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Sample records for sustaining sport-related injuries

  1. Emergency visits for sports-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, C W; Overpeck, M D

    2001-03-01

    We sought to estimate the effect and magnitude of patients with sports-related injuries presenting to hospital emergency departments in the United States and to examine differences in patient and visit characteristics between sports- and nonsports-related injuries. Data from the 1997 and 1998 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a national probabilistic sample of 496 US hospital EDs, were combined to examine emergency visits for sports-related injuries. Data from 16,997 sample ED encounter records for injuries that included narrative cause of injury text were analyzed. Narrative text entries were coded to 1 of 84 sport and recreational activity codes. Sample weights were applied to provide annual national estimates. Estimates of sports-related injury visits were based on 1,775 records with an assigned sports-related activity code. There were an average annual estimated 2.6 million emergency visits for sports-related injuries by persons between the ages of 5 and 24 years. They accounted for over 68% of the total 3.7 million sport injuries presented to the ED by persons of all ages. As a proportion of all kinds of injuries presenting to the ED, sports-related injuries accounted for more than one fifth of the visits by persons 5 to 24 years old. The use rate was 33.9 ED visits per 1,000 persons in this age group (95% confidence interval 30.3 to 37.5). The sports-related injury visit rate for male patients was more than double the rate for female patients (48.2 versus 19.2 per 1,000 persons between 5 and 24 years of age). Visits from sports-related activities for this age group were more frequent for basketball and cycling compared with other categories (eg, baseball, skateboarding, gymnastics). Compared with nonsports-related injuries for this age group, sports-related injuries were more likely to be to the brain or skull and upper and lower extremities. Patients with sports-related injuries were more likely to have a diagnosis of fracture and sprain or

  2. MRI EVALUATION OF SPORTS RELATED KNEE INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Basu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE To investigate the accuracy of MRI in evaluation of sports related knee injuries. MATERIALS AND METHODS From June 2015 to 1 st week of July 2016. Thirty patients referred for sports related knee pain have been included in this study. Patients were subjected to a dedicated MR knee study (GE HD XT 1.5T MR System and correlated knee arthroscopy and surgery. RESULTS The study included Thirty patients complaining of sports related knee pain, only 5 patients (16.67 % were with normal MRI findings and 25 patients (83.33% were with abnormal MRI findings. Among the 25 patients who had injuries of their knees, 15 patients (60% had ACL injuries, 6 patients (24% had PCL injuries, 10 patients (40% had meniscal injuries, 8 patients (32% had collateral ligament injuries, 5 patients (20% had bone injuries and 2 patients (8% had muscular injuries. Only 5 patients (20% were represented with isolated injury and 20 patients (80% were represented with combined injuries. In correlation with arthroscopies and surgeries, morphological analysis was true-positive in 23 (92% patients of the 25 injured patients, and true-negative in 1 (60% patient of the 2 normal patients. Morphological analysis revealed overall 92% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Regarding the 15 patients who had ACL injuries, 13 patients (86.6% were true-positive and 8 patients (80% of the 10 patients who had meniscal injuries were true-positive. CONCLUSION MRI represents the optimal imaging modalities in the evaluation of the sports related knee injuries, which has been shown to be an accurate and non-invasive method of diagnosing ligament, meniscal, cartilage and muscular knee injuries.

  3. Sports-related Head Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Snowboarding, Snowmobiling): 16,948 Horseback Riding: 14,466 Gymnastics/Dance/Cheerleading: 10,223 Golf: 10,035 Hockey: ... changes that are not picked up by CT. Brain Injury Symptoms Pain: Constant or recurring headache Motor ...

  4. Sports-related injuries in primary health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarveld, Frank; Visser, Chantal A. N.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Backx, Frank J. G.

    Methods. Survey study conducted in 612 patients with sports-related injuries by 21 GP trainees in as many GP practices. Inclusion of study subjects took place between September 2007 and April 2009. Results. In total, 694 sports-related injuries were registered. The incidence of sports-related

  5. Sports-related mild traumatic brain injury in female youths

    OpenAIRE

    Keightley, Michelle L.; Yule, Ashley; Garland, Kimberley; Reed, Nicholas; McAuliffe, Jim; Garton, Janice; Green, Stephanie; Taha, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Sports-related concussion or mild-traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common in children who participate in organised sports. We describe two case studies involving 14-year-old girls who each sustained a mTBI during ice hockey competition. Neurocognitive functioning post-injury is compared to baseline pre-injury assessment on the same measures. Results from Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT), Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT-II) and the Attention Netw...

  6. Sports-related injuries in children.

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    Taylor, B L; Attia, M W

    2000-12-01

    To describe the demographics and types of sports-related injuries (SRIs) in children. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of children 5-18 years of age diagnosed as having an SRI in a pediatric emergency department (ED) during a two-year period. Patients were identified by ICD-9 codes. Data collected were age, sex, sport, ED interventions, consultations, mechanism, location, and injury type. Pairwise comparisons were reported as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Six hundred seventy-seven SRIs fit the inclusion criteria; 480 of the patients were male (71%). The mean ages of the males and females were 13.0 years (SD +/- 3.0 yr) and 12.4 years (SD +/- 2.9 yr), respectively. The six most common sports implicated were basketball (19.5%), football (17.1%), baseball/softball (14.9%), soccer (14.2%), in-line skating (Rollerblading)/skating (5.7%), and hockey (4.6%). Sprains/strains (32.0%), fractures (29.4%), contusions/abrasions (19. 3%), and lacerations (9.7%) accounted for 90% of injury types. Pairwise comparison of the four injury types in the six sports listed showed significant associations for contusions/abrasions in baseball, sprains/strains in basketball, fractures in Rollerblading/skating, and lacerations in hockey. Age variance, including all sports, of the younger group (5-11 yr) in fractures and the older group (12-18 yr) in sprains was significant. The most common injury location was wrist/hand (28%), followed by head/face (22%) and ankle/foot (18%). Each had significant sport-specific predilections. Contact with person or object was the mechanism for >50% of the SRIs. Sport-specific mechanisms followed lines drawn from the sport-specific injury types and locations. The pediatric age group incurs a variety of injuries in numerous sports with diverse sex, age, mechanism, location, injury type, and sport-specific differences.

  7. Sports-related mild traumatic brain injury in female youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keightley, Michelle L; Yule, Ashley; Garland, Kimberley; Reed, Nicholas; McAuliffe, Jim; Garton, Janice; Green, Stephanie; Taha, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Sports-related concussion or mild-traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common in children who participate in organised sports. We describe two case studies involving 14-year-old girls who each sustained a mTBI during ice hockey competition. Neurocognitive functioning post-injury is compared to baseline pre-injury assessment on the same measures. Results from Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT), Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT-II) and the Attention Network Test (ANT) revealed decreased performance in attention, memory functioning and reaction time. Furthermore, some measures had not returned to baseline at midseason testing sessions approximately 30–40 days post-injury. The results are discussed with respect to the difference in recovery profiles and the need for thorough and ongoing evaluation following mTBI in the paediatric population, and for girls in particular. PMID:22791784

  8. MRI in assessment of sports related knee injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Hetta

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: MRI represents the optimal imaging tool in the evaluation of the sports related knee injuries, which has been shown to be an accurate and non invasive method of diagnosing ligament, meniscal, cartilage and muscular knee injuries.

  9. Sports-related overuse injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, F

    2015-02-01

    Increased intensity of sports activities combined with a decrease in daily physical activity is making overuse injuries in children more common. These injuries are located mainly in the epiphyseal cartilage. The broad term for these injuries is osteochondrosis, rather than osteochondritis, which more specifically refers to inflammatory conditions of bone and cartilage. The osteochondrosis may be epiphyseal, physeal, or apophyseal, depending on the affected site. The condition can either be in the primary deformans form or the dissecans form. While there is no consensus on the etiology of osteochondrosis, multiple factors seem to be involved: vascular, traumatic, or even microtraumatic factors. Most overuse injuries involve the lower limbs, especially the knees, ankle and feet. The most typical are Osgood-Schlatter disease and Sever's disease; in both conditions, the tendons remain relatively short during the pubescent grown spurt. The main treatment for these injuries is temporary suspension of athletic activities, combined with physical therapy in many cases. Surgery may be performed if conservative treatment fails. It is best, however, to try to prevent these injuries by analyzing and correcting problems with sports equipment, lifestyle habits, training intensity and the child's level of physical activity, and by avoiding premature specialization. Pain in children during sports should not be considered normal. It is a warning sign of overtraining, which may require the activity to be modified, reduced or even discontinued. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Current topics in sports-related head injuries: a review.

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    Nagahiro, Shinji; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    We review the current topic in sports-related head injuries including acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), concussion, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Sports-related ASDH is a leading cause of death and severe morbidity in popular contact sports like American football in the USA and judo in Japan. It is thought that rotational acceleration is most likely to produce not only cerebral concussion but also ASDH due to the rupture of a parasagittal bridging vein, depending on the severity of the rotational acceleration injury. Repeated sports head injuries increase the risk for future concussion, cerebral swelling, ASDH or CTE. To avoid fatal consequences or CTE resulting from repeated concussions, an understanding of the criteria for a safe post-concussion return to play (RTP) is essential. Once diagnosed with a concussion, the athlete must not be allowed to RTP the same day and should not resume play before the concussion symptoms have completely resolved. If brain damage has been confirmed or a subdural hematoma is present, the athlete should not be allowed to participate in any contact sports. As much remains unknown regarding the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of sports-related concussion, ASDH, and CTE, basic and clinical studies are necessary to elucidate the crucial issues in sports-related head injuries.

  11. Corticosteroids in sports-related injuries: Friend or Foe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-03-16

    Mar 16, 2002 ... Corticosteroids are used in the sports arena in many different forms and for many different reasons. They are potent anti- inflammatory drugs that inhibit the inflammatory cascade, and are thus seen as useful adjuncts in the treatment of some sports- related injuries. On the basis of their ability to down ...

  12. Biomechanical aspects of sports-related head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min S; Levy, Michael L

    2008-02-01

    With the increased conditioning, size, and speed of professional athletes and the increase in individuals engaging in sports and recreational activities, there is potential for rising numbers of traumatic brain injuries in sports. Fortunately, parallel strides in basic research technology and improvements in computer and video technology have created a new era of discovery in the study of the biomechanical aspects of sports-related head injuries. Although prevention will always be the most important factor in reducing the incidence of sports-related traumatic brain injuries, ongoing studies will lead to the development of newer protective equipment, improved recognition and management of concussions on the field of play, and modification of rules and guidelines to make these activities safer and more enjoyable.

  13. Imaging of sports-related hip and groin injuries.

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    Lischuk, Andrew W; Dorantes, Thomas M; Wong, William; Haims, Andrew H

    2010-05-01

    A normally functioning hip joint is imperative for athletes who use their lower extremities with running, jumping, or kicking activities. Sports-related injuries of the hip and groin are far less frequent than injuries to the more distal aspect of the extremity, accounting for less than 10% of lower extremity injuries. Despite the lower incidence, hip and groin injuries can lead to significant clinical and diagnostic challenges related to the complex anatomy and biomechanical considerations of this region. Loads up to 8 times normal body weight have been documented in the joint in common daily activities, such as jogging, with significantly greater force expected during competitive athletics. Additionally, treatment for hip and groin injuries can obviate the participation of medical and surgical specialties, with a multidisciplinary approach frequently required. Delay in diagnosis and triage of these injuries may cause loss of time from competition and, potentially, early onset of degenerative changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip has proven to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of sports-related hip and groin injuries in the setting of negative radiographs. With its exquisite soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capabilities, and lack of ionizing radiation, MRI is unmatched in the noninvasive diagnosis of intra-articular and extra-articular pathology, as well as intraosseous processes. This review focuses on MRI of common athletic injuries of the hip and groin, including acetabular labral tears, femoral acetabular impingement syndrome, muscle injuries around the hip and groin (including athletic pubalgia), and athletic osseous injuries.

  14. Patterns of ENT injuries in sports-related accidents.

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    Suggs, Bradley J; Cannon, C Ron

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate sports-related ENT injuries regarding demographical trends of patients, location and mechanism of injuries, treatments required, and ability to return to sports activities, an observational study of patients was conducted. Each of the 120 participants in the study was evaluated in a private practice clinic. Males were injured more frequently, and the most common ages affected were 12 to 15-year-olds. Most injuries were the result of collision with other players or from impact of game balls, and most injuries occurred during sporting competitions. The most commonly injured structure was the nose. Most patients were managed medically and able to return to sporting activities quickly. While the most frequent mechanisms for sports injuries are not always preventable, health care providers should be aware of these trends described regarding types of sports commonly producing injuries and the predominant sites of injury to provide optimal care for athletic participants.

  15. The clinical spectrum of sport-related traumatic brain injury.

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    Jordan, Barry D

    2013-04-01

    Acute and chronic sports-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are a substantial public health concern. Various types of acute TBI can occur in sport, but detection and management of cerebral concussion is of greatest importance as mismanagement of this syndrome can lead to persistent or chronic postconcussion syndrome (CPCS) or diffuse cerebral swelling. Chronic TBI encompasses a spectrum of disorders that are associated with long-term consequences of brain injury, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), dementia pugilistica, post-traumatic parkinsonism, post-traumatic dementia and CPCS. CTE is the prototype of chronic TBI, but can only be definitively diagnosed at autopsy as no reliable biomarkers of this disorder are available. Whether CTE shares neuropathological features with CPCS is unknown. Evidence suggests that participation in contact-collision sports may increase the risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease, but the data are conflicting. In this Review, the spectrum of acute and chronic sport-related TBI is discussed, highlighting how examination of athletes involved in high-impact sports has advanced our understanding of pathology of brain injury and enabled improvements in detection and diagnosis of sport-related TBI.

  16. The epidemiology of sports-related injuries in older adults: a central European epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerlander, Christian; Braito, Matthias; Kates, Stephen; Jeske, Christian; Roth, Tobias; Blauth, Michael; Dallapozza, Christian

    2012-10-01

    The population is rapidly aging and remaining more active over the age of 65. An increasing number of sports related injuries in individuals 65 and older are thus anticipated. The aim of this study is to analyze the epidemiology of sports injuries in the age group aged 65 and older. Data from the medical records of adults aged 65 years and older who were treated for sports-related injuries at a level one trauma center between December 1994 and February 2008 was collected and statistically analyzed. A total of 2635 patients met our inclusion criteria. There were 1647 men (62.5%) and 988 women (37.5%) with a mean age of 70.9 years. The yearly number of injuries doubled during the study period (1996-2007). The most common mechanism of injury was a simple fall from standing height (69%). Nearly 75% of all injuries occurred during alpine skiing, cycling or mountain climbing. The median Injury Severity Score was 4. Minor injuries and wounds (40%) were recorded most commonly followed by fractures (27%), sprains, ligament injuries (19%) and injuries of muscles and tendons (6%). The most frequent diagnoses were minor injuries to the head and ligament injuries around the knee joint. Injuries to the upper extremities occurred in 33.7%, injuries to the lower extremities in 29.4% and injuries to the head occurred in 20% of the patients. Women sustained substantially more fractures than men. Adults aged 65 and older are remaining active in sports, which results in higher numbers of sports related injuries in this age group. Identification of type, mechanism and distribution of the injuries can help with the recognition of risk factors for injury. This may enable us to develop appropriate preventative measures to reduce the incidence, and morbidity of such injuries.

  17. Sports-related injuries in athletes with disabilities.

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    Fagher, K; Lexell, J

    2014-10-01

    The number of athletes with disabilities participating in organized sports and the popularity of the Paralympic Games is steadily increasing around the world. Despite this growing interest and the fact that participation in sports places the athlete at risk for injury, there are few studies concerning injury patterns, risk factors, and prevention strategies of injuries in disabled athletes. In this systematic literature search and critical review, we summarize current knowledge of the epidemiology of sports-related injuries in disabled athletes and describe their characteristics, incidence, prevalence, and prevention strategies. The outcomes of interest were any injury, either an acute trauma or an overuse event. PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar were systematically searched and 25 of 605 identified studies met the inclusion criteria. Lower extremity injuries were more common in walking athletes, whereas upper extremity injuries were more prevalent in wheelchair athletes. The methodologies and populations varied widely between the studies. Few studies were sports or disability specific, which makes it difficult to determine specific risk factors, and few studies reported injury severity and prevention of injuries. Further longitudinal, systematic sports and disability specific studies are needed in order to identify and prevent injuries in athletes with disabilities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A Review of Sport-Related Head Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    We review current topics in sport-related head injuries including acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), traumatic cerebrovascular disease, cerebral concussion, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Sports-related ASDH is a leading cause of death and severe morbidity in popular contact sports like American football and Japanese judo. Rotational acceleration can cause either cerebral concussion or ASDH due to rupture of a parasagittal bridging vein. Although rare, approximately 80% of patients with cerebral infarction due to sport participation are diagnosed with ischemia or infarction due to arterial dissection. Computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and ultrasound are useful for diagnosing arterial dissection; ultrasound is particularly useful for detecting dissection of the common and internal carotid arteries. Repeated sports head injuries increase the risks of future concussion, cerebral swelling, ASDH, and CTE. To avoid fatal consequences of CTE, it is essential to understand the criteria for safe post-concussion sports participation. Once diagnosed with a concussion, an athlete should not be allowed to return to play on the same day and should not resume sports before the concussion symptoms have completely resolved. Information about the risks and management of head injuries in different sports should be widely disseminated in educational institutions and by sport organization public relations campaigns.

  19. Sport-related ankle injuries attending an accident and emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Man, Chi-Yin; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Cheung, Shui-Yuk; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2008-10-01

    This study investigated the sport-related ankle injuries attending an accident and emergency (A&E) department during a 1-year period. A total of 1715 sports injuries cases attending an A&E department from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2005 were prospectively recorded. Details of each classified case were recorded in a computerised record system by the triage nurse. At the end of the study period, all sport-related ankle injury cases were analysed. A total of 240 sport-related ankle injury cases were reported. Most cases were sustained from basketball (32.9%), soccer (31.7%) and hiking (5.8%) sports. The majority of the cases was ligamentous sprains (81.3%) and fractures (10.4%). The mean age of all patients was 24.6 years (S.D. = 12.3). Four fifths (80.4%) were male patients. All cases were not life threatening. Most cases (99.2%) were referred to orthopedics specialty. Radiography was routinely employed in 99.2% of the cases. Ligamentous sprains were mostly sustained in basketball (37.4%) and soccer (28.7%), and were often treated with bandaging (60.0%) and analgesics (48.7%). Most cases were discharged with or without referral to physiotherapy and specialty clinic (95.4%). Fractures were mostly sustained in soccer (52.0%), basketball (20.0%) and hiking (16.0%), and were very often admitted to hospital wards (84.0%). The estimated A&E attendance rate for all sports injuries, ankle injuries, ligamentous sprains and fractures were 1.68, 0.24, 0.19 and 0.02/1000 person-year. The results of this study together with the previous study on ankle sprain epidemiology suggested the following sports ankle injury pattern in Hong Kong-major and serious ankle ligamentous sprains and fractures were sustained from basketball, soccer and hiking, leading to A&E attendance, while minor sprains were sustained in running and jogging and racquet sports. We suggested that the Sports medicine specialists in Hong Kong should emphasise the ankle injury prevention strategies in these sports.

  20. Prevalence and patterns of combat sport related maxillofacial injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirani Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to assess the prevalence, distribution, and patterns of injury among athletes engaged in combat sports and compare the prevalence, pattern, and types of oral and maxillofacial trauma in these athletes. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 male athletes engaged in four combat sports (boxing, taekwondo, kickboxing, and Muay Thai who had sustained bodily trauma were studied; 95 subjects with at least one traumatic injury to the face requiring treatment were referred to us by the physician team. The type of injury (facial laceration, facial fractures, jaw dislocation, etc., site of facial injury (jaw, nose, malar bone, teeth, etc., dental injuries (tooth fracture, displacement, luxation, and avulsion, causative sport (boxing, taekwondo, kickboxing, and Muay Thai as well as demographic data were recorded. Injuries were examined clinically and radiographically, and treated accordingly by a specialist. Treatment data and demographics were recorded for each subject. Recorded data were assessed, and c2 , ANOVA, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to statistically analyze and compare the data. Results: Of 120 subjects, 95 male subjects (79.2%, aged 18-25 years (avg. 20 years, had at least one traumatic injury to the face requiring medical treatment. These injuries included facial laceration, bone fractures (nose, mandible, and zygoma, dental injuries (displacement, luxation, fracture, and avulsion, and mandibular dislocation which were recorded in 83 (69.2%, 55 (45.1%, 53 (44.2%, and 8 (6.7% cases respectively. Statistically significant differences were encountered among various injuries and the sports; kickboxing caused the most maxillofacial injuries and was identified as more injurious. Tooth fractures (59.7% were the most common dental injuries, and the nose (84.7% was the most frequently fractured facial bone. Lacerations were more common in Thai-boxers (93.3%. Injuries were significantly greater in professional rather

  1. Prevalence and patterns of combat sport related maxillofacial injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirani, Gholamreza; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein; Ashuri, Alireza; Eshkevari, Pooyan Sadr

    2010-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the prevalence, distribution, and patterns of injury among athletes engaged in combat sports and compare the prevalence, pattern, and types of oral and maxillofacial trauma in these athletes. A total of 120 male athletes engaged in four combat sports (boxing, taekwondo, kickboxing, and Muay Thai) who had sustained bodily trauma were studied; 95 subjects with at least one traumatic injury to the face requiring treatment were referred to us by the physician team. The type of injury (facial laceration, facial fractures, jaw dislocation, etc.), site of facial injury (jaw, nose, malar bone, teeth, etc.), dental injuries (tooth fracture, displacement, luxation, and avulsion), causative sport (boxing, taekwondo, kickboxing, and Muay Thai) as well as demographic data were recorded. Injuries were examined clinically and radiographically, and treated accordingly by a specialist. Treatment data and demographics were recorded for each subject. Recorded data were assessed, and χ(2), ANOVA, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to statistically analyze and compare the data. Of 120 subjects, 95 male subjects (79.2%), aged 18-25 years (avg. 20 years), had at least one traumatic injury to the face requiring medical treatment. These injuries included facial laceration, bone fractures (nose, mandible, and zygoma), dental injuries (displacement, luxation, fracture, and avulsion), and mandibular dislocation which were recorded in 83 (69.2%), 55 (45.1%), 53 (44.2%), and 8 (6.7%) cases respectively. Statistically significant differences were encountered among various injuries and the sports; kickboxing caused the most maxillofacial injuries and was identified as more injurious. Tooth fractures (59.7%) were the most common dental injuries, and the nose (84.7%) was the most frequently fractured facial bone. Lacerations were more common in Thai-boxers (93.3%). Injuries were significantly greater in professional rather than amateur athletes. In this study

  2. Rheumatic diseases presenting as sports-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Fabio; Lambert, Elaine; Fredericson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Most individuals seeking consultation at sports medicine clinics are young, healthy athletes with injuries related to a specific activity. However, these athletes may have other systemic pathologies, such as rheumatic diseases, that may initially mimic sports-related injuries. As rheumatic diseases often affect the musculoskeletal system, they may masquerade as traumatic or mechanical conditions. A systematic review of the literature found numerous case reports of athletes who presented with apparent mechanical low back pain, sciatica pain, hip pain, meniscal tear, ankle sprain, rotator cuff syndrome and stress fractures and who, on further investigation, were found to have manifestations of rheumatic diseases. Common systemic, inflammatory causes of these musculoskeletal complaints include ankylosing spondylitis (AS), gout, chondrocalcinosis, psoriatic enthesopathy and early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Low back pain is often mechanical among athletes, but cases have been described where spondyloarthritis, especially AS, has been diagnosed. Neck pain, another common mechanical symptom in athletes, can be an atypical presentation of AS or early RA. Hip or groin pain is frequently related to injuries in the hip joint and its surrounding structures. However, differential diagnosis should be made with AS, RA, gout, psudeogout, and less often with haemochromatosis and synovial chondochromatosis. In athletes presenting with peripheral arthropathy, it is mandatory to investigate autoimmune arthritis (AS, RA, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus), crystal-induced arthritis, Lyme disease and pigmented villonodular synovitis. Musculoskeletal soft tissue disorders (bursitis, tendinopathies, enthesitis and carpal tunnel syndrome) are a frequent cause of pain and disability in both competitive and recreational athletes, and are related to acute injuries or overuse. However, these disorders may occasionally be a manifestation of RA, spondyloarthritis

  3. Twitter and traumatic brain injury: A content and sentiment analysis of tweets pertaining to sport-related brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workewych, Adriana M; Ciuffetelli Muzzi, Madeline; Jing, Rowan; Zhang, Stanley; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Cusimano, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Sport-related traumatic brain injuries are a significant public health burden, with hundreds of thousands sustained annually in North America. While sports offer numerous physical and social health benefits, traumatic brain injuries such as concussion can seriously impact a player's life, athletic career, and sport enjoyment. The culture in many sports encourages winning at all costs, placing athletes at risk for traumatic brain injuries. As social media has become a central part of everyday life, the content of users' messages often reflects the prevailing culture related to a particular event or health issue. We hypothesized that Twitter data might be useful for understanding public perceptions and misperceptions of sport-related traumatic brain injuries. We performed a content and sentiment analysis of 7483 Twitter® tweets related to traumatic brain injuries in sports collected during June and July 2013. We identified five major themes. Users tweeted about personal traumatic brain injuries experiences, reported traumatic brain injuries in professional athletes, shared research about sport-related concussions, and discussed policy and safety in injury prevention, such as helmet use. We identified mixed perceptions of and sentiment toward traumatic brain injuries in sports: both an understanding that brain injuries are serious and disregard for activities that might reduce the public burden of traumatic brain injuries were prevalent in our Twitter analysis. While the scientific and medical community considers a concussion a form of traumatic brain injuries, our study demonstrates a misunderstanding of this fact among the public. In our current digital age, social media can provide useful insight into the culture around a health issue, facilitating implementation of prevention and treatment strategies.

  4. Sport-Related Structural Brain Injury: 3 Cases of Subdural Hemorrhage in American High School Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Gardner, Ryan M; Kuhn, Andrew W; Solomon, Gary S; Bonfield, Christopher M; Zuckerman, Scott L

    2017-10-01

    The risk of sport-related concussion (SRC) has emerged as a major public health concern. In rare instances, sport-related head injuries can be even more severe, such as subdural hemorrhage, epidural hemorrhage, or malignant cerebral edema. Unlike SRCs, sport-related structural brain injury (SRSBI) is rare, may require neurosurgical intervention, and can lead to permanent neurologic deficit or death. Data characterizing SRSBI are limited, and many have recognized the need to better understand these catastrophic brain injuries. The goal of the current series is to describe, in detail, the presentation, management, and outcomes of examples of these rare injuries. During the fall of 2015, three high school football players presented with acute subdural hemorrhages following in-game collisions and were treated at our institution within a span of 2 months. For the 2 athletes who required surgical intervention, a previous SRC was sustained within 4 weeks before the catastrophic event. One year after injury, 2 players have returned to school, though with persistent deficits. One patient remains nonverbal and wheelchair bound. None of the athletes has returned to sports. Acute subdural hemorrhage resultant from an in-game football collision is rare. The temporal proximity of the reported SRSBIs to recent SRCs emphasizes the importance of return-to-play protocols and raises questions regarding the possibility of second impact syndrome. Although epidemiologic conclusions cannot be drawn from this small sample, these cases provide a unique opportunity to demonstrate the presentation, management, and long-term outcomes of SRSBI in American high school football. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High-grade renal injuries are often isolated in sports-related trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, DP; Redshaw, JD; Breyer, BN; Smith, TG; Erickson, BA; Majercik, SD; Gaither, TW; Craig, JR; Gardner, S.; Presson, AP; Zhang, C.; Hotaling, JM; Brant, WO; Myers, JB

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Introduction: Most high-grade renal injuries (American Association for Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grades III-V) result from motor vehicle collisions associated with numerous concomitant injuries. Sports-related blunt renal injury tends to have a different mechanism, a solitary blow to the flank. We hypothesized that high-grade renal injury is often isolated in sports-related renal trauma. Material and methods: We identified patients with AAST grades III...

