behaviour ranges from chaotic motion on the whole measure to chaos on a set of measure zero. Thus we have called these maps ``lazy baker maps.'' The aim of introducing these maps is to provide the simplest models of systems with a mixed phase space, in which there are both regular and chaotic motions. We find that despite the obviously contrived nature of these maps they provide a good model for the study of the quantum mechanics of such systems. We notice the effect of a classically chaotic fractal set of measure zero on the corresponding quantum maps, which leads to a transition in the spectral statistics. Some periodic orbits belonging to this fractal set are seen to scar several eigenfunctions.

  17. Euler and applications of quantum mechanics. Paradox IH. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVASYSHIN Henrich Stepanovich

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available By some estimation, thirty percent of the gross national product of the USA depends on the applications of quantum mechanics in one or another form. Different aspects of the development of quantum theory are considered. Based on the residual stresses and relaxation of the stresses in the details of arbitrary forms the analysis of technological option of the Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen paradox interpretation is performed by the method of shaped coordination grid. The option refers to the mystery of measurement of two particles which are located far from each other but at the same time which quantum states are interconnected. The paper also regards the application of involute with variable evolute to increase working capacity of interfaces in free wheels, gearing and ribbon and rack mechanisms.

  18. Theoretical physics 7 quantum mechanics : methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nolting, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    This textbook offers a clear and comprehensive introduction to methods and applications in quantum mechanics, one of the core components of undergraduate physics courses. It follows on naturally from the previous volumes in this series, thus developing the understanding of quantized states further on. The first part of the book introduces the quantum theory of angular momentum and approximation methods. More complex themes are covered in the second part of the book, which describes multiple particle systems and scattering theory. Ideally suited to undergraduate students with some grounding in the basics of quantum mechanics, the book is enhanced throughout with learning features such as boxed inserts and chapter summaries, with key mathematical derivations highlighted to aid understanding. The text is supported by numerous worked examples and end of chapter problem sets.  About the Theoretical Physics series Translated from the renowned and highly successful German editions, the eight volumes of this seri...

  19. Aspects of phase-space noncommutative quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bertolami

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work some issues in the context of Noncommutative Quantum Mechanics (NCQM are addressed. The main focus is on finding whether symmetries present in Quantum Mechanics still hold in the phase-space noncommutative version. In particular, the issues related with gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field and the weak equivalence principle (WEP in the context of the gravitational quantum well (GQW are considered. The question of the Lorentz symmetry and the associated dispersion relation is also examined. Constraints are set on the relevant noncommutative parameters so that gauge invariance and Lorentz invariance holds. In opposition, the WEP is verified to hold in the noncommutative setup, and it is only possible to observe a violation through an anisotropy of the noncommutative parameters.

  20. On Unitary Evolution and Collapse in Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Giacosa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of an interference setup in which only two outcomes are possible (such as in the case of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer, we discuss in a simple and pedagogical way the difference between a standard, unitary quantum mechanical evolution and the existence of a real collapse of the wavefunction. This is a central and not-yet resolved question of quantum mechanics and indeed of quantum field theory as well. Moreover, we also present the Elitzur–Vaidman bomb, the delayed choice experiment, and the effect of decoherence. In the end, we propose two simple experiments to visualize decoherence and to test the role of an entangled particle.Quanta 2014; 3: 156–170.

  1. Horizon quantum mechanics: A hitchhiker’s guide to quantum black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, Roberto; Giugno, Andrea; Micu, Octavian

    2016-01-01

    It is congruous with the quantum nature of the world to view the spacetime geometry as an emergent structure that shows classical features only at some observational level. One can thus conceive the spacetime manifold as a purely theoretical arena, where quantum states are defined, with the additional freedom of changing coordinates like any other symmetry. Observables, including positions and distances, should then be described by suitable operators acting on such quantum states. In principle, the top-down (canonical) quantization of Einstein-Hilbert gravity falls right into this picture, but is notoriously very involved. The complication stems from allowing all the classical canonical variables that appear in the (presumably) fundamental action to become quantum observables acting on the “superspace” of all metrics, regardless of whether they play any role in the description of a specific physical system. On can instead revisit the more humble “minisuperspace” approach and choose the gravitational observables not simply by imposing some symmetry, but motivated by their proven relevance in the (classical) description of a given system. In particular, this review focuses on compact, spherically symmetric, quantum mechanical sources, in order to determine the probability that they are black holes (BHs) rather than regular particles. The gravitational radius is therefore lifted to the status of a quantum mechanical operator acting on the “horizon wave function (HWF),” the latter being determined by the quantum state of the source. This formalism is then applied to several sources with a mass around the fundamental scale, which are viewed as natural candidates of quantum BHs.

  2. Lectures on the mathematics of quantum mechanics II selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Dell'Antonio, Gianfausto

    2016-01-01

    The first volume (General Theory) differs from most textbooks as it emphasizes the mathematical structure and mathematical rigor, while being adapted to the teaching the first semester of an advanced course in Quantum Mechanics (the content of the book are the lectures of courses actually delivered.). It differs also from the very few texts in Quantum Mechanics that give emphasis to the mathematical aspects because this book, being written as Lecture Notes, has the structure of lectures delivered in a course, namely introduction of the problem, outline of the relevant points, mathematical tools needed, theorems, proofs. This makes this book particularly useful for self-study and for instructors in the preparation of a second course in Quantum Mechanics (after a first basic course). With some minor additions it can be used also as a basis of a first course in Quantum Mechanics for students in mathematics curricula. The second part (Selected Topics) are lecture notes of a more advanced course aimed at giving th...

  3. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Quantum Mechanics Post ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Physics Dept

    2016-02-20

    Feb 20, 2016 ... Science Academies' Refresher Course in Quantum Mechanics at. Post Graduate and Research Department of Physics, Government Arts College,. Melur, Madurai ... http://web-japps.ias.ac.in:8080/Refreshcourse/RCMT.jsp. A printed copy of the application approved by the Head of the institution should be ...

  4. Unitarity and causality in generalized quantum mechanics for nonchronal spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, James B.

