WorldWideScience

Sample records for sustaining tumor growth

  1. Sustained delivery of vincristine inside an orthotopic mouse sarcoma model decreases tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jamie C; Coburn, Jeannine M; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Kaplan, David L; Chiu, Bill

    2016-12-01

    Sarcoma accounts for 20% of solid tumors in children. Surgery has significant morbidity. We hypothesized that delivering chemotherapy directly into tumors through sustained release silk systems could slow tumor growth. Human Ewing sarcoma cells A673 were cultured with vincristine and doxorubicin to determine half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50). Cells were injected into mouse hind leg to create orthotopic tumors. Tumor volumes were measured using ultrasound. When volume reached >250mm(3,) interventions included: implantation of drug-free silk foam (Control-F), doxorubicin 400μg foam (Dox400-F), vincristine 50μg foam (Vin50-F), drug-free silk gel (Control-G), vincristine 50μg gel (Vin50-G), or single dose intravenous vincristine 50μg (Vin50-IV). End-point was volume>1000mm(3). Kaplan Meier and ANOVA were used. IC50 for vincristine and doxorubicin was 0.5ng/mL and 200ng/mL, respectively. There was no difference between Dox400-F [6±1days to end point (DTEP)] and Control-F (5±1.3 DTEP). Vin50-F (12.4±3.5 DTEP) had slower growth compared to Control-F (pinside the sarcoma tumor with silk gel decreased tumor growth. Applying this intratumoral treatment strategy may potentially decrease the extent of surgical excision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Towards Sustainable Growth Business Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamp-Roelands, N.; Balkenende, J.P.; Van Ommen, P.

    2012-03-15

    The Dutch Sustainable Growth Coalition (DSGC) has the following objectives: The DSGC aims to pro-actively drive sustainable growth business models along three lines: (1) Shape. DSGC member companies aim to connect economic profitability with environmental and social progress on the basis of integrated sustainable growth business models; (2) Share. DSGC member companies aim for joint advocacy of sustainable growth business models both internationally and nationally; and (3) Stimulate. DSGC member companies aim to stimulate and influence the policy debate on enabling sustainable growth - with a view to finding solutions to the environmental and social challenges we are facing. This is their first report. The vision, actions and mission of DSGC are documented in the Manifesto in Chapter 2 of this publication. Chapter 3 contains an overview of key features of an integrated sustainable growth business model and the roadmap towards such a model. In Chapter 4, project examples of DSGC members are presented, providing insight into the hands-on reality of implementing the good practices. Chapter 5 offers an overview of how the Netherlands provides an enabling environment for sustainable growth business models. Chapter 6 offers the key conclusions.

  3. Circulating Fibronectin Controls Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja von Au

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibronectin is ubiquitously expressed in the extracellular matrix, and experimental evidence has shown that it modulates blood vessel formation. The relative contribution of local and circulating fibronectin to blood vessel formation in vivo remains unknown despite evidence for unexpected roles of circulating fibronectin in various diseases. Using transgenic mouse models, we established that circulating fibronectin facilitates the growth of bone metastases by enhancing blood vessel formation and maturation. This effect is more relevant than that of fibronectin produced by endothelial cells and pericytes, which only exert a small additive effect on vessel maturation. Circulating fibronectin enhances its local production in tumors through a positive feedback loop and increases the amount of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF retained in the matrix. Both fibronectin and VEGF then cooperate to stimulate blood vessel formation. Fibronectin content in the tumor correlates with the number of blood vessels and tumor growth in the mouse models. Consistent with these results, examination of three separate arrays from patients with breast and prostate cancers revealed that a high staining intensity for fibronectin in tumors is associated with increased mortality. These results establish that circulating fibronectin modulates blood vessel formation and tumor growth by modifying the amount of and the response to VEGF. Furthermore, determination of the fibronectin content can serve as a prognostic biomarker for breast and prostate cancers and possibly other cancers.

  4. Sustainability, Smart Growth, and Landscape Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainability, Smart Growth, and Landscape Architecture is an overview course for landscape architecture students interested in sustainability in landscape architecture and how it might apply to smart growth principles in urban, suburban, and rural areas

  5. Quantitation and gompertzian analysis of tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    Human tumor xenografts in immune-deficient animals are used to establish tumor growth curves and for studying the effect of experimental therapy on tumor growth. In this review we describe a method for making serial measurements of tumor size in the nude mouse model as well as methods used...... to transform the experimental data into useful growth curves. A transformed Gompertz function is used as the basis for calculating relevant parameters pertaining to tumor growth and response to therapy. The calculations are facilitated by use of a computer program which performs the necessary calculations...

  6. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor C–Induced Lymphangiogenesis DecreasesTumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure and Tumor Growth1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias; Pflanzer, Ralph; Zoller, Nadja Nicole; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Thaci, Diamant; Bereiter-Hahn, Jurgen; Hirohata, Satoshi; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Characteristically, most solid tumors exhibit an increased tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) that directly contributes to the lowered uptake of macromolecular therapeutics into the tumor interstitium. Abnormalities in the tumor-associated lymph vessels are a central brick in the development and prolonged sustaining of an increased TIFP. In the current study, vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) was used to enhance tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis as a new mechanism to actively reduce the TIFP by increased lymphatic drainage of the tumor tissue. Human A431 epidermoid vulva carcinoma cells were inoculated in NMRI nu/nu mice to generate a xenograft mouse model. Seven days after tumor cell injection, VEGF-C was peritumorally injected to induce lymphangiogenesis. Tumor growth and TIFP was lowered significantly over time in VEGF-C-treated tumors in comparison to control or VEGF-A-treated animals. These data demonstrate for the first time that actively induced lymphangiogenesis can lower the TIFP in a xenograft tumor model and apparently reduce tumor growth. This model represents a novel approach to modulate biomechanical properties of the tumor interstitium enabling a lowering of TIFP in vivo. PMID:23908682

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor C-induced lymphangiogenesis decreases tumor interstitial fluid pressure and tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias; Pflanzer, Ralph; Zoller, Nadja Nicole; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Thaci, Diamant; Bereiter-Hahn, Jurgen; Hirohata, Satoshi; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Characteristically, most solid tumors exhibit an increased tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) that directly contributes to the lowered uptake of macromolecular therapeutics into the tumor interstitium. Abnormalities in the tumor-associated lymph vessels are a central brick in the development and prolonged sustaining of an increased TIFP. In the current study, vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) was used to enhance tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis as a new mechanism to actively reduce the TIFP by increased lymphatic drainage of the tumor tissue. Human A431 epidermoid vulva carcinoma cells were inoculated in NMRI nu/nu mice to generate a xenograft mouse model. Seven days after tumor cell injection, VEGF-C was peritumorally injected to induce lymphangiogenesis. Tumor growth and TIFP was lowered significantly over time in VEGF-C-treated tumors in comparison to control or VEGF-A-treated animals. These data demonstrate for the first time that actively induced lymphangiogenesis can lower the TIFP in a xenograft tumor model and apparently reduce tumor growth. This model represents a novel approach to modulate biomechanical properties of the tumor interstitium enabling a lowering of TIFP in vivo.

  8. Strange Attractor in Immunology of Tumor Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Voitikova, M

    1997-01-01

    The time delayed cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response on the tumor growth has been developed on the basis of discrete approximation (2-dimensional map). The growth kinetic has been described by logistic law with growth rate being the bifurcation parameter. Increase in the growth rate results in instability of the tumor state and causes period-doubling bifurcations in the immune+tumor system. For larger values of tumor growth rate a strange attractor has been observed. The model proposed is able to describe the metastable-state production when time series data of the immune state and the number of tumor cells are irregular and unpredictable. This metastatic disease may be caused not by exterior (medical) factors, but interior density dependent ones.

  9. Self-scaling tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegel, Jürgen

    We study the statistical properties of the star-shaped approximation of in vitro tumor profiles. The emphasis is on the two-point correlation structure of the radii of the tumor as a function of time and angle. In particular, we show that spatial two-point correlators follow a cosine law....... Based on this similarity, we provide a Lévy based model that captures the correlation structure of the radii of the star-shaped tumor profiles....

  10. Surgical stress and accelerated tumor growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kal, Henk B.; Struikmans, Henk; Rijbroek, Angelique D. Barten-van

    2008-01-01

    Background: Delay in the initiation of radiotherapy after surgery is associated with an increase in local regional recurrence. A possible mechanism might be that remaining tumor cells proliferate significantly faster as a result of induced angiogenic cytokines. The growth rate of tumors arising from

  11. Aspm sustains postnatal cerebellar neurogenesis and medulloblastoma growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Scott E; Garcia, Idoia; Crowther, Andrew J; Li, Shiyi; Stewart, Alyssa; Liu, Hedi; Lough, Kendall J; O'Neill, Sean; Veleta, Katherine; Oyarzabal, Esteban A; Merrill, Joseph R; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Gershon, Timothy R

    2015-11-15

    Alterations in genes that regulate brain size may contribute to both microcephaly and brain tumor formation. Here, we report that Aspm, a gene that is mutated in familial microcephaly, regulates postnatal neurogenesis in the cerebellum and supports the growth of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Cerebellar granule neuron progenitors (CGNPs) express Aspm when maintained in a proliferative state by sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, and Aspm is expressed in Shh-driven medulloblastoma in mice. Genetic deletion of Aspm reduces cerebellar growth, while paradoxically increasing the mitotic rate of CGNPs. Aspm-deficient CGNPs show impaired mitotic progression, altered patterns of division orientation and differentiation, and increased DNA damage, which causes progenitor attrition through apoptosis. Deletion of Aspm in mice with Smo-induced medulloblastoma reduces tumor growth and increases DNA damage. Co-deletion of Aspm and either of the apoptosis regulators Bax or Trp53 (also known as p53) rescues the survival of neural progenitors and reduces the growth restriction imposed by Aspm deletion. Our data show that Aspm functions to regulate mitosis and to mitigate DNA damage during CGNP cell division, causes microcephaly through progenitor apoptosis when mutated, and sustains tumor growth in medulloblastoma. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Cellular Potts modeling of tumor growth, tumor invasion and tumor evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Szabó (Andras); R.M.H. Merks (Roeland)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractDespite a growing wealth of available molecular data, the growth of tumors, invasion of tumors into healthy tissue, and response of tumors to therapies are still poorly understood. Although genetic mutations are in general the first step in the development of a cancer, for the mutated

  13. Rhabdoid tumor growth is inhibited by flavopiridol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melissa E; Cimica, Velasco; Chinni, Srinivasa; Challagulla, Kavitha; Mani, Sridhar; Kalpana, Ganjam V

    2008-01-15

    Rhabdoid tumors are aggressive and incurable pediatric malignancies. INI1/hSNF5, a tumor suppressor biallelically deleted/inactivated in rhabdoid tumors, directly represses cyclin D1. Rhabdoid tumors and cells are exquisitely dependent on cyclin D1 for genesis and survival, suggesting that targeting the cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) axis may be an effective therapeutic strategy for these tumors. Because cdk inhibitors have not been used for preclinical or clinical testing on rhabdoid tumors, we investigated the effect of flavopiridol, a pan-cdk inhibitor with promising clinical activity, on rhabdoid tumors. The effect of flavopiridol on rhabdoid cells was tested in vitro using survival, cell cycle, and apoptosis assays. Its effect was assessed in vivo using xenografted rhabdoid tumor models. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analysis was used to assess the effect of flavopiridol on cyclin D1 and p21 expression in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Nanomolar concentrations of flavopiridol inhibited rhabdoid cell growth (IC(50) approximately 200 nmol/L), induced G(1) and G(2) arrest, and apoptosis in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects were correlated with the down-modulation of cyclin D1, up-regulation of p21, and induction of caspase 3/7 activities. Flavopiridol (at 7.5 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the growth of xenografted rhabdoid tumors, and its effect was correlated with the induction of p21 and down-modulation of cyclin D1. Flavopiridol is effective in inducing cell cycle arrest and cytotoxicity in rhabdoid tumors. Its effects are correlated with the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and the up-regulation of p21. Flavopiridol is potentially a novel chemotherapeutic agent for rhabdoid tumors.

  14. Autoimmune mediated regulation of ovarian tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Jaini, Ritika; Kesaraju, Pavani; Jane-wit, Daniel; Johnson, Justin M; Covey, Kelly; Flask, Christopher A; Dutertre, Martin; Picard, Jean-Yves; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2012-01-01

    An immune response sufficient to induce organ failure may provide protection and therapy against tumors derived from the targeted organ particularly when removal or ablation of the organ is part of the standard therapy and does not threaten survival. We have previously shown that a targeted immune response directed against the ovarian-specific protein, inhibin-α, causes ovarian failure. Here we determined whether inhibin-α autoimmunity is effective in both prevention and treatment of ovarian tumors. A transgene consisting of the SV40 large tumor transformation antigen under the regulation of an anti-Mullerian hormone promoter (AMH-SV40Tag) was transferred by backcrossing for 12 generations to SJL/J mice producing SJL.AMH-SV40Tag (H-2(s)) females that develop a high incidence of autochthonous granulosa cell tumors. We determined whether immunization of SJL.AMH-SV40Tag female mice with the IA(s)-restricted p215-234 peptide of mouse inhibin-α was capable of preventing and treating these ovarian tumors. The growth of autochthonous ovarian granulosa cell tumors in SJL.AMH-SV40Tag transgenic mice was significantly inhibited in mice immunized with Inα 215-234. In addition, significant inhibition of tumor growth occurred when mice with established ovarian granulosa cell tumors were therapeutically vaccinated with Inα 215-234. Our results indicate that induction of ovarian-specific autoimmunity may serve as an effective way to prevent the emergence of autochthonous ovarian tumors and control the growth of established ovarian malignancies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. IL-18-producing Salmonella inhibit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Markus; Le'Negrate, Gaelle; Krajewska, Maryla; Reed, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that intravenously applied bacteria can accumulate in tumors and lead to sporadic tumor regression. Recently, systemic administration of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium was demonstrated to generate no significant side effects in humans, but also no anti-tumor responses. We report the enhanced antitumor activity in preclinical mouse cancer models of non-virulent S. typhimurium engineered to synthesize the cytokine, Interleukin-18 (IL-18). IL-18-producing bacteria (but not control bacteria) inhibit the growth of primary subcutaneous tumors as well as pulmonary metastases in immunocompetent mice challenged with syngeneic multi-drug resistant clones of murine carcinoma cell lines, without overt toxicity to normal tissues. Anti-tumor activity was associated with increased accumulation of T-lymphocytes and NK cells in tumors, and massive infiltration of granulocytes, as well as increased intra-tumoral production of several cytokines. In summary, these findings provide evidence of promising preclinical anti-tumor activity of IL-18-expressing, attenuated S. typhimurium, suggesting a novel strategy for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:18654612

  16. Big Bang Tumor Growth and Clonal Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ruping; Hu, Zheng; Curtis, Christina

    2017-07-14

    The advent and application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to tumor genomes has reinvigorated efforts to understand clonal evolution. Although tumor progression has traditionally been viewed as a gradual stepwise process, recent studies suggest that evolutionary rates in tumors can be variable with periods of punctuated mutational bursts and relative stasis. For example, Big Bang dynamics have been reported, wherein after transformation, growth occurs in the absence of stringent selection, consistent with effectively neutral evolution. Although first noted in colorectal tumors, effective neutrality may be relatively common. Additionally, punctuated evolution resulting from mutational bursts and cataclysmic genomic alterations have been described. In this review, we contrast these findings with the conventional gradualist view of clonal evolution and describe potential clinical and therapeutic implications of different evolutionary modes and tempos. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  17. Plasminogen supports tumor growth through a fibrinogen-dependent mechanism linked to vascular patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Joseph S; Talmage, Kathryn E; Liu, Hong; La Jeunesse, Christine M; Witte, David P; Degen, Jay L

    2003-10-15

    The growth of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) was sustained in plasminogen-deficient mice when transplanted into the dorsal skin but was dramatically suppressed in another anatomic location, the footpad. This unanticipated negative effect of plasminogen deficiency on footpad tumor growth was entirely relieved by superimposing a deficit in fibrinogen. This finding was not simply an unusual feature of LLC tumors--T241 fibrosarcoma growth in the footpad was also restricted by plasminogen deficiency in a fibrinogen-dependent manner. The probable mechanistic basis for suppression of tumor growth was revealed through transmission electron microscopy studies of tumor tissues. Occlusive microvascular thrombi were commonplace within footpad tumors from plasminogen-deficient mice, whereas no such lesions were observed within either dorsal skin tumors from plasminogen-deficient mice or footpad tumors from mice that also lacked fibrinogen. The data infer that tumor growth in the footpad of plasminogen-deficient mice is compromised as a function of the formation and persistence of vaso-occlusive thrombi that limit tumor blood supply. These studies indicate that plasminogen and fibrinogen can serve as critical determinants of tumor growth, but their relative importance is dependent on the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, these studies suggest that one target of plasmin(ogen) relevant to tumor progression in vivo is intravascular fibrin.

  18. Sustained growth but non-sustainable urbanisation in Penang, Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangel, Arne; Fold, Niels

    1998-01-01

    of trade unions, which lack the strength to substantially improve wages or influence the institutions of the labour market. So a frenzied labour market tries to balance the upgrading of skills and the control of wages. The paper concludes that a focus on sustainable urbanisation will renew the debate......Foreign capital, particularly from the transnational electronics industries, has spurred urban growth in Penang, Malaysia. But the demand for labour-quantitative and qualitative-exceeds its supply from the northern states. Local and national labour policies are decided without the involvement...

  19. Green economic growth premise for sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Lenuţa TRICĂ; Marilena PAPUC

    2013-01-01

    Accelerating the global issues such as natural resource depletion, damage to the natural environment, economic and financial crises and consumption growth led to the shift of the development paradigm from consumption to sustainable development and recognition of the new path, namely green economy. At the European level a number of international organizations discussed issues of transition to green economy (EC, UNEP, OECD). In 2008, UNEP launched “Green Economy Initiative to Get the Global Mar...

  20. Essential contribution of tumor-derived perlecan to epidermal tumor growth and angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Multhaupt, Hinke; Chan, En

    2004-01-01

    As a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (PG) in basement membranes, perlecan has been linked to tumor invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Here we produced epidermal tumors in immunocompromised rats by injection of mouse RT101 tumor cells. Tumor sections stained with species-specific perlecan...... factor. In vivo, antisense perlecan-transfected cells generated no tumors, whereas untransfected and vector-transfected cells formed tumors with obvious neovascularization, suggesting that tumor perlecan rather than host perlecan controls tumor growth and angiogenesis....

  1. Economic Growth and Sustainable Housing: An Uneasy Relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Hubert

    2017-01-01

    Book review of: "Economic Growth and Sustainable Housing: An Uneasy Relationship" by Jin Xue (Routledge, 2014)......Book review of: "Economic Growth and Sustainable Housing: An Uneasy Relationship" by Jin Xue (Routledge, 2014)...

  2. Endogenous morphinergic signaling and tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cadet, Patrick; Rasmussen, Mads; Zhu, Wei

    2004-01-01

    signaling molecule in neural, immune and vascular systems. In addition to their use in the treatment of pain, opioid peptides appear to be important in the growth regulation of normal and neoplastic tissue. This review will focus on the influence of opiate alkaloids, e.g., morphine, on tumor growth......The mu3 opiate receptor subtype has been characterized by various binding assays as opiate alkaloid selective (e.g. morphine) and opioid peptide (e.g. methionine enkephalin) insensitive. This opiate receptor subtype has been found on human, including cancer cell lines, and invertebrate tissues...

  3. SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH AND ECO-EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana\tLUPAN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The current economic and social contexts have brought forth the issues regarding growth and sustainability. The concept of growth has always been linked to an increase in consumption levels, and this inevitably led to pressures on the environment and on the resources that support human activity. Given these circumstances, the question whether we can avoid an environmental disaster while maintaining economic growth, has become more stringent. We chose to approach this aspect by examining the concept of eco-efficiency, a concept that embodies aspects of both economic efficiency and environmental efficiency. Eco-efficiency can be regarded as the effectiveness with which resources are used in order to create products and services that satisfy human needs. Based on this idea, the last decade has produced an increasing number of studies on eco-efficiency and how it can be measured and implemented in the production of goods and services, but also in the field regarding demand patterns. An analysis regarding the aspects of eco-efficiency at the macro level of the Romanian economy is in line with the current environmental concerns, thus I have chosen to cover these questions, as well as the evolution of the locale economy towards a more sustainable development. The outcome of the examined aspects shows that, in spite of an increase in eco-efficiency levels, energy and material consumption and emissions have increased. This raises the question if measuring economic and environmental efficiency by reporting to the GDP value is becoming obsolete and if there is a need to revaluate eco-efficiency indicators in order to measure the transition to a greener and more sustainable development from different points of view.

  4. Multiple gingival pregnancy tumors with rapid growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lian Sun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy gingivitis is an acute form of gingivitis that affects pregnant women, with a prevalence of 30%, possibly ranging up to 100%. Sometimes, pregnancy gingivitis shows a tendency toward a localized hyperplasia called gingival pyogenic granuloma. Pregnancy tumor is a benign gingival hyperplasia with the gingiva as the most commonly involved site, but rarely it involves almost the entire gingiva. A 22-year-old woman was referred to our clinic with a chief complaint of gingival swelling that had lasted for 2 days. The lesions progressed rapidly and extensively, and almost all the gingiva was involved a week later. Generalized erythema, edema, hyperplasia, a hemorrhagic tendency, and several typical hemangiomatous masses were noted. Pregnancy was denied by the patient at the first and second visits, but was confirmed 2 weeks after the primary visit. The patient was given oral hygiene instructions. She recovered well, and the mass gradually regressed and had disappeared completely at the end of 12 weeks of pregnancy, without recurrence. The gingival lesions were finally diagnosed as multiple gingival pregnancy tumors. The patient delivered a healthy infant. An extensive and rapid growth of gingival pregnancy tumors during the early first month of pregnancy is a rare occurrence that is not familiar to dentists, gynecologists, and obstetricians. Those practitioners engaged in oral medicine and periodontology, primary care obstetrics, and gynecology should be aware of such gingival lesions to avoid misdiagnosis and overtreatment.

  5. Withaferin A Suppresses Liver Tumor Growth in a Nude Mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of withaferin A on tumor growth and metastasis in liver in a nude mouse model. Methods: Withaferin A was injected through a portal vein to the orthotopic liver tumor in a nude mice model. Xenogen in vivo imaging system was used to monitor tumor growth and metastasis. The effect of ...

  6. Tumor-host interactions in the gallbladder suppress distal angiogenesis and tumor growth: involvement of transforming growth factor beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohongi, T; Fukumura, D; Boucher, Y; Yun, C O; Soff, G A; Compton, C; Todoroki, T; Jain, R K

    1999-10-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors produced by a primary tumor can create a systemic anti-angiogenic environment and maintain metastatic tumor cells in a state of dormancy. We show here that the gallbladder microenvironment modulates the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, a multifunctional cytokine that functions as an endogenous anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor factor in a cranial window preparation. We found that a wide variety of human gallbladder tumors express TGF-beta1 irrespective of histologic type. We implanted a gel impregnated with basic fibroblast growth factor or Mz-ChA-2 tumor in the cranial windows of mice without tumors or mice with subcutaneous or gallbladder tumors to study angiogenesis and tumor growth at a secondary site. Angiogenesis, leukocyte-endothelial interaction in vessels and tumor growth in the cranial window were substantially inhibited in mice with gallbladder tumors. The concentration of TGF-beta1 in the plasma of mice with gallbladder tumors was 300% higher than that in the plasma of mice without tumors or with subcutaneous tumors. In contrast, there was no difference in the plasma levels of other anti- and pro-angiogenic factors. Treatment with neutralizing antibody against TGF-beta1 reversed both angiogenesis suppression and inhibition of leukocyte rolling induced by gallbladder tumors. TGF-beta1 also inhibited Mz-ChA-2 tumor cell proliferation. Our results indicate that the production of anti-angiogenesis/proliferation factors is regulated by tumor-host interactions.

  7. Fractal Dimension and Universality in Avascular Tumor Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Fabiano L; Mata, Angélica S

    2016-01-01

    The comprehension of tumor growth is a intriguing subject for scientists. New researches has been constantly required to better understand the complexity of this phenomenon. In this paper, we pursue a physical description that account for some experimental facts involving avascular tumor growth. We have proposed an explanation of some phenomenological (macroscopic) aspects of tumor, as the spatial form and the way it growths, from a individual-level (microscopic) formulation. The model proposed here is based on a simple principle: competitive interaction between the cells dependent on their mutual distances. As a result, we reproduce many empirical evidences observed in real tumors, as exponential growth in their early stages followed by a power law growth. The model also reproduces the fractal space distribution of tumor cells and the universal behavior presented in animals and tumor growth, conform reported by West, Guiot {\\it et. al.}\\cite{West2001,Guiot2003}. The results suggest that the universal similar...

  8. A Comparison and Catalog of Intrinsic Tumor Growth Models

    OpenAIRE

    Sarapata, E. A.; L. G. de Pillis

    2013-01-01

    Determining the mathematical dynamics and associated parameter values that should be used to accurately reflect tumor growth continues to be of interest to mathematical modelers, experimentalists and practitioners. However, while there are several competing canonical tumor growth models that are often implemented, how to determine which of the models should be used for which tumor types remains an open question. In this work, we determine the best fit growth dynamics and associated parameter ...

  9. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmenperä, Pertteli, E-mail: pertteli.salmenpera@helsinki.fi [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Karhemo, Piia-Riitta [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Räsänen, Kati [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Laakkonen, Pirjo [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Vaheri, Antti [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland)

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts acquire a sustained quiescence when grown as multicellular spheroids. • This quiescence is associated with drastic change in gene expression. • Fibroblasts spheroids secrete various inflammation-linked cytokines and chemokines. • Fibroblasts spheroids reduced growth of RT3 SCC cells in xenograft model.

  10. The Role of Complement in Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, Ruben; Corrales, Leticia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a central part of the immune system that has developed as a first defense against non-self cells. Neoplastic transformation is accompanied by an increased capacity of the malignant cells to activate complement. In fact, clinical data demonstrate complement activation in cancer patients. On the basis of the use of protective mechanisms by malignant cells, complement activation has traditionally been considered part of the body's immunosurveillance against cancer. Inhibitory mechanisms of complement activation allow cancer cells to escape from complement-mediated elimination and hamper the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody–based cancer immunotherapies. To overcome this limitation, many strategies have been developed with the goal of improving complement-mediated effector mechanisms. However, significant work in recent years has identified new and surprising roles for complement activation within the tumor microenvironment. Recent reports suggest that complement elements can promote tumor growth in the context of chronic inflammation. This chapter reviews the data describing the role of complement activation in cancer immunity, which offers insights that may aid the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to control cancer. PMID:24272362

  11. Western and Chinese Development Discourses: Education, Growth and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordtveit, Bjorn Harald

    2009-01-01

    This article examines Western and Chinese discourses of education, sustainable growth and development. Education is increasingly considered as a means to fuel economic growth, especially since the 1980s, when conservative economic values became predominant in Western development thought. Despite a discourse on sustainability favouring ecologically…

  12. Soil Degradation, Policy Intervention and Sustainable Agricultural Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasmal, J.; Weikard, H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable agricultural growth in developing countries is jeopardized by soil degradation consequent upon intensive cultivation and use of increasing doses of chemical inputs. To pave the way to sustainable agricultural growth we develop a model that incorporates organic fertilizer into the

  13. Corruption and Challenges of Sustainable Inclusive Growth in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examines Corruption and Challenges of Sustainable Inclusive Growth in Nigeria. The paper adopts the theory of two publics as its framework of analysis. The theory explains the prevalence of corruption between and among public servants in Nigeria, which affects the attainment of sustainable inclusive growth.

  14. Green economic growth premise for sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lenuţa TRICĂ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerating the global issues such as natural resource depletion, damage to the natural environment, economic and financial crises and consumption growth led to the shift of the development paradigm from consumption to sustainable development and recognition of the new path, namely green economy.At the European level a number of international organizations discussed issues of transition to green economy (EC, UNEP, OECD. In 2008, UNEP launched “Green Economy Initiative to Get the Global Markets Back to Work”, aiming to mobilize and re-focuse the global economy towards.This is the twin challenge of moving towards a green economy: radically reducing the footprint of developed countries, while simultaneously raising levels of social and material well being in developing countries.Without public intervention, the related market failures (i.e. market prices that do not fully reflect the environmental degradation generated by economic activity may delay or even prevent the development of environmentally-friendly technologies.Furthermore, in sectors such as electricity, network effects arising from existing infrastructures create additional barriers to the adoption of alternative sources of power, further hampering incentives to invest in new technologies.Given that the transition to a green economy requires increasing of investment in economic sectors that contribute to enhancing of natural capital and reduce environmental risks, we intend to analyze the main measures taken by Romania to ensure transition to green economy.

  15. Nanoelectroablation of Murine Tumors Triggers a CD8-Dependent Inhibition of Secondary Tumor Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Nuccitelli

    Full Text Available We have used both a rat orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model and a mouse allograft tumor model to study liver tumor ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF. We confirm that nsPEF treatment triggers apoptosis in rat liver tumor cells as indicated by the appearance of cleaved caspase 3 and 9 within two hours after treatment. Furthermore we provide evidence that nsPEF treatment leads to the translocation of calreticulin (CRT to the cell surface which is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern indicative of immunogenic cell death. We provide direct evidence that nanoelectroablation triggers a CD8-dependent inhibition of secondary tumor growth by comparing the growth rate of secondary orthotopic liver tumors in nsPEF-treated rats with that in nsPEF-treated rats depleted of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. The growth of these secondary tumors was severely inhibited as compared to tumor growth in CD8-depleated rats, with their average size only 3% of the primary tumor size after the same one-week growth period. In contrast, when we depleted CD8+ T-cells the second tumor grew more robustly, reaching 54% of the size of the first tumor. In addition, we demonstrate with immunohistochemistry that CD8+ T-cells are highly enriched in the secondary tumors exhibiting slow growth. We also showed that vaccinating mice with nsPEF-treated isogenic tumor cells stimulates an immune response that inhibits the growth of secondary tumors in a CD8+-dependent manner. We conclude that nanoelectroablation triggers the production of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the inhibition of secondary tumor growth.

  16. A mathematical model for IL-6-mediated, stem cell driven tumor growth and targeted treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nör, Jacques Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    Targeting key regulators of the cancer stem cell phenotype to overcome their critical influence on tumor growth is a promising new strategy for cancer treatment. Here we present a modeling framework that operates at both the cellular and molecular levels, for investigating IL-6 mediated, cancer stem cell driven tumor growth and targeted treatment with anti-IL6 antibodies. Our immediate goal is to quantify the influence of IL-6 on cancer stem cell self-renewal and survival, and to characterize the subsequent impact on tumor growth dynamics. By including the molecular details of IL-6 binding, we are able to quantify the temporal changes in fractional occupancies of bound receptors and their influence on tumor volume. There is a strong correlation between the model output and experimental data for primary tumor xenografts. We also used the model to predict tumor response to administration of the humanized IL-6R monoclonal antibody, tocilizumab (TCZ), and we found that as little as 1mg/kg of TCZ administered weekly for 7 weeks is sufficient to result in tumor reduction and a sustained deceleration of tumor growth. PMID:29351275

  17. Cellular Automaton Model for Immunology of Tumor Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Voitikova, M

    1998-01-01

    The stochastic discrete space-time model of an immune response on tumor spreading in a two-dimensional square lattice has been developed. The immunity-tumor interactions are described at the cellular level and then transferred into the setting of cellular automata (CA). The multistate CA model for system, in which all statesoflattice sites, composing of both immune and tumor cells populations, are the functions of the states of the 12 nearest neighbors. The CA model incorporates the essential featuresof the immunity-tumor system. Three regimes of neoplastic evolution including metastatic tumor growth and screen effect by inactive immune cells surrounding a tumor have been predicted.

  18. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  19. Managed Sustainable Development Classification Of Resources And Goods amp Services Calculating Sustainable Growth Rate And The Sustainable Development Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Saxena

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Macro-level manmade problems can often be best solved by understanding and manipulating the economics behind it. The world today is facing genuine problems of scarcity of resources and environmental amp ecological issues in view of intergenerational equity. The paper proposes a new approach of identification and classification of i Resources and ii Goods and services in the context of sustainable development. Every economy has ambitious economic growth aspirations which are often found conflicting with the commitments on natural resource conservation and climate change obligations. The proposed methodology is a reconciliation of the aspired economic growth of a region and the conservation of the resources and nature. The paper employs contribution of different types of goods and services in the gross domestic product GDP of a region to analyze sustainability of development. The important parameters that the paper establishes are Sustainability Ratio R Sustainable Growth Rate SG and the Sustainable Development Index SI. These parameters can be used to compare the sustainable development level of different regions. Ensuring natural resource and environmental sustainability will eventually ensure economic sustainability. The paper considers resource depletion concerns as well as the environmental pollutants biological risks carbon footprint warhead proliferation et cetera thereby ensuring all round sustainability from survival to economic end. The sustainability analysis is done for long periods such as 50 years 100 years et cetera. The index shows how sustainable the development of an economy is and how sustainability it is growing. The presently much revered GDP growth numbers are directionless it does not tell the type of growth an economy essentially has. The direction should be sustainability which the paper stresses upon. An illustration of sustainability analysis of India is also done. Such indices can help identifying sustainably developing

  20. The Role of Tumor Associated Macrophage in Recurrent Growth of Tumor Stem Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    recent cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, recurrent tumor must arise from a dormant tumor stem cell whose re-growth is triggered by shifting of...microenvironment. This project aims at clarifying the roles of TAM in recurrent growth of dormant stem cell in breast cancer. We hypothesize that the balance of...dormancy and recurrence is determined by the ability of the tumor stem cells to recruit TAM which in turn promotes self-renewal of the stem cell . We

  1. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Yu [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakahama, Ken-ichi, E-mail: nakacell@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsuaki [Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  2. Sustainable Development and Sustainable Growth: Conceptual Plane or Points on a Conceptual Plain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Madsen, Henning

    ) becoming an empty catch-phrase of contemporary environmentalism, a thorough analysis and discussion of the concept is therefore required. A distinction is made between sustainable growth and sustainable development. In the general debate sustainable growth is often used by politicians and developers...... as synonym for sustainable development. It is argued, however, that this is either a misunderstanding based on a superficial knowledge about the meaning of the sustainability concept or simply that it is cynically used to make the traditional growth philosophy more 'digestible' in an age of increasing...... environmental concern. Except from the concept of industrial ecology, present environmental responses from industry bear little resemblance with a basic systems approach to the concept of sustainability. A systems approach, as in constrast to a reductionist approach, holds promises for paving the way...

  3. Enhancing circadian clock function in cancer cells inhibits tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Silke; Beaulieu-Laroche, Lou; Blum, Ian D; Landgraf, Dominic; Welsh, David K; Storch, Kai-Florian; Labrecque, Nathalie; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2017-02-14

    Circadian clocks control cell cycle factors, and circadian disruption promotes cancer. To address whether enhancing circadian rhythmicity in tumor cells affects cell cycle progression and reduces proliferation, we compared growth and cell cycle events of B16 melanoma cells and tumors with either a functional or dysfunctional clock. We found that clock genes were suppressed in B16 cells and tumors, but treatments inducing circadian rhythmicity, such as dexamethasone, forskolin and heat shock, triggered rhythmic clock and cell cycle gene expression, which resulted in fewer cells in S phase and more in G1 phase. Accordingly, B16 proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo was slowed down. Similar effects were observed in human colon carcinoma HCT-116 cells. Notably, the effects of dexamethasone were not due to an increase in apoptosis nor to an enhancement of immune cell recruitment to the tumor. Knocking down the essential clock gene Bmal1 in B16 tumors prevented the effects of dexamethasone on tumor growth and cell cycle events. Here we demonstrated that the effects of dexamethasone on cell cycle and tumor growth are mediated by the tumor-intrinsic circadian clock. Thus, our work reveals that enhancing circadian clock function might represent a novel strategy to control cancer progression.

  4. Improved brain tumor segmentation by utilizing tumor growth model in longitudinal brain MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Linmin; Reza, Syed M. S.; Li, Wei; Davatzikos, Christos; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we propose a novel method to improve texture based tumor segmentation by fusing cell density patterns that are generated from tumor growth modeling. To model tumor growth, we solve the reaction-diffusion equation by using Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM). Computational tumor growth modeling obtains the cell density distribution that potentially indicates the predicted tissue locations in the brain over time. The density patterns is then considered as novel features along with other texture (such as fractal, and multifractal Brownian motion (mBm)), and intensity features in MRI for improved brain tumor segmentation. We evaluate the proposed method with about one hundred longitudinal MRI scans from five patients obtained from public BRATS 2015 data set, validated by the ground truth. The result shows significant improvement of complete tumor segmentation using ANOVA analysis for five patients in longitudinal MR images.

  5. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpna Gupta

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm3 grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve

  6. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagan, Jonathan, E-mail: jdpagan@uams.edu; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Gupta, Kalpna [Vascular Biology Center and Division of Hematology-Oncology Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MN 72223 (United States); Griffin, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-02-18

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm{sup 3}) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  7. Tumor risk by tissue engineering: cartilaginous differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells reduces tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, I; Oxmann, D; Helfenstein, A; Mentlein, R; Schünke, M; Hassenpflug, J; Kurz, B

    2010-03-01

    Implantation of autologous chondrocytes (AC) is a promising option for the treatment of cartilage defects, but problems with cell harvesting, dedifferentiation, or the donor age limit the clinical outcome. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) gain much interest because of their simple isolation and multipotential differentiation capacity along with their immunosuppressive properties. The latter might introduce tumor manifestation. The influence of undifferentiated and chondrogenically differentiated MSC or AC on tumor growth and metastasis formation was investigated in a murine melanoma model. Allogeneic melanoma cells and either syngeneic MSC (C3H10T1/2, transduced with enhanced green fluorescent protein gene) or AC were co-injected at a distance of 3 cm into the contra lateral groins of five mice/group, and evaluated macroscopically and histologically after 4 weeks. Undifferentiated MSC migrated to the tumor site and induced strong tumor growth and metastasis formation. Even avital MSC promoted tumor growth and spreading, but insignificantly without detectable MSC at the tumor site. Chondrogenically differentiated MSC did not migrate and had a significantly lower impact on tumor growth and spreading; AC had no measurable influence on melanoma cells. Our data suggest that differentiation of MSC reduces MSC-dependent promotion of latent tumors and that native AC do not introduce any increased risk of tumor growth. The question of how far MSC should be differentiated prior to clinical application should be addressed in further studies. Copyright 2009 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tumor-Derived CXCL1 Promotes Lung Cancer Growth via Recruitment of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils have a traditional role in inflammatory process and act as the first line of defense against infections. Although their contribution to tumorigenesis and progression is still controversial, accumulating evidence recently has demonstrated that tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs play a key role in multiple aspects of cancer biology. Here, we detected that chemokine CXCL1 was dramatically elevated in serum from 3LL tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, 3LL cells constitutively expressed and secreted higher level of CXCL1. Furthermore, knocking down CXCL1 expression in 3LL cells significantly hindered tumor growth by inhibiting recruitment of neutrophils from peripheral blood into tumor tissues. Additionally, tumor-infiltrated neutrophils expressed higher levels of MPO and Fas/FasL, which may be involved in TAN-mediated inhibition of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results demonstrate that tumor-derived CXCL1 contributes to TANs infiltration in lung cancer which promotes tumor growth.

  9. Aspm sustains postnatal cerebellar neurogenesis and medulloblastoma growth in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Scott E; Garcia, Idoia; Crowther, Andrew J; Li, Shiyi; Stewart, Alyssa; Liu, Hedi; Lough, Kendall J; O'Neill, Sean; Veleta, Katherine; Oyarzabal, Esteban A; Merrill, Joseph R; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Gershon, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    .... Here, we report that Aspm, a gene that is mutated in familial microcephaly, regulates postnatal neurogenesis in the cerebellum and supports the growth of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor...

  10. Fractal dimension and universality in avascular tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fabiano L.; dos Santos, Renato Vieira; Mata, Angélica S.

    2017-04-01

    For years, the comprehension of the tumor growth process has been intriguing scientists. New research has been constantly required to better understand the complexity of this phenomenon. In this paper, we propose a mathematical model that describes the properties, already known empirically, of avascular tumor growth. We present, from an individual-level (microscopic) framework, an explanation of some phenomenological (macroscopic) aspects of tumors, such as their spatial form and the way they develop. Our approach is based on competitive interaction between the cells. This simple rule makes the model able to reproduce evidence observed in real tumors, such as exponential growth in their early stage followed by power-law growth. The model also reproduces (i) the fractal-space distribution of tumor cells and (ii) the universal growth behavior observed in both animals and tumors. Our analyses suggest that the universal similarity between tumor and animal growth comes from the fact that both can be described by the same dynamic equation—the Bertalanffy-Richards model—even if they do not necessarily share the same biological properties.

  11. Inhibition of tumor growth using salmonella expressing Fas ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Markus; Le'Negrate, Gaelle; Krajewska, Maryla; Reed, John C

    2008-08-06

    Intravenous administration of bacteria leads to their accumulation in tumors and to sporadic tumor regression. We therefore explored the hypothesis that Salmonella typhimurium engineered to express the proapoptotic cytokine Fas ligand (FasL) would exhibit enhanced antitumor activity. Immunocompetent mice carrying tumors derived from syngeneic murine D2F2 breast carcinoma or CT-26 colon carcinoma cells were treated intravenously with FasL-expressing S. typhimurium or with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; control). Treatment with FasL-expressing S. typhimurium inhibited growth of primary tumors by an average of 59% for D2F2 tumors and 82% for CT-26 tumors (eg, at 25 days after initial treatment, mean volume of PBS-treated CT-26 colon carcinomas = 1385 mm(3) and of S. typhimurium FasL-treated CT-26 tumors = 243 mm(3), difference = 1142 mm(3), 95% confidence interval = 800 mm(3) to 1484 mm(3), P strategy for some cancers.

  12. Phase transition in tumor growth: I avascular development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Rebelo, I.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular tumor growth based on a simple chemical network. This model presents a logistic behavior and shows a “second order” phase transition. We prove the fractal origin of the empirical logistics and Gompertz constant and its relation to mitosis and apoptosis rate. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates the entropy production rate as a Lyapunov function during avascular tumor growth.

  13. Population growth: Implications for environmental sustainability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of population growth on environment and its implication for survival is an important issue. Although considerable attention has been paid to this problem but systematic studies have been inadequate. Rapid population growth and economic development and daily demand for natural resources for domestic and ...

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2.Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation.These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  15. Nanotechnology policy in Korea for sustainable growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Dae Sup; Kim, Chang Woo; Chung, Pil Seung; Jhon, Myung S.

    2012-06-01

    Korea has become one of the leading countries in nanotechnology along with the U.S., Japan, and Germany. Since 2001, the Korean Government established the "Nanotechnology Development Plan." Since then, the trend in nanotechnology is steadily changing from fundamental research to application-driven technologies. In this paper, we examine the nanotechnology development and policy during the past decade, which includes the investments in R&D, infrastructure, and education. The Third Phase (2011-2020) on clean nanotechnology convergence and integration in information, energy, and the environmental sector is also given. Furthermore, the program on long-term strategy dealing with sustainability in resolving future societal demand and plans for sustainable energy and environmental activities will be discussed in depth. The outcomes and national evaluations of research and education are also given.

  16. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  17. Hypoxia promotes tumor growth in linking angiogenesis to immune escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem eCHOUAIB

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the impressive progress over the past decade, in the field of tumor immunology, such as the identification of tumor antigens and antigenic peptides as potential targets, there are still many obstacles in eliciting an effective immune response to eradicate cancer. It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in the control of immune protection and contains many overlapping mechanisms to evade antigen specific immunotherapy. Obviously, tumors have evolved to utilize hypoxic stress to their own advantage by activating key biochemical and cellular pathways that are important in progression, survival and metastasis. Among the hypoxia-induced genes, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF play a determinant role in promoting tumor cell growth and survival. In this regard, hypoxia is emerging as an attractive target for cancer therapy. How the microenvironmental hypoxia poses both obstacles and opportunities for new therapeutic immune interventions will be discussed.

  18. Rooting, growth and sustainability of yellow Ficus ( Ficus retusa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rooting, growth and sustainability of yellow Ficus ( Ficus retusa 'Nitida') as affected by growth media under nursery conditions. ... Significantly (P<0.05) highest vegetative and root length was produced by plants grown on a mixture of sawdust, cow dung and topsoil (1:1:3). Root length of Ficus retusa 'Nitida' was best ...

  19. Public Debt, Corruption and Sustainable Economic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunji Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There are many studies that look into the relationship between public debt and economic growth. It is hard to find, however, research addressing the role of corruption between these two variables. Noticing this vacancy in current literature, we strive to investigate the effect of corruption on the relationship between public debt and economic growth. For this purpose, the pooled ordinary least squares (OLS, fixed effects models and the dynamic panel generalized method of moments (GMM models (Arellano-Bond, 1991 are estimated with data of 77 countries from 1990 to 2014. The empirical results show that the interaction term between public debt and corruption is statistically significant. This confirms the hypothesis that the effect of public debt on economic growth is a function of corruption. The sign of the marginal effect is negative in corrupt countries, but public debt enhances economic growth within countries that are not corrupt, i.e., highly transparent.

  20. Modeling of the metabolic energy dissipation for restricted tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajic-Lijakovic, Ivana; Milivojevic, Milan

    2017-10-01

    Energy dissipation mostly represents unwanted outcome but in the biochemical processes it may alter the biochemical pathways. However, it is rarely considered in the literature although energy dissipation and its alteration due to the changes in cell microenvironment may improve methods for guiding chemical and biochemical processes in the desired directions. Deeper insight into the changes of metabolic activity of tumor cells exposed to osmotic stress or irradiation may offer the possibility of tumor growth reduction. In this work effects of the osmotic stress and irradiation on the thermodynamical affinity of tumor cells and their damping effects on metabolic energy dissipation were investigated and modeled. Although many various models were applied to consider the tumor restrictive growth they have not considered the metabolic energy dissipation. In this work a pseudo rheological model in the form of "the metabolic spring-pot element" is formulated to describe theoretically the metabolic susceptibility of tumor spheroid. This analog model relates the thermodynamical affinity of cell growth with the volume expansion of tumor spheroid under isotropic loading conditions. Spheroid relaxation induces anomalous nature of the metabolic energy dissipation which causes the damping effects on cell growth. The proposed model can be used for determining the metabolic energy "structure" in the context of restrictive cell growth as well as for predicting optimal doses for cancer curing in order to tailor the clinical treatment for each person and each type of cancer.

  1. Financial Markets and the Challenges of Sustainable Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janicka Małgorzata

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable growth and responsibility for the economy and the environment are postulates rarely associated with the term “financial market”. Financial markets are identified with the ruthless maximisation of profit at acceptable risk, rather than with socially responsible conduct. However, in the global economy businesses modify their priorities and become aware of not just the need to grow in financial terms but also to improve their quality performance. International financial markets have become part of this trend and are increasingly often adopting environmentally friendly attitudes and embracing the challenges posed by the concept of sustainable growth. Ideas such as CSR – Corporate Social Responsibility – and SRI – Socially Responsible Investment are gaining in importance. While sustainable growth of the economy as perceived from the point of view of the manufacturing or service sectors is widely discussed, the sustainable growth of financial markets is a relatively new concept and the available literature on “green” financial markets is quite scarce. This paper is intended to fill in this gap and examine the changes that have taken place on financial markets in the context of the idea of sustainable growth, with particular attention paid to the European Union markets.

  2. Sustaining an Acquisition-based Growth Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan; Toppenberg, Gustav; Shanks, Graeme

    Value creating acquisitions are a major challenge for many firms. Our case study of Cisco Systems shows that an advanced Enterprise Architecture (EA) capability can contribute to the acquisition process through a) preparing the acquirer to become ‘acquisition ready’, b) identifying resource......-based growth strategy over time....

  3. Natural blends, sustainable innovations and income growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krozer, Y.; Brezet, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses innovations for both income growth and the generation of better environmental qualities. This is possible in theory but progress in practices is slow. We argue that social pressures to contain pollution were effective insofar they invoked environmental policies all over the

  4. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland El Ghazal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1 in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4–deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  5. The Role of Oxygen in Avascular Tumor Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Robert Grimes

    Full Text Available The oxygen status of a tumor has significant clinical implications for treatment prognosis, with well-oxygenated subvolumes responding markedly better to radiotherapy than poorly supplied regions. Oxygen is essential for tumor growth, yet estimation of local oxygen distribution can be difficult to ascertain in situ, due to chaotic patterns of vasculature. It is possible to avoid this confounding influence by using avascular tumor models, such as tumor spheroids, a much better approximation of realistic tumor dynamics than monolayers, where oxygen supply can be described by diffusion alone. Similar to in situ tumours, spheroids exhibit an approximately sigmoidal growth curve, often approximated and fitted by logistic and Gompertzian sigmoid functions. These describe the basic rate of growth well, but do not offer an explicitly mechanistic explanation. This work examines the oxygen dynamics of spheroids and demonstrates that this growth can be derived mechanistically with cellular doubling time and oxygen consumption rate (OCR being key parameters. The model is fitted to growth curves for a range of cell lines and derived values of OCR are validated using clinical measurement. Finally, we illustrate how changes in OCR due to gemcitabine treatment can be directly inferred using this model.

  6. Tourism in Austria: biodiversity, environmental sustainability, and growth issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Muhammad Asad Saleem; Shah, Syed Asim; Zaman, Khalid

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the long-run and causal relationships between international tourism, biodiversity loss, environmental sustainability, and specific growth factors under the premises of sustainable tourism in Austria, by using a consistent time series data from 1975 to 2015. The results reveal that inbound tourism, per capita income, and population density affected the potential habitat area while population density largely affected the food production in a country. Inbound tourism and population density both deteriorate the environmental quality in a form of increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and fossil fuel energy consumption while per capita income reduces the fossil fuel energy consumption. Food exports increase per capita income, while food imports and population density both decrease economic growth. Inbound tourism and economic growth advance population density while forest area and food exports decrease the population density. The study supports growth-led tourism and growth-led food production in a country.

  7. Transforming growth factor-beta1 induces tumor stroma and reduces tumor infiltrate in cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazelbag, Suzanne; Gorter, Arko; Kenter, Gemma G.; van den Broek, Lambert; Fleuren, Gertjan

    2002-01-01

    Cervical carcinomas consist of tumor cell nests surrounded by varying amounts of intratumoral stroma containing different quantities and types of immune cells. Besides controlling (epithelial) cell growth, the multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) is involved in

  8. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors.

  9. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  10. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts and Tumor Growth: Focus on Multiple Myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Veirman, Kim, E-mail: kdeveirm@vub.ac.be [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Rao, Luigia [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Van Riet, Ivan [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Stem Cell Laboratory, Division of Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Frassanito, Maria Antonia [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of General Pathology, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); Di Marzo, Lucia; Vacca, Angelo [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); Vanderkerken, Karin, E-mail: kdeveirm@vub.ac.be [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium)

    2014-06-27

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) comprise a heterogeneous population that resides within the tumor microenvironment. They actively participate in tumor growth and metastasis by production of cytokines and chemokines, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors, creating a more supportive microenvironment. The aim of the current review is to summarize the origin and characteristics of CAFs, and to describe the role of CAFs in tumor progression and metastasis. Furthermore, we focus on the presence of CAFs in hypoxic conditions in relation to multiple myeloma disease.

  11. Heparanase-neutralizing antibodies attenuate lymphoma tumor growth and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissmann, Marina; Arvatz, Gil; Horowitz, Netanel; Feld, Sari; Naroditsky, Inna; Zhang, Yi; Ng, Mary; Hammond, Edward; Nevo, Eviatar; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans, resulting in disassembly of the extracellular matrix underlying endothelial and epithelial cells and associating with enhanced cell invasion and metastasis. Heparanase expression is induced in carcinomas and sarcomas, often associating with enhanced tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. In contrast, the function of heparanase in hematological malignancies (except myeloma) was not investigated in depth. Here, we provide evidence that heparanase is expressed by human follicular and diffused non-Hodgkin's B-lymphomas, and that heparanase inhibitors restrain the growth of tumor xenografts produced by lymphoma cell lines. Furthermore, we describe, for the first time to our knowledge, the development and characterization of heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that inhibit cell invasion and tumor metastasis, the hallmark of heparanase activity. Using luciferase-labeled Raji lymphoma cells, we show that the heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies profoundly inhibit tumor load in the mouse bones, associating with reduced cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Notably, we found that Raji cells lack intrinsic heparanase activity, but tumor xenografts produced by this cell line exhibit typical heparanase activity, likely contributed by host cells composing the tumor microenvironment. Thus, the neutralizing monoclonal antibodies attenuate lymphoma growth by targeting heparanase in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26729870

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta1 induces tumor stroma and reduces tumor infiltrate in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelbag, Suzanne; Gorter, Arko; Kenter, Gemma G; van den Broek, Lambert; Fleuren, Gertjan

    2002-12-01

    Cervical carcinomas consist of tumor cell nests surrounded by varying amounts of intratumoral stroma containing different quantities and types of immune cells. Besides controlling (epithelial) cell growth, the multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) is involved in the formation of stroma and extracellular matrix (ECM) and in immunosuppression. Several malignancies are known to be associated with enhanced production of TGF-beta(1), repression or mutation of TGF-beta transmembrane receptors, or mutations at the postreceptor intracellular signaling pathway. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of tumor cell-derived TGF-beta(1) on the amount of intratumoral stroma; the deposition of collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin; and the tumor infiltrate in cervical carcinoma. The expression of TGF-beta(1) mRNA in 108 paraffin-embedded cervical carcinomas was detected by mRNA in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the amount of tumor stroma and ECM proteins and the extent of the tumor infiltrate. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) protein expression in tumor cells was determined to verify the biological activity of TGF-beta(1.) Cytoplasmatic TGF-beta(1) mRNA expression in tumor cells was significantly correlated with the amount of intratumoral stroma and the deposition of collagen IV. TGF-beta(1) mRNA expression in every tumor was accompanied by PAI-1 expression, indicating biological activity of TGF-beta(1). An inverse relationship between TGF-beta(1) mRNA expression in tumor cells and the extent of the tumor infiltrate was demonstrated. Our results indicate that cervical cancer cells affect the amount and the composition of the intratumoral stroma and the tumor infiltrate by the production and secretion of TGF-beta(1). Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  13. Tumor suppressor miR-1 inhibits tumor growth and metastasis by simultaneously targeting multiple genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuilian; Zhang, Song; Wang, Qizhi; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    Cancer progression depends on tumor growth and metastasis, which are activated or suppressed by multiple genes. An individual microRNA may target multiple genes, suggesting that a miRNA may suppress tumor growth and metastasis via simultaneously targeting different genes. However, thus far, this issue has not been explored. In the present study, the findings showed that miR-1 could simultaneously inhibit tumor growth and metastasis of gastric and breast cancers by targeting multiple genes. The results indicated that miR-1 was significantly downregulated in cancer tissues compared with normal tissues. The miR-1 overexpression led to cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in gastric and breast cancer cells but not in normal cells. Furthermore, the miR-1 overexpression significantly inhibited the metastasis of gastric and breast cancer cells. An analysis of the underlying mechanism revealed that the simultaneous inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis mediated by miR-1 was due to the synchronous targeting of 6 miR-1 target genes encoding cyclin dependent kinase 4, twinfilin actin binding protein 1, calponin 3, coronin 1C, WAS protein family member 2 and thymosin beta 4, X-linked. In vivo assays demonstrated that miR-1 efficiently inhibited tumor growth and metastasis of gastric and breast cancers in nude mice. Therefore, our study contributed novel insights into the miR-1′s roles in tumorigenesis of gastric and breast cancers. PMID:28159933

  14. The Impact of Subsidies on Production Innovation and Sustainable Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žampa Sabina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates correlation between subsidies to invest in development projects, innovation, financial performance and sustainable growth. The focus of the study is on subsidies for co-financing purchases of new technological equipment aimed at promoting innovation and production of new products. Subsidies are distributed based on the prepared European Union (EU and national programs for the purposes of faster economic growth in accordance with the policies and guidelines of the EU. The paper employs a combination of enterprises’ accounting data, data on subsidies and unique in-depth data obtained through a survey at the enterprise level. The results revealed a positive impact of subsidies on financial indicators, and only limited effect on innovation. While analyzing sustainable growth, we have established that the enterprises that received subsidies had a higher growth of financial indicators.

  15. Inhibition of IL-17A suppresses enhanced-tumor growth in low dose pre-irradiated tumor beds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Lee

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation induces modification of the tumor microenvironment such as tumor surrounding region, which is relevant to treatment outcome after radiotherapy. In this study, the effects of pre-irradiated tumor beds on the growth of subsequently implanted tumors were investigated as well as underlying mechanism. The experimental model was set up by irradiating the right thighs of C3H/HeN mice with 5 Gy, followed by the implantation of HCa-I and MIH-2. Both implanted tumors in the pre-irradiated bed showed accelerated-growth compared to the control. Tumor-infiltrated lymphocyte (TIL levels were increased, as well as pro-tumor factors such as IL-6 and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1 in the pre-irradiated group. In particular, the role of pro-tumor cytokine interleukin-17A (IL-17A was investigated as a possible target mechanism because IL-6 and TGF-β are key factors in Th17 cells differentiation from naïve T cells. IL-17A expression was increased not only in tumors, but also in CD4+ T cells isolated from the tumor draining lymph nodes. The effect of IL-17A on tumor growth was confirmed by treating tumors with IL-17A antibody, which abolished the acceleration of tumor growth. These results indicate that the upregulation of IL-17A seems to be a key factor for enhancing tumor growth in pre-irradiated tumor beds.