  6. High-grade renal injuries are often isolated in sports-related trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Darshan P; Redshaw, Jeffrey D; Breyer, Benjamin N; Smith, Thomas G; Erickson, Bradley A; Majercik, Sarah D; Gaither, Thomas W; Craig, James R; Gardner, Scott; Presson, Angela P; Zhang, Chong; Hotaling, James M; Brant, William O; Myers, Jeremy B

    2015-07-01

    Most high-grade renal injuries (American Association for Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grades III-V) result from motor vehicle collisions associated with numerous concomitant injuries. Sports-related blunt renal injury tends to have a different mechanism, a solitary blow to the flank. We hypothesized that high-grade renal injury is often isolated in sports-related renal trauma. We identified patients with AAST grades III-V blunt renal injuries from four level 1 trauma centres across the United States between 1/2005 and 1/2014. Patients were divided into "Sport" or "Non-sport" related groups. Outcomes included rates of hypotension (systolic blood pressure 110bpm), concomitant abdominal injury, and procedural/surgical intervention between sports and non-sports related injury. 320 patients met study criteria. 18% (59) were sports-related injuries with the most common mechanisms being skiing, snowboarding and contact sports (25%, 25%, and 24%, respectively). Median age was 24 years for sports and 30 years for non-sports related renal injuries (p=0.049). Males were more commonly involved in sports related injuries (85% vs. 72%, p=0.011). Median injury severity score was lower for sports related injuries (10 vs. 27, ptrauma was more likely to be isolated without other significant injury (69% vs. 39% (ptrauma is more likely to occur in isolation without other abdominal or thoracic injuries and clinicians must have a high suspicion of renal injury with significant blows to the flank during sports activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Changing trends in paintball sport-related ocular injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineman, M S; Fischer, D H; Jeffers, J B; Buerger, D G; Repke, C

    2000-01-01

    To describe the type and severity of ocular injuries caused by paintballs, to summarize the outcomes, to determine if the injury occurred in a commercial or noncommercial setting, to compare the number of injuries in each setting as a function of time, and to ascertain whether eye-protective devices were worn and why they were removed. Retrospective analysis of 35 patients who sustained ocular injuries caused by paintballs and underwent evaluation and treatment at an eye hospital from January 1, 1985, to September 30, 1998. Thirty-five eyes of 35 patients underwent a complete ocular examination, diagnostic testing, and surgical intervention when indicated. All patients were male (average age, 22 years). Twenty-six patients (74%) had an initial visual acuity of 20/200 or worse, and visual acuity in 16 (46%) remained 20/200 or worse on follow-up (range, 2 weeks to 22 months). Traumatic hyphema was seen in 21 patients (60%). Twenty-two patients (63%) had access to goggles, 7 (33%) of whom removed them due to fogging before the injury. Injuries sustained after 1995 were 5.8 times (relative risk, 5.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-22.4) more likely to occur during a noncommercial war game than those occurring in 1995 or before. As the popularity of war games increases, so does the potential for serious ocular injury caused by paint pellet guns. Most injuries seen after 1995 occurred in noncommercial war game settings, where the use of eye-protective devices is not required. Industry standards for eye protection have been developed recently and should be implemented.

  8. Acute sports-related spinal cord injury: contemporary management principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, David H; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Berta, Scott C

    2003-07-01

    Improvements in helmet and equipment design have led to significant decreases in overall injury incidence, but no available helmet can prevent catastrophic injury to the neck and cervical spine. The most effective strategy for preventing this type of injury appears to be careful instruction, training, and regulations designed to eliminate head-first contact. The incidence of football-related quadriplegia has decreased from a peak of 13 cases per one million players between 1976 and 1980 to 3 per million from 1991 to 1993, mostly as a result of systematic research and an organized effort to eliminate high-risk behavior. An episode of transient quadriparesis does not appear to be a risk factor for catastrophic spinal cord injury. Torg reported that 0 of 117 quadriplegics in the National Football Head and Neck Injuries Registry recalled a prior episode of transient quadriparesis, and 0 of the 45 patients originally studied in his transient quadriparesis cohort have subsequently suffered quadriplegia. The significance of developmental spinal stenosis is unclear. Plain radiographic identification of a narrow spinal canal in a player sustaining cervical cord neurapraxia warrants further evaluation by MRI to rule out functional stenosis. The presence of actual cord deformation or compression on MRI should preclude participation in high-risk contact or collision sports.

  9. Sport-related structural brain injury associated with arachnoid cysts: a systematic review and quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Prather, Colin T; Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K; Bonfield, Christopher M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Arachnoid cysts (ACs) are congenital lesions bordered by an arachnoid membrane. Researchers have postulated that individuals with an AC demonstrate a higher rate of structural brain injury after trauma. Given the potential neurological consequences of a structural brain injury requiring neurosurgical intervention, the authors sought to perform a systematic review of sport-related structural-brain injury associated with ACs with a corresponding quantitative analysis. METHODS Titles and abstracts were searched systematically across the following databases: PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. The review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Peer-reviewed case reports, case series, or observational studies that reported a structural brain injury due to a sport or recreational activity (hereafter referred to as sport-related) with an associated AC were included. Patients were excluded if they did not have an AC, suffered a concussion without structural brain injury, or sustained the injury during a non-sport-related activity (e.g., fall, motor vehicle collision). Descriptive statistical analysis and time to presentation data were summarized. Univariate logistic regression models to assess predictors of neurological deficit, open craniotomy, and cystoperitoneal shunt were completed. RESULTS After an initial search of 994 original articles, 52 studies were found that reported 65 cases of sport-related structural brain injury associated with an AC. The median age at presentation was 16 years (range 4-75 years). Headache was the most common presenting symptom (98%), followed by nausea and vomiting in 49%. Thirteen patients (21%) presented with a neurological deficit, most commonly hemiparesis. Open craniotomy was the most common form of treatment (49%). Bur holes and cyst fenestration were performed in 29 (45%) and 31 (48%) patients, respectively. Seven patients (11%) received

  10. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Preventing and Managing Sport-Related Dental and Oral Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Trenton E.; Piland, Scott G.; Caswell, Shane V.; Ranalli, Dennis; Mills, Stephen; Ferrara, Michael S.; Courson, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To provide athletic trainers, health care professionals, and all those responsible for the care of athletes with clinical recommendations for preventing and managing sport-related dental and oral injuries. Background: Participation in competitive sports continues to grow at both the interscholastic and intercollegiate levels. Therefore, exposure to, and the incidence of athletic-related injury, including orofacial injury, will also likely increase. At the time of this writing, the leading governing agencies for interscholastic (National Federation of State High School Associations) and intercollegiate (National Collegiate Athletic Association) sports require only protective orofacial equipment (eg, mouthguards) for 5 and 4, respectively, of their sanctioned sports. Although orofacial injuries represent a small percentage of all sport-related injuries, the financial burden associated with these injuries (eg, tooth avulsion) can exceed $15 000 over an adult life. Therefore, effective management of sport-related dental injuries is critical to the long-term financial, physical, and emotional health of people who have experienced dental trauma. Recommendations: Based upon the current evidence regarding sport-related orofacial injury, we provide recommendations related to planning considerations, education, and mouthguard efficacy, material, fabrication, and care considerations. Additionally, suggested best practices for managing sport-related dental injury are also given for athletic trainers and other health care professionals. PMID:27875057

  11. Paralympic athletes' perceptions of their experiences of sports-related injuries, risk factors and preventive possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagher, Kristina; Forsberg, Anna; Jacobsson, Jenny; Timpka, Toomas; Dahlström, Örjan; Lexell, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Our knowledge of sports-related injuries in para-sport is limited and there are no data on how Paralympic athletes themselves perceive an injury. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore Paralympic athletes' perceptions of their experiences of sports-related injuries, risk factors and preventive possibilities. Eighteen Swedish Paralympic athletes with vision impairment, intellectual impairment, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, myelomeningocele, dysplasia and neuromuscular disorder, representing 10 different para-sports, were interviewed. The qualitative phenomenographic method was used to interpret the data. The analysis revealed nine categories of perceptions of experiences. The athletes perceived that their impairments were involved in the cause and consequential chains associated with a sports-related injury. Other categories that denoted and described these injuries were: sport overuse, risk behaviour, functional limitations, psychological stressors, the normalised pain, health hazards, individual possibilities to prevent sports-related injuries and unequal prerequisites. This qualitative study revealed that Paralympic athletes' perceptions of their experiences of sports-related injuries are complex and multifactorial, and in several ways differ from able-bodied athletes. This needs to be considered in the sports health and safety work within the Paralympic Movement as well as in the design of future injury surveillance systems and preventive programmes.

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Preventing and Managing Sport-Related Dental and Oral Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Trenton E; Piland, Scott G; Caswell, Shane V; Ranalli, Dennis; Mills, Stephen; Ferrara, Michael S; Courson, Ron

    2016-10-01

    To provide athletic trainers, health care professionals, and all those responsible for the care of athletes with clinical recommendations for preventing and managing sport-related dental and oral injuries. Participation in competitive sports continues to grow at both the interscholastic and intercollegiate levels. Therefore, exposure to, and the incidence of athletic-related injury, including orofacial injury, will also likely increase. At the time of this writing, the leading governing agencies for interscholastic (National Federation of State High School Associations) and intercollegiate (National Collegiate Athletic Association) sports require only protective orofacial equipment (eg, mouthguards) for 5 and 4, respectively, of their sanctioned sports. Although orofacial injuries represent a small percentage of all sport-related injuries, the financial burden associated with these injuries (eg, tooth avulsion) can exceed $15 000 over an adult life. Therefore, effective management of sport-related dental injuries is critical to the long-term financial, physical, and emotional health of people who have experienced dental trauma. Based upon the current evidence regarding sport-related orofacial injury, we provide recommendations related to planning considerations, education, and mouthguard efficacy, material, fabrication, and care considerations. Additionally, suggested best practices for managing sport-related dental injury are also given for athletic trainers and other health care professionals.

  13. A Sport Fitness Index for Assessment of Sport-Related Injury Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Gary B; Colston, Marisa A; Baker, Carrie S

    2016-09-01

    To develop and validate a concise survey that will identify athletes who possess elevated injury risk. Cohort study. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletic program. Cohorts of 188 and 146 college athletes who participated during successive academic years. The first cohort provided responses to 4 joint-specific outcome surveys that were related to subsequent time-loss injury occurrence. Receiver operating characteristic analysis identified survey items that provided best discrimination, which were combined with a negative life event stress item to create a new 10-item survey. The second cohort provided responses to the new survey, which were converted to a 0 to 100 score. Construct validity was assessed through documentation of time-loss injuries sustained during the preceding 12 months and predictive validity was assessed through prospective documentation of sport-related sprains and strains. Cronbach alpha was calculated to assess internal consistency. Each of the outcome survey items used to develop the new survey demonstrated much greater specificity than sensitivity. Both the retrospective and prospective receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses identified scores of 96 and 88 as cut-points that provided good discrimination between injured and noninjured cases. The area under the curve was 0.69 (P alpha was 0.89 (90% CI, 0.86-0.91). Self-reported effects of previous injury may be one method to efficiently identify athletes who possess elevated injury risk, and subsequently deliver preventive interventions, thereby providing an alternative method to time-intensive functional testing.

  14. Sports-related brain injuries: connecting pathology to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, James; Connolly, Ian D; Dangelmajer, Sean; Kintzing, James; Ho, Allen L; Grant, Gerald

    2016-04-01

    Brain injuries are becoming increasingly common in athletes and represent an important diagnostic challenge. Early detection and management of brain injuries in sports are of utmost importance in preventing chronic neurological and psychiatric decline. These types of injuries incurred during sports are referred to as mild traumatic brain injuries, which represent a heterogeneous spectrum of disease. The most dramatic manifestation of chronic mild traumatic brain injuries is termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which is associated with profound neuropsychiatric deficits. Because chronic traumatic encephalopathy can only be diagnosed by postmortem examination, new diagnostic methodologies are needed for early detection and amelioration of disease burden. This review examines the pathology driving changes in athletes participating in high-impact sports and how this understanding can lead to innovations in neuroimaging and biomarker discovery.

  15. Musculoskeletal ultrasound: an alternative imaging modality for sports-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriani, Martin; Kattapuram, Susan V

    2003-02-01

    Advanced technology and increasing clinical experience have established sonography as a reliable imaging modality for sports-related injuries. Tears of muscles and tendons, tendinosis, and tenosynovitis are promptly diagnosed using ultrasound. Dynamic assessment of joints can be performed, allowing diagnoses of conditions that may remain undetected when evaluated with conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Sonography provides expeditious image guidance for procedures such as drainage of fluid collections and cysts. This article reviews the applications of sonography to sports-related injuries in which its diagnostic performance may be comparable to magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. The Sports-Related Injuries and Illnesses in Paralympic Sport Study (SRIIPSS): a study protocol for a prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagher, Kristina; Jacobsson, Jenny; Timpka, Toomas; Dahlström, Örjan; Lexell, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Paralympic sport provides sporting opportunities for athletes with a disability, with the Paralympic Games as the main event. Participation in sport is, however, associated with a significant risk for sustaining injuries and illnesses. Our knowledge of sports-related injuries and illnesses in Paralympic sport is very limited and there are no large-scale epidemiological cohort studies. The purpose here is to present a protocol for a prospective longitudinal study: The Sports-Related Injuries and Illnesses in Paralympic Sport Study (SRIIPSS). An argument-based method for investigation of design problems was used to structure the study protocol. The primary requirement of the protocol is to allow prospective studies over time and include exposure to both training and competition. To reflect the complexity of Paralympic sport with athletes' pre-existing impairments, use of assistive equipment, pain and other and medical issues, it is required that the data collection system is specifically adapted to Paralympic sport. To allow the collection of data, at the same time as there is limited access to coaches and medical personnel, it is advantageous that data can be collected online directly from the athletes. Based on this a self-report athlete monitoring system will be developed, where the athletes can enter data weekly via their mobile phones or lap-tops. Data will be collected from around 100 Swedish Paralympic athletes for approximately 1 year, which will allow us to i) prospectively estimate the annual incidence of sports-related injuries and illnesses and ii) explore risk factors and mechanisms for sustaining sports-related injuries and illnesses based on athlete exposure and training loads. For effective implementation of injury and illness prevention measures, comprehensive epidemiological knowledge is required. This study will be the first prospective longitudinal self-report study of sports-related injuries and illnesses in Paralympic sport over a longer period

  17. Supplements of interest for sport-related injury and sources of supplement information among college athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, B M; Overton, R F; Carraway, V G; Cash, B C

    2007-01-01

    This study examined incidence of sport-related injury, interest in supplements to treat injury, and sources of supplement information among 145 college athletes (89 males, 56 females). A survey was used to assess sport-related injuries, interest in three categories of supplements to treat injury, and sources of supplement information among college athletes who used athletic training room and weight training facilities. Pearson chi2 was used to evaluate differences in frequency distribution of responses by sex. Sport-related injuries were experienced by 91% of athletes (93% males, 88% females). Overall, 17% of participants were interested in supplements to improve circulation, 34% for joint and soft tissue repair, and 22% to reduce inflammation. Significant sex differences were not found for any supplements in any categories evaluated. Males were more likely than females to rely on strength coaches (37%, 20%) for supplement information. Athletic trainers (71% of athletes), coaches (60%), and physicians (41%) were the primary professionals, and the internet (79%), magazines (68%), and television (52%) the most popular sources of media for supplement information. The majority of athletes experience injury during their college athletic career and 17% to 34% express an interest in supplements for injury treatment. Athletes would benefit from scientifically sound guidance to identify appropriate supplements for injury treatment and internet sites for supplement information. Future research should identify if athletes are more likely to increase supplement use when they are injured or if supplement use is more prevalent among athletes who are prone to injury.

  18. Corticosteroids in sports-related injuries: Friend or Foe | Rotunno ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corticosteroids act as potent anti-inflammatory drugs and have been used in various sport settings for the treatment of both acute and chronic injuries. Basic physiology and mechanisms of action for gluco- and mineralocorticoids are discussed. Methods of administration, the action on the inflammatory response, and ...

  19. Epidemiology of Sports-Related Eye Injuries in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, R Sterling; Sheffield, Isaac D; Canner, Joseph K; Schneider, Eric B

    2016-12-01

    Ocular trauma can lead to lifelong sequelae, and sports-related ocular injuries have been shown to disproportionately affect the young. Studies quantifying and characterizing the incidence and type of injuries seen with sports-related ocular trauma may be useful for resource utilization, training, and prevention efforts. To examine the emergency department (ED) burden of sports-related ocular trauma in the United States. This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, containing data from approximately 30 million ED visits annually at more than 900 hospitals nationwide, from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2013, to determine factors associated with sports-related ocular trauma. Annual incidence of sports-related ocular trauma, broken down by age, sex, mechanism of injury, and related activity, as well as factors associated with short-term impaired vision. During the study period, 120 847 individuals (mean age, 22.3 years [95% CI, 21.9-22.7]; 96 872 males, 23 963 females, and 12 with missing data) presented with sports-related ocular trauma, which was the primary diagnosis in 85 961 patients. Injuries occurred most commonly among males (69 849 [81.3%]; 95% CI, 80.6%-81.9%) and occurred most frequently as a result of playing basketball (22.6%; 95% CI, 21.7%-23.6%), playing baseball or softball (14.3%; 95% CI, 13.7%-14.9%), and shooting an air gun (11.8%; 95% CI, 10.8%-12.8%). Odds of presentation to the ED with impaired vision were greatest for paintball and air gun injuries relative to football-related injuries (odds ratio, 4.75; 95% CI, 2.21-10.19 and 3.71; 95% CI, 2.34-5.88, respectively; P < .001). In our study, approximately 30 000 individuals presented annually to EDs in the United States with sports-related eye injuries; in more than 70% of these cases, eye injuries were the primary diagnosis. Activities involving projectiles pose the greatest risk for visual impairment in the short term, although

  20. Sports-related lung injury during breath-hold diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijacika, Tanja; Dujic, Zeljko

    2016-12-01

    The number of people practising recreational breath-hold diving is constantly growing, thereby increasing the need for knowledge of the acute and chronic effects such a sport could have on the health of participants. Breath-hold diving is potentially dangerous, mainly because of associated extreme environmental factors such as increased hydrostatic pressure, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hypothermia and strenuous exercise.In this article we focus on the effects of breath-hold diving on pulmonary function. Respiratory symptoms have been reported in almost 25% of breath-hold divers after repetitive diving sessions. Acutely, repetitive breath-hold diving may result in increased transpulmonary capillary pressure, leading to noncardiogenic oedema and/or alveolar haemorrhage. Furthermore, during a breath-hold dive, the chest and lungs are compressed by the increasing pressure of water. Rapid changes in lung air volume during descent or ascent can result in a lung injury known as pulmonary barotrauma. Factors that may influence individual susceptibility to breath-hold diving-induced lung injury range from underlying pulmonary or cardiac dysfunction to genetic predisposition.According to the available data, breath-holding does not result in chronic lung injury. However, studies of large populations of breath-hold divers are necessary to firmly exclude long-term lung damage. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  1. Adult sports-related traumatic brain injury in United States trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; Burke, John F; Chan, Andrew K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berger, Mitchel S; Manley, Geoffrey T; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important public health concern estimated to affect 300,000 to 3.8 million people annually in the United States. Although injuries to professional athletes dominate the media, this group represents only a small proportion of the overall population. Here, the authors characterize the demographics of sports-related TBI in adults from a community-based trauma population and identify predictors of prolonged hospitalization and increased morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS Utilizing the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), the authors retrospectively analyzed sports-related TBI data from adults (age ≥ 18 years) across 5 sporting categories-fall or interpersonal contact (FIC), roller sports, skiing/snowboarding, equestrian sports, and aquatic sports. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify predictors of prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS), medical complications, inpatient mortality rates, and hospital discharge disposition. Statistical significance was assessed at α sports-related TBIs were documented in the NTDB, which represented 18,310 incidents nationally. Equestrian sports were the greatest contributors to sports-related TBI (45.2%). Mild TBI represented nearly 86% of injuries overall. Mean (± SEM) LOSs in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU) were 4.25 ± 0.09 days and 1.60 ± 0.06 days, respectively. The mortality rate was 3.0% across all patients, but was statistically higher in TBI from roller sports (4.1%) and aquatic sports (7.7%). Age, hypotension on admission to the emergency department (ED), and the severity of head and extracranial injuries were statistically significant predictors of prolonged hospital and ICU LOSs, medical complications, failure to discharge to home, and death. Traumatic brain injury during aquatic sports was similarly associated with prolonged ICU and hospital LOSs, medical complications, and failure to be discharged to

  2. Prevalence and clinical features of sports-related lumbosacral stress injuries in the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideto; Murakami, Mototsune; Nishizawa, Kazuya

    2017-05-01

    Stress injuries (stress fractures and stress reactions) of the lumbosacral region are one of the causes of sports-related lower back pain in young individuals. These injuries can be detected by bone marrow edema lesion on MRI. However, little is known about the prevalence and clinical features of early stage lumbosacral stress injuries. This study aimed to evaluate the epidemiology of lumbosacral stress injuries. A total of 312 patients (under 18 years of age) who complained of sports-related lower back pain that had lasted for ≥7 days underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. We reviewed patients' records retrospectively. MRI showed that 33.0% of the patients had lumbar stress injuries and 1.6% had sacral stress injuries. Lumbar stress injuries were more common in males than in females and were found in 30% of 13- to 18-year-old patients. About 50% of the patients that participated in soccer or track and field were diagnosed with lumbar stress injuries. No clinical patterns in the frequencies of sacral stress injuries were detected due to the low number of patients that suffered this type of injury. Plain radiography is rarely able to detect the early stage lesions associated with lumbosacral stress injuries, but such lesions can be detected in the caudal-ventral region of the pars interarticularis on sagittal computed tomography scans. Thirty-three percent of young patients that complained of sports-related lower back pain for ≥7 days had lumbar stress injuries, while 1.6% of them had sacral stress injuries. Clinicians should be aware of the existence of these injuries. MRI is useful for diagnosing lumbosacral stress injuries.

  3. Factors affecting sports-related orofacial injuries and the importance of mouthguards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Elif Bahar; Ozel, Emre

    2014-06-01

    Sports dentistry is one of the most recent and upcoming fields in dentistry. It includes mainly the prevention and management of sports-related orofacial injuries and associated oral diseases or traumas. The dentist can play a critical role in informing athletes, coaches, and patients and their parents about the importance of prevention, treatment, and diagnosis for orofacial injuries in sports. The most significant aspect in preventing sports-related orofacial injuries is wearing basic protective devices such as properly fitting helmets, face masks, and/or mouthguards. A properly fitted mouthguard prevents violent contact between the upper and lower dentition. According to the American Society for Testing and Materials, there are three types of mouthguards: custom-fabricated mouthguards, mouth-formed guards, and stock mouthguards. Essential properties of the various materials used in the manufacture of mouthguards include water absorption, density, and thickness as well as temperature transmission, energy absorption, and drawing strength (tensile strength) of custom-made mouthguards. Currently, a variety of materials is being used for mouthguards, most commonly polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene copolymer or ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer and polyvinyl chloride. Mouthguard use is significant for athletes, since dentists play an important role in the design and application of these in clinical practice. The purpose of this article is to review the importance of mouthguard use, the incidence and location of orofacial sports injuries, the risk factors for such injuries, and the types of mouthguards and their roles in the prevention of sports-related orofacial injuries.

  4. Rehabilitation of pediatric musculoskeletal sport-related injuries: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, E; Sala, D A

    2010-06-01

    The recent increase in sports participation in children and adolescents has resulted in the increase of sport-related injuries and the need for rehabilitation. The purposes of this study were to review studies involving rehabilitation of pediatric musculoskeletal sport-related injuries to determine the study design (level of evidence), inclusion of a reference to skeletal immaturity, adequacy of the description of the rehabilitation program and treatment outcome. Medline(1950-June 2009), CINAHL(1982-June 2009), Cochrane and journals (sports, physical therapy, pediatric orthopedic) were searched using the terms: physical therapy or rehabilitation plus sports/athletic injuries or individual sports plus pediatrics, adolescent, children, youth and young. Inclusion criteria were: published in English peer-reviewed journal, examined rehabilitation/management, subjects sport-related musculoskeletal injury/diagnosis. Study design (level of evidence), injury/diagnosis, sport involved, information regarding skeletal maturity, description of rehabilitation program and treatment outcome were extracted. Fifty-seven studies met the criteria: 75% were case reports, 21% case series, 4% retrospective comparative studies and no randomized-controlled trials. Forty-seven different diagnoses were investigated. Fifty-four percent did not address skeletal immaturity; 26% involved injuries/diagnoses unique to skeletally immature. Components and parameters of each study's rehabilitation program and outcome are reported. Current literature lacks well-designed controlled studies: 1) to address issues relevant to the pediatric injured athlete and 2) to determine the optimum program for each sport-related injury/diagnosis to expedite return to sport. Programs were often inadequately detailed to permit replication.

  5. Sports-related eye and adnexal injuries in the Western Australian paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskin, Annette K; Yardley, Anne-Marie E; Hanman, Kate; Lam, Geoffrey; Mackey, David A

    2016-09-01

    To identify the causes of sports-related eye and adnexal injuries in children in Perth, Western Australia, to determine which sporting activities pose the highest risk of eye and adnexal injury to children. We performed a 12-year retrospective review of children admitted to hospital from 2002 to 2013 with sports-related ocular and adnexal eye injuries. The main outcome measures were the cause and type of ocular and adnexal injuries, age and gender risk factors. A total of 93 cases of sports-related ocular and adnexal injury were identified in the 12-year time period. A peak in injuries occurred for 12- to 14-year-olds with a second peak in 6- to 8-year-olds; the median age was 8.82 years (range = 1.59-16.47). Cycling, football (including soccer and Australian Rules Football), tennis, trampolining, fishing and swimming were the sports responsible for the greatest number of injuries, a total of 63%. More than one-third (35%) of injuries resulted from being struck by a blunt object, and more than a quarter (26%) were as a result of contact with a blunt projectile. Serious ocular and adnexal injuries have occurred in children as a result of participating in sports, with cycling and football being the largest contributors in the 12-year period we assessed. As we continue to encourage children to spend more time participating in sports and recreational activities, identifying associated risk factors will help us develop injury prevention strategies to promote eye safety for children. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Sports-related concussion increases the risk of subsequent injury by about 50% in elite male football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Anna; Nordström, Peter; Ekstrand, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about the short-term and long-term sequelae of concussion, and about when athletes who have sustained such injuries can safely return to play. To examine whether sports-related concussion increases the risk of subsequent injury in elite male football players. Prospective cohort study. Injuries were registered for 46 male elite football teams in 10 European countries in the 2001/2002-2011/2102 seasons. Two survival models were used to analyse whether concussion increased the subsequent risk of an injury in the first year. During the follow-up period, 66 players sustained concussions and 1599 players sustained other injuries. Compared with the risk following other injuries, concussion was associated with a progressively increased risk of a subsequent injury in the first year (0 to medical evaluation, which includes neurological and cognitive assessment, is warranted within the concussion management and return-to- play process. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Pediatric sports-related traumatic brain injury in United States trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, John K; Winkler, Ethan A; Burke, John F; Chan, Andrew K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berger, Mitchel S; Manley, Geoffrey T; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children is a significant public health concern estimated to result in over 500,000 emergency department (ED) visits and more than 60,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually. Sports activities are one important mechanism leading to pediatric TBI. In this study, the authors characterize the demographics of sports-related TBI in the pediatric population and identify predictors of prolonged hospitalization and of increased morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS Utilizing the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), the authors retrospectively analyzed sports-related TBI data from children (age 0-17 years) across 5 sports categories: fall or interpersonal contact (FIC), roller sports, skiing/snowboarding, equestrian sports, and aquatic sports. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify predictors of prolonged length of stay (LOS) in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU), medical complications, inpatient mortality rates, and hospital discharge disposition. Statistical significance was assessed at α sports-related TBIs were recorded in the NTDB, and these injuries represented 11,614 incidents nationally after sample weighting. Fall or interpersonal contact events were the greatest contributors to sports-related TBI (47.4%). Mild TBI represented 87.1% of the injuries overall. Mean (± SEM) LOSs in the hospital and ICU were 2.68 ± 0.07 days and 2.73 ± 0.12 days, respectively. The overall mortality rate was 0.8%, and the prevalence of medical complications was 2.1% across all patients. Severities of head and extracranial injuries were significant predictors of prolonged hospital and ICU LOSs, medical complications, failure to discharge to home, and death. Hypotension on admission to the ED was a significant predictor of failure to discharge to home (OR 0.05, 95% CI 0.03-0.07, p injury incurred during roller sports was independently associated with prolonged hospital LOS compared

  8. Sports-related injuries in youth athletes: is overscheduling a risk factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Anthony; Lazaro, Rondy M; Bergeron, Michael F; Keyser, Laura; Benjamin, Holly; Brenner, Joel; d'Hemecourt, Pierre; Grady, Matthew; Philpott, John; Smith, Angela

    2011-07-01

    To examine the association between "overscheduling" and sports-related overuse and acute injuries in young athletes and to identify other potential contributing factors to create a working definition for "overscheduling injury." Survey. Six university-based sports medicine clinics in North America. Athletes aged 6 to 18 years (13.8 ± 2.6) and their parents and pediatric sports medicine-trained physicians. Questionnaires developed from literature review and expert consensus to investigate overscheduling and sports-related injuries were completed over a 3-month period. Physician's clinical diagnosis and injury categorization: acute not fatigue related (AI), overuse not fatigue related (OI), acute fatigue related (AFI), or overuse fatigue related (OFI). Overall, 360 questionnaires were completed (84% response rate). Overuse not fatigue-related injuries were encountered most often (44.7%), compared with AI (41.9%) and OFI (9.7%). Number of practices within 48 hours before injury was higher (1.7 ± 1.5) for athletes with OI versus those with AI (1.3 ± 1.4; P = 0.025). Athlete or parent perception of excessive play/training without adequate rest in the days before the injury was related to overuse (P = 0.016) and fatigue-related injuries (P = 0.010). Fatigue-related injuries were related to sleeping ≤6 hours the night before the injury (P = 0.028). When scheduling youth sporting events, potential activity volume and intensity over any 48-hour period, recovery time between all training and competition bouts, and potential between-day sleep time (≥ 7 hours) should be considered to optimize safety. An overscheduling injury can be defined as an injury related to excessive planned physical activity without adequate time for rest and recovery, including between training sessions/competitions and consecutive days.