    1994-06-01

    Spacetime must be foliable by spacelike surfaces for the quantum mechanics of matter fields to be formulated in terms of a unitarily evolving state vector defined on spacelike surfaces. When a spacetime possesses nonchronal regions which cannot be foliated by spacelike surfaces, as in the case of spacetimes with closed timelike curves, a more general formulation of quantum mechanics is required. In such generalizations the transition matrix between alternatives on two spacelike surfaces lying in regions of spacetime where foliating families can be defined may be nonunitary if a nonchronal region lies between them. This paper describes a sum-over-histories generalized quantum mechanics whose probabilities consistently obey the rules of probability theory even in the presence of such nonunitarity. The usual notion of state on a spacelike surface is lost in this generalization. Anomalies such as nonconservation of energy or ``Everett phones'' that are exhibited by some generalizations of quantum mechanics are not found in this one. However, the generalization is acausal in the sense that the existence of nonchronal regions of spacetime in the future can affect the probabilities of alternatives today and signaling outside the light cone is possible. The detectability of nonunitary evolution and violations of causality in measurement situations are briefly considered.

  5. Probabilistic theories What is special about Quantum Mechanics?

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2010-01-01

    More than a century after its birth, quantum mechanics (QM) remains mysterious. We still don't have general principles from which to derive its remarkable mathematical framework, as happened for the amazing Lorentz transformations, which were rederived by Einstein from the invariance of physical laws in inertial frames and from the constancy of the speed of light.

  6. Comment on ''Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics Is Incorrect''

    OpenAIRE

    Bier, Markus

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that ''Theorem 1'' of the article ''Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics Is Incorrect'' by G.-L. Li and V.O.K. Li (see quant-ph/0509089) is false. Therefore the assertion expressed in the title of that article is untenable.

  7. Quantum chemical study of mechanisms of dissociation and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum chemical study of mechanisms of dissociation and isomerization reactions in some molecules and radicals of astrophysical significance: Cyanides and related molecules. V P GUPTA∗ and ARCHNA SHARMA. Department of Physics, University of Jammu, Jammu-Tawi 180 006, India. ∗Corresponding author: ...

  8. Quantum Mechanics Concept Assessment: Development and Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaghiani, Homeyra R.; Pollock, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation of students' learning in first semester upper-division quantum mechanics, we needed a high-quality conceptual assessment instrument for comparing outcomes of different curricular approaches. The process of developing such a tool started with converting a preliminary version of a 14-item open-ended quantum…

  9. Review of Student Difficulties in Upper-Level Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandralekha; Marshman, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Learning advanced physics, in general, is challenging not only due to the increased mathematical sophistication but also because one must continue to build on all of the prior knowledge acquired at the introductory and intermediate levels. In addition, learning quantum mechanics can be especially challenging because the paradigms of classical…

  10. A multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics method for device simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, ChiYung; Meng, Lingyi; Zhang, Yu; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-07

    Multiscale modeling has become a popular tool for research applying to different areas including materials science, microelectronics, biology, chemistry, etc. In this tutorial review, we describe a newly developed multiscale computational method, incorporating quantum mechanics into electronic device modeling with the electromagnetic environment included through classical electrodynamics. In the quantum mechanics/electromagnetics (QM/EM) method, the regions of the system where active electron scattering processes take place are treated quantum mechanically, while the surroundings are described by Maxwell's equations and a semiclassical drift-diffusion model. The QM model and the EM model are solved, respectively, in different regions of the system in a self-consistent manner. Potential distributions and current densities at the interface between QM and EM regions are employed as the boundary conditions for the quantum mechanical and electromagnetic simulations, respectively. The method is illustrated in the simulation of several realistic systems. In the case of junctionless field-effect transistors, transfer characteristics are obtained and a good agreement between experiments and simulations is achieved. Optical properties of a tandem photovoltaic cell are studied and the simulations demonstrate that multiple QM regions are coupled through the classical EM model. Finally, the study of a carbon nanotube-based molecular device shows the accuracy and efficiency of the QM/EM method.

  11. Classical and quantum mechanics of complex Hamiltonian systems ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Certain aspects of classical and quantum mechanics of complex Hamiltonian systems in one dimension investigated within the framework of an extended complex phase space approach, characterized by the transformation = 1 + 2, = 1 + 2, are revisited. It is argued that Carl Bender inducted P T symmetry in ...

  12. A simplified quantum mechanical model of diatomic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Drud

    1978-01-01

    A one-dimensional molecule model with Coulomb potentials replaced by delta functions is introduced. The mathematical simplicity of the model facilitates the quantum mechanical treatment and offers a straightforward demonstration of the essentials of two-particle problems. In spite of the crudeness...

  13. Quantum mechanics in fractional and other anomalous spacetimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Nardelli, Giuseppe; Scalisi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We formulate quantum mechanics in spacetimes with real-order fractional geometry and more general factorizable measures. In spacetimes where coordinates and momenta span the whole real line, Heisenberg's principle is proven and the wave-functions minimizing the uncertainty are found. In spite of the

  14. On phase-space representations of quantum mechanics using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A phase-space formulation of quantum mechanics is proposed by constructing two representations (identified as p q and q p ) in terms of the Glauber coherent states, in which phase-space wave functions (probability amplitudes) play the central role, and position q and momentum p are treated on equal footing. After finding ...

  15. Lectures on the mathematics of quantum mechanics I

    CERN Document Server

    Dell'Antonio, Gianfausto

    2015-01-01

    The first volume (General Theory) differs from most textbooks as it emphasizes the mathematical structure and mathematical rigor, while being adapted to the teaching the first semester of an advanced course in Quantum Mechanics (the content of the book are the lectures of courses actually delivered.). It differs also from the very few texts in Quantum Mechanics that give emphasis to the mathematical aspects because this book, being written as Lecture Notes, has the structure of lectures delivered in a course, namely introduction of the problem, outline of the relevant points, mathematical tools needed, theorems, proofs. This makes this book particularly useful for self-study and for instructors in the preparation of a second course in Quantum Mechanics (after a first basic course). With some minor additions it can be used also as a basis of a first course in Quantum Mechanics for students in mathematics curricula. The second part (Selected Topics) are lecture notes of a more advanced course aimed at giving th...