  16. CHIP is a novel tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer and inhibits tumor growth through targeting EGFR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianxiao; Yang, Jingxuan; Xu, Jianwei; Li, Jian; Cao, Zhe; Zhou, Li; You, Lei; Shu, Hong; Lu, Zhaohui; Li, Huihua; Li, Min; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2014-01-01

    Carboxyl terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein (CHIP) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is involved in protein quality control and mediates several tumor-related proteins in many cancers, but the function of CHIP in pancreatic cancer is not known. Here we show that CHIP interacts and ubiquitinates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for proteasome-mediated degradation in pancreatic cancer cells, thereby inhibiting the activation of EGFR downstream pathways. CHIP suppressed cell proliferation, anchor-independent growth, invasion and migration, as well as enhanced apoptosis induced by erlotinib in vitro and in vivo. The expression of CHIP was decreased in pancreatic cancer tissues or sera. Low CHIP expression in tumor tissues was correlated with tumor differentiation and shorter overall survival. These observations indicate that CHIP serves as a novel tumor suppressor by down-regulating EGFR pathway in pancreatic cancer cells, decreased expression of CHIP was associated with poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24722501

  17. Promotion of lung tumor growth by interleukin-17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Beibei; Guenther, James F.; Pociask, Derek A.; Wang, Yu; Kolls, Jay K.; You, Zongbing; Chandrasekar, Bysani; Shan, Bin; Sullivan, Deborah E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate that inhaled cigarette smoke, the predominant lung carcinogen, elicits a T helper 17 (Th17) inflammatory phenotype. Interleukin-17A (IL-17), the hallmark cytokine of Th17 inflammation, displays pro- and antitumorigenic properties in a manner that varies according to tumor type and assay system. To investigate the role of IL-17 in lung tumor growth, we used an autochthonous tumor model (K-RasLA1 mice) with lung delivery of a recombinant adenovirus that expresses IL-17A. Virus-mediated expression of IL-17A in K-RasLA1 mice at 8–10 wk of age doubled lung tumor growth in 3 wk relative to littermates that received a green fluorescent protein-expressing control adenovirus. IL-17 induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression in vivo and in vitro. In accord with this finding, selective and specific inhibitors of MMP-9 repressed the increased motility and invasiveness of IL-17-treated lung tumor cells in culture. Knockdown or mutation of p53 promoted the motility of murine lung tumor cells and abrogated the promigratory role of IL-17. Coexpression of siRNA-resistant wild-type, but not mutant, human p53 rescued both IL-17-mediated migration and MMP-9 mRNA induction in p53 knockdown lung tumor cells. IL-17 increased MMP-9 mRNA stability by reducing interaction with the mRNA destabilizing serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1). Taken together, our results indicate that IL-17 stimulates lung tumor growth and regulates MMP-9 mRNA levels in a p53- and SRSF1-dependent manner. PMID:25038189

  18. CD248 facilitates tumor growth via its cytoplasmic domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssens Tom

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal fibroblasts participate in the development of a permissive environment for tumor growth, yet molecular pathways to therapeutically target fibroblasts are poorly defined. CD248, also known as endosialin or tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1, is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on activated fibroblasts. We recently showed that the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 is important in facilitating an inflammatory response in a mouse model of arthritis. Others have reported that CD248 gene inactivation in mice results in dampened tumor growth. We hypothesized that the conserved cytoplasmic domain of CD248 is important in regulating tumor growth. Methods Mice lacking the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 (CD248CyD/CyD were generated and evaluated in tumor models, comparing the findings with wild-type mice (CD248WT/WT. Results As compared to the response in CD248WT/WT mice, growth of T241 fibrosarcomas and Lewis lung carcinomas was significantly reduced in CD248CyD/CyD mice. Tumor size was similar to that seen with CD248-deficient mice. Conditioned media from CD248CyD/CyD fibroblasts were less effective at supporting T241 fibrosarcoma cell survival. In addition to our previous observation of reduced release of activated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, CD248CyD/CyD fibroblasts also had impaired PDGF-BB-induced migration and expressed higher transcripts of tumor suppressor factors, transgelin (SM22α, Hes and Hey1. Conclusions The multiple pathways regulated by the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 highlight its potential as a therapeutic target to treat cancer.

  19. Networks: Innovation, Growth and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Johnston

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of the Internet as a measureable manifestation of our social and economic relationships changed the domination of networks in our lives. From about 2000, the internet has allowed us to study and understand the type of networks in which we live, and to model their behaviour. The Internet has fundamentally changed the distribution of wealth. The rich became richer simply because of the larger scale of the trading network and stretched national wealth distributions. Network effects are therefore likely to be responsible for much of the perceived increases in inequalities in the last 20-30 years, and policies to tackle poverty must therefore address the extent to which the poor can engage with society's networks of wealth creation. The greatest challenge to continued growth and prosperity, and therefore to peace and justice, is climate change. The potential cost of inaction on climate change could be as high. Our self-organising social networks have structured our societies and economies, and are now reflected in our technology networks. We can now replicate their evolution in computer simulations and can therefore better assess how to deal with the greatest challenges facing us in the next few decades.

  20. Tackling the dual challenge of sustainable consumption and economic growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedlacko, Michal; Antunes, Paula; Asara, Viviana

    to ecosystem services have spurred parts of the academic and policy communities into identification of problems and solutions. Some of the most fundamental debates, led by researchers from various disciplines, centre around economic growth and sustainable consumption. However, there is often a lack...... research questions that link the challenges of sustainable consumption with economic growth debates and critiques. The research questions have been identified through an extensive participatory process involving leading researchers and policy makers responsible for sustainability policies throughout...... the whole EU and cover five areas (food, housing, mobility, information and communication technology, finance). The aim of the research questions is to orient researchers towards important research priorities as well as guide policy makers and public authorities in funding of research and use of sound...

  1. Plant Growth-Promoting Microorganisms for Environmental Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, P C; Dubey, Rama Kant; Tripathi, Vishal; Gupta, Vijai K; Singh, Harikesh B

    2016-11-01

    Agrochemicals used to meet the needs of a rapidly growing human population can deteriorate the quality of ecosystems and are not affordable to farmers in low-resource environments. Here, we propose the use of plant growth-promoting microorganisms (PGPMs) as a tool for sustainable food production without compromising ecosystems services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Review of Growth Inhibitory Peptide as a biotherapeutic agent for tumor growth, adhesion, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlemann, M; Miller, K D; Dauphinee, M; Mizejewski, G J

    2005-09-01

    This review surveys the biological activities of an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) derived peptide termed the Growth Inhibitory Peptide (GIP), which is a synthetic 34 amino acid segment produced from the full length 590 amino acid AFP molecule. The GIP has been shown to be growth-suppressive in both fetal and tumor cells but not in adult terminally-differentiated cells. The mechanism of action of this peptide has not been fully elucidated; however, GIP is highly interactive at the plasma membrane surface in cellular events such as endocytosis, cell contact inhibition and cytoskeleton-induced cell shape changes. The GIP was shown to be growth-suppressive in nine human tumor types and to suppress the spread of tumor infiltrates and metastases in human and mouse mammary cancers. The AFP-derived peptide and its subfragments were also shown to inhibit tumor cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and to block platelet aggregation; thus it was expected that the GIP would inhibit cell spreading/migration and metastatic infiltration into host tissues such as lung and pancreas. It was further found that the cyclic versus linear configuration of GIP determined its biological and anti-cancer efficacy. Genbank amino acid sequence identities with a variety of integrin alpha/beta chain proteins supported the GIP's linkage to inhibition of tumor cell adhesion and platelet aggregation. The combined properties of tumor growth suppression, prevention of tumor cell-to-ECM adhesion, and inhibition of platelet aggregation indicate that tumor-to-platelet interactions present promising targets for GIP as an anti-metastatic agent. Finally, based on cholinergic studies, it was proposed that GIP could influence the enzymatic activity of membrane acetylcholinesterases during tumor growth and metastasis. It was concluded that the GIP derived from full-length AFP represents a growth inhibitory motif possessing instrinsic properties that allow it to interfere in cell surface events such

  3. Withaferin A Suppresses Liver Tumor Growth in a Nude Mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Out of 14 withanolides isolated from W. somnifera, withaferin A is present as a major compound [13,14]. Withaferin A has anti- angiogenic effect [12,15] at micromolar doses and inhibits soft tissue sarcoma growth and local recurrence in xenograft experiments [16]. It is reported to have proapoptotic and anti-tumor activity in ...

  4. Withaferin A Suppresses Liver Tumor Growth in a Nude Mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research Article. Withaferin A Suppresses Liver Tumor Growth in a Nude. Mouse Model by Downregulation of Cell Signaling Pathway. Leading to Invasion and Angiogenesis. Yu-Xu Wang*, Wei-Bao Ding and Cheng-Wei Dong. Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Weifang People's Hospital, Weifang 261041, ...

  5. Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor in solid tumor malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Mette K; Hedegaard, Chris J; Poulsen, Hans S

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is over-expressed, as well as mutated, in many types of cancers. In particular, the EGFR variant type III mutant (EGFRvIII) has attracted much attention as it is frequently and exclusively found on many tumor cells, and hence both EGFR and EGFRvIII have...

  6. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  7. Peptide vaccines prevent tumor growth by activating T cells that respond to native tumor antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kimberly R; McMahan, Rachel H; Kemmler, Charles B; Kappler, John W; Slansky, Jill E

    2010-03-09

    Peptide vaccines enhance the response of T cells toward tumor antigens and represent a strategy to augment antigen-independent immunotherapies of cancer. However, peptide vaccines that include native tumor antigens rarely prevent tumor growth. We have assembled a set of peptide variants for a mouse-colon tumor model to determine how to improve T-cell responses. These peptides have similar affinity for MHC molecules, but differ in the affinity of the peptide-MHC/T-cell receptor interaction with a tumor-specific T-cell clone. We systematically demonstrated that effective antitumor responses are generated after vaccination with variant peptides that stimulate the largest proportion of endogenous T cells specific for the native tumor antigen. Importantly, we found some variant peptides that strongly stimulated a specific T-cell clone in vitro, but elicited fewer tumor-specific T cells in vivo, and were not protective. The T cells expanded by the effective vaccines responded to the wild-type antigen by making cytokines and killing target cells, whereas most of the T cells expanded by the ineffective vaccines only responded to the peptide variants. We conclude that peptide-variant vaccines are most effective when the peptides react with a large responsive part of the tumor-specific T-cell repertoire.

  8. Ketone body utilization drives tumor growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-11-01

    We have previously proposed that catabolic fibroblasts generate mitochondrial fuels (such as ketone bodies) to promote the anabolic growth of human cancer cells and their metastasic dissemination. We have termed this new paradigm "two-compartment tumor metabolism." Here, we further tested this hypothesis by using a genetic approach. For this purpose, we generated hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts overexpressing the rate-limiting enzymes that promote ketone body production, namely BDH1 and HMGCS2. Similarly, we generated MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells overexpressing the key enzyme(s) that allow ketone body re-utilization, OXCT1/2 and ACAT1/2. Interestingly, our results directly show that ketogenic fibroblasts are catabolic and undergo autophagy, with a loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) protein expression. Moreover, ketogenic fibroblasts increase the mitochondrial mass and growth of adjacent breast cancer cells. However, most importantly, ketogenic fibroblasts also effectively promote tumor growth, without a significant increase in tumor angiogenesis. Finally, MDA-MB-231 cells overexpressing the enzyme(s) required for ketone re-utilization show dramatic increases in tumor growth and metastatic capacity. Our data provide the necessary genetic evidence that ketone body production and re-utilization drive tumor progression and metastasis. As such, ketone inhibitors should be designed as novel therapeutics to effectively treat advanced cancer patients, with tumor recurrence and metastatic disease. In summary, ketone bodies behave as onco-metabolites, and we directly show that the enzymes HMGCS2, ACAT1/2 and OXCT1/2 are bona fide metabolic oncogenes.

  9. Dietary branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) and tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, W.; Baron, L.; Baron, P.; White, F.; Banks, W.L. Jr.

    1986-03-05

    The effects of high dietary BCAA on tumor growth was examined in adult male Fischer 344 rats inoculated with 10/sup 6/ viable MCA fibrosarcoma cells. Ten days after tumor inoculation, when tumors were of palpable size, rats were divided into two groups at random. The experimental(E) group was fed the AIN-76 diet supplemented with 4X the BCAA content of diet casein and the control(C) group was fed the AIN-76 made isonitrogenous with the E diet by glutamic acid supplementation. Five rats from each group were killed at days 0,3,6, and 9. Rats were injected with /sup 14/C-Tyrosine and /sup 3/H-Thymidine i.p. (2 and 4 uCi/100g BW, respectively) an hour before they were killed. The incorporation of /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H into the acid insoluble fraction of the tumor tissues samples were measured. Single cell suspension of tumor were prepared for cell cycle kinetics analysis using a Coulter EPICS IV flow microflorometer. The percentage of normal and hyperdiploid cells were analyzed. Results showed that both tumor size and weight were doubled at each time point the rats were killed. At day 0, the /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C incorporation were 32 +/- 10dpm and 27 +/- 4dpm/mg tumor, respectively. The /sup 3/H incorporation dropped in both diet groups at days 6 and 9 but the /sup 14/C incorporation showed a decrease only at day 9. These changes were statistically significant, P>0.05. No difference in the tumor growth parameters used in this study can be attributed to the high dietary BCAA.

  10. Enhancement or inhibition of tumor growth by interferon: dependence on treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murasko, D M; Fresa, K; Mark, R

    1983-12-15

    MSC cells are tumor cells originally induced in BALB/c mice by Moloney sarcoma virus. In these studies we demonstrated that, although these tumor cells are sensitive in vitro both to lysis by NK or NK-like cells and to the growth-inhibitory effect of murine L-cell interferon (IFN), the growth of the tumor in vivo could be either inhibited or enhanced by IFN. The outcome of in vivo IFN treatment was dependent on the timing and route of IFN administration relative to tumor challenge. IFN given systematically at the same time as tumor challenge resulted in enhancement of primary tumor formation, rate of tumor growth and subsequent progressive tumor growth. In contrast, IFN administered at the site of tumor inoculation on days 1-3 after tumor challenge inhibited tumor formation and growth. Histopathology of tissue sections obtained from the site of tumor challenge confirmed these results. Similar studies performed in mice given 450 rads of X-irradiation showed that IFN could still inhibit tumor growth when administered at the site of tumor inoculation on days 1-3 after tumor challenge. IFN administered simultaneously with tumor challenge, however, did not enhance tumor growth in irradiated mice. These results are consistent with the interpretation that 1) inhibition of MSC-induced tumor growth by IFN has a radioresistant component and 2) the enhancement of MSC-induced tumor formation by IFN is dependent on interaction with a radiosensitive population of cells, possibly lymphoid cells.

  11. Targeting stromal glutamine synthetase in tumors disrupts tumor microenvironment-regulated cancer cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive stromal cells are an integral part of tumor microenvironment (TME) and interact with cancer cells to regulate their growth. Although targeting stromal cells could be a viable therapy to regulate the communication between TME and cancer cells, identification of stromal targets that make canc...

  12. Mathematical modeling of Interleukin-35 promoting tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Ling Liao

    Full Text Available Interleukin-35 (IL-35, a cytokine from the Interleukin-12 cytokine family, has been considered as an anti-inflammatory cytokine which promotes tumor progression and tumor immune evasion. It has also been demonstrated that IL-35 is secreted by regulatory T cells. Recent mouse experiments have shown that IL-35 produced by cancer cells promotes tumor growth via enhancing myeloid cell accumulation and angiogenesis, and reducing the infiltration of activated CD8[Formula: see text] T cells into tumor microenvironment. In the present paper we develop a mathematical model based on these experimental results. We include in the model an anti-IL-35 drug as treatment. The extended model (with drug is used to design protocols of anti-IL-35 injections for treatment of cancer. We find that with a fixed total amount of drug, continuous injection has better efficacy than intermittent injections in reducing the tumor load while the treatment is ongoing. We also find that the percentage of tumor reduction under anti-IL-35 treatment improves when the production of IL-35 by cancer is increased.

  13. CRESCIMENTO ECONÔMICO E SUSTENTABILIDADE / Economic Growth and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Montibeller-Filho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The subject “economic growth and sustainability” refers to the relationship between economicgrowth and its positive impact on the wellbeing of the population and on the environment. It is,therefore, about economic, as well as social and environmental, sustainability, i.e. the root ofthe sustainable development paradigm. A historical review is needed for understanding theroots of the emergence of this new socio-political and scientific paradigm. It starts from themoment when the economy was mainly viewed as an evil against the environment, to the pointwhen the new sustainable development, or eco-development, is developed. Then the paperpresents the present, and most important, ways that several public and private actions attemptto develop their economic activities guided by this paradigm, emphasising the Brazilian context.

  14. Identification of microprocessor-dependent cancer cells allows screening for growth-sustaining micro-RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric, D; Chvalova, K; Rousselet, G

    2012-04-19

    Micro-RNAs are deregulated in cancer cells, and some are either tumor suppressive or oncogenic. In addition, a link has been established between decreased expression of micro-RNAs and transformation, and several proteins of the RNA interference pathway have been shown to be haploinsufficient tumor suppressors. Oncogenic micro-RNAs (oncomiRs) could represent new therapeutic targets, and their identification is therefore crucial. However, structural and functional redundancy between micro-RNAs hampers approaches relying on individual micro-RNA inhibition. We reasoned that in cancer cells that depend on oncomiRs, impairing the micro-RNA pathway could lead to growth perturbation rather than increased tumorigenesis. Identifying such cells could allow functional analyses of individual micro-RNAs by complementation of the phenotypes observed upon global micro-RNA inhibition. Therefore, we developed episomal vectors coding for small hairpin RNAs targeting either Drosha or DGCR8, the two components of the microprocessor, the nuclear micro-RNA maturation complex. We identified cancer cell lines in which both vectors induced colony growth arrest. We then screened for individual micro-RNAs complementing this growth arrest, and identified miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-20a and miR-27b as major growth-sustaining micro-RNAs. However, the effect of miR-19a and miR-19b was only transient. In addition, embryonic stem cell-derived micro-RNAs with miR-20a seeds were much less efficient than miR-20a in sustaining cancer cell growth, a finding that contrasted with results obtained in stem cells. Finally, we showed that the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10, a shared target of miR-19 and miR-20, was functionally involved in the growth arrest induced by microprocessor inhibition. We conclude that our approach allowed to identify microprocessor-dependent cancer cells, which could be used to screen for growth-sustaining micro-RNAs. This complementation screen

  15. THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF THE BRASOV GROWTH POLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida CATANA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The demographic dynamics analysed in the context of the relationship between economic development and social inclusion presents an image of the sustainable development of a community as well as the manner how the financial resources have been used. With an allocation of 74.3 million euro in the programming period 2007-2013, the Brasov Growth Pole has pursued the contribution to the achievement of sustainable development since 2005 by the participation in the Agenda 21. The implementation of projects with European financing in areas such as transport, social and educational infrastructure or tourism have generated changes/demographic movements, which this paper proposes to present. The evolution of the stable population, its dynamics at the level of each locality that is part of the Brasov growth pole as well as the dynamics of the number of employees or the development of the unemployment rate are presented by the cluster analysis. The effects of the European financing obtained from Regional Operational Programme 2007-2013 are thus reflected in the sustainable development of the Brasov growth pole from the point of view of the dynamics of the population

  16. Pectolinarigenin Suppresses the Tumor Growth in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyu Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC is one of the common human malignant diseases all over the world, and chemotherapy remains the main therapy for NPC. However, the survival and life quality of NPC patients are still very poor. Thus, novel and selective anti-tumor agents are pressingly needed. Our previous study identified pectolinarigenin as a novel effective anti-tumor drug candidate for NPC. In this study, we further investigated its anti-tumor activities and explored the potential molecular mechanism. Methods: NPC C666-1 cells were cultured and treated by pectolinarigenin. Cell proliferation assay, colony formation assay, Transwell assay and wound healing assay were conducted and cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential and ROS were also observed. NPC subcutaneous xenograft mice model was established to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of pectolinarigenin in vivo. Results: We observed that treatment of pectolinarigenin inhibited cell viability and cell migration of NPC C666-1 cells in concentration- and time-dependent manner. Pectolinarigenin induced cell apoptosis in C666-1 cells detected by flow cytometry analysis, which was associated with the activation of mitochondrial-related apoptosis and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Pectolinarigenin also activated caspase signaling pathway. The in vivo experiment of subcutaneous xenograft mice model also indicated that the administration of pectolinarigenin could decrease the tumor growth of NPC and no severe toxicity was observed. Conclusions: Based on our findings, we conclude that pectolinarigenin could suppress the tumor growth of NPC, which verifies it as a new therapeutic agent for treating this devastating disease.

  17. The Impact of Environmental Light Intensity on Experimental Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckow, Mark A; Wolter, William R; Duffield, Giles E

    2017-09-01

    Cancer research requires for consistent models that minimize environmental variables. Within the typical laboratory animal housing facility, animals may be exposed to varying intensities of light as a result of cage type, cage position, light source, and other factors; however, studies evaluating the differential effect of light intensity during the light phase on tumor growth are lacking. The effect of cage face light intensity, as determined by cage rack position was evaluated with two tumor models using the C57Bl/6NHsd mouse and transplantable B16F10 melanoma cells or Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. Animals were housed in individually-ventilated cages placed at the top, middle, or bottom of the rack in a diagonal pattern so that the top cage was closest to the ceiling light source, and cage face light intensity was measured. Following a two-week acclimation period at the assigned cage position, animals were subcutaneously administered either 1.3×106 B16F10 melanoma cells or 2.5×105 Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Weights of excised tumors were measured following euthanasia 18 days (melanoma) or 21 days (LCC) after tumor cell administration. Cage face light intensity was significantly different depending on the location of the cage, with cages closest to the light source have the greatest intensity. Mean tumor weights were significantly less (plight intensity mice compared to high and low light intensity mice. The environmental light intensity to which experimental animals are exposed may vary markedly with cage location and can significantly influence experimental tumor growth, thus supporting the idea that light intensity should be controlled as an experimental variable for animals used in cancer research. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  19. Ketone body utilization drives tumor growth and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously proposed that catabolic fibroblasts generate mitochondrial fuels (such as ketone bodies) to promote the anabolic growth of human cancer cells and their metastasic dissemination. We have termed this new paradigm “two-compartment tumor metabolism.” Here, we further tested this hypothesis by using a genetic approach. For this purpose, we generated hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts overexpressing the rate-limiting enzymes that promote ketone body production, namely BDH1 and HMGCS2...

  20. Interfacial properties in a discrete model for tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglia, Belén; Guisoni, Nara; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-03-01

    We propose and study, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations, a minimal discrete model for avascular tumor growth, which can also be applied for the description of cell cultures in vitro. The interface of the tumor is self-affine and its width can be characterized by the following exponents: (i) the growth exponent β=0.32(2) that governs the early time regime, (ii) the roughness exponent α=0.49(2) related to the fluctuations in the stationary regime, and (iii) the dynamic exponent z=α/β≃1.49(2), which measures the propagation of correlations in the direction parallel to the interface, e.g., ξ∝t1/z, where ξ is the parallel correlation length. Therefore, the interface belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, in agreement with recent experiments of cell cultures in vitro. Furthermore, density profiles of the growing cells are rationalized in terms of traveling waves that are solutions of the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. In this way, we achieved excellent agreement between the simulation results of the discrete model and the continuous description of the growth front of the culture or tumor.

  1. Serum platelet-derived growth factor and fibroblast growth factor in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christine Vestergaard; Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Olsen, Dorte Aalund

    2012-01-01

    New biological markers with predictive or prognostic value are highly warranted in the treatment of ovarian cancer. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) system and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system are important components in tumor growth and angiogenesis....

  2. MRI Based Bayesian Personalization of a Tumor Growth Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Matthieu; Delingette, Herve; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Batchelor, Tracy; Unkelbach, Jan; Ayache, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    The mathematical modeling of brain tumor growth has been the topic of numerous research studies. Most of this work focuses on the reaction-diffusion model, which suggests that the diffusion coefficient and the proliferation rate can be related to clinically relevant information. However, estimating the parameters of the reaction-diffusion model is difficult because of the lack of identifiability of the parameters, the uncertainty in the tumor segmentations, and the model approximation, which cannot perfectly capture the complex dynamics of the tumor evolution. Our approach aims at analyzing the uncertainty in the patient specific parameters of a tumor growth model, by sampling from the posterior probability of the parameters knowing the magnetic resonance images of a given patient. The estimation of the posterior probability is based on: 1) a highly parallelized implementation of the reaction-diffusion equation using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), and 2) a high acceptance rate Monte Carlo technique called Gaussian Process Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (GPHMC). We compare this personalization approach with two commonly used methods based on the spherical asymptotic analysis of the reaction-diffusion model, and on a derivative-free optimization algorithm. We demonstrate the performance of the method on synthetic data, and on seven patients with a glioblastoma, the most aggressive primary brain tumor. This Bayesian personalization produces more informative results. In particular, it provides samples from the regions of interest and highlights the presence of several modes for some patients. In contrast, previous approaches based on optimization strategies fail to reveal the presence of different modes, and correlation between parameters.

  3. Cell longevity and sustained primary growth in palm stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, P Barry; Huggett, Brett A

    2012-12-01

    Longevity, or organismal life span, is determined largely by the period over which constituent cells can function metabolically. Plants, with modular organization (the ability continually to develop new organs and tissues) differ from animals, with unitary organization (a fixed body plan), and this difference is reflected in their respective life spans, potentially much longer in plants than animals. We draw attention to the observation that palm trees, as a group of monocotyledons without secondary growth comparable to that of lignophytes (plants with secondary growth from a bifacial cambium), retain by means of sustained primary growth living cells in their trunks throughout their organismal life span. Does this make palms the longest-lived trees because they can grow as individuals for several centuries? No conventional lignophyte retains living metabolically active differentiated cell types in its trunk for this length of time, even though the tree as a whole can exist for millennia. Does this contrast also imply that the long-lived cells in a palm trunk have exceptional properties, which allows this seeming immortality? We document the long-life of many tall palm species and their inherent long-lived stem cell properties, comparing such plants to conventional trees. We provide a summary of aspects of cell age and life span in animals and plants. Cell replacement is a feature of animal function, whereas conventional trees rely on active growth centers (meristems) to sustain organismal development. However, the long persistence of living cells in palm trunks is seen not as evidence for unique metabolic processes that sustain longevity, but is a consequence of unique constructional features. This conclusion suggests that the life span of plant cells is not necessarily genetically determined.

  4. Activating Transcription Factor-5 Knockdown Reduces Aggressiveness of Mammary Tumor Cells and Attenuates Mammary Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Ben-Shmuel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Activating transcription factor-5 (ATF5 is an anti-apoptotic factor and has been implicated in enhancing the survival of cancer cells under stress and in regulating the autophagy process. Targeting ATF5 in anticancer therapy may be particularly attractive because of its differential role in cancer cells than in non-transformed cells, thus allowing specificity of the treatment. Using the delivery of short hairpin RNA vectors into the Mvt1 and Met1 cell lines, we tested the role of ATF5 in the development of mammary tumors in vivo and in regulating proliferation and migration of these cells in vitro. In this study, we demonstrate that knockdown of ATF5 (ATF5-KD in both cell lines results in a decreased tumor volume and weight, as well as in a reduced proliferation rate and migratory potential of the cells. In addition, ATF5-KD led to an increased autophagy flux and a shift in the sub-populations comprising Mvt1 cells from the aggressive CD24-positive cells toward less aggressive CD24-negative cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that ATF5 plays an important role in enhancing mammary tumor cells overall aggressiveness and in promoting mammary tumor growth and emphasize the possible benefit of anti-ATF5 therapy in breast cancer patients, particularly, against tumors characterized with the positive expression of cell surface CD24.

  5. Soluble CD80 Protein Delays Tumor Growth and Promotes Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Lucas A; Long, Tiha M; Atkinson, Ryan; Clements, Virginia; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    Tumor cells use various immune-suppressive strategies to overcome antitumor immunity. One such method is tumor expression of programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1), which triggers apoptotic death or anergy upon binding programmed death-1 (PD-1) on T cells. Our previous in vitro cellular studies with human and mouse PD-L1+ tumor cells demonstrated that a soluble form of the costimulatory molecule CD80 prevented PD-L1-mediated immune suppression and restored T-cell activation by binding PD-L1 and blocking interaction with PD-1. We now report that in vivo treatment of established syngeneic PD-L1+ CT26 colon carcinoma and B16F10 melanoma tumors with CD80-Fc delays tumor growth and promotes tumor-infiltrating T cells. Studies with PD-1-/- and CD28-/- mice demonstrate that soluble CD80 acts in vivo by simultaneously neutralizing PD-1 suppression and activating through CD28. We also report that soluble CD80 mediates its effects by activating transcription factors EGR1-4, NF-κB, and MAPK, downstream signaling components of the CD28 and T-cell receptor pathways. Soluble CD80 binds to CTLA-4 on activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, increasing quantities of CTLA-4 antagonist antibodies do not increase T-cell activation. These results indicate that soluble CD80 does not suppress T-cell function through CTLA-4 and suggest that CTLA-4 acts as a decoy receptor for CD80, rather than functioning as a suppressive signaling receptor. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that soluble CD80 has therapeutic efficacy in vivo in mouse tumor systems and that its effects are due to its ability to inhibit PD-1-mediated suppression while concurrently activating T cells through CD28. Cancer Immunol Res; 6(1); 59-68. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Selective blockade of matrix metalloprotease-14 with a monoclonal antibody abrogates invasion, angiogenesis and tumor growth in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tressel, Sarah L.; Pradhan, Rutika V.; Covic, Lidija; Kuliopulos, Athan; Zarwan, Corrine; Kim, Young B.; Sharifi, Sheida; Agarwal, Anika

    2013-01-01

    Most ovarian cancer patients are diagnosed late in progression and often experience tumor recurrence and relapses due to drug resistance. Surface expression of matrix metalloprotease MMP-14 on ovarian cancer cells stimulates a tumor-stromal signaling pathway that promotes angiogenesis and tumor growth. In a cohort of 92 patients, we found that MMP-14 was increased in the serum of women with malignant ovarian tumors. Therefore, we investigated the preclinical efficacy of a MMP-14 monoclonal antibody that could inhibit the migratory and invasive properties of aggressive ovarian cancer cells in vitro. MMP-14 antibody disrupted ovarian tumor-stromal communication and was equivalent to Avastin in suppressing blood vessel growth in mice harboring matrigel plugs. These effects on angiogenesis correlated with down regulation of several important angiogenic factors. Further, mice with ovarian cancer tumors treated with anti-MMP-14 monotherapy showed a marked and sustained regression in tumor growth with decreased angiogenesis compared to IgG treated controls. In a model of advanced peritoneal ovarian cancer, MMP-14-dependent invasion and metastasis was effectively inhibited by intraperitoneal administration of monoclonal MMP-14 antibody. Together, these studies provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for MMP-14 targeting as an adjuvant treatment strategy for advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:23423981

  7. Curcumin in combination with visible light inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujic, Jadranka; Kippenberger, Stefan; Ramirez-Bosca, Ana; Diaz-Alperi, Joaquin; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Kaufmann, Roland; Bernd, August; Hofmann, Matthias

    2009-03-15

    It is known that curcumin, a dietary pigment from the plant Curcuma longa, inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in different cell lines; however, the therapeutic benefit is hampered by very low absorption after transdermal or oral application. Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that curcumin at low concentrations (0.2-1 microg/ml) offered the described effects only when applied with UVA or visible light. Nevertheless, the in vivo efficacy of this combination is lacking. In the present study, we used a xenograft tumor model with human epithelial carcinoma A431 cells to test the effect of curcumin and visible light on tumor growth. It was found that tumor growth was significantly inhibited in mice that were i.p. injected with curcumin and consecutively irradiated with visible light. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed a reduction of Ki 67 expression, indicating a decrease of cycling cells and induction of apoptotic bodies. The effect on apoptosis was further confirmed by Western blot analysis showing enhanced activation of caspases-9. Vice versa inhibition of extracellular regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) was observed which may aid inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. In summary, the present findings suggest a combination of curcumin and light as a new therapeutic concept to increase the efficacy of curcumin in the treatment of cancer.

  8. Resource Demand Growth and Sustainability Due to Increased World Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Balatsky

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at continuing the discussion on sustainability and attempts to forecast the impossibility of the expanding consumption worldwide due to the planet’s limited resources. As the population of China, India and other developing countries continue to increase, they would also require more natural and financial resources to sustain their growth. We coarsely estimate the volumes of these resources (energy, food, freshwater and the gross domestic product (GDP that would need to be achieved to bring the population of India and China to the current levels of consumption in the United States. We also provide estimations for potentially needed immediate growth of the world resource consumption to meet this equality requirement. Given the tight historical correlation between GDP and energy consumption, the needed increase of GDP per capita in the developing world to the levels of the U.S. would deplete explored fossil fuel reserves in less than two decades. These estimates predict that the world economy would need to find a development model where growth would be achieved without heavy dependence on fossil fuels.

  9. Lycopene reduces ovarian tumor growth and intraperitoneal metastatic load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, Nina Pauline; Shokoohmand, Ali; Wagner, Ferdinand; Landgraf, Marietta; Champ, Simon; Holzapfel, Boris Michael; Clements, Judith Ann; Hutmacher, Dietmar Werner; Loessner, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Mutagens like oxidants cause lesions in the DNA of ovarian and fallopian tube epithelial cells, resulting in neoplastic transformation. Reduced exposure of surface epithelia to oxidative stress may prevent the onset or reduce the growth of ovarian cancer. Lycopene is well-known for its excellent antioxidant properties. In this study, the potential of lycopene in the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer was investigated using an intraperitoneal animal model. Lycopene prevention significantly reduced the metastatic load of ovarian cancer-bearing mice, whereas treatment of already established ovarian tumors with lycopene significantly diminished the tumor burden. Lycopene treatment synergistically enhanced anti-tumorigenic effects of paclitaxel and carboplatin. Immunostaining of tumor and metastatic tissues for Ki67 revealed that lycopene reduced the number of proliferating cancer cells. Lycopene decreased the expression of the ovarian cancer biomarker, CA125. The anti-metastatic and anti-proliferative effects were accompanied by down-regulated expression of ITGA5, ITGB1, MMP9, FAK, ILK and EMT markers, decreased protein expression of integrin α5 and reduced activation of MAPK. These findings indicate that lycopene interferes with mechanisms involved in the development and progression of ovarian cancer and that its preventive and therapeutic use, combined with chemotherapeutics, reduces the tumor and metastatic burden of ovarian cancer in vivo.

  10. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Xinyu [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Lab of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Han, Xingpeng [Department of Pathology, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjin 300051 (China); Zhang, Fang [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Enzymology, Yangtze Delta Region Institute of Tsinghua University, Jiaxing 314006, Zhejiang (China); He, Miao [Life Sciences School, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Zhang, Yi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhi, Xiu-Yi, E-mail: xiuyizhi@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhao, Hong, E-mail: zhaohong9@sina.com [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Lab of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  11. Nonimmune and immune surveillance. II. Effect of recipient's age, tumor immunogenicity, and neonatal thymectomy on tumor growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinzar, S N; Svet-Moldavsky, G J; Karmanova, N V

    1978-09-01

    After a suspension of tumor pieces was grafted into newborn and adult (CBA X C57BL/6J)F1 and BALB/c mice, the growth of Lewis lung adenocarcinoma and mammary gland adenocarcinoma was inhibited in newborn mice, whereas sarcoma of the rectum (SR-1-75) grew at the same rate in newborn and adult recipients. Neonatal thymectomy stimulated the growth of hepatoma (H-2-73) in newborns. The degree of tumor growth inhibition was age-dependent: The maximum inhibition was observed in 1- to 6-day-old recipients, but later it gradually decreased. The hepatoma (H-2-73) and ovarian carcinoma (OC-1-75) with inhibited growth in newborns and the tumor (SR-1-75) with uninhibited growth had equally low immunogenicity. The data suggested that newborns possess factors that inhibit tumor growth but these factors disappear with increased age of recipients.

  12. The Use of Biofuel for Sustainable Growth in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, J.

    2014-12-01

    The biofuel industry is divided into four categories comprising of feedstocks used in 1st and 2nd generation bioethanol and biodiesel. In order to identify and quantify each biofuel feedstock's potential for sustainable growth, each were evaluated according to self-developed social, financial, and environmental criteria. From the investigation and analysis carried out, 1st generation biodiesel and bioethanol were determined to be feedstocks not capable of facilitating sustainable growth. Results showed low earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) of -0.5 to 1 USD per gallon for biodiesel and 0.25 to 0.5 USD per gallon for bioethanol. Results also showed a poor return on asset (ROA). The energy required to produce one MJ of 1st generation biofuel fuel was at least 0.4 MJ, showing poor energy balance. Furthermore, high land, water, pesticide, and fertilizer requirements strained surrounding ecosystems by affecting the food web, thus reducing biodiversity. Over 55% of land used by the biodiesel industry in Indonesia and Malaysia involved the deforestation of local rainforests. This not only displaced indigenous organisms from their habitat and decreased their scope of nutrition, but also contributed to soil erosion and increased the probability of flooding. If left unregulated, imbalances in the ecosystem due to unsustainable growth will result in a permanent reshaping of tropical rainforest ecosystems in Southeast Asia. Algae, an example of 2nd generation biodiesel feedstock, was concluded to be the biofuel feedstock most capable of supporting sustainable growth. This is due to its low production costs of $1-1.5/gal, high biological productivity of 5000 gallons of biodiesel per acre per year, and high ROA of 25-35%. Additionally, algae's adaptability to varying environmental conditions also makes it an appealing candidate for businesses in developing countries, where access to resource supplies is unstable. Additionally, its reduced net

  13. Gas6-Axl signaling in presence of Sunitinib is enhanced, diversified and sustained in renal tumor cells, resulting in tumor-progressive advantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Anna; Fritz, Helena K M; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2017-06-01

    Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (CCRCC) is a lethal cancer with bad prognosis due to development of chemoresistance and recurrence of more aggressive tumors. Investigation of Gas6-mediated Axl signaling in CCRCC and endothelial cells reveals a Sunitinib resistant Gas6-Axl signaling that is sustained and enhanced and specifically triggers downstream AKT and PRAS40 activation in an intensified manner. Gas6-induced Axl signaling in presence of Sunitinib is also diversified displaying onset of Axl-dependent EGFR and METR activation and activation of classical MAPK pathways. Gas6+Sunitinib-adapted CCRCC cells present increased viability and decreased apoptosis and enhanced production of the multi-tumorigenic Osteopontin (OPN) and of one of its activator matrix metalloproteinase-7. Axl activity is necessary for CCRCC cell sphere formation and the ability of the cells to attach after non-adhesive growth. In addition, Gas6+Sunitinib-adapted CCRCC cells displayed enhanced migration and sphere formation, both mechanisms being Axl and OPN dependent. Altogether, this suggests that Sunitinib while targeting endothelial cells and tumor angiogenesis, simultaneously provides protumorigenic effects due to a constitutively, intensified and divergent Gas6-Axl system. Gas6-mediated Axl signaling, which is enhanced and diversified in the presence of Sunitinib possibly contributes to acquired chemoresistance, recurrence of aggressive disease and metastasis of CCRCC tumors. Therefore, combinatorial Axl-targeted therapy might be beneficial for CCRCC patients intended for Sunitinib treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Methylated DNA for monitoring tumor growth and regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Nielsen, Dorte; Söletormos, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A wide range of protein cancer biomarkers is currently recommended in international guidelines for monitoring the growth and regression of solid tumors. However, a number of these markers are also present in low concentrations in blood obtained from healthy individuals and from patients...... of evidence can partly be explained by incomplete collection of serial blood samples, by analytical challenges, and by lack of knowledge of how monitoring studies should be designed and how serial marker data obtained from individual patients should be interpreted. Here, we review the clinical validity...

  15. Emergent Behavior from A Cellular Automaton Model for Invasive Tumor Growth in Heterogeneous Microenvironments

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Understanding tumor invasion and metastasis is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical practice. In vitro experiments have established that the invasive growth of malignant tumors is characterized by the dendritic invasive branches composed of chains of tumor cells emanating from the primary tumor mass. The preponderance of previous tumor simulations focused on non-invasive (or proliferative) growth. The formation of the invasive cell chains and their interactions with the primary tumor mass and host microenvironment are not well understood. Here, we present a novel cellular automaton (CA) model that enables one to efficiently simulate invasive tumor growth in a heterogeneous host microenvironment. By taking into account a variety of microscopic-scale tumor-host interactions, including the short-range mechanical interactions between tumor cells and tumor stroma, degradation of extracellular matrix by the invasive cells and oxygen/nutrient gradient driven cell motions, our CA mo...

  16. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Chauviere

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth.

  17. Efficacy and safety of sustained-release recombinant human growth hormone in Korean adults with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsook; Hong, Jae Won; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Sung-Woon; Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Jin Hwa; Kim, Byung-Joon; Lee, Eun Jig

    2014-07-01

    The administration of recombinant human growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency has been known to improve metabolic impairment and quality of life. Patients, however, have to tolerate daily injections of growth hormone. The efficacy, safety, and compliance of weekly administered sustained-release recombinant human growth hormone (SR-rhGH, Declage™) supplement in patients with growth hormone deficiency were evaluated. This trial is 12-week prospective, single-arm, open-label trial. Men and women aged ≥20 years with diagnosed growth hormone deficiency (caused by pituitary tumor, trauma and other pituitary diseases) were eligible for this study. Each subject was given 2 mg (6 IU) of SR-rhGH once a week, subcutaneously for 12 weeks. Efficacy and safety at baseline and within 30 days after the 12th injection were assessed and compared. Score of Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA score) for quality of life and serum IGF-1 level. The IGF-1 level of 108.67±74.03 ng/mL was increased to 129.01±68.37 ng/mL (p=0.0111) and the AGHDA QoL score was decreased from 9.80±6.51 to 7.55±5.76 (p<0.0001) at week 12 compared with those at baseline. Adverse events included pain, swelling, erythema, and warmth sensation at the administration site, but many adverse events gradually disappeared during the investigation. Weekly administered SR-rhGH for 12 weeks effectively increased IGF-1 level and improved the quality of life in patients with GH deficiency without serious adverse events.

  18. Phase transitions in tumor growth: IV relationship between metabolic rate and fractal dimension of human tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt-Mar, J. A.; Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Cocho, G.; Mansilla, R.; Martin, R. R.; Montero, S.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    By the use of thermodynamics formalism of irreversible processes, complex systems theory and systems biology, it is derived a relationship between the production of entropy per unit time, the fractal dimension and the tumor growth rate for human tumors cells. The thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates that, the dissipation function is a Landau potential and also the Lyapunov function of the dynamical behavior of tumor growth, which indicate the directional character, stability and robustness of the phenomenon. The entropy production rate may be used as a quantitative index of the metastatic potential of tumors. The current theoretical framework will hopefully provide a better understanding of cancer and contribute to improvements in cancer treatment.

  19. Effects of fasting on growth and glycolysis of the Ehrlich ascites tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, R S

    1976-02-01

    C57BL/6 male mice bearing the Ehrlich escites tumor were subjected to two schedules of intermittent starvation, and the effect on the tumor's growth and production of lactic acid was determined. Fasting resulted in a linear dose--response inhibition of tumor growth, but did not alter its lactic acid production.

  20. Opposite Effects of Coinjection and Distant Injection of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Breast Tumor Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huilin; Zou, Weibin; Shen, Jiaying; Xu, Liang; Wang, Shu; Fu, Yang-Xin; Fan, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    : Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) usually promote tumor growth and metastasis. By using a breast tumor 4T1 cell-based animal model, this study determined that coinjection and distant injection of allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs with tumor cells could exert different effects on tumor growth. Whereas the coinjection of MSCs with 4T1 cells promoted tumor growth, surprisingly, the injection of MSCs at a site distant from the 4T1 cell inoculation site suppressed tumor growth. We further observed that, in the distant injection model, MSCs decreased the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in tumor tissues by enhancing proinflammatory factors such as interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, and TLR-4, promoting host antitumor immunity and inhibiting tumor growth. Unlike previous reports, this is the first study reporting that MSCs may exert opposite roles on tumor growth in the same animal model by modulating the host immune system, which may shed light on the potential application of MSCs as vehicles for tumor therapy and other clinical applications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely investigated for their potential roles in tissue engineering, autoimmune diseases, and tumor therapeutics. This study explored the impact of coinjection and distant injection of allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs on mouse 4T1 breast cancer cells. The results showed that the coinjection of MSCs and 4T1 cells promoted tumor growth. MSCs might act as the tumor stromal precursors and cause immunosuppression to protect tumor cells from immunosurveillance, which subsequently facilitated tumor metastasis. Interestingly, the distant injection of MSCs and 4T1 cells suppressed tumor growth. Together, the results of this study revealed the dual functions of MSCs in immunoregulation. ©AlphaMed Press.

  1. Usp9x Promotes Survival in Human Pancreatic Cancer and Its Inhibition Suppresses Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma In Vivo Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Pal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Usp9x has emerged as a potential therapeutic target in some hematologic malignancies and a broad range of solid tumors including brain, breast, and prostate. To examine Usp9x tumorigenicity and consequence of Usp9x inhibition in human pancreatic tumor models, we carried out gain- and loss-of-function studies using established human pancreatic tumor cell lines (PANC1 and MIAPACA2 and four spontaneously immortalized human pancreatic patient-derived tumor (PDX cell lines. The effect of Usp9x activity inhibition by small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor G9 was assessed in 2D and 3D culture, and its efficacy was tested in human tumor xenografts. Overexpression of Usp9x increased 3D growth and invasion in PANC1 cells and up-regulated the expression of known Usp9x substrates Mcl-1 and ITCH. Usp9x inhibition by shRNA-knockdown or by G9 treatment reduced 3D colony formation in PANC1 and PDX cell lines, induced rapid apoptosis in MIAPACA2 cells, and associated with reduced Mcl-1 and ITCH protein levels. Although G9 treatment reduced human MIAPACA2 tumor burden in vivo, in mouse pancreatic cancer cell lines established from constitutive (8041 and doxycycline-inducible (4668 KrasG12D/Tp53R172H mouse pancreatic tumors, Usp9x inhibition increased and sustained the 3D colony growth and showed no significant effect on tumor growth in 8041-xenografts. Thus, Usp9x inhibition may be therapeutically active in human PDAC, but this activity was not predicted from studies of genetically engineered mouse pancreatic tumor models.

  2. Fragmented sleep accelerates tumor growth and progression through recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages and TLR4 signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Fahed; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shelley XL; Zheng, Jiamao; Yolcu, Esma S.; Carreras, Alba; Khlayfa, Abdelnaby; Shirwan, Haval; Almendros, Isaac; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Fragmented sleep (SF) is a highly prevalent condition and a hallmark of sleep apnea, a condition that has been associated with increased cancer incidence and mortality. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that SF promotes tumor growth and progression through pro-inflammatory TLR4 signaling. In the design, we compared mice that were exposed to SF one week before engraftment of syngeneic TC1 or LL3 tumor cells and tumor analysis three weeks later. We also compared host contributions through the use of mice genetically deficient in TLR4 or its effector molecules MYD88 or TRIF. We found that SF enhanced tumor size and weight compared to control mice. Increased invasiveness was apparent in SF tumors, which penetrated the tumor capsule into surrounding tissues including adjacent muscle. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were more numerous in SF tumors where they were distributed in a relatively closer proximity to the tumor capsule, compared to control mice. Although tumors were generally smaller in both MYD88−/− and TRIF−/− hosts, the more aggressive features produced by SF persisted. In contrast, these more aggressive features produced by SF were abolished completely in TLR4−/− mice. Our findings offer mechanistic insights into how sleep perturbations can accelerate tumor growth and invasiveness through TAM recruitment and TLR4 signaling pathways. PMID:24448240

  3. Alerting the immune system via stromal cells is central to the prevention of tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navikas, Shohreh

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer immunotherapies are highly desired. Conversely, unwanted inflammatory or immune responses contribute to oncogenesis, tumor progression, and cancer-related death. For non-immunogenic therapies to inhibit tumor growth, they must promote, not prevent, the activation of anticancer immune...

  4. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  5. Role of constitutive behavior and tumor-host mechanical interactions in the state of stress and growth of solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysovalantis Voutouri

    Full Text Available Mechanical forces play a crucial role in tumor patho-physiology. Compression of cancer cells inhibits their proliferation rate, induces apoptosis and enhances their invasive and metastatic potential. Additionally, compression of intratumor blood vessels reduces the supply of oxygen, nutrients and drugs, affecting tumor progression and treatment. Despite the great importance of the mechanical microenvironment to the pathology of cancer, there are limited studies for the constitutive modeling and the mechanical properties of tumors and on how these parameters affect tumor growth. Also, the contribution of the host tissue to the growth and state of stress of the tumor remains unclear. To this end, we performed unconfined compression experiments in two tumor types and found that the experimental stress-strain response is better fitted to an exponential constitutive equation compared to the widely used neo-Hookean and Blatz-Ko models. Subsequently, we incorporated the constitutive equations along with the corresponding values of the mechanical properties - calculated by the fit - to a biomechanical model of tumor growth. Interestingly, we found that the evolution of stress and the growth rate of the tumor are independent from the selection of the constitutive equation, but depend strongly on the mechanical interactions with the surrounding host tissue. Particularly, model predictions - in agreement with experimental studies - suggest that the stiffness of solid tumors should exceed a critical value compared with that of the surrounding tissue in order to be able to displace the tissue and grow in size. With the use of the model, we estimated this critical value to be on the order of 1.5. Our results suggest that the direct effect of solid stress on tumor growth involves not only the inhibitory effect of stress on cancer cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis, but also the resistance of the surrounding tissue to tumor expansion.

  6. SUSTAINABILITY OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND INEQUALITY IN INCOMES DISTRIBUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Ion Boldea

    2012-07-01

    correlation between the explanatory variables and the country-specific effects. For a robustness assessment, we also apply the so-called GMM-System estimation. According to our results, an increase in the volatility of the social output (a decrease in the sustainability of the growth processes leads to a greater inequality in incomes distribution. Such outcome appears to be robust to the changes in estimation methodology

  7. SMART, SUSTAINABLE AND INCLUSIVE GROWTH FOR 2014-2020

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Popescu (Stîngaciu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting with general information about the EU multiannual financial framework and the European Union’s budget, the research paper attempts to respond to some questions of general interest regarding the activities financed through EU budget, the potential causes for a low absorption rate of funding in the current financing period and concludes with some measures needed to be taken to strengthen the absorption of funding for the next financing period, 2014-2020. Based on the main theme of the Europe 2020 strategy, smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, the article attempts to outline the important role of EU allocations for the period 2014-2020 for funding the growing number of policy in which EU can be more effective in the current context, after the economic and financial crisis. The paper presents the objectives of the Europe 2020 strategy and the targets for 2014-2020.

  8. Tumor-specific RNA interference targeting Pokemon suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yining; Xu, Shuxiong; Wang, Xiangwei; Shi, Hua; Sun, Zhaolin; Yang, Zhao

    2013-02-01

    To explore the exact mechanism of Pokemon in prostate cancer. Pokemon is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Its main function is suppression of the p14ARF (alternate reading frame) tumor suppressor gene. Although Pokemon expression has been found to be increased in various types of lymphoma, the exact mechanism of the gene in prostate cancer is not clear. In the present study, prostate cancer cells were transfected with the specific short hairpin ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression vector targeting Pokemon. The expression of Pokemon messenger RNA and its protein was detected by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. The cell growth and cell apoptosis were also examined using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and flow cytometry. The results demonstrated that specific RNA interference (RNAi) could decrease the expression levels of Pokemon gene messenger RNA and protein in prostate cancer cells. In addition, that specific RNAi significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and increased the apoptotic rate. In vivo experiments showed that specific RNAi inhibited the tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells and significantly suppressed tumor growth. Therefore, an RNAi-targeted Pokemon gene strategy could be a potential approach to prostate cancer therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor-superantigen conjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Qingwen [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Jiang, Songmin [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Han, Baohui [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); Sun, Tongwen [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China); Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang [College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Sun, Jialin, E-mail: jialin_sun@126.com [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF-SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF-SEA treated with 15 {mu}g, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  10. Caffeine mediates sustained inactivation of breast cancer-associated myofibroblasts via up-regulation of tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Mysoon M; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2014-01-01

    Active cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) or myofibroblasts play important roles not only in the development and progression of breast carcinomas, but also in their prognosis and treatment. Therefore, targeting these cells through suppressing their supportive procarcinogenic paracrine effects is mandatory for improving the current therapies that are mainly targeting tumor cells. To this end, we investigated the effect of the natural and pharmacologically safe molecule, caffeine, on CAF cells and their various procarcinogenic effects. We have shown here that caffeine up-regulates the tumor suppressor proteins p16, p21, p53 and Cav-1, and reduces the expression/secretion of various cytokines (IL-6, TGF-β, SDF-1 and MMP-2), and down-regulates α-SMA. Furthermore, caffeine suppressed the migratory/invasiveness abilities of CAF cells through PTEN-dependent Akt/Erk1/2 inactivation. Moreover, caffeine reduced the paracrine pro-invasion/-migration effects of CAF cells on breast cancer cells. These results indicate that caffeine can inactivate breast stromal myofibroblasts. This has been confirmed by showing that caffeine also suppresses the paracrine pro-angiogenic effect of CAF cells through down-regulating HIF-1αand its downstream effector VEGF-A. Interestingly, these effects were sustained in absence of caffeine. The present findings provide a proof of principle that breast cancer myofibroblasts can be inactivated, and thereby caffeine may provide a safe and effective prevention against breast tumor growth/recurrence through inhibition of the procarcinogenic effects of active stromal fibroblasts.

  11. Examining the contradiction in 'sustainable urban growth': an example of groundwater sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Moira L.; Reeves, Howard W.

    2012-01-01

    The environmental planning literature proposes a set of 'best management practices' for urban development that assumes improvement in environmental quality as a result of specific urban patterns. These best management practices, however, often do not recognise finite biophysical limits and social impacts that urban patterns alone cannot overcome. To shed light on this debate, we explore the effects of different degrees of urban clustering on groundwater levels using a coupled land-use change and groundwater-flow model. Our simulations show that specific urban forms only slow down the impact on groundwater. As population increases, the pattern in which it is accommodated ceases to matter, and widespread depletion ensues. These results are predictable, yet current planning practice tends to take growth for granted and is reluctant to envision either no-growth scenarios or the prospect of depletion. We propose to use simulations such as those presented here to aid in policy discussions that allow decision makers to question the assumption of sustainable growth and suggest alternative forms of development.

  12. 68Gallium-DOTATATE PET in meningioma: A reliable predictor of tumor growth rate?

    OpenAIRE

    Sommerauer, M; Burkhardt, J. K.; Frontzek, K; Rushing, E.; Buck, A; Krayenbuehl, N; Weller, M.; Schaefer, N.; Kuhn, F P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND DOTATATE-based radionuclides have added new options in the diagnosis and treatment of meningiomas; however, a reliable predictor of tumor growth has still not been established. METHODS We analyzed 64 meningiomas imaged with (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET. Tumor growth rates were calculated by volumetric analysis of sequential MRI scans. Maximums of standardized uptake values (SUVmax) were correlated with tumor growth and covariates. RESULTS World Health Organization (WHO) grades I and II...

  13. Sanguinarine Suppresses Prostate Tumor Growth and Inhibits Survivin Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Lou, Wei; Chun, Jae Yeon; Cho, Daniel S.; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Evans, Christopher P.; Chen, Jun; Yue, Jiao; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequently occurring disease and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths of men in the United States. Current treatments have proved inadequate in curing or controlling prostate cancer, and a search for agents for the management of this disease is urgently needed. Survivin plays an important role in both progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and resistance to chemotherapy. Altered expression of survivin in prostate cancer cells is associated with cancer progression, drug/radiation resistance, poor prognosis, and short patient survival. In the present study, the authors performed a cell-based rapid screen of the Prestwick Chemical Library consisting of 1120 Food and Drug Administration–approved compounds with known safety and bioavailability in humans to identify potential inhibitors of survivin and anticancer agents for prostate cancer. Sanguinarine, a benzophenanthridine alkaloid derived primarily from the bloodroot plant, was identified as a novel inhibitor of survivin that selectively kills prostate cancer cells over “normal” prostate epithelial cells. The authors found that sanguinarine inhibits survivin protein expression through protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Sanguinarine induces apoptosis and inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells and in vivo tumor formation. Administration of sanguinarine, beginning 3 days after ectopic implantation of DU145 human prostate cancer cells, reduces both tumor weight and volume. In addition, sanguinarine sensitized paclitaxel-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis, offering a potential therapeutic strategy for overcoming taxol resistance. These results suggest that sanguinarine may be developed as an agent either alone or in combination with taxol for treatment of prostate cancer overexpressing survivin. PMID:21318089

  14. Sustainable Mineral-Intensive Growth in Odisha, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, S.

    2012-04-01

    The focus of the work is to highlight the present environmental and social impacts of extensive mining on the health of the common people of Odisha. The mining activities have created havoc impact to the environment and social life of the state. Odisha has huge deposits of ores and minerals of chromite, nickel, bauxite, iron, coal, copper, manganese, graphite, vanadium etc. The mining activities have encouraged rapid urbanization and at the same time have altered the topography of these areas and extensively degraded the forest land. For long term sustainable development of the society, it is necessary to take a balanced and integrated approach towards environmental protection and economic advancement. Industries should aim at achieving their goals, through a system of permits based on best available techniques, which gives emphasis on integrated prevention and control of consumption of energy and water as well as pollution of water, air and soil. The rapid industrial growth has brought promising opportunities for economic development and poverty reduction in Odisha but at the same time has caused extensive environmental degradation. The best management practices to deal with environmental and social impacts on mineral-intensive growth are suggested in this work. In addition to lean technology, economic implications of the introduction of environmental technologies for mining activities are also discussed.