  9. Epidemiology of sport-related spinal cord injuries: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christie WL; Tator, Charles H.

    2016-01-01

    Context Despite the recognition of sports as a significant contributor in the etiology of spinal cord injury (SCI), no studies have systematically explored the epidemiology of SCI caused by sports. Objective This paper aims to give a systematic overview of the epidemiology of sport-related spinal cord injury around the world. Methods A systematic review was conducted to identify published literature reporting the epidemiology of SCI caused by sports. The literature search was conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Sportdiscus with date limits 1980 through to July 2015. Data from 54 studies covering 25 countries was extracted and collated. Results Important findings include identification of 6 countries in which sports accounts for over 13% of SCI (highest to lowest: Russia, Fiji, New Zealand, Iceland, France and Canada); individual sports with high risk for SCI (diving, skiing, rugby, and horseback riding); and the most common level of injury for various sports (almost entirely cervical for hockey, skiing, diving and American football, while over half of horseback riding and snowboarding injuries are thoracic or lumbosacral). Conclusion This paper identifies countries and sports with higher rates of sport-related SCIs where implementation of prevention programs and reporting systems to track SCI epidemiology may be helpful, and highlights gaps in our current knowledge for further investigation. The comparison of SCI occurrence for each sport across countries, as well as examination of the specific characteristics of SCI incurred for individual sports will assist in directing efforts for prevention. PMID:26864974

  10. Epidemiology of sport-related spinal cord injuries: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christie Wl; Eng, Janice J; Tator, Charles H; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Despite the recognition of sports as a significant contributor in the etiology of spinal cord injury (SCI), no studies have systematically explored the epidemiology of SCI caused by sports. This paper aims to give a systematic overview of the epidemiology of sport-related spinal cord injury around the world. A systematic review was conducted to identify published literature reporting the epidemiology of SCI caused by sports. The literature search was conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Sportdiscus with date limits 1980 through to July 2015. Data from 54 studies covering 25 countries was extracted and collated. Important findings include identification of 6 countries in which sports accounts for over 13% of SCI (highest to lowest: Russia, Fiji, New Zealand, Iceland, France and Canada); individual sports with high risk for SCI (diving, skiing, rugby, and horseback riding); and the most common level of injury for various sports (almost entirely cervical for hockey, skiing, diving and American football, while over half of horseback riding and snowboarding injuries are thoracic or lumbosacral). This paper identifies countries and sports with higher rates of sport-related SCIs where implementation of prevention programs and reporting systems to track SCI epidemiology may be helpful, and highlights gaps in our current knowledge for further investigation. The comparison of SCI occurrence for each sport across countries, as well as examination of the specific characteristics of SCI incurred for individual sports will assist in directing efforts for prevention.

  11. Imaging of Sports-related Injuries of the Lower Extremity in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, M Cody; Jaramillo, Diego; Bancroft, Laura; Varich, Laura; Logsdon, Gregory; Servaes, Sabah

    2016-10-01

    With increasing participation and intensity of training in youth sports in the United States, the incidence of sports-related injuries is increasing, and the types of injuries are shifting. In this article, the authors review sports injuries of the lower extremity, including both acute and overuse injuries, that are common in or specific to the pediatric population. Common traumatic injuries that occur in individuals of all ages (eg, tears of the acetabular labrum and anterior cruciate ligament) are not addressed, although these occur routinely in pediatric sports. However, some injuries that occur almost exclusively in high-level athletes (eg, athletic pubalgia) are reviewed to increase awareness and understanding of these entities among pediatric radiologists who may not be familiar with them and thus may not look for them. Injuries are described according to their location (ie, hip, knee, or foot and ankle) and pathologic process (eg, apophysitis, osteochondritis dissecans). Examples of abnormalities and normal variants of the anatomy that are often misdiagnosed are provided. The injuries reviewed represent a common and growing subset of pathologic processes about which all pediatric and musculoskeletal radiologists should be knowledgeable. Understanding physeal injury is especially important because missed diagnoses can lead to premature physeal closure and osteoarthritis. © RSNA, 2016.

  12. Sports-related testicular injuries and the use of protective equipment among young male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Jared M; Sumfest, Joel M

    2014-12-01

    To survey young male athletes to determine the self-reported prevalence of sports-related testicular injuries and use of protective equipment among adolescents and young adults. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to male students at local high schools and colleges. Respondents were asked about personal and team member usage of athletic cups and history of testicular injuries. Returned surveys were analyzed for descriptive statistics and compared between high school and college respondents. Approximately 1700 surveys were distributed and 731 returned. The mean age of all respondents was 17.7 years. Across all sports, 18% of athletes experienced a testicular injury during sports and 36.4% observed injuries in team members, whereas only 12.9% of respondents reported wearing athletic cups. The prevalence of testicular injuries for lacrosse, wrestling, baseball, and football was 48.5%, 32.8%, 21%, and 17.8%, respectively. Of athletes reporting a prior injury, 20.1% reported that they wear a cup now. Rates of athletic cup usage were significantly less for college baseball, football, and all respondents compared with their high school counterparts. Previously reported rates of testicular injury with sports participation may underestimate the prevalence of these injuries among adolescent and young adult athletes among whom testicular protective equipment is infrequently used. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. College Sports-Related Injuries - United States, 2009-10 Through 2013-14 Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Marshall, Stephen W; Dompier, Thomas P; Corlette, Jill; Klossner, David A; Gilchrist, Julie

    2015-12-11

    Sports-related injuries can have a substantial impact on the long-term health of student-athletes. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) monitors injuries among college student-athletes at member schools. In academic year 2013-14, a total of 1,113 member schools fielded 19,334 teams with 478,869 participating student-athletes in NCAA championship sports (i.e., sports with NCAA championship competition) (1). External researchers and CDC used information reported to the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) by a sample of championship sports programs to summarize the estimated national cumulative and annual average numbers of injuries during the 5 academic years from 2009-10 through 2013-14. Analyses were restricted to injuries reported among student-athletes in 25 NCAA championship sports. During this period, 1,053,370 injuries were estimated to have occurred during an estimated 176.7 million athlete-exposures to potential injury (i.e., one athlete's participation in one competition or one practice). Injury incidence varied widely by sport. Among all sports, men's football accounted for the largest average annual estimated number of injuries (47,199) and the highest competition injury rate (39.9 per 1,000 athlete-exposures). Men's wrestling experienced the highest overall injury rate (13.1 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.2 per 1,000). Among women's sports, gymnastics had the highest overall injury rate (10.4 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.0 per 1,000), although soccer had the highest competition injury rate (17.2 per 1,000). More injuries were estimated to have occurred from practice than from competition for all sports, with the exception of men's ice hockey and baseball. However, injuries incurred during competition were somewhat more severe (e.g., requiring ≥7 days to return to full participation) than those acquired during practice. Multiple strategies are employed by NCAA and others to reduce the number of injuries in

  14. Evaluation of MRI-US Fusion Technology in Sports-Related Musculoskeletal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-On, Manuel; Til-Pérez, Lluís; Balius, Ramón

    2015-06-01

    A combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with real-time high-resolution ultrasound (US) known as fusion imaging may improve visualization of musculoskeletal (MSK) sports medicine injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of MRI-US fusion technology in MSK sports medicine. This study was conducted by the medical services of the FC Barcelona. The participants included volunteers and referred athletes with symptomatic and asymptomatic MSK injuries. All cases underwent MRI which was loaded into the US system for manual registration on the live US image and fusion imaging examination. After every test, an evaluation form was completed in terms of advantages, disadvantages, and anatomic fusion landmarks. From November 2014 to March 2015, we evaluated 20 subjects who underwent fusion imaging, 5 non-injured volunteers and 15 injured athletes, 11 symptomatic and 4 asymptomatic, age range 16-50 years, mean 22. We describe some of the anatomic landmarks used to guide fusion in different regions. This technology allowed us to examine muscle and tendon injuries simultaneously in US and MRI, and the correlation of both techniques, especially low-grade muscular injuries. This has also helped compensate for the limited field of view with US. It improves spatial orientation of cartilage, labrum and meniscal injuries. However, a high-quality MRI image is essential in achieving an adequate fusion image, and 3D sequences need to be added in MRI protocols to improve navigation. The combination of real-time MRI and US image fusion and navigation is relatively easy to perform and is helping to improve understanding of MSK injuries. However, it requires specific skills in MSK imaging and still needs further research in sports-related injuries. Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  15. Snow sports related head and spinal injuries: an eight-year survey from the neurotrauma centre for the Snowy Mountains, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, T L T; Chandran, K N; Newcombe, R L; Fuller, J W; Pik, J H T

    2004-04-01

    Neurotrauma from snow-sports related injuries is infrequently documented in the literature. In Australia no collective data has ever been published. The aim of this study is to document the injury pattern of snow sports related neurotrauma admissions to The Canberra Hospital, the regional trauma centre for the Snowy Mountains. A computerised hospital record search conducted between January 1994 and July 2002 revealed 25 head and 66 spinal injury admissions. The incidence of severe injuries requiring referral to tertiary trauma hospital was estimated to be 7.4 per 100,000 skier-days and for head and spinal injury 1.8 per 1,000,000 skier-days and 5.6 per 1,000,000 skier-days, respectively. Collision with a stationary object was disproportionately associated with head injury ( [Formula: see text] ) and falling forward with spinal injury ( [Formula: see text] ). Snowboarders tended to sustain cervical fractures more often than skiers ( [Formula: see text] ). The importance of helmet usage in buffering the impact of head-on collision and the proposition of having both feet fastened to a snowboard in leading to cervical injury were highlighted.

  16. The epidemiology of competition and training-based surf sport-related injury in Australia, 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Brighton, Barbara; Sherker, Shauna

    2013-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of competition and training-based surf sport-related injury in Australia in the years 2003-2011. A retrospective epidemiological review. Information on surf sport-related injuries was obtained from Surf Life Saving Australia's SurfGuard Incident Reporting Database during 1 January 2003 to 20 August 2011. There were 2645 surf sport-related competition or training-related incidents. Males and females experienced similar proportions of injury by activity type, with older individuals experiencing a higher proportion of injuries during training than younger individuals. Minor first aid was required for 54.5% of the competition and 43.7% of the training-related incidents, with major first aid required in just over 10% of both incident types. Overall, inflatable rescue boats, beach flags, and surf boats were the most common activities performed at the time of the incident, with returning to shore and negotiating the break the most common possible contributing factors to surf boat incidents. Bruises/contusions, strains, inflammation/swelling, and sprains were the most common types of injuries that occurred during both competition and training. RICE--Rest-Ice-Compression-Elevation--was the most common form of initial treatment for the injury during both competition and training. Participation in surf sports is not without risk of injury. Information from this study will inform injury prevention efforts for surf sport and act as a guide for future research in this area, and towards improved injury surveillance for surf sport-related injuries. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. When to initiate integrative neuromuscular training to reduce sports-related injuries in youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Best, Thomas M.; Bergeron, Michael F.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2011-01-01

    Regular participation in organized youth sports does not ensure adequate exposure to skill- and health-related fitness activities; and sport training without preparatory conditioning does not appear to reduce risk of injury in young athletes. Recent trends indicate that widespread participation in organized youth sports is occurring at a younger age, especially in girls. Current public health recommendations developed to promote muscle strengthening and bone building activities for youth aged 6 and older, along with increased involvement in competitive sport activities at younger ages, has increased interest and concern from parents, clinicians, coaches and teachers regarding the optimal age to encourage and integrate more specialized physical training into youth development programs. This review synthesizes the latest literature and expert opinion regarding when to initiate neuromuscular conditioning in youth and presents a how to integrative training conceptual model that could maximize the potential health-related benefits for children by reducing sports-related injury risk and encouraging lifelong regular physical activity. PMID:21623307

  18. Mechanisms of team-sport-related brain injuries in children 5 to 19 years old: opportunities for prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Cusimano

    Full Text Available There is a gap in knowledge about the mechanisms of sports-related brain injuries. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanisms of brain injuries among children and youth participating in team sports.We conducted a retrospective case series of brain injuries suffered by children participating in team sports. The Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP database was searched for brain injury cases among 5-19 year-olds playing ice hockey, soccer, American football (football, basketball, baseball, or rugby between 1990 and 2009. Mechanisms of injury were classified as "struck by player," "struck by object," "struck by sport implement," "struck surface," and "other." A descriptive analysis was performed.There were 12,799 brain injuries related to six team sports (16.2% of all brain injuries registered in CHIRPP. Males represented 81% of injuries and the mean age was 13.2 years. Ice hockey accounted for the greatest number of brain injuries (44.3%, followed by soccer (19.0% and football (12.9%. In ice hockey, rugby, and basketball, striking another player was the most common injury mechanism. Football, basketball, and soccer also demonstrated high proportions of injuries due to contact with an object (e.g., post among younger players. In baseball, a common mechanism in the 5-9 year-old group was being hit with a bat as a result of standing too close to the batter (26.1% males, 28.3% females.Many sports-related brain injury mechanisms are preventable. The results suggest that further efforts aimed at universal rule changes, safer playing environments, and the education of coaches, players, and parents should be targeted in maximizing prevention of sport-related brain injury using a multifaceted approach.

  19. Mechanisms of team-sport-related brain injuries in children 5 to 19 years old: opportunities for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusimano, Michael D; Cho, Newton; Amin, Khizer; Shirazi, Mariam; McFaull, Steven R; Do, Minh T; Wong, Matthew C; Russell, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    There is a gap in knowledge about the mechanisms of sports-related brain injuries. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanisms of brain injuries among children and youth participating in team sports. We conducted a retrospective case series of brain injuries suffered by children participating in team sports. The Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP) database was searched for brain injury cases among 5-19 year-olds playing ice hockey, soccer, American football (football), basketball, baseball, or rugby between 1990 and 2009. Mechanisms of injury were classified as "struck by player," "struck by object," "struck by sport implement," "struck surface," and "other." A descriptive analysis was performed. There were 12,799 brain injuries related to six team sports (16.2% of all brain injuries registered in CHIRPP). Males represented 81% of injuries and the mean age was 13.2 years. Ice hockey accounted for the greatest number of brain injuries (44.3%), followed by soccer (19.0%) and football (12.9%). In ice hockey, rugby, and basketball, striking another player was the most common injury mechanism. Football, basketball, and soccer also demonstrated high proportions of injuries due to contact with an object (e.g., post) among younger players. In baseball, a common mechanism in the 5-9 year-old group was being hit with a bat as a result of standing too close to the batter (26.1% males, 28.3% females). Many sports-related brain injury mechanisms are preventable. The results suggest that further efforts aimed at universal rule changes, safer playing environments, and the education of coaches, players, and parents should be targeted in maximizing prevention of sport-related brain injury using a multifaceted approach.

  20. Sports Related Fractures Presenting To an Orthopaedic Department ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To profile the patients with sports related fractures. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective study of patients sustaining a sport related fracture between January 2000 and December 2006. The medical records including the demographic data, type of sport, mechanism and location of injury, and treatment ...

  1. A Study of Sports Related Occurrence of Traumatic Orodental Injuries and Associated Risk Factors in High School Students in North India

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Gundeep; Garg, Shalini; Damle, Satyawan Gangaramji; Dhindsa, Abhishek; Kaur, Ambreen; Singla, Shilpy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral and dental injuries contribute to a major part of sports related injuries in children. Trauma occurring in developing years disrupts normal social functioning and brings about a major impact on quality of life due to their cumulative effect. Objectives: To assess the prevalence and causes of various sports related traumatic orodental injuries among 8 to 16 year school students along with identifying the associated risk factors in North India. Patients and Methods: A cross sec...

  2. Epidemiology of sports-related injuries in children and youth presenting to Canadian emergency departments from 2007–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Although injuries related to sports and recreation represent a significant burden to children and youth, few studies have examined the descriptive epidemiology of sports-related injury since 2005, and some sports such as ringette have not been evaluated to date. The primary purpose of this study was to provide the descriptive epidemiology of sports-related injuries treated in emergency departments for children and youth aged 5 – 19. Methods A retrospective data analysis was performed using data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program [CHIRPP] from fiscal years (April – March) 2007/08 to 2009/10. CHIRPP is a computerized information system designed by the Public Health Agency of Canada that collects information about injuries to people evaluated in emergency departments across 11 pediatric hospitals and 5 general hospitals in Canada. Thirteen sports or activities were analyzed (baseball, basketball, cycling, football, ice hockey, lacrosse, ringette, rugby, skiing, sledding, snowboarding, soccer, and volleyball). Descriptive statistics, including frequency by sport, age and sex, as well as the percent of concussions within each sport were calculated. Results Out of a total of 56, 691 reported sports and recreational injuries, soccer accounted for the largest proportion of injuries with 11,941 reported cases over the 3 year time period. Of these, approximately 30% were fractures. The 10 – 14 year age group reported the greatest proportion of injuries in 10 out of the 13 sports analyzed. In addition, males reported a greater number of overall injuries than females in 11 out of the 13 sports analyzed. The largest percentage of concussions was reported in ringette; these injuries accounted for 17.1% of overall injuries within this sport. Conclusions Injury prevention programs in Canada should focus on improving evidence-based programs to reduce the burden of injuries in all sports. PMID:24364875

  3. Posttraumatic Cerebellar Infarction after Repeated Sport-related Minor Head Injuries in a Young Adult: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUMOTO, Hiroaki; YOSHIDA, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    A healthy 23-year-old man suffered helmet-to-helmet collisions with an opponent during American football game twice within 3 days. He then experienced continuous vomiting and dizziness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed acute infarction in the right cerebellar hemisphere, and magnetic resonance angiography revealed transient stenosis of the right superior cerebellar artery. Although minor head injury is not usually accompanied by complications, posttraumatic ischemic stroke has been reported on rare occasions. We report a case of cerebellar infarction after repeated sports-related minor head injuries in a young adult and discuss the etiology. PMID:25746313

  4. Sport-related concussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Natuline Ianof

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major cause of lifelong disability and death worldwide. Sport-related traumatic brain injury is an important public health concern. The purpose of this review was to highlight the importance of sport-related concussions. Concussion refers to a transient alteration in consciousness induced by external biomechanical forces transmitted directly or indirectly to the brain. It is a common, although most likely underreported, condition. Contact sports such as American football, rugby, soccer, boxing, basketball and hockey are associated with a relatively high prevalence of concussion. Various factors may be associated with a greater risk of sport-related concussion, such as age, sex, sport played, level of sport played and equipment used. Physical complaints (headache, fatigue, dizziness, behavioral changes (depression, anxiety, irritability and cognitive impairment are very common after a concussion. The risk of premature return to activities includes the prolongation of post-concussive symptoms and increased risk of concussion recurrence.

  5. Sports-related concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conder, Robert L; Conder, Alanna A

    2015-04-01

    Concussions are an inherent part of collision sports such as football and soccer. As a subset of traumatic brain injury, concussions are neurometabolic events that cause transient neurologic dysfunction. Following a concussion, some athletes require longer neurologic recovery than others. Education and intervention aimed at prevention and management can minimize the long-term sequelae of sports-related concussions.

  6. Epidemiology of Exercise- and Sports-Related Injuries in a Population of Young, Physically Active Adults: A Survey of Military Servicemembers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauret, Keith G; Bedno, Sheryl; Loringer, Kelly; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Mallon, Timothy; Jones, Bruce H

    2015-11-01

    Numerous studies document the health benefits of a physically active lifestyle, but relatively few document the hazards of physical activity. Because of the requirement for physical fitness to complete their mission, the United States military services have a vested interest in understanding the benefits and risks of physical activity including exercise and sports. One of these risks is injury. Rates and proportion of injuries caused by exercise- and sports-related (ESR) activities have not been reported previously across the services. The purposes of this population survey were to (1) document the rates and proportion of all injuries caused by ESR activities among military personnel, (2) compare rates across the military services, and (3) describe the causes and types of ESR injuries as well as associated days of limited activity. Descriptive epidemiology study. The Defense Manpower Data Center administered the web-based 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Service Members to a random sample of active-duty personnel. In all, 10,692 servicemembers completed the survey, which included questions about injuries from any cause and from exercise and sports during the previous year. Responses were weighted to produce population estimates for injury rates (any injury and ESR injury). Percentage distributions were used to describe activities, injury types, days of limited activity, and contributing factors for ESR injuries. There were 49% of servicemembers who sustained an injury from any cause in the previous year; 25% had an ESR injury. Thus, 52% of all injuries were ESR injuries. ESR injury rates ranged from 20% for the Navy to 33% for the Marine Corps. Running accounted for 45% of ESR injuries. Forty percent of ESR injuries were sprains and strains. As an indicator of injury severity, 35% of ESR injuries required more than 2 weeks of limited activity. This study quantified the overall incidence of injuries and the large proportion that are caused by exercise and

  7. Examining Measures of Weight as Risk Factors for Sport-Related Injury in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Richmond

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC as risk factors for sport injury in adolescents. Design. A secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial. Methods. Adolescents (n=1,040 at the ages of 11–15 years from two Calgary junior high schools were included. BMI (kg/m2 and WC (cm were measured from direct measures at baseline assessment. Categories (overweight/obese were created using validated international (BMI and national (WC cut-off points. A Poisson regression analysis controlling for relevant covariates (sex, previous injury, sport participation, intervention group, and aerobic fitness level estimated the risk of sport injury [incidence rate ratios (IRR with 95% confidence intervals (CI]. Results. There was an increased risk of time loss injury (IRR = 2.82, 95% CI: 1.01–8.04 and knee injury (IRR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.00–6.94 in adolescents that were overweight/obese; however, increases in injury risk for all injury and lower extremity injury were not statistically significant. Estimates suggested a greater risk of time loss injury [IRR = 1.63 (95% CI: 0.93–2.47] in adolescents with high measures of WC. Conclusions. There is an increased risk of time loss injury and knee injury in overweight/obese adolescents. Sport injury prevention training programs should include strategies that target all known risk factors for injury.

  8. When the rules of the game are broken: what proportion of high school sports-related injuries are related to illegal activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, C L; Fields, S K; Comstock, R D

    2008-02-01

    To compare sport and gender differences in injury rates and proportions of injuries related to illegal activity and to describe the epidemiology of injuries related to illegal activity. Descriptive epidemiology study. 100 US high schools. Athletes participating in nine sports: boys' football, soccer, basketball, wrestling, and baseball plus girls' soccer, volleyball, basketball, and softball. Illegal activity-related injuries were analyzed using data from the 2005-06 and 2006-07 National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study. Nationally, an estimated 98 066 injuries were directly related to an action that was ruled illegal activity by a referee/official or disciplinary committee, giving an injury rate of 0.24 injuries per 1000 athletic competition-exposures. Boys' and girls' soccer had the highest rates of injuries related to illegal activity, and girls' volleyball, girls' softball, and boys' baseball had the lowest. Overall, 6.4% of all high school sports-related injuries were related to illegal activity, with the highest proportion in girls' basketball (14.0%), girls' soccer (11.9%), and boys' soccer (11.4%). A greater proportion of injuries related to illegal activity were to the head/face (32.3%) and were concussions (25.4%) than injuries not related to illegal activity (13.8% (injury proportion ratio 2.35; 95% CI 1.82 to 3.04; preferees/officials may reduce sports-related injuries.

  9. Pediatric trauma in the Austrian Alps: the epidemiology of sport-related injuries in helicopter emergency medical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, Harald F; Hüpfl, Michael; Trimmel, Helmut; Voelckel, Wolfgang G; Nagele, Peter

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to examine the epidemiological characteristics and injury patterns of pediatric trauma in helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) caused by sports/outdoor activities in alpine environment. This retrospective cohort study analyzed 912 primary HEMS missions for pediatric trauma (0-14 years of age) in Austrian Alps between 1 January 2006 and 30 June 2007. Children were stratified by age into toddlers (3-5 years), children in early (6-9 years), and late school age (10-14 years). The majority of pediatric sports-related trauma in alpine environment was caused by skiing (82.1%; n=749). Pediatric patients were predominately in late school age and boys (72.8%, n=664 and 61.0%, n=556, respectively) and a minority (16.0%, n=146) was severely injured. Overall, fracture (47.0%, n=429), contusion (17.9%, n=163), and traumatic brain injury (17.0%, n=155) were the most common prehospital diagnoses. The most frequent pattern of injury was related to the head/face and spine (36.3%, n=331). The knowledge about epidemiological characteristics of HEMS use for injured children in alpine environment may be essential for training requirements of HEMS crews and operational considerations of HEMS providers. The incidence of head and spinal injuries requires support for initiatives to promote helmet wear and appropriate risk behavior amongst skiers and snowboarders.

  10. The burden and management of sports-related musculoskeletal injuries and conditions within the US military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kenneth L; Owens, Brett D

    2014-10-01

    Military service members comprise a young and physically active population who are at increased risk for musculoskeletal injuries and conditions related to sports and physical training. Even during times of war, musculoskeletal injuries and conditions related to sports and physical training, not associated with combat, are the leading cause of medical evacuation from theater. As a result, these injuries significantly compromise military readiness, and they can lead to an increased risk for reinjury and long-term disability among military service members. Regardless of the mechanism of injury, the large volume and types of musculoskeletal injuries and conditions that affect soldiers are similar to those that are commonly seen and treated in sports medicine clinics and practices. Recently, the US Marine Corps, Navy, and Army have recognized the value of the sports medicine model of care to improve the access, efficiency, and effectiveness of care for solders who experience musculoskeletal injuries related to sports and training. A highly skilled sports medicine team of providers and allied health care professionals (eg, athletic trainers, physical therapists), with expertise in the prevention, assessment, diagnosis, and management of musculoskeletal injuries and conditions, will continue to be an integral cog in the effective management of these types of injuries into the future, as the sports medicine model continues to expand across the military health system. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Symptom Experience and Quality of Life in Children after Sport-Related Head Injuries: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilyadi, Michael; Macartney, Gail; Barrowman, Nick; Anderson, Peter; Dube, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Sports are a major cause of concussions, and little is known about the symptom experience and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in children who remain symptomatic for over 3 months following such head injuries. A cross-sectional study of children aged 10-18 years was performed who were referred to the Neurosurgery Clinic at our centre following a head injury. Symptom experience was measured using the modified Concussion Symptom Scale, and HRQL was measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). The Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT) was administered to assess neurocognitive and neurobehavioural sequelae. Symptoms with the highest mean symptom scores on a Likert scale of 0-6 in 35 children at the time of assessment included headaches (3.1), poor concentration (2.7), memory problems (2.1), fatigue (2.1) and sensitivity to noise (2.0). Compared with normative data, children in this study had ImPACT summary scores between the 28th and 38th percentiles and a comparably low Cognitive Efficiency Index score. Mean scores for females were consistently statistically significantly lower (p Children continue to experience many symptoms at least 3 months following sport-related head injuries that significantly impact their HRQL and neurocognitive abilities. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Systematic review of clinical studies examining biomarkers of brain injury in athletes after sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Linda; Ramia, Michelle M; Edwards, Damyan; Johnson, Brian D; Slobounov, Semyon M

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this study was to systematically review clinical studies examining biofluid biomarkers of brain injury for concussion in athletes. Data sources included PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Database from 1966 to October 2013. Studies were included if they recruited athletes participating in organized sports who experienced concussion or head injury during a sports-related activity and had brain injury biomarkers measured. Acceptable research designs included experimental, observational, and case-control studies. Review articles, opinion papers, and editorials were excluded. After title and abstract screening of potential articles, full texts were independently reviewed to identify articles that met inclusion criteria. A composite evidentiary table was then constructed and documented the study title, design, population, methods, sample size, outcome measures, and results. The search identified 52 publications, of which 13 were selected and critically reviewed. All of the included studies were prospective and were published either in or after the year 2000. Sports included boxing (six studies), soccer (five studies), running/jogging (two studies), hockey (one study), basketball (one study), cycling (one study), and swimming (one study). The majority of studies (92%) had fewer than 100 patients. Three studies (23%) evaluated biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), one in both serum and CSF, and 10 (77%) in serum exclusively. There were 11 different biomarkers assessed, including S100β, glial fibrillary acidic protein, neuron-specific enolase, tau, neurofilament light protein, amyloid beta, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, creatine kinase and heart-type fatty acid binding protein, prolactin, cortisol, and albumin. A handful of biomarkers showed a correlation with number of hits to the head (soccer), acceleration/deceleration forces (jumps, collisions, and falls), postconcussive symptoms, trauma to the body versus the head, and dynamics of different sports

  13. Sports-related injuries of the spine; Sportverletzungen und -schaeden der Wirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochmuth, K. [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik, Stiftung Friedrichsheim der Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie der Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Mack, M.G.; Vogl, T.J. [Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie der Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Kurth, A.A.; Zichner, L. [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik, Stiftung Friedrichsheim der Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    Different sports show different patterns and frequencies of injuries, which are discussed in this paper. About 3% of all sports accidents relate to the spine. These injuries often have far-reaching consequences for the patients. A very early and extensive diagnosis of all changes is decisive for the start of an adequate therapy and thus for the prognosis of the injury. Radiological diagnosis is also of decisive importance for the documentation of late injuries and in the question of rehabilitation. Here special focus is put on MRT and CT diagnostics.A healthy spine of humans is normally able to resist all static and dynamic strains of the usual sports. However, anomalies and dysfunctions of the spine can reduce its capacity to resist strain. The recommendations of sporting activities are given according to the extent of deflection and the expected growth. The importance of radiology in primary diagnosis and in the follow-up due to typical changes like scoliosis, Morbus Scheuerman, spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis is discussed here as well. (orig.) [German] Die verschiedenen Sportarten weisen unterschiedliche Verletzungshaeufigkeiten und -muster auf, die im Rahmen dieser Uebersichtsarbeit diskutiert werden sollen. Circa 3% der Sportunfaelle betreffen die Wirbelsaeule. Diese Verletzungen sind haeufig von besonderer Tragweite fuer den Patienten. Eine fruehestmoegliche und umfassende Diagnose aller Veraenderungen ist dabei entscheidend fuer die Einleitung einer adaequaten Therapie und somit fuer die Prognose der Verletzung. Auch in der Dokumentation von Spaetschaeden und in der Frage der Rehabilitation kommt der radiologischen Diagnostik eine entscheidende Bedeutung zu. Ein besonderer Fokus wird dabei auf die Magnetresonanztomographie-(MRT-)und Computertomographie-(CT-)Diagnostik gelegt.Die gesunde Wirbelsaeule des Menschen ist in der Regel allen statischen und dynamischen Belastungen der ueblichen Sportarten gewachsen. Formanomalien und Funktionsstoerungen der

  14. Analysis of sports related mTBI injuries caused by elastic wave propagation through brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Case

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive concussions and sub-concussions suffered by athletes have been linked to a series of sequelae ranging from traumatic encephalopathy to dementia pugilistica. A detailed finite element model of the human head was developed based on standard libraries of medical imaging. The model includes realistic material properties for the brain tissue, bone, soft tissue, and CSF, as well as the structure and properties of a protective helmet. Various impact scenarios were studied, with a focus on the strains/stresses and pressure gradients and concentrations created in the brain tissue due to propagation of waves produced by the impact through the complex internal structure of the human head. This approach has the potential to expand our understanding of the mechanism of brain injury, and to better assess the risk of delayed neurological disorders for tens of thousands of young athletes throughout the world.