  16. Mapping superintegrable quantum mechanics to resonant spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evnin, Oleg; Demirchian, Hovhannes; Nersessian, Armen

    2018-01-01

    We describe a procedure naturally associating relativistic Klein-Gordon equations in static curved spacetimes to nonrelativistic quantum motion on curved spaces in the presence of a potential. Our procedure is particularly attractive in application to (typically, superintegrable) problems whose energy spectrum is given by a quadratic function of the energy level number, since for such systems the spacetimes one obtains possess evenly spaced, resonant spectra of frequencies for scalar fields of a certain mass. This construction emerges as a generalization of the previously studied correspondence between the Higgs oscillator and anti-de Sitter spacetime, which has been useful for both understanding weakly nonlinear dynamics in anti-de Sitter spacetime and algebras of conserved quantities of the Higgs oscillator. Our conversion procedure ("Klein-Gordonization") reduces to a nonlinear elliptic equation closely reminiscent of the one emerging in relation to the celebrated Yamabe problem of differential geometry. As an illustration, we explicitly demonstrate how to apply this procedure to superintegrable Rosochatius systems, resulting in a large family of spacetimes with resonant spectra for massless wave equations.

  17. Quantum mechanical cluster calculations of critical scintillationprocesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.; Weber, Marvin J.

    2000-02-22

    This paper describes the use of commercial quantum chemistrycodes to simu-late several critical scintillation processes. The crystalis modeled as a cluster of typically 50 atoms embedded in an array oftypically 5,000 point charges designed to reproduce the electrostaticfield of the infinite crystal. The Schrodinger equation is solved for theground, ionized, and excited states of the system to determine the energyand electron wavefunction. Computational methods for the followingcritical processes are described: (1) the formation and diffusion ofrelaxed holes, (2) the formation of excitons, (3) the trapping ofelectrons and holes by activator atoms, (4) the excitation of activatoratoms, and (5) thermal quenching. Examples include hole diffusion in CsI,the exciton in CsI, the excited state of CsI:Tl, the energy barrier forthe diffusion of relaxed holes in CaF2 and PbF2, and prompt hole trappingby activator atoms in CaF2:Eu and CdS:Te leading to an ultra-fast (<50ps) scintillation risetime.

  18. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Irreversibility in quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadomtsev, Boris B.

    2003-11-01

    From the Editorial Board. November 9, 2003 would have marked the seventy-fifth birthday of Boris Borisovich Kadomtsev, were he alive. An outstanding theoretical physicist, teacher, and enlightener, a prominent scientist in plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion, Kadomtsev was also actively involved in science organization activities. In particular, from 1976 until his untimely death on August 19, 1998, Kadomtsev was the Editor-in-Chief of Physics-Uspekhi, and it is owing to his efforts that the journal improved notably during his tenure. Now, the Editorial Board, with gratitude and sorrow, would like to celebrate his birthday and to honor his blessed memory in these pages. There is, however, a rule — indeed an immutable tradition — in the journal that, except for the Personalia section, no anniversary can be marked in any way other than in a scientific publication. This rule was strictly observed under Kadomtsev, and certainly should not be violated now, even when honoring his memory. Fortunately, there is a video which remained of a lecture on modern problems of quantum physics that Kadomtsev delivered on May 12, 1997. Prepared for publication by M B Kadomtsev, the lecture allows the reader to revisit the heritage of B B Kadomtsev, to appreciate his logic in treating this very difficult area of physics, to hear his voice as it were, to recall Boris Borisovich Kadomtsev and to honor his memory.

  19. A quantum protective mechanism in photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marais, A.; Sinayskiy, I.; Petruccione, F.; van Grondelle, R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, living systems have developed protective mechanisms against reactive oxygen species. During charge separation in photosynthetic reaction centres, triplet states can react with molecular oxygen generating destructive singlet oxygen. The triplet product

  20. The Weyl representation in classical and quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Alfredo M.O. de [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]|[Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France). Inst. Henri Poincare

    1996-09-01

    The position representation of the evolution operator in quantum mechanics is analogous to the generating function formalism of classical mechanics. Similarly, the Weyl representation is connected to new generating functions described by chords and centres. Both classical and quantal theories rely on the group of translations and reflections through a point in phase space. The composition of small time evolutions leads to new versions of the classical variational principle and to path integrals in quantum mechanics. The restriction of the motion to the energy shell in classical mechanics is the basis for a full review of the semiclassical Wigner function and the theory of scars of periodic orbits. By embedding the theory of scars in a fully uniform approximation, it is shown that the region in which the scar contribution is oscillatory is separated from a decaying region by a caustic that touches the shell along the periodic orbit and widens quadratically within the energy shell. (author). 56 refs., 35 figs.

  1. Solvable Quantum Macroscopic Motions and Decoherence Mechanisms in Quantum Mechanics on Nonstandard Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tsunehiro

    1996-01-01

    Quantum macroscopic motions are investigated in the scheme consisting of N-number of harmonic oscillators in terms of ultra-power representations of nonstandard analysis. Decoherence is derived from the large internal degrees of freedom of macroscopic matters.

  2. Highlights from SUSY searches with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsou, V A

    2014-01-01

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is one of the most relevant scenarios of new physics searched by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. In this write-up the principal search strategies employed by ATLAS are outlined and the most recent results for analyses targeting SUSY discovery are discussed. A wide range of signatures is covered motivated by various theoretical scenarios and topologies: strong production, third-generation fermions, long-lived particles and R-parity violation, among others. The results are based on up to ~5/fb of data recorded during 2010 - 2011 at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.

  3. Renormalizations in softly broken SUSY gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeev, L. V.; Kazakov, D. I.; Kondrashuk, I. N.

    1998-01-01

    The supergraph technique for calculations in supersymmetric gauge theories where supersymmetry is broken in a "soft" way (without introducing quadratic divergencies) is reviewed. By introducing an external spurion field the set of Feynman rules is formulated and explicit connections between the UV counterterms of a softly broken and rigid SUSY theories are found. It is shown that the renormalization constants of softly broken SUSY gauge theory also become external superfields depending on the spurion field. Their explicit form repeats that of the constants of a rigid theory with the redefinition of the couplings. The method allows us to reproduce all known results on the renormalization of soft couplings and masses in a softly broken theory. As an example the renormalization group functions for soft couplings and masses in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model up to the three-loop level are calculated.