  15. Sustainable de-growth: Mapping the context, criticisms and future prospects of an emergent paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Alier, Joan [Department of Economics and Economic History, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Pascual, Unai [Department of Land Economy, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Vivien, Franck-Dominique [Department of Economics, Universite de Reims Champagne Ardenne (France); Zaccai, Edwin [Institute for Environmental Management and Land Planning, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    'Sustainable de-growth' is both a concept and a social-grassroots (Northern) movement with its origins in the fields of ecological economics, social ecology, economic anthropology and environmental and social activist groups. This paper introduces the concept of sustainable de-growth by mapping some of the main intellectual influences from these fields, with special focus on the Francophone and Anglophone thinking about this emergent notion. We propose hypotheses pertaining to the appeal of sustainable de-growth, and compare it to the messages enclosed within the dominant sustainable development idea. We scrutinize the theses, contradictions, and consequences of sustainable de-growth thinking as it is currently being shaped by a heterogeneous body of literature and as it interacts with an ample and growing corpus of social movements. We also discuss possible future paths for the de-growth movement compared to the apparent weakening of the sustainable development paradigm. (author)

  16. The impact of the quality of coal mine stockpile soils on sustainable vegetation growth and productivity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mushia, NM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available , chemical, and biological properties, limiting their capability for sustainable vegetation growth. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of stockpile soils of differing depth and quality on vegetation growth and productivity. Soils were collected...

  17. Real effects of government debt on sustainable economic growth in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Danial Ariff Burhanudin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The persistent increase of government debt in Malaysia in the recent years has raised con-cerns as to whether the borrowings have spurred the economy or became a drag on econom-ic growth. The present paper investigates the real effect of government debt on sustainable economic growth in Malaysia using the Autoregressive Distributed Lag approach for the period of 1970-2015. The results show there are positive significant long- and short-run relationships between government debt and sustainable economic growth. There is also a unidirectional causality running from government debt to sustainable economic growth. The findings indicate that Malaysia’s government debt is an important macroeconomic element for sustainability of economic growth in Malaysia. There is no evidence, however, to con-clude that the level of government debt had any adverse impacts on sustainable economic growth.

  18. M-HIFU inhibits tumor growth, suppresses STAT3 activity and enhances tumor specific immunity in a transplant tumor model of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Huang

    Full Text Available In this study, we explored the use of mechanical high intensity focused ultrasound (M-HIFU as a neo-adjuvant therapy prior to surgical resection of the primary tumor. We also investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 in M-HIFU elicited anti-tumor immune response using a transplant tumor model of prostate cancer.RM-9, a mouse prostate cancer cell line with constitutively activated STAT3, was inoculated subcutaneously in C57BL/6J mice. The tumor-bearing mice (with a maximum tumor diameter of 5∼6 mm were treated by M-HIFU or sham exposure two days before surgical resection of the primary tumor. Following recovery, if no tumor recurrence was observed in 30 days, tumor rechallenge was performed. The growth of the rechallenged tumor, survival rate and anti-tumor immune response of the animal were evaluated.No tumor recurrence and distant metastasis were observed in both treatment groups employing M-HIFU + surgery and surgery alone. However, compared to surgery alone, M-HIFU combined with surgery were found to significantly inhibit the growth of rechallenged tumors, down-regulate intra-tumoral STAT3 activities, increase cytotoxic T cells in spleens and tumor draining lymph nodes (TDLNs, and improve the host survival. Furthermore, M-HIFU combined with surgery was found to significantly decrease the level of immunosuppression with concomitantly increased number and activities of dendritic cells, compared to surgery alone.Our results demonstrate that M-HIFU can inhibit STAT3 activities, and when combined synergistically with surgery, may provide a novel and promising strategy for the treatment of prostate cancers.

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in radiation-induced dog lung tumors by immunocytochemical localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, F.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    In studies to determine the role of growth factors in radiation-induced lung cancer, epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression was examined by immunocytochemistry in 51 lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium; 21 of 51 (41%) tumors were positive for EGFR. The traction of tumors positive for EGFR and the histological type of EGFR-positive tumors in the plutonium-exposed dogs were not different from spontaneous dog lung tumors, In which 36% were positive for EGFR. EGFR involvement in Pu-induced lung tumors appeared to be similar to that in spontaneous lung tumors. However, EGFR-positive staining was observed in only 1 of 16 tumors at the three lowest Pu exposure levels, compared to 20 of 35 tumors staining positive at the two highest Pu exposure levels. The results in dogs were in good agreement with the expression of EGFR reported in human non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, suggesting that Pu-induced lung tumors in the dog may be a suitable animal model to investigate the role of EGFR expression in lung carcinogenesis. In humans, EGFR expression in lung tumors has been primarily related to histological tumor types. In individual dogs with multiple primary lung tumors, the tumors were either all EGFR positive or EGFR negative, suggesting that EGFR expression may be related to the response of the individual dog as well as to the histological type of tumor.

  20. Impact of Stroma on the Growth, Microcirculation, Metabolism of Experimental Prostate Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M. Zechmann

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In prostate cancers (PCa, the formation of malignant stroma may substantially influence tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. Thus, the impact of the orthotopic and subcutaneous implantations of hormone-sensitive (H, hormone-insensitive (HI, anaplastic (AT1 Dunning PCa in rats on growth, microcirculation, metabolism was investigated. For this purpose, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([1H]MRS were applied in combination with histology. Consistent observations revealed that orthotopic H tumors grew significantly slower compared to subcutaneous ones, whereas the growth of HI and AT1 tumors was comparable at both locations. Histologic analysis indicated that glandular differentiation and a close interaction of tumor cells and smooth muscle cells (SMC were associated with slow tumor growth. Furthermore, there was a significantly lower SMC density in subcutaneous H tumors than in orthotopic H tumors. Perfusion was observed to be significantly lower in orthotopic H tumors than in subcutaneous H tumors. Regional blood volume and permeability-surface area product showed no significant differences between tumor models and their implantation sites. Differences in growth between subcutaneous and orthotopic H tumors can be attributed to tumor-stroma interaction and perfusion. Here, SMC, may stabilize glandular structures and contribute to the maintenance of differentiated phenotype.

  1. The HMGB1/RAGE inflammatory pathway promotes pancreatic tumor growth by regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, R; Tang, D; Schapiro, NE; Loux, T; Livesey, KM; Billiar, TR; Wang, H; Van Houten, B; Lotze, MT; Zeh, HJ

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells require increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to support anabolism and proliferation. The precise mechanisms regulating this process in tumor cells are unknown. Here, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) and one of its primary ligands, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), are required for optimal mitochondrial function within tumors. We found that RAGE is present in the mitochondria of cultured tumor cells as well as primary tumors. RAGE and HMGB1 coordinately enhanced tumor cell mitochondrial complex I activity, ATP production, tumor cell proliferation and migration. Lack of RAGE or inhibition of HMGB1 release diminished ATP production and slowed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. These findings link, for the first time, the HMGB1–RAGE pathway with changes in bioenergetics. Moreover, our observations provide a novel mechanism within the tumor microenvironment by which necrosis and inflammation promote tumor progression. PMID:23318458

  2. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  3. The effect of CT26 tumor-derived TGF-β on the balance of tumor growth and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owyang, Stephanie Y; Zhang, Min; Walkup, Grace A; Chen, Grace E; Grasberger, Helmut; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Kao, John Y

    2017-11-01

    TGF-β is an important target for many cancer therapies under development. In addition to suppressing anti-tumor immunity, it has pleiotropic direct pro- and anti- tumor effects. The actions of increased endogenous TGF-β production remain unclear, and may affect the outcomes of anti-TGF-β cancer therapy. We hypothesize that tumor-derived TGF-β (td-TGF-β) plays an important role in maintaining tumor remission by controlling tumor proliferation in vivo, and that decreasing td-TGF-β in the tumor microenvironment will result in tumor progression. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of TGF-β in the tumor microenvironment on the balance between its anti-proliferative and immunosuppressive effects. A murine BALB/c spontaneous colon adenocarcinoma cell line (CT26) was genetically engineered to produce increased active TGF-β (CT26-TGF-β), a dominant-negative soluble TGF-β receptor (CT26-TGF-β-R), or the empty neomycin cassette as control (CT26-neo). In vitro proliferation rates were measured. For in vivo studies, the three cell lines were injected into syngeneic BALB/c mice, and tumor growth was measured over time. Immunodeficient BALB/c nude mice were used to investigate the role of T and B cells. In vitro, CT26-TGF-β-R and CT26-TGF-β cells showed increased and suppressed proliferation, respectively, compared to control (CT26-neo), confirming TGF-β has direct anti-tumor effects. In vivo, we found that CT26-TGF-β-R cells displayed slower growth compared to control, likely secondary to reduced suppression of anti-tumor immunity, as this effect was ablated in immunodeficient BALB/c nude mice. However, CT26-TGF-β cells (excess TGF-β) exhibited rapid early growth compared to control, but later failed to progress. The same pattern was shown in immunodeficient BALB/c nude mice, suggesting the effect on tumor growth is direct, with minimal immune system involvement. There was minimal effect on systemic antitumor immunity as determined by peripheral

  4. Expression of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and steroidgenic enzymes in canine testis tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M.A.J.; Mol, J.A.; Wolferen, van M.E.; Oosterlaken-Dijksterhuis, M.A.; Teerds, K.J.; Sluijs, van F.J.

    2003-01-01

    Testis tumors occur frequently in dogs. The main types of tumors are Sertoli cell tumors, seminomas, and Leydig cell tumors. Mixed tumors and bilateral occurrence of tumors may be encountered frequently. To elucidate the possible relationship between the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and

  5. Malignant cells fuel tumor growth by educating infiltrating leukocytes to produce the mitogen Gas6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loges, Sonja; Schmidt, Thomas; Tjwa, Marc; van Geyte, Katie; Lievens, Dirk; Lutgens, Esther; Vanhoutte, Davy; Borgel, Delphine; Plaisance, Stephane; Hoylaerts, Marc; Luttun, Aernout; Dewerchin, Mieke; Jonckx, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The transforming and tumor growth-promoting properties of Axl, a member of the Tyro3, Axl, and Mer (TAM) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (TAMRs), are well recognized. In contrast, little is known about the role of the TAMR ligand growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) in tumor biology. By using

  6. Effects of dietary fatty acid composition on tumor growth and metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, C. E.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids of the n-6 and n-3 class have been shown to affect tumor growth and metastasis. The very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids of the n-3 family, e.g. eicosapentaenoic acids (C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acids (C22:5n-3), have an inhibiting effect on tumor growth.

  7. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 regulates tumor invasion by coupling fibroblast growth factor signaling to extracellular matrix degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, Nami; Varjosalo, Markku; Meller, Pipsa

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant expression and polymorphism of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) has been linked to tumor progression and anticancer drug resistance. We describe here a novel mechanism of tumor progression by matrix degradation involving epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in response...... substantiated by reduced MT1-MMP content and in vivo growth of prostate carcinoma cells after the FGFR4-R388 gene silencing. In contrast, knockdown of the alternative FGFR4-G388 allele enhanced MT1-MMP and invasive tumor cell growth in vivo and within three-dimensional collagen. These results will help...

  8. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejal Desai

    Full Text Available Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2 and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper

  9. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M S; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu; Pandey, B N

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  10. Increased growth rate of vestibular schwannoma after resection of contralateral tumor in neurofibromatosis type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Peyre, Matthieu; Goutagny, Stephane; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Bozorg-Grayeli, Alexis; Felce, Michele; Sterkers, Olivier; Kalamarides, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Surgical management of bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) in neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is often difficult, especially when both tumors threaten the brainstem. When the largest tumor has been removed, the management of the contralateral VS may become puzzling. To give new insights into the growth pattern of these tumors and to determine the best time point for treatment (surgery or medical treatment), we studied radiological growth in 11 VS (11 patients with NF2) over a long period (me...

  11. Stochastic resonance induced by Lévy noise in a tumor growth model with periodic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Hao, Mengli; Gu, Xudong; Yang, Guidong

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the stochastic resonance phenomenon in a tumor growth model under subthreshold periodic therapy and Lévy noise excitation is investigated. The possible reoccurrence of tumor due to stochastic resonance is discussed. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is calculated numerically to measure the stochastic resonance. It is found that smaller stability index is better for avoiding tumor reappearance. Besides, the effect of the skewness parameter on the tumor regrowth is related to the stability index. Furthermore, increasing the intensity of periodic treatment does not always facilitate tumor therapy. These results are beneficial to the optimization of periodic tumor therapy.

  12. Fasting inhibits colorectal cancer growth by reducing M2 polarization of tumor-associated macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Pengfei; Wang, Huihui; He, Zhiyong; Chen, Xiangyuan; Wu, Qichao; Chen, Wankun; Sun, Zhirong; Weng, Meilin; Zhu, Minmin; Ma, Duan; Miao, Changhong

    2017-01-01

    Dietary restriction has been recognized as a healthy and natural therapy for cancer. It is reported that different forms of dietary restriction can promote anti-tumor immunity. However, it is not clear how fasting affects tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). This study aims to investigate the relationship between fasting and antitumor immunity in terms of tumor-associated macrophages. In vivo, the results showed that alternate day fasting for 2 weeks inhibitted the tumor growth of mice withou...

  13. Ski Promotes Tumor Growth Through Abrogation of Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, T Ryan; Lyman, Suzanne; Schoonhoven, Robert; Behrns, Kevin E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that human pancreatic cancer resists TGF-β signaling and cell death through increased Ski expression. Summary Background Data: Ski is an oncogenic protein that acts as a TGF-β repressor and prevents related gene transcription. Previous work suggests that Ski acts as an oncoprotein in melanoma and esophageal cancer. Ski expression and function have not been determined in human pancreatic cancer. Methods: Immunohistochemistry and immunoblots assessed Ski expression in human pancreatic cancer. Panc-1 cells were treated with or without Ski siRNA, and Ski and Smad protein expression, transcriptional reporter activation, and growth assays were determined. Panc-1 cells were inoculated in the flank of nude mice and tumor volume and histology assessed after administration of Ski siRNA or control vector. Results: Ski was abundantly expressed in human pancreatic cancer specimens assessed by immunohistochemistry (91%) and immunoblot analysis (67%). Panc-1 cells exhibited nascent Ski expression that was maximally inhibited 48 hours after transfection with Ski siRNA. TGF-β transcriptional activity was increased 2.5-fold in Ski siRNA-treated cells compared with control (P < 0.05). Ski siRNA increased TGF-β-induced Smad2 phosphorylation and p21 expression. Panc-1 growth in culture was decreased 2-fold at 72 hours. A Ski siRNA expression vector injected into nude mice resulted in a 5-fold decrease in growth. Conclusion: Inhibition of Ski through RNA interference restored TGF-β signaling and growth inhibition in vitro, and decreased tumor growth in vivo. PMID:17592292

  14. Growth curves of three human malignant tumors transplanted to nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Nielsen, A; Visfeldt, J

    1980-01-01

    Experimental growth data for three human malignant tumors transplanted to nude mice of BALB/c origin are analyzed statistically in order to investigate whether they can be described according to the Gompertz function. The aim is to set up unequivocal standards for planned therapeutic experiments...... and to develop an essential part of the determination of proliferation parameters for the tumors. The results indicate that the course of tumor growth can be described with good approximation by the Gompertz function. A transformation of this function depicts the growth rectilinearly and appears to be suitable...... as a standard, e.g. in therapeutic experiments. The course of tumor growth is independent of the size of the transplant, and whether tumors are transplanted in the right or left or both flanks of the recipient mice. Furthermore, the growth does not vary in a systematic way with the number of passages in nude...

  15. S100A9 interaction with TLR4 promotes tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Källberg

    Full Text Available By breeding TRAMP mice with S100A9 knock-out (S100A9(-/- animals and scoring the appearance of palpable tumors we observed a delayed tumor growth in animals devoid of S100A9 expression. CD11b(+ S100A9 expressing cells were not observed in normal prostate tissue from control C57BL/6 mice but were readily detected in TRAMP prostate tumors. Also, S100A9 expression was observed in association with CD68(+ macrophages in biopsies from human prostate tumors. Delayed growth of TRAMP tumors was also observed in mice lacking the S100A9 ligand TLR4. In the EL-4 lymphoma model tumor growth inhibition was observed in S100A9(-/- and TLR4(-/-, but not in RAGE(-/- animals lacking an alternative S100A9 receptor. When expression of immune-regulating genes was analyzed using RT-PCR the only common change observed in mice lacking S100A9 and TLR4 was a down-regulation of TGFβ expression in splenic CD11b(+ cells. Lastly, treatment of mice with a small molecule (ABR-215050 that inhibits S100A9 binding to TLR4 inhibited EL4 tumor growth. Thus, S100A9 and TLR4 appear to be involved in promoting tumor growth in two different tumor models and pharmacological inhibition of S100A9-TLR4 interactions is a novel and promising target for anti-tumor therapies.

  16. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes tumor growth in the context of lung injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, Douglas; Luckhardt, Tracy R; Carskadon, Shannon; Zhao, Liujian; Amin, Mohammad A; Koch, Alisa E

    2010-10-15

    Tissue injury and repair involve highly conserved processes governed by mechanisms that can be co-opted in tumors. We hypothesized that soluble factors released during the repair response to lung injury would promote orthotopic tumor growth. To determine whether lung injury promoted growth of orthotopic lung tumors and to study the molecular mechanisms. We initiated lung injury in C57Bl6 mice using different stimuli, then injected Lewis lung carcinoma cells during the repair phase. We assessed tumor growth 14 days later. We measured tumor angiogenesis, cytokine expression, proliferation, and apoptosis. Regardless of the mechanism, injured lungs contained more numerous and larger tumors than sham-injured lungs. Tumors from injured lungs were no more vascular, but had higher levels of proliferation and reduced rates of apoptosis. The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was highly expressed in both models of tissue injury. We observed no increase in tumor growth after lung injury in MIF knockout mice. We induced lung-specific overexpression of MIF in a double-transgenic mouse, and observed that MIF overexpression by itself was sufficient to accelerate the growth of orthotopic Lewis lung carcinoma tumors. Lung injury leads to increased expression of the cytokine MIF, which results in protection from apoptosis and increased proliferation in orthotopic tumors injected after the acute phase of injury.

  17. Nonimmune and immune surveillance. I. Growth of tumors and normal fetal tissues grafted into newborn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinzar, S N; Svet-Moldavsky, G J; Karmanova, N V

    1976-07-01

    Growth of various fetal tissues and transplantable tumors in syngeneic newborn and adult mice [BALB/c, DBA/2, and (CBA X C57BL/6J)F1] was compared. Fetal skin, a mixture of all fetal tissues, and tumors were transplanted. The tumors arose spontaneously [hepatomas, mammary gland adenocarcinoma (MGAC)] or resulted from malignant conversion of ectopic transplants either of fetal tissues (urinary bladder carcinoma, adenocarcinoma of small intestine, stomach sarcoma) or of adult animal tissues (ovarian carcinoma) in the syngeneic system. The growth of fetal skin transplants and teratomas, which developed after transplantation of minced tissue from 18- to 20-day and 12- to 14-day fetuses, was considerably inferior in newborn syngeneic recipients, as compared with similar transplants in adults. Inhibition of tumor growth observed in newborn animals was manifested in prolongation of latent period before tumor node appearance and in slowing of growth rate of developed tumors. One of six tumors studied (MGAC) grew at the same rate in newborn and adult recipients. It was suggested that a special type of cellular and/or humoral mechanisms controlling tumor growth exists in newborns. The activity of such factors was conceivably based on fetal tumor antigens as targets. We assumed that weakly antigenic and strongly antigenic tumors behaved differently in respect to nonimmune and immune surveillance mechanisms.

  18. Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    the predicted effect maps against IHC using spatial analysis. We will orient the tumor tissue (before IHC processing) to the corresponding ultrasound ...neuroblastoma (NB5) xenograft tumors (n=3 CD1 nude mice/time point) using nonlinear contrast enhanced  ultrasound   technique  (CEUS). Tumor tissue and...The output from the individualized tumor compartment from the PBPK model will be used to predict individual tumor concentration-time data that could

  19. INFLUENCE OF ECONOMIC GROWTH ON THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF ROMANIA 2007-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina MĂRCUTĂ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to analyse the correlation between the level of economic growth of a country and its rural development. The phrase sustainable development combines the economic growth and the preservation and improvement of environmental and human health, preservation of social justice and assurance of democratic environment in social life. Therefore, the sustainable economic growth provides for the meeting of current consumption requirements without compromising or prejudicing those of the future generations. By adding the requirements regarding environmental protection and preservation of natural resources to economic growth we may speak of a proper sustainable development.

  20. Linear ubiquitin chain induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhoushuai; Jiang, Wandong; Wang, Guifen; Sun, Ying; Xiao, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an important role in DNA damage response. Ectopic expression of PCNA fused at either terminus with ubiquitin (Ub) lacking two C-terminal glycine residues induces translesion DNA synthesis which resembles synthesis mediated by PCNA monoubiquitination. PCNA fused with Ub containing the C-terminal Gly residues at the C-terminus can be further polyubiquitinated in a Gly-dependent manner, which inhibits cell proliferation and induces ATR-dependent replication checkpoint. In this study, we surprisingly found that PCNA fused to a head-to-tail linear Ub chain induces apoptosis in a Ub chain length-dependent manner. Further investigation revealed that the apoptotic effect is actually induced by the linear Ub chain independently from PCNA, as the Ub chain fused to GFP or an epitope tag still efficiently induces apoptosis. It is revealed that the artificial linear Ub chain differs from endogenously encoded linear Ub chains in that its Ubs contain a Ub-G76S substitution, making the Ub chain resistant to cleavage by deubiquitination enzymes. We demonstrated in this study that ectopic expression of the artificial Ub chain alone in cultured human cancer cells is sufficient to inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model, making the linear Ub chain a putative anti-cancer agent.

  1. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  2. Clinically relevant doses of candesartan inhibit growth of prostate tumor xenografts in vivo through modulation of tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusban, Ahmed; Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Goc, Anna; Gao, Fei; Fagan, Susan C; Somanath, Payaningal R

    2014-09-01

    Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers (ARBs), widely used antihypertensive drugs, have also been investigated for their anticancer effects. The effect of ARBs on prostate cancer in experimental models compared with meta-analysis data from clinical trials is conflicting. Whereas this discrepancy might be due to the use of supratherapeutic doses of ARBs in cellular and animal models as compared with the clinical doses used in human trials, further investigation of the effects of clinical doses of ARBs on prostate cancer in experimental models is warranted. In the current study, we sought to determine the effects of candesartan on prostate cancer cellular function in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, and characterize the underlying mechanisms. Our analysis indicated that clinically relevant doses of candesartan significantly inhibited growth of PC3 cell tumor xenografts in mice. Interestingly, the same concentrations of candesartan actually promoted prostate cancer cellular function in vitro, through a modest but significant inhibition in apoptosis. Inhibition of tumor growth by candesartan was associated with a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in tumors and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, but normalization of tumor vasculature. Although candesartan did not impair PC3 cell viability, it inhibited endothelial-barrier disruption by tumor-derived factors. Furthermore, candesartan significantly inhibited expression of VEGF in PC3 and DU145 cell lines independent of angiotensin II type 2 receptor, but potentially via angiotensin II type 1 receptor inhibition. Our findings clearly demonstrate the therapeutic potential of candesartan for prostate cancer and establish a link between ARBs, VEGF expression, and prostate tumor angiogenesis. U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  3. Making long-term economic growth more sustainable. Evaluating the costs and benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Sardar M.N.; Clarke, Matthew [Sustainable Economic Growth Program, Centre for Strategic Economic Studies, City Campus, Victoria University, PO Box 14428, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia); Munasinghe, Mohan [Munasinghe Institute for Development (MIND), Colombo (Sri Lanka)

    2003-12-01

    Currently, traditional development issues such as economic stagnation, poverty, hunger, and illness as well as newer challenges like environmental degradation and globalisation demand attention. Sustainable development, including its economic, environmental and social elements, is a key goal of decisionmakers. Optimal economic growth has also been a crucial goal of both development theorists and practitioners. This paper examines the conditions under which optimal growth might be sustainable, by assessing the costs and benefits of growth. Key environmental and social aspects are considered. The Ecol-Opt-Growth-1 model analyses economic-ecological interactions, including resource depletion, pollution, irreversibility, other environmental effects, and uncertainty. It addresses some important issues, including savings, investment, technical progress, substitutability of productive factors, intergenerational efficiency, equity, and policies to make economic growth more sustainable-a basic element of the sustainomics framework. The empirical results support growing concerns that costs of growth may outweigh its benefits, resulting in unsustainability. Basically, in a wide range of circumstances, long term economic growth is unsustainable due to increasing environmental damage. Nevertheless, the model has many options that can be explored by policy makers, to make the development path more sustainable, as advocated by sustainomics. One example suggests that government supported abatement programs are needed to move towards sustainable development, since the model runs without abatement were infeasible. The optimal rate of abatement increases over time. Abatement of pollution is necessary to improve ecosystem viability and increase sustainability. Further research is necessary to seek conditions under which alternative economic growth paths are likely to become sustainable.

  4. EMODnet MedSea Checkpoint for sustainable Blue Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussat, Eric; Pinardi, Nadia; Manzella, Giuseppe; Blanc, Frederique

    2016-04-01

    The EMODNET checkpoint is a wide monitoring system assessment activity aiming to support the sustainable Blue Growth at the scale of the European Sea Basins by: 1) Clarifying the observation landscape of all compartments of the marine environment including Air, Water, Seabed, Biota and Human activities, pointing out to the existing programs, national, European and international 2) Evaluating fitness for use indicators that will show the accessibility and usability of observation and modeling data sets and their roles and synergies based upon selected applications by the European Marine Environment Strategy 3) Prioritizing the needs to optimize the overall monitoring Infrastructure (in situ and satellite data collection and assembling, data management and networking, modeling and forecasting, geo-infrastructure) and release recommendations for evolutions to better meet the application requirements in view of sustainable Blue Growth The assessment is designed for : - Institutional stakeholders for decision making on observation and monitoring systems - Data providers and producers to know how their data collected once for a given purpose could fit other user needs - End-users interested in a regional status and possible uses of existing monitoring data Selected end-user applications are of paramount importance for: (i) the blue economy sector (offshore industries, fisheries); (ii) marine environment variability and change (eutrophication, river inputs and ocean climate change impacts); (iii) emergency management (oil spills); and (iv) preservation of natural resources and biodiversity (Marine Protected Areas). End-user applications generate innovative products based on the existing observation landscape. The fitness for use assessment is made thanks to the comparison of the expected product specifications with the quality of the product derived from the selected data. This involves the development of checkpoint information and indicators based on Data quality and

  5. Intratumoral chemotherapy with a sustained-release drug delivery system inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J P; Stock, E; Orenberg, E K; Yu, N Y; Kanekal, S; Brown, D M

    1995-12-01

    This study provides the first evidence that treatment of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma is markedly improved by the intratumoral administration of chemotherapeutic agents in a novel drug delivery system. The effect of chemotherapeutic agents delivered in a sustained-release, protein-based, injectable gel was evaluated on the growth of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, BxPC-3. In vitro chemosensitivity of BxPC-3 cells exposed for 24 or 72 h to fluorouracil (0.01-5 mM), cisplatin or doxorubicin (0.1-50 microM) and floxuridine, vinblastine, mitomycin or paclitaxel (1.0-100 microM) was compared with that of untreated cells. In vitro chemosensitivity was also studied with fluorouracil and mitomycin in the poorly differentiated PANC-1, human pancreatic cancer cell line. Survival was determined after 7-10 days. All drugs decreased cell growth in a dose-dependent fashion. The efficacy of fluorouracil, cisplatin and doxorubicin increased with prolonged exposure, rendering these drugs most appropriate for a sustained-release preparation. For in vivo studies, athymic nude mice bearing BxPC-3 xenografts were treated either with fluorouracil, cisplatin or doxorubicin in the therapeutic injectable gel containing epinephrine or with vehicle alone administered intratumorally on days 1 and 4. After 28 days, the mice were sacrificed and tumors dissected and weighed. Tumors in mice treated with the injectable gel decreased in size by 72-79% compared with tumors in untreated controls and tumors treated with vehicle alone. Intratumoral injection of drug solution and intraperitoneal injection of drug in the injectable gel did not change tumor size compared with controls. In a drug-retention study, mice were injected intratumorally with [3H]fluorouracil either in the injectable gel or in solution. Sustained radioactivity was observed in tumors injected with the gel, and, conversely, greater radioactivity was detected in the liver and kidneys in mice receiving the radiolabeled

  6. Absence of tumor growth stimulation in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines by mistletoe extracts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Gerhard; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert

    2002-04-01

    Extracts of Viscum album (mistletoe) are widely used as complementary cancer therapies in Europe. The mistletoe lectins have been identified as the main active principle of mistletoe extracts. They have been shown to exhibit cytotoxic effects as well as immunomodulatory activities. The latter is exemplified by induction of cytokine secretion and increased activity of natural killer cells. Recent reports, however, indicated possible tumor growth stimulation by mistletoe extracts. Therefore, the three aqueous mistletoe extracts (Iscador M special, Iscador Qu special and Iscador P) were evaluated for antiproliferative and/or stimulatory effects in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines in vitro using a cellular proliferation assay. The results show no evidence of stimulation of tumor growth by any of the three Iscador preparations, comprising central nervous system, gastric, non-small cell lung, mammary, prostate, renal and uterine cancer cell lines, as well as cell lines from hematological malignancies and melanomas. On the contrary, Iscador preparations containing a high lectin concentration (Iscador M special and Iscador Qu special) showed antitumor activity in the mammary cancer cell line MAXF 401NL at the 15 microg/ml dose level with a more than 70% growth inhibition compared to untreated control cells. In addition, a slight antitumor activity (growth inhibition 30-70%) was found in three tumor cell lines for Iscador M special and in seven tumor cell lines for Iscador Qu special, respectively. Iscador P, which contains no mistletoe lectin I, showed no antiproliferative activity.

  7. Sustained activation of sphingomyelin synthase by 2-hydroxyoleic acid induces sphingolipidosis in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maria Laura; Liebisch, Gerhard; Lehneis, Stefan; Schmitz, Gerd; Alonso-Sande, María; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; Lopez, Daniel H; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn

    2013-05-01

    The mechanism of action of 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2OHOA), a potent antitumor drug, involves the rapid and specific activation of sphingomyelin synthase (SMS), leading to a 4-fold increase in SM mass in tumor cells. In the present study, we investigated the source of the ceramides required to sustain this dramatic increase in SM. Through radioactive and fluorescent labeling, we demonstrated that sphingolipid metabolism was altered by a 24 h exposure to 2OHOA, and we observed a consistent increase in the number of lysosomes and the presence of unidentified storage materials in treated cells. Mass spectroscopy revealed that different sphingolipid classes accumulated in human glioma U118 cells after exposure to 2OHOA, demonstrating a specific effect on C16-, C20-, and C22-containing sphingolipids. Based on these findings, we propose that the demand for ceramides required to sustain the SMS activation (ca. 200-fold higher than the basal level) profoundly modifies both sphingolipid and phospholipid metabolism. As the treatment is prolonged, tumor cells fail to adequately metabolize sphingolipids, leading to a situation resembling sphingolipidosis, whereby cell viability is compromised.

  8. Sustained activation of sphingomyelin synthase by 2-hydroxyoleic acid induces sphingolipidosis in tumor cells1[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maria Laura; Liebisch, Gerhard; Lehneis, Stefan; Schmitz, Gerd; Alonso-Sande, María; Bestard-Escalas, Joan; Lopez, Daniel H.; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V.; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of action of 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2OHOA), a potent antitumor drug, involves the rapid and specific activation of sphingomyelin synthase (SMS), leading to a 4-fold increase in SM mass in tumor cells. In the present study, we investigated the source of the ceramides required to sustain this dramatic increase in SM. Through radioactive and fluorescent labeling, we demonstrated that sphingolipid metabolism was altered by a 24 h exposure to 2OHOA, and we observed a consistent increase in the number of lysosomes and the presence of unidentified storage materials in treated cells. Mass spectroscopy revealed that different sphingolipid classes accumulated in human glioma U118 cells after exposure to 2OHOA, demonstrating a specific effect on C16-, C20-, and C22-containing sphingolipids. Based on these findings, we propose that the demand for ceramides required to sustain the SMS activation (ca. 200-fold higher than the basal level) profoundly modifies both sphingolipid and phospholipid metabolism. As the treatment is prolonged, tumor cells fail to adequately metabolize sphingolipids, leading to a situation resembling sphingolipidosis, whereby cell viability is compromised. PMID:23471028

  9. Sustained-releasing hollow microparticles with dual-anticancer drugs elicit greater shrinkage of tumor spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jong-Suep; Choo, Chee Chong; Tan, Nguan Soon; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2017-10-06

    Polymeric particulate delivery systems are vastly explored for the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. However, the preparation of polymeric particulate systems with the capability of providing sustained release of two or more drugs is still a challenge. Herein, poly (D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid, 50:50) hollow microparticles co-loaded with doxorubicin and paclitaxel were developed through double-emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Hollow microparticles were formed through the addition of an osmolyte into the fabrication process. The benefits of hollow over solid microparticles were found to be higher encapsulation efficiency and a more rapid drug release rate. Further modification of the hollow microparticles was accomplished through the introduction of methyl-β-cyclodextrin. With this, a higher encapsulation efficiency of both drugs and an enhanced cumulative release were achieved. Spheroid study further demonstrated that the controlled release of the drugs from the methyl-β-cyclodextrin -loaded hollow microparticles exhibited enhanced tumor regressions of MCF-7 tumor spheroids. Such hollow dual-drug-loaded hollow microparticles with sustained releasing capabilities may have a potential for future applications in cancer therapy.

  10. Coupled Hybrid Continuum-Discrete Model of Tumor Angiogenesis and Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lyu

    Full Text Available The processes governing tumor growth and angiogenesis are codependent. To study the relationship between them, we proposed a coupled hybrid continuum-discrete model. In this model, tumor cells, their microenvironment (extracellular matrixes, matrix-degrading enzymes, and tumor angiogenic factors, and their network of blood vessels, described by a series of discrete points, were considered. The results of numerical simulation reveal the process of tumor growth and the change in microenvironment from avascular to vascular stage, indicating that the network of blood vessels develops gradually as the tumor grows. Our findings also reveal that a tumor is divided into three regions: necrotic, semi-necrotic, and well-vascularized. The results agree well with the previous relevant studies and physiological facts, and this model represents a platform for further investigations of tumor therapy.

  11. Optimization of a therapeutic electromagnetic field (EMF) to retard breast cancer tumor growth and vascularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ivan L; Markov, Marko S; Hardman, W Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This study provided additional data on the effects of a therapeutic electromagnetic field (EMF) device on growth and vascularization of murine 16/C mammary adenocarcinoma cells implanted in C3H/HeJ mice. The therapeutic EMF device generated a defined 120 Hz semi sine wave pulse signal of variable intensity. Murine 16/C mammary adenocarcinoma tumor fragments were implanted subcutaneously between the scapulae of syngeneic C3H mice. Once the tumor grew to 100 mm(3), daily EMF treatments were started by placing the cage of mice within the EMF field. Treatment ranged from 10 to 20 milli-Tesla (mT) and was given for 3 to 80 minutes either once or twice a day for 12 days. Tumors were measured and volumes calculated each 3-4 days. Therapeutic EMF treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in all 7 EMF treated groups. Exposure to 20mT for 10 minutes twice a day was the most effective tumor growth suppressor. The effect of EMF treatment on extent of tumor vascularization, necrosis and viable area was determined after euthanasia. The EMF reduced the vascular (CD31 immunohistochemically positive) volume fraction and increased the necrotic volume of the tumor. Treatment with 15 mT for 10 min/d gave the maximum anti-angiogenic effect. Lack of a significant correlation between tumor CD 31 positive area and tumor growth rate indicates a mechanism for suppression of tumor growth in addition to suppression of tumor vascularization. It is proposed that EMF therapy aimed at suppression of tumor growth and vascularization may prove a safe alternative for patients whether they are or are not candidates for conventional cancer therapy.

  12. Caffeine Mediates Sustained Inactivation of Breast Cancer-Associated Myofibroblasts via Up-Regulation of Tumor Suppressor Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Mysoon M.; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2014-01-01

    Background Active cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) or myofibroblasts play important roles not only in the development and progression of breast carcinomas, but also in their prognosis and treatment. Therefore, targeting these cells through suppressing their supportive procarcinogenic paracrine effects is mandatory for improving the current therapies that are mainly targeting tumor cells. To this end, we investigated the effect of the natural and pharmacologically safe molecule, caffeine, on CAF cells and their various procarcinogenic effects. Methodology/Principal Findings We have shown here that caffeine up-regulates the tumor suppressor proteins p16, p21, p53 and Cav-1, and reduces the expression/secretion of various cytokines (IL-6, TGF-β, SDF-1 and MMP-2), and down-regulates α-SMA. Furthermore, caffeine suppressed the migratory/invasiveness abilities of CAF cells through PTEN-dependent Akt/Erk1/2 inactivation. Moreover, caffeine reduced the paracrine pro-invasion/−migration effects of CAF cells on breast cancer cells. These results indicate that caffeine can inactivate breast stromal myofibroblasts. This has been confirmed by showing that caffeine also suppresses the paracrine pro-angiogenic effect of CAF cells through down-regulating HIF-1αand its downstream effector VEGF-A. Interestingly, these effects were sustained in absence of caffeine. Conclusion/Significance The present findings provide a proof of principle that breast cancer myofibroblasts can be inactivated, and thereby caffeine may provide a safe and effective prevention against breast tumor growth/recurrence through inhibition of the procarcinogenic effects of active stromal fibroblasts. PMID:24595168

  13. Caffeine mediates sustained inactivation of breast cancer-associated myofibroblasts via up-regulation of tumor suppressor genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysoon M Al-Ansari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Active cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs or myofibroblasts play important roles not only in the development and progression of breast carcinomas, but also in their prognosis and treatment. Therefore, targeting these cells through suppressing their supportive procarcinogenic paracrine effects is mandatory for improving the current therapies that are mainly targeting tumor cells. To this end, we investigated the effect of the natural and pharmacologically safe molecule, caffeine, on CAF cells and their various procarcinogenic effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have shown here that caffeine up-regulates the tumor suppressor proteins p16, p21, p53 and Cav-1, and reduces the expression/secretion of various cytokines (IL-6, TGF-β, SDF-1 and MMP-2, and down-regulates α-SMA. Furthermore, caffeine suppressed the migratory/invasiveness abilities of CAF cells through PTEN-dependent Akt/Erk1/2 inactivation. Moreover, caffeine reduced the paracrine pro-invasion/-migration effects of CAF cells on breast cancer cells. These results indicate that caffeine can inactivate breast stromal myofibroblasts. This has been confirmed by showing that caffeine also suppresses the paracrine pro-angiogenic effect of CAF cells through down-regulating HIF-1αand its downstream effector VEGF-A. Interestingly, these effects were sustained in absence of caffeine. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The present findings provide a proof of principle that breast cancer myofibroblasts can be inactivated, and thereby caffeine may provide a safe and effective prevention against breast tumor growth/recurrence through inhibition of the procarcinogenic effects of active stromal fibroblasts.

  14. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  15. Napsin A and Thyroid Transcription Factor-1-Positive Cerebellar Tumor with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiji Kuwata

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a very rare case of cerebellar metastasis of unknown origin, in which a primary lung adenocarcinoma was diagnosed by pathological examination of a cerebellar metastatic tumor, using immunohistochemical markers and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation of primary lung cancer. A 69-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a hemorrhagic cerebellar tumor and multiple small brain tumors. She underwent cerebellar tumor resection. On pathological examination, the tumor was diagnosed as adenocarcinoma. However, the primary tumor site was unidentifiable even with several imaging inspections. On immunohistochemical analysis, the resected tumor was positive for napsin A and thyroid transcription factor-1. In addition, an EGFR mutation was detected in the tumor. Therefore, primary lung cancer was diagnosed and the patient was started on gefitinib (250 mg/day therapy.

  16. Between green growth and degrowth: Decoupling, rebound effects and the politics for long-term sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen; Xue, Jin

    2016-01-01

    that the rebound effect is both a natural consequence of the growth dedicated society and a driver of further economic growth. Through rebound effects, labour productivity and eco-efficiency technologies in the growth society tend to contradict the goal of achieving environmental sustainability. To address...

  17. The Effect of Electroacupuncture on Osteosarcoma Tumor Growth and Metastasis: Analysis of Different Treatment Regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branden A. Smeester

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant bone tumor found in children and adolescents and is associated with many complications including cancer pain and metastasis. While cancer patients often seek complementary and alternative medicine (CAM approaches to treat cancer pain and fatigue or the side effects of chemotherapy and treatment, there is little known about the effect of acupuncture treatment on tumor growth and metastasis. Here we evaluate the effects of six different electroacupuncture (EA regimens on osteosarcoma tumor growth and metastasis in both male and female mice. The most significant positive effects were observed when EA was applied to the ST-36 acupoint twice weekly (EA-2X/3 beginning at postimplantation day 3 (PID 3. Twice weekly treatment produced robust reductions in tumor growth. Conversely, when EA was applied twice weekly (EA-2X/7, starting at PID 7, there was a significant increase in tumor growth. We further demonstrate that EA-2X/3 treatment elicits significant reductions in tumor lymphatics, vasculature, and innervation. Lastly, EA-2X/3 treatment produced a marked reduction in pulmonary metastasis, thus providing evidence for EA’s potential antimetastatic capabilities. Collectively, EA-2X/3 treatment was found to reduce both bone tumor growth and lung metastasis, which may be mediated in part through reductions in tumor-associated vasculature, lymphatics, and innervation.

  18. Export growth, energy costs, and sustainable supply chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The report examines sustainable supply chains in North America and the role played by rail intermodal : operations in lowering ten-mile fuel and emission costs. It examines whether current systems favor imports : over exports a current complaint ...

  19. Dichloroacetate induces tumor-specific radiosensitivity in vitro but attenuates radiation-induced tumor growth delay in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, F; Kirsner, A; Peschke, P; Roeder, F; Debus, J; Huber, P E; Weber, K J

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) by dichloroacetate (DCA) can shift tumor cell metabolism from anaerobic glycolysis to glucose oxidation, with activation of mitochondrial activity and chemotherapy-dependent apoptosis. In radiotherapy, DCA could thus potentially enhance the frequently moderate apoptotic response of cancer cells that results from their mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate tumor-specific radiosensitization by DCA in vitro and in a human tumor xenograft mouse model in vivo. The interaction of DCA with photon beam radiation was investigated in the human tumor cell lines WIDR (colorectal) and LN18 (glioma), as well as in the human normal tissue cell lines HUVEC (endothelial), MRC5 (lung fibroblasts) and TK6 (lymphoblastoid). Apoptosis induction in vitro was assessed by DAPI staining and sub-G1 flow cytometry; cell survival was quantified by clonogenic assay. The effect of DCA in vivo was investigated in WIDR xenograft tumors growing subcutaneously on BALB/c-nu/nu mice, with and without fractionated irradiation. Histological examination included TUNEL and Ki67 staining for apoptosis and proliferation, respectively, as well as pinomidazole labeling for hypoxia. DCA treatment led to decreased clonogenic survival and increased specific apoptosis rates in tumor cell lines (LN18, WIDR) but not in normal tissue cells (HUVEC, MRC5, TK6). However, this significant tumor-specific radiosensitization by DCA in vitro was not reflected by the situation in vivo: The growth suppression of WIDR xenograft tumors after irradiation was reduced upon additional DCA treatment (reflected by Ki67 expression levels), although early tumor cell apoptosis rates were significantly increased by DCA. This apparently paradoxical effect was accompanied by a marked DCA-dependent induction of hypoxia in tumor-tissue. DCA induced tumor-specific radiosensitization in vitro but not in vivo. DCA also induced development of hypoxia in tumor tissue

  20. Effects of artemisinin sustained-release granules on mixed alga growth and microcystins production and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lixiao; Li, Danye; Hu, Shuzhen; Wang, Peifang; Li, Shiyin; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Acharya, Kumud

    2015-12-01

    To safely and effectively apply artemisinin sustained-release granules to control and prevent algal water-blooms, the effects of artemisinin and its sustained-release granules on freshwater alga (Scenedesmus obliquus (S. obliquus) and Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa)), as well as the production and release of microcystins (MCs) were studied. The results showed that artemisinin sustained-release granules inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa (above 95% IR) and S. obliquus (about 90% IR), with M. aeruginosa more sensitive. The artemisinin sustained-release granules had a longer inhibition effect on growth of pure algae and algal coexistence than direct artemisinin dosing. The artemisinin sustained-release granules could decrease the production and release of algal toxins due to the continued stress of artemisinin released from artemisinin sustained-release granules. There was no increase in the total amount of MC-LR in the algal cell culture medium.

  1. Vascular network remodeling via vessel cooption, regression and growth in tumors

    CERN Document Server

    Bartha, K

    2016-01-01

    The transformation of the regular vasculature in normal tissue into a highly inhomogeneous tumor specific capillary network is described by a theoretical model incorporating tumor growth, vessel cooption, neo-vascularization, vessel collapse and cell death. Compartmentalization of the tumor into several regions differing in vessel density, diameter and in necrosis is observed for a wide range of parameters in agreement with the vessel morphology found in human melanoma. In accord with data for human melanoma the model predicts, that microvascular density (MVD, regarded as an important diagnostic tool in cancer treatment, does not necessarily determine the tempo of tumor progression. Instead it is suggested, that the MVD of the original tissue as well as the metabolic demand of the individual tumor cell plays the major role in the initial stages of tumor growth.

  2. Tumor growth model for atlas based registration of pathological brain MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moualhi, Wafa; Ezzeddine, Zagrouba

    2015-02-01

    The motivation of this work is to register a tumor brain magnetic resonance (MR) image with a normal brain atlas. A normal brain atlas is deformed in order to take account of the presence of a large space occupying tumor. The method use a priori model of tumor growth assuming that the tumor grows in a radial way from a starting point. First, an affine transformation is used in order to bring the patient image and the brain atlas in a global correspondence. Second, the seeding of a synthetic tumor into the brain atlas provides a template for the lesion. Finally, the seeded atlas is deformed combining a method derived from optical flow principles and a model for tumor growth (MTG). Results show that an automatic segmentation method of brain structures in the presence of large deformation can be provided.

  3. A Systems Model to Make, Market, and Lead Your Way towards Sustained Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raman Kumar Agrawalla

    2017-01-01

    .... Marketing is a key business function to market and lead a business towards sustained profitable growth but the problem is it lacks a systems perspective in its operations, strategy, and practice...

  4. An Integrated Diagnostic Framework to Manage Organization Sustainable Growth: An Empirical Case

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jingxiao Zhang; Klaus Schmidt; Hui Li

    2016-01-01

      This research aims to develop a quantitative diagnostic framework by combining the Weisbord six-box model with the growth management model to focus on an organization's internally driven sustainable management system...

  5. A Spherically Symmetric Model for the Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed M. Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear tumor equation in spherical coordinates assuming that both the diffusivity and the killing rate are functions of concentration of tumor cell is studied. A complete classification with regard to the diffusivity and net killing rate is obtained using Lie symmetry analysis. The reduction of the nonlinear governing equation is carried out in some interesting cases and exact solutions are obtained.

  6. A chemical energy approach of avascular tumor growth: multiscale modeling and qualitative results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ampatzoglou, Pantelis; Dassios, George; Hadjinicolaou, Maria; Kourea, Helen P; Vrahatis, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    In the present manuscript we propose a lattice free multiscale model for avascular tumor growth that takes into account the biochemical environment, mitosis, necrosis, cellular signaling and cellular mechanics...

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF LECITHIN AND CHOLESTERIN UPON THE GROWTH OF TUMORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, T B; Burnett, T C

    1913-03-01

    1. Cholesterin, whether suspended in dilute alcohol or in sodium oleate solution, when injected directly into tumors causes a marked acceleration both of the primary and of the metastatic growth. 2. The acceleration of the growth of the primary tumor by cholesterin is most evident in the premetastatic stage. 3. Lecithin, when injected in the form of an aqueous emulsion directly into tumors, diminishes the tendency to form metastases, retards the metastatic growth when it does occur, and in some instances also retards the primary growth. 4. The retardation due to lecithin is most evident in the metastatic stage. 5. Simultaneous injection of M/6 strontium chloride solution into the tumors does not appreciably affect the action of the lecithin.

  8. Adiponectin deficiency promotes tumor growth in mice by reducing macrophage infiltration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutong Sun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived plasma protein that has been implicated in regulating angiogenesis, but the role of adiponectin in regulating this process is still controversial. In this study, in order to determine whether adiponectin affects tumor growth and tumor induced vascularization, we implanted B16F10 melanoma and Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells subcutaneously into adiponectin knockout and wild-type control mice, and found that adiponectin deficiency markedly promoted the growth of both tumors. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that adiponectin deficiency reduced macrophage recruitment to the tumor, but did not affect cancer cell mitosis, apoptosis, or tumor-associated angiogenesis. In addition, treatment with recombinant adiponectin did not affect the proliferation of cultured B16F10 tumor cells. Importantly, the restoration of microphage infiltration at an early stage of tumorigenesis by means of co-injection of B16F10 cells and macrophages reversed the increased tumor growth in adiponectin knockout mice. Thus, we conclude that the enhanced tumor growth observed in adiponectin deficient mice is likely due to the reduction of macrophage infiltration rather than enhanced angiogenesis.

  9. Adiponectin deficiency promotes tumor growth in mice by reducing macrophage infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yutong; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-08-05

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived plasma protein that has been implicated in regulating angiogenesis, but the role of adiponectin in regulating this process is still controversial. In this study, in order to determine whether adiponectin affects tumor growth and tumor induced vascularization, we implanted B16F10 melanoma and Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells subcutaneously into adiponectin knockout and wild-type control mice, and found that adiponectin deficiency markedly promoted the growth of both tumors. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that adiponectin deficiency reduced macrophage recruitment to the tumor, but did not affect cancer cell mitosis, apoptosis, or tumor-associated angiogenesis. In addition, treatment with recombinant adiponectin did not affect the proliferation of cultured B16F10 tumor cells. Importantly, the restoration of microphage infiltration at an early stage of tumorigenesis by means of co-injection of B16F10 cells and macrophages reversed the increased tumor growth in adiponectin knockout mice. Thus, we conclude that the enhanced tumor growth observed in adiponectin deficient mice is likely due to the reduction of macrophage infiltration rather than enhanced angiogenesis.

  10. Sensitivity of fibroblast growth factor 23 measurements in tumor-induced osteomalacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imel, Erik A; Peacock, Munro; Pitukcheewanont, Pisit

    2006-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a paraneoplastic syndrome of hypophosphatemia, decreased renal phosphate reabsorption, normal or low serum 1,25-dihydryxyvitamin-D concentration, myopathy, and osteomalacia. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic protein overexpressed in tumors...

  11. Comparing immune-tumor growth models with drug therapy using optimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marisa C.; Rocha, Ana Maria A. C.; Costa, M. Fernanda P.; Fernandes, Edite M. G. P.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we compare the dynamics of three tumor growth models that include an immune system and a drug administration therapy using optimal control. The objective is to minimize a combined function of the total of tumor cells over time and a chemotherapeutic drug administration.

  12. Colon cancer stem cells dictate tumor growth and resist cell death by production of interleukin-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todaro, Matilde; Alea, Mileidys Perez; Di Stefano, Anna B.; Cammareri, Patrizia; Vermeulen, Louis; Iovino, Flora; Tripodo, Claudio; Russo, Antonio; Gulotta, Gaspare; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    A novel paradigm in tumor biology suggests that cancer growth is driven by stem-like cells within a tumor. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of such cells from colon carcinomas using the stem cell marker CD133 that accounts around 2% of the cells in human colon cancer. The

  13. Liposome-Encapsulated Prednisolone Phosphate Inhibits Growth of Established Tumors in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond M. Schiffelers

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids can inhibit solid tumor growth possibly due to an inhibitory effect on angiogenesis. The antitumor effects of the free drugs have only been observed using treatment schedules based on high and frequent dosing for prolonged periods of time. As long-circulating liposomes accumulate at sites of malignancy, we investigated the tumor-inhibiting potential of liposome-encapsulated prednisolone phosphate. Liposomal prednisolone phosphate could inhibit tumor growth dose-dependently, with 80% to 90% tumor growth inhibition of subcutaneous B16.F10 melanoma and C26 colon carcinoma murine tumor models at 20 mg/kg by single or weekly doses. Prednisolone phosphate in the free form was completely ineffective at this low-frequency treatment schedule, even when administered at a dose of 50 mg/kg. In vitro studies did not show an inhibitory effect of prednisolone (phosphate on tumor cell, nor on endothelial cell proliferation. Histologic evaluation revealed that liposomal prednisolone phosphate-treated tumors contained a center with areas of picnotic/necrotic cells, which were not apparent in untreated tumors or tumors treated with the free drug. In conclusion, the present study shows potent antitumor effects of liposomal formulations of glucocorticoids in a low dose and lowfrequency schedule, offering promise for liposomal glucocorticoids as novel antitumor agents.

  14. A kinetic model of tumor growth and its radiation response with an application to Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Leder, Kevin Z; Hui, Susanta K

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to simulate the growth of tumor volume and its response to a single fraction of high dose irradiation. We made several key assumptions of the model. Tumor volume is composed of proliferating (or dividing) cancer cells and non-dividing (or dead) cells. Tumor growth rate (or tumor volume doubling time, Td) is proportional to the ratio of the volumes of tumor vasculature and the tumor. The vascular volume grows slower than the tumor by introducing the vascular growth retardation factor, theta. Upon irradiation the proliferating cells gradually die over a fixed time period after irradiation. Dead cells are cleared away with cell clearance time, Tcl. The model was applied to simulate pre-treatment growth and post-treatment radiation response of rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumor and metastatic brain tumors of five patients who were treated by Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). By selecting appropriate model parameters, we showed the temporal variation of the tumors for both th...

  15. Fasting inhibits colorectal cancer growth by reducing M2 polarization of tumor-associated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pengfei; Wang, Huihui; He, Zhiyong; Chen, Xiangyuan; Wu, Qichao; Chen, Wankun; Sun, Zhirong; Weng, Meilin; Zhu, Minmin; Ma, Duan; Miao, Changhong

    2017-09-26

    Dietary restriction has been recognized as a healthy and natural therapy for cancer. It is reported that different forms of dietary restriction can promote anti-tumor immunity. However, it is not clear how fasting affects tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). This study aims to investigate the relationship between fasting and antitumor immunity in terms of tumor-associated macrophages. In vivo, the results showed that alternate day fasting for 2 weeks inhibitted the tumor growth of mice without causing a reduction of body weight. Meanwhile, M2 polarization of tumor-associated macrophages in tumor tissues of alternate day fasting group was also decreased. In vitro, fasting induced the autophagy of CT26 cells, decreased the generation of extracellular adenosine by supressing the expression of CD73 in CT26 cells. Decreasing adenosine inhibitted M2 polarization of RAW264.7 cells through inactivating JAK1/STAT3 signal pathway in fasting condition. Eventually, the proliferation of CT26 cancer cells declined on account of fasting-facilitated antitumor immunity. These results suggested that fasting suppressed M2 polarization of tumor-associated macrophages to inhibit tumor growth through decreasing the level of adenosine in the tumor microenvironment both in vivo and in vitro. This process was associated with increasing autophagy of tumor cells.

  16. 68Gallium-DOTATATE PET in meningioma: A reliable predictor of tumor growth rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerauer, Michael; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Frontzek, Karl; Rushing, Elisabeth; Buck, Alfred; Krayenbuehl, Niklaus; Weller, Michael; Schaefer, Niklaus; Kuhn, Felix P.