  15. Injury and Treatment Characteristics of Sport-Specific Injuries Sustained in Interscholastic Athletics

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Kenneth C.; Snyder Valier, Alison R.; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C

    2015-01-01

    Background: The inclusion of clinical practice factors, beyond epidemiologic data, may help guide medical coverage and care decisions. Hypothesis: Trends in injury and treatment characteristics of sport-specific injuries sustained by secondary school athletes will differ based on sport. Study Design: Retrospective analysis of electronic patient records. Level of evidence: Level 4. Methods: Participants consisted of 3302 boys and 2293 girls who were diagnosed with a sport-related injury or con...

  16. The impact of motivation on neuropsychological performance in sports-related mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Christopher M; Echemendia, Ruben J; Arnett, Peter A

    2006-07-01

    The current project examined the impact of differential motivation on baseline versus post-mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) neuropsychological measures in athletes. Collegiate athletes were administered a neuropsychological battery prior to and post-MTBI. High Motivation at Baseline (HMB) and Suspect Motivation at Baseline (SMB) groups were established for each measure based on whether baseline performance fell +/- one or more standard deviations from the mean of the given measure. Greater improvement was expected in the SMB group than the HMB group given hypothesized differences in baseline motivation. In repeated measures analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) that removed achievement performance, the SMB groups demonstrated greater improvement than the HMB groups for the Trail Making Test A & B (TMT-A & B), Digit Span, and Stroop-Color Word (Stroop-CW) tests. Also, the percentage of participants who improved according to reliable change indices was greater for the SMB groups on the TMT-A & B, Stroop-CW, and the Vigil. These findings are likely due to lower motivation in the SMB group for each test. However, results also suggest that some tests may be relatively unaffected by motivation. These data may have clinical implications and point to the need for better methods of identifying athletes with suspect motivation at baseline.

  17. Association of polymorphisms rs1800012 in COL1A1 with sports-related tendon and ligament injuries: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunguang; Li, Hao; Chen, Kang; Wu, Bing; Liu, Haifeng

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1800012 in COL1A1 might be associated with the susceptibility to sports-related tendon and ligament injuries such as ACL injuries, Achilles tendon injuries, shoulder dislocations and tennis elbow. But the data from different studies have been conflicting. Here we attempted to systematically summarize and clarify the association between the SNP and sports-related tendon and ligament injuries risk. Six eligible studies including 933 cases and 1,381 controls were acquired from PubMed, Web Of Science and Cochrane library databases. Significant association was identified in homozygote model (TT versus GG: OR=0.17, 95%CI 0.08-0.35, PH=0.00) and recessive model (TT versus GT/GG: OR=0.21, 95%CI 0.10-0.44, PH=0.00). Our results indicated that COL1A1 rs1800012 polymorphism may be associated with the reduced risk of sports-related tendon or ligament injuries, especially in ACL injuries, and that rare TT may played as a protective role. PMID:28206959

  18. A study of sports related occurrence of traumatic orodental injuries and associated risk factors in high school students in north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gundeep; Garg, Shalini; Damle, Satyawan Gangaramji; Dhindsa, Abhishek; Kaur, Ambreen; Singla, Shilpy

    2014-09-01

    Oral and dental injuries contribute to a major part of sports related injuries in children. Trauma occurring in developing years disrupts normal social functioning and brings about a major impact on quality of life due to their cumulative effect. To assess the prevalence and causes of various sports related traumatic orodental injuries among 8 to 16 year school students along with identifying the associated risk factors in North India. A cross sectional study consisting of high school students of different organized sports teams aged 8-16 years was carried out in geographical area of north India. The students were selected by multistage cluster sampling methodology. 1105 students from 19 school teams (sports teams) and sports academies participated in study through structured interview and clinical examination in different sports situations. 30.3% (n = 335) of students suffered from orodental injuries. A higher number of girls had injury (32%) than boys (29%), though the difference was not significant. Most of the students suffered from soft tissue injuries (48%) followed by tooth fractures (43%). Maximum numbers of injuries were reported in high velocity (44.1%) and medium intensity sports (46.6%) (P boys and 2% of girls used mouthguards. The result of the present study confirmed that students participating in different organized sports at high school level are at a very high risk of getting orodental injury. Hence knowledge and education regarding prevention of traumatic injuries is of paramount importance.

  19. Sport-Related Maxillo-Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslin, Muhammad; Boffano, Paolo; ten Brincke, Y J D; Forouzanfar, Tymour; Brand, Henk S

    2016-01-01

    Sports and exercise are important causes of maxillofacial injuries. Different types of sports might differ in frequency and type of fractures. The aim of the present study was to explore the possible relation between the types of sport practiced and the frequency and nature of the facial bone fractures of patients presenting in an oral and maxillofacial surgery department of a Dutch university center. This study is based on an analysis of patient records containing maxillofacial fractures sustained between January 1, 2000 and April 1, 2014 at the Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center (VUmc) in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The present study comprised data from 108 patients with 128 maxillofacial fractures. Seventy-nine percent of the patients were male and 21% were female. The patients ranged in age from 10 to 64 years old with a mean age of 30.6 ± 12.0. The highest incidence of sport-related maxillofacial fractures occurred in individuals between the ages of 20 and 29. The most common sport-related fractures were zygoma complex fractures, followed by mandible fractures. Soccer and hockey were the most prominent causes of sport-related maxillofacial trauma in the present study. Coronoid process fractures were only observed in soccer players and not in other sports groups. Mandible angle fractures were relatively more frequent in rugby than in other sports. The results of this study suggest a relation between type of sport and the nature and frequency of the fractures it causes.

  20. Sports related to drowning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Szpilman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic sports are included in the top list of risky practices as the environment per se carries a possibility of death by drowning if not rescued in time. Not only are aquatic sports related to a high risk of death, but also all sports practiced on the water, over the water and on ice. Whatever the reason a person is in the water, drowning carries a higher possibility of death if the individual is unable to cope with the water situation, which may simply be caused by an inability to stay afloat and get out of the water or by an injury or disease that may lead to physical inability or unconsciousness. The competitive nature of sports is a common pathway that leads the sports person to exceed their ability to cope with the environment or simply misjudge their physical capability. Drowning involves some principles and medical interventions that are rarely found in other medical situations as it occurs in a deceptively hostile environment that may not seem dangerous. Therefore, it is essential that health professionals are aware of the complete sequence of action in drowning. This article focuses on the pulmonary injury in sports and recreational activities where drowning plays the major role.

  1. Sports related to drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpilman, David; Orlowski, James P

    2016-09-01

    Aquatic sports are included in the top list of risky practices as the environment per se carries a possibility of death by drowning if not rescued in time. Not only are aquatic sports related to a high risk of death, but also all sports practiced on the water, over the water and on ice. Whatever the reason a person is in the water, drowning carries a higher possibility of death if the individual is unable to cope with the water situation, which may simply be caused by an inability to stay afloat and get out of the water or by an injury or disease that may lead to physical inability or unconsciousness. The competitive nature of sports is a common pathway that leads the sports person to exceed their ability to cope with the environment or simply misjudge their physical capability. Drowning involves some principles and medical interventions that are rarely found in other medical situations as it occurs in a deceptively hostile environment that may not seem dangerous. Therefore, it is essential that health professionals are aware of the complete sequence of action in drowning. This article focuses on the pulmonary injury in sports and recreational activities where drowning plays the major role. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  2. Junior Seau: An Illustrative Case of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Update on Chronic Sports-Related Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Tej D; Li, Amy; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Veeravagu, Anand; Grant, Gerald A

    2016-02-01

    Few neurologic diseases have captured the nation's attention more completely than chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which has been discovered in the autopsies of professional athletes, most notably professional football players. The tragic case of Junior Seau, a Hall of Fame, National Football League linebacker, has been the most high-profile confirmed case of CTE. Here we describe Seau's case, which concludes an autopsy conducted at the National Institutes of Health that confirmed the diagnosis. Since 1990, Junior Seau had a highly distinguished 20-year career playing for the National Football League as a linebacker, from which he sustained multiple concussions. He committed suicide on May 2, 2012, at age 43, after which an autopsy confirmed a diagnosis of CTE. His clinical history was significant for a series of behavioral disturbances. Seau's history and neuropathologic findings were used to better understand the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and possible risk factors for CTE. This high-profile case reflects an increasing awareness of CTE as a long-term consequence of multiple traumatic brain injuries. The previously unforeseen neurologic risks of American football have begun to cast doubt on the safety of the sport. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidemiology of High School Sports-Related Injuries Resulting in Medical Disqualification: 2005-2006 Through 2013-2014 Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirabassi, Jill; Brou, Lina; Khodaee, Morteza; Lefort, Roxanna; Fields, Sarah K; Comstock, R Dawn

    2016-11-01

    Although rare, season- or career-ending injuries in young athletes are concerning because they can result in time lost from sport participation and school, social costs, and economic costs of medical care. To describe rates and patterns of medically disqualifying (MDQ) injuries among United States high school athletes overall and by sport, sex, type of athletic activity, and mechanism. Descriptive epidemiological study. Sports-related injury data on high school athletes were collected during the 2005-2006 through 2013-2014 academic years from a large national sample of United States high schools via High School Reporting Information Online (RIO). MDQ injuries were defined as season- or career-ending injuries. From 2005-2006 through 2013-2014, High School RIO captured 59,862 total injuries including 3599 MDQ injuries (6.0% of all injuries). Most MDQ injuries (60.4%) occurred in competition. Football had the highest injury rate (26.5 per 100,000 athlete-exposures), followed by gymnastics (18.6) and wrestling (17.9). MDQ injury rates were higher among girls in the sex-comparable sports of basketball (rate ratio [RR], 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3-2.0), cross-country (RR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.0-7.5), soccer (RR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3-1.9), and track and field (RR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.7-4.0). Player-player contact (48.2%) was the most common MDQ injury mechanism. The most commonly injured body site was the knee (33.7%). The most common MDQ injury diagnosis was sprains/strains (35.9%); the most common specific MDQ injury was knee sprains/strains (25.4%), with the anterior cruciate ligament being the most commonly injured knee structure. Among boys, fracture was the most common diagnosis in 3 sports, and sprain/strain was the most common in 6 sports. Among girls, sprain/strain was the most common diagnosis in 9 sports, and fracture was the most common only in softball. MDQ injuries vary by sport, sex, and type of athletic activity and occur most frequently as a result of player-player contact. These

  4. Cervical spine immobilization in sports related injuries: review of current guidelines and a case study of an injured athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamra, Js; Morar, Y; Khan, Ws; Deep, K; Hammer, A

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spine immobilization is an essential component of the ATLS(®) system. Inadequate training in the management of trauma calls and failure of early recognition can have disastrous consequences. Pre-hospital personnel are routinely involved more in the assessment and stabilization of patients in comparison to other health care professionals.This case study and review highlights the importance of early recognition, assessment and correct stabilization of cervical spine injuries both in the field and during the initial assessment in hospital.Inadequate assessment, immobilization and lack of standard guidelines on the management of suspected cervical spine trauma can result in secondary injury. Regular assessment and training of pre-hospital and medical personnel is essential to the proper management of these potentially devastating injuries.

  5. A prospective cohort study on physical activity and sports related injuries in 10-12 year old children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Collard, D.C.M.; Chin A Paw, J.M.M.; Mechelen, van W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the incidence and severity of injuries resulting from physical education, sports, and leisure time physical activity (PA) in 10-12 year old children. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study SETTING: Primary schools PARTICIPANTS: 995 children aged 10-12y. INTERVENTIONS: Individual

  6. Sport-Related Concussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Don; Brady, Flo

    2011-01-01

    Sport-related concussions (SRC) are not limited to specific age ranges, professional athletes, or gender. The primary focus of much of SRC research pertains to the assessment, management, and return to play (RTP) of the concussed athlete. This article highlights some major issues of SRC along with some controversies that presently exist within the…

  7. Efficacy and tolerability of a new ibuprofen 200mg plaster in patients with acute sports-related traumatic blunt soft tissue injury/contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Hans-Georg; Giannetti, Bruno; Connolly, Mark P; Lewis, Fraser; Bhatt, Aomesh

    2018-01-01

    Ibuprofen is used for the treatment of non-serious pain. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of a new ibuprofen plaster for the treatment of pain associated with acute sports impact injuries/contusions. In this randomised, double-blind, multi-centre, placebo controlled, parallel group study, adults (n = 130; 18-58 years of age) diagnosed with acute sports-related blunt soft tissue injury/contusion were randomized to receive either ibuprofen 200 mg plaster or placebo plaster. Plasters were administered once daily for five consecutive days. The primary assessment was area under the visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain on movement (POM) over 0 to three days (VAS AUC0-3d). Other endpoints included algometry AUC from 0 to three days (AUC0-3d) and 0 to five days (AUC0-5d), to evaluate improvement of sensitivity at the injured site, and patient and investigator global assessment of efficacy. Safety was monitored throughout the study. The ibuprofen plaster resulted in superior reduction in AUC0-3d compared with placebo; the Least Squares (LS) mean difference was 662.82 mm*h in favour of the ibuprofen 200mg plaster (P = 0.0011). The greater improvement in VAS AUC of POM was also observed after 12 h, 24 h, and five days of therapy. Tenderness also significantly improved with the ibuprofen plaster compared with placebo; LS mean difference in algometry/tenderness AUC0-3d was 1.87 N/cm2*d and AUC0-5d was 1.87 N/cm2*d (P values ≤0.0004). At all study timepoints, a greater percentage of patients and investigators rated the effectiveness of the ibuprofen 200 mg plaster as good/excellent than the placebo plaster. Treatment-emergent adverse events for the ibuprofen plaster were few (≤1.5%) and were mild in severity. The results of this study indicate 200 mg plaster is effective and safe for the treatment of pain due to acute sports-related traumatic blunt soft tissue injury/contusion in adults.

  8. Intra-oral Mouth-Guard In Sport Related Oro-Facial Injuries: Prevention is Better Than Cure!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantri, Sneha S.; Mantri, Shivkumar P.; Deogade, Suryakant; Bhasin, Abhilasha S.

    2014-01-01

    India is rapidly assuming a more health-conscious posture. Olympic competition and professional sports have turned from mere dreams into goals. Many major professional sports leagues are expanding. Sports dentistry is a composite of skills for treatment, prevention, education and research in which dentistry and sports come together. Custom athletic mouth guards present additional health-care opportunities. They are designed to reduce the impact force of a direct blow to the jaw and create a gap between the condyle and skull thereby reducing the transference of the impact to the brain. The prevalence and severity of injuries to the teeth, jaws and intra-oral and peri-oral soft tissues, concussions and neck injuries are reduced when mouth guards are used. The dentist can play a proactive role in helping to deliver important expanded health care services. PMID:24596803

  9. Gender- and sex-specific sports-related injury research in emergency medicine: a consensus on future research direction and focused application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raukar, Neha P; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Kane, Kathleen; Davenport, Moira; Espinoza, Tamara R; Weiland, Jessica; Franco, Vanessa; Vaca, Federico E

    2014-12-01

    Title IX, the commercialization of sports, the social change in sports participation, and the response to the obesity epidemic have contributed to the rapid proliferation of participation in both competitive organized sports and nontraditional athletic events. As a consequence, emergency physicians are regularly involved in the acute diagnosis, management, disposition, and counseling of a broad range of sports-related pathology. Three important and highly publicized mechanisms of injury in sports relevant to emergency medicine (EM) include concussion, heat illness, and sudden cardiac death. In conjunction with the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Gender-specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," a consensus group consisting of experts in EM, emergency neurology, sports medicine, and public health convened to deliberate and develop research questions that could ultimately advance the field of sports medicine and allow for meaningful application in the emergency department (ED) clinical setting. Sex differences in injury risk, diagnosis, ED treatment, and counseling are identified in each of these themes. This article presents the consensus-based priority research agenda. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  10. High school coaches perceptions of physicians’ role in the assessment and management of sports-related concussive injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolan eWilliams

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sports concussions are an increasingly recognized common type of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI that affect athletes of all ages. The need for an increased involvement of trained physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of concussion has become more obvious as the pathophysiology and long-term sequelae of sports concussion are better understood. To date, there has been great variability in the athletic community about the recognition of symptoms, diagnosis, management, and physician role in concussion care. An awareness assessment survey administered to 96 high school coaches in a large metropolitan city demonstrated that 37.5% of responders refer their concussed players to an emergency department after the incident, only 39.5% of responders have a physician available to evaluate their players after a concussion, 71.6% of those who had a physician available sent their players to a sports medicine physician, and none of the responders had their player’s concussion evaluated by a neurologist. Interestingly, 71.8% of responders stated that their players returned to the team with return to play guidelines from their physician. This survey has highlighted two important areas where the medical community can better serve the athletic community. Because a concussion is a sport-inflicted injury to the nervous system, it is optimally evaluated and managed by a clinician with relevant training in both clinical neuroscience and sports medicine. Furthermore, all physicians who see patients suffering concussion should be educated in the current recommendations from the Consensus Statement on Concussion and provide return to play instructions that outline a graduated return to play, allowing the athlete to return to the field safely.

  11. An eHealth Application of Self-Reported Sports-Related Injuries and Illnesses in Paralympic Sport: Pilot Feasibility and Usability Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagher, Kristina; Jacobsson, Jenny; Dahlström, Örjan; Timpka, Toomas; Lexell, Jan

    2017-11-29

    Sport participation is associated with a risk of sports-related injuries and illnesses, and Paralympic athletes' additional medical issues can be a challenge to health care providers and medical staff. However, few prospective studies have assessed sports-related injuries and illnesses in Paralympic sport (SRIIPS) over time. Advances in mobile phone technology and networking systems offer novel opportunities to develop innovative eHealth applications for collection of athletes' self-reports. Using eHealth applications for collection of self-reported SRIIPS is an unexplored area, and before initiation of full-scale research of SRIIPS, the feasibility and usability of such an approach needs to be ascertained. The aim of this study was to perform a 4-week pilot study and (1) evaluate the monitoring feasibility and system usability of a novel eHealth application for self-reported SRIIPS and (2) report preliminary data on SRIIPS. An eHealth application for routine collection of data from athletes was developed and adapted to Paralympic athletes. A 4-week pilot study was performed where Paralympic athletes (n=28) were asked to weekly self-report sport exposure, training load, general well-being, pain, sleep, anxiety, and possible SRIIPS. The data collection was followed by a poststudy use assessment survey. Quantitative data related to the system use (eg, completed self-reports, missing responses, and errors) were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The qualitative feasibility and usability data provided by the athletes were condensed and categorized using thematic analysis methods. The weekly response rate was 95%. The athletes were of the opinion that the eHealth application was usable and feasible but stated that it was not fully adapted to Paralympic athletes and their impairments. For example, it was difficult to understand how a new injury or illness should be identified when the impairment was involved. More survey items related to the impairments were

  12. [Sport-related concussion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Silvia; Duthon, Victoria; Ziltener, Jean-Luc; Menetrey, Jacques

    2017-07-12

    Sport-related concussion is a frequent and complex pathology whose physiopathological mechanisms are not completely understood yet. A recent consensus statement has been published with the objective to provide practicioners with an overview of literature and give some guidelines based on the current state of knowledge. An 11R approach (Recognise, Remove, Re-evaluate, Rest, Rehabilitation, Refer, Recover, Return to sport, Reconsider, Residual effects and sequelae, Risk reduction) is proposed to evaluate and manage sport-related concussion. There is currently no available test predicting recovery, but the risk factors for a slow recovery are now known. Return to daily activities (as school) and to full sport participation should follow the graduated return-to-school or - sport strategy, and the ultimate decision is clinically based, and made by the physician.

  13. The nature and characteristics of abdominal injuries sustained during children's sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noaman, Farah; Lam, Lawrence T; Soundappan, S V; Browne, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    To increase the evidence base by characterizing various features of pediatric sports-related abdominal injuries. A review of the trauma database at The Children's Hospital at Westmead was undertaken for all abdominal injuries presenting to the emergency department between 2001 and 2006. The Children's Hospital at Westmead is a tertiary-level pediatric trauma center servicing Sydney's west. It sees approximately 50,000 patients a year. Only those injuries occurring during an organized sport were included for analysis. Thirty-three of the original 513 patients were eligible for inclusion. The data collected included basic demographics, mechanism of injury, sport injury, time to presentation, length of stay, diagnoses, treatment, and complications. Injury severity scores were assigned retrospectively. Males sustained more injuries than females. Collisions and falls were the most common modes of injury. Rugby was the most common sport for injury. Most patients presented within 12 hours, and most presented with musculoskeletal injuries. Injury severity was usually mild; treatment, conservative; length of stay, short; and complications, uncommon. When characteristics were compared by sex, males had mostly collision injuries in high-impact/contact sports, with females having more falls in other sports. When characteristics were compared by age, the only statistically significant difference was in the organ injured: older children had more single solid organ injuries, and younger children had more multiple and hollow viscus injuries. Sports-related abdominal injuries in children are mostly minor and not as common as other injury mechanisms. Despite this, they can be serious, with early diagnosis often delayed because of their subtle nature. Sports-related abdominal injuries in children require a high index of suspicion in the part of the clinician if they are to be recognized early and managed effectively.

  14. Sport-related anxiety: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford JL

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Jessica L Ford, Kenneth Ildefonso, Megan L Jones, Monna Arvinen-Barrow Department of Kinesiology, Integrative Health Care & Performance Unit, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA Abstract: To date, much research has been devoted to understanding how anxiety can affect sport performance, both in practice and in competitive settings. It is well known that sport has the potential for high levels of stress and anxiety, and that practicing and employing a range of psychological strategies can be beneficial in anxiety management. Equally, growing evidence also suggests that anxiety can play a role in sport injury prevention, occurrence, rehabilitation, and the return to sport process. The purpose of this paper is to provide current insights into sport-related anxiety. More specifically, it will provide the reader with definitions and theoretical conceptualizations of sport-related anxiety. This will be followed by making a case for considering the term "performance" to be broader than activities associated with sport-related performance in practice and competition, by including performance activities associated with sport injury prevention, rehabilitation, and the return to sport process. The paper will then highlight the importance of recognizing early signs and symptoms of anxiety, and the potential need for referral. Finally, the conclusions will emphasize the need for appropriate, client-specific, and practitioner competent care for athletes experiencing sport-related anxiety. Keywords: anxiety, sport, performance, injury, sport medicine professional, sport psychology, mental health

  15. CDC's Approach to Educating Coaches about Sports-Related Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchko, Jane; Huitric, Michele; Sarmiento, Kelly; Hayes, Gail; Pruzan, Marcia; Sawyer, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Sports-related concussions can happen to any athlete in any sport. Each year in the United States, an estimated 1.6-3.8 million sports and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) occur, most of which can be classified as concussions. To help coaches prevent, recognize, and better manage sports-related concussions, the Centers for…

  16. Sport-related anxiety: current insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jessica L; Ildefonso, Kenneth; Jones, Megan L; Arvinen-Barrow, Monna

    2017-01-01

    To date, much research has been devoted to understanding how anxiety can affect sport performance, both in practice and in competitive settings. It is well known that sport has the potential for high levels of stress and anxiety, and that practicing and employing a range of psychological strategies can be beneficial in anxiety management. Equally, growing evidence also suggests that anxiety can play a role in sport injury prevention, occurrence, rehabilitation, and the return to sport process. The purpose of this paper is to provide current insights into sport-related anxiety. More specifically, it will provide the reader with definitions and theoretical conceptualizations of sport-related anxiety. This will be followed by making a case for considering the term "performance" to be broader than activities associated with sport-related performance in practice and competition, by including performance activities associated with sport injury prevention, rehabilitation, and the return to sport process. The paper will then highlight the importance of recognizing early signs and symptoms of anxiety, and the potential need for referral. Finally, the conclusions will emphasize the need for appropriate, client-specific, and practitioner competent care for athletes experiencing sport-related anxiety.

  17. Lived Experiences of Adolescent Athletes Following Sport-Related Concussion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valovich McLeod, Tamara C; Wagner, Alyssa J; Bacon, Cailee E. Welch

    2017-01-01

    .... However, there has been little research exploring the underlying mechanisms that influence these perceptions of health-related quality of life among adolescent athletes who have sustained a sport-related concussion. Purpose...

  18. Epidemiology, trends, assessment and management of sport-related concussion in United States high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Réjean M; Proctor, Mark R; Mannix, Rebekah; Meehan, William P

    2012-12-01

    Sport-related concussion affects athletes at every level of participation. The short and long-term effects of concussions that occur during childhood and adolescence are not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to describe the current burden of disease, current practice patterns and current recommendations for the assessment and management of sport-related concussions sustained by United States high school athletes. Millions of high school students participate in organized sports in the United States. Current estimates suggest that, across all sports, approximately 2.5 concussions occur for every 10 000 athletic exposures, in which an athletic exposure is defined as one athlete participating in one game or practice. At schools that employ at least one athletic trainer, most high school athletes who sustain sport-related concussions will be cared for by athletic trainers and primary care physicians. Approximately 40% will undergo computerized neurocognitive assessment. The number of high school athletes being diagnosed with sport-related concussions is rising. American football has the highest number of concussions in high school with girls' soccer having the second highest total number. Fortunately, coaches are becoming increasingly aware of these injuries and return-to-play guidelines are being implemented.

  19. Maxillofacial and dental injuries sustained in hurling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, C

    2010-06-01

    The incidence of facial injuries in hurling has decreased since the introduction of helmets with facial protection. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of facial and dental injuries sustained in hurling training or matches and compliance with wearing helmets, with or without modified or unmodified faceguards. This prospective study included all patients who attended the Mid Western Regional Hospital Limerick, with injuries sustained while playing hurling during 2007 and 2008 seasons. The study population included 70 patients. Forty two (60%) injuries occurred during practice and 28(40%) during matches. Fifty two players (75%) sustained facial injuries whilst no helmet was worn. Eighteen injuries (25%) were sustained by players wearing helmets. Th study demonstrates that 60% of injuries occur during training when players do not wear helmets. We support the recent introduction by the GAA making it compulsory to wear helmets with faceguard protection from January 1st 2010.