  4. Renormalizations in softly broken SUSY gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdeev, L.V.; Kazakov, D.I.; Kondrashuk, I.N. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Lab. of Theoretical Physics

    1998-01-19

    The supergraph technique for calculations in supersymmetric gauge theories where supersymmetry is broken in a ``soft`` way (without introducing quadratic divergencies) is reviewed. By introducing an external spurion field the set of Feynman rules is formulated and explicit connections between the UV counterterms of a softly broken and rigid SUSY theories are found. It is shown that the renormalization constants of softly broken SUSY gauge theory also become external superfields depending on the spurion field. Their explicit form repeats that of the constants of a rigid theory with the redefinition of the couplings. The method allows us to reproduce all known results on the renormalization of soft couplings and masses in a softly broken theory. As an example the renormalization group functions for soft couplings and masses in the minimal supersymmetric standard model up to the three-loop level are calculated. (orig.). 16 refs.

  5. Hilltop supernatural inflation and SUSY unified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohri, Kazunori [Cosmophysics Group, Theory Center, IPNS KEK, and The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, 305-0801 (Japan); Lim, C.S. [Department of Mathematics, Tokyo Woman' s Christian University, Tokyo, 167-8585 (Japan); Lin, Chia-Min [Department of Physics, Chuo University, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 112 (Japan); Mimura, Yukihiro, E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp, E-mail: lim@lab.twcu.ac.jp, E-mail: lin@chuo-u.ac.jp, E-mail: mimura@hep1.phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider high scale (100TeV) supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking and realize the idea of hilltop supernatural inflation in concrete particle physics models based on flipped-SU(5)and Pati-Salam models in the framework of supersymmetric grand unified theories (SUSY GUTs). The inflaton can be a flat direction including right-handed sneutrino and the waterfall field is a GUT Higgs. The spectral index is n{sub s} = 0.96 which fits very well with recent data by PLANCK satellite. There is no both thermal and non-thermal gravitino problems. Non-thermal leptogenesis can be resulted from the decay of right-handed sneutrino which plays (part of) the role of inflaton.

  6. Hilltop supernatural inflation and SUSY unified models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Lim, C. S.; Lin, Chia-Min; Mimura, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider high scale (100TeV) supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking and realize the idea of hilltop supernatural inflation in concrete particle physics models based on flipped-SU(5)and Pati-Salam models in the framework of supersymmetric grand unified theories (SUSY GUTs). The inflaton can be a flat direction including right-handed sneutrino and the waterfall field is a GUT Higgs. The spectral index is ns = 0.96 which fits very well with recent data by PLANCK satellite. There is no both thermal and non-thermal gravitino problems. Non-thermal leptogenesis can be resulted from the decay of right-handed sneutrino which plays (part of) the role of inflaton.

  7. A quantum-statistical-mechanical extension of Gaussian mixture model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, K [Graduate School of Information Sciences, Tohoku University, 6-3-09 Aramaki-aza-aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Tsuda, K [Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)], E-mail: kazu@smapip.is.tohoku.ac.jp

    2008-01-15

    We propose an extension of Gaussian mixture models in the statistical-mechanical point of view. The conventional Gaussian mixture models are formulated to divide all points in given data to some kinds of classes. We introduce some quantum states constructed by superposing conventional classes in linear combinations. Our extension can provide a new algorithm in classifications of data by means of linear response formulas in the statistical mechanics.

  8. Applications of molecular quantum mechanics to problems in chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, H.F. III

    1983-03-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in the development of rigorous quantum mechanical methods for the study of molecular electronic structure. Key developments include the emergence of large scale configuration interaction methods (including more than one million variational parameters) and of analytic first and second energy derivative techniques. These advances have greatly increased the scope of current applications of quantun mechanics to chemistry. Present and anticipated future developments with respect to the fields of physical, organic, and inorganic chemistry are surveyed.

  9. Quantum statistics as geometry: Conflict, Mechanism, Interpretation, and Implication

    OpenAIRE

    Galehouse, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    The conflict between the determinism of geometry in general relativity and the essential statistics of quantum mechanics blocks the development of a unified theory. Electromagnetic radiation is essential to both fields and supplies a common meeting ground. It is proposed that a suitable mechanism to resolve these differences can be based on the use of a time-symmetric treatment for the radiation. Advanced fields of the absorber can be interpreted to supply the random character of spontaneous ...

  10. Introduction to non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Aschbacher, W; Pautrat, Y; Pillet, C A

    2005-01-01

    These notes are an expanded version of the lectures given by the second and fourth autor in the summer school "Open Quantum System" held in Grenoble, June 16-July 4, 2003. They provide an introduction to recent developments in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of open quantum systems, including a completely worked out (simple) example. We discuss non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) and their structural properties, entropy production, linear response theory and weak coupling limit. The emphasis is on Ruelle's scattering approach to the construction of NESS.

  11. Topics in non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Aschbacher, W; Pautrat, Y; Pillet, C

    2005-01-01

    These notes are an expanded and revised version of the lectures given by the second and fourth autor in the summer school "Open Quantum System" held in Grenoble, June 16-July 4, 2003. They provide an introduction to recent developments in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of open quantum systems, including a completely worked out (simple) example. We discuss non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) and their structural properties, entropy production, linear response theory and weak coupling limit. The emphasis is on Ruelle's scattering approach to the construction of NESS.

  12. Provably unbounded memory advantage in stochastic simulation using quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Andrew J. P.; Liu, Qing; Thompson, Jayne; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, mile

    2017-10-01

    Simulating the stochastic evolution of real quantities on a digital computer requires a trade-off between the precision to which these quantities are approximated, and the memory required to store them. The statistical accuracy of the simulation is thus generally limited by the internal memory available to the simulator. Here, using tools from computational mechanics, we show that quantum processors with a fixed finite memory can simulate stochastic processes of real variables to arbitrarily high precision. This demonstrates a provable, unbounded memory advantage that a quantum simulator can exhibit over its best possible classical counterpart.

  13. Special Relativity, Causality and Quantum Mechanics - 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The problem arose when it was shown that Maxwell's equations change their form when written in other iner- tial frames following the Galilean transformations which keep the laws of mechanics invariant in all inertial frames. So the principle of relativity seemed to be at stake with the entry of the electromagnetic theory in ...