    2016-01-01

    Background DOTATATE-based radionuclides have added new options in the diagnosis and treatment of meningiomas; however, a reliable predictor of tumor growth has still not been established. Methods We analyzed 64 meningiomas imaged with 68Ga-DOTATATE PET. Tumor growth rates were calculated by volumetric analysis of sequential MRI scans. Maximums of standardized uptake values (SUVmax) were correlated with tumor growth and covariates. Results World Health Organization (WHO) grades I and II meningiomas showed a correlation of SUVmax and tumor growth rate (meningiomas limited to the intracranial compartment: r = 0.757, P DOTATATE PET is a reliable predictor of tumor growth in WHO grades I and II meningiomas and provides additional information to conventional cross-sectional imaging modalities. Hence, 68Ga-DOTATATE PET can assist in selecting the time point for treatment initiation. Furthermore, meningiomas with fast tumor growth and transosseous expansion elicit the highest DOTATATE binding; therefore, they might be especially suited for DOTATATE-based therapy. PMID:26865086

  17. S100A9 Interaction with TLR4 Promotes Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källberg, Eva; Vogl, Thomas; Liberg, David; Olsson, Anders; Björk, Per; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders; Roth, Johannes; Ivars, Fredrik; Leanderson, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    By breeding TRAMP mice with S100A9 knock-out (S100A9−/−) animals and scoring the appearance of palpable tumors we observed a delayed tumor growth in animals devoid of S100A9 expression. CD11b+ S100A9 expressing cells were not observed in normal prostate tissue from control C57BL/6 mice but were readily detected in TRAMP prostate tumors. Also, S100A9 expression was observed in association with CD68+ macrophages in biopsies from human prostate tumors. Delayed growth of TRAMP tumors was also observed in mice lacking the S100A9 ligand TLR4. In the EL-4 lymphoma model tumor growth inhibition was observed in S100A9−/− and TLR4−/−, but not in RAGE−/− animals lacking an alternative S100A9 receptor. When expression of immune-regulating genes was analyzed using RT-PCR the only common change observed in mice lacking S100A9 and TLR4 was a down-regulation of TGFβ expression in splenic CD11b+ cells. Lastly, treatment of mice with a small molecule (ABR-215050) that inhibits S100A9 binding to TLR4 inhibited EL4 tumor growth. Thus, S100A9 and TLR4 appear to be involved in promoting tumor growth in two different tumor models and pharmacological inhibition of S100A9-TLR4 interactions is a novel and promising target for anti-tumor therapies. PMID:22470535

  18. Modified Gompertz equation for electrotherapy murine tumor growth kinetics: predictions and new hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quevedo María

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrotherapy effectiveness at different doses has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies; however, several aspects that occur in the tumor growth kinetics before and after treatment have not yet been revealed. Mathematical modeling is a useful instrument that can reveal some of these aspects. The aim of this paper is to describe the complete growth kinetics of unperturbed and perturbed tumors through use of the modified Gompertz equation in order to generate useful insight into the mechanisms that underpin this devastating disease. Methods The complete tumor growth kinetics for control and treated groups are obtained by interpolation and extrapolation methods with different time steps, using experimental data of fibrosarcoma Sa-37. In the modified Gompertz equation, a delay time is introduced to describe the tumor's natural history before treatment. Different graphical strategies are used in order to reveal new information in the complete kinetics of this tumor type. Results The first stage of complete tumor growth kinetics is highly non linear. The model, at this stage, shows different aspects that agree with those reported theoretically and experimentally. Tumor reversibility and the proportionality between regions before and after electrotherapy are demonstrated. In tumors that reach partial remission, two antagonistic post-treatment processes are induced, whereas in complete remission, two unknown antitumor mechanisms are induced. Conclusion The modified Gompertz equation is likely to lead to insights within cancer research. Such insights hold promise for increasing our understanding of tumors as self-organizing systems and, the possible existence of phase transitions in tumor growth kinetics, which, in turn, may have significant impacts both on cancer research and on clinical practice.

  19. Modified Gompertz equation for electrotherapy murine tumor growth kinetics: predictions and new hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrales, Luis E Bergues; Nava, Juan J Godina; Aguilera, Andrés Ramírez; Joa, Javier A González; Ciria, Héctor M Camué; González, Maraelys Morales; Salas, Miriam Fariñas; Jarque, Manuel Verdecia; González, Tamara Rubio; Mateus, Miguel A O'Farril; Brooks, Soraida C Acosta; Palencia, Fabiola Suárez; Zamora, Lisset Ortiz; Quevedo, María C Céspedes; Seringe, Sarah Edward; Cuitié, Vladimir Crombet; Cabrales, Idelisa Bergues; González, Gustavo Sierra

    2010-10-28

    Electrotherapy effectiveness at different doses has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies; however, several aspects that occur in the tumor growth kinetics before and after treatment have not yet been revealed. Mathematical modeling is a useful instrument that can reveal some of these aspects. The aim of this paper is to describe the complete growth kinetics of unperturbed and perturbed tumors through use of the modified Gompertz equation in order to generate useful insight into the mechanisms that underpin this devastating disease. The complete tumor growth kinetics for control and treated groups are obtained by interpolation and extrapolation methods with different time steps, using experimental data of fibrosarcoma Sa-37. In the modified Gompertz equation, a delay time is introduced to describe the tumor's natural history before treatment. Different graphical strategies are used in order to reveal new information in the complete kinetics of this tumor type. The first stage of complete tumor growth kinetics is highly non linear. The model, at this stage, shows different aspects that agree with those reported theoretically and experimentally. Tumor reversibility and the proportionality between regions before and after electrotherapy are demonstrated. In tumors that reach partial remission, two antagonistic post-treatment processes are induced, whereas in complete remission, two unknown antitumor mechanisms are induced. The modified Gompertz equation is likely to lead to insights within cancer research. Such insights hold promise for increasing our understanding of tumors as self-organizing systems and, the possible existence of phase transitions in tumor growth kinetics, which, in turn, may have significant impacts both on cancer research and on clinical practice.

  20. Pro-Poor Growth and Social Policy Approaches to Sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the intriquing paradoxes for most developing countries including Nigeria is the rising rate of low human development indices. This study is a critical examination of human welfare issues and human development indices as a parameter for sustainable development in Nigeria. The paper contends that one major issue ...

  1. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: identification of predictors for continued tumor growth and the influence of documented tumor growth preceding radiation treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Hanssens, P.E.; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Donders, R.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become an important treatment modality for vestibular schwannomas. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether tumor growth at the moment of GKRS has any correlation with the outcome. The secondary aim was to identify clinical

  2. A volume change index for forest growth and sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Van Deusen; Francis Roesch

    2009-01-01

    A volume change index is suggested that is derived from growth components that can be estimated from remeasured plots. The new index incorporates more information than the traditional growth over removals, ratio. The new index directly indicates whether the standing volume will be increasing or decreasing if current conditions persist, whereas the ratio of...

  3. Economics of Sustainable Development. Competitiveness and Economic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorel AILENEI

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Economic growth is one of the most important issues of humanity. Both in national economies and world economy, recession and prosperity periods are regularly succeeding with different amplitudes. But beyond these fluctuations and their effects, the results are important: performance and economic growth. Because of the problematical issue of economic growth, the authors are trying to critically reflect on the economic growth concept and on its implications on the praxis area. Although there is a large literature about economic growth modeling, it is intriguing that there still are some serious obstacles for conceptualization and praxis. Only the simple fact that the economic growth process needs serious thinking on the time dimension is sufficient for understanding the real difficulties of this problematical issue. As for the economic growth praxis, a clear analysis of the interests system within an economy is needed. Without trying to find miraculous solutions for the economic growth issue, the authors suggest a clear and correct analysis of this important subject.

  4. B16 melanoma tumor growth is delayed in mice in an age-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Pettan-Brewer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A major risk factor for cancer is increasing age, which suggests that syngeneic tumor implants in old mice would grow more rapidly. However, various reports have suggested that old mice are not as permissive to implanted tumor cells as young mice. In order to determine and characterize the age-related response to B16 melanoma, we implanted 5×105 tumor cells into 8, 16, 24, and 32-month-old male C57BL/6 (B6 and C57BL/6×BALB/c F1 (CB6 F1 mice subcutaneously in the inguinal and axillary spaces, or intradermally in the lateral flank. Results showed decreased tumor volume with increasing age, which varied according to mouse genetic background and the implanted site. The B6 strain showed robust tumor growth at 8 months of age at the inguinal implantation site, with an average tumor volume of 1341.25 mm3. The 16, 24, and 32-month age groups showed a decrease in tumor growth with tumor volumes of 563.69, 481.02, and 264.55 mm3, respectively (p≤0.001. The axillary implantation site was less permissive in 8-month-old B6 mice with an average tumor volume of 761.52 mm3. The 24- and 32-month age groups showed a similar decrease in tumor growth with tumor volumes of 440 and 178.19 mm3, respectively (p≤0.01. The CB6F1 strain was not as tumor permissive at 8 months of age as B6 mice with average tumor volumes of 446.96 and 426.91 mm3 for the inguinal and axillary sites, respectively. There was a decrease in tumor growth at 24 months of age at both inguinal and axillary sites with an average tumor volume of 271.02 and 249.12 mm3, respectively (p≤0.05. The strain dependence was not apparent in 8-month-old mice injected intradermally with B16 melanoma cells, with average tumor volumes of 736.82 and 842.85 mm3 for B6 and CB6 F1, respectively. However, a strain difference was seen in 32-month-old B6 mice with an average decrease in tumor volume of 250.83 mm3 (p≤0.01. In contrast, tumor growth significantly decreased earlier in CB6 F1 mice with average

  5. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth.

  6. Voluntary Running Suppresses Tumor Growth through Epinephrine- and IL-6-Dependent NK Cell Mobilization and Redistribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line; Idorn, Manja; Olofsson, Gitte H.

    2016-01-01

    . Microarray analysis revealed training-induced upregulation of pathways associated with immune function. NK cell infiltration was significantly increased in tumors from running mice, whereas depletion of NK cells enhanced tumor growth and blunted the beneficial effects of exercise. Mechanistic analyses showed...... that NK cells were mobilized by epinephrine, and blockade of β-adrenergic signaling blunted training-dependent tumor inhibition. Moreover, epinephrine induced a selective mobilization of IL-6-sensitive NK cells, and IL-6-blocking antibodies blunted training-induced tumor suppression, intratumoral NK cell...

  7. Salmonella mediated the hemagglutinating virus of Japan-envelope transfer suppresses tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Che-Hsin; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2017-05-23

    Salmonella can target to tumor microenvironments after systemic treatment. The hemagglutinating virus of Japan-envelope (HVJ-E) induced apoptosis in tumor cells without toxicity in normal cells. Current HVJ-E therapeutic strategies, aimed at using HVJ-E for intratumor treatment, have shown great promise in animal models but have achieved only limited systemic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the modulation of the anti-tumor efficiency of HVJ-E by coating the particles with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), designated as P-HVJ-E. Treatment with P-HVJ-E resulted in decreased hemagglutinating activity and maintained tumor cell-selective apoptosis and anti-tumor immunity. The use of Salmonella as a coating for P-HVJ-E (PHS) enhanced the antitumor activity and maintained the tumor-targeting activity. Treatment with PHS resulted in delayed tumor growth in tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, a Western blot assay of the tumors revealed that HVJ-E targeted to the tumor after systemic treatment with PHS. These results indicate that Salmonella coating viral particles may provide a new approach for tumor therapy.

  8. The effect of housing temperature on the growth of CT26 tumor expressing fluorescent protein EGFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzhakova, Diana V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Lapkina, Irina V.; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2016-04-01

    To date, the effect of housing temperature on tumor development in the immunocompetent mice has been studied on poorly immunogenic cancer models. Standard housing temperature 20-26°C was shown to cause chronic metabolic cold stress and promote tumor progression via suppression of the antitumor immune response, whereas a thermoneutral temperature 30-31°C was more preferable for normal metabolism of mice and inhibited tumor growth. Our work represents the first attempt to discover the potential effect of housing temperature on the development of highly immunogenic tumor. EGFP-expressing murine colon carcinoma CT26 generated in Balb/c mice was used as a tumor model. No statistically significant differences were shown in tumor incidences and growth rates at 20°C, 25°C and 30°C for non-modified CT26. Maintaining mice challenged with CT26-EGFP cells at 30°C led to complete inhibition of tumor development. In summary, we demonstrated that the housing temperature is important for the regulation of growth of highly immunogenic tumors in mice through antitumor immunity.

  9. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Luo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects.

  10. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects. PMID:22174618

  11. Tumor fibroblast–derived epiregulin promotes growth of colitis-associated neoplasms through ERK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufert, Clemens; Becker, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Waldner, Maximilian J.; Backert, Ingo; Floh, Katharina; Atreya, Imke; Leppkes, Moritz; Jefremow, Andre; Vieth, Michael; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Klinger, Patricia; Greten, Florian R.; Threadgill, David W.; Sahin, Ugur; Neurath, Markus F.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms specific to colitis-associated cancers have been poorly characterized. Using comparative whole-genome expression profiling, we observed differential expression of epiregulin (EREG) in mouse models of colitis-associated, but not sporadic, colorectal cancer. Similarly, EREG expression was significantly upregulated in cohorts of patients with colitis-associated cancer. Furthermore, tumor-associated fibroblasts were identified as a major source of EREG in colitis-associated neoplasms. Functional studies showed that Ereg-deficient mice, although more prone to colitis, were strongly protected from colitis-associated tumors. Serial endoscopic studies revealed that EREG promoted tumor growth rather than initiation. Additionally, we demonstrated that fibroblast-derived EREG requires ERK activation to induce proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and tumor development in vivo. To demonstrate the functional relevance of EREG-producing tumor-associated fibroblasts, we developed a novel system for adoptive transfer of these cells via mini-endoscopic local injection. It was found that transfer of EREG-producing, but not Ereg-deficient, fibroblasts from tumors significantly augmented growth of colitis-associated neoplasms in vivo. In conclusion, our data indicate that EREG and tumor-associated fibroblasts play a crucial role in controlling tumor growth in colitis-associated neoplasms. PMID:23549083

  12. Tumor fibroblast-derived epiregulin promotes growth of colitis-associated neoplasms through ERK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufert, Clemens; Becker, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Waldner, Maximilian J; Backert, Ingo; Floh, Katharina; Atreya, Imke; Leppkes, Moritz; Jefremow, Andre; Vieth, Michael; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Klinger, Patricia; Greten, Florian R; Threadgill, David W; Sahin, Ugur; Neurath, Markus F

    2013-04-01

    Molecular mechanisms specific to colitis-associated cancers have been poorly characterized. Using comparative whole-genome expression profiling, we observed differential expression of epiregulin (EREG) in mouse models of colitis-associated, but not sporadic, colorectal cancer. Similarly, EREG expression was significantly upregulated in cohorts of patients with colitis-associated cancer. Furthermore, tumor-associated fibroblasts were identified as a major source of EREG in colitis-associated neoplasms. Functional studies showed that Ereg-deficient mice, although more prone to colitis, were strongly protected from colitis-associated tumors. Serial endoscopic studies revealed that EREG promoted tumor growth rather than initiation. Additionally, we demonstrated that fibroblast-derived EREG requires ERK activation to induce proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and tumor development in vivo. To demonstrate the functional relevance of EREG-producing tumor-associated fibroblasts, we developed a novel system for adoptive transfer of these cells via mini-endoscopic local injection. It was found that transfer of EREG-producing, but not Ereg-deficient, fibroblasts from tumors significantly augmented growth of colitis-associated neoplasms in vivo. In conclusion, our data indicate that EREG and tumor-associated fibroblasts play a crucial role in controlling tumor growth in colitis-associated neoplasms.

  13. Sca1-positive murine pituitary adenoma cells show tumor growth advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donangelo, Ines; Ren, Song-Guang; Eigler, Tamar; Svendsen, Clive; Melmed, Shlomo

    2014-01-01

    The role of tumor stem cells in benign tumors such as pituitary adenomas remains unclear. We investigated whether cells within pituitary adenomas that spontaneously develop in Rb+/− mice are hierarchically distributed with a subset being responsible for tumor growth. Cells derived directly from such tumors grew as spheres in serum-free culture medium supplemented with EGF and bFGF. Some cells within growing pituitary tumor spheres (PTS) expressed common stem cell markers (Sca1, Sox2, Nestin, CD133), but were devoid of hormone-positive differentiated cells. Under subsequent differentiating conditions (matrigel-coated growth surface), PTS expressed all six pituitary hormones. We next searched for specific markers of the stem cell population and isolated a Sca1+ cell population that showed increased sphere formation potential, lower hormone mRNA expression, higher expression of stem cell markers (Notch1, Sox2, Nestin), and increased proliferation rates. When transplanted into NOD scid gamma mice brains, Sca1+ pituitary tumor cells exhibited higher rates of tumor formation (brain tumors observed in 11/11 [100%] vs. 7/12 [54%] of mice transplanted with Sca1+ and Sca1− cells, respectively). Magnetic resonance imaging and histological analysis of brain tumors showed that those derived from Sca1+ pituitary tumor cells were also larger and plurihormonal. Our findings show that Sca1+ cells derived from benign pituitary tumors exhibit an undifferentiated expression profile and tumor proliferative advantages, and we propose that they could represent putative pituitary tumor stem/progenitor cells. PMID:24481638

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles: Roles in Tumor Growth, Progression, and Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are ubiquitously present in many tissues. Due to their unique advantages, MSCs have been widely employed in clinical studies. Emerging evidences indicate that MSCs can also migrate to the tumor surrounding stroma and exert complex effects on tumor growth and progression. However, the effect of MSCs on tumor growth is still a matter of debate. Several studies have shown that MSCs could favor tumor growth. On the contrary, other groups have demonstrated that MSCs suppressed tumor progression. Extracellular vesicles have emerged as a new mechanism of cell-to-cell communication in the development of tumor diseases. MSCs-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs could mimic the effects of the mesenchymal stem cells from which they originate. Different studies have reported that MSC-EVs may exert various effects on the growth, metastasis, and drug response of different tumor cells by transferring proteins, messenger RNA, and microRNA to recipient cells. In the present review, we summarize the components of MSC-EVs and discuss the roles of MSC-EVs in different malignant diseases, including the related mechanisms that may account for their therapeutic potential. MSC-EVs open up a promising opportunity in the treatment of cancer with increased efficacy.

  15. Tumor growth in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex on the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu-Shore, Catherine J; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2010-04-01

    New evidence is emerging that the availability of nutrients plays a key role in regulating the mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway in human cancers. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disorder which results in the growth of hamartomatous lesions in multiple organs due to insufficient suppression of the mTORC1 pathway. A minority of patients with TSC who develop epilepsy which is intractable to standard anticonvulsant medical and/or surgical treatments are treated with the ketogenic diet. To provide insight into the effects of nutrient manipulation on tumor growth in this condition, we describe our experience in a unique group of patients with known tuberous sclerosis complex who are on the ketogenic diet for seizure control. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients with TSC treated with the ketogenic diet between January 2002 and May 2007 at Massachusetts General Hospital. Five patients with definite TSC underwent serial imaging for tumor growth while on the ketogenic diet or had unchanged imaging prior to the onset of the diet and after termination. Three out of five patients, all children, had progression of a known tumor or tumors or the development of a new tumor while on the ketogenic diet. In this limited case series of five TSC patients, the ketogenic diet did not induce tumor regression or suppress the growth of TSC-related tumors. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Physical activity counteracts tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26-injected muscles: an interim report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Hiroux

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis.

  17. A hybrid cellular automaton model of solid tumor growth and bioreductive drug transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmi, Nabila; Hossain, M A; Phillips, Roger M

    2012-01-01

    Bioreductive drugs are a class of hypoxia selective drugs that are designed to eradicate the hypoxic fraction of solid tumors. Their activity depends upon a number of biological and pharmacological factors and we used a mathematical modeling approach to explore the dynamics of tumor growth, infusion, and penetration of the bioreductive drug Tirapazamine (TPZ). An in-silico model is implemented to calculate the tumor mass considering oxygen and glucose as key microenvironmental parameters. The next stage of the model integrated extra cellular matrix (ECM), cell-cell adhesion, and cell movement parameters as growth constraints. The tumor microenvironments strongly influenced tumor morphology and growth rates. Once the growth model was established, a hybrid model was developed to study drug dynamics inside the hypoxic regions of tumors. The model used 10, 50 and 100 \\mu {\\rm M} as TPZ initial concentrations and determined TPZ pharmacokinetic (PK) (transport) and pharmacodynamics (cytotoxicity) properties inside hypoxic regions of solid tumor. The model results showed that diminished drug transport is a reason for TPZ failure and recommend the optimization of the drug transport properties in the emerging TPZ generations. The modeling approach used in this study is novel and can be a step to explore the behavioral dynamics of TPZ.

  18. Microfoundations for Sustainable Growth with Eco-Intelligent Product Service-Arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najine Ameli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that the contemporary growth paradigm needs to be reconsidered on a micro level of consumption and product service-systems. This becomes necessary since a dynamic link between macro strategies and micro implementation of sustainable growth is missing up to date. Therefore, mainstream sustainability strategies of efficiency and consistency are extended by sufficiency in order to integrate strategies for individual welfare within their social environment. Limits to and drivers for growth are revised and updated socially in terms of qualitative values, diminishing marginal utility or symbolic social distinction. We elaborate a definition of sustainable growth that fosters individual welfare by enhancing social enactment within the boundaries of environmental space. Shifting focus on social aspects in design fosters more sustainable production and consumption patterns while sustaining individual welfare. We derive latent indications for eco-intelligent product service-arrangements and evaluate to concepts by referring to introduced definitions and according indications. With doing so, we illustrate new pathways for the translation of sustainable growth and strategies into product service-systems.

  19. Effects of Ligustilide on Tumor Growth and Immune Function in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Normal and tumor-bearing Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were treated p.o. with LIG (5, 20 and 80 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. In normal ICR mice, phagocytosis of peritoneal macrophages and serum hemolysin concentration were assessed by chicken red blood cell ingestion test and quantitative hemolysis of ...

  20. Tumor cell phenotype is sustained by selective MAPK oxidation in mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Galli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are major cellular sources of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2, the production of which is modulated by oxygen availability and the mitochondrial energy state. An increase of steady-state cell H(2O(2 concentration is able to control the transition from proliferating to quiescent phenotypes and to signal the end of proliferation; in tumor cells thereby, low H(2O(2 due to defective mitochondrial metabolism can contribute to sustain proliferation. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs orchestrate signal transduction and recent data indicate that are present in mitochondria and regulated by the redox state. On these bases, we investigated the mechanistic connection of tumor mitochondrial dysfunction, H(2O(2 yield, and activation of MAPKs in LP07 murine tumor cells with confocal microscopy, in vivo imaging and directed mutagenesis. Two redox conditions were examined: low 1 microM H(2O(2 increased cell proliferation in ERK1/2-dependent manner whereas high 50 microM H(2O(2 arrested cell cycle by p38 and JNK1/2 activation. Regarding the experimental conditions as a three-compartment model (mitochondria, cytosol, and nuclei, the different responses depended on MAPKs preferential traffic to mitochondria, where a selective activation of either ERK1/2 or p38-JNK1/2 by co-localized upstream kinases (MAPKKs facilitated their further passage to nuclei. As assessed by mass spectra, MAPKs activation and efficient binding to cognate MAPKKs resulted from oxidation of conserved ERK1/2 or p38-JNK1/2 cysteine domains to sulfinic and sulfonic acids at a definite H(2O(2 level. Like this, high H(2O(2 or directed mutation of redox-sensitive ERK2 Cys(214 impeded binding to MEK1/2, caused ERK2 retention in mitochondria and restricted shuttle to nuclei. It is surmised that selective cysteine oxidations adjust the electrostatic forces that participate in a particular MAPK-MAPKK interaction. Considering that tumor mitochondria are dysfunctional, their inability to

  1. Sunitinib Does Not Accelerate Tumor Growth in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krastan B. Blagoev

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies have suggested that sunitinib accelerates metastases in animals, ascribing this to inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor or the tumor’s adaptation. To address whether sunitinib accelerates tumors in humans, we analyzed data from the pivotal randomized phase III trial comparing sunitinib and interferon alfa in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The evidence clearly shows that sunitinib was not harmful, did not accelerate tumor growth, and did not shorten survival. Specifically, neither longer sunitinib treatment nor a greater effect of sunitinib on tumors reduced survival. Sunitinib did reduce the tumor’s growth rate while administered, thereby improving survival, without appearing to alter tumor biology after discontinuation. Concerns arising from animal models do not apply to patients receiving sunitinib and likely will not apply to similar agents.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Growth Hormone-producing Tumors in the GC Rat Model of Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan F; Muñoz-Bravo, Jose L; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Maza, Laura; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Cano, David A

    2015-11-09

    Acromegaly is a disorder resulting from excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and consequent increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), most frequently caused by pituitary adenomas. Elevated GH and IGF-I levels results in wide range of somatic, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and gastrointestinal morbidities. Subcutaneous implantation of the GH-secreting GC cell line in rats leads to the formation of tumors. GC tumor-bearing rats develop characteristics that resemble human acromegaly including gigantism and visceromegaly. However, GC tumors remain poorly characterized at a molecular level. In the present work, we report a detailed histological and molecular characterization of GC tumors using immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and imaging techniques. GC tumors display histopathological and molecular features of human GH-producing tumors, including hormone production, cell architecture, senescence activation and alterations in cell cycle gene expression. Furthermore, GC tumors cells displayed sensitivity to somatostatin analogues, drugs that are currently used in the treatment of human GH-producing adenomas, thus supporting the GC tumor model as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic agents. The information obtained would help to maximize the usefulness of the GC rat model for research and preclinical studies in GH-secreting tumors.

  3. Multicenter study on adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing-min; Gu, Jian-wen; Kuang, Yong-qin; Ma, Yuan; Xia, Xun; Yang, Tao; Lu, Min; He, Wei-qi; Sun, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Yan-chao

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to observe the adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients of multi-centers, and explore the change of hypophyseal hormones in postoperative pituitary tumor patients. Sixty patients with pituitary tumor admitted during March, 2011-March, 2012 were selected. Postoperative hypophyseal hormone deficiency and the change of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative growth hormone levels were recorded. Growth hormone hypofunction was the most common hormonal hypofunction, which took up to 85.0 %. Adrenocortical hormone hypofunction was next to it and accounted for 58.33 %. GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn deficiency was the most common in postoperative hormone deficiency, which took up to 40.00 %, and GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn + AVP and GH deficiencies were next to it and accounted for 23.33 and 16.67 %, respectively. The hormone levels in patients after total pituitary tumor resection were significantly lower than those after partial pituitary tumor resection, and the difference was statistically significant; growth hormone and serum prolactin levels after surgery in two groups were decreased, and the difference was statistically significant. The incidence rate of growth hormone deficiency in postoperative pituitary tumor patients is high, which is usually complicated with deficiency of various hypophyseal hormones. In clinical, we should pay attention to the levels of the hypopnyseal hormones, and take timely measures to avoid postoperative complications.

  4. NIGERIA’S ECONOMIC GROWTH THROUGH TOURISM PROMOTION/SUSTAINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor N. ITUMO

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nigeria is currently facing economic growth and development challenge. The economic challenge is occasioned by mono-cultural economic reliance on the single resource of crude oil export revenue as well as other internal and international effects that affect her economic drive for heightened growth and development. The Nigerian government had over the years searched for ways of diversifying its economy for greater growth and development especially given the various challenges in the economy, mainly the steep reduction in crude oil revenue arising from volatility of global oil price. This paper therefore uses the research methodology of case study to do a holistic assessment of the possibility of Nigeria diversifying into her tourism potentials for economic growth and development. This would be done equally by drawing relevant comparative analysis of other countries bringing economic benefits in Africa and across the globe.

  5. A simple mathematical model based on the cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests kinetic commonalities in solid tumor growth.

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    Rodolfo Molina-Peña

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Cancer Stem Cell (CSC hypothesis has gained credibility within the cancer research community. According to this hypothesis, a small subpopulation of cells within cancerous tissues exhibits stem-cell-like characteristics and is responsible for the maintenance and proliferation of cancer. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a simple compartmental pseudo-chemical mathematical model for tumor growth, based on the CSC hypothesis, and derived using a "chemical reaction" approach. We defined three cell subpopulations: CSCs, transit progenitor cells, and differentiated cells. Each event related to cell division, differentiation, or death is then modeled as a chemical reaction. The resulting set of ordinary differential equations was numerically integrated to describe the time evolution of each cell subpopulation and the overall tumor growth. The parameter space was explored to identify combinations of parameter values that produce biologically feasible and consistent scenarios. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Certain kinetic relationships apparently must be satisfied to sustain solid tumor growth and to maintain an approximate constant fraction of CSCs in the tumor lower than 0.01 (as experimentally observed: (a the rate of symmetrical and asymmetrical CSC renewal must be in the same order of magnitude; (b the intrinsic rate of renewal and differentiation of progenitor cells must be half an order of magnitude higher than the corresponding intrinsic rates for cancer stem cells; (c the rates of apoptosis of the CSC, transit amplifying progenitor (P cells, and terminally differentiated (D cells must be progressively higher by approximately one order of magnitude. Simulation results were consistent with reports that have suggested that encouraging CSC differentiation could be an effective therapeutic strategy for fighting cancer in addition to selective killing or inhibition of symmetric division of CSCs.

  6. Conservative management of bilateral vestibular schwannomas in neurofibromatosis type 2 patients: hearing and tumor growth results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyre, Matthieu; Goutagny, Stéphane; Bah, Alpha; Bernardeschi, Daniele; Larroque, Béatrice; Sterkers, Olivier; Kalamarides, Michel

    2013-06-01

    As new treatment modalities develop for the management of vestibular schwannomas (VS) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2, it remains crucial to ascertain the natural history of the disease. To determine the relationship between hearing and tumor growth in patients undergoing conservative VS management. Patients harboring bilateral VS with at least 1 year of radiological follow-up were selected. Conservative management was proposed based on the small tumor size and/or serviceable hearing at presentation. Tumor size was calculated by using the 2-component box model and reported as mean tumor diameter. Hearing was evaluated by using pure-tone average and the American Academy of Otololaryngologists and Head and Neck Surgery classification. Forty-six patients harboring 92 VS were included. The mean clinical and radiological follow-up times were 6.0 and 4.2 years, respectively. The mean tumor diameter was 13 mm at presentation and 20 mm at the end of follow-up. Mean tumor growth rate was 1.8 mm/year. During follow-up, 17 patients (37%) underwent surgery for VS. Surgery-free rate for VS was 88% at 5 years. The number of patients with at least 1 serviceable ear was 39 (85%) at presentation and 34 (74%) at the end of follow-up, including 22 (66%) with binaural serviceable hearing maintained. There was no statistical correlation between tumor growth rate and preservation of serviceable hearing. Tumor growth rates and age at presentation were inversely correlated. This study illustrates the high variability among neurofibromatosis type 2 patients regarding hearing status and VS growth rate and justifies the choice of initial conservative management in selected cases. : AAO-HNS, American Academy of Otololaryngologists and Head and Neck Surgery classificationMTD, mean tumor diameterNF2, neurofibromatosis type 2PTA, pure-tone averageSDS, speech discrimination scoreVS, vestibular schwannomas.

  7. Bone marrow-derived cells and tumor growth : Contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to tumor micro-environments with special focus on mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Berber D.; ter Elst, Arja; Kamps, Willem A.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    Research has provided evidence that tumor growth depends on the interaction of tumor cells with stromal cells, as already suggested in 1889 by Paget. Experimental and clinical studies have revealed that tumor stromal cells can be derived from bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells, such as

  8. The Potential Role of Innovative Indian SMEs in Sustainable Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Ionica Oncioiu; Florentina Raluca Bîlcan; Anca Gabriela Petrescu

    2017-01-01

    India has experienced a robust economic growth in the recent years, but with a trajectory which offers both positive and negative lessons on the business innovation faced by many countries in Asia and elsewhere in the developing world. This study sought to test the relationship between innovation, financial performance and economic growth. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics on the factors that contribute to assuring the innovation of the processes invo...

  9. A Systems Model to Make, Market, and Lead Your Way towards Sustained Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Kumar Agrawalla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Business enterprises exist in a world that is fiercely competitive, tied with huge global uncertainties. They always encounter increasing pressure on prices and margins. Hence, irrespective of their domain of operations and industry, businesses are naturally concerned about their growth, specifically sustained profitable growth, in today’s world. Marketing is a key business function to market and lead a business towards sustained profitable growth but the problem is it lacks a systems perspective in its operations, strategy, and practice. Further, given the confluence and systemic interactions of various economic, digital, and competitive forces; the challenge for different business functions—including marketing—increases tremendously. In this context, it is important for business enterprises to have a systems perspective to find their ways to growth that will be sustained. This calls for a holistic approach to assimilate and steer the business functions in any enterprise. The present conceptual paper focuses on an important business function for sustained growth in a holistic way and presents a systems model, called ‘Value Based Business Approach (VBBA-marketing’, which has potential to guide and steer companies and business enterprises to create a path for their sustained profitable growth.

  10. Increased growth rate of vestibular schwannoma after resection of contralateral tumor in neurofibromatosis type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyre, Matthieu; Goutagny, Stephane; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Bozorg-Grayeli, Alexis; Felce, Michele; Sterkers, Olivier; Kalamarides, Michel

    2011-10-01

    Surgical management of bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) in neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is often difficult, especially when both tumors threaten the brainstem. When the largest tumor has been removed, the management of the contralateral VS may become puzzling. To give new insights into the growth pattern of these tumors and to determine the best time point for treatment (surgery or medical treatment), we studied radiological growth in 11 VS (11 patients with NF2) over a long period (mean duration, 7.6 years), before and after removal of the contralateral tumor while both were threatening the brainstem. We used a quantitative approach of the radiological velocity of diametric expansion (VDE) on consecutive magnetic resonance images. Before first surgery, growth patterns of both tumors were similar in 9 of 11 cases. After the first surgery, VDE of the remaining VS was significantly elevated, compared with the preoperative period (2.5 ± 2.2 vs 4.4 ± 3.4 mm/year; P = .01, by Wilcoxon test). Decrease in hearing function was associated with increased postoperative growth in 3 cases. Growth pattern of coexisting intracranial meningiomas was not modified by VS surgery on the first side. In conclusion, removal of a large VS in a patient with NF2 might induce an increase in the growth rate of the contralateral medium or large VS. This possibility should be integrated in NF2 patient management to adequately treat the second VS.

  11. SUSTAINABLE GROWTH: RECENT TRENDS ACROSS CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPEAN ECONOMIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihut Ioana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available What is economic growth? Although the answer to this question may seems of real simplicity, developing an accurate definition of this concept may constitute a real challenge both from a theoretical but also empirical point of view. This constant debate upon the concept of economic growth as well as indentifying the optimum set of instruments for quantifying it, constituted the starting point of the current article. The concept of economic growth is used nowadays complementary to terms like economic development, economic welfare or economic progress with reference to this complex process that implies macro-scale structures. Moreover indentifying the main factors that generate a significant impact upon the dynamics of the economic growth process, constitute a useful approach taking into consideration the high degree of heterogeneity that characterize the architecture of the economies around the world. If we develop this analysis across the European Union member states this debate became even more challenging due to the high degree of diversity that characterize these economies. Moreover, the Central and Eastern European countries and especially the ones that joined EU in 2004 and 2007 embody a set of particularities that make them extremely different from the rest of the European Union member states, features related to the historical background, economic policies and common efforts to intensify the convergence process with the more developed EU members. This paper studies the impact of two main factors upon the economic growth process namely an endogenous-exogenous factor like the degree of openness and an endogenous factor like the human capital using a complex dynamic panel method. The arguments that were in favour of choosing this two factors are on one hand the multitude of theoretical studies that argued the importance of them in modelling the economic growth process and on the other hand the small number of studies that use panel methods in

  12. An Approach to Assess the Effectiveness of Smart Growth in Achieving Sustainable Development

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    Ishak Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Smart Growth has become an evident concept in public policy debates and provides answers to the enduring problems of sprawling development and its many adverse consequences. While the concept has widely been touted to promote an urban development pattern characterized by compact and mixed-use development, walkable and bikeable neighborhoods, preserved green spaces, and the availability of mass transit, not much has been written about its contribution to sustainable development. This paper is an attempt to explore the concepts of smart growth and sustainable development and the extent to which the former contributes to the achievement of the latter. The various debates surrounding the smart growth movement have also been explored. The 2003 general plan guideline by the US State of California is used as the basis for determining the sustainable development role of smart growth policies in Portland (Oregon, Arlington (Virginia, Boulder (Colorado and Lancaster County (Pennsylvania. The paper concludes that it would be inappropriate to equate smart growth to sustainable development as the latter is a much broader concept and cuts across myriad disciplines. Notwithstanding, the implementation of smart growth policies in the cases studied have been observed to promote compact, infill and transit-oriented development and to conserve and protect open spaces and natural areas. All these are pro-sustainable development. While this paper has observed that smart growth serves as one of the approaches for achieving sustainable development goals, it calls for a more quantitative study to be able to measure the magnitude of the contribution associated with the smart growth policies.

  13. Immunostimulatory early phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages does not predict tumor growth outcome in an HLA-DR mouse model of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabov, Vladimir; Kim, David; Chhina, Surmeet; Alexander, Richard B; Klyushnenkova, Elena N

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were shown to support the progression of many solid tumors. However, anti-tumor properties of TAM were also reported in several types of cancer. Here, we investigated the phenotype and functions of TAM in two transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer that display striking differences in tumor growth outcome. Mice expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a self-antigen specifically in prostate (PSAtg mice) rejected PSA-expressing transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) tumors. However, the introduction of HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b) transgene presenting PSA-derived peptides in a MHC class II-restricted manner exacerbated the growth of TRAMP-PSA tumors in DR2bxPSA F 1 mice. Despite the difference in tumor growth outcome, tumors in both strains were equally and intensively infiltrated by macrophages on the first week after tumor challenge. TAM exhibited mixed M1/M2 polarization and simultaneously produced pro-inflammatory (TNFα, IL1β) and anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines. TAM from both mouse strains demonstrated antigen-presenting potential and pronounced immunostimulatory activity. Moreover, they equally induced apoptosis of tumor cells. In vivo depletion of macrophages in DR2bxPSA F 1 but not PSAtg mice aggravated tumor growth suggesting that macrophages more strongly contribute to anti-tumor immunity when specific presentation of PSA to CD4+ T cells is possible. In summary, we conclude that in the early stages of tumor progression, the phenotype and functional properties of TAM did not predict tumor growth outcome in two transgenic prostate cancer models. Furthermore, we demonstrated that during the initial stage of prostate cancer development, TAM have the potential to activate T cell immunity and mediate anti-tumor effects.

  14. Antitumor effect of Ganoderma lucidum : Cytotoxicity and Tumor Growth Delay(1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dong Seong [Chonju Woosuck Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chang Won [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    1994-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Ganoderma lucidum(G.I.) on the survival of tumor cells in vitro and on the growth of tumors in vivo. Materials and Methods: Dried G.I. was made into powder, extracted with distilled water, filtered and diluted from a maximum concentration of 100 mg/ml in sequence. The cytotoxicity of G.O. in vitro was evaluated from its ability to reduce the clonogenicity of SCK tumor cells. For the tumor growth delay study, about 2x10{sup 5} of SCK tumor cells were subcutaneously inoculated in the legs of A/J mice. The first experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G/I. From the first day after tumor inoculation for 10 days. The second experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G.I. either once a day for 10 days or twice a day for 5 days beginning from the 7th day after tumor inoculation. Results: 1. Cytotoxicity in vitro; survival fraction, as judged from the curve, at G.I. concentration of 0.5, 1,5,10,25,50 and 100 mg/ml were 1.0, 0.74{+-}0.03, 0.18{+-}0.03, 0.15{+-}0.02, 0.006{+-}0.002, 0.015 and 0.0015, respectively. 2. Tumor growth delay in vivo; a) the time required for the mean tumor volume to grow to 1,000mm{sup 3} was 11 days in the control group and 14 days in the experimental group. b) the time required for tumor volume to increase 4 times was 11 days in the control group while it was 10.5 and 12 days in the groups injected with G.I. once a day and twice a day from the 7th day after tumor inoculation respectively. Conclusion: Aqueous extracts of G.I. showed a marked cytotoxicity on the SCK mammary cells in vitro. Tumor growth delay was statistically significant when G.I. injection was started soon after tumor inoculation, but it was not significant when injection was started after the tumors were firmly established.

  15. Aneurysm growth after brain tumor removal: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prandini Mirto N.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of rapid growth of an aneurysm after a posterior fossa meningioma removal in a 69-year-old lady is reported. Serial angiography, cerebral computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are presented. The patient harbored risk factors to both aneurysm formation and growth as current cigarette smoking, arterial hypertension, female sex and reduction of intracranial hypertension. One-year follow up after the first surgical procedure is presented.

  16. Tumors induce coordinate growth of artery, vein, and lymphatic vessel triads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumors drive blood vessel growth to obtain oxygen and nutrients to support tumor expansion, and they also can induce lymphatic vessel growth to facilitate fluid drainage and metastasis. These processes have generally been studied separately, so that it is not known how peritumoral blood and lymphatic vessels grow relative to each other. Methods The murine B16-F10 melanoma and chemically-induced squamous cell carcinoma models were employed to analyze large red-colored vessels growing between flank tumors and draining lymph nodes. Immunostaining and microscopy in combination with dye injection studies were used to characterize these vessels. Results Each peritumoral red-colored vessel was found to consist of a triad of collecting lymphatic vessel, vein, and artery, that were all enlarged. Peritumoral veins and arteries were both functional, as detected by intravenous dye injection. The enlarged lymphatic vessels were functional in most mice by subcutaneous dye injection assay, however tumor growth sometimes blocked lymph drainage to regional lymph nodes. Large red-colored vessels also grew between benign papillomas or invasive squamous cell carcinomas and regional lymph nodes in chemical carcinogen-treated mice. Immunostaining of the red-colored vessels again identified the clustered growth of enlarged collecting lymphatics, veins, and arteries in the vicinity of these spontaneously arising tumors. Conclusions Implanted and spontaneously arising tumors induce coordinate growth of blood and lymphatic vessel triads. Many of these vessel triads are enlarged over several cm distance between the tumor and regional lymph nodes. Lymphatic drainage was sometimes blocked in mice before lymph node metastasis was detected, suggesting that an unknown mechanism alters lymph drainage patterns before tumors reach draining lymph nodes. PMID:24886322

  17. Tumors induce coordinate growth of artery, vein, and lymphatic vessel triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, Alanna; Croft, Alexandra; Kelly-Spratt, Karen; Furuya, Momoko; Kemp, Christopher J

    2014-05-21

    Tumors drive blood vessel growth to obtain oxygen and nutrients to support tumor expansion, and they also can induce lymphatic vessel growth to facilitate fluid drainage and metastasis. These processes have generally been studied separately, so that it is not known how peritumoral blood and lymphatic vessels grow relative to each other. The murine B16-F10 melanoma and chemically-induced squamous cell carcinoma models were employed to analyze large red-colored vessels growing between flank tumors and draining lymph nodes. Immunostaining and microscopy in combination with dye injection studies were used to characterize these vessels. Each peritumoral red-colored vessel was found to consist of a triad of collecting lymphatic vessel, vein, and artery, that were all enlarged. Peritumoral veins and arteries were both functional, as detected by intravenous dye injection. The enlarged lymphatic vessels were functional in most mice by subcutaneous dye injection assay, however tumor growth sometimes blocked lymph drainage to regional lymph nodes. Large red-colored vessels also grew between benign papillomas or invasive squamous cell carcinomas and regional lymph nodes in chemical carcinogen-treated mice. Immunostaining of the red-colored vessels again identified the clustered growth of enlarged collecting lymphatics, veins, and arteries in the vicinity of these spontaneously arising tumors. Implanted and spontaneously arising tumors induce coordinate growth of blood and lymphatic vessel triads. Many of these vessel triads are enlarged over several cm distance between the tumor and regional lymph nodes. Lymphatic drainage was sometimes blocked in mice before lymph node metastasis was detected, suggesting that an unknown mechanism alters lymph drainage patterns before tumors reach draining lymph nodes.

  18. Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis by Soluble EphB4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Martiny-Baron

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available EphB receptors and their ephrinB ligands play a key role in the formation of a regular vascular system. Recent studies have also shown the involvement of Eph/ephrin interactions in malignant tumor progression and angiogenesis. We have generated soluble monomeric EphB4 (sEphB4-expressing A375 melanoma cells to study the effect of dominant negatively acting sEphB4 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. Soluble EphB4-expressing A375 tumors grown subcutaneously in nude mice show dramatically reduced tumor growth compared to control tumors. The proliferative capacity of sEphB4-expressing cells in monolayer culture is not altered. Yet, sEphB4-expressing A375 cells cannot establish proper cell-cell contacts in three-dimensional spheroids. However, sEphB4 transfectants have reduced proliferation and apoptosis rates when grown in three-dimensional culture in vitro or in subcutaneous tumors in vivo. Analysis of the vascular phenotype of the tumors revealed a reduction of intratumoral microvessel density in sEphB4-expressing tumors. Corresponding to these mouse experiments, a matched pair analysis of EphB4 and ephrinB2 expression in human colon carcinomas revealed significantly upregulated levels of EphB4 expression compared to adjacent normal tissue. Taken together, the data identify dual effects of sEphB4 on the tumor and the vascular compartment that collectively inhibit tumor growth.

  19. Adenosine A2B receptor blockade slows growth of bladder and breast tumors1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Li, Yuesheng; Theodorescu, Dan; Strieter, Robert M.; Linden, Joel

    2011-01-01

    The accumulation of high levels of adenosine in tumors activates A2A and A2B receptors on immune cells and inhibits their ability to suppress tumor growth. Deletion of A2AARs has been reported to activate anti-tumor T cells, stimulates DC function and inhibits angiogenesis. Here we evaluated the effects of intermittent intratumor injection of a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, aminophylline (AMO, theophylline ethylenediamine) and, for the first time, a selective A2BAR antagonist, ATL801. AMO and ATL801 slowed the growth of MB49 bladder and 4T1 breast tumors in syngeneic mice, and reduced by 85% metastasizes of breast cancer cells from mammary fat to lung. Based on experiments with A2AAR−/− or A2BAR−/− mice, the effect of AMO injection was unexpectedly attributed to A2BAR and not to A2AAR blockade. AMO and ATL801 significantly increased tumor levels of IFNγ and the interferon-inducible chemokine CXCL10, which is a ligand for CXCR3. This was associated with an increase in activated tumor-infiltrating CXCR3+ T cells and a decrease in endothelial cell precursors within tumors. Tumor growth inhibition by AMO or ATL801 was eliminated in CXCR3−/− mice and in RAG1−/− mice that lack mature T cells. In RAG1−/− mice A2BAR deletion enhanced CD86 expression on CD11b- DCs. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that CXCR3 and A2BAR expression on bone marrow cells are required for the anti-tumor effects of AMO. The data suggest that blockade of A2BARs enhances DC activation and CXCR3-dependent anti-tumor responses. PMID:22116822

  20. Nicotine promotes tumor growth and metastasis in mouse models of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Davis

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine is the major addictive component of tobacco smoke. Although nicotine is generally thought to have limited ability to initiate cancer, it can induce cell proliferation and angiogenesis in a variety of systems. These properties might enable nicotine to facilitate the growth of tumors already initiated. Here we show that nicotine significantly promotes the progression and metastasis of tumors in mouse models of lung cancer. This effect was observed when nicotine was administered through intraperitoneal injections, or through over-the-counter transdermal patches.In the present study, Line1 mouse adenocarcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into syngenic BALB/c mice. Nicotine administration either by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection or transdermal patches caused a remarkable increase in the size of implanted Line1 tumors. Once the tumors were surgically removed, nicotine treated mice had a markedly higher tumor recurrence (59.7% as compared to the vehicle treated mice (19.5%. Nicotine also increased metastasis of dorsally implanted Line1 tumors to the lungs by 9 folds. These studies on transplanted tumors were extended to a mouse model where the tumors were induced by the tobacco carcinogen, NNK. Lung tumors were initiated in A/J mice by i.p. injection of NNK; administration of 1 mg/kg nicotine three times a week led to an increase in the size and the number of tumors formed in the lungs. In addition, nicotine significantly reduced the expression of epithelial markers, E-Cadherin and beta-Catenin as well as the tight junction protein ZO-1; these tumors also showed an increased expression of the alpha(7 nAChR subunit. We believe that exposure to nicotine either by tobacco smoke or nicotine supplements might facilitate increased tumor growth and metastasis.Our earlier results indicated that nicotine could induce invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in cultured lung, breast and pancreatic cancer cells. This study

  1. Promoting Sustainable Economic Growth in Mexico (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.; Butheau, M.; Sandor, D.

    2013-11-01

    Mexico is the second largest economy in Latin America, with rapid growth occurring in the industrial and services sectors. A forward-thinking country on climate change, the nation recognizes that the threat of higher temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, and more frequent weather-related disasters could pose a substantial risk to its expanding economy.

  2. CD200-expressing human basal cell carcinoma cells initiate tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmont, Chantal S; Benketah, Antisar; Reed, Simon H; Hawk, Nga V; Telford, William G; Ohyama, Manabu; Udey, Mark C; Yee, Carole L; Vogel, Jonathan C; Patel, Girish K

    2013-01-22

    Smoothened antagonists directly target the genetic basis of human basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common of all cancers. These drugs inhibit BCC growth, but they are not curative. Although BCC cells are monomorphic, immunofluorescence microscopy reveals a complex hierarchical pattern of growth with inward differentiation along hair follicle lineages. Most BCC cells express the transcription factor KLF4 and are committed to terminal differentiation. A small CD200(+) CD45(-) BCC subpopulation that represents 1.63 ± 1.11% of all BCC cells resides in small clusters at the tumor periphery. By using reproducible in vivo xenograft growth assays, we determined that tumor initiating cell frequencies approximate one per 1.5 million unsorted BCC cells. The CD200(+) CD45(-) BCC subpopulation recreated BCC tumor growth in vivo with typical histological architecture and expression of sonic hedgehog-regulated genes. Reproducible in vivo BCC growth was achieved with as few as 10,000 CD200(+) CD45(-) cells, representing ~1,500-fold enrichment. CD200(-) CD45(-) BCC cells were unable to form tumors. These findings establish a platform to study the effects of Smoothened antagonists on BCC tumor initiating cell and also suggest that currently available anti-CD200 therapy be considered, either as monotherapy or an adjunct to Smoothened antagonists, in the treatment of inoperable BCC.

  3. Urban growth management and ecological sustainability: confronting the "smart growth" fallacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor Zovanyi

    2005-01-01

    Growth management and Smart Growth initiatives in the United States represent an ongoing process of growth accommodation. Because growth by definition constitutes unsustainable behavior in that it is incapable of being continued or maintained indefinitely, ongoing growth accommodation must be recognized as activity incongruous with advancing the goal of ecological...

  4. Dioscin inhibits colon tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis through regulating VEGFR2 and AKT/MAPK signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Qingyi [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Qing, Yong, E-mail: qingyongxy@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Hu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Lei [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Xiaohua, E-mail: wuxh@scu.edu.cn [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Dioscin has shown cytotoxicity against cancer cells, but its in vivo effects and the mechanisms have not elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study was to assess the antitumor effects and the molecular mechanisms of dioscin. We showed that dioscin could inhibit tumor growth in vivo and has no toxicity at the test condition. The growth suppression was accompanied by obvious blood vessel decrease within solid tumors. We also found dioscin treatment inhibited the proliferation of cancer and endothelial cell lines, and most sensitive to primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). What's more, analysis of HUVECs migration, invasion, and tube formation exhibited that dioscin has significantly inhibitive effects to these actions. Further analysis of blood vessel formation in the matrigel plugs indicated that dioscin could inhibit VEGF-induced blood vessel formation in vivo. We also identified that dioscin could suppress the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src, FAK, AKT and Erk1/2, accompanied by the increase of phosphorylated P38MAPK. The results potently suggest that dioscin may be a potential anticancer drug, which efficiently inhibits angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathways. - Highlights: • Dioscin inhibits tumor growth in vivo and does not exhibit any toxicity. • Dioscin inhibits angiogenesis within solid tumors. • Dioscin inhibits the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs. • Dioscin inhibits VEGF–induced blood vessel formation in vivo. • Dioscin inhibits VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathway.

  5. Regulation of growth of LNCaP human prostate tumor cells by growth factors and steroid hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L.G. Schuurmans (Alex); J. Bolt (Joan); J. Veldscholte (Jos); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The mitogenic activity of several growth factors on androgen responsive LNCaP human prostate tumor cells was studied. A two-fold stimulation of cell proliferation was observed after a culture period of 6 days in 1 ng EGF/ml, 10 ng TGF-α/ml or 20 ng basic FGF/ml. TGF-β

  6. Is the growth stimulation by low doses of glyphosate sustained over time?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cedergreen, Nina [Department of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Life Science, University of Copenhagen, Hojbakkegard Alle 13, 2630 Tastrup (Denmark)], E-mail: ncf@life.ku.dk

    2008-12-15

    The herbicide, glyphosate, has been shown to stimulate growth in a range of species when applied at doses of 5-60 g a.e. ha{sup -1}, corresponding to realistic spray drift events. This study investigates growth of shoot parameters over time to detect whether the glyphosate induced growth increase was sustained and had a final effect on reproduction. The results showed that an actual biomass growth rate increase took place within the first week after spraying with glyphosate doses <60 g a.e. ha{sup -1}. This initial growth boost kept treated plants larger than untreated plants for up to six weeks, but at harvest there was no significant difference between control plants and treated plants. Possible effects of glyphosate hormesis on the competitive ability of spray drift affected plants are discussed. - Glyphosate induced hormesis in barley is not sustained over time.

  7. Treatment of Gastrin-Secreting Tumor With Sustained-Release Octreotide Acetate in a Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangho; Hosoya, Kenji; Takagi, Satoshi; Okumura, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    An 8 yr old, intact male Shiba Inu was presented with loose stool, polydipsia, hematuria, vomiting, and anorexia. On abdominal ultrasonography, numerous nodules were detected in the hepatic parenchyma distributed diffusely throughout all lobes. Excisional biopsy of one of the nodules was performed via exploratory laparotomy. A histopathological diagnosis of the lesion was carcinoid, and the tumor cells stained positive to chromogranin A and gastrin. The serum gastrin level of the dog was 45,613 pg/mL (reference range: 160-284). In addition to medical treatment with omeprazole(c) and famotidine(e), suppression of gastrin secretion was attempted with octreotide acetate. A test dose of octreotide acetate significantly decreased the serum gastrin level to approximately one third of the baseline in 2 hr and the effect lasted approximately for 6 hr. On day 21, treatment with sustained-release formulation of octreotide acetate(a) (5 mg intramuscular, q 4 wk) was initiated. The serum gastrin concentration gradually decreased over 32 days and then progressively increased in parallel with the progression of the hepatic nodules. The dog gradually developed recurrence of initial clinical signs, and was lost to follow-up on day 510.

  8. The Potential Role of Innovative Indian SMEs in Sustainable Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica Oncioiu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available India has experienced a robust economic growth in the recent years, but with a trajectory which offers both positive and negative lessons on the business innovation faced by many countries in Asia and elsewhere in the developing world. This study sought to test the relationship between innovation, financial performance and economic growth. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics on the factors that contribute to assuring the innovation of the processes involved in the financial performance and economic development in the rubber and plastic product sector in India. The results revealed that there is a positive relationship between innovation and economic growth, as well as between innovation and the financial performance of the company. Finally, the conclusion presents implications, limitations and directions for future research regarding the importance of innovation to the firm’s performance. A clear lesson from this study is that the future must include promoting Innovative Indian SMEs; in other words, business competitiveness depends on the creativity and innovativeness of its entrepreneurship.

  9. Loss of CSL Unlocks a Hypoxic Response and Enhanced Tumor Growth Potential in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike-Benjamin Braune

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Notch signaling is an important regulator of stem cell differentiation. All canonical Notch signaling is transmitted through the DNA-binding protein CSL, and hyperactivated Notch signaling is associated with tumor development; thus it may be anticipated that CSL deficiency should reduce tumor growth. In contrast, we report that genetic removal of CSL in breast tumor cells caused accelerated growth of xenografted tumors. Loss of CSL unleashed a hypoxic response during normoxic conditions, manifested by stabilization of the HIF1α protein and acquisition of a polyploid giant-cell, cancer stem cell-like, phenotype. At the transcriptome level, loss of CSL upregulated more than 1,750 genes and less than 3% of those genes were part of the Notch transcriptional signature. Collectively, this suggests that CSL exerts functions beyond serving as the central node in the Notch signaling cascade and reveals a role for CSL in tumorigenesis and regulation of the cellular hypoxic response.

  10. Brain Tumor Tropism of Transplanted Human Neural Stem Cells Is Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Ole Schmidt

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs offers a new potential therapeutic approach as a cell-based delivery system for gene therapy in brain tumors. This is based on the unique capacity of NSCs to migrate throughout the brain and to target invading tumor cells. However, the signals controlling the targeted migration of transplanted NSCs are poorly defined. We analyzed the in vitro and in vivo effects of angiogenic growth factors and protein extracts from surgical specimens of brain tumor patients on NSC migration. Here, we demonstrate that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is able to induce a long-range attraction of transplanted human NSCs from distant sites in the adult brain. Our results indicate that tumorupregulated VEGF and angiogenic-activated microvasculature are relevant guidance signals for NSC tropism toward brain tumors.

  11. Genetically Modified Crops: Towards Agricultural Growth, Agricultural Development, or Agricultural Sustainability?

    OpenAIRE

    Azadi, Hossein; Ghanian, Mansour; Ghuchani, Omid M.; Rafiaani, Parisa; Taning, Clauvis N. T.; Hajivand, Roghaye Y.; Dogot, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The present debate on how to increase global food production in a sustainable way has focused on arguments over the pros and cons of genetically modified (GM) crops. Scientists in both public and private sectors clearly regard GM technology as a major new set of tools, whereas industry sees it as an opportunity for increased profits. However, it remains questionable whether GM crops can contribute to agricultural growth, agricultural development, and agricultural sustainability. This review p...