  20. Lived Experiences of Adolescent Athletes Following Sport-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovich McLeod, Tamara C; Wagner, Alyssa J; Bacon, Cailee E Welch

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have identified the effect of sport-related concussion on health-related quality of life through the use of patient-reported outcome measures. However, there has been little research exploring the underlying mechanisms that influence these perceptions of health-related quality of life among adolescent athletes who have sustained a sport-related concussion. To explore the psychosocial aspects of concussion among adolescent athletes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 12 interscholastic athletes (4 girls, 8 boys; mean ± SD age, 15.7 ± 1.7 years; grade level, 10.2 ± 1.4) were interviewed via a semistructured interview protocol between 15 and 30 days postinjury. Data analysis was guided by the consensual qualitative research tradition. Themes and categories emerged through consensus by a 3-person research team, and bias was minimized through the use of multiple-analyst triangulation. Participants identified numerous postconcussion symptoms that resulted in increasing difficulty with emotions (eg, irritable, easily frustrated), roles at school (eg, concentration difficulties, fatigue), and roles in their social environment (eg, letting the team down, not being able to contribute to sport). As a result, participants expressed how they tried to minimize or mask symptoms to decrease the potential of being viewed differently by their peers. Adolescent athletes perceived a significant effect of sport-related concussion on numerous areas of psychosocial and emotional health and well-being. Anticipatory guidance-with education regarding the possible signs and symptoms, risk factors, and recovery expectations following a concussion-is important to include in postinjury management. A better understanding of sport-related concussion and expected recovery could help to improve perceptions of this injury among interscholastic athletes. Additionally, best practices should be identified to assist health care professionals and school personnel in the

  1. Lived Experiences of Adolescent Athletes Following Sport-Related Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.; Wagner, Alyssa J.; Bacon, Cailee E. Welch

    2017-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have identified the effect of sport-related concussion on health-related quality of life through the use of patient-reported outcome measures. However, there has been little research exploring the underlying mechanisms that influence these perceptions of health-related quality of life among adolescent athletes who have sustained a sport-related concussion. Purpose: To explore the psychosocial aspects of concussion among adolescent athletes. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 12 interscholastic athletes (4 girls, 8 boys; mean ± SD age, 15.7 ± 1.7 years; grade level, 10.2 ± 1.4) were interviewed via a semistructured interview protocol between 15 and 30 days postinjury. Data analysis was guided by the consensual qualitative research tradition. Themes and categories emerged through consensus by a 3-person research team, and bias was minimized through the use of multiple-analyst triangulation. Results: Participants identified numerous postconcussion symptoms that resulted in increasing difficulty with emotions (eg, irritable, easily frustrated), roles at school (eg, concentration difficulties, fatigue), and roles in their social environment (eg, letting the team down, not being able to contribute to sport). As a result, participants expressed how they tried to minimize or mask symptoms to decrease the potential of being viewed differently by their peers. Conclusion: Adolescent athletes perceived a significant effect of sport-related concussion on numerous areas of psychosocial and emotional health and well-being. Anticipatory guidance—with education regarding the possible signs and symptoms, risk factors, and recovery expectations following a concussion—is important to include in postinjury management. A better understanding of sport-related concussion and expected recovery could help to improve perceptions of this injury among interscholastic athletes. Additionally, best practices should be

  2. The incidence and burden of hospital-treated sports-related injury in people aged 15+ years in Victoria, Australia, 2004-2010: a future epidemic of osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C F; Kemp, J L; Clapperton, A J

    2015-07-01

    Previous sports injury is a known risk factor for subsequent osteoarthritis (OA), but population-based rates of sports injury are unknown. The aims of this study were to: (1) describe the trends in the population incidence and burden of all hospital-treated sports injury in Victoria, Australia in adults aged 15+ years; (2) determine the incidence of lower limb and knee injuries; and (3) quantify their population health burden as average direct hospital costs per injury and lengths of stay. Health sector data relating to adults aged 15+ years, for 2004-2010 inclusive, was extracted from the Victorian Admitted Episodes Dataset (VAED) and Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset (VEMD). Data relating to sports injuries were identified using activity codes in each dataset Trends in injury frequency and rates were determined, and economic burden was calculated. The overall annual rate of hospital treated sports injuries increased by 24% (P = 0.001), and lower limb injuries by 26% (P = 0.001) over the 7 years. The associated accumulated economic burden was $265 million for all sports injuries and $110 million for lower limb injuries over the 7-years. The findings of this study show a significant increase in sports injuries in the state of Victoria, Australia over a 7-year period. As previous sports injury is a risk factor for the development of OA, the future incidence of OA will escalate, placing an even greater burden on health care systems. Population-wide preventative strategies that reduce the risk of sports injury are urgently required in order to reduce the future burden of OA. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Subject-specific increases in serum S-100B distinguish sports-related concussion from sports-related exertion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kiechle

    Full Text Available The on-field diagnosis of sports-related concussion (SRC is complicated by the lack of an accurate and objective marker of brain injury.To compare subject-specific changes in the astroglial protein, S100B, before and after SRC among collegiate and semi-professional contact sport athletes, and compare these changes to differences in S100B before and after non-contact exertion.Longitudinal cohort study.From 2009-2011, we performed a prospective study of athletes from Munich, Germany, and Rochester, New York, USA. Serum S100B was measured in all SRC athletes at pre-season baseline, within 3 hours of injury, and at days 2, 3 and 7 post-SRC. Among a subset of athletes, S100B was measured after non-contact exertion but before injury. All samples were collected identically and analyzed using an automated electrochemiluminescent assay to quantify serum S100B levels.Forty-six athletes (30 Munich, 16 Rochester underwent baseline testing. Thirty underwent additional post-exertion S100B testing. Twenty-two athletes (16 Rochester, 6 Munich sustained a SRC, and 17 had S100B testing within 3 hours post-injury. The mean 3-hour post-SRC S100B was significantly higher than pre-season baseline (0.099±0.008 µg/L vs. 0.058±0.006 µg/L, p = 0.0002. Mean post-exertion S100B was not significantly different than the preseason baseline. S100B levels at post-injury days 2, 3 and 7 were significantly lower than the 3-hour level, and not different than baseline. Both the absolute change and proportional increase in S100B 3-hour post-injury were accurate discriminators of SRC from non-contact exertion without SRC (AUC 0.772 and 0.904, respectively. A 3-hour post-concussion S100B >0.122 µg/L and a proportional S100B increase of >45.9% over baseline were both 96.7% specific for SRC.Relative and absolute increases in serum S100B can accurately distinguish SRC from sports-related exertion, and may be a useful adjunct to the diagnosis of SRC.

  4. Sports-related dentofacial trauma among high school students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and pattern of occurrence of sports - related dentofacial injuries among athletes participating in Rugby and Football in Nairobi, Kenya. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting: Seventeen Secondary schools participating in either or both Rugby tournaments and the ...

  5. Brain network activation as a novel biomarker for the return-to-play pathway following sport-related brain injury: A prospective case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam W Kiefer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Children and adolescent athletes are at a higher risk for concussion than adults, and also experience longer recovery times and increased associated symptoms. It has also recently been demonstrated that multiple, seemingly mild concussions may result in exacerbated and prolonged neurologic deficits. Objective assessments and return to play criteria are needed to reduce risk and morbidity associated with concussive events in these populations. Recent research has pushed to study the use of electroencephalography as an objective measure of brain injury. In the present case study, we present a novel approach that examines event related potentials via a brain network activation (BNA analysis as a biomarker of concussion and recovery. Specifically, changes in BNA scores as indexed through this approach, offer a potential indicator of neurological health as the BNA assessment qualitatively and quantitatively indexes the network dynamics associated with brain injury. Objective tools such as these support accurate and efficient assessment of brain injury and may offer a useful step in categorizing the temporal and spatial changes in brain activity following concussive blows, as well as the functional connectivity of brain networks, associated with concussion.

  6. Sports-related maxillofacial fractures: a retrospective study of 125 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourouzis, C; Koumoura, F

    2005-09-01

    This study assessed the spectrum of maxillofacial fractures sustained during sports in Greece, discuss the aetiology in different sports and suggest protective measures. One hundred and twenty-five patients suffered facial fractures as a result of different sport activities. The factors evaluated were: type of sport involved, age, sex, mechanism of injury, site of fractures, associated non-maxillofacial injuries and mode of treatment. The ratio male to female was 9:1 and the highest incidence of sport-related facial fractures was found in the 21-30 year age group. Football was the most common sport-related to facial fractures and the main mechanism of injury was that of impact against another player's head. The most common were the mandibular fractures, followed by zygoma fractures. Furthermore, the angle of the mandible is the highest risk region for fracture. The majority of patients needed surgical treatment. Facial fractures during sports mainly affect the young and the majority of the patients are amateur athletes. Although these injuries are not usually severe, initial hospitalisation and surgical interventions may be required. Team sports are responsible for the majority of facial fractures.

  7. Sports-related concussions and the Louisiana Youth Concussion Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Anil; Khan, Imad Saeed; Goldman, Rose; Testa, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Concussion, also referred to as mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), is defined as a "complex pathophysiological process affecting the brain, induced by traumatic biomechanical forces." Various symptoms may be observed in patients with concussions. All of these might not be evident at the time of the injury and be intermittent in their nature. It is estimated that 300,000 of the yearly TBIs in the United States are sports-related, the second leading cause for TBIs after motor vehicle accidents among people aged 15 to 24 years old. Due to some recently reported high profile injuries and deaths of sports personalities, sports-related concussion has seen increasing media and public interest in the last decade. We review the role of football in youth concussions and analyze the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2007 to 2009 to elucidate the outcome and costs associated with sports-related concussions of the youth in the United States. We also review the latest state legislative efforts to decrease the incidence of dangerous sports-related concussions in youth--the Louisiana Youth Concussion Act.

  8. A comprehensive, targeted approach to the clinical care of athletes following sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael W; Kontos, Anthony P; Reynolds, Erin; Murawski, Christopher D; Fu, Freddie H

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss risk and prognostic factors for concussion outcomes, review comprehensive approaches to assessment, and describe a new method for conceptualizing treatment for sport-related concussion using clinical experience. Based on the current literature of sport-related concussion and clinical experience, an approach for conceptualizing concussion care using clinical trajectories and targeted treatments was developed. A comprehensive approach to assessment and targeted treatments for sport-related concussion was developed using specific clinical trajectories. Sport-related concussions are heterogeneous and require an individualized clinical approach. The use of a comprehensive approach for assessing specific clinical trajectories following a sport-related concussion will help clinicians better conceptualize this injury. Clinicians can then match targeted treatment pathways to specific clinical trajectories to accelerate safe return to play for athletes following a sport-related concussion.

  9. Promoting oral health: interventions for preventing dental caries, oral and pharyngeal cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries. A report on recommendations of the task force on community preventive services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-30

    The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) has conducted systematic reviews of the evidence of effectiveness of selected population-based interventions to prevent and control dental caries (tooth decay), oral (mouth) and pharyngeal (throat) cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries. The Task Force strongly recommends community water fluoridation and school-based or school-linked pit and fissure sealant delivery programs for prevention and control of dental caries. Using the rules of evidence it has established, the Task Force found insufficient evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the remaining interventions reviewed. Therefore, the Task Force makes no recommendation for or against use of statewide or communitywide sealant promotion programs, population-based interventions for early detection of precancers and cancers, or population-based interventions to encourage use of helmets, facemasks, and mouthguards to reduce oral-facial trauma in contact sports. The Task Force's finding of insufficient evidence indicates the need for more research on intervention effectiveness. Until the results of such research become available, readers are encouraged to judge the usefulness of these interventions by other criteria. This report presents additional information regarding the recommendations, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, and provides information designed to help apply the strongly recommended interventions locally.

  10. Young Athletes' Concerns About Sport-Related Concussion: The Patient's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Cynthia J; MacDougall, Robert; Quatman-Yates, Catherine C; Myer, Gregory D; Sugimoto, Dai; Dennison, Roberta J; Meehan, William P

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have examined the experience and concerns of the concussed athlete. The purpose of this study was to identify the most pressing concerns of athletes with concussion. Cross-sectional survey of athletes who presented for evaluation of a new sport-related concussion during an 8-month period. Tertiary-level sports medicine division of a large academic pediatric medical center. One hundred twenty one patients (67 male, 54 female) aged 8 to 18 years who had sustained a sport-related concussion participated in the study by responding to "What is the worst thing for you about having a concussion?" on the study questionnaire. Questionnaires were completed in the clinic waiting room before the visit with a provider. Inductive content analysis was used to identify themes in the responses to the study question. Age, sex, sport played at the time of the current injury, history of previous concussion, known contacts with concussion, and subjective report of worst aspect of concussion. Seventy respondents (57.9%) cited symptoms, and 68 (56.2%) reported loss of activity as the worst part of concussion, including 17 (14.0%) who listed both symptoms and loss of activity. Over half of concussed athletes indicate that the most distressing part of the injury is loss of activities, which may result from symptoms of the injury itself and/or the prescribed treatment. Health care providers should not underestimate the degree to which symptoms and loss of activities affect young athletes' general well-being. In addition to the negative impact of concussion symptoms, there is an obvious cost of physical, cognitive, and social activity restrictions for patients recovering from sport-related concussions that should be explicitly addressed.

  11. Rugby Injuries Sustained during Tournament Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, T

    1985-01-01

    Rugby football is a fast growing physical contact sport that is known for its ruggedness and injuries. Tournament play tests the stamina of the individual players and may have a cumulative wear and tear effect that results in different types of injuries. This study was conducted to determine what body parts are injured in a rugby tournament and how serious those injuries are. Climatic conditions, mainly heat and humidity, were considered to be major factors. Heat-related injuries were the single most important cause for termination of play. This type of injury is very serious and may be reduced or prevented by following simple guidelines for play based on the temperature-humidity index. Most other injuries were strains, sprains, contusions, and several lacerations to the knee, thorax, head, and neck; none was catastrophic. The reputation that rugby football is brutal does not seem justified by the injuries sustained in this tournament. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1985;7(1):16-19.

  12. Safe treatment of sport related concussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kampen, D.A.; Lovell, M.R.; Diercks, Ron

    2006-01-01

    Sport related concussion is a hot item. The Health Council of the Netherlands published its report on concussions in 2003 and there is much concern about the negative health effects of sports related concussion. Neuropsychological testing has recently been endorsed as a 'cornerstone' of concussion

  13. Role of neuropsychologists in the evaluation and management of sport-related concussion: an inter-organization position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echemendia, Ruben J; Iverson, Grant L; McCrea, Michael; Broshek, Donna K; Gioia, Gerard A; Sautter, Scott W; Macciocchi, Stephen N; Barr, William B

    2011-11-01

    Over the past 20 years, clinical neuropsychologists have been at the forefront of both scientific and clinical initiatives aimed at developing evidence-based approaches to the evaluation and management of sport-related concussion. These efforts have directly impacted current policy on strategies for injury assessment and return-to-play by athletes after concussion. Many states are considering legislation requiring (a) education of athletes, parents, coaches, and school/organization officials on the recognition, evaluation, and management of sport-related concussions; (b) removal from play of any youth athlete that is suspected of having sustained a concussion; and (c) not allowing the student to return to participation until the student is evaluated and cleared for return to participation in writing by an appropriate healthcare professional. It is the official position of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN), American Board of Neuropsychology (ABN), Division 40 (Neuropsychology) of the American Psychological Association (APA), and the National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN) that neuropsychologists should be included among the licensed health care professionals authorized to evaluate, clinically manage, and provide return to play clearance for athletes who sustain a sport-related concussion.

  14. First-Time Sports-Related Concussion Recovery: The Role of Sex, Age, and Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidecker, John M; Gealt, David B; Luksch, John R; Weaver, Martin D

    2017-10-01

    Concussion is one of the most common injuries in athletes. Current concussion consensus statements propose that female sex may be a modifying factor in concussion management and recovery. To determine whether female athletes in middle school and high school with a first-time, sports-related concussion remained symptomatic longer than their male counterparts. A retrospective medical record analysis was performed among athletes who sustained a concussion between 2011 and 2013. Inclusion criteria consisted of age between 11 and 18 years and diagnosis of first-time concussion sustained while playing organized sports. Using the documented notes in the medical record, length of time that each athlete was symptomatic from his or her concussion was calculated. A total of 110 male and 102 female athletes (N=212) met the eligibility criteria for the study. A significant difference was found in the median number of days female athletes remained symptomatic (28 days) when compared with male athletes (11 days) (Psports played. Female athletes aged 11 to 18 years with first-time, sports-related concussions remained symptomatic for a longer period when compared with male athletes of similar age, regardless of sport played. The mechanism behind this difference needs to be further elucidated.

  15. Sport-related maxillofacial fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruslin, M.; Boffano, P.; ten Brincke, Y.J.D.; Forouzanfar, T.; Brand, H.S.

    2016-01-01

    Sports and exercise are important causes of maxillofacial injuries. Different types of sports might differ in frequency and type of fractures. The aim of the present study was to explore the possible relation between the types of sport practiced and the frequency and nature of the facial bone

  16. In-office management of sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Erin; Collins, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    The field of sport-related concussion has grown exponentially over the past decade, with more concussion-specific clinics being identified in major hospital systems as well as independent practitioner's offices. To date, there is no standardized in-office protocol for managing ongoing symptoms. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Sports Concussion Program, established in 2000, is one of the largest programs in the USA, pioneering the way in clinical management, research, and education of sport-related concussion. This report will outline the essential components of a successful concussion clinic, using the UPMC Sports Concussion Program as a case example of best practice. We will share several case studies illustrating the individualized and complex nature of this injury, as well as review important rehabilitation components. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. A study of sports-related orbital fractures in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Jing Zhan; Hegde, Raghuraj; Young, Stephanie; Lim, Thiam Chye; Amrith, Shantha; Sundar, Gangadhara

    2017-10-01

    With an increased popularity of sport and active living worldwide, our study aims to explore the incidence and features of sports-related orbital fractures in Singapore. 1421 computer tomography (CT) imaging scans of the face and orbits done at the National University Hospital over a 24-month period from January 2013 and December 2014 were reviewed retrospectively for orbital fractures. We identified 483 orbital fractures of which sports injury was the fourth most common etiology (n = 65; 13.5%) after road traffic accident (n = 131; 27.1%), geriatric fall (n = 81; 16.8%) and workplace injury (n = 67; 13.9%). The three most common sport in orbital fractures were soccer (n = 20; 30.8%), bicycling (n = 11; 16.9%) and jogging (n = 8; 12.3%). The three most common fracture patterns were zygomatico-maxillary complex fractures (n = 24; 36.9%), isolated one wall blowout fractures (n = 19; 29.2%) and naso-orbito-ethmoid fractures (n = 7; 10.8%). Sports-related orbital fractures were associated with a low mean age of patients (45.9 years, range, 14-79 years), a higher proportion of males (n = 58; 89.2%) than that from geriatric falls (n = 37, 45.6%) (P Sports-related orbital fractures are the fourth most common cause of orbital fractures. Though commonly seen in young male adults, in view of the aging population and people exercising more regularly, education of safety measures among sports users is paramount to preventing sports-related orbital fractures.

  18. Neuropsychological and psychological rehabilitation interventions in refractory sport-related post-concussive syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conder, Robert; Conder, Alanna Adler

    2015-01-01

    The neuropsychological, physical, vestibular and oculomotor sequelae of sports-related concussion are extremely well documented. However, there is a paucity of interventions for these symptoms in refractory sports-related concussions. The intent of this article is to review the known and emerging neuropsychological and psychological rehabilitation interventions for reducing morbidity in refractory sports-related concussions (SRCs). The authors openly acknowledge the limited amount of empirical data available for review, as did the Zurich consensus papers, but posit a mindful and ethical approach towards rehabilitation interventions in the absence of evidence-based guidelines. Further, rehabilitation interventions proven useful with similar injuries or illnesses, particularly non-sports-related mild TBI, will be reviewed for applicability. Such interventions include Cognitive-Behavioural psychotherapy, biofeedback, cranial electrical stimulation, neurofeedback and cognitive rehabilitation. Modified approaches for rehabilitation with young children within family and school systems are provided. Recommendations for further research are offered.

  19. MR imaging in sports-related glenohumeral instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, Klaus; Waldt, Simone [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Sports-related shoulder pain and injuries represent a common problem. In this context, glenohumeral instability is currently believed to play a central role either as a recognized or as an unrecognized condition. Shoulder instabilities can roughly be divided into traumatic, atraumatic, and microtraumatic glenohumeral instabilities. In athletes, atraumatic and microtraumatic instabilities can lead to secondary impingement syndromes and chronic damage to intraarticular structures. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is superior to conventional MR imaging in the diagnosis of labro-ligamentous injuries, intrinsic impingement, and SLAP (superior labral anteroposterior) lesions, and thus represents the most informative imaging modality in the overall assessment of glenohumeral instability. This article reviews the imaging criteria for the detection and classification of instability-related injuries in athletes with special emphasis on the influence of MR findings on therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  20. Injury and treatment characteristics of sport-specific injuries sustained in interscholastic athletics: a report from the athletic training practice-based research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kenneth C; Snyder Valier, Alison R; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of clinical practice factors, beyond epidemiologic data, may help guide medical coverage and care decisions. Trends in injury and treatment characteristics of sport-specific injuries sustained by secondary school athletes will differ based on sport. Retrospective analysis of electronic patient records. Level 4. Participants consisted of 3302 boys and 2293 girls who were diagnosed with a sport-related injury or condition during the study years. Injury (sport, body part, diagnosis via ICD-9 codes) and treatment (type, amount, and duration of care) characteristics were grouped by sport and reported using summary statistics. Most injuries and treatments occurred in football, girls' soccer, basketball, volleyball, and track and field. Sprain or strain of the ankle, knee, and thigh/hip/groin and concussion were the most commonly documented injuries across sports. The injury pattern for boys' wrestling differed from other sports and included sprain or strain of the elbow and neck and general medical skin conditions. The most frequently reported service was athletic training evaluation/reevaluation treatment, followed by hot/cold pack, therapeutic exercise, manual therapy techniques, electrical stimulation, and strapping of lower extremity joints. Most sports required 4 to 5 services per injury. With the exception of boys' soccer and girls' softball, duration of care ranged from 10 to 14 days. Girls' soccer and girls' and boys' track and field reported the longest durations of care. Injury and treatment characteristics are generally comparable across sports, suggesting that secondary school athletic trainers may diagnose and treat similar injuries regardless of sport. Subtle sport trends, including skin conditions associated with boys' wrestling and longer duration of care for girls' soccer, are important to note when discussing appropriate medical coverage and care.

  1. [Sports-related carotid artery dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrouschot, J; Bormann, A; Routsi, D; Stoll, A

    2009-09-01

    Sports-related carotid artery dissection are very rare and were described in different kinds of sports. We report on a 45-year old man who suffered bilateral brain infarctions caused by bilateral extracranial internal carotid artery dissection after excessive weight lifting in a gym. As possible trigger factors for the dissections we assumed the abrupt extension of the neck during weight lifting and the frequent Valsalva manoeuvers with massive rise in the pressure in the carotid artery system. The patient underwent angioplasty and stenting of the stenosis of right carotid artery, the primarily occluded left carotid artery recanalized spontaneously. Secondary prevention was established by platelet aggregation inhibitors. The patient recovered completely. The pathogenesis of sports-related dissections is multifactorial. In addition to sporting activities hereditary or acquired structural aberrations in the arterial walls could be discussed. Acute focal neurological symptoms after sport should always focus on carotid or vertebral artery dissection. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  2. Biceps femoris tendon injuries sustained while playing hockey

    OpenAIRE

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2011-01-01

    A 42-year-old female nurse presented in March 2008 with a left proximal hamstring tendon injury sustained while playing hockey. At surgery, the proximal biceps femoris tendon and semitendonosus were found to be ruptured and were repaired. The patient made a good recovery but sustained a further hockey injury in January 2010 involving a complete tear and rupture of the biceps femoris tendon distally. This was managed conservatively and the patient was able to return to playing hockey 10 months...

  3. Epidemiology of Hospital-Treated Injuries Sustained by Fitness Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Shannon E.; Finch, Caroline F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to provide an epidemiological profile of injuries sustained by participants in fitness activities in Victoria, Australia, based on hospital admissions and emergency department (ED) presentations and to identify the most common types, causes, and sites of these injuries. Method: Hospital-treated fitness…

  4. Early symptom burden predicts recovery after sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, William P; Mannix, Rebekah; Monuteaux, Michael C; Stein, Cynthia J; Bachur, Richard G

    2014-12-09

    To identify independent predictors of and use recursive partitioning to develop a multivariate regression tree predicting symptom duration greater than 28 days after a sport-related concussion. We conducted a prospective cohort study of patients in a sports concussion clinic. Participants completed questionnaires that included the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS). Participants were asked to record the date on which they last experienced symptoms. Potential predictor variables included age, sex, score on symptom inventories, history of prior concussions, performance on computerized neurocognitive assessments, loss of consciousness and amnesia at the time of injury, history of prior medical treatment for headaches, history of migraines, and family history of concussion. We used recursive partitioning analysis to develop a multivariate prediction model for identifying athletes at risk for a prolonged recovery from concussion. A total of 531 patients ranged in age from 7 to 26 years (mean 14.6 ± 2.9 years). The mean PCSS score at the initial visit was 26 ± 26; mean time to presentation was 12 ± 5 days. Only total score on symptom inventory was independently associated with symptoms lasting longer than 28 days (adjusted odds ratio 1.044; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.034, 1.054 for PCSS). No other potential predictor variables were independently associated with symptom duration or useful in developing the optimal regression decision tree. Most participants (86%; 95% CI 80%, 90%) with an initial PCSS score of sport-related concussion is overall symptom burden. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Dental injuries sustained by high school athletes in the United States, from 2008/2009 through 2013/2014 academic years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christy L; McKenzie, Lara B; Ferketich, Amy K; Andridge, Rebecca; Xiang, Huiyun; Comstock, R Dawn

    2016-04-01

    Risk of dental injuries is present in a variety of sports. Mouthguards are effective yet underutilized. This study aimed to estimate the rate of dental injuries among high school athletes and investigate the utilization of mouthguards across multiple high school sports. Athlete exposure and dental injury data were collected during the 2008/2009 through 2013/2014 academic years from a large sample of high schools in the United States as part of the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study. There were 222 dental injuries sustained during 24,787,258 athlete exposures for a rate of 0.90 per 100,000 athlete exposures. The rate of dental injuries in competition (1.8) was three times higher than the rate in practice (0.6) (RR: 3.1, 95% CI: 2.3-4.0). Rates of dental injuries varied by sport with the highest rates in girls' field hockey (3.9) and boys' basketball (2.6). Dental injuries most commonly occurred as a result of contact with another player (61.3%) and contact with a playing apparatus (31.5%). For the majority of dental injuries, the athlete was not wearing a mouthguard (72.5%). Among injuries where athletes were wearing mouthguards, the majority were self-fitted (95.9%). Although dental injuries were relatively uncommon, the majority occurred while the athlete was not wearing a mouthguard. As previous studies have shown that mouthguards are effective in preventing injuries, all high school athletes participating in a sport that places them at risk of sustaining a dental injury should wear a mouthguard consistently in both competition and practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Injuries Sustained by the Mixed Martial Arts Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Andrew R; Maciel, Robert C; Petrigliano, Frank A; Rodriguez, John P; Brooks, Adam G

    2016-08-16

    Mixed martial arts (MMA) is rapidly growing in popularity in the United States and abroad. This combat sport joins athletes from a wide variety of martial art disciplines, each with characteristic and distinguishing injury profiles, together in competition. Because of increasing participation by professionals and amateurs alike, injuries sustained by MMA athletes have been on the rise. A review of relevant publications using the search term mixed martial arts and each of its component combat sports (eg, Muay Thai, Brazilian jiu-jitsu) from 1980 through 2015 was completed using PubMed and Google Scholar. Clinical review. Level 5. The majority of studies on MMA injuries evaluate those sustained during competition, which range in incidence from 22.9 to 28.6 per 100 fight-participations. Striking-predominant disciplines such as boxing, karate, and Muay Thai have high rates of head and facial injuries, whereas submission-predominant disciplines such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu, judo, and wrestling have high rates of joint injuries. Numerous studies have evaluated injuries in athletes who participate in MMA and its component disciplines during competition but much remains to be discovered about injuries sustained during training and in specific patient populations such as adolescents and women. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Musculoskeletal injuries sustained in modern army combatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possley, Daniel R; Johnson, Anthony E

    2012-01-01

    Participation in martial arts has grown over the past 15 years with an estimated 8 million participants. In 2004, the Chief of Staff of the Army directed that all Initial Military Training soldiers receive Modern Army Combatives (MAC) training. The mechanical differences between the various martial arts styles incorporated into mixed martial arts/MAC pose challenges to the medical professional. We report the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries by Level 1 and 2 trained active duty soldiers participating in MAC over a 3-year period. From June 1, 2005 to January 1, 2009, the Orthopaedic Surgery service treated and tracked all injuries in MAC. Data was analyzed using the Chi(2) method of analysis. (p injuries reported inability to perform their military occupation specialty duties. The knee was most frequently injured followed by shoulder. Surgical intervention was warranted 24% of the time. Participants in MAC reported injuries severe enough to impact occupational duties at 15.5%. Surgical intervention was warranted only 24% of the time. The knee and shoulder are the most frequently injured body parts. Labral repair was the most frequent surgical procedure.