  14. Thermalization and its mechanism for generic quantum isolated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshanii, Maxim; Dunjko, Vanja; Rigol, Marcos

    2008-05-01

    Time dynamics of isolated many-body quantum systems has long been an elusive subject, perhaps most urgently needed in the foundations of quantum statistical mechanics. In generic systems, one expects the nonequilibrium dynamics to lead to thermalization: a relaxation to states where the values of macroscopic quantities are stationary, universal with respect to widely differing initial conditions, and predictable through the time-tested recipe of statistical mechanics. The relaxation mechanism is not obvious, however; dynamical chaos cannot play the key role as it does in classical systems since quantum evolution is linear. Here we demonstrateootnotetextM. Rigol, V. Dunjko, and M. Olshanii, to appear in Nature (2008), using the results of an ab initio numerical experiment with 5 hard-core bosons moving in a 5x5 lattice, that in quantum systems thermalization happens not in course of time evolution but instead at the level of individual eigenstates, as first proposed by DeutschootnotetextJ. M. Deutsch, Phys.Rev. A 43, 2046 (1991) and SrednickiootnotetextM. Srednicki, Phys. Rev. E 50, 888 (1994).

  15. A perspective on quantum mechanics calculations in ADMET predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, J Phillip; Güner, Osman F

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of drug action has been an important objective for pharmaceutical scientists. With the increasing speed of computers and the implementation of quantum chemistry methodologies, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic problems have become more computationally tractable. Historically the former has been the focus of drug design, but within the last two decades efforts to understand the latter have increased. It takes about fifteen years and over $1 billion dollars for a drug to go from laboratory hit, through lead optimization, to final approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. While the costs have increased substantially, the overall clinical success rate for a compound to emerge from clinical trials is approximately 10%. Most of the attrition rate can be traced to ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity) problems, which is a powerful impetus to study these issues at an earlier stage in drug discovery. Quantum mechanics offers pharmaceutical scientists the opportunity to investigate pharmacokinetic problems at the molecular level prior to laboratory preparation and testing. This review will provide a perspective on the use of quantum mechanics or a combination of quantum mechanics coupled with other classical methods in the pharmacokinetic phase of drug discovery. A brief overview of the essential features of theory will be discussed, and a few carefully selected examples will be given to highlight the computational methods.

  16. The SSM with Suppressed SUSY Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Dixon

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Suppressed SUSY Charge, introduced in a recent Letter, is used here to assemble a new version of the SSM. This new SSM has no need for Squarks or Sleptons. It does not need spontaneous breaking of SUSY, so that the cosmological constant problem does not arise (at least at tree level. It mimics the usual non-supersymmetric Standard Model very well, and the absence of large flavour changing neutral currents is natural. There is no need for a hidden sector, or a messenger sector, or explicit ‘soft’ breaking of SUSY. Spontaneous Gauge Symmetry Breaking from SU(3×SU(2×U(1 to SU(3×U(1 in the model assembled here implies the existence of two new very heavy Higgs Bosons with mass 13.4 TeV, slightly smaller than the energy of the LHC at 14 TeV. There is also a curious set of Gauginos and Higgsinos which have exactly the same masses as the Higgs and Gauge Bosons. These do not couple to the Quarks and Leptons, except through the Higgs and Gauge Bosons. As it stands, this model probably gives rise to too many W+ decays to be consistent with experiment. The Feynman loop expansion of this theory also needs further examination.

  17. The equivalence myth of quantum mechanics-part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, F. A.

    The author endeavours to show two things: first, that Schrödingers (and Eckarts) demonstration in March (September) 1926 of the equivalence of matrix mechanics, as created by Heisenberg, Born, Jordan and Dirac in 1925, and wave mechanics, as created by Schrödinger in 1926, is not foolproof; and second, that it could not have been foolproof, because at the time matrix mechanics and wave mechanics were neither mathematically nor empirically equivalent. That they were is the Equivalence Myth. In order to make the theories equivalent and to prove this, one has to leave the historical scene of 1926 and wait until 1932, when von Neumann finished his magisterial edifice. During the period 1926-1932 the original families of mathematical structures of matrix mechanics and of wave mechanics were stretched, parts were chopped off and novel structures were added. To Procrustean places we go, where we can demonstrate the mathematical, empirical and ontological equivalence of 'the final versions of' matrix mechanics and wave mechanics. The present paper claims to be a comprehensive analysis of one of the pivotal papers in the history of quantum mechanics: Schrödingers equivalence paper. Since the analysis is performed from the perspective of Suppes structural view ('semantic view') of physical theories, the present paper can be regarded not only as a morsel of the internal history of quantum mechanics, but also as a morsel of applied philosophy of science. The paper is self-contained and presupposes only basic knowledge of quantum mechanics. For reasons of length, the paper is published in two parts; Part I appeared in the previous issue of this journal. Section 1 contains, besides an introduction, also the papers five claims and a preview of the arguments supporting these claims; so Part I, Section 1 may serve as a summary of the paper for those readers who are not interested in the detailed arguments.

  18. Quantum Interactomics and Cancer Molecular Mechanisms: I. Report Outline

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    Single cell interactomics in simpler organisms, as well as somatic cell interactomics in multicellular organisms, involve biomolecular interactions in complex signalling pathways that were recently represented in modular terms by quantum automata with ‘reversible behavior’ representing normal cell cycling and division. Other implications of such quantum automata, modular modeling of signaling pathways and cell differentiation during development are in the fields of neural plasticity and brain development leading to quantum-weave dynamic patterns and specific molecular processes underlying extensive memory, learning, anticipation mechanisms and the emergence of human consciousness during the early brain development in children. Cell interactomics is here represented for the first time as a mixture of ‘classical’ states that determine molecular dynamics subject to Boltzmann statistics and ‘steady-state’, metabolic (multi-stable) manifolds, together with ‘configuration’ spaces of metastable quant...