  12. Porous biodegradable EW62 medical implants resist tumor cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, O; Ventura, Y; Goldman, J; Vago, R; Aghion, E

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium alloys have been widely investigated for biodegradable medical applications. However, the shielding of harmful cells (eg. bacteria or tumorous cells) from immune surveillance may be compounded by the increased porosity of biodegradable materials. We previously demonstrated the improved corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of a novel EW62 (Mg-6%Nd-2%Y-0.5%Zr)) magnesium alloy by rapid solidification followed by extrusion (RS) compared to its conventional counterpart (CC). The present in vitro study evaluated the influence of rapid solidification on cytotoxicity to murine osteosarcoma cells. We found that CC and RS corrosion extracts significantly reduced cell viability over a 24-h exposure period. Cell density was reduced over 48 h following direct contact on both CC and RS surfaces, but was further reduced on the CC surface. The direct presence of cells accelerated corrosion for both materials. The corroded RS material exhibited superior mechanical properties relative to the CC material. The data show that the improved corrosion resistance of the rapidly solidified EW62 alloy (RS) resulted in a relatively reduced cytotoxic effect on tumorous cells. Hence, the tested alloy in the form of a rapidly solidified substance may introduce a good balance between its biodegradation characteristics and cytotoxic effect towards cancerous and normal cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF TUMOR GROWTH MARKERS AND ANGIOGENESIS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Examinations were made in 121 patients, including 76 patients with urinary bladder cancer (UBC (superficial (T1N0M (n = 16 and invasive (T2N0M0 and T3aN0M0 (n = 39 carcinomas, carcinoma invading into and out of the bladder wall (n = 21, including T3bN0M0 (n = 14, T3bN1M0 (n = 6, and with T4N1M1 (n = 1, 10 patients with cystitis, 10 with urolithiasis, and 25 apparently healthy individuals who made up a control group. The patients with UBC were additionally divided into the following groups according to the degree of tumor cell differentiation: 27 with a low-grade tumor (G1, 24 with a moderate-grade tumor (G2, and 25 with a high-grade tumor (G3. The levels of oncomarkers (urinary bladder carcinoma antigen (UBCA, tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA, tissue-specific polypeptide antigen (TSPA, cytokines (interleukin (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α, and angiogenetic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor-α (TGFα, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I were studied by solid-phase enzyme immunoassay. It has been established that measuring the level of cytokeratin oncomarkers (UBC II, TPA, TPS in the serum, urine, and washings can be, along with cystoscopy, used in the early diagnosis of UBC. A combination of UBC II, TPA, and TPS contents allows speci- fication of the stage of UBC and the grade of tumor cells. The increased levels of TNF-α and IL-12 in patients with UBC confirm the development of a proinflammatory cytokine shift and activation of angiogenesis. The ratio of proangiogenic TNF-α to anti-angiogenic IL12 rises with UBC progression. This may be considered to cause increased vascular permeability and a proneness to bleedings from tumor tissues in patients with UBC. Tumor growth and UBC progression are accompanied by a pronounced increase in the serum levels of growth and angiogenetic factors (VEGF, TGF-α, b-FGF, and IGF-1 as compared to the normal values and to

  14. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF TUMOR GROWTH MARKERS AND ANGIOGENESIS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Examinations were made in 121 patients, including 76 patients with urinary bladder cancer (UBC (superficial (T1N0M (n = 16 and invasive (T2N0M0 and T3aN0M0 (n = 39 carcinomas, carcinoma invading into and out of the bladder wall (n = 21, including T3bN0M0 (n = 14, T3bN1M0 (n = 6, and with T4N1M1 (n = 1, 10 patients with cystitis, 10 with urolithiasis, and 25 apparently healthy individuals who made up a control group. The patients with UBC were additionally divided into the following groups according to the degree of tumor cell differentiation: 27 with a low-grade tumor (G1, 24 with a moderate-grade tumor (G2, and 25 with a high-grade tumor (G3. The levels of oncomarkers (urinary bladder carcinoma antigen (UBCA, tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA, tissue-specific polypeptide antigen (TSPA, cytokines (interleukin (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α, and angiogenetic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor-α (TGFα, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I were studied by solid-phase enzyme immunoassay. It has been established that measuring the level of cytokeratin oncomarkers (UBC II, TPA, TPS in the serum, urine, and washings can be, along with cystoscopy, used in the early diagnosis of UBC. A combination of UBC II, TPA, and TPS contents allows speci- fication of the stage of UBC and the grade of tumor cells. The increased levels of TNF-α and IL-12 in patients with UBC confirm the development of a proinflammatory cytokine shift and activation of angiogenesis. The ratio of proangiogenic TNF-α to anti-angiogenic IL12 rises with UBC progression. This may be considered to cause increased vascular permeability and a proneness to bleedings from tumor tissues in patients with UBC. Tumor growth and UBC progression are accompanied by a pronounced increase in the serum levels of growth and angiogenetic factors (VEGF, TGF-α, b-FGF, and IGF-1 as compared to the normal values and to

  15. Midkine expression correlating with growth activity and tooth morphogenesis in odontogenic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Shuichi; Seki, Sachiko; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Ikeda, Tohru

    2008-01-01

    Midkine (MK; a low molecular weight heparin-binding growth factor) is a multifunctional cytokine. MK plays a role in morphogenesis of many organs including teeth through epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. We immunohistochemically examined MK expression in various human odontogenic tumors. There was no difference in positive rate and intensity of MK between benign odontogenic tumors and their malignant counterparts. Ameloblastoma showed MK localization in the peripheral columnar cells in bud...

  16. Discovery of a Novel Molecule that Regulates Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chery A. Whipple

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The heparan sulfate proteoglycan, Glypican-1 (GPC1, significantly impacts the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo and markedly attenuates tumor angiogenesis and metastasis in athymic mice. Interestingly, both cancer cell–derived and host-derived GPC1 play an important role in tumor development and spread. These data suggest that GPC1 may be a valid therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer.

  17. Three-dimensional tumor cell growth stimulates autophagic flux and recapitulates chemotherapy resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingel, Corinna; Koeneke, Emily; Ridinger, Johannes; Bittmann, Annika; Sill, Martin; Peterziel, Heike; Wrobel, Jagoda K; Rettig, Inga; Milde, Till; Fernekorn, Uta; Weise, Frank; Schober, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Oehme, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Current preclinical models in tumor biology are limited in their ability to recapitulate relevant (patho-) physiological processes, including autophagy. Three-dimensional (3D) growth cultures have frequently been proposed to overcome the lack of correlation between two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell cultures and human tumors in preclinical drug testing. Besides 3D growth, it is also advantageous to simulate shear stress, compound flux and removal of metabolites, e.g., via bioreactor systems, through which culture medium is constantly pumped at a flow rate reflecting physiological conditions. Here we show that both static 3D growth and 3D growth within a bioreactor system modulate key hallmarks of cancer cells, including proliferation and cell death as well as macroautophagy, a recycling pathway often activated by highly proliferative tumors to cope with metabolic stress. The autophagy-related gene expression profiles of 2D-grown cells are substantially different from those of 3D-grown cells and tumor tissue. Autophagy-controlling transcription factors, such as TFEB and FOXO3, are upregulated in tumors, and 3D-grown cells have increased expression compared with cells grown in 2D conditions. Three-dimensional cultures depleted of the autophagy mediators BECN1, ATG5 or ATG7 or the transcription factor FOXO3, are more sensitive to cytotoxic treatment. Accordingly, combining cytotoxic treatment with compounds affecting late autophagic flux, such as chloroquine, renders the 3D-grown cells more susceptible to therapy. Altogether, 3D cultures are a valuable tool to study drug response of tumor cells, as these models more closely mimic tumor (patho-)physiology, including the upregulation of tumor relevant pathways, such as autophagy. PMID:28837150

  18. Transgenic Overexpression of the Proprotein Convertase Furin Enhances Skin Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Fu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Furin, one of the members of the family of proprotein convertases (PCs, ubiquitously expressed as a type I membrane-bound proteinase, activates several proteins that contribute to tumor progression. In vitro studies using cancer cell lines and clinical specimens demonstrated that furin processes important substrates such as insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R and transforming growth factor β, leading to increased tumor growth and progression. Despite the numerous studies associating furin with tumor development, its effects in preclinical models has not been comprehensively studied. In this study, we sought to determine the protumorigenic role of furin in vivo after a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol in transgenic mice in which furin expression was targeted to the epidermal basal layer. We found that processing of the PC substrate IGF-1R and the proliferation rate of mouse epidermis was enhanced in transgenic mice when compared with their WT counterparts. Histopathologic diagnoses of the tumors demonstrated that furin transgenic mice (line F47 developed twice as many squamous carcinomas as the control, WT mice (P < .002. Similarly, tumors cells from transgenic mice were able to process PC substrates more efficiently than tumor cells from WT mice. Furthermore, furin expression resulted in a higher SCC volume in transgenic mice as well as an increase in the percentage of high-grade SCC, including poorly differentiated and spindle cell carcinomas. In conclusion, expression of furin in the basal layer of the epidermis increased tumor development and enhanced tumor growth, supporting the consideration of furin as a potential target for cancer treatment.

  19. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  20. Modulation of CXCL-8 expression in human melanoma cells regulates tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng; Singh, Seema; Varney, Michelle L; Kindle, Scott; Singh, Rakesh K

    2012-12-01

    CXCL-8, a chemokine secreted by melanoma and stromal cells, serves as a growth and angiogenic factor for melanoma progression. This study evaluated how modulation of CXCL-8 levels in melanoma cell lines with different tumorigenic and metastatic potentials affected multiple tumor phenotypes. A375P cells (CXCL-8 low expressor) were stably transfected with a CXCL-8 mammalian expression vector to overexpress CXCL-8, whereas A375SM cells (CXCL-8 high expressor) were transfected with a CXCL-8 antisense expression vector to suppress CXCL-8 expression. Subsequent cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and soft-agar colony formation were analyzed, and in vivo tumor growth and metastasis were evaluated using mouse xenograft models. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of CXCL-8 significantly enhanced primary tumor growth and lung metastasis, accompanied by increased microvessel density in vivo, as compared with vector control-transfected cells. We also observed increased clonogenic ability, growth, and invasive potential of CXCL-8 overexpressing cells in vitro. Knockdown of CXCL-8 using an antisense vector resulted in increased cell death and reduced tumor growth relative to control. Taken together, these data confirm that CXCL-8 expression plays a critical role in regulating multiple cellular phenotypes associated with melanoma growth and metastasis.

  1. Alvocidib (Flavopiridol) suppresses tumor growth in SCID mice with human esophageal cancer xenografts without inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinsuke; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Masahiko; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Sonoue, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Toshiharu; Tsurumaru, Masahiko

    2006-08-01

    Alvocidib (Flavopiridol, HMR1275) is a potent inhibitor of multiple cyclin-dependent kinases and has been identified recently as an antitumor agent in several cancers. Previous studies have shown that alvocidib could potentially treat esophageal cancer in vitro. This study evaluates alvocidib for its ability to suppress tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing TE8 human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) xenografts. Alvocidib treatment of 10mg/kg body weight reduced tumor volume significantly. Immunohistochemistry analysis of alvocidib-treated tumor sections showed significant reductions in cyclin D1, VEGF, and Rb levels. Alvocidib treatment did not cause a marked increase in apoptotic tumor cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis, yet hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed tumor necrosis. In vivo investigation of alvocidib treatment confirmed antitumor activity in TE8 esophageal xenografts. These findings suggest that alvocidib could be a useful anti-cancer agent for esophageal cancer.

  2. A new computational tool for the phenomenological analysis of multipassage tumor growth curves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio S Gliozzi

    Full Text Available Multipassage experiments are performed by subcutaneous implantation in lab animals (usually mice of a small number of cells from selected human lines. Tumor cells are then passaged from one mouse to another by harvesting them from a growing tumor and implanting them into other healthy animals. This procedure may be extremely useful to investigate the various mechanisms involved in the long term evolution of tumoral growth. It has been observed by several researchers that, contrary to what happens in in vitro experiments, there is a significant growth acceleration at each new passage. This result is explained by a new method of analysis, based on the Phenomenological Universalities approach. It is found that, by means of a simple rescaling of time, it is possible to collapse all the growth curves, corresponding to the successive passages, into a single curve, belonging to the Universality Class U2. Possible applications are proposed and the need of further experimental evidence is discussed.

  3. Accomplices of the Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment Compromising Antitumor Immunity: Adenosine, Lactate, Acidosis, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Potassium Ions, and Phosphatidylserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, Peter; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    In this minireview, we aim to highlight key factors of the tumor microenvironment, including adenosine, lactate, acidosis, vascular endothelial growth factor, phosphatidylserine, high extracellular K + levels, and tumor hypoxia with respect to antitumor immune functions. Most solid tumors have an immature chaotic microvasculature that results in tumor hypoxia. Hypoxia is a key determinant of tumor aggressiveness and therapy resistance and hypoxia-related gene products can thwart antitumor immune responses.

  4. Accomplices of the Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment Compromising Antitumor Immunity: Adenosine, Lactate, Acidosis, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Potassium Ions, and Phosphatidylserine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vaupel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this minireview, we aim to highlight key factors of the tumor microenvironment, including adenosine, lactate, acidosis, vascular endothelial growth factor, phosphatidylserine, high extracellular K+ levels, and tumor hypoxia with respect to antitumor immune functions. Most solid tumors have an immature chaotic microvasculature that results in tumor hypoxia. Hypoxia is a key determinant of tumor aggressiveness and therapy resistance and hypoxia-related gene products can thwart antitumor immune responses.

  5. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J. M.; Custidiano, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  6. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasko John EJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS, we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7 and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10 cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments.

  7. Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity as Tumor Growth Promoter and Catalyst of Population Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Poleszczuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly argued that cancer stem cells are not a cellular phenotype but rather a transient state that cells can acquire, either through intrinsic signaling cascades or in response to environmental cues. While cancer stem cell plasticity is generally associated with increased aggressiveness and treatment resistance, we set out to thoroughly investigate the impact of different rates of plasticity on early and late tumor growth dynamics and the response to therapy. We develop an agent-based model of cancer stem cell driven tumor growth, in which plasticity is defined as a spontaneous transition between stem and nonstem cancer cell states. Simulations of the model show that plasticity can substantially increase tumor growth rate and invasion. At high rates of plasticity, however, the cells get exhausted and the tumor will undergo spontaneous remission in the long term. In a series of in silico trials, we show that such remission can be facilitated through radiotherapy. The presented study suggests that stem cell plasticity has rather complex, nonintuitive implications on tumor growth and treatment response. Further theoretical, experimental, and integrated studies are needed to fully decipher cancer stem cell plasticity and how it can be harnessed for novel therapeutic approaches.

  8. Tumor Cells Growth and Survival Time with the Ketogenic Diet in Animal Models: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Soheila; Sobhani, Nafiseh; Mirshekar, Somaye; Ghiasvand, Reza; Pourmasoumi, Makan; Miraghajani, Maryam; Dehsoukhteh, Somayeh Shahraki

    2017-01-01

    Recently, interest in targeted cancer therapies via metabolic pathways has been renewed with the discovery that many tumors become dependent on glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis. Also the inability of ketone bodies metabolization due to various deficiencies in mitochondrial enzymes is the major metabolic changes discovered in malignant cells. Therefore, administration of a ketogenic diet (KD) which is based on high in fat and low in carbohydrates might inhibit tumor growth and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies. So, we conducted this systematic review to assess the effects of KD on the tumor cells growth and survival time in animal studies. All databases were searched from inception to November 2015. We systematically searched the PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholars, Science Direct and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. To assess the quality of included studies we used SYRCLE's RoB tool. 268 articles were obtained from databases by primary search. Only 13 studies were eligible according to inclusion criteria. From included studies, 9 articles indicate that KD had a beneficial effect on tumor growth and survival time. Tumor types were included pancreatic, prostate, gastric, colon, brain, neuroblastoma and lung cancers. In conclusions, although studies in this field are rare and inconsistence, recent findings have demonstrated that KD can potentially inhibit the malignant cell growth and increase the survival time. Because of differences physiology between animals and humans, future studies in cancer patients treated with a KD are needed.

  9. Tumor cells growth and survival time with the ketogenic diet in animal models: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Khodadadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, interest in targeted cancer therapies via metabolic pathways has been renewed with the discovery that many tumors become dependent on glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis. Also the inability of ketone bodies metabolization due to various deficiencies in mitochondrial enzymes is the major metabolic changes discovered in malignant cells. Therefore, administration of a ketogenic diet (KD which is based on high in fat and low in carbohydrates might inhibit tumor growth and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies. So, we conducted this systematic review to assess the effects of KD on the tumor cells growth and survival time in animal studies. All databases were searched from inception to November 2015. We systematically searched the PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholars, Science Direct and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. To assess the quality of included studies we used SYRCLE's RoB tool. 268 articles were obtained from databases by primary search. Only 13 studies were eligible according to inclusion criteria. From included studies, 9 articles indicate that KD had a beneficial effect on tumor growth and survival time. Tumor types were included pancreatic, prostate, gastric, colon, brain, neuroblastoma and lung cancers. In conclusions, although studies in this field are rare and inconsistence, recent findings have demonstrated that KD can potentially inhibit the malignant cell growth and increase the survival time. Because of differences physiology between animals and humans, future studies in cancer patients treated with a KD are needed.

  10. Modulation of the leptin receptor mediates tumor growth and migration of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisha M Mendonsa

    Full Text Available Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration.

  11. Modulation of the leptin receptor mediates tumor growth and migration of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonsa, Alisha M; Chalfant, Madeleine C; Gorden, Lee D; VanSaun, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration.

  12. Alternatively spliced Spalax heparanase inhibits extracellular matrix degradation, tumor growth, and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Nicola J.; Avivi, Aaron; Shafat, Itay; Edovitsky, Evgeny; Zcharia, Eyal; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel; Nevo, Eviatar

    2009-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that degrades heparan sulfate (HS) at the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. Heparanase is expressed mainly by cancer cells, and its expression is correlated with increased tumor aggressiveness, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Here, we report the cloning of a unique splice variant (splice 36) of heparanase from the subterranean blind mole rat (Spalax). This splice variant results from skipping part of exon 3, exons 4 and 5, and part of exon 6 and functions as a dominant negative to the wild-type enzyme. It inhibits HS degradation, suppresses glioma tumor growth, and decreases experimental B16–BL6 lung colonization in a mouse model. Intriguingly, Spalax splice variant 7 of heparanase (which results from skipping of exon 7) is devoid of enzymatic activity, but unlike splice 36 it enhances tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that alternative splicing of heparanase regulates its enzymatic activity and might adapt the heparanase function to the fluctuating normoxic–hypoxic subterranean environment that Spalax experiences. Development of anticancer drugs designed to suppress tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis is a major challenge, of which heparanase inhibition is a promising approach. We anticipate that the heparanase splicing model, evolved during 40 million years of Spalacid adaptation to underground life, would pave the way for the development of heparanase-based therapeutic modalities directed against angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis. PMID:19164514

  13. Numerical Simulation of a Tumor Growth Dynamics Model Using Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Qing

    Tumor cell growth models involve high-dimensional parameter spaces that require computationally tractable methods to solve. To address a proposed tumor growth dynamics mathematical model, an instance of the particle swarm optimization method was implemented to speed up the search process in the multi-dimensional parameter space to find optimal parameter values that fit experimental data from mice cancel cells. The fitness function, which measures the difference between calculated results and experimental data, was minimized in the numerical simulation process. The results and search efficiency of the particle swarm optimization method were compared to those from other evolutional methods such as genetic algorithms.

  14. Critical Sustainability: Setting the Limits to Growth and Responsibility in Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarkko Saarinen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea of sustainable development has been discussed in tourism research for almost a quarter of a century. During that time, sustainability has become an important policy framework for tourism and regional developers guiding their planning and development thinking. Sustainability has also emerged academically as an important field of research with an emphasis on defining the limits to growth and responsibilities in tourism. However, while there are urgent needs to incorporate sustainability into tourism, there is also a growing amount of frustration among scholars on the conceptual nature of sustainability and how tourism as a private-driven economic activity relates to the ideals of sustainable development. This has created an increasing need to understand and potentially reframe the concept. The purpose of this paper is to overview the conceptual dimensions of sustainable tourism and discuss some of the main sources of frustration. Based on this, it is concluded that while a conceptual plurality seems to be unavoidable, there is a need to re-frame i.e., rescale and decentralize tourism in policy frameworks and practices aiming towards sustainability.

  15. Depletion of tumor associated macrophages slows the growth of chemically-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Fritz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for lung cancer, and low dose aspirin intake reduces lung cancer risk. However, the roles that specific inflammatory cells and their products play in lung carcinogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated. In mice, alveolar macrophage numbers increase as lung tumors progress, and pulmonary macrophage programming changes within 2 weeks of carcinogen exposure. To examine how macrophages specifically affect lung tumor progression, they were depleted in mice bearing urethane-induced lung tumors using clodronate-encapsulated liposomes. Alveolar macrophage populations decreased to ≤ 50% of control levels after 4-6 weeks of liposomal clodronate treatment. Tumor burden decreased by 50% compared to vehicle treated mice, and tumor cell proliferation, as measured by Ki67 staining, was also attenuated. Pulmonary fluid levels of IGF-I, CXCL1, IL-6 and CCL2 diminished with clodronate liposome treatment. Tumor associated macrophages expressed markers of both M1 and M2 programming in vehicle and clodronate liposome treated mice. Mice lacking CCR2 (the receptor for macrophage chemotactic factor CCL2 had comparable numbers of alveolar macrophages and showed no difference in tumor growth rates when compared to similarly treated wild-type mice suggesting that while CCL2 may recruit macrophages to lung tumor microenvironments, redundant pathways can compensate when CCL2/CCR2 signaling is inactivated. Depletion of pulmonary macrophages rather than inhibition of their recruitment may be an advantageous strategy for attenuating lung cancer progression.

  16. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Akhtar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy.

  17. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Erin B; Steinberg, Howard; Breen, Matthew; Auerbach, Robert; Helfand, Stuart C

    2004-01-01

    Abstract We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL)-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy. PMID:15140399

  18. Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase Overexpression Reduces Tumor Growth in a Xenograph Medulloblastoma Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica R Cappellari

    Full Text Available Ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 (ecto-5'-NT participates in extracellular ATP catabolism by converting adenosine monophosphate (AMP into adenosine. This enzyme affects the progression and invasiveness of different tumors. Furthermore, the expression of ecto-5'-NT has also been suggested as a favorable prognostic marker, attributing to this enzyme contradictory functions in cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB is the most common brain tumor of the cerebellum and affects mainly children.The effects of ecto-5'-NT overexpression on human MB tumor growth were studied in an in vivo model. Balb/c immunodeficient (nude 6 to 14-week-old mice were used for dorsal subcutaneous xenograph tumor implant. Tumor development was evaluated by pathophysiological analysis. In addition, the expression patterns of adenosine receptors were verified.The human MB cell line D283, transfected with ecto-5'-NT (D283hCD73, revealed reduced tumor growth compared to the original cell line transfected with an empty vector. D283hCD73 generated tumors with a reduced proliferative index, lower vascularization, the presence of differentiated cells and increased active caspase-3 expression. Prominent A1 adenosine receptor expression rates were detected in MB cells overexpressing ecto-5'-NT.This work suggests that ecto-5'-NT promotes reduced tumor growth to reduce cell proliferation and vascularization, promote higher differentiation rates and initiate apoptosis, supposedly by accumulating adenosine, which then acts through A1 adenosine receptors. Therefore, ecto-5'-NT might be considered an important prognostic marker, being associated with good prognosis and used as a potential target for therapy.

  19. Inhibition of mammary tumor growth and metastases to bone and liver by dietary grape polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M; Martínez, Joel E; Wall, Kristin M; Cubano, Luis A; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2009-01-01

    The cancer preventive properties of grape products such as red wine have been attributed to polyphenols enriched in red wine. However, much of the studies on cancer preventive mechanisms of grape polyphenols have been conducted with individual compounds at concentrations too high to be achieved via dietary consumption. We recently reported that combined grape polyphenols at physiologically relevant concentrations are more effective than individual compounds at inhibition of ERalpha(-), ERbeta(+) MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and primary mammary tumor growth (Schlachterman et al., Transl Oncol 1:19-27, 2008). Herein, we show that combined grape polyphenols induce apoptosis and are more effective than individual resveratrol, quercetin, or catechin at inhibition of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cell migration in the highly metastatic ER (-) MDA-MB-435 cell line. The combined effect of dietary grape polyphenols (5 mg/kg each resveratrol, quercetin, and catechin) was tested on progression of mammary tumors in nude mice created from green fluorescent protein-tagged MDA-MB-435 bone metastatic variant. Fluorescence image analysis of primary tumor growth demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in tumor area by dietary grape polyphenols. Molecular analysis of excised tumors demonstrated that reduced mammary tumor growth may be due to upregulation of FOXO1 (forkhead box O1) and NFKBIA (IkappaBalpha), thus activating apoptosis and potentially inhibiting NfkappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) activity. Image analysis of distant organs for metastases demonstrated that grape polyphenols reduced metastasis especially to liver and bone. Overall, these results indicate that combined dietary grape polyphenols are effective at inhibition of mammary tumor growth and site-specific metastasis.

  20. Tumor growth increases neuroinflammation, fatigue and depressive-like behavior prior to alterations in muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norden, Diana M; Bicer, Sabahattin; Clark, Yvonne; Jing, Runfeng; Henry, Christopher J; Wold, Loren E; Reiser, Peter J; Godbout, Jonathan P; McCarthy, Donna O

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently suffer from fatigue, a complex syndrome associated with loss of muscle mass, weakness, and depressed mood. Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) can be present at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and persists for years after treatment. CRF negatively influences quality of life, limits functional independence, and is associated with decreased survival in patients with incurable disease. Currently there are no effective treatments to reduce CRF. The aim of this study was to use a mouse model of tumor growth and discriminate between two main components of fatigue: loss of muscle mass/function and altered mood/motivation. Here we show that tumor growth increased fatigue- and depressive-like behaviors, and reduced body and muscle mass. Decreased voluntary wheel running activity (VWRA) and increased depressive-like behavior in the forced swim and sucrose preference tests were evident in tumor-bearing mice within the first two weeks of tumor growth and preceded the loss of body and muscle mass. At three weeks, tumor-bearing mice had reduced grip strength but this was not associated with altered expression of myosin isoforms or impaired contractile properties of muscles. These increases in fatigue and depressive-like behaviors were paralleled by increased expression of IL-1β mRNA in the cortex and hippocampus. Minocycline administration reduced tumor-induced expression of IL-1β in the brain, reduced depressive-like behavior, and improved grip strength without altering muscle mass. Taken together, these results indicate that neuroinflammation and depressed mood, rather than muscle wasting, contribute to decreased voluntary activity and precede major changes in muscle contractile properties with tumor growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictive pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of tumor growth kinetics in xenograft models after administration of anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeoni, Monica; Magni, Paolo; Cammia, Cristiano; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Croci, Valter; Pesenti, Enrico; Germani, Massimiliano; Poggesi, Italo; Rocchetti, Maurizio

    2004-02-01

    The available mathematical models describing tumor growth and the effect of anticancer treatments on tumors in animals are of limited use within the drug industry. A simple and effective model would allow applying quantitative thinking to the preclinical development of oncology drugs. In this article, a minimal pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model is presented, based on a system of ordinary differential equations that link the dosing regimen of a compound to the tumor growth in animal models. The growth of tumors in nontreated animals is described by an exponential growth followed by a linear growth. In treated animals, the tumor growth rate is decreased by a factor proportional to both drug concentration and number of proliferating tumor cells. A transit compartmental system is used to model the process of cell death, which occurs at later times. The parameters of the pharmacodynamic model are related to the growth characteristics of the tumor, to the drug potency, and to the kinetics of the tumor cell death. Therefore, such parameters can be used for ranking compounds based on their potency and for evaluating potential differences in the tumor cell death process. The model was extensively tested on discovery candidates and known anticancer drugs. It fitted well the experimental data, providing reliable parameter estimates. On the basis of the parameters estimated in a first experiment, the model successfully predicted the response of tumors exposed to drugs given at different dose levels and/or schedules. It is, thus, possible to use the model prospectively, optimizing the design of new experiments.

  2. Parasitic chytrids sustain zooplankton growth during inedible algal bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasconi, Serena; Grami, Boutheina; Niquil, Nathalie; Jobard, Marlène; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the quantitative impact of parasitic chytrids on the planktonic food web of two contrasting freshwater lakes during different algal bloom situations. Carbon-based food web models were used to investigate the effects of chytrids during the spring diatom bloom in Lake Pavin (oligo-mesotrophic) and the autumn cyanobacteria bloom in Lake Aydat (eutrophic). Linear inverse modeling was employed to estimate undetermined flows in both lakes. The Monte Carlo Markov chain linear inverse modeling procedure provided estimates of the ranges of model-derived fluxes. Model results confirm recent theories on the impact of parasites on food web function through grazers and recyclers. During blooms of "inedible" algae (unexploited by planktonic herbivores), the epidemic growth of chytrids channeled 19-20% of the primary production in both lakes through the production of grazer exploitable zoospores. The parasitic throughput represented 50% and 57% of the zooplankton diet, respectively, in the oligo-mesotrophic and in the eutrophic lakes. Parasites also affected ecological network properties such as longer carbon path lengths and loop strength, and contributed to increase the stability of the aquatic food web, notably in the oligo-mesotrophic Lake Pavin.

  3. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Chiaho, E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Chemaitilly, Wassim [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatric Medicine, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  4. A Peptide Antagonist of the ErbB1 Receptor Inhibits Receptor Activation, Tumor Cell Growth and Migration In Vitro and Xenograft Tumor Growth In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruodan; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Soroka, Vladislav; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbBs) plays essential roles in tumorigenesis and cancer disease progression, and therefore has become an attractive target for structure-based drug design. ErbB receptors are activated by ligand-induced homo- and heterodimerization. Structural studies have revealed that ErbB receptor dimers are stabilized by receptor–receptor interactions, primarily mediated by a region in the second extracellular domain, termed the “dimerization arm”. The present study is the first biological characterization of a peptide, termed Inherbin3, which constitutes part of the dimerization arm of ErbB3. Inherbin3 binds to the extracellular domains of all four ErbB receptors, with the lowest peptide binding affinity for ErbB4. Inherbin3 functions as an antagonist of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-ErbB1 signaling. We show that Inherbin3 inhibits EGF-induced ErbB1 phosphorylation, cell growth, and migration in two human tumor cell lines, A549 and HN5, expressing moderate and high ErbB1 levels, respectively. Furthermore, we show that Inherbin3 inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces apoptosis in a tumor xenograft model employing the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549. The Inherbin3 peptide may be a useful tool for investigating the mechanisms of ErbB receptor homo- and heterodimerization. Moreover, the here described biological effects of Inherbin3 suggest that peptide-based targeting of ErbB receptor dimerization is a promising anti-cancer therapeutic strategy. PMID:20364069

  5. A Peptide Antagonist of the ErbB1 Receptor Inhibits Receptor Activation, Tumor Cell Growth and Migration In Vitro and Xenograft Tumor Growth In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruodan Xu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbBs plays essential roles in tumorigenesis and cancer disease progression, and therefore has become an attractive target for structure-based drug design. ErbB receptors are activated by ligand-induced homo- and heterodimerization. Structural studies have revealed that ErbB receptor dimers are stabilized by receptor–receptor interactions, primarily mediated by a region in the second extracellular domain, termed the “dimerization arm”. The present study is the first biological characterization of a peptide, termed Inherbin3, which constitutes part of the dimerization arm of ErbB3. Inherbin3 binds to the extracellular domains of all four ErbB receptors, with the lowest peptide binding affinity for ErbB4. Inherbin3 functions as an antagonist of epidermal growth factor (EGF-ErbB1 signaling. We show that Inherbin3 inhibits EGF-induced ErbB1 phosphorylation, cell growth, and migration in two human tumor cell lines, A549 and HN5, expressing moderate and high ErbB1 levels, respectively. Furthermore, we show that Inherbin3 inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces apoptosis in a tumor xenograft model employing the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549. The Inherbin3 peptide may be a useful tool for investigating the mechanisms of ErbB receptor homo- and heterodimerization. Moreover, the here described biological effects of Inherbin3 suggest that peptide-based targeting of ErbB receptor dimerization is a promising anti-cancer therapeutic strategy.

  6. Invasion and Evasion: Investigations on Early Glioblastoma Growth Reveal Two Novel Mechanisms of Brain Tumor Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Gregory Joseph

    2014-01-01

    As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they associate with various microanatomic structures such as blood vessels and myelinated white matter tracts. How distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remains poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular invasion affects glioma growth patterning and response to anti-angiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to common...

  7. A ribonuclease inhibitor expresses anti-angiogenic properties and leads to reduced tumor growth in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Polakowski, I. J.; Lewis, M K; Muthukkaruppan, V. R.; Erdman, B.; Kubai, L.; Auerbach, R

    1993-01-01

    Our experiments were designed to determine whether recombinant ribonuclease inhibitor (RNasin) could inhibit angiogenesis and reduce tumor growth in adult mice. We used the Fajardo disc angiogenesis assay as the primary means of measuring new blood vessel growth. This assay measures the penetration of cells into a polyvinyl alcohol sponge with a central core of ELVAX-coated sponge containing test substances. Cell penetration was reduced to 29.3% of control (phosphate-buffered saline; heat-ina...

  8. Ganglioside synthase knockout in oncogene-transformed fibroblasts depletes gangliosides and impairs tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihui; Yan, Su; Wondimu, Assefa; Bob, Daniel; Weiss, Michael; Sliwinski, Konrad; Villar, Joaquín; Notario, Vicente; Sutherland, Margaret; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M.; Ladisch, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Biologically active membrane gangliosides, expressed and released by many human tumors, are hypothesized to significantly impact tumor progression. Lack of a model of complete and specific tumor ganglioside depletion in vivo, however, has hampered elucidation of their role. Here we report the creation of a novel, stable, genetically induced tumor cell system resulting in specific and complete blockade of ganglioside synthesis. Wild type (WT) and GM3 synthase/GM2 synthase double knockout (DKO) murine embryonic fibroblasts were transformed using amphotropic retrovirus-transduced oncogenes (pBABE-c-MycT58A+H-RasG12V). The transformed cells, WTt and DKOt respectively, evidenced comparable integrated copy numbers and oncogene expression. Ganglioside synthesis was completely blocked in the DKOt cells, importantly without triggering an alternate pathway of ganglioside synthesis. Ganglioside depletion (to oncogene expression and growth kinetics, DKOt cells evidenced significantly impaired tumor growth in syngeneic immunocompetent mice, underscoring the pivotal role of tumor cell gangliosides and providing an ideal system for probing their mechanisms of action in vivo. PMID:20305696

  9. Study on Growth Inhibition of Implanted Tumor in Nude Mice by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide Targeting Telomerase RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao YU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective Many studies have proven that telomerase plays an important role during the occurrence and development of lung cancer, which has been an important target in gene therapy. The aim of this study is to explore the inhibitory effect of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASODN targeting human telomerase RNA on implanted tumor growth in nude mice. Mothods Implanted tumor models were Constructed in nude mice using human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Eighteen Balb/C nude mice with implanted tumors were divided into three groups randomly: antisense oligodeoxynucleotide group (group ASODN, sense oligodeoxynucleotide group (group SODN, normal saline group (group NS, with 6 mice respectively. ASODs or SODNs mixed with Lipofectamine-2000 was injected into tumor directly every 24 h for fourteen days. Results The inhibitory rates of tumor volume in Group ASODN and Group SODN were 43.94% and 6.91%, respectively. There was significant difference between the two groups (t=6.17, P<0.001. All the animals tolerated the drugs well and there was no nausea, vomiting and subcutaneous hemorrhage to occur during the therapy. The weight of the animals increased slightly at the end of experiment. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that intratumoral injection of human telomerase ribonucleic acid (hTR ASOND could effectively inhibit the growth of implanted tumor in nude mice.

  10. Disruption of lysosome function promotes tumor growth and metastasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Congwu; Zhu, Huanhu; Han, Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Xu, Tian

    2010-07-09

    Lysosome function is essential to many physiological processes. It has been suggested that deregulation of lysosome function could contribute to cancer. Through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we have discovered that mutations disrupting lysosomal degradation pathway components contribute to tumor development and progression. Loss-of-function mutations in the Class C vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) gene, deep orange (dor), dramatically promote tumor overgrowth and invasion of the Ras(V12) cells. Knocking down either of the two other components of the Class C VPS complex, carnation (car) and vps16A, also renders Ras(V12) cells capable for uncontrolled growth and metastatic behavior. Finally, chemical disruption of the lysosomal function by feeding animals with antimalarial drugs, chloroquine or monensin, leads to malignant tumor growth of the Ras(V12) cells. Taken together, our data provide evidence for a causative role of lysosome dysfunction in tumor growth and invasion and indicate that members of the Class C VPS complex behave as tumor suppressors.

  11. Exploring Drug Dosing Regimens In Vitro Using Real-Time 3D Spheroid Tumor Growth Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal-Nag, Madhu; McGee, Lauren; Titus, Steven A; Brimacombe, Kyle; Michael, Sam; Sittampalam, Gurusingham; Ferrer, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer cell proliferation assays for cancer drug discovery have made the implementation of large-scale screens feasible but only seem to reflect a simplified view that oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes are the genetic drivers of cancer cell proliferation. However, there is now increased evidence that the cellular and physiological context in which these oncogenic events occur play a key role in how they drive tumor growth in vivo and, therefore, in how tumors respond to drug treatments. In vitro 3D spheroid tumor models are being developed to better mimic the physiology of tumors in vivo, in an attempt to improve the predictability and efficiency of drug discovery for the treatment of cancer. Here we describe the establishment of a real-time 3D spheroid growth, 384-well screening assay. The cells used in this study constitutively expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enabled the real-time monitoring of spheroid formation and the effect of chemotherapeutic agents on spheroid size at different time points of sphere growth and drug treatment. This real-time 3D spheroid assay platform represents a first step toward the replication in vitro of drug dosing regimens being investigated in vivo. We hope that further development of this assay platform will allow the investigation of drug dosing regimens, efficacy, and resistance before preclinical and clinical studies.

  12. A cellular automata model for avascular solid tumor growth under the effect of therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, E. A.; Santos, L. B. L.; Pinho, S. T. R.

    2009-04-01

    Tumor growth has long been a target of investigation within the context of mathematical and computer modeling. The objective of this study is to propose and analyze a two-dimensional stochastic cellular automata model to describe avascular solid tumor growth, taking into account both the competition between cancer cells and normal cells for nutrients and/or space and a time-dependent proliferation of cancer cells. Gompertzian growth, characteristic of some tumors, is described and some of the features of the time-spatial pattern of solid tumors, such as compact morphology with irregular borders, are captured. The parameter space is studied in order to analyze the occurrence of necrosis and the response to therapy. Our findings suggest that transitions exist between necrotic and non-necrotic phases (no-therapy cases), and between the states of cure and non-cure (therapy cases). To analyze cure, the control and order parameters are, respectively, the highest probability of cancer cell proliferation and the probability of the therapeutic effect on cancer cells. With respect to patterns, it is possible to observe the inner necrotic core and the effect of the therapy destroying the tumor from its outer borders inwards.

  13. Depletion of Ascorbic Acid Restricts Angiogenesis and Retards Tumor Growth in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucheta Telang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis requires the deposition of type IV collagen by endothelial cells into the basement membrane of new blood vessels. Stabilization of type IV collagen triple helix depends on the hydroxylation of proline, which is catalyzed by the iron-containing enzyme prolyl hydroxylase. This enzyme, in turn, requires ascorbic acid to maintain the enzyme-bound iron in its reduced state. We hypothesized that dietary ascorbic acid might be required for tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, tumor growth. Here, we show that, not surprisingly, ascorbic acid is necessary for the synthesis of collagen type IV by human endothelial cells and for their effective migration and tube formation on a basement membrane matrix. Furthermore, ascorbic acid depletion in mice incapable of synthesizing ascorbic acid (Gulo-/- dramatically restricts the in vivo growth of implanted Lewis lung carcinoma tumors. Histopathological analyses of these tumors reveal poorly formed blood vessels, extensive hemorrhagic foci, and decreased collagen and von Willebrand factor expression. Our data indicate that ascorbic acid plays an essential role in tumor angiogenesis and growth, and that restriction of ascorbic acid or pharmacological inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase may prove to be novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment of cancer.

  14. SUSTAINABLE GROWTH OF THE COMMERCIAL AVIATION INDUSTRY IN MALAYSIA USING A SYSTEM DYNAMICS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. TAN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact of the commercial aviation industry for an emerging economy like Malaysia is under-studied. The focus on the subject has thus far concentrated either on non geographical performance of the aviation industry or technical performance of aircrafts and that leaves the sustainability of the commercial aviation industry for an economy, or more specifically, an emerging economy least understood. Hence, this paper aims to investigate the sustainability of the growth of the commercial aviation industry in Malaysia and its impact upon the environment using a system dynamics approach. VENSIM is employed to model the commercial aviation industry in Malaysia as a dynamic system to evaluate the CO2 emitted from each component within the industry in order to forecast its overall CO2 emission. Results from the analysis show that sustainable growth can be affected by adopting short and long term strategies identified in this study.

  15. In Tourism Industry We Talk About Sustainable Development, But We Evaluate Profits and Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirk Tanja

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is one of the biggest economic sectors, it has a significant impact on the environment. At the same time, the long-term development of tourism also greatly depends on the environment it affects. Experts are unanimous that it is necessary for the longterm existence and development of tourism that it becomes sustainable. Nevertheless, in tourism businesses, sustainable development strategies are not sufficiently present and put into practice. The author of the article presents the argument as a possible reason for this: the management of tourism enterprises as well as management of all the companies is focused on doing business successfully; and because the performance of management is assessed in terms of growth and security of its operations, and not in relation to the measures taken in the field of sustainable development, management gives priority to ensuring relatively short-term growth and security of operations.

  16. Characterizing Stand Structure and Growth of Natural Beech Forests for the Development of Sustainable Forest Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghalandarayeshi, Shaaban

    forests in northern Iran lack such scientific foundation. The objective of the present study is to assist in this process by characterizing growth and stand structure of oriental beech for a range of growing conditions in northern Iran and to provide useful insight for application in sustainable...

  17. Unmasking a Growth-promoting Effect of the Adrenocorticotropic Hormone in Y1 Mouse Adrenocortical Tumor Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Claudimara F. P. Lotfi; Zana Todorovic; Hugo A. Armelin; Bernard P. Schimmer

    1997-01-01

    The adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) inhibits the growth of Y1 mouse adrenocortical tumor cells as well as normal adrenocortical cells in culture but stimulates adrenocortical cell growth in vivo...

  18. Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor C increases growth and alters the metastatic pattern of orthotopic PC-3 prostate tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Väänänen H Kalervo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant sites but the roles of lymphatic and hematogenous pathways in metastasis are not fully understood. Methods We studied the roles of VEGF-C and VEGFR3 in prostate cancer metastasis by blocking VEGFR3 using intravenous adenovirus-delivered VEGFR3-Ig fusion protein (VEGFR3-Ig and by ectopic expression of VEGF-C in PC-3 prostate tumors in nude mice. Results VEGFR3-Ig decreased the density of lymphatic capillaries in orthotopic PC-3 tumors (p p p p Conclusion The data suggest that even though VEGF-C/VEGFR3 pathway is primarily required for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, an increased level of VEGF-C can also stimulate angiogenesis, which is associated with growth of orthotopic prostate tumors and a switch from a primary pattern of lymph node metastasis to an increased proportion of metastases at distant sites.

  19. Advances in neuroimaging techniques for the evaluation of tumor growth, vascular permeability, and angiogenesis in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Sorensen, A Gregory; Jain, Rakesh K; Batchelor, Tracy T

    2008-12-01

    This review will summarize new neuroimaging techniques, particularly MRI and PET imaging, that can be used to assess brain tumor growth and angiogenesis. Glioma tumor vasculature is abnormal, and advances in MRI now permit visualization of the hemodynamic properties of gliomas including cerebral blood volume and blood flow, vascular permeability, and blood vessel diameter. New radiolabeled PET tracers have allowed more specific interrogation of glioma physiology such as hypoxia assessment or tumor proliferation rate. These two techniques are complementary and will likely yield important information on tumor response to therapy, particularly in the setting of antiangiogenic agents, which confound the interpretation of standard contrast-enhanced MRI scans. These techniques may allow development of patient-specific therapy to improve outcome in patients with gliomas.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Pancreatic Tumor Growth by Inducing Alternative Polarization of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esha Mathew

    2016-03-01

    Significance: Targeting the stroma is emerging as a new paradigm in pancreatic cancer; however, efforts to that effect are hampered by our limited understanding of the nature and function of stromal components. Here, we uncover previously unappreciated heterogeneity within the stroma and identify interactions among stromal components that promote tumor growth and could be targeted therapeutically.

  1. Pravastatin inhibits tumor growth through elevating the levels of apolipoprotein A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yeh

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated that pravastatin elevated ApoA1, an HDL major constituent with anti-inflammatory characteristics, which displayed strong adversary associations with tumor developments and growth. Increasing the amounts of ApoA1 by pravastatin coupled with DOX may improve the therapeutic efficacy for cancer treatment.

  2. A stable scheme for a nonlinear, multiphase tumor growth model with an elastic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Wise, Steven M; Shenoy, Vivek B; Lowengrub, John S

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the 3D multispecies diffuse-interface model of the tumor growth, which was derived in Wise et al. (Three-dimensional multispecies nonlinear tumor growth-I: model and numerical method, J. Theor. Biol. 253 (2008) 524-543), and incorporate the effect of a stiff membrane to model tumor growth in a confined microenvironment. We then develop accurate and efficient numerical methods to solve the model. When the membrane is endowed with a surface energy, the model is variational, and the numerical scheme, which involves adaptive mesh refinement and a nonlinear multigrid finite difference method, is demonstrably shown to be energy stable. Namely, in the absence of cell proliferation and death, the discrete energy is a nonincreasing function of time for any time and space steps. When a simplified model of membrane elastic energy is used, the resulting model is derived analogously to the surface energy case. However, the elastic energy model is actually nonvariational because certain coupling terms are neglected. Nevertheless, a very stable numerical scheme is developed following the strategy used in the surface energy case. 2D and 3D simulations are performed that demonstrate the accuracy of the algorithm and illustrate the shape instabilities and nonlinear effects of membrane elastic forces that may resist or enhance growth of the tumor. Compared with the standard Crank-Nicholson method, the time step can be up to 25 times larger using the new approach. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Tumor growth and hypoxia: it's all about location, location and location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blouw, B.

    2007-01-01

    In response to hypoxia during tumor growth, a number of genetic changes are induced that allow the cancer cells to survive. These changes are orchestrated by the Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs), respectively HIF-1alpha, HIF-2alpha and HIF-3alpha. HIF-1alpha is the main regulator of this response

  4. Fungi & Health: can polysaccharides from the fungus inonotus obliquus (CHAGA) inhibit tumor growth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wold, C. W.; Corthay, A.; Kjeldsen, Christian

    cancer. The last few decades, studies have found Chaga to contain biologically active substances such as polysaccharides, triterpenoids, polyphenols and melanin. In vivo effects such as tumor growth inhibition have been observed in mice receiving various Chaga extracts. The main hypothesis behind...

  5. Plasticity of tumor cell invasion: governance by growth factors and cytokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odenthal, J.; Takes, R.P.; Friedl, P.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell migration, the basis for metastatic dissemination, is an adaptive process which depends upon coordinated cell interaction with the environment, influencing cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal dynamics and extracellular matrix remodeling. Growth factors and cytokines, released

  6. Adenosine A2B receptor blockade slows growth of bladder and breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Li, Yuesheng; Theodorescu, Dan; Strieter, Robert M; Linden, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of high levels of adenosine in tumors activates A(2A) and A(2B) receptors on immune cells and inhibits their ability to suppress tumor growth. Deletion of adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)ARs) has been reported to activate antitumor T cells, stimulate dendritic cell (DC) function, and inhibit angiogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of intermittent intratumor injection of a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, aminophylline (AMO; theophylline ethylenediamine) and, for the first time to our knowledge, a selective A(2B)AR antagonist, ATL801. AMO and ATL801 slowed the growth of MB49 bladder and 4T1 breast tumors in syngeneic mice and reduced by 85% metastasizes of breast cancer cells from mammary fat to lung. Based on experiments with A(2A)AR(-/-) or adenosine A(2B) receptor(-/-) mice, the effect of AMO injection was unexpectedly attributed to A(2B)AR and not to A(2A)AR blockade. AMO and ATL801 significantly increased tumor levels of IFN-γ and the IFN-inducible chemokine CXCL10, which is a ligand for CXCR3. This was associated with an increase in activated tumor-infiltrating CXCR3(+) T cells and a decrease in endothelial cell precursors within tumors. Tumor growth inhibition by AMO or ATL801 was eliminated in CXCR3(-/-) mice and RAG1(-/-) mice that lack mature T cells. In RAG1(-/-) mice, A(2B)AR deletion enhanced CD86 expression on CD11b(-) DCs. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that CXCR3 and A(2B)AR expression on bone marrow cells is required for the antitumor effects of AMO. The data suggest that blockade of A(2B)ARs enhances DC activation and CXCR3-dependent antitumor responses.

  7. Occurrence of epidermal growth factor receptors in benign and malignant ovarian tumors and normal ovarian tissues: an immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Henzen-Logmans; M.E.L. van der Burg (Maria); J.A. Foekens (John); P.M.J.J. Berns (Els); R. Brussée (R.); J.H. Fieret (J.); J.G.M. Klijn (Jan); D. Chadha; C.J. Rodenburg (C.)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractEpidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) was studied with monoclonal antibody 2E9 on 50 ovarian tumors of various histological types and 10 non-tumorous ovarian tissues by immunohistochemistry. Enhanced expression was observed in 26/50 (52%) of the tumors. Only 25 out of 46 epithelial

  8. Curcumin targets the AKT-mTOR pathway for uterine leiomyosarcoma tumor growth suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tze Fang; Takeda, Takashi; Li, Bin; Tsuiji, Kenji; Kondo, Akiko; Tadakawa, Mari; Nagase, Satoru; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2014-04-01

    Uterine leiomyosarcomas generally do not respond well to standard chemotherapy. We previously demonstrated that curcumin, the active ingredient derived from the herb Curcuma longa, inhibits uterine leiomyosarcoma cells in vitro via the inhibition of the AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. As a preclinical investigation, we performed an in vivo study using female nude mice to confirm the therapeutic potential of curcumin against uterine leiomyosarcoma. Human leiomyosarcoma cells, SK-UT-1, were inoculated in female nude mice to establish subcutaneous tumors. Either vehicle control or 250 mg/kg curcumin was administered intraperitoneally every day for 14 consecutive days, and the mice were then killed. The tumors were measured every 2-3 days. The tumors were processed for immunohistochemical analyses to detect total AKT, phosphorylated AKT, total mTOR, phosphorylated mTOR, and phosphorylated S6. To detect apoptosis, the tumors were stained for cleaved PARP and TUNEL. Ki-67 immunohistochemistry was performed to determine cell viability of the tumors. Compared with the control, curcumin reduced uterine leiomyosarcoma tumor volume and mass significantly with a concordant decrease in mTOR and S6 phosphorylation. However, AKT phosphorylation was not significantly altered. Cleaved PARP and TUNEL staining increased significantly with curcumin administration, indicating the induction of apoptosis. There was no difference in Ki-67 staining between the two groups. Curcumin inhibited uterine leiomyosarcoma tumor growth in vivo by targeting the AKT-mTOR pathway for inhibition.

  9. Predicting the probability of abnormal stimulated growth hormone response in children after radiotherapy for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chiaho; Wu, Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C; Merchant, Thomas E

    2012-11-15

    To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n=72), low-grade glioma (n=28) or craniopharyngioma (n=6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test≥7 ng/mL. Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (pcapacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sales Forecasting in the Context of Seasonal Activities and Company Sustainable Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Stancu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the use of the “time series model” to forecast the quarterly and yearly sales for a company with business seasonality. These sales forecasts will represent the fundamental basis for estimating the external financing, using the percentage to sales method. Sales growth rates are afterwards analysed in the context of ensuring a sustainable and self-financed growth. We focus on establishing the forecasted financial structure of the external financial requirements both in the context of using the reinvested profit complemented with credit, maintaining the debt rate constant, and in the context of total internal funding of the company economic growth, from reinvested profit.

  11. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT-PET Imaging for Monitoring Everolimus Effect on Tumor-Growth in Neuroendocrine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Munk Jensen, Mette; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen

    2014-01-01

    .027). CONCLUSION: Everolimus was effective in vitro and in vivo in human xenografts lung carcinoid NETs and especially early 18F-FLT uptake predicted subsequent tumor growth. We suggest that 18F-FLT PET can be used for tailoring therapy for neuroendocrine tumor patients through early identification of responders...

  12. Ecological network analysis for economic systems: growth and development and implications for sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiali; Ulanowicz, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of growth and development is an important issue in economics, because these phenomena are closely related to sustainability. We address growth and development from a network perspective in which economic systems are represented as flow networks and analyzed using ecological network analysis (ENA). The Beijing economic system is used as a case study and 11 input-output (I-O) tables for 1985-2010 are converted into currency networks. ENA is used to calculate system-level indices to quantify the growth and development of Beijing. The contributions of each direct flow toward growth and development in 2010 are calculated and their implications for sustainable development are discussed. The results show that during 1985-2010, growth was the main attribute of the Beijing economic system. Although the system grew exponentially, its development fluctuated within only a small range. The results suggest that system ascendency should be increased in order to favor more sustainable development. Ascendency can be augmented in two ways: (1) strengthen those pathways with positive contributions to increasing ascendency and (2) weaken those with negative effects.

  13. Taguchi method for partial differential equations with application in tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, M; Turnea, M; Rotariu, M; Arotăriţei, D; Popescu, Marilena

    2014-01-01

    The growth of tumors is a highly complex process. To describe this process, mathematical models are needed. A variety of partial differential mathematical models for tumor growth have been developed and studied. Most of those models are based on the reaction-diffusion equations and mass conservation law. A variety of modeling strategies have been developed, each focusing on tumor growth. Systems of time-dependent partial differential equations occur in many branches of applied mathematics. The vast majority of mathematical models in tumor growth are formulated in terms of partial differential equations. We propose a mathematical model for the interactions between these three cancer cell populations. The Taguchi methods are widely used by quality engineering scientists to compare the effects of multiple variables, together with their interactions, with a simple and manageable experimental design. In Taguchi's design of experiments, variation is more interesting to study than the average. First, Taguchi methods are utilized to search for the significant factors and the optimal level combination of parameters. Except the three parameters levels, other factors levels other factors levels would not be considered. Second, cutting parameters namely, cutting speed, depth of cut, and feed rate are designed using the Taguchi method. Finally, the adequacy of the developed mathematical model is proved by ANOVA. According to the results of ANOVA, since the percentage contribution of the combined error is as small. Many mathematical models can be quantitatively characterized by partial differential equations. The use of MATLAB and Taguchi method in this article illustrates the important role of informatics in research in mathematical modeling. The study of tumor growth cells is an exciting and important topic in cancer research and will profit considerably from theoretical input. Interpret these results to be a permanent collaboration between math's and medical oncologists.

  14. Puberty and Plexiform Neurofibroma Tumor Growth in Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagalakis, Urania; Lodish, Maya; Dombi, Eva; Sinaii, Ninet; Sabo, Jessica; Baldwin, Andrea; Steinberg, Seth M.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Widemann, Brigitte C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between pubertal progression and change in PN burden over time in pediatric and young adult patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and plexiform neurofibromas (PN). Study design Analyses accounted for sex, age, race, and chemotherapy. Forty-one patients with NF1 (15 female, 26 male) were studied at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Tanner stage, testosterone, progesterone, estradiol, insulin-like growth factor −1, luteinizing hormone, and follicle stimulating hormone were assessed. Tumor volume was measured using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and lesion detection software developed at NIH. Patients were divided into two groups based upon whether they were actively progressing through puberty (n=16) or peri pubertal (n=25), and were followed for an average of 20 months. Tumor growth rates in the puberty and peri pubertal group were analyzed for a subset of patients. Results There was no statistically significant difference in tumor burden change over time (cc/kg/month) between the pubertal and peri pubertal group (−0.16 ± 0.34 vs. 0.03 ± 1.8, p=0.31), and in the PN growth rates pre and during puberty (p=0.90). Change in tumor volume/patient weight/time did not correlate with testosterone change/time in males or estradiol change/time in females. Conclusion These findings support that hormonal changes of puberty do not accelerate PN growth. Additional long-term follow up of patients is necessary to further characterize the interaction between puberty and tumor growth. PMID:24321536

  15. Prostate-Specific Antigen Modulates the Expression of Genes Involved in Prostate Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bindukumar

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is a serine protease that is widely used as a surrogate marker in the early diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. The physiological relevance of tissue PSA levels and their role in prostate tumor growth and metastasis are not known. Free-PSA (f-PSA was purified to homogeneity from human seminal plasma by column chromatography, eliminating hk2 and all known PSA complexes and retaining its protease activity. Confluent monolayers of prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3M and LNCaP, were treated with f-PSA in a series of in vitro experiments to determine the changes in expression of various genes that are known to regulate tumor growth and metastasis. Gene array, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA results show significant changes in the expression of various cancer-related genes in PC-3M and LNCaP cells treated with f-PSA. In a gene array analysis of PC-3M cells treated with 10 4tM f-PSA, 136 genes were upregulated and 137 genes were downregulated. In LNCaP cells treated with an identical concentration of f-PSA, a total of 793 genes was regulated. QPCR analysis reveals that the genes for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA, VEGF, Pim-1 oncogene, known to promote tumor growth, were significantly downregulated, whereas IFN-γ, known to be a tumor-suppressor gene, was significantly upregulated in f-PSA-treated PC-3M cells. The effect of f-PSA on VEGF and IFN-γ gene expression and on protein release in PC-3M cells was distinctly dose-dependent. In vivo studies showed a significant reduction (P = .03 in tumor load when fPSA was administered in the tumor vicinity of PC-3M tumor-bearing BALB/c nude mice. Our data support the hypothesis that f-PSA plays a significant role in prostate tumor growth by regulating various proangiogenic and antiangiogenic growth factors.

  16. A stochastic mathematical model of avascular tumor growth patterns and its treatment by means of noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Moslemi, Dariush

    2017-01-01

    Due to the rate increase in cancer incidence, many researchers in different fields have been conducting studies on cancer-related phenomena. Most studies are conducted to focus on cellular and molecular aspects of cancerous diseases and treatment strategies. Physicists have been using mathematical modeling and simulation to explain the growth pattern of tumors. Although most published studies in this area still have not gained the needed maturity for "treating cancer", research has helped with the statistical laws of growth, predation and proliferation of cancer cells. In this review, a brief explanation of mathematical models for tumor growth is presented, followed by a discussion on treatment simulations, introducing white noise as one of the clinical remedies in the original model.