  8. Evidence-based management of sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Michael; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Concussion is not only one of the most common injuries encountered by athletes participating in contact and collision sports, but also among the most complex injuries to manage in a sports medicine setting. Over the past two decades, we have made great progress in advancing the basic and clinical science of concussion. These advances have had enormous clinical translational value for developing evidence-based guidelines for management of concussion in sports. Applied clinical research has clarified the defining characteristics of sport-related concussion (SRC) that support new diagnostic criteria. At the same time, major advancements have been realized in the development and validation of clinical tools that allow a more objective and accurate assessment of concussion and performance-based measures of recovery. These tools provide clinicians with a more informed basis for determining an athlete's cognitive and physical fitness to return to competition after concussion. Standardized injury management protocols that systematically prescribe rest, graded activity, and return to play have been adopted in nearly all clinical settings. Herein, we briefly summarize the findings and recommendations from several national and international consensus guidelines and position statements on best practice in the evaluation and management of SRC. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Assessment and management of sport-related concussions in United States high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, William P; d'Hemecourt, Pierre; Collins, Christy L; Comstock, R Dawn

    2011-11-01

    Little existing data describe which medical professionals and which medical studies are used to assess sport-related concussions in high school athletes. To describe the medical providers and medical studies used when assessing sport-related concussions. To determine the effects of medical provider type on timing of return to play, frequency of imaging, and frequency of neuropsychological testing. Descriptive epidemiology study. All concussions recorded by the High School Reporting Information Online (HS RIO) injury surveillance system during the 2009 to 2010 academic year were included. χ(2) analyses were conducted for categorical variables. Fisher exact test was used for nonparametric data. Logistic regression analyses were used when adjusting for potential confounders. Statistical significance was considered for P sport-related concussions, representing 14.6% of all injuries. Most (94.4%) concussions were assessed by athletic trainers (ATs), 58.8% by a primary care physician. Few concussions were managed by specialists. The assessment of 21.2% included computed tomography. Computerized neuropsychological testing was used for 41.2%. For 50.1%, a physician decided when to return the athlete to play; for 46.2%, the decision was made by an AT. After adjusting for potential confounders, no associations between timing of return to play and the type of provider (physician vs AT) deciding to return the athlete to play were found. Concussions account for nearly 15% of all sport-related injuries in high school athletes. The timing of return to play after a sport-related concussion is similar regardless of whether the decision to return the athlete to play is made by a physician or an AT. When a medical doctor is involved, most concussions are assessed by primary care physicians as opposed to subspecialists. Computed tomography is obtained during the assessment of 1 of every 5 concussions occurring in high school athletes.

  10. Sports-related concussions: diagnosis, complications, and current management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jonathan G; Young, Jacob S; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-04-01

    Sports-related concussions (SRCs) are traumatic events that affect up to 3.8 million athletes per year. The initial diagnosis and management is often instituted on the field of play by coaches, athletic trainers, and team physicians. SRCs are usually transient episodes of neurological dysfunction following a traumatic impact, with most symptoms resolving in 7-10 days; however, a small percentage of patients will suffer protracted symptoms for years after the event and may develop chronic neurodegenerative disease. Rarely, SRCs are associated with complications, such as skull fractures, epidural or subdural hematomas, and edema requiring neurosurgical evaluation. Current standards of care are based on a paradigm of rest and gradual return to play, with decisions driven by subjective and objective information gleaned from a detailed history and physical examination. Advanced imaging techniques such as functional MRI, and detailed understanding of the complex pathophysiological process underlying SRCs and how they affect the athletes acutely and long-term, may change the way physicians treat athletes who suffer a concussion. It is hoped that these advances will allow a more accurate assessment of when an athlete is truly safe to return to play, decreasing the risk of secondary impact injuries, and provide avenues for therapeutic strategies targeting the complex biochemical cascade that results from a traumatic injury to the brain.

  11. Nerve injuries sustained during warfare: part I--Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, R; Misra, P; Stewart, M P M; Eardley, W G P; Ramasamy, A; Brown, K; Shenoy, R; Anand, P; Clasper, J; Dunn, R; Etherington, J

    2012-04-01

    We describe 261 peripheral nerve injuries sustained in war by 100 consecutive service men and women injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. Their mean age was 26.5 years (18.1 to 42.6), the median interval between injury and first review was 4.2 months (mean 8.4 months (0.36 to 48.49)) and median follow-up was 28.4 months (mean 20.5 months (1.3 to 64.2)). The nerve lesions were predominantly focal prolonged conduction block/neurapraxia in 116 (45%), axonotmesis in 92 (35%) and neurotmesis in 53 (20%) and were evenly distributed between the upper and the lower limbs. Explosions accounted for 164 (63%): 213 (82%) nerve injuries were associated with open wounds. Two or more main nerves were injured in 70 patients. The ulnar, common peroneal and tibial nerves were most commonly injured. In 69 patients there was a vascular injury, fracture, or both at the level of the nerve lesion. Major tissue loss was present in 50 patients: amputation of at least one limb was needed in 18. A total of 36 patients continued in severe neuropathic pain. This paper outlines the methods used in the assessment of these injuries and provides information about the depth and distribution of the nerve lesions, their associated injuries and neuropathic pain syndromes.

  12. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Pham

    Full Text Available Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  13. Early symptom burden predicts recovery after sport-related concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannix, Rebekah; Monuteaux, Michael C.; Stein, Cynthia J.; Bachur, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify independent predictors of and use recursive partitioning to develop a multivariate regression tree predicting symptom duration greater than 28 days after a sport-related concussion. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of patients in a sports concussion clinic. Participants completed questionnaires that included the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS). Participants were asked to record the date on which they last experienced symptoms. Potential predictor variables included age, sex, score on symptom inventories, history of prior concussions, performance on computerized neurocognitive assessments, loss of consciousness and amnesia at the time of injury, history of prior medical treatment for headaches, history of migraines, and family history of concussion. We used recursive partitioning analysis to develop a multivariate prediction model for identifying athletes at risk for a prolonged recovery from concussion. Results: A total of 531 patients ranged in age from 7 to 26 years (mean 14.6 ± 2.9 years). The mean PCSS score at the initial visit was 26 ± 26; mean time to presentation was 12 ± 5 days. Only total score on symptom inventory was independently associated with symptoms lasting longer than 28 days (adjusted odds ratio 1.044; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.034, 1.054 for PCSS). No other potential predictor variables were independently associated with symptom duration or useful in developing the optimal regression decision tree. Most participants (86%; 95% CI 80%, 90%) with an initial PCSS score of concussion is overall symptom burden. PMID:25381296

  14. Assessment and Management of Sport-Related Concussions in United States High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, William P.; d’Hemecourt, Pierre; Collins, Christy L.; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Background Little existing data describe which medical professionals and which medical studies are used to assess sport-related concussions in high school athletes. Purpose To describe the medical providers and medical studies used when assessing sport-related concussions. To determine the effects of medical provider type on timing of return to play, frequency of imaging, and frequency of neuropsychological testing. Study Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods All concussions recorded by the High School Reporting Information Online (HS RIO) injury surveillance system during the 2009 to 2010 academic year were included. χ2 analyses were conducted for categorical variables. Fisher exact test was used for nonparametric data. Logistic regression analyses were used when adjusting for potential confounders. Statistical significance was considered for P concussions, representing 14.6% of all injuries. Most (94.4%) concussions were assessed by athletic trainers (ATs), 58.8% by a primary care physician. Few concussions were managed by specialists. The assessment of 21.2% included computed tomography. Computerized neuropsychological testing was used for 41.2%. For 50.1%, a physician decided when to return the athlete to play; for 46.2%, the decision was made by an AT. After adjusting for potential confounders, no associations between timing of return to play and the type of provider (physician vs AT) deciding to return the athlete to play were found. Conclusion Concussions account for nearly 15% of all sport-related injuries in high school athletes. The timing of return to play after a sport-related concussion is similar regardless of whether the decision to return the athlete to play is made by a physician or an AT. When a medical doctor is involved, most concussions are assessed by primary care physicians as opposed to subspecialists. Computed tomography is obtained during the assessment of 1 of every 5 concussions occurring in high school athletes. PMID:21969181

  15. Work-related injury sustained by foreign workers in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carangan, M; Tham, K Y; Seow, E

    2004-03-01

    Singapore has a resident population of 3.26 million and 0.53 million foreign workers. The objective of the study was to compare the injuries sustained by foreign and local workers presenting to an emergency department (ED). Adult victims of work-related injury who presented to an urban public hospital ED from 1 December 1998 to 31 May 1999 were interviewed. Chart reviews were done for those hospitalised. Data collected were those of demographic, nature of injury, ambulance care, ED and hospital care, outcome and final diagnoses. There were 1244 local workers and 1936 foreign workers, giving a ratio of 1 local:1.6 foreign workers. The mean age of foreign workers was 29.6 years [standard deviation (SD) 6.2], which was younger (P workers. Fridays and Saturdays were the common days for injuries among foreign workers as opposed to Wednesdays and Mondays for local workers. Falls from height > or = 2m occurred among 9.1% of foreign workers, more (P workers, resulting in 2 out of 3 foreign workers death. Though the pattern of injuries was similar between foreign and local workers, foreign workers needed longer (P = 0.03) sick leave and more (P = 0.01) foreign workers were hospitalised, giving a ratio of 2 foreign workers for every 1 local worker hospitalised. Foreign workers had no difficulty accessing ED and hospital care for work-related injuries. The pattern and severity of injuries were similar between foreign and local workers but more foreign workers were hospitalised.

  16. On-field management and return-to-play in sports-related concussion in children: Are children managed appropriately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haran, Harini P; Bressan, Silvia; Oakley, Ed; Davis, Gavin A; Anderson, Vicki; Babl, Franz E

    2016-03-01

    On-field management and return-to-play guidelines aim to ensure the identification and appropriate management of the concussed athlete. Compliance with current guidelines in many settings is unknown. We assessed whether key components of current concussion guidelines are being followed in child athletes. Prospective observational study. Data were collected from children (5-18 years) presenting to a paediatric emergency department with sport-related concussion via researcher-administered surveys in the emergency department and during a follow up phone call. On hospital discharge all patients received a return to sports fact sheet based on the International Concussion in Sports Group. Ninety-three had sustained a concussion (mean age 12.7 (±0.27) years, 83% male). Sports played included Australian Football (47%), soccer (12%), rugby (9%) basketball (8%), other (25%). 82% participated in organised sports. Concussive signs or symptoms included loss of consciousness (41%), disorientation (36%), vomiting (23%), amnesia (30%), headache (60%). For concussive injury in organised sports (n=76), overall 42% were not managed according to recommended guidelines: 19% were not immediately removed from play, 29% were allowed to return to play on the same day and 27% were not assessed by qualified personnel. 93% of parents and 96% of patients were unaware of concussion or return-to-play guidelines from their organisations. Overall, 72% were compliant with provided return-to-play guidelines. Many children with sports related-concussion are not formally assessed on-field and continue to play. On-field concussion management and return to play practices are often suboptimal. Awareness and education of coaches, teachers, parents and children need to be improved. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolution of Sports-related Headgear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvaterra, George

    2016-09-01

    The major focus of this review is to establish concussion in sport as a silent epidemic in our society that is not an accident. Brain injury has a definitive pattern and distinct nonrandom predictable characteristic. The development of successful head protection requires a scientific database approach to the mechanics of headgear. It is the responsibility of the health care clinician to help with the maintenance of protective standards for headgear and support rule changes to decrease the morbidity and mortality of athletes.

  18. Length of Recovery From Sports-Related Concussions in Pediatric Patients Treated at Concussion Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Donald J; Coxe, Kathryn; Li, Hongmei; Pommering, Thomas L; Young, Julie A; Smith, Gary A; Yang, Jingzhen

    2018-01-01

    We quantified the length of recovery time by week in a cohort of pediatric sports-related concussion patients treated at concussion clinics, and examined patient and injury characteristics associated with prolonged recovery. A retrospective, cohort design. Seven concussion clinics at a Midwest children's hospital. Patients aged 10 to 17 years with a diagnosed sports-related concussion presenting to the clinic within 30 days of injury. Length of recovery by week. Unadjusted and adjusted multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to model the effect of patient and injury characteristics on length of recovery by week. Median length of recovery was 17 days. Only 16.3% (299/1840) of patients recovered within one week, whereas 26.4% took longer than four weeks to recover. By 2 months postinjury, 6.7% of patients were still experiencing symptoms. Higher symptom scores at injury and initial visit were significantly associated with prolonged symptoms by week. Patients who presented to the clinic more than 2 weeks postinjury or who had 2 or more previous concussions showed increased risk for prolonged recovery. Females were at greater risk for prolonged recovery than males (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval = 1.49-2.89). Age was not significantly associated with recovery length. High symptom scores at injury and initial visit, time to initial clinical presentation, presence of 2 or more previous concussions, and female sex are associated with prolonged concussion recovery. Further research should aim to establish objective measures of recovery, accounting for treatment received during the recovery. The median length of recovery is 17 days among pediatric sports-related concussion patients treated at concussion clinics. Only 16.3% of patients recovered within one week, whereas 26.4% took longer than 4 weeks to recover.

  19. Pediatric injury prevention programs: Identifying markers for success and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Sofia; Pomerantz, Wendy J; Miller, Beverly; Pan, Anqi; Agarwal, Maneesha

    2017-11-01

    Injury is the leading cause of death in children. Although many pediatric hospitals and trauma centers provide injury prevention (IP) programming, there is no national standard. This study aims to identify characteristics of a sustainable and successful IP program by querying programs affiliated with the Injury Free Coalition for Kids (IFCK). The IFCK sites were sent a 30-question survey via e-mail. Questions focused on demographics, scope of IP activities, self-efficacy, and outcome measures including finances, academic productivity, and legislative advocacy. Counts and frequencies were calculated and compared using χ tests. The survey was completed by 38 (90.4%) of 42 sites. The majority were associated with a freestanding children's hospital (57.9%) and Level I pediatric trauma center (86.8%). Most programs (79%) had at least one dedicated full-time equivalent (FTE) staff. Research was most common on child passenger safety and teen driving. Nearly 30% of programs offered educational curricula to health care providers; these sites were more likely to have FTE support (p = 0.036). Steady sources of funding were identified for 60.5% of programs, with 47.8% citing their hospital as the primary source; 73% of respondents were confident in their program's capacity to sustain activities; these were more likely to be larger programs (p = 0.001) with steady sources of funding (p < 0.001). Despite 73.7% of sites having academic affiliations, 60.5% had 5 or fewer publications over the previous 5 years. In the prior 2 years, 55.3% of programs impacted legislative or policy changes. Funding, size of program, and FTE had no statistical correlation with research productivity or number of legislative/policy contributions. This study characterizes the variation among pediatric IP programs within IFCK sites, while highlighting the association between financial and FTE support from programs' institutions with sustainable IP programming. These results can assist programs in

  20. A systematic review of potential long-term effects of sport-related concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Andrew J; Schneider, Kathryn J; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Bailes, Julian; Cantu, Robert C; Castellani, Rudolph J; Turner, Michael; Jordan, Barry D; Randolph, Christopher; Dvořák, Jiří; Hayden, K. Alix; Tator, Charles H; McCrory, Paul; Iverson, Grant L

    2017-01-01

    Objective Systematic review of possible long-term effects of sports-related concussion in retired athletes. Data sources Ten electronic databases. Study selection Original research; incidence, risk factors or causation related to long-term mental health or neurological problems; individuals who have suffered a concussion; retired athletes as the subjects and possible long-term sequelae defined as >10 years after the injury. Data extraction Study population, exposure/outcome measures, clinical data, neurological examination findings, cognitive assessment, neuroimaging findings and neuropathology results. Risk of bias and level of evidence were evaluated by two authors. Results Following review of 3819 studies, 47 met inclusion criteria. Some former athletes have depression and cognitive deficits later in life, and there is an association between these deficits and multiple prior concussions. Former athletes are not at increased risk for death by suicide (two studies). Former high school American football players do not appear to be at increased risk for later life neurodegenerative diseases (two studies). Some retired professional American football players may be at increased risk for diminishment in cognitive functioning or mild cognitive impairment (several studies), and neurodegenerative diseases (one study). Neuroimaging studies show modest evidence of macrostructural, microstructural, functional and neurochemical changes in some athletes. Conclusion Multiple concussions appear to be a risk factor for cognitive impairment and mental health problems in some individuals. More research is needed to better understand the prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurological conditions and diseases, and the extent to which they are related to concussions and/or repetitive neurotrauma sustained in sports. PMID:28455362

  1. A systematic review of potential long-term effects of sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Geoff; Gardner, Andrew J; Schneider, Kathryn J; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Bailes, Julian; Cantu, Robert C; Castellani, Rudolph J; Turner, Michael; Jordan, Barry D; Randolph, Christopher; Dvořák, Jiří; Hayden, K Alix; Tator, Charles H; McCrory, Paul; Iverson, Grant L

    2017-06-01

    Systematic review of possible long-term effects of sports-related concussion in retired athletes. Ten electronic databases. Original research; incidence, risk factors or causation related to long-term mental health or neurological problems; individuals who have suffered a concussion; retired athletes as the subjects and possible long-term sequelae defined as >10 years after the injury. Study population, exposure/outcome measures, clinical data, neurological examination findings, cognitive assessment, neuroimaging findings and neuropathology results. Risk of bias and level of evidence were evaluated by two authors. Following review of 3819 studies, 47 met inclusion criteria. Some former athletes have depression and cognitive deficits later in life, and there is an association between these deficits and multiple prior concussions. Former athletes are not at increased risk for death by suicide (two studies). Former high school American football players do not appear to be at increased risk for later life neurodegenerative diseases (two studies). Some retired professional American football players may be at increased risk for diminishment in cognitive functioning or mild cognitive impairment (several studies), and neurodegenerative diseases (one study). Neuroimaging studies show modest evidence of macrostructural, microstructural, functional and neurochemical changes in some athletes. Multiple concussions appear to be a risk factor for cognitive impairment and mental health problems in some individuals. More research is needed to better understand the prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurological conditions and diseases, and the extent to which they are related to concussions and/or repetitive neurotrauma sustained in sports. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Corticosteroids in sports-related injuries: Friend or Foe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-03-16

    Mar 16, 2002 ... thrombocytosis, eosinophilopenia and monocytopenia may also develop.21,22. Taking neuropsychological effects into consideration, some symptoms ... Increased intraocular pressure has been reported in pediatric populations,28 patients over the age of 40 and those with a history of glaucoma.29 ...

  3. Multidisciplinary Management of Pediatric Sports-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Ritchie, Lesley J; McDonald, Patrick J; Cordingley, Dean; Reimer, Karen; Nijjar, Satnam; Koltek, Mark; Hosain, Shahid; Johnston, Janine; Mansouri, Behzad; Sawyer, Scott; Silver, Norm; Girardin, Richard; Larkins, Shannon; Vis, Sara; Selci, Erin; Davidson, Michael; Gregoire, Scott; Sam, Angela; Black, Brian; Bunge, Martin; Essig, Marco; MacDonald, Peter; Leiter, Jeff; Russell, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    To summarize the clinical characteristics and outcomes of pediatric sports-related concussion (SRC) patients who were evaluated and managed at a multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program and examine the healthcare resources and personnel required to meet the needs of this patient population. We conducted a retrospective review of all pediatric SRC patients referred to the Pan Am Concussion Program from September 1st, 2013 to May 25th, 2015. Initial assessments and diagnoses were carried out by a single neurosurgeon. Return-to-Play decision-making was carried out by the multidisciplinary team. 604 patients, including 423 pediatric SRC patients were evaluated at the Pan Am Concussion Program during the study period. The mean age of study patients was 14.30 years (SD: 2.32, range 7-19 years); 252 (59.57%) were males. Hockey (182; 43.03%) and soccer (60; 14.18%) were the most commonly played sports at the time of injury. Overall, 294 (69.50%) of SRC patients met the clinical criteria for concussion recovery, while 75 (17.73%) were lost to follow-up, and 53 (12.53%) remained in active treatment at the end of the study period. The median duration of symptoms among the 261 acute SRC patients with complete follow-up was 23 days (IQR: 15, 36). Overall, 25.30% of pediatric SRC patients underwent at least one diagnostic imaging test and 32.62% received referral to another member of our multidisciplinary clinical team. Comprehensive care of pediatric SRC patients requires access to appropriate diagnostic resources and the multidisciplinary collaboration of experts with national and provincially-recognized training in TBI.

  4. Sports injuries in Plus League volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśla, E; Dutkiewicz, R; Mgłosiek, M; Nowak-Starz, G; Markowska, M; Jasiński, P; Dudek, J

    2015-06-01

    Although physical activity brings a range of lifelong health benefits, it may also lead to injuries that pose a significant threat to health. It is particularly noticeable in people involved in professional sports where sport-related injuries commonly occur and are associated with intense exercise which aims to improve physical fitness. The article attempts to determine incidence of sports injuries reported by Plus League volleyball players, as well as to identify their most common types and causes. The research project involved 90 Plus League volleyball players aged 18-37 with the average age of 25.11 (SD±5.378). A method of diagnostic survey was applied to collect empirical data by means of questionnaire developed by the authors (researchers). The results were statistically analysed and verified with the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and χ2 test at the significance level (or critical P-value) of P≤0.05. Over 87% of the respondents suffered from at least one sport-related injury. In total, 362 injuries occurred, on average 4.02 injuries per one volleyball player. The most common sports injuries involved ankle or talocrural joint (46 injuries), knee and lower leg muscles (30), interphalangeal articulations of fingers (30) as well as shoulder joint. More than half of the injuries (57%) occurred twice or three times. Volleyball players commonly sustain injuries through contact with an opposing player in competition. Sport-specific injuries may also occur due to exhaustion, lack of rest and undertreated injuries. The most common volleyball-related injuries are primarily talocrural joint, hand and shoulder injuries. Common types of injuries that can affect volleyball players include muscles, joints and ligaments injuries, sprains and strains as well as bruises. Most of these injuries are caused by exhaustion, contact with an opposing player during competition and fatigue. The incidence of sport-related injuries seems to be influenced by such factors as somatic

  5. The Relation of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury to Chronic Lapses of Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontifex, Matthew B.; Broglio, Steven P.; Drollette, Eric S.; Scudder, Mark R.; Johnson, Chris R.; O'Connor, Phillip M.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the extent to which failures in sustained attention were associated with chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) deficits in cognitive control among college-age young adults with and without a history of sport-related concussion. Participants completed the ImPACT computer-based assessment and a modified flanker task. Results…

  6. The association between hip and groin injuries in the elite junior football years and injuries sustained during elite senior competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbe, B J; Bailey, M; Cook, J L; Makdissi, M; Scase, E; Ames, N; Wood, T; McNeil, J J; Orchard, J W

    2010-09-01

    To establish the relationship between the history of hip and groin injuries in elite junior football players prior to elite club recruitment and the incidence of hip and groin injuries during their elite career. Retrospective cohort study. Analysis of existing data. 500 Australian Football League (AFL) players drafted from 1999 to 2006 with complete draft medical assessment data. Previous history of hip/groin injury, anthropometric and demographic information. The number of hip/groin injuries resulting in > or =1 missed AFL game. Data for 500 players were available for analysis. 86 (17%) players reported a hip/groin injury in their junior football years. 159 (32%) players sustained a hip/groin injury in the AFL. Players who reported a previous hip or groin injury at the draft medical assessment demonstrated a rate of hip/groin injury in the AFL >6 times higher (IRR 6.24, 95% CI 4.43 to 8.77) than players without a pre-AFL hip or groin injury history. This study demonstrated that a hip or groin injury sustained during junior football years is a significant predictor of missed game time at the elite level due to hip/groin injury. The elite junior football period should be targeted for research to investigate and identify modifiable risk factors for the development of hip/groin injuries.

  7. Association between the Number of Injuries Sustained and 12-Month Disability Outcomes: Evidence from the Injury-VIBES Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbe, Belinda J.; Simpson, Pam M.; Lyons, Ronan A.; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Harrison, James E.; Derrett, Sarah; Polinder, Suzanne; Davie, Gabrielle; Rivara, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine associations between the number of injuries sustained and three measures of disability 12-months post-injury for hospitalised patients. Methods Data from 27,840 adult (18+ years) participants, hospitalised for injury, were extracted for analysis from the Validating and Improving injury Burden Estimates (Injury-VIBES) Study. Modified Poisson and linear regression analyses were used to estimate relative risks and mean differences, respectively, for a range of outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended, GOS-E; EQ-5D and 12-item Short Form health survey physical and mental component summary scores, PCS-12 and MCS-12) according to the number of injuries sustained, adjusted for age, sex and contributing study. Findings More than half (54%) of patients had an injury to more than one ICD-10 body region and 62% had sustained more than one Global Burden of Disease injury type. The adjusted relative risk of a poor functional recovery (GOS-Einjuries in disability studies. Future studies should consider the impact of multiple injuries to avoid under-estimation of injury burden. PMID:25501651

  8. Modern sports eye injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capão Filipe, J A; Rocha-Sousa, A; Falcão-Reis, F; Castro-Correia, J

    2003-11-01

    To determine the severity and long term sequelae of eye injuries caused by modern sports that could be responsible for significant ocular trauma in the future. Prospective observational study of 24 (25 eyes) athletes with sports related ocular injuries from health clubs, war games, adventure, radical and new types of soccer, presenting to an eye emergency department between 1992 and 2002 (10 years). Modern sports were responsible for 8.3% of the 288 total sports eye injuries reported. Squash (29.2%) was the most common cause, followed by paintball (20.8%) and motocross (16.6%). The most common diagnosis during the follow up period was retinal breaks (20%). 18 (75%) patients sustained a severe injury. The final visual acuity remained paintball players. Ocular injuries resulting from modern sports are often severe. Adequate instruction of the participants in the games, proper use of eye protectors, and a routine complete ophthalmological examination after an eye trauma should be mandatory.

  9. Preliminary investigation of Brain Network Activation (BNA) and its clinical utility in sport-related concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, A.; Kutcher, J.; Elbin, R. J.; Or-Ly, H.; Sadeh, B.; Greer, J.; McAllister, D. J.; Geva, A.; Kontos, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The clinical diagnosis and management of patients with sport-related concussion is largely dependent on subjectively reported symptoms, clinical examinations, cognitive, balance, vestibular and oculomotor testing. Consequently, there is an unmet need for objective assessment tools that can identify the injury from a physiological perspective and add an important layer of information to the clinician’s decision-making process. Objective: The goal of the study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the EEG-based tool named Brain Network Activation (BNA) as a longitudinal assessment method of brain function in the management of young athletes with concussion. Methods: Athletes with concussion (n = 86) and age-matched controls (n = 81) were evaluated at four time points with symptom questionnaires and BNA. BNA scores were calculated by comparing functional networks to a previously defined normative reference brain network model to the same cognitive task. Results: Subjects above 16 years of age exhibited a significant decrease in BNA scores immediately following injury, as well as notable changes in functional network activity, relative to the controls. Three representative case studies of the tested population are discussed in detail, to demonstrate the clinical utility of BNA. Conclusion: The data support the utility of BNA to augment clinical examinations, symptoms and additional tests by providing an effective method for evaluating objective electrophysiological changes associated with sport-related concussions. PMID:28055228

  10. Predictors of delayed recovery following pediatric sports-related concussion: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joseph H; Gill, Clarence; Kuhn, Elizabeth N; Rocque, Brandon G; Menendez, Joshua Y; O'Neill, Jilian A; Agee, Bonita S; Brown, Steven T; Crowther, Marshall; Davis, R Drew; Ferguson, Drew; Johnston, James M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Pediatric sports-related concussions are a growing public health concern. The factors that determine injury severity and time to recovery following these concussions are poorly understood. Previous studies suggest that initial symptom severity and diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are predictors of prolonged recovery (> 28 days) after pediatric sports-related concussions. Further analysis of baseline patient characteristics may allow for a more accurate prediction of which patients are at risk for delayed recovery after a sports-related concussion. METHODS The authors performed a single-center retrospective case-control study involving patients cared for at the multidisciplinary Concussion Clinic at Children's of Alabama between August 2011 and January 2013. Patient demographic data, medical history, sport concussion assessment tool 2 (SCAT2) and symptom severity scores, injury characteristics, and patient balance assessments were analyzed for each outcome group. The control group consisted of patients whose symptoms resolved within 28 days. The case group included patients whose symptoms persisted for more than 28 days. The presence or absence of the SCAT2 assessment had a modifying effect on the risk for delayed recovery; therefore, stratum-specific analyses were conducted for patients with recorded SCAT2 scores and for patients without SCAT2 scores. Unadjusted ORs and adjusted ORs (aORs) for an association of delayed recovery outcome with specific risk factors were calculated with logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 294 patients met the inclusion criteria of the study. The case and control groups did not statistically significantly differ in age (p = 0.7). For the patients who had received SCAT2 assessments, a previous history of concussion (aOR 3.67, 95% CI 1.51-8.95), presenting SCAT2 score playing a nonhelmet sport were also associated with a higher risk for prolonged symptoms in patients with and without SCAT2

  11. [SPORTS-RELATED SUDDEN DEATH: LESSONS FROM THE FRENCH REGISTRY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijon, Eloi; Bougouin, Wulfran; Jouven, Xavier

    2015-09-01

    So far, sports-related sudden death has been mainly studied through young competitive athletes. The national sports-related sudden death French registry (2005-2010) is the first study evaluating sudden death during sports activities in the general population, estimating that approximately 1000 cases occur each year in France. The vast majority occurs among middle age men practicing recreational activities, with women presenting a very low risk (up to 30-fold lower) compared to men. Outcomes dramatically vary across districts with survival to hospital discharge from 0 to 50%. Those differences are mainly the result of major disparities between districts regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation initiated by bystanders. Coronary artery disease remains the most frequent cardiovascular disease associated with such events.