  19. Models on the boundary between classical and quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooft, Gerard 't

    2015-08-06

    Arguments that quantum mechanics cannot be explained in terms of any classical theory using only classical logic seem to be based on sound mathematical considerations: there cannot be physical laws that require 'conspiracy'. It may therefore be surprising that there are several explicit quantum systems where these considerations apparently do not apply. In this report, several such counterexamples are shown. These are quantum models that do have a classical origin. The most curious of these models is superstring theory. So now the question is asked: how can such a model feature 'conspiracy', and how bad is that? Is there conspiracy in the vacuum fluctuations? Arguments concerning Bell's theorem are further sharpened. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Entropy production and equilibration in Yang-Mills quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hung-Ming; Müller, Berndt

    2012-01-01

    The Husimi distribution provides for a coarse-grained representation of the phase-space distribution of a quantum system, which may be used to track the growth of entropy of the system. We present a general and systematic method of solving the Husimi equation of motion for an isolated quantum system, and we construct a coarse-grained Hamiltonian whose expectation value is exactly conserved. As an application, we numerically solve the Husimi equation of motion for two-dimensional Yang-Mills quantum mechanics (the x-y model) and calculate the time evolution of the coarse-grained entropy of a highly excited state. We show that the coarse-grained entropy saturates to a value that coincides with the microcanonical entropy corresponding to the energy of the system. © 2012 American Physical Society

  1. Quantum mechanical reality according to Copenhagen 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Allan M.

    2016-05-01

    The long-standing conceptual controversies concerning the interpretation of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics are argued, on one hand, to be due to its incompleteness, as affirmed by Einstein. But on the other hand, it appears to be possible to complete it at least partially, as Bohr might have appreciated it, in the framework of its standard mathematical formalism with observables as appropriately defined self-adjoint operators. This completion of quantum mechanics is based on the requirement on laboratory physics to be effectively confined to a bounded space region and on the application of the von Neumann deficiency theorem to properly define a set of self-adjoint extensions of standard observables, e.g. the momenta and the Hamiltonian, in terms of certain isometries on the region boundary. This is formalized mathematically in the setting of a boundary ontology for the so-called Qbox in which the wave function acquires a supplementary dependence on a set of Additional Boundary Variables (ABV). It is argued that a certain geometric subset of the ABV parametrizing Quasi-Periodic Translational Isometries (QPTI) has a particular physical importance by allowing for the definition of an ontic wave function, which has the property of epitomizing the spatial wave function “collapse.” Concomitantly the standard wave function in an unbounded geometry is interpreted as an epistemic wave function, which together with the ontic QPTI wave function gives rise to the notion of two-wave duality, replacing the standard concept of wave-particle duality. More generally, this approach to quantum physics in a bounded geometry provides a novel analytical basis for a better understanding of several conceptual notions of quantum mechanics, including reality, nonlocality, entanglement and Heisenberg’s uncertainty relation. The scope of this analysis may be seen as a foundational update of the multiple versions 1.x of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, which is

  2. On the complexity of classical and quantum algorithms for numerical problems in quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessen, Arvid J.

    Our understanding of complex quantum mechanical processes is limited by our inability to solve the equations that govern them except for simple cases. Numerical simulation of quantum systems appears to be our best option to understand, design and improve quantum systems. It turns out, however, that computational problems in quantum mechanics are notoriously difficult to treat numerically. The computational time that is required often scales exponentially with the size of the problem. One of the most radical approaches for treating quantum problems was proposed by Feytiman in 1982 [46]: he suggested that quantum mechanics itself showed a promising way to simulate quantum physics. This idea, the so called quantum computer, showed its potential convincingly in one important regime with the development of Shor's integer factorization algorithm which improves exponentially on the best known classical algorithm. In this thesis we explore six different computational problems from quantum mechanics, study their computational complexity and try to find ways to remedy them. In the first problem we investigate the reasons behind the improved performance of Shor's and similar algorithms. We show that the key quantum part in Shor's algorithm, the quantum phase estimation algorithm, achieves its good performance through the use of power queries and we give lower bounds for all phase estimation algorithms that use power queries that match the known upper bounds. Our research indicates that problems that allow the use of power queries will achieve similar exponential improvements over classical algorithms. We then apply our lower bound technique for power queries to the Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem and show matching lower bounds to the upper bounds of Papageorgiou and Wozniakowski [85]. It seems to be very difficult, though, to find nontrivial instances of the Sturm-Lionville problem for which power queries can be simulated efficiently. A quantum computer differs from a

  3. Principles of physics from quantum field theory to classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, Ni

    2014-01-01

    This book starts from a set of common basic principles to establish the formalisms in all areas of fundamental physics, including quantum field theory, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, general relativity, electromagnetic field, and classical mechanics. Instead of the traditional pedagogic way, the author arranges the subjects and formalisms in a logical-sequential way, i.e. all the formulas are derived from the formulas before them. The formalisms are also kept self-contained. Most of the required mathematical tools are also given in the appendices. Although this book covers all the disciplines of fundamental physics, the book is concise and can be treated as an integrated entity. This is consistent with the aphorism that simplicity is beauty, unification is beauty, and thus physics is beauty. The book may be used as an advanced textbook by graduate students. It is also suitable for physicists who wish to have an overview of fundamental physics. Readership: This is an advanced gradua...

  4. Quantum mechanical properties of graphene nano-flakes and quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongqing; Barnard, Amanda S; Snook, Ian K

    2012-11-07

    In recent years considerable attention has been given to methods for modifying and controlling the electronic and quantum mechanical properties of graphene quantum dots. However, as these types of properties are indirect consequences of the wavefunction of the material, a more efficient way of determining properties may be to engineer the wavefunction directly. One way of doing this may be via deliberate structural modifications, such as producing graphene nanostructures with specific sizes and shapes. In this paper we use quantum mechanical simulations to determine whether the wavefunction, quantified via the distribution of the highest occupied molecular orbital, has a direct and reliable relationship to the physical structure, and whether structural modifications can be useful for wavefunction engineering. We find that the wavefunction of small molecular graphene structures can be different from those of larger nanoscale counterparts, and the distribution of the highest occupied molecular orbital is strongly affected by the geometric shape (but only weakly by edge and corner terminations). This indicates that both size and shape may be more useful parameters in determining quantum mechanical and electronic properties, which should then be reasonably robust against variations in the chemical passivation or functionalisation around the circumference.

  5. Can the photosynthesis first step quantum mechanism be explained?

    CERN Document Server

    Sacilotti, Marco; Mota, Claudia C B O; Nunes, Frederico Dias; Gomes, Anderson S L

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthesis first step mechanism concerns the sunlight absorption and both negative and positive charges separation. Recent and important photosynthesis literature claims that this mechanism is quantum mechanics controlled, however without presenting qualitative or quantitative scientifically based mechanism. The present accepted and old-fashioned photosynthesis mechanism model suffers from few drawbacks and an important issue is the absence of driving force for negative and positive charges separation. This article presents a new qualitative model for this first step mechanism in natural catalytic systems such as photosynthesis in green leaves. The model uses a concept of semiconductor band gap engineering, such as the staggered energy band gap line-up in semiconductors. To explain the primary mechanism in natural photosynthesis the proposal is the following: incident light is absorbed inside the leaves causing charges separation. The only energetic configuration that allows charges separation under illum...