  17. Investigation of HT1080 tumor growth dynamics and ECM invasion in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogurtcu, Osman; Jimenez Valencia, Angela; Lee, Meng-Horng; Sun, Sean; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-03-01

    Tumors are complex arrangements of tissues made up of several components, including dense masses of cancer cells and re-organized extracellular matrix (ECM). Recent studies have revealed the crucial role that extracellular matrix components have on single cancer cell behavior, but how the interaction of ECM components affects the growth dynamics of an entire tumor is not fully understood. Here, we use human derived fibrosarcoma cell (HT1080) aggregates in combination with live cell imaging, cryo-stat sectioning, immunostaining, and confocal imaging to study changes in cell aggregate size, proliferation, and spatial distribution within 3 dimensional (3D) matrices. We compare our experimental observations with a coupled partial differential equations based mathematical model to predict cell aggregate growth and cell density distribution and determine how cell interactions play a significant role in this dynamic growth. Using this model, we investigate the distinct contributions from cell migration, proliferation, cell-matrix interactions, and matrix remodeling to the aggregate dynamics.

  18. Inhibition of Colonic Tumor Growth by the Selective SGK Inhibitor EMD638683

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda T. Towhid

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The serum and glucocorticoid inducible kinase SGK1, which was originally cloned from mammary tumor cells, is highly expressed in some but not all tumors. SGK1 confers survival to several tumor cells. Along those lines, the number of colonic tumors following chemical carcinogenesis was decreased in SGK1 knockout mice. Recently, a highly selective SGK inhibitor (EMD638683 has been developed. The present study explored whether EMD638683 affects survival of colon carcinoma cells in vitro and impacts on development of colonic tumors in vivo. Methods: Colon carcinoma (Caco-2 cells were exposed to EMD638683 with or without exposure to radiation (3 Gray and cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine exposure from annexin V binding, mitochondrial potential from JC-9 fluorescence, caspase 3 activity from CaspGlow Fluorescein staining, DNA degradation from propidium iodide staining as well as late apoptosis from annexin-V FITC and propidium iodide double staining. In vivo tumor growth was determined in wild type mice subjected to chemical carcinogenesis (intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg 1,2-dimethylhydrazine followed by three cycles of 30 g/L synthetic dextran sulfate sodium in drinking water for 7 days. Results: EMD638683 treatment significantly augmented the radiation-induced decrease of forward scatter, increase of phosphatidylserine exposure, decrease of mitochondrial potential, increase of caspase 3 activity, increase of DNA fragmentation and increase of late apoptosis. The in vivo development of tumors following chemical carcinogenesis was significantly blunted by treatment with EMD638683. Conclusions: EMD638683 promotes radiation-induced suicidal death of colon tumor cells in vitro and decreases the number of colonic tumors following chemical carcinogenesis in vivo.

  19. Tragedy of the Commons, Business Growth and the Fundamental Sustainability Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Garrity

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the major issues involved in Hardin’s [1] tragedy of the commons, written over 44 years ago, and examines whether these issues are still relevant today. We assert that this model still provides important insight to aid in the solution to our global problems. In particular, we maintain that the underlying issues of growth against limits and bounded rationality are still not adequately recognized and addressed; this underlies many of the reasons for our unsustainable world. Examples from fisheries management are used to examine potential solutions and reveal weaknesses in current approaches. We show how our current, restricted mental models promote social injustice and blind us to developing sustainable solutions. Both the neo-liberal economic view of business that directly seeks growth and the new sustainable development view that indirectly supports growth are leading our global economy in the wrong direction and away from prosperity and sustainability. Current thinking has not realized Hardin’s message that sustainability is of the class of no technology solution problems. We conclude with recommendations to radically advance a new world view and business paradigm.

  20. Avoiding the Limits to Growth: Gross National Happiness in Bhutan as a Model for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy S. Brooks

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In their 30-year update to Limits to Growth, Meadows et al. call for a vision of sustainable development that includes systemic change brought on by new perspectives on the purpose of development, new ways of measuring progress, and changes in social norms. Here, I discuss Meadows et al.’s work in the context of the literature on sustainable development and well-being as well as the development trajectory of Bhutan. I suggest that Bhutan’s development approach mirrors Meadows et al.’s recommendations and provides one model for sustainable development. The ideal of maximizing Gross National Happiness (GNH exemplifies Bhutan’s commitment to holistic development and dovetails with arguments about the shortcomings of approaches that emphasize economic growth. I provide examples of how GNH has been put into practice, describe how happiness is being measured, and discuss the emergence of social norms and a shared Bhutanese identity that may contribute to sustainable development. Bhutan’s development success suggests that an alternative to growth-centric development is viable. However, while Bhutan’s standard of living has increased, the country faces challenges, the most important of which may be their ability to manage rising consumption levels. Importantly, other nations have begun measuring well-being and considering similar development approaches.

  1. Impact of circulating cholesterol levels on growth and intratumoral androgen concentration of prostate tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second most common cancer in men. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT leads to tumor involution and reduction of tumor burden. However, tumors eventually reemerge that have overcome the absence of gonadal androgens, termed castration resistant PCa (CRPC. Theories underlying the development of CRPC include androgen receptor (AR mutation allowing for promiscuous activation by non-androgens, AR amplification and overexpression leading to hypersensitivity to low androgen levels, and/or tumoral uptake and conversion of adrenally derived androgens. More recently it has been proposed that prostate tumor cells synthesize their own androgens through de novo steroidogenesis, which involves the step-wise synthesis of androgens from cholesterol. Using the in vivo LNCaP PCa xenograft model, previous data from our group demonstrated that a hypercholesterolemia diet potentiates prostatic tumor growth via induction of angiogenesis. Using this same model we now demonstrate that circulating cholesterol levels are significantly associated with tumor size (R = 0.3957, p = 0.0049 and intratumoral levels of testosterone (R = 0.41, p = 0.0023 in LNCaP tumors grown in hormonally intact mice. We demonstrate tumoral expression of cholesterol uptake genes as well as the spectrum of steroidogenic enzymes necessary for androgen biosynthesis from cholesterol. Moreover, we show that circulating cholesterol levels are directly correlated with tumoral expression of CYP17A, the critical enzyme required for de novo synthesis of androgens from cholesterol (R = 0.4073, p = 0.025 Since hypercholesterolemia does not raise circulating androgen levels and the adrenal gland of the mouse synthesizes minimal androgens, this study provides evidence that hypercholesterolemia increases intratumoral de novo steroidogenesis. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that cholesterol-fueled intratumoral androgen synthesis may accelerate the

  2. Ischemia in tumors induces early and sustained phosphorylation changes in stress kinase pathways but does not affect global protein levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertins, Philipp; Yang, Feng; Liu, Tao; Mani, DR; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gillette, Michael; Clauser, Karl; Qiao, Jana; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Davies, Sherri; Ruggles, Kelly; Fenyo, David; Kitchens, R. T.; Li, Shunqiang; Olvera, Narcisco; Dao, Fanny; Rodriguez, Henry; Chan, Daniel W.; Liebler, Daniel; White, Forest; Rodland, Karin D.; Mills, Gordon; Smith, Richard D.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.

    2014-07-01

    Advances in quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics have sparked efforts to characterize the proteomes of tumor samples to provide complementary and unique information inaccessible by genomics. Tumor samples are usually not accrued with proteomic characterization in mind, raising concerns regarding effects of undocumented sample ischemia on protein abundance and phosphosite stoichiometry. Here we report the effects of cold ischemia time on clinical ovarian cancer samples and patient-derived basal and luminal breast cancer xenografts. Tumor tissues were excised and collected prior to vascular ligation, subjected to accurately defined ischemia times up to 60 min, and analyzed by quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics using isobaric tags and high-performance, multidimensional LC-MS/MS. No significant changes were detected at the protein level in each tumor type after 60 minutes of ischemia, and the majority of the >25,000 phosphosites detected were also stable. However, large, reproducible increases and decreases in protein phosphorylation at specific sites were observed in up to 24% of the phosphoproteome starting as early as 5 minutes post-excision. Early and sustained activation of stress response, transcriptional regulation and cell death pathways were observed in common across tumor types. Tissue-specific changes in phosphosite stability were also observed suggesting idiosyncratic effects of ischemia in particular lineages. Our study provides insights into the information that may be obtained by proteomic characterization of tumor samples after undocumented periods of ischemia, and suggests caution especially in interpreting activation of stress pathways in such samples as they may reflect sample handling rather than tumor physiology.

  3. Computational modeling of the mechanical modulation of the growth plate by sustained loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narváez-Tovar Carlos A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a computational model that describes the growth of the bone as a function of the proliferation and hypertrophy of chondrocytes in the growth plate. We have included the effects of the mechanical loads on the sizes of the proliferative and hypertrophic areas, the number of proliferative chondrocytes and the final size of the hypertrophic chondrocytes. The validation of the model was performed with experimental data published on other investigations about proximal tibia of rats, subjected to sustained axial stresses of 0.1 MPa, 0.0 MPa, -0.1 MPa and −0.2 MPa. Growth was simulated during 23 days, obtaining numerical errors between 2.77% and 3.73% with respect to experimental growth rates. The results obtained show that the model adequately simulates the behavior of the growth plate and the effect of mechanical loads over its cellular activity.

  4. Bifunctional Elastin-like Polypeptide Nanoparticles Bind Rapamycin and Integrins and Suppress Tumor Growth in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandhukia, Jugal P; Shi, Pu; Peddi, Santosh; Li, Zhe; Aluri, Suhaas; Ju, Yaping; Brill, Dab; Wang, Wan; Janib, Siti M; Lin, Yi-An; Liu, Shuanglong; Cui, Honggang; MacKay, J Andrew

    2017-11-15

    Recombinant protein-polymer scaffolds such as elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) offer drug-delivery opportunities including biocompatibility, monodispersity, and multifunctionality. We recently reported that the fusion of FK-506 binding protein 12 (FKBP) to an ELP nanoparticle (FSI) increases rapamycin (Rapa) solubility, suppresses tumor growth in breast cancer xenografts, and reduces side effects observed with free-drug controls. This new report significantly advances this carrier strategy by demonstrating the coassembly of two different ELP diblock copolymers containing drug-loading and tumor-targeting domains. A new ELP nanoparticle (ISR) was synthesized that includes the canonical integrin-targeting ligand (Arg-Gly-Asp, RGD). FSI and ISR mixed in a 1:1 molar ratio coassemble into bifunctional nanoparticles containing both the FKBP domain for Rapa loading and the RGD ligand for integrin binding. Coassembled nanoparticles were evaluated for bifunctionality by performing in vitro cell-binding and drug-retention assays and in vivo MDA-MB-468 breast tumor regression and tumor-accumulation studies. The bifunctional nanoparticle demonstrated superior cell target binding and similar drug retention to FSI; however, it enhanced the formulation potency, such that tumor growth was suppressed at a 3-fold lower dose compared to an untargeted FSI-Rapa control. This data suggests that ELP-mediated scaffolds are useful tools for generating multifunctional nanomedicines with potential activity in cancer.

  5. Over-Expression of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-D Promotes Tumor Growth and Invasion in Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The platelet-derived growth factor-D (PDGF-D was demonstrated to be able to promote tumor growth and invasion in human malignancies. However, little is known about its roles in endometrial cancer. In the present study, we investigated the expression and functions of PDGF-D in human endometrial cancer. Alterations of PDGF-D mRNA and protein were determined by real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical staining. Up-regulation of PDGF-D was achieved by stably transfecting the pcDNA3-PDGF-D plasmids into ECC-1 cells; and knockdown of PDGF-D was achieved by transient transfection with siRNA-PDGF-D into Ishikawa cells. The MTT assay, colony formation assay and Transwell assay were used to detect the effects of PDGF-D on cellular proliferation and invasion. The xenograft assay was used to investigate the functions of PDGF-D in vivo. Compared to normal endometrium, more than 50% cancer samples showed over-expression of PDGF-D (p < 0.001, and high level of PDGF-D was correlated with late stage (p = 0.003, deep myometrium invasion (p < 0.001 and lympha vascular space invasion (p = 0.006. In vitro, over-expressing PDGF-D in ECC-1 cells significantly accelerated tumor growth and promoted cellular invasion by increasing the level of MMP2 and MMP9; while silencing PDGF-D in Ishikawa cells impaired cell proliferation and inhibited the invasion, through suppressing the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-expressed PDGF-D could induce EMT and knockdown of PDGF-D blocked the EMT transition. Consistently, in xenografts assay, PDGF-D over-expression significantly promoted tumor growth and tumor weights. We demonstrated that PDGF-D was commonly over-expressed in endometrial cancer, which was associated with late stage deep myometrium invasion and lympha vascular space invasion. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments showed PDGF-D could promote tumor growth and invasion through up-regulating MMP2/9 and inducing EMT. Thus, we

  6. Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 signaling pathway and tumor growth in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chian, Song; Thapa, Ruby; Chi, Zhexu [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wang, Xiu Jun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Tang, Xiuwen, E-mail: xiuwentang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in mouse liver and in xenografted tumors. • Luteolin markedly inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. • Luteolin enhances the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin in mice in vivo. • Luteolin could serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is over-expressed in many types of tumor, promotes tumor growth, and confers resistance to anticancer therapy. Hence, Nrf2 is regarded as a novel therapeutic target in cancer. Previously, we reported that luteolin is a strong inhibitor of Nrf2 in vitro. Here, we showed that luteolin reduced the constitutive expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in mouse liver in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further, luteolin inhibited the expression of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione transferases, decreasing the reduced glutathione in the liver of wild-type mice under both constitutive and butylated hydroxyanisole-induced conditions. In contrast, such distinct responses were not detected in Nrf2{sup −/−} mice. In addition, oral administration of luteolin, either alone or combined with intraperitoneal injection of the cytotoxic drug cisplatin, greatly inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line A549 cells grown subcutaneously in athymic nude mice. Cell proliferation, the expression of Nrf2, and antioxidant enzymes were all reduced in tumor xenograft tissues. Furthermore, luteolin enhanced the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin. Together, our findings demonstrated that luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in vivo and can serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC.

  7. Influence of pulsed electromagnetic and pulsed vector magnetic potential field on the growth of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loja, Tomas; Stehlikova, Olga; Palko, Lukas; Vrba, Kamil; Rampl, Ivan; Klabusay, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Tumor diseases cause 20% of deaths in Europe and they are the second most common cause of death and morbidity after cardiovascular diseases. Thus, tumor cells are target of many therapeutic strategies and tumor research is focused on searching more efficient and specific drugs as well as new therapeutic approaches. One of the areas of tumor research is an issue of external fields. In our work, we tested influence of a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) and a hypothetic field of the pulsed vector magnetic potential (PVMP) on the growth of tumor cells; and further the possible growth inhibition effect of the PVMP. Both unipolar and bipolar PEMF fields of 5 mT and PVMP fields of 0 mT at frequencies of 15 Hz, 125 Hz and 625 Hz were tested on cancer cell lines derived from various types of tumors: CEM/C2 (acute lymphoblastic leukemia), SU-DHL-4 (B-cell lymphoma), COLO-320DM (colorectal adenocarcinoma), MDA-BM-468 (breast adenocarcinoma), and ZR-75-1 (ductal carcinoma). Cell morphology was observed, proliferation activity using WST assay was measured and simultaneous proportion of live, early apoptotic and dead cells was detected using flow cytometry. A PEMF of 125 Hz and 625 Hz for 24 h-48 h increased proliferation activity in the 2 types of cancer cell lines used, i.e. COLO-320DM and ZR-75-1. In contrast, any of employed methods did not confirm a significant inhibitory effect of hypothetic PVMP field on tumor cells.

  8. The c-Met Inhibitor MSC2156119J Effectively Inhibits Tumor Growth in Liver Cancer Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bladt, Friedhelm, E-mail: Friedhelm.Bladt@merckgroup.com; Friese-Hamim, Manja; Ihling, Christian; Wilm, Claudia; Blaukat, Andree [EMD Serono, and Merck Serono Research and Development, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt 64293 (Germany)

    2014-08-19

    The mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met) is a receptor tyrosine kinase with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) as its only high-affinity ligand. Aberrant activation of c-Met is associated with many human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We investigated the in vivo antitumor and antimetastatic efficacy of the c-Met inhibitor MSC2156119J (EMD 1214063) in patient-derived tumor explants. BALB/c nude mice were inoculated with MHCC97H cells or with tumor fragments of 10 patient-derived primary liver cancer explants selected according to c-Met/HGF expression levels. MSC2156119J (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) and sorafenib (50 mg/kg) were administered orally as single-agent treatment or in combination, with vehicle as control. Tumor response, metastases formation, and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels were measured. MSC2156119J inhibited tumor growth and induced complete regression in mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic MHCC97H tumors. AFP levels were undetectable after 5 weeks of MSC2156119J treatment, and the number of metastatic lung foci was reduced. Primary liver explant models with strong c-Met/HGF activation showed increased responsiveness to MSC2156119J, with MSC2156119J showing similar or superior activity to sorafenib. Tumors characterized by low c-Met expression were less sensitive to MSC2156119J. MSC2156119J was better tolerated than sorafenib, and combination therapy did not improve efficacy. These findings indicate that selective c-Met/HGF inhibition with MSC2156119J is associated with marked regression of c-Met high-expressing tumors, supporting its clinical development as an antitumor treatment for HCC patients with active c-Met signaling.

  9. Metastases and Colon Cancer Tumor Growth Display Divergent Responses to Modulation of Canonical WNT Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Seth

    Full Text Available Human colon cancers commonly harbor loss of function mutations in APC, a repressor of the canonical WNT pathway, thus leading to hyperactive WNT-TCF signaling. Re-establishment of Apc function in mice, engineered to conditionally repress Apc through RNAi, resolve the intestinal tumors formed due to hyperactivated Wnt-Tcf signaling. These and other results have prompted the search for specific WNT pathway antagonists as therapeutics for clinically problematic human colon cancers and associated metastases, which remain largely incurable. This widely accepted view seems at odds with a number of findings using patient-derived material: Canonical TCF targets are repressed, instead of being hyperactivated, in advanced colon cancers, and repression of TCF function does not generally result in tumor regression in xenografts. The results of a number of genetic mouse studies have also suggested that canonical WNT-TCF signaling drives metastases, but direct in vivo tests are lacking, and, surprisingly, TCF repression can enhance directly seeded metastatic growth. Here we have addressed the abilities of enhanced and blocked WNT-TCF signaling to alter tumor growth and distant metastases using xenografts of advanced human colon cancers in mice. We find that endogenous WNT-TCF signaling is mostly anti-metastatic since downregulation of TCF function with dnTCF generally enhances metastatic spread. Consistently, elevating the level of WNT signaling, by increasing the levels of WNT ligands, is not generally pro-metastatic. Our present and previous data reveal a heterogeneous response to modulating WNT-TCF signaling in human cancer cells. Nevertheless, the findings that a fraction of colon cancers tested require WNT-TCF signaling for tumor growth but all respond to repressed signaling by increasing metastases beg for a reevaluation of the goal of blocking WNT-TCF signaling to universally treat colon cancers. Our data suggest that WNT-TCF blockade may be effective

  10. Classical mathematical models for description and prediction of experimental tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Benzekry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1 to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2 to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3 to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80% extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70% beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic.

  11. Classical Mathematical Models for Description and Prediction of Experimental Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzekry, Sébastien; Lamont, Clare; Beheshti, Afshin; Tracz, Amanda; Ebos, John M. L.; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma) and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1) to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2) to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3) to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80%) extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70%) beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic. PMID:25167199

  12. Effect of cyhalothrin on Ehrlich tumor growth and macrophage activity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.M. Quinteiro-Filho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyhalothrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, induces stress-like symptoms, increases c-fos immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and decreases innate immune responses in laboratory animals. Macrophages are key elements in cellular immune responses and operate at the tumor-host interface. This study investigated the relationship among cyhalothrin effects on Ehrlich tumor growth, serum corticosterone levels and peritoneal macrophage activity in mice. Three experiments were done with 10 experimental (single gavage administration of 3.0 mg/kg cyhalothrin daily for 7 days and 10 control (single gavage administration of 1.0 mL/kg vehicle of cyhalothrin preparation daily for 7 days isogenic BALB/c mice in each experiment. Cyhalothrin i increased Ehrlich ascitic tumor growth after ip administration of 5.0 x 106 tumor cells, i.e., ascitic fluid volume (control = 1.97 ± 0.39 mL and experimental = 2.71 ± 0.92 mL; P < 0.05, concentration of tumor cells/mL in the ascitic fluid (control = 111.95 ± 16.73 x 106 and experimental = 144.60 ± 33.18 x 106; P < 0.05, and total number of tumor cells in the ascitic fluid (control = 226.91 ± 43.22 x 106 and experimental = 349.40 ± 106.38 x 106; P < 0.05; ii increased serum corticosterone levels (control = 200.0 ± 48.3 ng/mL and experimental = 420.0 ± 75.5 ng/mL; P < 0.05, and iii decreased the intensity of macrophage phagocytosis (control = 132.3 ± 19.7 and experimental = 116.2 ± 4.6; P < 0.05 and oxidative burst (control = 173.7 ± 40.8 and experimental= 99.58 ± 41.7; P < 0.05 in vitro in the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. These data provide evidence that cyhalothrin simultaneously alters host resistance to Ehrlich tumor growth, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis function, and peritoneal macrophage activity. The results are discussed in terms of data suggesting a link between stress, HPA axis activation and resistance to tumor growth.

  13. Optimization of a therapeutic electromagnetic field (EMF) to retard breast cancer tumor growth and vascularity

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, Ivan L.; Markov, Marko S; Hardman, W Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Background This study provided additional data on the effects of a therapeutic electromagnetic field (EMF) device on growth and vascularization of murine 16/C mammary adenocarcinoma cells implanted in C3H/HeJ mice. Methods The therapeutic EMF device generated a defined 120 Hz semi sine wave pulse signal of variable intensity. Murine 16/C mammary adenocarcinoma tumor fragments were implanted subcutaneously between the scapulae of syngeneic C3H mice. Once the tumor grew to 100 mm3, daily EMF tr...

  14. Plasmin-driven fibrinolysis facilitates skin tumor growth in a gender-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Andreas; Eickhardt, Hanne; Maerkedahl, Rasmus Baadsgaard

    2012-01-01

    Rearrangement of the skin during wound healing depends on plasmin and plasminogen, which serve to degrade fibrin depositions in the provisional matrix and thereby facilitate keratinocyte migration. In the current study, we investigated whether plasmin and plasminogen likewise played a role during...... by maintaining patency of the tumor vasculature.-Hald, A., Eickhardt, H., Maerkedahl, R. B., Feldborg, C. W., Egerod, K. L., Engelholm. L. H., Laerum, O. D., Lund, L. R., Rønø, B. Plasmin-driven fibrinolysis facilitates skin tumor growth in a gender-dependent manner....

  15. A novel PEGylated liposome-encapsulated SANT75 suppresses tumor growth through inhibiting hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yike Yuan

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (Hh pathway inhibitors have shown great promise in cancer therapeutics. SANT75, a novel compound we previously designed to specially inhibit the Smoothened (SMO protein in the Hh pathway, has greater inhibitory potency than many of commonly used Hh inhibitors. However, preclinical studies of SANT75 revealed water insolubility and acute toxicity. To overcome these limitations, we developed a liposomal formulation of SANT75 and investigated its antitumor efficacy in vitro and in vivo. We encapsulated SANT75 into PEGylated liposome and the mean particle size distribution and zeta-potential (ZP of liposomes were optimized. Using the Shh-light2 cell and Gli-GFP or Flk-GFP transgenic reporter zebrafish, we confirmed that liposome-encapsulated SANT75 inhibited Hh activity with similar potency as the original SANT75. SANT75 encapsulated into liposome exerted strong tumor growth-inhibiting effects in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the liposomal SANT75 therapy efficiently improved the survival time of tumor-bearing mice without obvious systemic toxicity. The pathological morphology and immunohistochemistry staining revealed that liposomal SANT75 induced tumor cell apoptosis, inhibited tumor angiogenesis as assessed by CD31 and down-regulated the expression of Hh target protein Gli-1 in tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that liposomal formulated SANT75 has improved solubility and bioavailability and should be further developed as a drug candidate for treating tumors with abnormally high Hh activity.

  16. Truncating Prolactin Receptor Mutations Promote Tumor Growth in Murine Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Mammary Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obi L. Griffith

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ERα+ luminal tumors are the most frequent subtype of breast cancer. Stat1−/− mice develop mammary tumors that closely recapitulate the biological characteristics of this cancer subtype. To identify transforming events that contribute to tumorigenesis, we performed whole genome sequencing of Stat1−/− primary mammary tumors and matched normal tissues. This investigation identified somatic truncating mutations affecting the prolactin receptor (PRLR in all tumor and no normal samples. Targeted sequencing confirmed the presence of these mutations in precancerous lesions, indicating that this is an early event in tumorigenesis. Functional evaluation of these heterozygous mutations in Stat1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed that co-expression of truncated and wild-type PRLR led to aberrant STAT3 and STAT5 activation downstream of the receptor, cellular transformation in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo. In conclusion, truncating mutations of PRLR promote tumor growth in a model of human ERα+ breast cancer and warrant further investigation.

  17. Dietary grape polyphenol resveratrol increases mammary tumor growth and metastasis in immunocompromised mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Cubano, Luis A; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2013-01-08

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol from grapes and red wine has many health beneficial effects, including protection against cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. However, our group and others have provided evidence for a dual cancer promoting or inhibitory role for resveratrol in breast cancer, dependent on estrogenic or antiestrogenic activities. Moreover, much of the inhibitory effects of resveratrol have been reported from studies with high non-physiological concentrations. We investigated the effects of a range of concentrations (0.5, 5, 50 mg/kg body weight) of resveratrol on mammary tumor development post-initiation, using immunocompromised mice. Our findings suggest promotion of mammary tumor growth and metastasis by resveratrol at all concentrations tested in tumors derived from the low metastatic estrogen receptor (ER)α(-), ERβ(+) MDA-MB-231 and the highly metastatic ER(-) MDA-MB-435 cancer cell lines. Additionally, the activity of the migration/invasion regulator Rac, which we have previously shown to be regulated by resveratrol in vitro, was measured in tumors from resveratrol treated mice. Our results show a significant induction of tumoral Rac activity and a trend in increased expression of the Rac downstream effector PAK1 and other tumor promoting molecules following resveratrol treatment. Taken together, our findings implicate low concentrations of resveratrol in potential promotion of breast cancer. Therefore, this study illuminates the importance of further delineating resveratrol's concentration dependent effects, particularly in breast cancer, before it can be tested in the clinic or used as a dietary supplement for breast cancer patients.

  18. Truncating Prolactin Receptor Mutations Promote Tumor Growth in Murine Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Mammary Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Obi L; Chan, Szeman Ruby; Griffith, Malachi; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L; Hundal, Jasreet; Allen, Julie A; Arthur, Cora D; Runci, Daniele; Bugatti, Mattia; Miceli, Alexander P; Schmidt, Heather; Trani, Lee; Kanchi, Krishna-Latha; Miller, Christopher A; Larson, David E; Fulton, Robert S; Vermi, William; Wilson, Richard K; Schreiber, Robert D; Mardis, Elaine R

    2016-09-27

    Estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ERα+) luminal tumors are the most frequent subtype of breast cancer. Stat1(-/-) mice develop mammary tumors that closely recapitulate the biological characteristics of this cancer subtype. To identify transforming events that contribute to tumorigenesis, we performed whole genome sequencing of Stat1(-/-) primary mammary tumors and matched normal tissues. This investigation identified somatic truncating mutations affecting the prolactin receptor (PRLR) in all tumor and no normal samples. Targeted sequencing confirmed the presence of these mutations in precancerous lesions, indicating that this is an early event in tumorigenesis. Functional evaluation of these heterozygous mutations in Stat1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed that co-expression of truncated and wild-type PRLR led to aberrant STAT3 and STAT5 activation downstream of the receptor, cellular transformation in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo. In conclusion, truncating mutations of PRLR promote tumor growth in a model of human ERα+ breast cancer and warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Developing Policy Scenarios for Sustainable Urban Growth Management: A Delphi Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajida Perveen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In many parts of the world, a rapid urbanization process is taking place at an unprecedented scale, and its drastic impacts on societies and the environment are evident. To combat the externalities of such rapid, and to a degree uncontrolled, development, many cities around the globe introduced various urban growth management policies. However, policy making—to provide sustainable outcomes, while generating growth opportunities—has been a daunting task for urban administrators. To ease the task, scenario-based planning methods are introduced to produce alternative visions for managing urban growth in sustainable ways by incorporating various socio-environmental issues. However, even though modelling urban growth and associated impacts based on these scenarios have emerged to strengthen and quantify the future of urban policies and related planning actions, this process has a number of glitches. Major issues include the uncertainties associated with the selection of suitable methods to generate scenarios, identify indicators to be used to assess scenarios, evaluate scenarios to prioritize for policy formulation, and assess the impacts of policy scenarios. This paper aims to address the challenge of developing suitable policy scenarios for sustainable urban growth. As for the methodological approach, the study undertakes a thorough review of the literature and current practices, and conducts a two-round Delphi survey—involving experts from public, private and academic sectors specialized in the fields of urban planning, environmental planning, social planning, transportation modelling, and economic development. The expert driven policy scenarios are validated in a local context by comparing findings against the policy options as proposed in the South East Queensland Regional Plan 2017 (Australia. The findings offer valuable guidelines for planners, modellers, and policy makers in adopting suitable methods, indicators, and policy priorities

  20. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Guifang [Department of Pathology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cai, Xiaojun [Department of Ophthalmology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Falck, John R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  1. Osteopontin induces growth of metastatic tumors in a preclinical model of non-small lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojaei Farbod

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteopontin (OPN, also known as SPP1 (secreted phosphoprotein, is an integrin binding glyco-phosphoprotein produced by a variety of tissues. In cancer patients expression of OPN has been associated with poor prognosis in several tumor types including breast, lung, and colorectal cancers. Despite wide expression in tumor cells and stroma, there is limited evidence supporting role of OPN in tumor progression and metastasis. Using phage display technology we identified a high affinity anti-OPN monoclonal antibody (hereafter AOM1. The binding site for AOM1 was identified as SVVYGLRSKS sequence which is immediately adjacent to the RGD motif and also spans the thrombin cleavage site of the human OPN. AOM1 efficiently inhibited OPNa binding to recombinant integrin αvβ3 with an IC50 of 65 nM. Due to its unique binding site, AOM1 is capable of inhibiting OPN cleavage by thrombin which has been shown to produce an OPN fragment that is biologically more active than the full length OPN. Screening of human cell lines identified tumor cells with increased expression of OPN receptors (αvβ3 and CD44v6 such as mesothelioma, hepatocellular carcinoma, breast, and non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma (NSCLC. CD44v6 and αvβ3 were also found to be highly enriched in the monocyte, but not lymphocyte, subset of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs. In vitro, OPNa induced migration of both tumor and hPBMCs in a transwell migration assay. AOM1 significantly blocked cell migration further validating its specificity for the ligand. OPN was found to be enriched in mouse plasma in a number of pre-clinical tumor model of non-small cell lung cancers. To assess the role of OPN in tumor growth and metastasis and to evaluate a potential therapeutic indication for AOM1, we employed a KrasG12D-LSLp53fl/fl subcutaneously implanted in vivo model of NSCLC which possesses a high capacity to metastasize into the lung. Our data indicated that treatment of tumor

  2. Up-regulation of hepatoma-derived growth factor facilitates tumor progression in malignant melanoma [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-En Tsai

    Full Text Available Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the fastest increasing malignancy in humans. Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF is a novel growth factor identified from human hepatoma cell line. HDGF overexpression is correlated with poor prognosis in various types of cancer including melanoma. However, the underlying mechanism of HDGF overexpression in developing melanoma remains unclear. In this study, human melanoma cell lines (A375, A2058, MEL-RM and MM200 showed higher levels of HDGF gene expression, whereas human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn expressed less. Exogenous application of HDGF stimulated colony formation and invasion of human melanoma cells. Moreover, HDGF overexpression stimulated the degree of invasion and colony formation of B16-F10 melanoma cells whereas HDGF knockdown exerted opposite effects in vitro. To evaluate the effects of HDGF on tumour growth and metastasis in vivo, syngeneic mouse melanoma and metastatic melanoma models were performed by manipulating the gene expression of HDGF in melanoma cells. It was found that mice injected with HDGF-overexpressing melanoma cells had greater tumour growth and higher metastatic capability. In contrast, mice implanted with HDGF-depleted melanoma cells exhibited reduced tumor burden and lung metastasis. Histological analysis of excised tumors revealed higher degree of cell proliferation and neovascularization in HDGF-overexpressing melanoma. The present study provides evidence that HDGF promotes tumor progression of melanoma and targeting HDGF may constitute a novel strategy for the treatment of melanoma.

  3. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of etoposide tumor growth inhibitory effect in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rat model using free intratumoral drug concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigatto, Maiara Cássia; Roman, Renatha Menti; Carrara, Letizia; Buffon, Andréia; Magni, Paolo; Dalla Costa, Teresa

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to establish a population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model linking etoposide free tumor and total plasma concentrations to the inhibition of solid tumor growth in rats. Walker-256 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously in the right flank of Wistar rats, which were randomly divided in control and two treated groups that received etoposide 5 or 10mg/kg i.v. bolus every day for 8 and 4days, respectively, and tumor volume was monitored daily for 30days. The plasma and intratumoral concentrations-time profiles were obtained from a previous study and were modeled by a four-compartment population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model. PK/PD analysis was conducted using MONOLIX v.4.3.3 on average data and by mean of a nonlinear mixed-effect model. PK/PD data were analyzed using a modification of Simeoni Tumor Growth Inhibition (TGI) model by introduction of an Emax function to take into account the concentration dependency of k2variable parameter (variable potency). The Simeoni TGI-Emax model was capable to fit schedule-dependent antitumor effects using the tumor growth curves from the control and two different administered schedules. The PK/PD model was capable of describing the tumor growth inhibition using total plasma or free tumor concentrations, resulting in higher k2max (maximal potency) for free concentrations (25.8mL·μg(-1)·day(-1) - intratumoral vs. 12.6mL·μg(-1)·day(-1) total plasma). These findings indicate that the plasma concentration may not be a good surrogate for pharmacologically active free tumor concentrations, emphasizing the importance of knowing drug tumor penetration to choose the best antitumor therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Tumor and Microenvironment Secretomes in Plasma and in Platelets during Prostate Cancer Growth in a Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A. Kerr

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available To survive and metastasize, tumors interact with surrounding tissues by secreting growth factors and cytokines. In return, surrounding host tissues respond by changing their secretome. Numerous factors theoretically function as therapeutic targets or biomarkers of cancer growth and metastatic risk. However, it is unclear if these factors are tumor-derived or actually represent the host defense. To analyze the concentrations of tumor- and microenvironmentderived factors associated with neoplastic growth, we used ELISA-based arrays specific for murine or human proteins to establish a profile of tumor- or host-derived factors circulating in the plasma or within the platelets upon human tumor implantation into mice. Many factors characterized as tumor-derived were actually secreted by host tissues. This study uncovered the origin of various cytokines and revealed their circulation methods. We found that tumor-produced cytokines are predominantly sequestered in platelets. Sequestered proteins are protected from degradation and, thus, may be functional at metastatic sites. These findings identify tumor-specific targets for the detection and prevention of tumor growth and metastasis. As predicted by our model, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and tumor necrosis factor α may be biomarkers for human cancers. Thus, our study identified several potential biomarkers that might be predictive of prostate cancer.

  5. Effects of Population Growth and Climate Variability on Sustainable Groundwater in Mali, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lutz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is increasingly relied on as a source of potable water in developing countries, but factors such as population growth, development, and climate variability, pose potential challenges for ongoing sustainable supply. The effect of these factors on the groundwater system was considered in four scenarios using a numerical model to represent the Bani area of Mali, West Africa. By 2040, population growth, climate variability, and development as urbanization, agriculture, and industry creates scenarios in which groundwater extraction is an increasingly larger percentage of the groundwater system. Consumption from agriculture and industry increases extraction rates from less than 1 to 3.8% of mean annual precipitation, which will likely affect the groundwater system. For instance, concentrated pumping in local areas may result in water level declines. The results of this study contribute to an ongoing evaluation of sustainable groundwater resources in West Africa.

  6. Sharing Economy as a Contributor to Sustainable Growth. An EU Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Bonciu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper bases its analytical approach on two assumptions: the first refers to a significant change taking place in the contemporary world economy – the phenomenon of multipolarity – and proposes a new concept, that of multi-level manifestation of multipolarity; the second has in view the need of a new model of sustainable economic growth. In the context of these two points of view, the paper analyses the sharing economy as a potential significant contributor to sustainable economic growth. The conclusion of this research is that sharing economy has a huge potential of involving millions or even billions of participants and of capitalizing the existing assets while providing spill over effects in the economy. The authors expect sharing economy to become a form of economic activity that will complement traditional forms of business while generating positive economic, social and environmental effects.

  7. Carnosine retards tumor growth in vivo in an NIH3T3-HER2/neu mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meixensberger Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was previously demonstrated that the dipeptide carnosine inhibits growth of cultured cells isolated from patients with malignant glioma. In the present work we investigated whether carnosine also affects tumor growth in vivo and may therefore be considered for human cancer therapy. Results A mouse model was used to investigate whether tumor growth in vivo can be inhibited by carnosine. Therefore, NIH3T3 fibroblasts, conditionally expressing the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu, were implanted into the dorsal skin of nude mice, and tumor growth in treated animals was compared to control mice. In two independent experiments nude mice that received tumor cells received a daily intra peritoneal injection of 500 μl of 1 M carnosine solution. Measurable tumors were detected 12 days after injection. Aggressive tumor growth in control animals, that received a daily intra peritoneal injection of NaCl solution started at day 16 whereas aggressive growth in mice treated with carnosine was delayed, starting around day 19. A significant effect of carnosine on tumor growth was observed up to day 24. Although carnosine was not able to completely prevent tumor growth, a microscopic examination of tumors revealed that those from carnosine treated animals had a significant lower number of mitosis (p Conclusion As a naturally occurring substance with a high potential to inhibit growth of malignant cells in vivo, carnosine should be considered as a potential anti-cancer drug. Further experiments should be performed in order to understand how carnosine acts at the molecular level.

  8. A Study on International Trade and Endogenous/Sustainable Growth Model considering Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sang In; Kim, Tae Wan; Han, Hwa Jin; Kang, Kwang Gyu; Choi, Dae Seung [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    The worldwide industrialization, which has spread from advanced industrial nations to developing nations via newly industrialized nations, and the expanded international trade have been triggering all kinds of environmental pollution, so the environmental pollution has become an environmental problem of pan-global line. The spread of modern industrial society, which is characterized by mass production and mass consumption, has been polluting an entire earth as well as a relevant area and draining usable natural resources. It has caused discord between evironmentalists - regarding environment - and developmentalists - stressing growth through industralization - to deepen. Joint Working Party on Trade and Environment 0f OECD and Committee on Trade and Environment of WTO, which was established with joint efforts of international community in order to resolve such problems, has suggested new improved methodologies to promote the protection of environment, trade liberalization, and sustainable development, besides the discussion for the establishment of reciprocal supporting relation at the same time. The concept of sustainable development, whose main objects are the protection of environment, economic growth, and social development, is recognized as an alternative program that can settle the deepened discord between developed and developing countries on the surrounding issue of the protection of environment and economic development. Because the past discussion connecting environment and trade was developed around a static analysis, it was not available to consider thoroughly the dynamic environmental effects of trade liberalization. This study started from such a critical mind has developed the theoretical analysis model on endogenous growth in order to study on the reciprocal relation among environment, trade, and growth at the first time. This report examined the reciprocal relation between environment and trade, trade and growth, and growth and environment within

  9. Graduate Programs in Green Growth and Sustainable Development: A Comparative Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Fairlie Reinoso, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Since the concern about the negative impacts of the current economic modelin the scarcity of natural resources and their conservation, it comes the need toconfront them and create, from academia, some research areas that include thesenew features and development trends. In this paper, an overview of the conceptualaspects of the main proposals for the transition to sustainable development isperformed, such as the Green Growth, Bio-Commerce, Bio-Economy, amongothers. Then, it is identified and ...

  10. Role of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria in Agricultural Sustainability-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejan, Pravin; Abdullah, Rosazlin; Khadiran, Tumirah; Ismail, Salmah; Nasrulhaq Boyce, Amru

    2016-04-29

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) shows an important role in the sustainable agriculture industry. The increasing demand for crop production with a significant reduction of synthetic chemical fertilizers and pesticides use is a big challenge nowadays. The use of PGPR has been proven to be an environmentally sound way of increasing crop yields by facilitating plant growth through either a direct or indirect mechanism. The mechanisms of PGPR include regulating hormonal and nutritional balance, inducing resistance against plant pathogens, and solubilizing nutrients for easy uptake by plants. In addition, PGPR show synergistic and antagonistic interactions with microorganisms within the rhizosphere and beyond in bulk soil, which indirectly boosts plant growth rate. There are many bacteria species that act as PGPR, described in the literature as successful for improving plant growth. However, there is a gap between the mode of action (mechanism) of the PGPR for plant growth and the role of the PGPR as biofertilizer-thus the importance of nano-encapsulation technology in improving the efficacy of PGPR. Hence, this review bridges the gap mentioned and summarizes the mechanism of PGPR as a biofertilizer for agricultural sustainability.

  11. The dioxin receptor has tumor suppressor activity in melanoma growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contador-Troca, María; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Barrasa, Eva; Rico-Leo, Eva M; Catalina-Fernández, Inmaculada; Menacho-Márquez, Mauricio; Bustelo, Xosé R; García-Borrón, José C; Gómez-Durán, Aurea; Sáenz-Santamaría, Javier; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro M

    2013-12-01

    Melanoma is a highly metastatic and malignant skin cancer having poor rates of patient survival. Since the incidence of melanoma is steadily increasing in the population, finding prognostic and therapeutic targets are crucial tasks in cancer. The dioxin receptor (AhR) is required for xenobiotic-induced toxicity and carcinogenesis and for cell physiology and organ homeostasis. Yet, the mechanisms by which AhR affects tumor growth and dissemination are largely uncharacterized. We report here that AhR contributes to the tumor-stroma interaction, blocking melanoma growth and metastasis when expressed in the tumor cell but supporting melanoma when expressed in the stroma. B16F10 cells engineered to lack AhR (small hairpin RNA for AhR) exacerbated melanoma primary tumorigenesis and lung metastasis when injected in AhR+/+ recipient mice but not when injected in AhR- /- mice or when co-injected with AhR-/- fibroblasts in an AhR+/+ stroma. Contrary, B16F10 cells expressing a constitutively active AhR had reduced tumorigenicity and invasiveness in either AhR genetic background. The tumor suppressor role of AhR in melanoma cells correlated with reduced migration and invasion, with lower numbers of cancer stem-like cells and with altered levels of β1-integrin and caveolin1. Human melanoma cell lines with highest AHR expression also had lowest migration and invasion. Moreover, AHR expression was reduced in human melanomas with respect to nevi lesions. We conclude that AhR knockdown in melanoma cells requires stromal AhR for maximal tumor progression and metastasis. Thus, AhR can be a molecular marker in melanoma and its activity in both tumor and stromal compartments should be considered.

  12. Arctigenin inhibits prostate tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Piwen; Solorzano, Walter; Diaz, Tanya; Magyar, Clara E; Henning, Susanne M; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2017-06-01

    The low bioavailability of most phytochemicals limits their translation to humans. We investigated whether arctigenin, a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa, has favorable bioavailability/potency against prostate cancer. The anticarcinogenic activity of arctigenin was investigated both in vitro using the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and LAPC-4 human prostate cancer cells and pre-malignant WPE1-NA22 cells, and in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Arctigenin at lower doses (arctigenin at 50mg/kg (LD) or 100mg/kg (HD) b.w. daily or vehicle control by oral gavage. After 6 weeks, tumor growth was inhibited by 50% (LD) and 70% (HD) compared to control. A stronger tumor inhibitory effect was observed in a second experiment where arctigenin intervention started two weeks prior to tumor implantation. Arc was detectable in blood and tumors in Arc groups, with a mean value up to 2.0 μM in blood, and 8.3 nmol/g tissue in tumors. Tumor levels of proliferation marker Ki67, total and nuclear androgen receptor, and growth factors including VEGF, EGF, and FGF-β were significantly decreased by Arc, along with an increase in apoptosis marker of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Genes responsive to arctigenin were identified including TIMP3 and ZNF185, and microRNAs including miR-126-5p, and miR-21-5p. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the strong anticancer activity of arctigenin in prostate cancer. The effective dose of arctigenin in vitro is physiologically achievable in vivo, which provides a high promise in its translation to human application.

  13. Chinese red yeast rice inhibition of prostate tumor growth in SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mee Young; Henning, Susanne; Moro, Aune; Seeram, Navindra P; Zhang, Yanjun; Heber, David

    2011-04-01

    Prostate cancer is a slowly developing but very common cancer in males that may be amenable to preventive strategies that are not toxic. Chinese red yeast rice (RYR), a food herb made by fermenting Monascus purpureus Went yeast on white rice, contains a mixture of eight different monacolins that inhibit cholesterogenesis in addition to red pigments with antioxidant properties. Monacolin K is identical to lovastatin (LV), but LV unlike RYR can be used in individuals intolerant to statins due to muscle pain. Both LV and RYR inhibit de novo cholesterogenesis, which is critical to the growth of tumor cells. Long-term use of statin drugs has been associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. We have previously shown that RYR inhibited androgen-dependent and androgen receptor-overexpressing androgen-independent prostate cancer cell proliferation in vitro. This study was designed to determine whether RYR and LV inhibit prostate tumor growth in SCID mice. RYR significantly reduced tumor volumes of androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate xenograft tumors compared with animals receiving vehicle alone (P < 0.05). Inhibition by RYR was greater than that observed with LV at the dose found in RYR, showing that other compounds in RYR contributed to the antiproliferative effect. There was a significant correlation of tumor volume to serum cholesterol (P < 0.001). RYR decreased gene expression of androgen synthesizing enzymes (HSD3B2, AKR1C3, and SRD5A1) in both type of tumors (P < 0.05). Clinical studies of RYR for prostate cancer prevention in the increasing population of men undergoing active surveillance should be considered. ©2011 AACR.

  14. Recombinant TIMP-1-GPI inhibits growth of fibrosarcoma and enhances tumor sensitivity to doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Q; Niess, H; Djafarzadeh, R; Zhao, Y; Schwarz, B; Angele, M K; Jauch, K-W; Nelson, P J; Bruns, C J

    2014-09-01

    Fibrosarcomas show a high incidence of recurrence and general resistance to apoptosis. Limiting tumor regrowth and increasing their sensitivity to chemotherapy and apoptosis represent key issues in developing more effective treatments of these tumors. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) broadly blocks matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and can moderate tumor growth and metastasis. We previously described generation of a recombinant fusion protein linking TIMP-1 to glycosylphophatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (TIMP-1-GPI) that efficiently directs the inhibitor to cell surfaces. In the present report, we examined the effect of TIMP-1-GPI treatment on fibrosarcoma biology. Exogenously applied TIMP-1-GPI efficiently incorporated into surface membranes of human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. It inhibited their proliferation, migration, suppressed cancer cell clone formation, and enhanced apoptosis. Doxorubicin, the standard chemotherapeutic drug for fibrosarcoma, was tested alone or in combination with TIMP-1-GPI. In parallel, the influence of treatment on HT1080 side population cells (exhibiting tumor stem cell-like characteristics) was investigated using Hoechst 33342 staining. The sequential combination of TIMP-1-GPI and doxorubicin showed more than additive effects on apoptosis, while TIMP-1-GPI treatment alone effectively decreased "stem-cell like" side population cells of HT1080. TIMP-1-GPI treatment was validated using HT1080 fibrosarcoma murine xenografts. Growing tumors treated with repeated local injections of TIMP-1-GPI showed dramatically inhibited fibrosarcoma growth and reduced angiogenesis. Intraoperative peritumoral application of GPI-anchored TIMP-1 as an adjuvant to surgery may help maintain tumor control by targeting microscopic residual fibrosarcoma cells and increasing their sensitivity to chemotherapy.

  15. Fiscal Deficit, National Saving and Sustainability of Economic Growth in Emerging Economies: A Dynamic GMM Panel Data Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buscemi Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The neoclassical growth models argued that the movement to steady states; technology, exogenous rate of savings, population growth and technical progress stimulate higher growth levels (Solow 1956. Contrary to the neoclassical argument, endogenous growth model argues that, in the theory of endogenous growth, government play a significant role in promoting accumulation of knowledge, research and development, public investment, human capital development, law and order can generate growth both in the short and long run. Moreover, they assumed technical progress as endogenous variable for growth (Barro 1995. This study analyze the effects of fiscal deficit on sustainability of economic growth and provided new empirical evidence on the effects of fiscal deficit on saving and sustainability of economic growth based on the assumption of endogenous growth model. We estimated using the reduced form of GMM method for dynamic panels covers 1990-2009 for three emerging countries that includes China, India and South Africa.

  16. Interleukin 21 therapy increases the density of tumor infiltrating CD8+ T cells and inhibits the growth of syngeneic tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Henrik; Frederiksen, Klaus S; Thygesen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-21 is a recently discovered cytokine in early clinical development, which has shown anti-tumor activity in various animal models. In the present study, we examine the anti-tumor activity of IL-21 protein therapy in two syngeneic tumor models and its effect on the density of tumor...

  17. Resorbable Polymer Microchips Releasing BCNU Inhibit Tumor Growth in the Rat 9L Flank Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Grace Y.; Tyler, Betty M.; Tupper, Malinda M.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Langer, Robert S.; Brem, Henry; Cima, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Sustained local delivery of single agents and controlled delivery of multiple chemotherapeutic agents are sought for the treatment of brain cancer. A resorbable, multi-reservoir polymer microchip drug delivery system has been against a tumor model. The microchip reservoirs were loaded with 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). BCNU was more stabile at 37°C within the microchip compared to a uniformly impregnated polymeric wafer (70% intact drug vs. 38%, at 48 hours). The half-life of t...

  18. Transmembrane Domain Targeting Peptide Antagonizing ErbB2/Neu Inhibits Breast Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Arpel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is still a deadly disease despite major achievements in targeted therapies designed to block ligands or ligand-binding subunits of major tyrosine kinase receptors. Relapse is significant and metastases deleterious, which demands novel strategies for fighting this disease. Here, we report a proof-of-concept experiment demonstrating that small peptides interfering with the transmembrane domain of the tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor ErbB2 exhibit anticancer properties when used at micromolar dosages in a genetically engineered mouse model of breast cancer. Different assays demonstrate the specificity of the ErbB2-targeting peptide, which induces long-term reduction of ErbB2 phosphorylation and Akt signaling consistent with reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased survival. Microcomputed tomography analysis established the antimetastatic activity of the peptide and its impact on primary tumor growth. This reveals the interior of the cell membrane as an unexplored dimension for drug design.

  19. Tumor growth effects of rapamycin on human biliary tract cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuer Matthias

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver transplantation is an important treatment option for patients with liver-originated tumors including biliary tract carcinomas (BTCs. Post-transplant tumor recurrence remains a limiting factor for long-term survival. The mammalian target of rapamycin-targeting immunosuppressive drug rapamycin could be helpful in lowering BTC recurrence rates. Therein, we investigated the antiproliferative effect of rapamycin on BTC cells and compared it with standard immunosuppressants. Methods We investigated two human BTC cell lines. We performed cell cycle and proliferation analyses after treatment with different doses of rapamycin and the standard immunosuppressants, cyclosporine A and tacrolimus. Results Rapamycin inhibited the growth of two BTC cell lines in vitro. By contrast, an increase in cell growth was observed among the cells treated with the standard immunosuppressants. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that rapamycin inhibits BTC cell proliferation and thus might be the preferred immunosuppressant for patients after a liver transplantation because of BTC.

  20. Raloxifene reduces triple-negative breast cancer tumor growth and decreases EGFR expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Allen, Kirstie M; Scandlyn, Marissa J; Rosengren, Rhonda J

    2013-09-01

    The poor prognosis of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and the lack of targeted treatments have raised the need for alternative therapies. Previous studies have suggested an effect of raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator that is independent of the estrogen receptor (ER). Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic value of raloxifene in TNBC mouse models. Mice received a daily oral treatment with different doses of raloxifene. Tumor progression was monitored weekly; in addition microvessel density, proliferation, migration and invasion, apoptosis and tumorigenicity were analyzed. This study demonstrates that raloxifene (0.85 mg/kg) prevents TNBC tumor growth and induces tumor regression. The treated tumors showed a 54% decreased microvascular density and proliferation and a 7-fold increase in apoptosis. The underlying therapeutic mechanism of raloxifene was associated with a 27-fold decrease in the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Moreover, raloxifene promoted the translocation of EGFR into endosomes associated with decreased cell migration, cell invasion and tumorigenicity in vitro. Together, these data showed that raloxifene acts independently of the ER and may be relevant for the treatment as well as control the progression of TNBC.

  1. Metastasis Suppressor Genes: At the Interface Between the Environment and Tumor Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Douglas R.; Welch, Danny R.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms and genetic programs required for cancer metastasis are sometimes overlapping, but components are clearly distinct from those promoting growth of a primary tumor. Every sequential, rate-limiting step in the sequence of events leading to metastasis requires coordinated expression of multiple genes, necessary signaling events, and favorable environmental conditions or the ability to escape negative selection pressures. Metastasis suppressors are molecules that inhibit the process of metastasis without preventing growth of the primary tumor. The cellular processes regulated by metastasis suppressors are diverse and function at every step in the metastatic cascade. As we gain knowledge into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis suppressors and cofactors with which they interact, we learn more about the process, including appreciation that some are potential targets for therapy of metastasis, the most lethal aspect of cancer. Until now, metastasis suppressors have been described largely by their function. With greater appreciation of their biochemical mechanisms of action, the importance of context is increasingly recognized especially since tumor cells exist in myriad microenvironments. In this review, we assemble the evidence that selected molecules are indeed suppressors of metastasis, collate the data defining the biochemical mechanisms of action, and glean insights regarding how metastasis suppressors regulate tumor cell communication to–from microenvironments. PMID:21199781

  2. Honokiol inhibits bladder tumor growth by suppressing EZH2/miR-143 axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cunjie; Li, Yuying; Huang, Xiaojing; Shen, Lan; Li, Yan; Cui, Yangyan; Song, Jiannan; Shen, Bing; Eliaz, Isaac; Huang, Ruimin; Ying, Hao; Guo, Hongqian; Yan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The oncoprotein EZH2, as a histone H3K27 methyltransferase, is frequently overexpressed in various cancer types. However, the mechanisms underlying its role in urinary bladder cancer (UBC) cells have not yet fully understood. Herein, we reported that honokiol, a biologically active biphenolic compound isolated from the Magnolia officinalis inhibited human UBC cell proliferation, survival, cancer stemness, migration, and invasion, through downregulation of EZH2 expression level, along with the reductions of MMP9, CD44, Sox2 and the induction of tumor suppressor miR-143. Either EZH2 overexpression or miR-143 inhibition could partially reverse honokiol-induced cell growth arrest and impaired clonogenicity. Importantly, it was first revealed that EZH2 could directly bind to the transcriptional regulatory region of miR-143 and repress its expression. Furthermore, honokiol treatment on T24 tumor xenografts confirmed its anticancer effects in vivo, including suppression tumor growth and tumor stemness, accompanied by the dysregulation of EZH2 and miR-143 expressions. Our data suggest a promising therapeutic option to develop drugs targeting EZH2/miR-143 axis, such as honokiol, for bladder cancer treatment. PMID:26484567

  3. Preoperative serum levels of epidermal growth factor receptor, HER2, and vascular endothelial growth factor in malignant and benign ovarian tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Steffensen, Karina; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Jeppesen, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    Background: Epidermal growth factor receptors ([EGFRs]; EGFR/HER1 and ErbB2/HER2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are essential to tumor growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the serum levels of these potential biomarkers in benign, borderline...

  4. Long non-coding RNA CRNDE promotes tumor growth in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H; Han, L-M; Gao, Q; Sun, Y

    2016-06-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Despite remarkable advances over the past decades, a novel therapeutic strategy is urgently required to increase long-term survival. This study aimed to understand the role of a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed (CRNDE), in medulloblastoma tumor growth. The transcript level of CRNDE was initially examined in dissected clinical tissues and cultured cancerous cells. Effects of CRNDE knockdown on cell viability and colony formation in vitro were assessed using the CCK-8 and colony formation assays, respectively. Cell cycle progression and survival were also determined after CRNDE knockdown. A xenograft mouse model of human medulloblastoma was established by injecting nude mice with medulloblastoma cells stably depleted of CRNDE expression. Our data suggest that transcript levels of CRNDE are elevated in clinical medulloblastoma tissues instead of in adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Knockdown of CRNDE significantly slowed cell proliferation rates and inhibited colony formation in Daoy and D341 cells. Tumor growth in vivo was also inhibited after CRNDE knockdown. Moreover, after knockdown of CRNDE, cell cycle progression was arrested in S phase and apoptosis was promoted by 15-20% in Daoy and D341 cells. In vivo data further showed that proliferating cell nuclei antigen (PCNA) was decreased, whereas the apoptosis initiator cleaved-caspase-3 was increased upon CRNDE knockdown in cancerous tissues from the mouse model. All these data suggest that CRNDE promotes tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo. This growth-promotion effect might be achieved via arresting cell cycle progression and inhibiting apoptosis. Therapeutics against CRNDE may be a novel strategy for the treatment of medulloblastoma.