  12. Sports-related concussions — media, science and policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannix, Rebekah; Meehan, William P.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2017-01-01

    Although growing awareness about the potential long-term deleterious effects of sport-related concussion has led to increased attention to the risks of collision sports, calls to ban these sports, such as American football, might be premature. Collision sports have a relatively high incidence of concussions, but participation in these sports also confers a host of benefits. In addition, the associated risks of participation, including concussion, have not been definitively shown to outweigh the benefits they provide, and the risk–benefit ratio might vary among individuals. The risks of concussion and repetitive concussions associated with collision sports are unknown in the general population and not well characterized even in elite athlete populations. In this article, we discuss current knowledge on sports-related concussion, its neurological consequences, and implications for regulation of the practice of collision sports. PMID:27364748

  13. Sports-Related Emergency Preparedness in Oregon High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel T; Norcross, Marc F; Bovbjerg, Viktor E; Hoffman, Mark A; Chang, Eunwook; Koester, Michael C

    Best practice recommendations for sports-related emergency preparation include implementation of venue-specific emergency action plans (EAPs), access to early defibrillation, and first responders-specifically coaches-trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator (AED) use. The objective was to determine whether high schools had implemented these 3 recommendations and whether schools with a certified athletic trainer (AT) were more likely to have done so. Schools with an AT were more likely to have implemented the recommendations. Cross-sectional study. Level 4. All Oregon School Activities Association member school athletic directors were invited to complete a survey on sports-related emergency preparedness and AT availability at their school. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze the associations between emergency preparedness and AT availability. In total, 108 respondents (37% response rate) completed the survey. Exactly half reported having an AT available. Only 11% (95% CI, 6%-19%) of the schools had implemented all 3 recommendations, 29% (95% CI, 21%-39%) had implemented 2, 32% (95% CI, 24%-42%) had implemented 1, and 27% (95% CI, 19%-36%) had not implemented any of the recommendations. AT availability was associated with implementation of the recommendations (χ2 = 10.3, P = 0.02), and the proportion of schools with ATs increased with the number of recommendations implemented (χ2 = 9.3, P Schools with an AT were more likely to implement venue-specific EAPs (52% vs 24%, P schools were inadequately prepared for sports-related emergencies. Schools with an AT were more likely to implement some, but not all, of the recommendations. Policy changes may be needed to improve implementation. Most Oregon high schools need to do more to prepare for sports-related emergencies. The results provide evidence for sports medicine professionals and administrators to inform policy changes that ensure the safety of athletes.

  14. Sport-related concussions: a review of epidemiology, challenges in diagnosis, and potential risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, James M; Hesdorffer, Dale C

    2013-12-01

    Sport-related concussion (SRC) is a common mild traumatic brain injury among young, active individuals, affecting approximately 300,000 young American adults annually. In this review of the epidemiology of SRC, we describe the challenges in identifying concussion occurrence and review the studies describing concussion incidence in various sports. In high risk contact sports, American football, soccer (European football), hockey, lacrosse, and basketball athletes experience concussion unintentionally during the course of play. Among these, football concussion incidence is reviewed in greatest detail because it has the highest incidence among the contact sports, and some studies have shown long-term neurophysiologic and neurodegenerative outcomes. Mechanisms of injury differ significantly by sport and can be potential targets for concussion risk mitigation. Despite the apparent high incidence of SRC, risk factors determining initial concussion, recovery periods, recurrence, and long-term outcomes remain poorly understood and warrant further study exploring the influence of age, sex, genetics, and athletic factors.

  15. Supporting the Student-Athlete's Return to the Classroom After a Sport-Related Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Neal

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This article provides a framework for school athletic trainers to use in advising colleagues about the health and academic needs of student-athletes presenting with concussions. Background: Management of sport-related concussions has been an area of growing concern for school athletic programs. Recent work in this area has highlighted significant risks for student-athletes presenting with these mild traumatic brain injuries. Description: Topics covered include general teaching points for the athletic trainer to use with school colleagues. An integrated model for school management of sport concussion injuries is presented that includes involvement of the student's athletic trainer, school nurse, guidance counselor, teachers, social worker, psychologist, physicians, and parents. Clinical Advantages: Academic accommodations for specific postconcussion symptoms are proposed that may help the student-athlete strike an optimum balance between rest and continued academic progress during recovery. PMID:20831397

  16. Motorcyclist's thumb: carpometacarpal injuries of the thumb sustained in motorcycle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C; Abzug, J M; Johnson, A J; Pensy, R A; Eglseder, W A; Paryavi, E

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate motorcycle crash thumb injury patterns. We hypothesized that ulnar collateral ligament injuries at the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint would be most common and there would be a side predilection due to the clutch and brake positions. Motorcyclist admissions following injury between 2002 and 2013 were reviewed, and phalangeal and metacarpal injuries treated acutely identified. Demographics, injury, and treatment characteristics were recorded. Association between laterality and injury type was assessed. Of 128 patients, 59 underwent acute treatment for thumb injuries. Eleven patients sustained thumb ulnar collateral ligament injuries; 27 sustained thumb carpometacarpal injuries. Most carpometacarpal injuries were fracture-dislocations (19/27). Thumb carpometacarpal injuries had no overall side predilection; ulnar collateral ligament injuries occurred more on the right. Carpometacarpal fractures and dislocations are the most frequent motorcycle crash thumb injury, probably due to the mechanics of gripping handlebars and the high-energy force directed into the palm and against the metacarpal base. Level IV. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. emergency management of injuries sustained during child sexual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    the management of child rape victims has focused on the forensic, psychosocial ... management of the sexually abused child in the South African context. .... after the injury. Abdominal injuries. Injury to intra-abdominal organs is rarely a result of a sexual assault, but if not detected can cause death from blood loss or later ...

  18. Sport Injuries Sustained by Athletes with Disability: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Richard; Van Mechelen, Willem; Fuller, Colin; Verhagen, Evert

    2016-08-01

    Fifteen percent of the world's population live with disability, and many of these individuals choose to play sport. There are barriers to sport participation for athletes with disability and sports injury can greatly impact on daily life, which makes sports injury prevention additionally important. The purpose of this review is to systematically review the definitions, methodologies and injury rates in disability sport, which should assist future identification of risk factors and development of injury prevention strategies. A secondary aim is to highlight the most pressing issues for improvement of the quality of injury epidemiology research for disability sport. A search of NICE, AMED, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE and Medline was conducted to identify all publications up to 16 June 2015. Of 489 potentially relevant articles and reference searching, a total of 15 studies were included. Wide study sample heterogeneity prevented data pooling and meta-analysis. Results demonstrated an evolving field of epidemiology, but with wide differences in sports injury definition and with studies focused on short competitions. Background data were generally sparse; there was minimal exposure analysis, and no analysis of injury severity, all of which made comparison of injury risk and injury severity difficult. There is an urgent need for consensus on sports injury definition and methodology in disability sports. The quality of studies is variable, with inconsistent sports injury definitions, methodologies and injury rates, which prevents comparison, conclusions and development of injury prevention strategies. The authors highlight the most pressing issues for improvement of the quality in injury epidemiology research for disability sport.

  19. Resuscitation Strategies for Burn Injuries Sustained in Austere Environments to Improve Renal Perfusion and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    vascular endothelial growth factor gene transfer on wound healing after burn injury , Crit. Care Med. 31 (2003) 1017–1025. D.M. Burmeister et al. BBA...G.L. Su, D.G. Remick, S.C. Wang, S. Arbabi, Attenuating burn wound inflammatory signaling reduces systemic inflammation and acute lung injury , J...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-2-0041 TITLE: Resuscitation Strategies for Burn Injuries Sustained in Austere Environments to Improve Renal Perfusion

  20. History of neuropsychological study of sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbe, Frank M; Zimmer, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Although the medical literature has a long history of description and comment on concussion, the occurrence of concussion within the context of sports other than boxing was not judged to be problematic until the 1980s. Neuropsychological assessment played a critical and integral role in identifying the cognitive sequelae of concussion and mapping out the short- and long-term vagaries in recovery. This paper captures that history and expands upon current applications of neuropsychological assessment in the diagnosis and management of sport-related concussion.

  1. Survey of tail injuries sustained by working gundogs and terriers in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, R; Bennett, D; Parkin, T

    2014-05-03

    Working dog owners in Scotland were invited to take part in an internet survey regarding the 2010/2011 shooting season, which was designed to estimate the prevalence of tail injuries; assess the risk of tail injuries in docked and undocked working dogs; and identify risk factors for owner-reported tail injuries. Of 2860 working dogs, 13.5 per cent sustained at least one tail injury during the 2010/2011 shooting season. Undocked spaniels and hunt point retrievers (HPRs) were at greatest risk of tail injury with 56.6 per cent of undocked spaniels and 38.5 per cent of undocked HPRs sustaining at least one tail injury during the season. There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of tail injury in dogs with tails docked by one-third, half or shorter. To prevent one tail injury in one shooting season, between two and 18 spaniels or HPRs would need to be docked as puppies. The authors believe that this work provides the best available evidence on which to base a consultation for changes to the legislation on tail docking in working dogs in Scotland. Docking the tails of HPRs and spaniels by one-third would significantly decrease the risk of tail injury sustained while working in these breeds.

  2. Positive and Negative Themes Found in Sport-Related Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Hannah M; Olympia, Robert P; King, Tonya S; Wakefield, Bryan H; Weber, Chris J

    2017-06-01

    Sport participation is an important part of the development of children and adolescents in the United States. The objective of this study was to determine positive and negative themes found in a selected number of sport-related films. A total of 44 sport-related films were independently viewed and analyzed by four reviewers. The most common sports depicted were baseball (27%) and football (25%). The most common positive themes were positive interactions with the coach, positive interactions with family and friends, and positive interactions with teammates (2.04, 1.42, 1.2 mean events per hour). The most common negative themes were taunting/fighting/poor sportsmanship, negative interactions with the coach, and drinking/smoking/drug use (2.13, 1.10, 0.94 mean events per hour). In conclusion, the coviewing of sport films among pediatric athletes and their coaches, athletic trainers, and/or parents in order to focus on "teachable moments" may encourage the acquisition and development of positive themes and the avoidance and de-emphasis of negative themes.

  3. Management of Persistent Cognitive Symptoms After Sport-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohlberg, McKay Moore; Ledbetter, Alexander K

    2016-05-01

    This case review examines treatments speech-language pathologists at our clinic delivered to middle school, high school, and college students for the management of persistent cognitive symptoms after sport-related concussion. The goal is to examine a range of treatment options, describe clinical rationale for selecting those treatments, and report outcomes in order to identify feasible interventions for systematic evaluation through efficacy research. Review of clinic intake data identified 63 cases referred for cognitive rehabilitation over a 36-month period. Twenty-four cases (14 women and 10 men) met selection criteria, including documented sport-related concussion, postconcussion symptoms persisting at least 2 months with deleterious effect on school performance, and enrollment in secondary or postsecondary education. The authors independently coded demographics, treatment approaches, functional goal domains, and outcomes. Treatment approaches fell into 4 broad categories: direct attention training, metacognitive strategy training, training assistive technology for cognition, and psychoeducational supports. Eighty-three percent of clients achieved self-selected functional goals. Research has focused primarily on return to play and provision of academic accommodations in the initial weeks following concussion. Findings from this case series suggest that speech-language pathologists can deliver individualized interventions that lead to positive clinical outcomes. The authors hope findings encourage efficacy research.

  4. Sport-Related Identities and the “Toxic Jock”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the multidimensional nature of athletic involvement, which includes identity formation as well as participation in sports activities. Five hundred eighty-one sport-involved undergraduate students completed a questionnaire assessing their sport-related identities, goal orientations, primary sport ratings, and conformity to masculine norms. F-tested mean comparisons and hierarchical linear regressions were used to explore the characteristics associated with two distinct sport-related identities (“athletes” and “jocks”). Jock identity was associated with an ego-oriented approach to sports (men only), whereas athlete identity was associated with a task-oriented approach (both genders). Jock identity was positively associated with conformity to masculine norms, particularly for men, whereas athlete identity was positively associated with some masculine norms (i.e., Winning) and negatively associated with others (i.e., Playboy). These findings help to identify the correlates of a “toxic Jock” identity that may signal elevated risk for health-compromising behavior. PMID:21643553

  5. The National Incidence and Resource Utilization of Burn Injuries Sustained While Smoking on Home Oxygen Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assimacopoulos, Evangelia M; Liao, Junlin; Heard, Jason P; Kluesner, Karen M; Wilson, Jeffrey; Wibbenmeyer, Lucy A

    2016-01-01

    Considerable risk of burn injury exists for those patients on home oxygen therapy (HOT) who continue to smoke. In this study, the authors sought to establish the national incidence of burns incurred while smoking on HOT and to determine the resource utilization and sequelae of these injuries. A retrospective review of the American Burn Association's National Burn Repository was conducted to identify patients burned while on HOT during the years 2002 to 2011. Duplicate entries, as well as records of follow-up visits and readmissions, were removed. Univariate analysis was used to compare the differences between patients sustaining burn injuries related to HOT and patients with other mechanisms of injury. Multivariate analysis provided odds ratios for mortality controlling for all significant variables. The frequency of burns sustained on HOT significantly increased during the 10-year period reviewed and were associated with increased comorbidities and certain complications. Compared with non-HOT injuries, HOT injuries had higher incidence of inhalation injury and mortality. Inhalation injury was the strongest predictor of mortality in HOT burn injuries. The likelihood of poor prognosis was even more pronounced in patients who required intubation. Smoking was responsible for 83% of the HOT burn injuries described here. Therefore, smoking cessation counseling and treatment should be mandatory in all patients prescribed HOT.

  6. Video analysis of acute motor and convulsive manifestations in sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrory, P R; Berkovic, S F

    2000-04-11

    To describe the motor and convulsive manifestations in acute sports-related head injury. A total of 234 cases of concussive injuries during the 1995 through 1997 football seasons were obtained from the Australian Football League Medical Officers Association injury survey. Of these, 102 cases were recorded adequately on television videotape and were analyzed by two independent observers using a standardized recording form detailing injury mechanics and clinical features of the episodes. Motor and convulsive features were correlated with mechanical variables and with duration of loss of consciousness using linear modeling techniques. Tonic posturing occurred in 25 subjects, clonic movements in 6, righting movement in 40, and gait unsteadiness in 42. In one subject the tonic and clonic features were sufficiently prolonged to be deemed a concussive convulsion. The only risk factor for tonic posturing using logistic regression was the presence of loss of consciousness (p = 0.0001). There was a trend toward facial impact being an independent predictor of tonic posturing but this did not reach significance. No other independent variable predicted the development of clonic movements, righting movements, or gait unsteadiness. Subtle motor manifestations such as tonic posturing and clonic movements commonly occur in concussion; the main predictive factor for tonic posturing is the presence of loss of consciousness. The authors speculate that these clinical features are due to brainstem dysfunction secondary to biomechanical forces inducing a transient functional decerebration.

  7. Preinjury somatization symptoms contribute to clinical recovery after sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lindsay D; Tarima, Sergey; LaRoche, Ashley A; Hammeke, Thomas A; Barr, William B; Guskiewicz, Kevin; Randolph, Christopher; McCrea, Michael A

    2016-05-17

    To determine the degree to which preinjury and acute postinjury psychosocial and injury-related variables predict symptom duration following sport-related concussion. A total of 2,055 high school and collegiate athletes completed preseason evaluations. Concussed athletes (n = 127) repeated assessments serially (history variables; baseline psychological, neurocognitive, and balance functioning; acute injury characteristics; and postinjury clinical measures. Preinjury somatic symptom score (Brief Symptom Inventory-18 somatization scale) was the strongest premorbid predictor of symptom duration. Acute (24-hour) postconcussive symptom burden (Sport Concussion Assessment Tool-3 symptom severity) was the best injury-related predictor of recovery. These 2 predictors were moderately correlated (r = 0.51). Path analyses indicated that the relationship between preinjury somatization symptoms and symptom recovery was mediated by postinjury concussive symptoms. Preinjury somatization symptoms contribute to reported postconcussive symptom recovery via their influence on acute postconcussive symptoms. The findings highlight the relevance of premorbid psychological factors in postconcussive recovery, even in a healthy athlete sample relatively free of psychopathology or medical comorbidities. Future research should elucidate the neurobiopsychosocial mechanisms that explain the role of this individual difference variable in outcome following concussive injury. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Do Children Who Sustain Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Childhood Need and Receive Academic Services 7 Years After Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingery, Kathleen M; Narad, Megan E; Taylor, H Gerry; Yeates, Keith Owen; Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L

    To examine the prevalence of academic need, academic service utilization, and unmet need as well as factors associated with academic service utilization 6.8 years after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in early childhood. Fifty-eight (16 severe, 14 moderate, 28 complicated mild) children with TBI and 72 children with orthopedic injury (OI) completed the long-term follow-up 6.8 years after injury in early childhood (ages 3-7 years). Injury group differences in rates of need for academic services, academic service utilization, and unmet need as well as factors associated with service utilization and unmet need were examined. Students with moderate and severe TBI had significantly greater rates of need than those with OI. A greater proportion of the severe TBI sample was receiving academic services at long-term follow-up than the OI and complicated mild groups however, among those with an identified need, injury group did not affect academic service utilization. Below average IQ/achievement scores was the only area of need predictive of academic service utilization. Rates of unmet need were high and similar across injury groups (46.2%-63.6%). The need for academic services among patients who sustained a TBI during early childhood remains high 6.8 years post injury. Findings underscore the importance of continued monitoring of behaviors and academic performance in students with a history of early childhood TBI. This may be especially true among children with less severe injuries who are at risk for being underserved.

  9. Characteristics of traumatic brain injuries sustained among veterans seeking homeless services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Sean M; Russell, Leah M; Hostetter, Trisha A; Forster, Jeri E; Devore, Maria D; Brenner, Lisa A

    2015-02-01

    This hypothesis-generating research describes the characteristics of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) sustained among 229 Veterans seeking homeless services. Nearly all participants (83%) had sustained at least one TBI prior to their first episode of homelessness. Among participants with a TBI, assaults, transportation-related accidents, and falls were the most common causes of these injuries. Thirty percent of individuals sustained injuries with severity levels that would be expected to be associated with ongoing TBI-related deficits. Forty-three percent of the Veterans sustained at least one brain injury following their first episode of homelessness. Median lifetime number of TBIs was three. The severity of TBIs was similar among Veterans who sustained injuries before or after their first incident of homelessness. Findings suggest that future research should directly examine the potential bi-directional relationship between TBI and homelessness, as well as the impact of TBI-related deficits on Veterans' ability to benefit from homeless services and/or maintain stable housing.

  10. The prevalence of dental, facial and head injuries sustained by schoolboy rugby players. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagger, Robert G; Abbasbhai, Ali; Patel, Dilan; Jagger, Daryll C; Griffiths, Alex

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of dental, orofacial and head injuries and of mouthguard use among schoolboy rugby players. All members of the first and second XV rugby squads at three secondary schools (two in England and one in Australia) were included in the study. All participants answered a questionnaire that sought information regarding dental, orofacial and head injuries. Statistical differences between groups were determined using chi-square tests for categorical variables and Kruskal-Wallis tests for discrete (count) variables. One hundred and seventy-eight completed questionnaires were returned (100% response rate). One hundred and twenty-five (70%) players reported having sustained at least one injury (range 1-4). Facial injuries were common. Dental injuries were the most prevalent injury: 46 (26%) were reported. Fractured teeth were reported by 20 (11%) players, and avulsed teeth by 7 (4%). There was evidence of a difference between schools in the prevalence of injured players (P=0.014), but among those reporting injuries, there was no difference between schools in the number of injuries (P=0.95). All players said that they used a mouthguard regularly. Dental, orofacial and head injuries were commonly reported. Dental injuries were the most prevalent type of injury. All players used mouthguards regularly.

  11. A computer-based analysis of injuries sustained by victims of a major air disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelmeyer, T D; Beer, B; Mullins, P R

    1982-03-01

    A computer-based analysis of the injury patterns sustained by victims in the DC-10 aircraft that crashed into Mt. Erebus, Antarctica, On November 28, 1979, is presented. The distribution of these injury patterns supports the hypothesis that at impact the plane was in a nose-high attitude with respect to the slope and the impact point was the underside of the rear section of the fuselage.

  12. Epidemiology of rugby injuries sustained by Free State University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From 18 July 2003 to 1 August 2003 (the first three weeks after the June/July holidays), 25 injuries occurred. Conclusion Our findings were similar to those of other studies in certain respects but differed in others. Further research should investigate the effect of coaching techniques, fitness levels, protective gear and first aid ...

  13. emergency management of injuries sustained during child sexual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    vaginal rape being well documented — even in young infants under one year of age.3 These severe and brutal assaults can result in serious and sometimes life- threatening injury to the young child.4 A systematic approach to the care of these individuals is essential in order to achieve a satisfactory outcome. Traditionally.

  14. Searching for sustainability within public health policy: insights from an injury prevention perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errington, Gail; Evans, Catrin; Watson, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    Sustaining public health programmes in the long-term is key to ensuring full manifestation of their intended benefits. Although an increasing interest in sustainability is apparent within the global literature, empirical studies from within the European setting are few. The factors that influence sustainability are generally conceptualized at three levels: programme level, the immediate context and the wider environment. To-date attention has focused primarily on the former two. Using a community-based child injury prevention programme in England as an exemplar, this paper explores the concept of sustainability within the wider policy environment, and considers the impact of this on local programmes. A content review of global and UK national public health policies (1981-2014) relevant to child safety was undertaken. Interviews were held with senior representatives of global and UK agencies involved in developing child safety policy. Forty-nine policies were reviewed. The term 'sustain', or its derivatives, featured in 36 (73%) of these. Its' use however, related primarily to conservation of resources rather than continued programme operation. Potential mechanisms for supporting programme sustainability featured within some documents; however, the approach to sustainability was inconsistent between policies and over time. Policy stakeholders identified programme sustainability as relevant to their core business, but its' conceptualization varied according to individual interpretation. Programme sustainability is poorly addressed within global and UK-based public health policy. Strengthening a national and international policy focus on sustainability and incorporating sustainability into public health planning frameworks may create a more supportive environment for local programmes.

  15. Cervicovestibular rehabilitation in sport-related concussion: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kathryn J; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Barlow, Karen; Boyd, Lara; Kang, Jian; Emery, Carolyn A

    2014-09-01

    Concussion is a common injury in sport. Most individuals recover in 7-10 days but some have persistent symptoms. The objective of this study was to determine if a combination of vestibular rehabilitation and cervical spine physiotherapy decreased the time until medical clearance in individuals with prolonged postconcussion symptoms. This study was a randomised controlled trial. Consecutive patients with persistent symptoms of dizziness, neck pain and/or headaches following a sport-related concussion (12-30 years, 18 male and 13 female) were randomised to the control or intervention group. Both groups received weekly sessions with a physiotherapist for 8 weeks or until the time of medical clearance. Both groups received postural education, range of motion exercises and cognitive and physical rest until asymptomatic followed by a protocol of graded exertion. The intervention group also received cervical spine and vestibular rehabilitation. The primary outcome of interest was medical clearance to return to sport, which was evaluated by a study sport medicine physician who was blinded to the treatment group. In the treatment group, 73% (11/15) of the participants were medically cleared within 8 weeks of initiation of treatment, compared with 7% (1/14) in the control group. Using an intention to treat analysis, individuals in the treatment group were 3.91 (95% CI 1.34 to 11.34) times more likely to be medically cleared by 8 weeks. A combination of cervical and vestibular physiotherapy decreased time to medical clearance to return to sport in youth and young adults with persistent symptoms of dizziness, neck pain and/or headaches following a sport-related concussion. NCT01860755. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Cervical Spinal Injury from Repeated Exposures to Sustained Acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    load (51). Also, with arm movements the upper trapezius and the levator scapulae become involved and resist neck movement, thus directly and...proper diet and weight control; 2. Regular strength and aerobic training with stretching and functional respiration training; 3. Massage, sauna and...physical warm-up including stretching neck muscles immediately before taking off while the pilot is in the cockpit. 39 CHAPTER 10 CERVICAL INJURY AND

  17. A review of 10 years of scapula injuries sustained by UK military personnel on operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Darren C; Power, D M; Stapley, S A

    2017-09-11

    Scapula fractures are relatively uncommon injuries, mostly occurring due to the effects of high-energy trauma. Rates of scapula fractures are unknown in the military setting. The aim of this study is to analyse the incidence, aetiology, associated injuries, treatment and complications of these fractures occurring in deployed military personnel. All UK military personnel returning with upper limb injuries from Afghanistan and Iraq were retrospectively reviewed using the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine database and case notes (2004-2014). Forty-four scapula fractures out of 572 upper limb fractures (7.7%) were sustained over 10 years. Blast and gunshot wounds (GSW) were leading causative factors in 85%. Over half were open fractures (54%), with open blast fractures often having significant bone and soft tissue loss requiring extensive reconstruction. Multiple injuries were noted including lung, head, vascular and nerve injuries. Injury Severity Scores (ISS) were significantly higher than the average upper limb injury without a scapula fracture (pmilitary personnel with GSW have a favourable chance of nerve recovery, 75% of brachial plexus injuries that are associated with blast have poorer outcomes. Fixation occurred with either glenoid fractures or floating shoulders (10%); these were as a result of high velocity GSW or mounted blast ejections. There were no cases of deep soft tissue infection or osteomyelitis and all scapula fractures united. Scapula fractures have a 20 times higher incidence in military personnel compared with the civilian population, occurring predominantly as a result of blast and GSW, and a higher than average ISS. These fractures are often associated with multiple injuries, including brachial plexus injuries, where those sustained from blast have less favourable outcome. High rates of union following fixation and low rates of infection are expected despite significant contamination and soft tissue loss. © Article author(s) (or their

  18. An epidemiologic comparison of high school sports injuries sustained in practice and competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechel, Julie A; Yard, Ellen E; Comstock, R Dawn

    2008-01-01

    More than 7 million US high school students play sports. To compare practice and competition injury rates and patterns in 5 boys' sports (football, soccer, basketball, wrestling, and baseball) and 4 girls' sports (soccer, volleyball, basketball, and softball) during the 2005-2006 school year. Prospective injury surveillance study. Injury data were collected from 100 nationally representative United States high schools via High School RIO (Reporting Information Online). Athletes from participating high schools injured while participating in a school-sanctioned practice or competition in one of the above sports. Practice and competition injury rates, body site, diagnosis, and severity. High school athletes participating in these 9 sports at participating schools sustained 4350 injuries during the 2005-2006 school year, which corresponds to an estimated 1 442 533 injuries nationally. The rate of injury per 1000 athlete-exposures was higher in competition (4.63) than in practice (1.69) (rate ratio [RR] = 2.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.58, 2.90). Of all sports, football had the highest competition (12.09) and practice (2.54) injury rates per 1000 athlete-exposures. Compared with injuries sustained during practice, higher proportions of competition injuries were head/face/neck injuries (proportion ratio [PR] = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.34, 1.94), particularly in boys' soccer (PR = 7.74, 95% CI = 2.53, 23.65) and girls' basketball (PR = 6.03, 95% CI = 2.39, 15.22). Competition injuries were more likely to be concussions (PR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.56, 2.62), especially in boys' soccer (PR = 6.94, 95% CI = 2.01, 23.95) and girls' basketball (PR = 5.83, 95% CI = 2.06, 16.49). Higher proportions of competition injuries caused the athlete to miss more than 3 weeks of play (PR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.08, 1.52), particularly in baseball (PR = 3.47, 95% CI = 1.48, 8.11) and volleyball (PR = 2.88, 95% CI = 1.01, 8.24). Rates and patterns of high school sport injuries differed between

  19. 42 CFR 102.50 - Medical records necessary to establish that a covered injury was sustained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Required Documentation To Be Deemed... to establish that a smallpox vaccine recipient or vaccinia contact sustained a covered injury, a... records, including the admission history and physical examination, the discharge summary, all physician...

  20. Woodworking injuries: an epidemiologic survey of injuries sustained using woodworking machinery and hand tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justis, E J; Moore, S V; LaVelle, D G

    1987-09-01

    Woodworking equipment produces approximately 720,000 injuries per year often causing severe psychologic and functional impairment. Responses from 1000 injured woodworkers to a demographic survey revealed that 60.5% of injuries occurred to amateur woodworkers; 42% of injuries were caused by the table saw and 37% of respondents reported amputation of one or more digits. The most significant causal factor reported was failure to use properly installed guards, but personal factors, such as fatigue and postprandial somnolence were also implicated. Twenty-seven percent of respondents required hospitalization for an average of 3.7 days, and 22.8% were treated by hand surgeons. Hand surgeons need to become more aware of the dangers of specific types of woodworking equipment and the injuries produced by these tools to better treat and perhaps, prevent woodworking injuries.