  6. Quantum theory and the flight from realism philosophical responses to quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    This book is a critical introduction to the long-standing debate concerning the conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics and the problems it has posed for physicists and philosophers from Einstein to the present. Quantum theory has been a major infulence on postmodernism, and presents significant problems for realists. Keeping his own realist position in check, Christopher Norris subjects a wide range of key opponents and supporters of realism to a high and equal level of scrutiny. With a characteristic combination of rigour and intellectual generosity, he draws out the merits and weaknesses from opposing arguments. In a sequence of closely argued chapters, Norris examines the premises of orthodox quantum theory, as developed most influentially by Bohr and Heisenberg, and its impact on varous philosophical developments. These include the ideas developed by W.V Quine, Thomas Kuhn, Michael Dummett, Bas van Fraassen, and Hilary Puttnam. In each case, Norris argues, these thinkers have been influenced by the...

  7. Insights into Teaching Quantum Mechanics in Secondary and Lower Undergraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijtenburg-Lewerissa, K.; Pol, H. J.; Brinkman, A.; van Joolingen, W. R.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a review of the current state of research on teaching quantum mechanics in secondary and lower undergraduate education. A conceptual approach to quantum mechanics is being implemented in more and more introductory physics courses around the world. Because of the differences between the conceptual nature of quantum mechanics and…

  8. Observations of the Ramsauer-Townsend effect in quaternionic quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Hadi; Hassanabadi, Hassan; Chung, Won Sang

    2017-06-01

    In this article, one of the well-known effects in quantum mechanics is addressed and also the extended form of quantum mechanics which is based on quaternions is presented. In the presence of this version of quantum mechanics the Ramsauer-Townsend effect has been investigated and the existence of this phenomenon is studied according to quaternionic calculations; results are presented by graphs.

  9. Improving Students' Understanding of Quantum Mechanics by Using Peer Instruction Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Chandralekha; Zhu, Guangtian

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanics is a challenging subject, even for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Here, we discuss the development and evaluation of research-based concept tests for peer instruction as a formative assessment tool in quantum mechanics (QM) courses. The preliminary evaluations show that these tools are effective in helping students develop a good grasp of quantum mechanics.

  10. Foundations of quantum mechanics an exploration of the physical meaning of quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Norsen, Travis

    2017-01-01

    Authored by an acclaimed teacher of quantum physics and philosophy, this textbook pays special attention to the aspects that many courses sweep under the carpet. Traditional courses in quantum mechanics teach students how to use the quantum formalism to make calculations. But even the best students - indeed, especially the best students - emerge rather confused about what, exactly, the theory says is going on, physically, in microscopic systems. This supplementary textbook is designed to help such students understand that they are not alone in their confusions (luminaries such as Albert Einstein, Erwin Schroedinger, and John Stewart Bell having shared them), to sharpen their understanding of the most important difficulties associated with interpreting quantum theory in a realistic manner, and to introduce them to the most promising attempts to formulate the theory in a way that is physically clear and coherent. The text is acces sible to students with at least one semester of prior exposure to quantum (or...

  11. Edge Quantum Criticality and Emergent Supersymmetry in Topological Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Xiang; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Yao, Hong

    2017-09-01

    Proposed as a fundamental symmetry describing our Universe, spacetime supersymmetry (SUSY) has not been discovered yet in nature. Nonetheless, it has been predicted that SUSY may emerge in low-energy physics of quantum materials such as topological superconductors and Weyl semimetals. Here, by performing state-of-the-art sign-problem-free quantum Monte Carlo simulations of an interacting two-dimensional topological superconductor, we show convincing evidence that the N =1 SUSY emerges at its edge quantum critical point (EQCP) while its bulk remains gapped and topologically nontrivial. Remarkably, near the EQCP, we find that the edge Majorana fermion acquires a mass that is identical with that of its bosonic superpartner. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first observation that fermions and bosons have equal dynamically generated masses, a hallmark of emergent SUSY. We further discuss experimental signatures of such EQCP and associated SUSY.

  12. The hyperbolic step potential: Anti-bound states, SUSY partners and Wigner time delays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadella, M. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Atómica y Óptica and IMUVA, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Kuru, Ş. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ankara University, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Negro, J., E-mail: jnegro@fta.uva.es [Departamento de Física Teórica, Atómica y Óptica and IMUVA, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    We study the scattering produced by a one dimensional hyperbolic step potential, which is exactly solvable and shows an unusual interest because of its asymmetric character. The analytic continuation of the scattering matrix in the momentum representation has a branch cut and an infinite number of simple poles on the negative imaginary axis which are related with the so called anti-bound states. This model does not show resonances. Using the wave functions of the anti-bound states, we obtain supersymmetric (SUSY) partners which are the series of Rosen–Morse II potentials. We have computed the Wigner reflection and transmission time delays for the hyperbolic step and such SUSY partners. Our results show that the more bound states a partner Hamiltonian has the smaller is the time delay. We also have evaluated time delays for the hyperbolic step potential in the classical case and have obtained striking similitudes with the quantum case. - Highlights: • The scattering matrix of hyperbolic step potential is studied. • The scattering matrix has a branch cut and an infinite number of poles. • The poles are associated to anti-bound states. • Susy partners using antibound states are computed. • Wigner time delays for the hyperbolic step and partner potentials are compared.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Mind, Matter and Quantum Mechanics (2nd edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, G.