  5. Picropodophyllin inhibits tumor growth of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Shu-Cheng [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Guo, Wei [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tao, Ze-Zhang, E-mail: zezhangtao@gmail.com [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •We identified that PPP inhibits IGF-1R/Akt pathway in NPC cells. •PPP dose-dependently inhibits NPC cell proliferation in vitro. •PPP suppresses tumor growth of NPC in nude mice. •PPP have little effect on microtubule assembly. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a cell membrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity and plays important roles in cell transformation, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a selective IGF-1R inhibitor and shows promising antitumor effects for several human cancers. However, its antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of PPP in NPC using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. We found that PPP dose-dependently decreased the IGF-induced phosphorylation and activity of IGF-1R and consequently reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, one downstream target of IGF-1R. In addition, PPP inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PPP for NPC cell line CNE-2 was ⩽1 μM at 24 h after treatment and ⩽0.5 μM at 48 h after treatment, respectively. Moreover, administration of PPP by intraperitoneal injection significantly suppressed the tumor growth of xenografted NPC in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest targeting IGF-1R by PPP may represent a new strategy for treatment of NPCs with positive IGF-1R expression.

  6. Complete adrenocorticotropin deficiency after radiation therapy for brain tumor with a normal growth hormone reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Haruna; Yoshioka, Katsunobu; Yamagami, Keiko [Osaka City General Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-06-01

    A 34-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1, who had received radiation therapy after the excision of a brain tumor 5 years earlier, was admitted to our hospital with vomiting and weight loss. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) were undetectable before and after administration of 100 {mu}g corticotropin releasing hormone. The level of growth hormone without stimulation was 24.7 ng/ml. We diagnosed him to have complete ACTH deficiency attributable to radiation therapy. This is the first known case of a patient with complete ACTH deficiency after radiation therapy and a growth hormone reserve that remained normal. (author)

  7. miR-137 suppresses tumor growth of malignant melanoma by targeting aurora kinase A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Xiao; Zhang, Haiping [Department of Dermatology and Venereal Disease, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Lian, Shi [Department of Dermatology and Venereal Disease, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Zhu, Wei, E-mail: zhuwei_2020@163.com [Department of Dermatology and Venereal Disease, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2016-07-01

    As an oncogene, aurora kinase A (AURKA) is overexpressed in various types of human cancers. However, the expression and roles of AURKA in malignant melanoma are largely unknown. In this study, a miR-137-AURKA axis was revealed to regulate melanoma growth. We found a significant increase in levels of AURKA in melanoma. Both genetic knockdown and pharmacologic inhibition of AURKA decreased tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Further found that miR-137 reduced AURKA expression through interaction with its 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) and that miR-137 was negatively correlated with AURKA expression in melanoma specimens. Overexpression of miR-137 decreased cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. Notably, re-expression of AURKA significantly rescued miR-137-mediated suppression of cell growth and clonality. In summary, these results reveal that miR-137 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting AURKA, providing new insights into investigation of therapeutic strategies against malignant melanoma. -- Highlights: •First reported overexpression of AURKA in melanoma. •Targeting AURKA inhibits melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo. •Further found miR-137 suppressed cell growth by binding to AURKA 3′UTR. •Re-expression of AURKA rescued miR-137-mediated suppression. •miR-137-AURKA axis may be potential therapeutic targets of melanoma.

  8. Tocotrienol-adjuvanted dendritic cells inhibit tumor growth and metastasis: a murine model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitti Rahma Abdul Hafid

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF from palm oil is reported to possess anti-cancer and immune-enhancing effects. In this study, TRF supplementation was used as an adjuvant to enhance the anti-cancer effects of dendritic cells (DC-based cancer vaccine in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in mammary pad to induce tumor. When the tumor was palpable, the mice in the experimental groups were injected subcutaneously with DC-pulsed with tumor lysate (TL from 4T1 cells (DC+TL once a week for three weeks and fed daily with 1 mg TRF or vehicle. Control mice received unpulsed DC and were fed with vehicle. The combined therapy of using DC+TL injections and TRF supplementation (DC+TL+TRF inhibited (p<0.05 tumor growth and metastasis. Splenocytes from the DC+TL+TRF group cultured with mitomycin-C (MMC-treated 4T1 cells produced higher (p<0.05 levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL assay also showed enhanced tumor-specific killing (p<0.05 by CD8(+ T-lymphocytes isolated from mice in the DC+TL+TRF group. This study shows that TRF has the potential to be used as an adjuvant to enhance effectiveness of DC-based vaccines.

  9. Oridonin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis through anti-angiogenesis by blocking the Notch signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Dong

    Full Text Available While significant progress has been made in understanding the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects of the natural diterpenoid component Oridonin on tumor cells, little is known about its effect on tumor angiogenesis or metastasis and on the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, Oridonin significantly suppressed human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs proliferation, migration, and apillary-like structure formation in vitro. Using aortic ring assay and mouse corneal angiogenesis model, we found that Oridonin inhibited angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo. In our animal experiments, Oridonin impeded tumor growth and metastasis. Immunohistochemistry analysis further revealed that the expression of CD31 and vWF protein in xenografts was remarkably decreased by the Oridonin. Furthermore, Oridonin reinforced endothelial cell-cell junction and impaired breast cancer cell transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, Oridonin not only down-regulated Jagged2 expression and Notch1 activity but also decreased the expression of their target genes. In conclusion, our results demonstrated an original role of Oridonin in inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and propose a mechanism. This study also provides new evidence supporting the central role of Notch in tumor angiogenesis and suggests that Oridonin could be a potential drug candidate for angiogenesis related diseases.

  10. Methylglyoxal-Mediated Stress Correlates with High Metabolic Activity and Promotes Tumor Growth in Colorectal Cancer

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    Barbara Chiavarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells generally rely on aerobic glycolysis as a major source of energy. Methylglyoxal (MG, a dicarbonyl compound that is produced as a side product during glycolysis, is highly reactive and induces the formation of advanced glycation end-products that are implicated in several pathologies including cancer. All mammalian cells have an enzymatic defense against MG composed by glyoxalases GLO1 and GLO2 that converts MG to d-lactate. Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most frequently occurring cancers with high morbidity and mortality. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to examine the level of MG protein adducts, in a series of 102 CRC human tumors divided into four clinical stages. We consistently detected a high level of MG adducts and low GLO1 activity in high stage tumors compared to low stage ones suggesting a pro-tumor role for dicarbonyl stress. Accordingly, GLO1 depletion in CRC cells promoted tumor growth in vivo that was efficiently reversed using carnosine, a potent MG scavenger. Our study represents the first demonstration that MG adducts accumulation is a consistent feature of high stage CRC tumors. Our data point to MG production and detoxification levels as an important molecular link between exacerbated glycolytic activity and CRC progression.

  11. Metformin inhibits prostate cancer cell proliferation, migration, and tumor growth through upregulation of PEDF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowan; Li, Chenli; He, Tiantian; Mao, Jiating; Li, Chunmei; Lyu, Jianxin; Meng, Qing H

    2016-05-03

    Metformin has been reported to inhibit the growth of various types of cancers, including prostate cancer. Yet the mode of anti-cancer action of metformin and the underlying mechanisms remain not fully elucidated. We hypothesized that the antitumorigenic effects of metformin are mediated through upregulation of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) expression in prostate cancer cells. In this report, metformin treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of prostate cancer cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Meanwhile, Metformin markedly suppressed migration and invasion and induced apoptosis of both LNCaP and PC3 cancer cells. Metformin also reduced PC3 tumor growth in BALB/c nude mice in vivo. Furthermore, metformin treatment was associated with higher PEDF expression in both prostate cancer cells and tumor tissue. Taken together, metformin inhibits prostate cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tumor growth, and these activities are mediated by upregulation of PEDF expression. These findings provide a novel insight into the molecular functions of metformin as an anticancer agent.

  12. FOXD3 suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jun-Hai; Zhao, Chun-Liu [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Luwan Branch of Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 20020 (China); Ding, Lan-Bao [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhou, Xi, E-mail: modelmap@139.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Luwan Branch of Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 20020 (China)

    2015-10-09

    The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3), widely studied as a transcriptional repressor in embryogenesis, participates in the carcinogenesis of many cancers. However, the expression pattern and role of FOXD3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been well characterized. We report that FOXD3 is significantly downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and clinical tissues. FOXD3 overexpression significantly inhibits cell growth and results in G1 cell cycle arrest in NSCLC A549 and H1299 cells. In a xenograft tumor model, FOXD3 overexpression inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Remarkably, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was reduced in FOXD3 overexpression models both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that FOXD3 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in NSCLC progression and represents a promising clinical prognostic marker and therapeutic target for this disease. - Highlights: • FOXD3 is downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and tissues. • FOXD3 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation in NSCLC cells. • FOXD3 overexpression led to decreased angiogenesis in NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo.

  13. FBXW7 Acts as an Independent Prognostic Marker and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Human Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanchun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBXW7 is a potent tumor suppressor in human cancers including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we found that the expressions of FBXW7 protein and mRNA levels in osteosarcoma (OS cases were significantly lower than those in normal bone tissues. Clinical analysis indicated that FBXW7 was expressed at lower levels in OS patients with advanced clinical stage, high T classification and poor histological differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high expression of FBXW7 was correlated with a better 5-year survival of OS patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that FBXW7 was an independent prognostic marker in OS. Our in vitro studies showed that FBXW7 overexpression inhibited cell cycle transition and cell proliferation, and promoted apoptosis in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. In a nude mouse xenograft model, FBXW7 overexpression slowed down tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest. Mechanistically, FBXW7 inversely regulated oncoprotein c-Myc and cyclin E levels in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. Together these findings suggest that FBXW7 may serve as a prognostic biomarker and inhibit tumor progression by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest in OS.

  14. Protective Effect of Metformin Against Walker 256 Tumor Growth is Not Dependent on Metabolism Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudinéia Conationi da Silva Franco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The objective of the current work was to test the effect of metformin on the tumor growth in rats with metabolic syndrome. Methods: We obtained pre-diabetic hyperinsulinemic rats by neonatal treatment with monosodium L-glutamate (MSG, which were chronically treated every day, from weaning to 100 day old, with dose of metformin (250 mg/kg body weight. After the end of metformin treatment, the control and MSG rats, treated or untreated with metformin, were grafted with Walker 256 carcinoma cells. Tumor weight was evaluated 14 days after cancer cell inoculation. The blood insulin, glucose levels and glucose-induced insulin secretion were evaluated. Results: Chronic metformin treatment improved the glycemic homeostasis in pre-diabetic MSG-rats, glucose intolerance, tissue insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and decreased the fat tissue accretion. Meanwhile, the metformin treatment did not interfere with the glucose insulinotropic effect on isolated pancreatic islets. Chronic treatment with metformin was able to decrease the Walker 256 tumor weight by 37% in control and MSG rats. The data demonstrated that the anticancer effect of metformin is not related to its role in correcting metabolism imbalances, such as hyperinsulinemia. However, in morphological assay to apoptosis, metformin treatment increased programmed cell death. Conclusion: Metformin may have a direct effect on cancer growth, and it may programs the rat organism to attenuate the growth of Walker 256 carcinoma.

  15. Does Renewable Energy Drive Sustainable Economic Growth? Multivariate Panel Data Evidence for EU-28 Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ştefan Armeanu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy is crucial to economic progress, but the contemporary worldwide population increase that demands greater energy generated from conventional exhaustible resources, an energy price upsurge, and environmental concerns, imperils sustainable economic growth. Nevertheless, switching to renewable energy produced from naturally replenished resources promotes energy security, likewise addressing issues such as global warming and climate change. This paper aims at exploring the influence and causal relation between renewable energy, both overall and by type, and sustainable economic growth of European Union (EU-28 countries for the period of 2003–2014. We notice that the mean share of renewable energy in the gross final energy consumption is 15%, while the mean share of renewable energy in transport fuel consumption is 3%, which are below the thresholds of 20% and 10%, respectively, as set by the EU Directive 2009/28/EC. By estimating panel data fixed-effects regression models, the results provide support for a positive influence of renewable energy overall, as well as by type, namely biomass, hydropower, geothermal energy, wind power, and solar energy on gross domestic product per capita. However, biomass energy shows the highest influence on economic growth among the rest of renewable energy types. In fact, a 1% increase of the primary production of solid biofuels increases GDP per capita by 0.16%. Besides, cointegrating regressions set on panel fully modified and dynamic ordinary least squares regressions confirm the positive influence related to the primary production of renewable energies on economic growth. A 1% increase in primary production of renewable energies increases GDP per capita by 0.05%–0.06%. However, the results of Granger causality based on panel vector error correction model indicate both in short-run and long-run a unidirectional causal relationship running from sustainable economic growth to the primary production of

  16. Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peanut plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some ...

  17. Inhibiting Vimentin or beta 1-integrin Reverts Prostate Tumor Cells in IrECM and Reduces Tumor Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xueping; Fournier, Marcia V.; Ware, Joy L.; Bissell, Mina J.; Zehner, Zendra E.

    2009-07-27

    Prostate epithelial cells grown embedded in laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) undergo morphological changes that closely resemble their architecture in vivo. In this study, growth characteristics of three human prostate epithelial sublines derived from the same cellular lineage, but displaying different tumorigenic and metastatic properties in vivo, were assessed in three-dimensional (3D) lrECM gels. M12, a highly tumorigenic and metastatic subline, was derived from the parental prostate epithelial P69 cell line by selection in nude mice and found to contain a deletion of 19p-q13.1. The stable reintroduction of an intact human chromosome 19 into M12 resulted in a poorly tumorigenic subline, designated F6. When embedded in lrECM gels, the nontumorigenic P69 line produced acini with clearly defined lumena. Immunostaining with antibodies to {beta}-catenin, E-cadherin or {alpha}6-, {beta}4- and {beta}1-integrins showed polarization typical of glandular epithelium. In contrast, the metastatic M12 subline produced highly disorganized cells with no evidence of polarization. The F6 subline reverted to acini-like structures exhibiting basal polarity marked with integrins. Reducing either vimentin levels via siRNA interference or {beta}1-integrin expression by the addition of the blocking antibody, AIIB2, reorganized the M12 subline into forming polarized acini. The loss of vimentin significantly reduced M12-Vim tumor growth when assessed by subcutaneous injection in athymic mice. Thus, tumorigenicity in vivo correlated with disorganized growth in 3D lrECM gels. These studies suggest that the levels of vimentin and {beta}1-integrin play a key role in the homeostasis of the normal acini in prostate and that their dysregulation may lead to tumorigenesis.

  18. 5′-AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Supports the Growth of Aggressive Experimental Human Breast Cancer Tumors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laderoute, Keith R.; Calaoagan, Joy M.; Chao, Wan-ru; Dinh, Dominc; Denko, Nicholas; Duellman, Sarah; Kalra, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohe; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sambucetti, Lidia; Boros, Laszlo G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth can establish metabolically stressed microenvironments that activate 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a ubiquitous regulator of ATP homeostasis. Previously, we investigated the importance of AMPK for the growth of experimental tumors prepared from HRAS-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts and for primary brain tumor development in a rat model of neurocarcinogenesis. Here, we used triple-negative human breast cancer cells in which AMPK activity had been knocked down to investigate the contribution of AMPK to experimental tumor growth and core glucose metabolism. We found that AMPK supports the growth of fast-growing orthotopic tumors prepared from MDA-MB-231 and DU4475 breast cancer cells but had no effect on the proliferation or survival of these cells in culture. We used in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling with [13C]glucose tracers to investigate the contribution of AMPK to core glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 cells, which have a Warburg metabolic phenotype; these experiments indicated that AMPK supports tumor glucose metabolism in part through positive regulation of glycolysis and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate cycle. We also found that AMPK activity in the MDA-MB-231 tumors could systemically perturb glucose homeostasis in sensitive normal tissues (liver and pancreas). Overall, our findings suggest that the contribution of AMPK to the growth of aggressive experimental tumors has a critical microenvironmental component that involves specific regulation of core glucose metabolism. PMID:24993821

  19. 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) supports the growth of aggressive experimental human breast cancer tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laderoute, Keith R; Calaoagan, Joy M; Chao, Wan-ru; Dinh, Dominc; Denko, Nicholas; Duellman, Sarah; Kalra, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohe; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sambucetti, Lidia; Boros, Laszlo G

    2014-08-15

    Rapid tumor growth can establish metabolically stressed microenvironments that activate 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a ubiquitous regulator of ATP homeostasis. Previously, we investigated the importance of AMPK for the growth of experimental tumors prepared from HRAS-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts and for primary brain tumor development in a rat model of neurocarcinogenesis. Here, we used triple-negative human breast cancer cells in which AMPK activity had been knocked down to investigate the contribution of AMPK to experimental tumor growth and core glucose metabolism. We found that AMPK supports the growth of fast-growing orthotopic tumors prepared from MDA-MB-231 and DU4475 breast cancer cells but had no effect on the proliferation or survival of these cells in culture. We used in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling with [(13)C]glucose tracers to investigate the contribution of AMPK to core glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 cells, which have a Warburg metabolic phenotype; these experiments indicated that AMPK supports tumor glucose metabolism in part through positive regulation of glycolysis and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate cycle. We also found that AMPK activity in the MDA-MB-231 tumors could systemically perturb glucose homeostasis in sensitive normal tissues (liver and pancreas). Overall, our findings suggest that the contribution of AMPK to the growth of aggressive experimental tumors has a critical microenvironmental component that involves specific regulation of core glucose metabolism. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Splenectomy inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by modulating anti-tumor adaptive and innate immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Liran; Mishalian, Inbal; Bayuch, Rachel; Zolotarov, Lida; Michaeli, Janna; Fridlender, Zvi G

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that inhibitors of the immune system reside in the spleen and inhibit the endogenous antitumor effects of the immune system. We hypothesized that splenectomy would inhibit the growth of relatively large non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors by modulating the systemic inhibition of the immune system, and in particular Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC). The effect of splenectomy was evaluated in several murine lung cancer models. We found that splenectomy reduces tumor growth and the development of lung metastases, but only in advanced tumors. In immune-deficient NOD-SCID mice the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth and metastatic spread disappeared. Splenectomy significantly reduced the presence of MDSC, and especially monocytic-MDSC in the circulation and inside the tumor. Specific reduction of the CCR2+ subset of monocytic MDSC was demonstrated, and the importance of the CCL2-CCR2 axis was further shown by a marked reduction in CCL2 following splenectomy. These changes were followed by changes in the macrophages contents of the tumors to become more antitumorigenic, and by increased activation of CD8+ Cytotoxic T-cells (CTL). By MDSC depletion, and adoptive transfer of MDSCs, we demonstrated that the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth was substantially mediated by MDSC cells. We conclude that the spleen is an important contributor to tumor growth and metastases, and that splenectomy can blunt this effect by depletion of MDSC, changing the amount and characteristics of myeloid cells and enhancing activation of CTL. PMID:26137413

  1. Chemokine receptor CXCR7 regulates the invasion, angiogenesis and tumor growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of recent advances in diagnostic and therapeutic measures, the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients remains poor. Therefore, it is crucial to understand what factors are involved in promoting development of HCC. Evidence is accumulating that members of the chemokine receptor family are viewed as promising therapeutic targets in the fight against cancer. More recent studies have revealed that chemokine receptor CXCR7 plays an important role in cancer development. However, little is known about the effect of CXCR7 on the process of HCC cell invasion and angiogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of CXCR7 in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and cell lines and to evaluate the role of CXCR7 in tumor growth, angiogenesis and invasion of HCC cells. Methods We constructed CXCR7 expressing shRNA, and CXCR7shRNA was subsequently stably transfected into human HCC cells. We evaluated the effect of CXCR7 inhibition on cell invasion, adhesion, VEGF secretion, tube formation and tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry was done to assess the expression of CXCR7 in human hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and CD31 in tumor of mice. We also evaluated the effect of VEGF stimulation on expression of CXCR7. Results CXCR7 was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. We showed that high invasive potential HCC cell lines express high levels of CXCR7. In vitro, CXCL12 was found to induce invasion, adhesion, tube formation, and VEGF secretion in SMMC-7721 cells. These biological effects were inhibited by silencing of CXCR7 in SMMC-7721 cells. In addition, we also found that VEGF stimulation can up-regulate CXCR7 expression in SMMC-7721 cells and HUVECs. More importantly, enhanced expression of CXCR7 by VEGF was founctional. In vivo, tumor growth and angiogenesis were suppressed by knockdown of CXCR7 in SMMC-7721 cells. However, silencing of CXCR7 did not affect metastasis of tumor in vivo

  2. Model-Based Tumor Growth Dynamics and Therapy Response in a Mouse Model of De Novo Carcinogenesis.

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    Charalambos Loizides

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is a complex, multistep process that depends on numerous alterations within the cell and contribution from the surrounding stroma. The ability to model macroscopic tumor evolution with high fidelity may contribute to better predictive tools for designing tumor therapy in the clinic. However, attempts to model tumor growth have mainly been developed and validated using data from xenograft mouse models, which fail to capture important aspects of tumorigenesis including tumor-initiating events and interactions with the immune system. In the present study, we investigate tumor growth and therapy dynamics in a mouse model of de novo carcinogenesis that closely recapitulates tumor initiation, progression and maintenance in vivo. We show that the rate of tumor growth and the effects of therapy are highly variable and mouse specific using a Gompertz model to describe tumor growth and a two-compartment pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic model to describe the effects of therapy in mice treated with 5-FU. We show that inter-mouse growth variability is considerably larger than intra-mouse variability and that there is a correlation between tumor growth and drug kill rates. Our results show that in vivo tumor growth and regression in a double transgenic mouse model are highly variable both within and between subjects and that mathematical models can be used to capture the overall characteristics of this variability. In order for these models to become useful tools in the design of optimal therapy strategies and ultimately in clinical practice, a subject-specific modelling strategy is necessary, rather than approaches that are based on the average behavior of a given subject population which could provide erroneous results.

  3. Degranulating mast cells in fibrotic regions of human tumors and evidence that mast cell heparin interferes with the growth of tumor cells through a mechanism involving fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanakubo Emi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells that are present in fibrotic regions of cancer can suppress the growth of tumor cells through an indirect mechanism involving peri-tumoral fibroblasts. Methods We first immunostained a wide variety of human cancers for the presence of degranulated mast cells. In a subsequent series of controlled in vitro experiments, we then co-cultured UACC-812 human breast cancer cells with normal fibroblasts in the presence or absence of different combinations and doses of mast cell tryptase, mast cell heparin, a lysate of the human mast cell line HMC-1, and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7, a powerful, heparin-binding growth factor for breast epithelial cells. Results Degranulating mast cells were localized predominantly in the fibrous tissue of every case of breast cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Hodgkin's disease that we examined. Mast cell tryptase and HMC-1 lysate had no significant effect on the clonogenic growth of cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. By contrast, mast cell heparin at multiple doses significantly reduced the size and number of colonies of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, especially in the presence of FGF-7. Neither heparin nor FGF-7, individually or in combination, produced any significant effect on the clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells cultured without fibroblasts. Conclusion Degranulating mast cells are restricted to peri-tumoral fibrous tissue, and mast cell heparin is a powerful inhibitor of clonogenic growth of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. These results may help to explain the well-known ability of heparin to inhibit the growth of primary and metastatic tumors.

  4. Mifepristone inhibits MPA-and FGF2-induced mammary tumor growth but not FGF2-induced mammary hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Cerliani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a crosstalk between fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 and progestins inducing experimental breast cancer growth. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of FGF2 and of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA on the mouse mammary glands and to investigate whether the antiprogestin RU486 was able to reverse the MPA- or FGF2-induced effects on both, mammary gland and tumor growth. We demonstrate that FGF2 administered locally induced an intraductal hyperplasia that was not reverted by RU486, suggesting that FGF2-induced effects are progesterone receptor (PR-independent. However, MPA-induced paraductal hyperplasia was reverted by RU486 and a partial agonistic effect was observed in RU486-treated glands. Using C4-HD tumors which only grow in the presence of MPA, we showed that FGF2 administered intratumorally was able to stimulate tumor growth as MPA. The histology of FGF2-treated tumors showed different degrees of gland differentiation. RU486 inhibited both, MPA or FGF2 induced tumor growth. However, only complete regression was observed in MPA-treated tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that stromal FGF2 activates PR inducing hormone independent tumor growth.

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 inhibition in-vivo affects tumor vasculature in a tumor type-dependent way and downregulates vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 protein without a prominent role for miR-296

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenkamp, Elise; Zwiers, Peter J.; Moorlag, Henk E.; Leenders, William P.; Croix, Brad St.; Molema, Grietje

    The precise molecular effects that antiangiogenic drugs exert on tumor vasculature remain to be poorly understood. We therefore set out to investigate the molecular and architectural changes that occur in the vasculature of two different tumor types that both respond to vascular endothelial growth

  6. Gap junction enhancer increases efficacy of cisplatin to attenuate mammary tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N Shishido

    Full Text Available Cisplatin treatment has an overall 19% response rate in animal models with malignant tumors. Increasing gap junction activity in tumor cells provides the targets to enhance antineoplastic therapies. Previously, a new class of substituted quinolines (PQs acts as gap junction enhancer, ability to increase the gap junctional intercellular communication, in breast cancer cells. We examined the effect of combinational treatment of PQs and antineoplastic drugs in an animal model, showing an increase in efficacy of antineoplastic drugs via the enhancement of gap junctions. Mice were implanted with estradiol-17ß (1.7 mg/pellet before the injection of 1×10⁷ T47D breast cancer cells subcutaneously into the inguinal region of mammary fat pad. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with DMSO (control, cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg, PQ (25 mg/kg, or a combining treatment of cisplatin and PQ. Cisplatin alone decreased mammary tumor growth by 85% while combinational treatment of cisplatin and PQ1 or PQ7 showed an additional reduction of 77% and 22% of tumor growth after 7 treatments at every 2 days, respectively. Histological results showed a significant increase of gap junction proteins, Cx43 and Cx26, in PQ-treated tissues compared to control or cisplatin. Furthermore, evidence of highly stained caspase 3 in tumors of combinational treatment (PQ and cisplatin was seen compared to cisplatin alone. We have showed for the first time an increase in the efficacy of antineoplastic drugs through a combinational treatment with PQs, a specific class of gap junction enhancers.

  7. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  8. Sustained complete remission in a patient with platinum-resistant ovarian yolk sac tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyakumar, A; Chalas, E; Hindenburg, A

    2001-09-01

    Yolk sac tumors of the ovary are generally very responsive to chemotherapy; however, they are difficult to manage in the setting of platinum resistance where treatment options are limited and outcomes are poorer. We present a 39-year-old woman who had a platinum-resistant yolk sac ovarian tumor. She achieved complete remission on an innovative regimen of docetaxel, gemcitabine, and thalidomide. The combination of docetaxel, gemcitabine, and thalidomide might be an active regimen for platinum-resistant ovarian nondysgerminomas and further investigation of this combination is warranted. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Sustainable treatment potential of mixed algal consortia for domestic waste water: Growth and mixotrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Murthy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing levels of generation of nutrient-rich waste water pose serious challenge. Conventional biological and chemical methods of waste water treatment have failed in meeting sustainability challenges. Naturally occurring mixed algal species reared in mixotrophic growth modes have been deployed to recover nutrients (N and P from domestic wastewater after anaerobic digestion. In this paper, we present the results pertaining to growth and mixotrophy. Pilot-scale operation shows that the cultivation methods adopted and the use of naturally selected species lead to a tendency among these species to clump at certain stages of growth that in turn float or settle rapidly making algal harvest and thereby the nutrient recovery processes energy efficient. The highest settling rate was found to be 6.37 ± 1.6 g/m2/d. Mixotrophy was seen to contribute 15 – 24 % across the various algal consortia in wastewater (polyculture.

  10. Sustainability of population growth: a case study of urban settlements in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnov, B A; Pearlmutter, D

    1997-01-01

    "One of the most sensitive criteria for gauging the degree of socio-economic prosperity of an urban settlement is the ability to sustain stable rates of population growth by attracting newcomers and retaining existing population. The present paper argues that after reaching a particular size (on the average, 20-30,000 residents), urban localities in Israel tend to experience substantial changes in components of their annual population growth. Starting with this inflection point, the growth of settlements gradually becomes less dependent on natural causes (birth and death rates) than on the ability to attract newcomers and retain current residents. On the basis of this conclusion, a strategy of ¿redirecting priorities' to developing the peripheral regions of the country is suggested." excerpt

  11. Sustainability of the Chinese economic growth: a review from the institutional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Galindo Farfán

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of Chinese economic growth correlates with more or less inclusive politic and economic institutions at different points of history. At 13 century, China stood as the most technologically advanced nation in the world, where economic institutions motivates innovation and trade. In 20th century China experienced some industrialization policy by the regime, the Great Leap Forward, while in the last three decades economic growth has been pushed by an abundant workforce, implementation of economic reforms aimed at the market and promotion of domestic consumption. However, China has driven its economic activity into an authoritarian context, political and economic constraints where we could assume that sustainability of Chinese economic model with high growth rates tends to stagnate in the coming years, if political reforms are not carried out.

  12. Low-Dose Paclitaxel Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Regulating Glutaminolysis in Colorectal Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoxiang Lv

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Paclitaxel (PTX is a natural alkaloid isolated from the bark of a tree, Taxus brevifolia, and is currently used to treat a variety of tumors. Recently, it has been found that low-dose PTX is a promising treatment for some cancers, presenting few side effects. However, antitumor mechanisms of low-dose PTX (<1 nM have rarely been illuminated. Here we report a new antitumor mechanism of low-dose PTX in colorectal carcinoma cells. We treated colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells with PTX at 0.1 and 0.3 nM for 0, 1, 2, or 3 days, and found that low-dose PTX inhibits cell growth without altering cell morphology and cell cycle. There was a significant decrease of pH in culture media with 0.3 nM PTX for 3 days. Also, lactate production was significantly increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression of glutaminolysis-related genes GLS, SLC7A11 and SLC1A5 were significantly decreased in the colorectal carcinoma cells treated with low-dose PTX. Meanwhile, protein expression levels of p53 and p21 increased significantly in colorectal carcinoma cells so treated. In summary, low-dose PTX down-regulated glutaminolysis-related genes and increased their lactate production, resulting in decreased pH of tumor microenvironments and inhibition of tumor cell growth. Up-regulation of p53 and p21 in colorectal carcinoma cells treated with low-dose PTX also contributed to inhibition of tumor cell growth.

  13. Inhibition of BRD4 suppresses tumor growth and enhances iodine uptake in thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xuemei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Wu, Xinchao [Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Zhang, Xiao; Hua, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yajing [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Maimaiti, Yusufu [Department of Thyroid and Breast Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Gao, Zairong, E-mail: gaobonn@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Zhang, Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, Hubei Province (China)

    2016-01-15

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of the endocrine system. Although radioiodine {sup 131}I treatment on differentiated thyroid cancer is widely used, many patients still fail to benefit from {sup 131}I therapy. Therefore, exploration of novel targeted therapies to suppress tumor growth and improve radioiodine uptake remains necessary. Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an important member of the bromodomain and extra terminal domain family that influences transcription of downstream genes by binding to acetylated histones. In the present study, we found that BRD4 was up-regulated in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of BRD4 in thyroid cancer cells by JQ1 resulted in cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and enhanced {sup 131}I uptake in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, JQ1 treatment suppressed C-MYC but enhanced NIS expression. We further demonstrated that BRD4 was enriched in the promoter region of C-MYC, which could be markedly blocked by JQ1 treatment. In conclusion, our findings revealed that the aberrant expression of BRD4 in thyroid cancer is possibly involved in tumor progression, and JQ1 is potentially an effective chemotherapeutic agent against human thyroid cancer. - Highlights: • BRD4 is upregulated in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. • Inhibition of BRD4 induced cell cycle arrest and enhanced radioiodine uptake in vitro and impaired tumor growth in vivo. • JQ1 suppressed the expression of C-MYC and promoted the expression of NIS and P21. • JQ1 attenuated the recruitment of BRD4 to MYC promoter in thyroid cancer.

  14. Metformin Reduces Prostate Tumor Growth, in a Diet-Dependent Manner, by Modulating Multiple Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento-Cabral, André; L-López, Fernando; Gahete, Manuel D; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2017-07-01

    Prostate-cancer is strongly influenced by obesity, wherein metformin could represent a promising treatment; however, the endocrine metabolic/cellular/molecular mechanisms underlying these associations and effects are still unclear. To determine the beneficial antitumoral effects of metformin on prostate cancer progression/aggressiveness and the relative contribution of high-fat diet (HFD; independently of obesity), we used HFD-fed immunosuppressed mice inoculated with PC3 cells (which exhibited partial resistance to diet-induced obesity) compared with low-fat diet (LFD)-fed control mice. Moreover, gene expression analysis was performed on cancer-associated genes in the xenografted tumors, and the antitumorigenic role of metformin on tumoral (PC3/22Rv1/LNCaP) and normal (RWPE1) prostate cells was evaluated. The results demonstrate that HFD is associated with enhanced prostate cancer growth irrespective of body weight gain and endocrine metabolic dysregulations and that metformin can reduce prostate cancer growth under LFD but more prominently under HFD, acting through the modulation of several tumoral-associated processes (e.g., cell cycle, apoptosis, and/or necrosis). Moreover, the actions observed in vivo could be mediated by the modulation of the local expression of GH/IGF1 axis components. Finally, it was demonstrated that metformin had disparate effects on proliferation, migration, and prostate-specific antigen secretion from different cell lines. Altogether, these data reveal that metformin inhibits prostate cancer growth under LFD and, specially, under HFD conditions through multiple metabolic/tumoral signaling pathways. Implications: The current study linking dietary influence on metformin-regulated signaling pathways and antitumoral response provides new and critical insight on environment-host interactions in cancer and therapy. Mol Cancer Res; 15(7); 862-74. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. [Effects of RAGE on Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth in Pancreatic Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Wei; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Zhao-da; Hu, Wei-Ming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effect of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) on cell proliferation and tumor growth in nude mice with pancreatic cancer. PANC-1 cells were transfected with shRNA RAGE -1, -2, -3 to down-regulate the expression of RAGE. Cholecystokinin octopeptide-8 (CCK-8), real-time PCR and Western blot were performed to test the impact of shRNA RAGE on the expressions of mRNAs and proteins of RAGE, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Tumor growth and microvessel density in the nude mice implanted with shRNA RAGE transfected PANC-1 cells were observed using immunohistochemistry. The shRNA RAGE -1, -2, -3 transfected cells had lower absorbance values than the controls 24 h after transfection, and the absorbance value reached the lowest at 48 h. The specific shRNA sequences significantly inhibited the expressions of mRNA and protein of RAGE. The mice implanted with shRNA RAGE -2 had lower tumor volume and microvessel density than shRNA RAGE -1, -3. The expressions of mRNAs and proteins of RAGE, MMP-2, NF-κB, MMP-9 and VEGF were lower in the cells transfected with shRNA RAGE -2 compared with shRNA RAGE -1, -3. RAGE is involved in the progression of pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo . The RAGE expression could influence the process of tumor angiogenesis.

  16. Delphinidin Inhibits Tumor Growth by Acting on VEGF Signalling in Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thérèse Keravis

    Full Text Available The vasculoprotective properties of delphinidin are driven mainly by its action on endothelial cells. Moreover, delphinidin displays anti-angiogenic properties in both in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis models and thereby might prevent the development of tumors associated with excessive vascularization. This study was aimed to test the effect of delphinidin on melanoma-induced tumor growth with emphasis on its molecular mechanism on endothelial cells. Delphinidin treatment significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth induced by B16-F10 melanoma cell xenograft in mice. In vitro, delphinidin was not able to inhibit VEGFR2-mediated B16-F10 melanoma cell proliferation but it specifically reduced basal and VEGFR2-mediated endothelial cell proliferation. The anti-proliferative effect of delphinidin was reversed either by the MEK1/2 MAP kinase inhibitor, U-0126, or the PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002. VEGF-induced proliferation was reduced either by U-0126 or LY-294002. Under these conditions, delphinidin failed to decrease further endothelial cell proliferation. Delphinidin prevented VEGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK and decreased the expression of the transcription factors, CREB and ATF1. Finally, delphinidin was more potent in inhibiting in vitro cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs, PDE1 and PDE2, compared to PDE3-PDE5. Altogether delphinidin reduced tumor growth of melanoma cell in vivo by acting specifically on endothelial cell proliferation. The mechanism implies an association between inhibition of VEGF-induced proliferation via VEGFR2 signalling, MAPK, PI3K and at transcription level on CREB/ATF1 factors, and the inhibition of PDE2. In conjunction with our previous studies, we demonstrate that delphinidin is a promising compound to prevent pathologies associated with generation of vascular network in tumorigenesis.

  17. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists inhibit tumor growth and metastasis of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamri, Zahida; Preet, Anju; Nasser, Mohd W.; Bass, Caroline E.; Leone, Gustavo; Barsky, Sanford H.; Ganju, Ramesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoids have been reported to possess antitumorogenic activity. Not much is known, however, about the effects and mechanism of action of synthetic nonpsychotic cannabinoids on breast cancer growth and metastasis. We have shown that the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 are overexpressed in primary human breast tumors compared with normal breast tissue. We have also observed that the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB231, MDA-MB231-luc, and MDA-MB468 express CB1 and CB2 receptors. Furthermore, we have shown that the CB2 synthetic agonist JWH-133 and the CB1 and CB2 agonist WIN-55,212-2 inhibit cell proliferation and migration under in vitro conditions. These results were confirmed in vivo in various mouse model systems. Mice treated with JWH-133 or WIN-55,212-2 showed a 40% to 50% reduction in tumor growth and a 65% to 80% reduction in lung metastasis. These effects were reversed by CB1 and CB2 antagonists AM 251 and SR144528, respectively, suggesting involvement of CB1 and CB2 receptors. In addition, the CB2 agonist JWH-133 was shown to delay and reduce mammary gland tumors in the polyoma middle T oncoprotein (PyMT) transgenic mouse model system. Upon further elucidation, we observed that JWH-133 and WIN-55,212-2 mediate the breast tumor-suppressive effects via a coordinated regulation of cyclooxygenase-2/ prostaglandin E2 signaling pathways and induction of apoptosis. These results indicate that CB1 and CB2 receptors could be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies against breast cancer growth and metastasis. PMID:19887554

  18. Comparative analysis of the immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khot, Komal; Deshmukh, Siddharth B; Alex, Sheeba

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cysts. Both these factors seem to be interrelated to each other. The importance of the MMPs in the induction of the angiogenic process has recently been described. MMPs, which are produced by microvascular endothelial cells, break down the extracellular matrix. This is one of the earliest and sustained events in the process of new capillary formation. Thus, we studied the expression of VEGF and MMP-9 in Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and radicular cysts (RCs). Ten cases each of KCOTs, DCs and RCs and were included in the study and immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-VEGF and anti-MMP-9 antibody using standard protocol. When the data of positive cells in the epithelium of KCOTs was compared with DCs and RCs, it showed highly significant results (Pcyst that is currently considered a cystic tumor rather than a developmental cyst.

  19. Quantitative gene-expression of the tumor angiogenesis markers vascular endothelial growth factor, integrin alphaV and integrin beta3 in human neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxboel, Jytte; Binderup, Tina; Knigge, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    compared to both colorectal liver metastases (p=0.10) and normal liver tissue (p=0.06). In neuroendocrine tumors, gene-expression was highly variable of VEGF (530-fold), integrin alphaV (23-fold) and integrin beta3 (106-fold). Quantitative gene-expression levels of the key angiogenesis molecules VEGF......, in neuroendocrine tumors. We used quantitative real-time PCR for measuring mRNA gene-expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), integrin alphaV, and integrin beta3, and CD34 for a group of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (n=13). Tissue from patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (n=14......) and normal liver tissues (n=16) was used as control. We found a lower mRNA level of VEGF in neuroendocrine tumors compared to both colorectal liver metastases (pbeta3 there was also a borderline significant lower level of mRNA in neuroendocrine tumors...

  20. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 deficiency attenuates growth while promoting chemosensitivity of human endometrial xenograft tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Anne M; Zhang, Ling; Pru, Cindy A; Clark, Nicole C; McCallum, Melissa L; Blok, Leen J; Shioda, Toshi; Peluso, John J; Rueda, Bo R; Pru, James K

    2015-01-28

    during chemotherapeutic stress. In sum, these in vitro and in vivo findings demonstrate that PGRMC1 plays a prominent role in the growth and chemoresistance of human endometrial tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) in human breast cancer correlates with low tumor grade, and inhibits tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardini, E; Agresti, R; Tagliabue, E

    2000-01-01

    of Src family kinases, and regulation of integrin signaling, cell adhesion, and growth factor responsiveness. To explore its potential contribution to human neoplasia, we surveyed RPTPalpha protein levels in primary human breast cancer. We found RPTPalpha levels to vary widely among tumors, with 29......% of cases manifesting significant overexpression. High RPTPalpha protein levels correlated significantly with low tumor grade and positive estrogen receptor status. Expression of RPTPalpha in breast carcinoma cells led to growth inhibition, associated with increased accumulation in G0 and G1, and delayed...... tumor growth and metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a study correlating expression level of a specific bona fide PTP with neoplastic disease status in humans....

  2. Publication Growth in Biological Sub-Fields: Patterns, Predictability and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pautasso

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Biologists are producing ever-increasing quantities of papers. The question arises of whether current rates of increase in scientific outputs are sustainable in the long term. I studied this issue using publication data from the Web of Science (1991–2010 for 18 biological sub-fields. In the majority of cases, an exponential regression explains more variation than a linear one in the number of papers published each year as a function of publication year. Exponential growth in publication numbers is clearly not sustainable. About 75% of the variation in publication growth among biological sub-fields over the two studied decades can be predicted by publication data from the first six years. Currently trendy fields such as structural biology, neuroscience and biomaterials cannot be expected to carry on growing at the current pace, because in a few decades they would produce more papers than the whole of biology combined. Synthetic and systems biology are problematic from the point of view of knowledge dissemination, because in these fields more than 80% of existing papers have been published over the last five years. The evidence presented here casts a shadow on how sustainable the recent increase in scientific publications can be in the long term.

  3. Dietary grape polyphenol resveratrol increases mammary tumor growth and metastasis in immunocompromised mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo-Pichardo Linette

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resveratrol, a polyphenol from grapes and red wine has many health beneficial effects, including protection against cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. However, our group and others have provided evidence for a dual cancer promoting or inhibitory role for resveratrol in breast cancer, dependent on estrogenic or antiestrogenic activities. Moreover, much of the inhibitory effects of resveratrol have been reported from studies with high non-physiological concentrations. Methods We investigated the effects of a range of concentrations (0.5, 5, 50 mg/kg body weight of resveratrol on mammary tumor development post-initiation, using immunocompromised mice. Results Our findings suggest promotion of mammary tumor growth and metastasis by resveratrol at all concentrations tested in tumors derived from the low metastatic estrogen receptor (ERα(-, ERβ(+ MDA-MB-231 and the highly metastatic ER(- MDA-MB-435 cancer cell lines. Additionally, the activity of the migration/invasion regulator Rac, which we have previously shown to be regulated by resveratrol in vitro, was measured in tumors from resveratrol treated mice. Our results show a significant induction of tumoral Rac activity and a trend in increased expression of the Rac downstream effector PAK1 and other tumor promoting molecules following resveratrol treatment. Conclusion Taken together, our findings implicate low concentrations of resveratrol in potential promotion of breast cancer. Therefore, this study illuminates the importance of further delineating resveratrol’s concentration dependent effects, particularly in breast cancer, before it can be tested in the clinic or used as a dietary supplement for breast cancer patients.

  4. Ovarian tumor growth regression using a combination of vascular targeting agents anginex or topomimetic 0118 and the chemotherapeutic irofulven

    OpenAIRE

    Dings, Ruud P. M.; Van Laar, Emily S.; Webber, Jeremy; Zhang, Yan; Griffin, Robert J.; Waters, Stephen J.; Macdonald, John R.; Mayo, Kevin H.

    2008-01-01

    Combination of chemotherapeutic agents and angiogenesis inhibitors is now commonly employed in the clinic to treat cancer. Here, we used angiostatic agents anginex and 0118, in combination with the chemotherapeutic irofulven, to treat human ovarian tumor xenografts in mice. General linear mixed models were used to statistically analyze tumor growth curves. Overall, combination of a low, non-toxic dose of irofulven with either angiogenesis inhibitor was more effective at inhibiting tumor growt...

  5. Preparation of selenium-enriched Bifidobacterium longum and its effect on tumor growth and immune function of tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yan; Wang, Rong-Rong; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jian-Jun; Xu, Gen-Xing

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated selenium (Se) accumulation in Bifidobacterium longum strain (B. longum) and evaluated the effect of Se-enriched B. longum (Se-B. longum) on tumor growth and immune function in tumor-bearing mice. Analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) revealed that more than 99% of Se in Se-B. longum was organic, the main component of which was selenomethionine (SeMet). In the in vivo experiments, tumor-bearing mice (n=8) were orally administrated with different doses of Se-B. longum alone or combined with cyclophosphamide (CTX). The results showed that the middle and high dose of Se-B. longum significantly inhibited tumor growth. When Se-B. longum and CTX were combined, the antitumor effect was significantly enhanced and the survival time of tumor-bearing mice (n=12) was prolonged. Furthermore, compared with CTX alone, the combination of Se-B. longum and CTX stimulated the activity of natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes, increasing the levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the leukocyte count of H22 tumor-bearing mice (n=12).

  6. An expanded accounting framework for sustainable growth: Focus on the relationship between a focal firm and its stakeholders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taeyoung Yoo; Giseok Nam

    2015-01-01

    ... about relationships between a focal firm and its stakeholders. That is, we could more accurately assess the sustainability of a firm's profit and growth by considering both its financial outcomes and business relationships...

  7. AAV-mediated human PEDF inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in murine colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Qin Jie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis, therefore antiangiogenic therapy was widely investigated as a promising approach for cancer therapy. Recently, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF has been shown to be the most potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. Adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors have been intensively studied due to their wide tropisms, nonpathogenicity, and long-term transgene expression in vivo. The objective of this work was to evaluate the ability of AAV-mediated human PEDF (hPEDF as a potent tumor suppressor and a potential candidate for cancer gene therapy. Methods Recombinant AAV2 encoding hPEDF (rAAV2-hPEDF was constructed and produced, and then was assigned for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Conditioned medium from cells infected with rAAV2-hPEDF was used for cell proliferation and tube formation tests of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Subsequently, colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis (CRPC mouse model was established and treated with rAAV2-hPEDF. Therapeutic efficacy of rAAV2-hPEDF were investigated, including tumor growth and metastasis, survival time, microvessel density (MVD and apoptosis index of tumor tissues, and hPEDF levels in serum and ascites. Results rAAV2-hPEDF was successfully constructed, and transmission electron microscope (TEM showed that rAAV2-hPEDF particles were non-enveloped icosahedral shape with a diameter of approximately 20 nm. rAAV2-hPEDF-infected cells expressed hPEDF protein, and the conditioned medium from infected cells inhibited proliferation and tube-formation of HUVECs in vitro. Furthermore, in CRPC mouse model, rAAV2-hPEDF significantly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis, and prolonged survival time of treated mice. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that rAAV2-hPEDF could inhibit angiogenesis and induce apoptosis in tumor tissues. Besides, hPEDF levels in serum and ascites of rAAV2-hPEDF-treated mice were significant

  8. Arctigenin inhibits prostate tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piwen Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The low bioavailability of most phytochemicals limits their translation to humans. We investigated whether arctigenin, a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa, has favorable bioavailability/potency against prostate cancer. The anticarcinogenic activity of arctigenin was investigated both in vitro using the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and LAPC-4 human prostate cancer cells and pre-malignant WPE1-NA22 cells, and in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Arctigenin at lower doses (<2 μM significantly inhibited the proliferation of LNCaP and LAPC-4 cells by 30–50% at 48 h compared to control, and inhibited WPE1-NA22 cells by 75%, while did not affect normal prostate epithelial cells. Male severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice were implanted subcutaneously with LAPC-4 cells for in vivo studies. In one experiment, the intervention started one week after tumor implantation. Mice received arctigenin at 50 mg/kg (LD or 100 mg/kg (HD b.w. daily or vehicle control by oral gavage. After 6 weeks, tumor growth was inhibited by 50% (LD and 70% (HD compared to control. A stronger tumor inhibitory effect was observed in a second experiment where arctigenin intervention started two weeks prior to tumor implantation. Arc was detectable in blood and tumors in Arc groups, with a mean value up to 2.0 μM in blood, and 8.3 nmol/g tissue in tumors. Tumor levels of proliferation marker Ki67, total and nuclear androgen receptor, and growth factors including VEGF, EGF, and FGF-β were significantly decreased by Arc, along with an increase in apoptosis marker of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Genes responsive to arctigenin were identified including TIMP3 and ZNF185, and microRNAs including miR-126-5p, and miR-21-5p. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the strong anticancer activity of arctigenin in prostate cancer. The effective dose of arctigenin in vitro is physiologically achievable in vivo, which provides a high promise in its

  9. A Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model of Tamoxifen and Endoxifen to Predict Their Distribution and Effects on Inhibition of Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shengyue; Sun, Qingrong; Chen, Yao; Liao, Jun

    2017-08-15

    Tamoxifen is widely used in the therapy for breast cancer and has three major metabolites, N-desmethyltamoxifen, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, and endoxifen. Endoxifen has played a major role in the inhibition of tumor growth of breast cancer and the tumor growth is related to endoxifen concentration. The aim of this study was to develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model to predict the distribution of tamoxifen and endoxifen quantitatively, and to discover the anti-tumor effect patterns of tamoxifen and endoxifen. The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model was established by integrating a four compartments pharmacokinetics model and a pharmacodynamic model, the first one include central compartment and peripheral compartment both of which contain tamoxifen and endoxifen. The parameters of the model were calculated by the values of plasma concentrations and the tumor growth data before and after the administration of tamoxifen. The transport rate k42 (6.0003) of endoxifen from the peripheral compartment to the central compartment and the metabolism rate k34 (0.0031) from tamoxifen to endoxifen in the peripheral compartment were proved to be significant, which showed that tamoxifen and endoxifen are mainly distributed in the central compartment. The model provided reasonable predictions of tumor growth, which was inhibited after the administration and varies with the concentration of endoxifen. We established a PK-PD model of tamoxifen and endoxifen to predict the tumor growth. The parameters of the pharmacodynamic model, which characterized the tumor growth, revealed the patterns of tamoxifen's anti-tumor functions. The PK-PD model successfully provided illustration for the pharmacokinetics of tamoxifen and endoxifen, and predicted the inhibition effect of endoxifen on the tumor growth. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. 'Big'-insulin-like growth factor-II signaling is an autocrine survival pathway in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikhof, B.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Suurmeijer, A.J.H.; Doorn, J. van; Meersma, G.J.; Groenen, P.J.T.A.; Schuuring, E.M.; Meijer, C.; Jong, S. de

    2012-01-01

    New treatment targets need to be identified in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) to extend the treatment options for patients experiencing failure with small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II acts as an autocrine factor in several tumor

  11. 'Big'-Insulin-Like Growth Factor-II Signaling Is an Autocrine Survival Pathway in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikhof, Bart; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.; van Doorn, Jaap; Meersma, Gert Jan; Groenen, Patricia J. T. A.; Schuuring, Ed M. D.; Meijer, Coby; de Jong, Steven

    New treatment targets need to be identified in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) to extend the treatment options for patients experiencing failure with small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II acts as an autocrine factor in several tumor

  12. Override of the osteoclast defect in osteopontin-deficient mice by metastatic tumor growth in the bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, Tajneen; Kuhn, Misty; Kelly, Owen; Rittling, Susan R

    2006-02-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a major noncollagenous protein of bone that is frequently up-regulated in tumors, where it enhances tumor growth. OPN-deficient mice are resistant to stimulated bone resorption, including that occurring after ovariectomy. Using a new syngeneic model of bone metastasis (r3T), we examined whether OPN-deficient mice are similarly resistant to bone loss resulting from osteolytic tumor growth. Transformed mammary epithelial cells, r3T, which express parathyroid hormone-related protein but not receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand, were injected via the intracardiac route into both wild-type and OPN-/- mice. We measured tumor burden in the bone by quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay and evaluated bone loss by X-ray and microCT. Unexpectedly, bone loss was similar in OPN-/- and wild-type mice bearing similar-sized tumors. Osteoclast number was comparable in both genotypes, and the expression of bone sialoprotein was similar in tumor-bearing bones of both genotypes, excluding two potential mechanisms of overriding the defect. Taken together, these results indicate that in the absence of OPN, the bone loss associated with tumor growth at the bone site proceeds rapidly despite the osteoclast defects documented in OPN-/- mice, suggesting that the mechanism of bone loss due to tumor growth differs from that occurring in other pathologies.

  13. Oncogenic Mutations Regulate Tumor Microenvironment through Induction of Growth Factors and Angiogenic Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizhen Emily; Yu, Yang; Criswell, Tracy L.; DeBusk, Laura M.; Lin, P. Charles; Zent, Roy; Johnson, David H.; Ren, Xiubao; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2010-01-01

    Activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of HER2 (ErbB2) have been identified in human cancers. Compared to wild-type HER2, mutant HER2 shows constitutively activate kinase activity and increased oncogenicity. Cells transformed by mutant HER2 are resistant to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and exhibit an attenuated response to the HER2 antibody trastuzumab. We investigated herein pathways through which mutant HER2 alters the extracellular environment, potentially leading to drug resistance and the effect of simultaneously targeting HER2 and the tumor cell microenvironment with a therapeutic intent. Expression of mutant HER2 in mammary epithelial cells activated autocrine transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 signaling through a mechanism involving Rac1 and JNK-AP1-dependent transcription. Cells transformed by an activating mutant of H-Ras (G12V) also expressed higher TGF-β1 level through Rac1 activation. In addition, mutant HER2 induced the EGFR ligands TGF-α and amphiregulin at the mRNA and protein levels. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a target of the TGF-β-Smad transcriptional regulation, was also induced as a result of expression of mutant HER2. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling with the Alk5 small molecule inhibitor LY2109761 reduced growth and invasiveness of cells expressing mutant HER2. Combined inhibition of intracellular and paracrine effects of mutant HER2 by trastuzumab and the EGFR antibody cetuximab was more efficient than single-agent therapies. These data suggest that mutations in oncogenes such as HER2 and Ras not only alter intracellular signaling and also influence on other components of the tumor microenvironment by inducing several pro-invasive growth factors. In turn, these serve as extracellular targets of novel therapeutic strategies directed at both cancer-driving oncogenes and the modified tumor microenvironment. PMID:20383197

  14. Downregulation of SREBP inhibits tumor growth and initiation by altering cellular metabolism in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yang-An; Xiong, Xiaopeng; Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y; Napier, Dana L; Vallee, Emma; Li, Austin T; Wang, Chi; Weiss, Heidi L; Evers, B Mark; Gao, Tianyan

    2018-02-15

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) belong to a family of transcription factors that regulate the expression of genes required for the synthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol. Three SREBP isoforms, SREBP1a, SREBP1c, and SREBP2, have been identified in mammalian cells. SREBP1a and SREBP1c are derived from a single gene through the use of alternative transcription start sites. Here we investigated the role of SREBP-mediated lipogenesis in regulating tumor growth and initiation in colon cancer. Knockdown of either SREBP1 or SREBP2 decreased levels of fatty acids as a result of decreased expression of SREBP target genes required for lipid biosynthesis in colon cancer cells. Bioenergetic analysis revealed that silencing SREBP1 or SREBP2 expression reduced the mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, as well as fatty acid oxidation indicating an alteration in cellular metabolism. Consequently, the rate of cell proliferation and the ability of cancer cells to form tumor spheroids in suspension culture were significantly decreased. Similar results were obtained in colon cancer cells in which the proteolytic activation of SREBP was blocked. Importantly, knockdown of either SREBP1 or SREBP2 inhibited xenograft tumor growth in vivo and decreased the expression of genes associated with cancer stem cells. Taken together, our findings establish the molecular basis of SREBP-dependent metabolic regulation and provide a rationale for targeting lipid biosynthesis as a promising approach in colon cancer treatment.

  15. NFAT1 Directly Regulates IL8 and MMP3 to Promote Melanoma Tumor Growth and Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshan, Einav; Braeuer, Russell R; Kamiya, Takafumi; Mobley, Aaron K; Huang, Li; Vasquez, Mayra E; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Chakravarti, Nitin; Ivan, Cristina; Prieto, Victor; Villares, Gabriel J; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT1, NFATC2) is a transcription factor that binds and positively regulates IL2 expression during T-cell activation. NFAT1 has important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses, but its involvement in cancer is not completely understood. We previously demonstrated that NFAT1 contributes to melanoma growth and metastasis by regulating the autotaxin gene (Enpp2). Here, we report a strong correlation between NFAT1 expression and metastatic potential in melanoma cell lines and tumor specimens. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying NFAT1 overexpression during melanoma progression, we conducted a microarray on a highly metastatic melanoma cell line in which NFAT1 expression was stably silenced. We identified and validated two downstream targets of NFAT1, IL8, and MMP3. Accordingly, NFAT1 depletion in metastatic melanoma cell lines was associated with reduced IL8 and MMP3 expression, whereas NFAT1 overexpression in a weakly metastatic cell line induced expression of these targets. Restoration of NFAT1 expression recovered IL8 and MMP3 expression levels back to baseline, indicating that both are direct targets of NFAT1. Moreover, in vivo studies demonstrated that NFAT1 and MMP3 promoted melanoma tumor growth and lung metastasis. Collectively, our findings assign a new role for NFAT1 in melanoma progression, underscoring the multifaceted functions that immunomodulatory factors may acquire in an unpredictable tumor microenvironment. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3145-55. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Luteolin and its inhibitory effect on tumor growth in systemic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Shailendra, E-mail: shailendrakapoor@yahoo.com [74 crossing place, Mechanicsville, VA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Lamy et al have provided interesting data in their recent article in your esteemed journal. Luteolin augments apoptosis in a number of systemic malignancies. Luteolin reduces tumor growth in breast carcinomas. Luteolin mediates this effect by up-regulating the expression of Bax and down-regulating the expression of Bcl-xL. EGFR-induced MAPK activation is also attenuated. As a result there is increased G2/ M phase arrest. These effects have been seen both in vivo as well as in vitro. It also reduces ERα expression and causes inhibition of IGF-1 mediated PI3K–Akt pathway. Luteolin also activates p38 resulting in nuclear translocation of the apoptosis-inducing factor. Simultaneously it also activates ERK. As a result there is increased intra-tumoral apoptosis which is caspase dependent as well as caspase independent. - Highlights: ► Luteolin and tumor growth in breast carcinomas. ► Luteolin and pulmonary cancer. ► Luteolin and colon cancer.