    2004-07-01

    Quantum mechanics is usually defined in terms of some loosely connected axioms and rules. Such a foundation is far from the beauty of, e.g., the `principles' underlying classical mechanics. Motivated, in addition, by notorious interpretation problems, there have been numerous attempts to modify or `complete' quantum mechanics. A first attempt was based on so-called hidden variables; its proponents essentially tried to expel the non-classical nature of quantum mechanics. More recent proposals intend to complete quantum mechanics not within mechanics proper but on a `higher (synthetic) level'; by means of a combination with gravitation theory (R Penrose), with quantum information theory (C M Caves, C A Fuchs) or with psychology and brain science (H P Stapp). I think it is fair to say that in each case the combination is with a subject that, per se, suffers from a very limited understanding that is even more severe than that of quantum mechanics. This was acceptable, though, if it could convincingly be argued that scientific progress desperately needs to join forces. Quantum mechanics of a closed system was a beautiful and well understood theory with its respective state being presented as a point on a deterministic trajectory in Liouville space---not unlike the motion of a classical N-particle system in its 6N-dimensional phase-space. Unfortunately, we need an inside and an outside view, we need an external reference frame, we need an observer. This unavoidable partition is the origin of most of the troubles we have with quantum mechanics. A pragmatic solution is introduced in the form of so-called measurement postulates: one of the various incompatible properties of the system under consideration is supposed to be realized (i.e. to become a fact, to be defined without fundamental dispersion) based on `instantaneous' projections within some externally selected measurement basis. As a result, the theory becomes essentially statistical rather than deterministic

  14. Students' epistemological framing in quantum mechanics problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modir, Bahar; Thompson, John D.; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2017-12-01

    Students' difficulties in quantum mechanics may be the result of unproductive framing and not a fundamental inability to solve the problems or misconceptions about physics content. We observed groups of students solving quantum mechanics problems in an upper-division physics course. Using the lens of epistemological framing, we investigated four frames in our observational data: algorithmic math, conceptual math, algorithmic physics, and conceptual physics. We discuss the characteristics of each frame as well as causes for transitions between different frames, arguing that productive problem solving may occur in any frame as long as students transition appropriately between frames. Our work extends epistemological framing theory on how students frame discussions in upper-division physics courses.

  15. The black hole S-Matrix from quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betzios, Panagiotis; Gaddam, Nava; Papadoulaki, Olga [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Center for Extreme Matter and Emergent Phenomena,Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, Utrecht, 3508 TD The (Netherlands)

    2016-11-22

    We revisit the old black hole S-Matrix construction and its new partial wave expansion of ’t Hooft. Inspired by old ideas from non-critical string theory & c=1 Matrix Quantum Mechanics, we reformulate the scattering in terms of a quantum mechanical model — of waves scattering off inverted harmonic oscillator potentials — that exactly reproduces the unitary black hole S-Matrix for all spherical harmonics; each partial wave corresponds to an inverted harmonic oscillator with ground state energy that is shifted relative to the s-wave oscillator. Identifying a connection to 2d string theory allows us to show that there is an exponential degeneracy in how a given total initial energy may be distributed among many partial waves of the 4d black hole.

  16. Sampling Molecular Conformers in Solution with Quantum Mechanical Accuracy at a Nearly Molecular-Mechanics Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Marta; Micciarelli, Marco; Laio, Alessandro; Baroni, Stefano

    2016-09-13

    We introduce a method to evaluate the relative populations of different conformers of molecular species in solution, aiming at quantum mechanical accuracy, while keeping the computational cost at a nearly molecular-mechanics level. This goal is achieved by combining long classical molecular-dynamics simulations to sample the free-energy landscape of the system, advanced clustering techniques to identify the most relevant conformers, and thermodynamic perturbation theory to correct the resulting populations, using quantum-mechanical energies from density functional theory. A quantitative criterion for assessing the accuracy thus achieved is proposed. The resulting methodology is demonstrated in the specific case of cyanin (cyanidin-3-glucoside) in water solution.

  17. Introduction of a quantum of time (`chronon`) and its consequences for quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, R.H.A. [Lab. Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Recami, E. [Bergamo Univ. (Italy). Fac. di Ingegneria]|[INFN, Milan (Italy)]|[Campinas, State University, SP (Brazil). DMO-FEEC, CCS

    1998-12-31

    The authors discuss the consequences of the introduction of a quantum of time {tau}{sub 0} in the formalism of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, by referring themselves in particular to the theory of the chronon as proposed by P. Caldirola. Such an interesting `finite difference` theory, forwards -at the classical level- a solution for the motion of a particle endowed with a non-negligible charge in an external electromagnetic field, overcoming all the known difficulties met by Abraham-Lorentz`s and Dirac`s approaches (and even allowing a clear answer to the question whether a free falling charged particle does or not emit radiation), and -at the quantum level- yields a remarkable mass spectrum for leptons. After having briefly reviewed Caldirola`s approach, the first aim of the authors is to work out, discuss, and compare one another the mew representations of Quantum Mechanics (QM) resulting from it, in the Schroedinger, Heisenberg and density-operator (Liouville-von Neumann) pictures, respectively.The authors also obtain the (retarded) finite-difference Schroedinger equation within the Feynman path integral approach, and study some of its relevant solutions. They, then, derive the time-evolution operators of this discrete theory, and use them to get the finite-difference Heisenberg equations. At last, the density matrix formalism is applied to the solution of the measurement problem in QM, with very interesting results, so as a natural explication of `decoherence`, which reveal the power of dicretized (in particular, retarded) QM.

  18. Towards a Neo-Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    de Muynck, W. M.

    2003-01-01

    The Copenhagen interpretation is critically considered. A number of ambiguities, inconsistencies and confusions are discussed. It is argued that it is possible to purge the interpretation so as to obtain a consistent and reasonable way to interpret the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics, which is in agreement with the way this theory is dealt with in experimental practice. In particular, the essential role attributed by the Copenhagen interpretation to measurement is acknowledged. Fo...

  19. The Phase Space Formulation of Time-Symmetric Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlyne de Gosson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Time-symmetric quantum mechanics can be described in the Weyl–Wigner–Moyal phase space formalism by using the properties of the cross-terms appearing in the Wigner distribution of a sum of states. These properties show the appearance of a strongly oscillating interference between the pre-selected and post-selected states. It is interesting to note that the knowledge of this interference term is sufficient to reconstruct both states. Quanta 2015; 4: 27–34.

  20. Arithmetic for the unification of quantum mechanics and general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korotkikh, Victor, E-mail: v.korotkikh@cqu.edu.a [School of Computing Sciences, Faculty of Business and Informatics, Central Queensland University, Mackay, Queensland, 4740 (Australia)

    2009-06-01

    In the paper we bring attention to description of complex systems in terms of self-organization processes of prime integer relations. Revealed through the unity of two equivalent forms, arithmetical and geometrical, the description may have the potential for the unification of quantum mechanics and general relativity. Remarkably, based on integers and controlled by arithmetic only such processes can define nonlocal correlations between parts of a complex system and the geometry of their spacetimes.