  17. Stromal PDGFR-α Activation Enhances Matrix Stiffness, Impedes Mammary Ductal Development, and Accelerates Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Anisha M; Sizemore, Gina M; Shukla, Vasudha C; Avendano, Alex; Sizemore, Steven T; Chang, Jonathan J; Kladney, Raleigh D; Cuitiño, Maria C; Thies, Katie A; Verfurth, Quinn; Chakravarti, Arnab; Yee, Lisa D; Leone, Gustavo; Song, Jonathan W; Ghadiali, Samir N; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2017-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical for mammary ductal development and differentiation, but how mammary fibroblasts regulate ECM remodeling remains to be elucidated. Herein, we used a mouse genetic model to activate platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFRα) specifically in the stroma. Hyperactivation of PDGFRα in the mammary stroma severely hindered pubertal mammary ductal morphogenesis, but did not interrupt the lobuloalveolar differentiation program. Increased stromal PDGFRα signaling induced mammary fat pad fibrosis with a corresponding increase in interstitial hyaluronic acid (HA) and collagen deposition. Mammary fibroblasts with PDGFRα hyperactivation also decreased hydraulic permeability of a collagen substrate in an in vitro microfluidic device assay, which was mitigated by inhibition of either PDGFRα or HA. Fibrosis seen in this model significantly increased the overall stiffness of the mammary gland as measured by atomic force microscopy. Further, mammary tumor cells injected orthotopically in the fat pads of mice with stromal activation of PDGFRα grew larger tumors compared to controls. Taken together, our data establish that aberrant stromal PDGFRα signaling disrupts ECM homeostasis during mammary gland development, resulting in increased mammary stiffness and increased potential for tumor growth. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stromal PDGFR-α Activation Enhances Matrix Stiffness, Impedes Mammary Ductal Development, and Accelerates Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha M. Hammer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM is critical for mammary ductal development and differentiation, but how mammary fibroblasts regulate ECM remodeling remains to be elucidated. Herein, we used a mouse genetic model to activate platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFRα specifically in the stroma. Hyperactivation of PDGFRα in the mammary stroma severely hindered pubertal mammary ductal morphogenesis, but did not interrupt the lobuloalveolar differentiation program. Increased stromal PDGFRα signaling induced mammary fat pad fibrosis with a corresponding increase in interstitial hyaluronic acid (HA and collagen deposition. Mammary fibroblasts with PDGFRα hyperactivation also decreased hydraulic permeability of a collagen substrate in an in vitro microfluidic device assay, which was mitigated by inhibition of either PDGFRα or HA. Fibrosis seen in this model significantly increased the overall stiffness of the mammary gland as measured by atomic force microscopy. Further, mammary tumor cells injected orthotopically in the fat pads of mice with stromal activation of PDGFRα grew larger tumors compared to controls. Taken together, our data establish that aberrant stromal PDGFRα signaling disrupts ECM homeostasis during mammary gland development, resulting in increased mammary stiffness and increased potential for tumor growth.

  19. Sulindac Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vivo in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Scheper

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac has antineoplastic effects on various cancer cell lines; consequently, we assessed sulindac's effects on laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, SCC (HEP-2 cells treated with various cyclooxygenase inhibitors or transfected with constitutively active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 or survivin vectors were analyzed using Western blot analysis, annexin V assay, and cell proliferation assay. In parallel, nude mice injected subcutaneously with HEP-2 cells were either treated intraperitoneally with sulindac or left untreated, and analyzed for tumor weight, survivin expression, and tyrosine-phosphorylated Stat3 expression. In vitro studies confirmed the selective antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of sulindac, which also downregulated Stat3 and survivin protein expression. Stat3 or survivin forced expression partially rescued the antiproliferative effects of sulindac. In vivo studies showed significant repression of HEP-2 xenograft growth in sulindactreated mice versus controls, with near-complete resolution at 10 days. Additionally, tumor specimens treated with sulindac showed downregulation of phosphorylated tyrosine-705 Stat3 and survivin expression. Taken together, our data suggest, for the first time, a specific inhibitory effect of sulindac on tumor growth and survivin expression in laryngeal cancer, both in vitro and in vivo, in a Stat3-dependent manner, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach to head and neck cancer.

  20. Effect of intermittent fasting on prostate cancer tumor growth in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J A; Antonelli, J A; Lloyd, J C; Masko, E M; Poulton, S H; Phillips, T E; Pollak, M; Freedland, S J

    2010-12-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to have anti-cancer properties. However, CR may be difficult to apply in humans secondary to compliance and potentially deleterious effects. An alternative is intermittent CR, or in the extreme case intermittent fasting (IF). In a previous small pilot study, we found 2 days per week of IF with ad libitum feeding on the other days resulted in trends toward prolonged survival of mice bearing prostate cancer xenografts. We sought to confirm these findings in a larger study. A total of 100 (7- to 8-week-old) male severe combined immunodeficiency mice were injected subcutaneously with 1 × 10(5) LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells. Mice were randomized to either ad libitum Western Diet (44% carbohydrates, 40% fat and 16% protein) or ad libitum Western Diet with twice-weekly 24 h fasts (IF). Tumor volumes and mouse bodyweights were measured twice weekly. Mice were killed when tumor volumes reached 1000 mm(3). Serum and tumor were collected for analysis of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) hormonal axis. Overall, there was no difference in mouse survival (P=0.37) or tumor volumes (P ≥ 0.10) between groups. Mouse body weights were similar between arms (P=0.84). IF mice had significantly higher serum IGF-1 levels and IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratios at killing (Pfasting periods. Future studies are required to optimize CR for application in humans.

  1. A low molecular weight polysaccharide isolated from Agaricus blazei suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Y C; Liu, J C; Zhao, X M; Wu, X X

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the low molecular weight polysaccharide extracts from Agaricus blazei are potential antitumor agents or adjuvant in tumor treatment. In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of LMPAB, a low molecular weight polysaccharide isolated from Agaricus blazei, and the molecular mechanisms of its antitumor activity. The antitumor effect of LMPAB was examined using mouse sarcoma 180 (S180) xenograft models. Antiangiogenic effect of LMPAB was determined by chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) angiogenesis and Matrigel-induced neovascularization in vivo models. The mRNA and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were assessed using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Tumor inhibitory rates in the S180 xenograft models were 9.7, 23.9, and 33.0%, respectively, after administration of LMPAB at dose of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks. LMPAB also inhibited angiogenesis in the CAM model and Matrigel-induced neovascularization in C57BL/6 mice. The mRNA and protein levels of VEGF in tumor tissues were significantly down-regulated in the BALB/c mice received LMPAB treatment. Furthermore, significant down-regulation of serum VEGF levels was also observed in the mice. Our data suggest that LMPAB might be a promising agent for tumor therapy, and the antitumor and antiangiogenic effects of LMPAB may be related with down-regulation of VEGF.

  2. FRIZZLED7 Is Required for Tumor Initiation and Metastatic Growth of Melanoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Tiwary

    Full Text Available Metastases are thought to arise from cancer stem cells and their tumor initiating abilities are required for the establishment of metastases. Nevertheless, in metastatic melanoma, the nature of cancer stem cells is under debate and their contribution to metastasis formation remains unknown. Using an experimental metastasis model, we discovered that high levels of the WNT receptor, FZD7, correlated with enhanced metastatic potentials of melanoma cell lines. Knocking down of FZD7 in a panel of four melanoma cell lines led to a significant reduction in lung metastases in animal models, arguing that FZD7 plays a causal role during metastasis formation. Notably, limiting dilution analyses revealed that FZD7 is essential for the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and FZD7 knockdown impeded the early expansion of metastatic melanoma cells shortly after seeding, in accordance with the view that tumor initiating ability of cancer cells is required for metastasis formation. FZD7 activated JNK in melanoma cell lines in vitro and the expression of a dominant negative JNK suppressed metastasis formation in vivo, suggesting that FZD7 may promote metastatic growth of melanoma cells via activation of JNK. Taken together, our findings uncovered a signaling pathway that regulates the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and contributes to metastasis formation in melanoma.

  3. Persistent STAT3 Activation in Colon Cancer Is Associated with Enhanced Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian M. Corvinus

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma (CRC is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries. It has so far been molecularly defined mainly by alterations of the Wnt pathway. We show here for the first time that aberrant activities of the signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT3 actively contribute to this malignancy and, thus, are a potential therapeutic target for CRC. Constitutive STAT3 activity was found to be abundant in dedifferentiated cancer cells and infiltrating lymphocytes of CRC samples, but not in non-neoplastic colon epithelium. Cell lines derived from malignant colorectal tumors lost persistent STAT3 activity in culture. However, implantation of colon carcinoma cells into nude mice resulted in restoration of STAT3 activity, suggesting a role of an extracellular stimulus within the tumor microenvironment as a trigger for STAT activation. STAT3 activity in CRC cells triggered through interleukin-6 or through a constitutively active STAT3 mutant promoted cancer cell multiplication, whereas STAT3 inhibition through a dominant-negative variant impaired IL-6-driven proliferation. Blockade of STAT3 activation in CRCderived xenograft tumors slowed down their development, arguing for a contribution of STAT3 to colorectal tumor growth.

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor enhances bone tumor growth in mice in an osteoclast-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Hirbe, Angela C.; Uluçkan, Özge; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Eagleton, Mark C.; Prior, Julie L.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Apicelli, Anthony; Weilbaecher, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of osteoclast (OC) activity has been associated with decreased tumor growth in bone in animal models. Increased recognition of factors that promote osteoclastic bone resorption in cancer patients led us to investigate whether increased OC activation could enhance tumor growth in bone. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to treat chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, but is also associated with increased markers of OC activity and decreased bone mineral density (BMD). ...

  5. Edema control by cediranib, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-targeted kinase inhibitor, prolongs survival despite persistent brain tumor growth in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamoun, Walid S; Ley, Carsten D; Farrar, Christian T

    2009-01-01

    by an increase in plasma collagen IV. These rapid changes in tumor vascular morphology and function led to edema alleviation -- as measured by MRI and by dry/wet weight measurement of water content -- but did not affect tumor growth. By immunohistochemistry, we found a transient decrease in macrophage...... infiltration and significant but minor changes in tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Systemically, cediranib increased plasma VEGF and placenta growth factor levels, and the number of circulating CXCR4(+)CD45(+) cells. However, by controlling edema, cediranib significantly increased survival of mice...

  6. Growth-promoting effects of sustained swimming in fingerlings of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Josefina; Moya, A; Millán-Cubillo, A; Vélez, E J; Capilla, E; Pérez-Sánchez, J; Gutiérrez, J; Fernández-Borrás, J

    2015-12-01

    Fish growth is strongly influenced by environmental and nutritional factors and changing culture conditions can help optimize it. The importance of early-life experience on the muscle phenotype later in life is well known. Here, we study the effects of 5 weeks of moderate and sustained swimming activity (5 BL s(-1)) in gilthead sea bream during early development. We analysed growth and body indexes, plasma IGF-I and GH levels, feed conversion, composition [proximate and isotopic ((15)N/(13)C)] and metabolic key enzymes (COX, CS, LDH, HOAD, HK, ALAT, ASAT) of white muscle. Moderate and continuous exercise in fingerlings of gilthead sea bream increased plasma IGF-I, whereas it reduced plasma GH. Under these conditions, growth rate improved without any modification to feed intake through an increase in muscle mass and a reduction in mesenteric fat deposits. There were no changes in the content and turnover of muscle proteins and lipid reserves. Glycogen stores were maintained, but glycogen turnover was higher in white muscle of exercised fish. A lower LDH/CS ratio demonstrated an improvement in the aerobic capacity of white muscle, while a reduction in the COX/CS ratio possibly indicated a functional adaptation of mitochondria to adjust to the tissue-specific energy demand and metabolic fuel availability in exercised fish. We discuss the synergistic effects of dietary nutrients and sustained exercise on the different mitochondrial responses.

  7. The United States after the great recession: the challenge of sustainable growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meltzer, Joshua [The Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (United States); Steven, David (The Brookings Institution Center and the Center on International Cooperation at New York University (United States)); Langley, Claire (The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-02-15

    The paper outlines the strengths and weaknesses of the U.S. economic growth model, assesses its’ ability to respond to the key economic, environmental and social challenges currently facing the U.S. and proposes policies that if adopted would move the U.S. onto a more sustainable growth path. The paper provides scenarios of projected future growth trajectories, as well as recommendations for specific policies in key areas: employment, infrastructure, energy and fiscal rebalancing. To reach this goal this paper focuses on four areas for action: Increasing employment, which is the most urgent priority to accelerate recovery from the Great Recession, while addressing underlying structural issues that have led to a decade of poor economic outcomes for most citizens; Investing in the future, as the key marker of whether the United States is prepared to make farsighted decisions to improve education, build new infrastructure and increase innovation; Maximizing an increased energy endowment in a way that grows the economy, while reinforcing the trend towards reducing resource demand and reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and, Fiscal rebalancing, where the United States must insulate economic recovery from the process of fiscal reform while reducing and stabilizing debt over the long term. Finally, we argue that President Obama can re-energize America’s global leadership if he builds on a platform of domestic actions that enhance the sustainability of America’s society and economy.

  8. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  9. Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα regulates granulosa cell tumor (GCT cell proliferation and migration through activation of multiple pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    Full Text Available Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs are the most common ovarian estrogen producing tumors, leading to symptoms of excessive estrogen such as endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial adenocarcinoma. These tumors have malignant potential and often recur. The etiology of GCT is unknown. TGFα is a potent mitogen for many different cells. However, its function in GCT initiation, progression and metastasis has not been determined. The present study aims to determine whether TGFα plays a role in the growth of GCT cells. KGN cells, which are derived from an invasive GCT and have many features of normal granulosa cells, were used as the cellular model. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and RT-PCR results showed that the ErbB family of receptors is expressed in human GCT tissues and GCT cell lines. RT-PCR results also indicated that TGFα and EGF are expressed in the human granulosa cells and the GCT cell lines, suggesting that TGFα might regulate GCT cell function in an autocrine/paracrine manner. TGFα stimulated KGN cell DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, cell viability, cell cycle progression, and cell migration. TGFα rapidly activated EGFR/PI3K/Akt and mTOR pathways, as indicated by rapid phosphorylation of Akt, TSC2, Rictor, mTOR, P70S6K and S6 proteins following TGFα treatment. TGFα also rapidly activated the EGFR/MEK/ERK pathway, and P38 MAPK pathways, as indicated by the rapid phosphorylation of EGFR, MEK, ERK1/2, P38, and CREB after TGFα treatment. Whereas TGFα triggered a transient activation of Akt, it induced a sustained activation of ERK1/2 in KGN cells. Long-term treatment of KGN cells with TGFα resulted in a significant increase in cyclin D2 and a decrease in p27/Kip1, two critical regulators of granulosa cell proliferation and granulosa cell tumorigenesis. In conclusion, TGFα, via multiple signaling pathways, regulates KGN cell proliferation and migration and may play an important role in the growth and metastasis of GCTs.

  10. Does Firms’ Innovation Promote Export Growth Sustainably?—Evidence from Chinese Manufacturing Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangfeng Hao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent theoretical analysis and empirical studies have emphasized that firms’ innovation could significantly improve export growth. However, the positive effect of innovation on exports is likely to change due to unstable domestic offsetting for innovation and increasing worldwide competition for trade. This study aims to explore the dynamic link between them. We first develop a theoretical model between innovation and export growth based on the theory of heterogeneity. Export growth is measured through the dimensions of extensive margin and intensive margin so as to better investigate the effect of innovation on export performance. The propositions of mechanism analysis reveal that the effect of innovation on exports is non-linear rather than sustainable. An empirical study is followed to test the propositions by using data from a representative panel of Chinese manufacturing firms. Consistent with the theoretical predictions, the results show an inverted U-shaped relationship between innovation and extensive margin and a U-shaped relationship between innovation and intensive margin. The non-linear relations are verified by a threshold effect test. Further study shows less innovation and more firms on the left side of the relation curves. The distribution suggests irregular innovation ability among the exporters. Moreover, the role of innovation is more important for export growth and the corresponding threshold is higher in terms of high technological sectors. The contribution of this study is to introduce a comprehensive framework to investigate the dynamic effect of innovation on export growth, serving as a modest spur to induce the following studies to explore the sustainability of innovation effect.

  11. Suppression of peroxiredoxin 4 in glioblastoma cells increases apoptosis and reduces tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyong Kim

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common and aggressive primary brain malignancy, is incurable despite the best combination of current cancer therapies. For the development of more effective therapies, discovery of novel candidate tumor drivers is urgently needed. Here, we report that peroxiredoxin 4 (PRDX4 is a putative tumor driver. PRDX4 levels were highly increased in a majority of human GBMs as well as in a mouse model of GBM. Reducing PRDX4 expression significantly decreased GBM cell growth and radiation resistance in vitro with increased levels of ROS, DNA damage, and apoptosis. In a syngenic orthotopic transplantation model, Prdx4 knockdown limited GBM infiltration and significantly prolonged mouse survival. These data suggest that PRDX4 can be a novel target for GBM therapies in the future.

  12. Preferential lymphatic growth in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue in sustained lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluk, Peter; Adams, Alicia; Phillips, Keeley; Feng, Jennifer; Hong, Young-Kwon; Brown, Mary B; McDonald, Donald M

    2014-05-01

    Lymphatics proliferate, become enlarged, or regress in multiple inflammatory lung diseases in humans. Lymphatic growth and remodeling is known to occur in the mouse trachea in sustained inflammation, but whether intrapulmonary lymphatics exhibit similar plasticity is unknown. We examined the time course, distribution, and dependence on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2/VEGFR-3 signaling of lung lymphatics in sustained inflammation. Lymphatics in mouse lungs were examined under baseline conditions and 3 to 28 days after Mycoplasma pulmonis infection, using prospero heomeobox 1-enhanced green fluorescence protein and VEGFR-3 as markers. Sprouting lymphangiogenesis was evident at 7 days. Lymphatic growth was restricted to regions of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT), where VEGF-C-producing cells were scattered in T-cell zones. Expansion of lung lymphatics after infection was reduced 68% by blocking VEGFR-2, 83% by blocking VEGFR-3, and 99% by blocking both receptors. Inhibition of VEGFR-2/VEGFR-3 did not prevent the formation of BALT. Treatment of established infection with oxytetracycline caused BALT, but not the lymphatics, to regress. We conclude that robust lymphangiogenesis occurs in mouse lungs after M. pulmonis infection through a mechanism involving signaling of both VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3. Expansion of the lymphatic network is restricted to regions of BALT, but lymphatics do not regress when BALT regresses after antibiotic treatment. The lung lymphatic network can thus expand in sustained inflammation, but the expansion is not as reversible as the accompanying inflammation. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aspirin blocks growth of breast tumor cells and tumor-initiating cells and induces reprogramming factors of mesenchymal to epithelial transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Gargi; De, Archana; Das, Amlan; Banerjee, Snigdha; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2015-07-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), also known as aspirin, a classic, nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is widely used to relieve minor aches and pains and to reduce fever. Epidemiological studies and other experimental studies suggest that ASA use reduces the risk of different cancers including breast cancer (BC) and may be used as a chemopreventive agent against BC and other cancers. These studies have raised the tempting possibility that ASA could serve as a preventive medicine for BC. However, lack of in-depth knowledge of the mechanism of action of ASA reshapes the debate of risk and benefit of using ASA in prevention of BC. Our studies, using in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft models, show a strong beneficial effect of ASA in the prevention of breast carcinogenesis. We find that ASA not only prevents breast tumor cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in nude mice xenograft model through the induction of apoptosis, but also significantly reduces the self-renewal capacity and growth of breast tumor-initiating cells (BTICs)/breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) and delays the formation of a palpable tumor. Moreover, ASA regulates other pathophysiological events in breast carcinogenesis, such as reprogramming the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and delaying in vitro migration in BC cells. The tumor growth-inhibitory and reprogramming roles of ASA could be mediated through inhibition of TGF-β/SMAD4 signaling pathway that is associated with growth, motility, invasion, and metastasis in advanced BCs. Collectively, ASA has a therapeutic or preventive potential by attacking possible target such as TGF-β in breast carcinogenesis.

  14. Rac2 controls tumor growth, metastasis and M1-M2 macrophage differentiation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Joshi

    Full Text Available Although it is well-established that the macrophage M1 to M2 transition plays a role in tumor progression, the molecular basis for this process remains incompletely understood. Herein, we demonstrate that the small GTPase, Rac2 controls macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and the metastatic phenotype in vivo. Using a genetic approach, combined with syngeneic and orthotopic tumor models we demonstrate that Rac2-/- mice display a marked defect in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Microarray, RT-PCR and metabolomic analysis on bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from the Rac2-/- mice identify an important role for Rac2 in M2 macrophage differentiation. Furthermore, we define a novel molecular mechanism by which signals transmitted from the extracellular matrix via the α4β1 integrin and MCSF receptor lead to the activation of Rac2 and potentially regulate macrophage M2 differentiation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a macrophage autonomous process by which the Rac2 GTPase is activated downstream of the α4β1 integrin and the MCSF receptor to control tumor growth, metastasis and macrophage differentiation into the M2 phenotype. Finally, using gene expression and metabolomic data from our Rac2-/- model, and information related to M1-M2 macrophage differentiation curated from the literature we executed a systems biologic analysis of hierarchical protein-protein interaction networks in an effort to develop an iterative interactome map which will predict additional mechanisms by which Rac2 may coordinately control macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and metastasis.

  15. CDDO-Me inhibits tumor growth and prevents recurrence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Liu, Yongbo; Liu, Patricia; Zhang, Yiguan; Shaw, Jiajiu; Gautam, Subhash C

    2015-12-01

    Methyl-2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) has shown potent antitumorigenic activity against a wide range of cancer cell lines in vitro and inhibited the growth of liver, lung and prostate cancer in vivo. In the present study, we examined the antitumor activity of CDDO-Me for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells with and without activating K-ras mutations. Treatment of K-ras mutant MiaPaCa-2 and K-ras normal BxPC-3 cells with CDDO-Me elicited strong antiproliferative and proapoptopic responses in both cell lines in culture. The inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis was accompanied by the inhibition of antiapoptotic/prosurvival p-Akt, NF-кB and p-mTOR signaling proteins. For testing efficacy of CDDO-Me in vivo heterotopic and orthotopic xenografts were generated by implanting BxPC-3 and MiaPaCa-2 cells subcutaneously and in the pancreatic tail, respectively. Treatment with CDDO-Me significantly inhibited the growth of BxPC-3 xenografts and reduced the levels of p-Akt and p-mTOR in tumor tissue. In mice with orthotopic MiaPaCa-2 xenografts, treatment with CDDO-Me prolonged the survival of mice when administered following the surgical resection of tumors. The latter was attributed to the eradication of residual PDAC remaining after resection of tumors. These preclinical data demonstrate the potential of CDDO-Me for treating primary PDAC tumors and for preventing relapse/recurrence through the destruction of residual disease.

  16. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase (ASNS) suppresses cell proliferation and inhibits tumor growth in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingxiang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Li; Zheng, Jia; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-10-01

    Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine. ASNS is deemed as a promising therapeutic target and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance in several human cancers. However, its role in gastric cancer tumorigenesis has not been investigated. In this study, we employed small interfering RNA (siRNA) to transiently knockdown ASNS in two gastric cancer cell lines, AGS and MKN-45, followed by growth rate assay and colony formation assay. Dose response curve analysis was performed in AGS and MKN-45 cells with stable ASNS knockdown to assess sensitivity to cisplatin. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo synergistic effects of ASNS depletion and cisplatin on tumor growth. Expression level of ASNS was evaluated in human patient samples using quantitative PCR. Kaplan-Meier curve analysis was performed to evaluate association between ASNS expression and patient survival. Transient knockdown of ASNS inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in AGS and MKN-45 cells. Stable knockdown of ASNS conferred sensitivity to cisplatin in these cells. Depletion of ASNS and cisplatin treatment exerted synergistic effects on tumor growth in AGS xenografts. Moreover, ASNS was found to be up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissues compared with matched normal colon tissues. Low expression of ASNS was significantly associated with better survival in gastric cancer patients. ASNS may contribute to gastric cancer tumorigenesis and may represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of gastric cancer.

  17. Soft matrices downregulate FAK activity to promote growth of tumor-repopulating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Youhua; Wood, Adam Richard; Jia, Qiong; Zhou, Wenwen; Luo, Junyu; Yang, Fang; Chen, Junwei; Chen, Junjian; Sun, Jian; Seong, Jihye; Tajik, Arash; Singh, Rishi; Wang, Ning

    2017-01-29

    Tumor-repopulating cells (TRCs) are a tumorigenic sub-population of cancer cells that drives tumorigenesis. We have recently reported that soft fibrin matrices maintain TRC growth by promoting histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9) demethylation and Sox2 expression and that Cdc42 expression influences H3K9 methylation. However, the underlying mechanisms of how soft matrices induce H3K9 demethylation remain elusive. Here we find that TRCs exhibit lower focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and H3K9 methylation levels in soft fibrin matrices than control melanoma cells on 2D rigid substrates. Silencing FAK in control melanoma cells decreases H3K9 methylation, whereas overexpressing FAK in tumor-repopulating cells enhances H3K9 methylation. Overexpressing Cdc42 or RhoA in the presence of FAK knockdown restores H3K9 methylation levels. Importantly, silencing FAK, Cdc42, or RhoA promotes Sox2 expression and proliferation of control melanoma cells in stiff fibrin matrices, whereas overexpressing each gene suppresses Sox2 expression and reduces growth of TRCs in soft but not in stiff fibrin matrices. Our findings suggest that low FAK mediated by soft fibrin matrices downregulates H3K9 methylation through reduction of Cdc42 and RhoA and promotes TRC growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The importance of training for sustainable growth: Example of Six Sigma implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastasić Aleksandra P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of the business environment, education and training are the basis for sustainable growth. Implementation of Six Sigma (6σ concept and appropriate techniques and tools for quality management contribute to the efficiency and effectiveness of the business as a whole, in a manner that organization achieves and maintains competitive advantage by reducing process variability, costs of scraps, price and need for control, shortening production cycle and increasing product quality, customer satisfaction and profit. Successful implementation of Six Sigma (6σ concept requires involvement of all employees and appropriate level of training.

  19. How can maritime spatial planning contribute to sustainable Blue Growth in the Baltic Sea?

    OpenAIRE

    Tarvainen, Hanna; Tolvanen, Harri; Repka, Sari

    2015-01-01

    The sea and the coasts are drivers of Europe’s economy as many of the economic activities as well as large part of trade depend on the sea. At the European level there is strong political pressure to enhance the growth of maritime economy sectors. The European Union has developed the Integrated Maritime Policy to support the sustainable development of the seas and oceans. The aim is to reach a good environmental status of European seas by 2020. The value of this study is to provi...

  20. Some growth factors in neoplastic tissues of brain tumors of different histological structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Kit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pathologic angiogenesis is typical for angiogenic diseases including tumor growth. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, transforming growth factor alpha and beta (which are also known as “triggers” of angiogenesis, and other factors (Gacche, Meshram, 2013; Nijaguna et al., 2015 play a special role in its development. Evaluation of the important mechanisms of angiogenesis in physiological and pathological conditions remains to be a subject of heightened interest for the past 30 years. It is known that VEGF A is the main trigger of growing blood vessels into the tumor tissue. This is specific mitogen signal for endothelial cells that triggers the mechanisms of cell division and migration. VEGF-induced tumor vasculature has a number of structural and functional features that provide growth and progression of tumors, including increased permeability of blood vessels and their chaotic arrangement.Objective: to study in comparative aspect the level of certain growth factors in the following tissues: glioblastomas, brain metastasis of the breast cancer, meningiomas as well as corresponding peritumoral areas.Materials and methods. Tissue samples were obtained from 56 patients admitted to the surgical treatment in Rostov Research Institute of Oncology: 24 patients had glioblastomas, 19 patients had brain metastasis of the breast cancer, 13 patients with meningiomas without peritumoral edema. Histological control was carried out in all cases. Age of patients ranged from 35 to 72 years. The level of growth factor was detected in the samples of tumor tissue and regions immediately adjacent to the tumor foci (peritumoral area by the method of immunoassay and using standard test systems. The following growth factor were detected: VEGF-A and its receptors VEGF-R1 (BenderMedSystem, Austria, VEGF-C and its receptor VEGF-R3 (BenderMedSystem, Austria, EGF (Biosource, USA, IFR-1 and IFR-2 (Mediagnost, USA, TGF

  1. Does native Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin mediate growth inhibition of a mammary tumor during infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abello-Cáceres, Paula; Pizarro-Bauerle, Javier; Rosas, Carlos; Maldonado, Ismael; Aguilar-Guzmán, Lorena; González, Carlos; Ramírez, Galia; Ferreira, Jorge; Ferreira, Arturo

    2016-09-13

    For several decades now an antagonism between Trypanosoma cruzi infection and tumor development has been detected. The molecular basis of this phenomenon remained basically unknown until our proposal that T. cruzi Calreticulin (TcCRT), an endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone, translocated-externalized by the parasite, may mediate at least an important part of this effect. Thus, recombinant TcCRT (rTcCRT) has important in vivo antiangiogenic and antitumor activities. However, the relevant question whether the in vivo antitumor effect of T. cruzi infection is indeed mediated by the native chaperone (nTcCRT), remains open. Herein, by using specific modified anti-rTcCRT antibodies (Abs), we have neutralized the antitumor activity of T. cruzi infection and extracts thereof, thus identifying nTcCRT as a valid mediator of this effect. Polyclonal anti-rTcCRT F(ab')2 Ab fragments were used to reverse the capacity of rTcCRT to inhibit EAhy926 endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, as detected by BrdU uptake. Using these F(ab')2 fragments, we also challenged the capacity of nTcCRT, during T. cruzi infection, to inhibit the growth of an aggressive mammary adenocarcinoma cell line (TA3-MTXR) in mice. Moreover, we determined the capacity of anti-rTcCRT Abs to reverse the antitumor effect of an epimastigote extract (EE). Finally, the effects of these treatments on tumor histology were evaluated. The rTcCRT capacity to inhibit ECs proliferation was reversed by anti-rTcCRT F(ab')2 Ab fragments, thus defining them as valid probes to interfere in vivo with this important TcCRT function. Consequently, during infection, these Ab fragments also reversed the in vivo experimental mammary tumor growth. Moreover, anti-rTcCRT Abs also neutralized the antitumor effect of an EE, again identifying the chaperone protein as an important mediator of this anti mammary tumor effect. Finally, as determined by conventional histological parameters, in infected animals and in those treated with EE

  2. Citral reduces breast tumor growth by inhibiting the cancer stem cell marker ALDH1A3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Margaret Lois; de Antueno, Roberto; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Sultan, Mohammad; Cruickshank, Brianne Marie; Giacomantonio, Michael Anthony; Giacomantonio, Carman Anthony; Duncan, Roy; Marcato, Paola

    2016-11-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) can be identified by increased Aldefluor fluorescence caused by increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A3 (ALDH1A3), as well as ALDH1A1 and ALDH2. In addition to being a CSC marker, ALDH1A3 regulates gene expression via retinoic acid (RA) signaling and plays a key role in the progression and chemotherapy resistance of cancer. Therefore, ALDH1A3 represents a druggable anti-cancer target of interest. Since to date, there are no characterized ALDH1A3 isoform inhibitors, drugs that were previously described as inhibiting the activity of other ALDH isoforms were tested for anti-ALDH1A3 activity. Twelve drugs (3-hydroxy-dl-kynurenine, benomyl, citral, chloral hydrate, cyanamide, daidzin, DEAB, disulfiram, gossypol, kynurenic acid, molinate, and pargyline) were compared for their efficacy in inducing apoptosis and reducing ALDH1A3, ALDH1A1 and ALDH2-associated Aldefluor fluorescence in breast cancer cells. Citral was identified as the best inhibitor of ALDH1A3, reducing the Aldefluor fluorescence in breast cancer cell lines and in a patient-derived tumor xenograft. Nanoparticle encapsulated citral specifically reduced the enhanced tumor growth of MDA-MB-231 cells overexpressing ALDH1A3. To determine the potential mechanisms of citral-mediated tumor growth inhibition, we performed cell proliferation, clonogenic, and gene expression assays. Citral reduced ALDH1A3-mediated colony formation and expression of ALDH1A3-inducible genes. In conclusion, citral is an effective ALDH1A3 inhibitor and is able to block ALDH1A3-mediated breast tumor growth, potentially via blocking its colony forming and gene expression regulation activity. The promise of ALDH1A3 inhibitors as adjuvant therapies for patients with tumors that have a large population of high-ALDH1A3 CSCs is discussed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Action of hexachlorobenzene on tumor growth and metastasis in different experimental models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontillo, Carolina Andrea, E-mail: caroponti@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Efectos Biológicos de Contaminantes Ambientales, Departamento de Bioquímica Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rojas, Paola, E-mail: parojas2010@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Chiappini, Florencia, E-mail: florenciachiappini@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Efectos Biológicos de Contaminantes Ambientales, Departamento de Bioquímica Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sequeira, Gonzalo, E-mail: chicon27_7@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cocca, Claudia, E-mail: cm_cocca@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Radioisótopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Crocci, Máximo, E-mail: info@crescenti.com.ar [Instituto de Inmunooncología Crescenti, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Colombo, Lucas, E-mail: lucascol2003@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Oncología Angel Roffo, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires,Argentina (Argentina); Lanari, Claudia, E-mail: lanari.claudia@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-05-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread organochlorine pesticide, considered a possible human carcinogen. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We have found that HCB activates c-Src/HER1/STAT5b and HER1/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and cell migration, in an AhR-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the effect of HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 μM) on cell invasion and metalloproteases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we examined in vivo the effect of HCB (0.3, 3, 30 mg/kg b.w.) on tumor growth, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and metastasis using MDA-MB-231 xenografts and two syngeneic mouse breast cancer models (spontaneous metastasis using C4-HI and lung experimental metastasis using LM3). Our results show that HCB (5 μM) enhances MMP2 expression, as well as cell invasion, through AhR, c-Src/HER1 pathway and MMPs. Moreover, HCB increases MMP9 expression, secretion and activity through a HER1 and AhR-dependent mechanism, in MDA-MB-231 cells. HCB (0.3 and 3 mg/kg b.w.) enhances subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. In vivo, using MDA-MB-231 model, the pesticide (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg b.w.) activated c-Src, HER1, STAT5b, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and increased MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels. Furthermore, we observed that HCB stimulated lung metastasis regardless the tumor hormone-receptor status. Our findings suggest that HCB may be a risk factor for human breast cancer progression. - Highlights: ► HCB enhances MMP2 and MMP9 expression and cell invasion in MDA-MB-231, in vitro. ► HCB-effects are mediated through AhR, HER1 and/or c-Src. ► HCB increases subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. ► HCB activates c-Src/HER1 pathway and increases MMPs levels in MDA-MB-231 tumors. ► HCB stimulates lung metastasis in C4-HI and LM3 in vivo models.

  4. Dysregulation of microRNA-34a expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma promotes tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna Kumar

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRs are small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in cancer development where they can act as oncogenes or as tumor-suppressors. miR-34a is a tumor-suppressor that is frequently downregulated in a number of tumor types. However, little is known about the role of miR-34a in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC.miR-34a expression in tumor samples, HNSCC cell lines and endothelial cells was examined by real time PCR. Lipofectamine-2000 was used to transfect miR-34a in HNSCC cell lines and human endothelial cells. Cell-proliferation, migration and clonogenic survival was examined by MTT, Xcelligence system, scratch assay and colony formation assay. miR-34a effect on tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis was examined by in vivo SCID mouse xenograft model. Our results demonstrate that miR-34a is significantly downregulated in HNSCC tumors and cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-34a in HNSCC cell lines significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation, colony formation and migration. miR-34a overexpression also markedly downregulated E2F3 and survivin levels. Rescue experiments using microRNA resistant E2F3 isoforms suggest that miR-34a-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation is predominantly mediated by E2F3a isoform. In addition, tumor samples from HNSCC patients showed an inverse relationship between miR-34a and survivin as well as miR-34a and E2F3 levels. Overexpression of E2F3a completely rescued survivin expression in miR-34a expressing cells, thereby suggesting that miR-34a may be regulating survivin expression via E2F3a. Ectopic expression of miR-34a also significantly inhibited tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis in a SCID mouse xenograft model. Interestingly, miR-34a inhibited tumor angiogenesis by blocking VEGF production by tumor cells as well as directly inhibiting endothelial cell functions.Taken together, these findings suggest that dysregulation of miR-34a expression is common in HNSCC

  5. Withania somnifera Suppresses Tumor Growth of Intracranial Allograft of Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Kumar, Sushil; Chaudhary, Harshita; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2016-08-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent type of primary brain tumor in adults. Their highly proliferative nature, complex cellular composition, and ability to escape therapies have confronted investigators for years, hindering the advancement toward an effective treatment. Agents that are safe and can be administered as dietary supplements have always remained priority to be most feasible for cancer therapy. Withania somnifera (ashwagandha) is an essential ingredient of Ayurvedic preparations and is known to eliminate cancer cells derived from a variety of peripheral tissues. Although our previous studies have addressed the in vitro anti-proliferative and differentiation-inducing properties of ashwagandha on neuronal cell lines, in vivo studies validating the same are lacking. While exploring the mechanism of its action in vitro, we observed that the ashwagandha water extract (ASH-WEX) induced the G2/M phase blockade and caused the activation of multiple pro-apoptotic pathways, leading to suppression of cyclin D1, bcl-xl, and p-Akt, and reduced the expression of polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) as well as the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. ASH-WEX reduced the intracranial tumor volumes in vivo and suppressed the tumor-promoting proteins p-nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p-Akt, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), PSA-NCAM, and cyclin D1 in the rat model of orthotopic glioma allograft. Reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and upregulation of mortalin and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) expression specifically in tumor-bearing tissue further indicated the anti-glioma efficacy of ASH-WEX in vivo. Combining this enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ASH-WEX in glioma with in vivo model system offers new opportunities to develop therapeutic strategy for safe, specific, and effective formulations for treating brain tumors.

  6. Ellagic Acid Inhibits Bladder Cancer Invasiveness and In Vivo Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ceci

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ellagic acid (EA is a polyphenolic compound that can be found as a naturally occurring hydrolysis product of ellagitannins in pomegranates, berries, grapes, green tea and nuts. Previous studies have reported the antitumor properties of EA mainly using in vitro models. No data are available about EA influence on bladder cancer cell invasion of the extracellular matrix triggered by vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A, an angiogenic factor associated with disease progression and recurrence, and tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we have investigated EA activity against four different human bladder cancer cell lines (i.e., T24, UM-UC-3, 5637 and HT-1376 by in vitro proliferation tests (measuring metabolic and foci forming activity, invasion and chemotactic assays in response to VEGF-A and in vivo preclinical models in nude mice. Results indicate that EA exerts anti-proliferative effects as a single agent and enhances the antitumor activity of mitomycin C, which is commonly used for the treatment of bladder cancer. EA also inhibits tumor invasion and chemotaxis, specifically induced by VEGF-A, and reduces VEGFR-2 expression. Moreover, EA down-regulates the expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1, an immune checkpoint involved in immune escape. EA in vitro activity was confirmed by the results of in vivo studies showing a significant reduction of the growth rate, infiltrative behavior and tumor-associated angiogenesis of human bladder cancer xenografts. In conclusion, these results suggest that EA may have a potential role as an adjunct therapy for bladder cancer.

  7. Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor Blockade Inhibits Tumor Growth by Altering the Polarization of Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Jian-Yang; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Chai, Zong-Tao; Cai, Hao; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Ke-Zhi; Kong, Ling-Qun; Zhang, Ning; Ye, Bo-Gen; Ma, De-Ning; Sun, Hui-Chuan

    2017-08-01

    Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and its receptor, CSF-1R, regulate the differentiation and function of macrophages and play an important role in macrophage infiltration in the context of hepatocellular carcinoma. The therapeutic effects of CSF-1R blockade in hepatocellular carcinoma remain unclear. In this study, we found that CSF-1R blockade by PLX3397, a competitive inhibitor with high specificity for CSF-1R tyrosine kinase, significantly delayed tumor growth in mouse models. PLX3397 inhibited the proliferation of macrophages in vitro, but intratumoral macrophage infiltration was not decreased by PLX3397 in vivo Gene expression profiling of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) showed that TAMs from the PLX3397-treated tumors were polarized toward an M1-like phenotype compared with those from vehicle-treated tumors. In addition, PLX3397 treatment increased CD8(+) T-cell infiltration, whereas CD4(+) T-cell infiltration was decreased. Further study revealed that tumor cell-derived CSF-2 protected TAMs from being depleted by PLX3397. In conclusion, CSF-1R blockade delayed tumor growth by shifting the polarization rather than the depletion of TAMs. CSF-1R blockade warrants further investigation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(8); 1544-54. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Protective effect of a polyherbal preparation, Brahma rasayana against tumor growth and lung metastasis in rat prostate model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddipati, Jaya P; Rajeshkumar, N V; Thangapazham, Rajesh L; Sharma, Anuj; Warren, James; Mog, Steven R; Singh, Anoop K; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2004-10-01

    Rasayanas are a group of herbal formulations and are used to improve health of the body. Recent studies have demonstrated the immunostimulatory and antioxidant activities of some of these rasayanas and their usefulness in tumor regression. The objective of the study is to evaluate Brahma rasayana for the inhibition of tumor development and prevention of metastasis in vivo using Copenhagen rats and MAT-LyLu cell model system. Copenhagen rats injected with MAT-LyLu cells were treated with Brahma rasayana once daily. This treatment was followed from the second day of cell inoculation until the end of the experiment. The study comprises a comparison of survival time, body weight, tumor incidence, tumor size, tumor weight, histopathological examination of the lung metastasis and serum testosterone levels between rasayana treated and control animals. Brahma rasayana treatment resulted in a 25-37% decrease in palpable tumor incidence, a delay of 1-2 weeks in the tumor occurrence, lower mean tumor volumes, by as much as 14-35% and significant reduction in tumor weight and lung metastasis in comparison to untreated controls. The Ayurvedic poly herbal preparation, Brahma rasayana may play a beneficial role in preventing tumor incidence, tumor growth and metastatic spread. These are inexpensive preparations that have little or no adverse side effects with a potential as lead chemopreventive compounds and which might prove useful for the treatment of disorders such as human prostate cancer.

  9. Inhibition of Pediatric Glioblastoma Tumor Growth by the Anti-Cancer Agent OKN-007 in Orthotopic Mouse Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho de Souza, Patricia; Mallory, Samantha; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; Li, Xiao-Nan; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y.; Fung, Kar-Ming; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas (pGBM), although rare, are one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in children, with tumors essentially refractory to existing treatments. Here, we describe the use of conventional and advanced in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to assess a novel orthotopic xenograft pGBM mouse (IC-3752GBM patient-derived culture) model, and to monitor the effects of the anti-cancer agent OKN-007 as an inhibitor of pGBM tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry support data is also presented for cell proliferation and tumor growth signaling. OKN-007 was found to significantly decrease tumor volumes (pcancer agent for some patients with pGBMs by inhibiting cell proliferation and angiogenesis, possibly via the PDGFRα pathway, and could be considered as an additional therapy for pediatric brain tumor patients. PMID:26248280

  10. Placenta growth factor-1 antagonizes VEGF-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth by the formation of functionally inactive PIGF-1/VEGF heterodimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, A.; Cao, R.; Pawliuk, R.

    2002-01-01

    , the biological function of its related homolog, placenta growth factor (PlGF), is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that PlGF-1, an alternatively spliced isoform of the PlGF gene, antagonizes VEGF-induced angiogenesis when both factors are coexpressed in murine fibrosarcoma cells. Overexpression of PlGF-1...... signaling pathways. Further, PlGF-1 inhibits the growth of a murine fibrosarcoma by approximately 90% when PlGF-1-expressing tumor cells are implanted in syngeneic mice. In contrast, overexpression of human VEGF in murine tumor cells causes accelerated and exponential growth of primary fibrosarcomas...

  11. Orientation-specific responses to sustained uniaxial stretching in focal adhesion growth and turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Pasapera, Ana M.; Koretsky, Alan P.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2013-01-01

    Cells are mechanosensitive to extracellular matrix (ECM) deformation, which can be caused by muscle contraction or changes in hydrostatic pressure. Focal adhesions (FAs) mediate the linkage between the cell and the ECM and initiate mechanically stimulated signaling events. We developed a stretching apparatus in which cells grown on fibronectin-coated elastic substrates can be stretched and imaged live to study how FAs dynamically respond to ECM deformation. Human bone osteosarcoma epithelial cell line U2OS was transfected with GFP-paxillin as an FA marker and subjected to sustained uniaxial stretching. Two responses at different timescales were observed: rapid FA growth within seconds after stretching, and delayed FA disassembly and loss of cell polarity that occurred over tens of minutes. Rapid FA growth occurred in all cells; however, delayed responses to stretch occurred in an orientation-specific manner, specifically in cells with their long axes perpendicular to the stretching direction, but not in cells with their long axes parallel to stretch. Pharmacological treatments demonstrated that FA kinase (FAK) promotes but Src inhibits rapid FA growth, whereas FAK, Src, and calpain 2 all contribute to delayed FA disassembly and loss of polarity in cells perpendicular to stretching. Immunostaining for phospho-FAK after stretching revealed that FAK activation was maximal at 5 s after stretching, specifically in FAs oriented perpendicular to stretch. We hypothesize that orientation-specific activation of strain/stress-sensitive proteins in FAs upstream to FAK and Src promote orientation-specific responses in FA growth and disassembly that mediate polarity rearrangement in response to sustained stretch. PMID:23754369

  12. The dependence receptor Ret induces apoptosis in somatotrophs through a Pit-1/p53 pathway, preventing tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañibano, Carmen; Rodriguez, Noela L; Saez, Carmen; Tovar, Sulay; Garcia-Lavandeira, Montse; Borrello, Maria Grazia; Vidal, Anxo; Costantini, Frank; Japon, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos; Alvarez, Clara V

    2007-04-18

    Somatotrophs are the only pituitary cells that express Ret, GFRalpha1 and GDNF. This study investigated the effects of Ret in a somatotroph cell line, in primary pituitary cultures and in Ret KO mice. Ret regulates somatotroph numbers by inducing Pit-1 overexpression, leading to increased p53 expression and apoptosis, both of which can be prevented with Ret or Pit-1 siRNA. The Pit-1 overexpression is mediated by sustained activation of PKCdelta, JNK, c/EBPalpha and CREB induced by a complex of Ret, caspase 3 and PKCdelta. In the presence of GDNF, Akt is activated, and the Pit-1 overexpression and resulting apoptosis are blocked. The adenopituitary of Ret KO mice is larger than normal, showing Pit-1 and somatotroph hyperplasia. In normal animals, activation of the Ret/Pit-1/p53 pathway by retroviral introduction of Ret blocked tumor growth in vivo. Thus, somatotrophs have an intrinsic mechanism for controlling Pit-1/GH production through an apoptotic/survival pathway. Ret might be of value for treatment of pituitary adenomas.

  13. Ovarian tumor growth regression using a combination of vascular targeting agents anginex or topomimetic 0118 and the chemotherapeutic irofulven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dings, Ruud P M; Van Laar, Emily S; Webber, Jeremy; Zhang, Yan; Griffin, Robert J; Waters, Stephen J; MacDonald, John R; Mayo, Kevin H

    2008-07-08

    Combination of chemotherapeutic agents and angiogenesis inhibitors is now commonly employed in the clinic to treat cancer. Here, we used angiostatic agents anginex and 0118, in combination with the chemotherapeutic irofulven, to treat human ovarian tumor xenografts in mice. General linear mixed models were used to statistically analyze tumor growth curves. Overall, combination of a low, non-toxic dose of irofulven with either angiogenesis inhibitor was more effective at inhibiting tumor growth than any of the single agent therapies. For example, the anginex/irofulven and 0118/irofulven combinations inhibited tumor growth relative to controls by 92% (pirofulven combinations yielding 100% complete responses. This study suggests that combination therapy of 0118 or anginex and irofulven may be highly effective in the clinical setting.

  14. Latex bead-based artificial antigen-presenting cells induce tumor-specific CTL responses in the native T-cell repertoires and inhibit tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chuanlai; Cheng, Kai; Miao, Shenwei; Wang, Wei; He, Yong; Meng, Fanyan; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2013-02-01

    Cell-free artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) were generated by coupling H-2K(b)/TRP2 tetramers together with anti-CD28 and anti-4-1BB antibodies onto cell-sized latex beads and injected intravenously and subcutaneously into naïve mice and antigen-primed mice (B6, H-2K(b)). Vigorous tumor antigen-specific CTL responses in the native T-cell repertoire in each mouse model were elicited as evaluated by measuring surface CD69 and CD25, intracellular IFN-γ, tetramer staining and cytolysis of melanoma cells. Furthermore, the aAPCs efficiently inhibited subcutaneous tumor growth and markedly delayed tumor progression in tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that bead-based aAPCs represent a potential strategy for the active immunotherapy of cancers or persistent infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rate of tumor growth predicts recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation in patients beyond Milan or UCSF criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanouneh, I A; Macaron, C; Lopez, R; Aucejo, F; Zein, N N

    2011-12-01

    It is likely that some patients whose tumor burdens exceed the current transplant criteria have favorable tumor biology, and that these patients would have low risk of tumor recurrence after liver transplantation (LT). To assess the rate of tumor growth as selection criteria for LT in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We identified all patients who underwent LT for HCC in our institution from 2002 to 2008. Total tumor volume (TTV) was calculated as the sum of the volumes of all tumors on pretransplantation imaging [(4/3)πr3, where r is the maximum radius of each HCC]. The rate of tumor growth was calculated as per-month change in TTV on sequential pretransplantation imaging before any locoregional therapy. A Kaplan-Meier plot was constructed and Cox regression analysis performed. Ninety-two patients were included in the study. The median follow-up was 19.5 (range 10.7-30.7) months during which 12 patients (13%) experienced recurrence of HCC. Twenty-four patients (26%) had HCC beyond the Milan criteria, and the overall survival rate of the entire group was 72%. Higher pre-LT alpha-fetoprotein (hazard ratio [HR] 1.01; P=.001), poorly differentiated tumors (HR 13; P=.039), the presence of microvascular invasion (HR 7.9; P=.001), higher TTV (HR 1.03; P1.61 cm3/mo. Similarly, rate of tumor growth predicted HCC recurrence in those beyond the University of California of San Francisco (UCSF) criteria. Patients with slowly growing tumor who would be currently excluded from LT because tumor burden exceeds traditional Milan and UCSF criteria may have a favorable posttransplantation outcome. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. A RNA antagonist of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, EZN-2968, inhibits tumor cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenberger, Lee M; Horak, Ivan D; Filpula, David

    2008-01-01

    pathways, is associated with poor prognosis in many types of cancer. Therefore, down-regulation of HIF-1alpha protein by RNA antagonists may control cancer growth. EZN-2968 is a RNA antagonist composed of third-generation oligonucleotide, locked nucleic acid, technology that specifically binds and inhibits......-regulation of endogenous HIF-1alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor in the liver. The effect can last for days after administration of single dose of EZN-2968 and is associated with long residence time of locked nucleic acid in certain tissues. In efficacy studies, tumor reduction was found in nude mice implanted...... with DU145 cells treated with EZN-2968. Ongoing phase I studies of EZN-2968 in patients with advanced malignancies will determine optimal dose and schedule for the phase II program....

  17. Furthering knowledge of seaweed growth and development to facilitate sustainable aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Bénédicte; Abreu, Maria Helena; Araujo, Rita; Bruhn, Annette; Coates, Juliet C; De Clerck, Olivier; Katsaros, Christos; Robaina, Rafael R; Wichard, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Macroalgae (seaweeds) are the subject of increasing interest for their potential as a source of valuable, sustainable biomass in the food, feed, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Compared with microalgae, the pace of knowledge acquisition in seaweeds is slower despite the availability of whole-genome sequences and model organisms for the major seaweed groups. This is partly a consequence of specific hurdles related to the large size of these organisms and their slow growth. As a result, this basic scientific field is falling behind, despite the societal and economic importance of these organisms. Here, we argue that sustainable management of seaweed aquaculture requires fundamental understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms controlling macroalgal life cycles - from the production of germ cells to the growth and fertility of the adult organisms - using diverse approaches requiring a broad range of technological tools. This Viewpoint highlights several examples of basic research on macroalgal developmental biology that could enable the step-changes which are required to adequately meet the demands of the aquaculture sector. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Four Sustainability Goals in a Swedish Low-Growth/Degrowth Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eléonore Fauré

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Continual environmental degradation and an unfair distribution of environmental burdens and benefits are two great challenges for humanity. Economic growth is often taken for granted when planning for the future. However, it is often argued that maintaining economic growth conflicts with keeping human activities adjusted to ecological boundaries and finite resources, at least for the more-developed countries. With this paper, we present sustainability goals for building and planning in Sweden to be achieved by 2050 in a context of limited or even negative economic growth. These goals should ensure that all groups in society have sufficient resources and a good life within planetary boundaries. We select four goals in a participatory process: two environmental goals related to climate change and land use and two social goals related to welfare and participation. Our results show that achieving the environmental goals will require significant reductions of Sweden’s greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and land use compared to today’s levels. Regarding the social goals, these are, in many aspects, reasonably well fulfilled in Sweden today, although disparities remain between groups of citizens. The main challenge, however, is to ensure that these goals are fulfilled even within environmental limits and if economic growth should halt.

  19. The analysis of feasibility and effectiveness of vascular targeting radiotherapy based on a model of tumor growth and angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yihong

    Targeting cytotoxic agents to tumor angiogenesis, instead of the tumor itself, is an attractive new approach in Radiation Oncology. Unlike tumor cells, endothelial cells are less likely to develop radio-resistance. Investigations have shown that radiation can cause a definite increase in cell permeability. Permeability changes in the tumor capillary endothelium can contribute to circulatory failure and serve as a site for clot formation. Therefore, radiation could initiate platelet aggregation and blood coagulation locally within the tumor vasculature, leading to tumor cell killing through depletion of oxygen and nutrients. In order to analyze the efficacy of a potential 90Y-labeled compound for vascular targeting radiotherapy and to evaluate the factors that may affect targets' absorbed dose, a tumor vasculature model including its angiogenesis process as a function of time and tumor growth are adopted and improved from the Liotta model. Its output is used to estimate targets' absorbed doses by Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that the effectiveness of vascular targeting therapy depends on the existence of available tumor endothelial cells and target expression. The alphavbeta3 antagonist model compound is less effective in the early stage tumors, which have very few vessels. Although a high administered dose, such as injecting of 2.1 mCi/kg to saturate all available binding sites, can destroy tumor endothelium network, the toxicity to bone marrow makes it impossible to inject such a dose. To a vascularized tumor, after giving one maximum allowable administered activity, 0.83 mCi/kg for the 90Y-labeled model compound, an average of 9.8%, 27.3%, 34.7% and 37.8% of endothelial cells would be killed when treatment starts at day 4, 7, 9 and 12 after tumor development, respectively. Therefore, recurrent treatment by vascular targeting therapy to well-vascularized tumor has the potential to slow down tumor growth or may even cause tumor regression at the primary

  20. Knockout of the Nogo-B Gene Attenuates Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a malignant cancer. It is a challenge to develop anti-HCC drugs due to HCC's extreme aggressiveness and with the sensitivity of the liver to show severe adverse effects. More importantly, the precise mechanisms causing HCC pathogenicity are not known. Our previous study disclosed Nogo-B as a reticulon 4 (Rtn4 family member. In the present study, we first identified that Nogo-B played a critical role in HCC progression. We found, via in vitro and in vivo assays, that Nogo-B was expressed aberrantly in primary HCC tumor tissues and immortal HCC cells but was relatively scarce in the normal liver tissues or cells. Nogo-B knockout, via the CRISPR-Cas9 technique, resulted in significant suppression of HCC cell proliferation and tumor growth. Next-generation sequencing analysis showed that Nogo-B knockout have effects on interleukin-6 (IL-6 signaling pathway. Furthermore, we observed that IL-6 induced phosphorylation of STAT3 (pSTAT3 in wild-type HCC cells, but Nogo-B knockout could reduce IL-6–induced increase of pSTAT3, supporting that Nogo-B affects HCC tumor progression possibly via regulating the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. In conclusion, Nogo-B is expressed aberrantly in HCCs and plays an oncogenic role. These findings support that Nogo-B may be a novel anti-HCC therapeutic target.