  1. Consumption of Sport-Related Dietary Supplements among NCAA Division 1 Female Student Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housman, Jeff; Dorman, Steve; Pruitt, Buzz; Ranjita, Misra; Perko, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine factors that influence sport-related dietary supplement consumption among NCAA Division 1 female student athletes and to estimate the plausibility of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) for predicting the use of sport-related dietary supplements among NCAA Division 1 female student athletes. Method: Self-report data were…

  2. Sports-related fractures in South East Scotland: an analysis of 990 fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Stuart A; Watson, Bruce S; Wood, Alexander M; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2014-12-01

    To describe the characteristics of all sports related fractures in patients aged ≥ 15 years in South East Scotland in one year. Medical records of 990 consecutive patients aged ≥ 15 years who presented to the Orthopaedic Trauma Unit of the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh with sports-related fractures between 1 July 2007 and 30 June 2008 were reviewed. Acute fractures of the upper limbs, lower limbs, pelvis, and cervical spine were included, but those of the skull, facial bones, and thorax were excluded, as were stress and chronic fractures. The incidence of sports-related fractures was 1.8/1000/year (82% involving men). The median age of patients was 25 (interquartile range, 19-35) years. Sports-related fractures accounted for 24.6% and 5.1% of all fractures in men and women, respectively. Men aged 15 to 19 years were 9 times more likely to have sports-related fractures than women of the same age. The sports-related fractures involved the upper limbs (52.4%), lower limbs (45.4%), and axial skeleton (2.2%). 12 of 49 sports (football, rugby, skiing, snowboarding, 3 cycling disciplines, horse riding, motocross, basketball, martial arts, and ice skating) accounted for 82.8% of all sports-related fractures. Upper limb fractures outnumbered lower limb fractures in all sports, except for horse riding and motocross that the proportions were similar. In South East Scotland, most sports related fractures involved the upper limbs.

  3. Sports-related concussion relevant to the South African football ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    depressed affect, fatigue and drowsiness. The last 8 years has seen a more collated approach to head injury ... followed by airway, breathing and circulation evaluation and management take priority. In more subtle cases, a validated ... All children with head injuries. • High-risk patients (e.g. haemophilia, anticoagulant use).

  4. The minimal energetic requirement of sustained awareness after brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Johan; Mortensen, Kristian Nygaard; Thibaut, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of the minimally conscious state (MCS) and the unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) is a persistent clinical challenge [1]. Based on positron emission tomography (PET) studies with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) during sleep and anesthesia, the global cerebral metabolic rate...... changes in brain metabolism [4]. We here used FDG-PET to measure resting state brain glucose metabolism in 131 DOC patients to identify objective quantitative metabolic indicators and predictors of awareness. Quantitation of images was performed by normalizing to extracerebral tissue. We show that 42......, associated with the reemergence of consciousness after brain injury. Our data further revealed that regional variations relative to the global resting metabolic level reflect preservation of specific cognitive or sensory modules, such as vision and language comprehension. These findings provide a simple...

  5. A pilot study of active rehabilitation for adolescents who are slow to recover from sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, I; Grilli, L; Friedman, D; Iverson, G L

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an active rehabilitation intervention for adolescents who are slow-to-recover after a sport-related concussion. Ten adolescents (three girls and seven boys) seen at the Montreal Children's Hospital Concussion Clinic participated in this case series. Adolescents who were symptomatic more than 4 weeks after the injury were provided with an active rehabilitation intervention (M = 7.9 weeks following injury; range = 3.7 to 26.2 weeks). The rehabilitation program includes gradual, closely monitored light aerobic exercise, general coordination exercises, mental imagery, as well as reassurance, normalization of recovery, and stress/anxiety reduction strategies. The program continued until complete symptom resolution and readiness to begin stepwise return to activities. The primary outcome of the study was evolution of post-concussion symptoms. Secondary outcomes included mood, energy, balance, and cognition. After the intervention, post-concussion symptoms significantly decreased for the group of participants. They also had decreased fatigue and improved mood after 6 weeks of initiating the rehabilitation intervention. This case series shows that postconcussive symptoms and functioning in adolescents following sports-related concussion can be improved after participation in an active rehabilitation intervention. The introduction of graded light intensity exercise in the post-acute period following concussion is safe, feasible and appears to have a positive impact on adolescents' functioning. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Injuries sustained during contact with law enforcement: An analysis from US trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Morgan; Inaba, Kenji; Cho, Jayun; Tatum, James M; Barmparas, Galinos; Strumwasser, Aaron; Grabo, Daniel; Bir, Cynthia; Eastman, Alexander; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-12-01

    Injuries sustained by civilians from interaction with police are a polarizing contemporary sociopolitical issue. Few comprehensive studies have been published using national hospital-based data. The aim of this study was to examine the epidemiology of these injuries to better understand this mechanism of injury. Patients entered into the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) (January 2007 to December 2012) with E-codes E970.0 to E976.0 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification), identifying injuries associated with law enforcement in the course of legal action, were enrolled. Patients' demographics, injury characteristics, procedures, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. Patients injured by other civilians (E960.0-E968.0) were used for comparison. Of 4,146,428 patients in the NTDB, 7,203 (0.17%) were injured during interaction with police. The numbers of patients in consecutive study years were 858, 1,103, 1,148, 1,274, 1,316, and 1,504. The incidence of these injuries was stable over time (0.17-0.18%) (p = 0.129). Patients had a median age of 31 years (range, 0-108), and 94.3% were male. Median injury severity score was 9 (interquartile range [IQR], 4-17). The most common mechanism of injury was gunshot wound (44%).Patients were white, 43%; black, 30%; Hispanic, 17%; Asian, 1%; and Other, 9%. As a proportion of the total race-specific NTDB trauma population, there was an average of 1.13 white patients, 2.71 Hispanic patients, and 3.83 black patients per 1,000. Mechanism, injury severity score, and outcomes did not vary by race. Compared to patients injured by civilians, patients injured by police are more likely to be white (43% vs 25%, p wounds (44% vs 32%, p trauma centers across the United States, the rate of injuries sustained during interactions with police has been stable over time. Gunshot wounds are the most common mechanism of injury. Proportionally, black patients are the most frequently injured race. When compared

  7. Late intellectual and academic outcomes following traumatic brain injury sustained during early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Prasad, Mary R; Kramer, Larry; Cox, Charles S; Baumgartner, James; Fletcher, Stephen; Mendez, Donna; Barnes, Marcia; Zhang, Xiaoling; Swank, Paul

    2006-10-01

    Although long-term neurological outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained early in life are generally unfavorable, the effect of TBI on the development of academic competencies is unknown. The present study characterizes intelligence quotient (IQ) and academic outcomes an average of 5.7 years after injury in children who sustained moderate to severe TBI prior to 6 years of age. Twenty-three children who suffered inflicted or noninflicted TBI between the ages of 4 and 71 months were enrolled in a prospective, longitudinal cohort study. Their mean age at injury was 21 months; their mean age at assessment was 89 months. The authors used general linear modeling approaches to compare IQ and standardized academic achievement test scores from the TBI group and a community comparison group (21 children). Children who sustained early TBI scored significantly lower than children in the comparison group on intelligence tests and in the reading, mathematical, and language domains of achievement tests. Forty-eight percent of the TBI group had IQs below the 10th percentile. During the approximately 5-year follow-up period, longitudinal IQ testing revealed continuing deficits and no recovery of function. Both IQ and academic achievement test scores were significantly related to the number of intracranial lesions and the lowest postresuscitation Glasgow Coma Scale score but not to age at the time of injury. Nearly 50% of the TBI group failed a school grade and/or required placement in self-contained special education classrooms; the odds of unfavorable academic performance were 18 times higher for the TBI group than the comparison group. Traumatic brain injury sustained early in life has significant and persistent consequences for the development of intellectual and academic functions and deleterious effects on academic performance.

  8. A review of the number and severity of injuries sustained following a single motocross event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Charles G; White, Simon; Bopf, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Competitive and recreational motocross is an increasingly popular sport in Australia and worldwide. Children as young as 4-year-old can participate in this activity. It is recognised that this is a high risk sport despite the use of protective equipment and developments in course design. Injuries sustained range from minor contusions and fractures to severe life threatening spine and head injuries in adults and the paediatric population. In addition organised events can generate a surge of trauma that can burden small local hospitals, resulting in an unpredicted increase in the workload with subsequent delays to treatment. We present the trauma workload generated in a district hospital following a single motocross event. All patients attending a district hospital emergency department with injuries sustained during a single motocross event were identified through hospital and ambulance records. The nature of their injuries and the treatment required, the length of hospital stay and operative theatre time generated by their injuries were obtained from hospital and theatre records. 14 patients attended the emergency department over a 24-hour period, requiring 5 ambulances from the scene. 7 patients required hospital admission with 7 operations performed, consuming 12.2 h of operating theatre time and 21 days of hospital beds. 2 patients sustained head injuries requiring observation, one of which was transferred to a spinal unit for management of their spinal injuries. Motocross is a popular sport and at times has unacceptable risks of injury in organised competitions, especially with regards to paediatric injuries. Better course design, restrictions on participant age and limitations in vehicle speeds may help reduce the number of severe injuries. These events can also generate a sudden trauma burden to local hospital facilities with knock on effects on waiting times for theatre and potentially compromising not only treatment of the injured participants but also

  9. Blunt laryngeal trauma secondary to sporting injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, D; Anderson, J A

    2017-08-01

    Laryngeal injury after blunt trauma is uncommon, but can cause catastrophic airway obstruction and significant morbidity in voice and airway function. This paper aims to discuss a case series of sports-related blunt laryngeal trauma patients and describe the results of a thorough literature review. Retrospective case-based analysis of laryngeal trauma referrals over six years to a tertiary laryngology centre. Twenty-eight patients were identified; 13 (46 per cent) sustained sports-related trauma. Most were young males, presenting with dysphonia, some with airway compromise (62 per cent). Nine patients were diagnosed with a laryngeal fracture. Four patients were managed conservatively and nine underwent surgery. Post-treatment, the majority of patients achieved good voice outcomes (83 per cent) and all had normal airway function. Sports-related neck trauma can cause significant injury to the laryngeal framework and endolaryngeal soft tissues, and most cases require surgical intervention. Clinical presentation may be subtle; a systematic approach along with a high index of suspicion is essential, as early diagnosis and treatment have been reported to improve airway and voice outcome.

  10. A Multifactorial Approach to Sport-Related Concussion Prevention and Education: Application of the Socioecological Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register-Mihalik, Johna; Baugh, Christine; Kroshus, Emily; Y Kerr, Zachary; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C

    2017-03-01

    To offer an overview of sport-related concussion (SRC) prevention and education strategies in the context of the socioecological framework (SEF). Athletic trainers (ATs) will understand the many factors that interact to influence SRC prevention and the implications of these interactions for effective SRC education. Concussion is a complex injury that is challenging to identify and manage, particularly when athletes fail to disclose symptoms to their health care providers. Education is 1 strategy for increasing disclosure. However, limited information addresses how ATs can integrate the many factors that may influence the effectiveness of SRC education into their specific settings. Public health models provide an example through the SEF, which highlights the interplay among various levels of society and sport that can facilitate SRC prevention strategies, including education. For ATs to develop appropriate SRC prevention strategies, a framework for application is needed. A growing body of information concerning SRC prevention indicates that knowledge alone is insufficient to change concussion-related behaviors. The SEF allows this information to be considered at levels such as policy and societal, community, interpersonal (relationships), and intrapersonal (athlete). The use of such a framework will facilitate more comprehensive SRC prevention efforts that can be applied in all athletic training practice settings. Clinical Applications: Athletic trainers can use this information as they plan SRC prevention strategies in their specific settings. This approach will aid in addressing the layers of complexity that exist when developing a concussion-management policy and plan.

  11. Assessment, management and knowledge of sport-related concussion: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Doug; Brughelli, Matt; Hume, Patria; Gissane, Conor

    2014-04-01

    Sport-related concussions are a subset of mild traumatic brain injuries and are a concern for many sporting activities worldwide. To review and update the literature in regard to the history, pathophysiology, recognition, assessment, management and knowledge of concussion. Searches of electronic literature databases were performed to identify studies published up until April 2013. 292 publications focussing on concussion met the inclusion criteria, and so they were quality rated and reviewed. Concussion is hard to recognize and diagnose. Initial sideline assessment via the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 3 (SCAT3), Child-SCAT3 or King-Devick test should be undertaken to identify athletes with concussion as part of a continuum of assessment modalities and athlete management. Sports medicine practitioners should be cognisant of the definition, extent and nature of concussion, and should work with coaches, athletes and trainers to identify and manage concussions. The most common reason for variations in management of concussion is lack of awareness of-and confusion about-the many available published guidelines for concussion. Future research should focus on better systems and tools for recognition, assessment and management of concussion. Sport participants' knowledge of concussion should be evaluated more rigorously, with interventions for sports where there is little knowledge of recognition, assessment and appropriate management of concussion.

  12. Obesity and neurocognitive recovery after sports-related concussion in athletes: a matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young M; Wu, Adela; Zuckerman, Scott L; Stanko, Kevin M; LaChaud, Gregory Y; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K

    2016-09-01

    Sports-related concussions (SRCs) are a significant public health concern in athletes. Data exist suggesting a link between obesity and decreased neurocognitive function, yet the effect of body mass index (BMI) on neurocognitive function and recovery after a SRC is unknown. The goal of our study was to discern the effect of BMI on recovery after SRC. This study was a retrospective observational cohort study. Between 2013 and 2014, 7,606 athletes between the ages of 13-20 years valid baseline neurocognitive testing performed at multiple regional concussion centers sustained a concussion. Out of these athletes, 711 normal weight athletes and 711 obese athletes were matched by age, gender, number of previous concussions, and sport. The proportions of athletes returning to baseline within two weeks between the groups were defined by using 80% confidence reliable change index (RCI) criteria and were compared using Fisher's Exact Test. Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis with log-rank test was used to compare the median time to neurocognitive recovery between groups. Fewer obese athletes returned to baseline within 2 weeks on measures of verbal memory, visual motor speed, reaction time, postconcussion symptom scale (PCSS), and overall recovery compared to normal weight athletes. Obese athletes also had greater median time of return to baseline with respect to reaction time, PCSS, and overall recovery. Using RCI methodology, there exists an association between obesity and increased time to return to neurocognitive and symptom baseline after SRC in athletes, specifically reaction time, symptom scores, and overall recovery.

  13. A prospective study of injuries sustained during competitive Muay Thai kickboxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartland, Sam; Malik, Mohammad Hammad; Lovell, Martyn

    2005-01-01

    To investigate prospectively the type and rate of injuries sustained during amateur Muay Thai competition. Prospective cohort study collection of data following clinical examination. Amateur Muay Thai competitions in the United Kingdom organized by the International Amateur Muay Thai Federation. Amateur Muay Thai boxers. Both sexes. Lightweight to super heavyweight. There were 92 participants, 12 females and 82 males. The average age was 17.3 years, and the average previous number of bouts was 3.9. A total of 588.5 minutes of competition time was assessed during a total of 10 events. Injury rates were 1.3 injuries per 100 minutes of competition in the lightweight category, 2.25 per 100 minutes of competition in the middleweight category, 30 per 100 minutes of competition in the heavyweight category, and 2.54 per 100 minutes of competition in the super heavyweight category. Compared with other reported martial arts, the injury rates are higher in Muay Thai. The head was shown to be the most common site of injury in amateur fighters, but there was an almost complete absence of lower limb injuries, which again is at variance with reported figures for other martial arts.

  14. Changes in functional brain networks following sports-related concussion in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virji-Babul, Naznin; Hilderman, Courtney G E; Makan, Nadia; Liu, Aiping; Smith-Forrester, Jenna; Franks, Chris; Wang, Z J

    2014-12-01

    Sports-related concussion is a major public health issue; however, little is known about the underlying changes in functional brain networks in adolescents following injury. Our aim was to use the tools from graph theory to evaluate the changes in brain network properties following concussion in adolescent athletes. We recorded resting state electroencephalography (EEG) in 33 healthy adolescent athletes and 9 adolescent athletes with a clinical diagnosis of subacute concussion. Graph theory analysis was applied to these data to evaluate changes in brain networks. Global and local metrics of the structural properties of the graph were calculated for each group and correlated with Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) scores. Brain networks of both groups showed small-world topology with no statistically significant differences in the global metrics; however, significant differences were found in the local metrics. Specifically, in the concussed group, we noted: 1) increased values of betweenness and degree in frontal electrode sites corresponding to the (R) dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the (R) inferior frontal gyrus and 2) decreased values of degree in the region corresponding to the (R) frontopolar prefrontal cortex. In addition, there was significant negative correlation between degree and hub value, with total symptom score at the electrode site corresponding to the (R) prefrontal cortex. This preliminary report in adolescent athletes shows for the first time that resting-state EEG combined with graph theoretical analysis may provide an objective method of evaluating changes in brain networks following concussion. This approach may be useful in identifying individuals at risk for future injury.

  15. Non-surgical treatment of sports-related temporomandibular joint disorders in basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhtaroğullari, Mehmet; Demiralp, Burak; Ertan, Atila

    2004-12-01

    In this study, 18 basketball players (11 female, seven male; age range 14-32 years) with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) problems who had a history of sport injuries related to head or jaw region were evaluated and the results of the treatment were presented. A standardized functional examination of the masticatory system was performed including measurement of maximal jaw movements, recording of joint sounds, pain on movement of the jaw as well as tenderness to palpation of the both TMJ or masticatory muscles. Patients were also evaluated periodontally. Diagnosis was made according the criteria, described by Okeson, and appropriate treatment was applied using different kind of splints. At the end of treatment only one patient continued with right TMJ reduction with slight pain. Except for that patient, none of the patients had pain after treatment. The maximum opening of the jaws and the maximal jaw movements were statistically increased after treatment. Patients with TMJ problems also showed periodontal problems, most likely due to inadequate oral hygiene because of the limited jaw movements and pain. Periodontal parameters including probing depth (PD), Plaque index (PI), and Sulcus Bleeding Index (SBI) improved after treatment. Sports-related TMJ injuries may result in complex problems such as pain, TMJ sounds, limitation in maximal jaw movements and maximum opening of the mouth, difficulty in chewing. With the appropriate diagnosis this could be treated non-surgically in 6-8 months. This study also showed that the TMJ disorders may cause periodontal problems, which may affect all teeth and also the general health of the athlete.

  16. Frequency and Outcomes of a Symptom-Free Waiting Period After Sport-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Adam Y; Nelson, Lindsay D; Apps, Jennifer N; Walter, Kevin D; McCrea, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    Guidelines and practices for the management of sport-related concussion (SRC) have evolved swiftly over the past 2 decades. Despite common recommendations for a symptom-free waiting period (SFWP) before returning to sport, past reports have suggested poor utilization rates for this intervention. To obtain current estimates of the utilization and characterization of SFWPs with high school and collegiate athletes. Descriptive epidemiology study. Data were extracted from a larger prospective study that followed athletes with SRC across 13 institutions in southeastern Wisconsin from 2012 to 2014. Participants included 143 contact and collision sport athletes who were followed serially through their recoveries after SRCs. In the current study sample, 99.3% of athletes used an SFWP. The mean self-reported symptom duration was 6.35 days (median, 5 days), with 72.7% reporting symptom recovery within 1 week of injury, 93.7% within 2 weeks, and 99.3% within 30 days. Rate of same-season repeat concussion was low (3.8%) and was similar to or lower than the overall rate of concussion (4.3%). Five same-season repeat concussions occurred at a range of 8 to 42 days after initial injuries. In comparison with prior published data collected from 1999 to 2004, utilization and duration of SFWPs were higher in the current study samples (99.3% vs 60.3% of athletes reported an SFWP; mean duration, 6.1 vs 3.2 days), and athletes were withheld from sports for more days than previously reported (12.3 vs 7.4 days). Rate of same-season repeat concussion was equivalent to that of prior published data. The findings support improved adherence to clinical management guidelines through increased utilization of SFWPs after SRC. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Reversing Sports-Related Iron and Zinc Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosli, Alvin R.

    1993-01-01

    Many active athletes do not consume enough zinc or iron, which are important for oxygen activation, electron transport, and injury healing. Subclinical deficiencies may impair performance and impair healing times. People who exercise regularly need counseling about the importance of adequate dietary intake of iron and zinc. (SM)

  18. Premature return to play and return to learn after a sport-related concussion: physician's chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, James D; Lawrence, David W; Kraft, Sari A; Garel, Alisha; Snow, Catherine L; Chatterjee, Ananda; Libfeld, Paula; MacKenzie, Heather M; Thornton, Jane S; Moineddin, Rahim; Frémont, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    To determine what proportion of patients experience an exacerbation of their symptoms as a result of premature return to play (RTP) and return to learn (RTL) following sport-related concussions. Retrospective study of electronic medical records from the office-based practice of one family and sport medicine physician who had systematically provided recommendations for cognitive and physical rest based on existing consensus recommendations. Two blinded authors independently reviewed each chart, which included Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) and SCAT2 symptom self-report forms to determine whether an athlete had returned to play or learn prematurely. If there was a discrepancy between the 2 reviewers then a third author reviewed the charts. A sport medicine and family practice in Ontario. The physician assessed sport-related concussions after self-referral or referral from other primary care physicians, teams, and schools. A total of 170 charts of 159 patients were assessed for sport-related concussion during a 5-year period (April 2006 to March 2011). All participants were students who were participating in sports at the time of injury. There were 41 concussions in elementary students, 95 concussions in high school students, and 34 concussions in college or university students. Premature RTP and RTL were defined as chart records documenting the recurrence or worsening of symptoms that accompanied the patients' RTP or RTL. Measures were compared using the earliest available SCAT forms and self-reporting. In 43.5% of concussion cases, the patient returned to sport too soon and in 44.7% of concussion cases, the patient returned to school too soon. Patients with a history of previous concussion required more days of rest before being permitted to participate in any physical activity than those patients without a previous history of concussion. Elementary school students required fewer days of rest before being permitted to return to any physical activity

  19. Sustained delivery of nicotinamide limits cortical injury and improves functional recovery following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffus, Andrea M; Anderson, Gail D; Hoane, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that nicotinamide (NAM), a neuroprotective soluble B-group vitamin, improves recovery of function following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, no prior studies have examined whether NAM is beneficial following continuous infusions over 7 days post-TBI. The purpose of this study was to investigate the preclinical efficacy of NAM treatment as it might be delivered clinically; over several days by slow infusion. Rats were prepared with either unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) injuries or sham procedures and divided into three groups: CCI-NAM, CCI-vehicle, and sham. Thirty minutes following CCI, Alzet osmotic mini-pumps were implanted subcutaneously. NAM was delivered at a rate of 50 mg/kg/day for 7 days immediately post-CCI. On day 7 following injury, the pumps were removed and blood draws were collected for serum NAM and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) analyses. Starting on day 2 post-CCI, animals were tested on a battery of sensorimotor tests (bilateral tactile adhesive removal, locomotor placing, and limb-use asymmetry). Continuous infusion of NAM resulted in a significant serum elevation in NAM, but not NAD+. Statistical analyses of the tactile removal and locomotor placing data revealed that continuous administration of NAM significantly reduced the initial magnitude of the injury deficit and improved overall recovery compared to the vehicle-treated animals. NAM treatment also significantly decreased limb-use asymmetries compared to vehicle-treated animals. The overall extent of the cortical damage was also reduced by NAM treatment. No detrimental effects were seen following continuous infusion. The present results suggest that NAM delivered via a clinically relevant therapeutic regimen may truncate behavioral damage following TBI. Thus our results offer strong support for translation into the clinical population.

  20. Sustained delivery of nicotinamide limits cortical injury and improves functional recovery following traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Goffus, Andrea M.; Anderson, Gail D; Hoane, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that nicotinamide (NAM), a neuroprotective soluble B-group vitamin, improves recovery of function following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, no prior studies have examined whether NAM is beneficial following continuous infusions over 7 days post-TBI. The purpose of this study was to investigate the preclinical efficacy of NAM treatment as it might be delivered clinically; over several days by slow infusion. Rats were prepared with either unilateral contr...

  1. Sustained Delivery of Nicotinamide Limits Cortical Injury and Improves Functional Recovery Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Goffus, Andrea M.; Anderson, Gail D; Hoane, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that nicotinamide (NAM), a neuroprotective soluble B-group vitamin, improves recovery of function following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, no prior studies have examined whether NAM is beneficial following continuous infusions over 7 days post-TBI. The purpose of this study was to investigate the preclinical efficacy of NAM treatment as it might be delivered clinically; over several days by slow infusion. Rats were prepared with either unilateral contr...

  2. Sustained Delivery of Nicotinamide Limits Cortical Injury and Improves Functional Recovery Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Goffus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we have demonstrated that nicotinamide (NAM, a neuroprotective soluble B-group vitamin, improves recovery of function following traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, no prior studies have examined whether NAM is beneficial following continuous infusions over 7 days post-TBI. The purpose of this study was to investigate the preclinical efficacy of NAM treatment as it might be delivered clinically; over several days by slow infusion. Rats were prepared with either unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI injuries or sham procedures and divided into three groups: CCI-NAM, CCI-vehicle and sham. Thirty minutes following CCI, Alzet osmotic mini-pumps were implanted subcutaneously. NAM was delivered at a rate of 50 mg/kg/day for 7 days immediately post-CCI. On day 7 following injury, the pumps were removed and blood draws were collected for serum NAM and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ analyses. Starting on day 2 post-CCI, animals were tested on a battery of sensorimotor tests (bilateral tactile adhesive removal, locomotor placing and limb-use asymmetry. Continuous infusion of NAM resulted in a significant serum elevation in NAM, but not NAD+. Statistical analyses of the tactile removal and locomotor placing data revealed that continuous administration of NAM significantly reduced the initial magnitude of the injury deficit and improved overall recovery compared to the vehicle-treated animals. NAM treatment also significantly decreased limb-use asymmetries compared to vehicle-treated animals. The overall extent of the cortical damage was also reduced by NAM treatment. No detrimental effects were seen following continuous infusion. The present results suggest that NAM delivered via a clinically relevant therapeutic regimen may truncate behavioral damage following TBI. Thus our results offer strong support for translation into the clinical population.

  3. Psychiatric outcomes after pediatric sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Ritchie, Lesley J; Koltek, Mark; Hosain, Shahid; Cordingley, Dean; Chu, Stephanie; Selci, Erin; Leiter, Jeff; Russell, Kelly

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this study were twofold: (1) to examine the prevalence of emotional symptoms among children and adolescents with a sports-related concussion (SRC) who were referred to a multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program and (2) to examine the prevalence, clinical features, risk factors, and management of postinjury psychiatric outcomes among those in this clinical population. The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with SRC referred to a multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program between September 2013 and October 2014. Clinical assessments carried out by a single neurosurgeon included clinical history, physical examination, and Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS) scoring. Postinjury psychiatric outcomes were defined as a subjective worsening of symptoms of a preinjury psychiatric disorder or new and isolated suicidal ideation or diagnosis of a novel psychiatric disorder (NPD). An NPD was defined as a newly diagnosed psychiatric disorder that occurred in a patient with or without a lifetime preinjury psychiatric disorder after a concussion. Clinical resources, therapeutic interventions, and clinical and return-to-play outcomes are summarized. One hundred seventy-four patients (mean age 14.2 years, 61.5% male) were included in the study. At least 1 emotional symptom was reported in 49.4% of the patients, and the median emotional PCSS subscore was 4 (interquartile range 1-8) among those who reported at least 1 emotional symptom. Overall, 20 (11.5%) of the patients met the study criteria for a postinjury psychiatric outcome, including 14 patients with an NPD, 2 patients with isolated suicidal ideation, and 4 patients with worsening symptoms of a preinjury psychiatric disorder. Female sex, a higher initial PCSS score, a higher emotional PCSS subscore, presence of a preinjury psychiatric history, and presence of a family history of psychiatric illness were significantly associated with postinjury psychiatric outcomes

  4. Safety and effectiveness of pharmacotherapy for depression in adults who have sustained a traumatic brain injury: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Fiona J; Perry, Luke A; Hicks, Amelia J; Batty, Rachel; Tufanaru, Catalin; Jayaram, Mahesh; Ponsford, Jennie; Hopwood, Malcolm

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this systematic review is to synthesize the current evidence on the effectiveness and harms of pharmacotherapy in the management of depression in adults who have sustained a traumatic brain injury.

  5. Conflict on the courts: a review of sports-related violence literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Sarah K; Collins, Christy L; Comstock, R Dawn

    2007-10-01

    Sports-related violence is a form of interpersonal violence. Violence that occurs in and around the sporting world can have potentially severe physical and psychological repercussions for those involved. Although scholars in a wide range of disciplines have addressed three of the subsets of sports-related violence, they have done so without regard to the interconnected nature of the subsets, choosing instead to look at hazing, brawling, and foul play as independent problems. By separating hazing, brawling, and foul play and failing to recognize that their connection to sport connects them, scholars fail to see how sports-related violence is a broad example of interpersonal violence. This review describes some of the academic literature, primarily from the United States, and identifies similar themes and prevention suggestions that appear across disciplines. It also argues that the three subsets are an interconnected whole of sports-related violence that deserves more detailed study.

  6. Pneumomediastinum from sports-related trauma: key findings and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Kevin J; Dorshimer, Gary W; Bartolozzi, Arthur R; Deluca, Peter F

    2003-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum can result from blunt chest trauma in sports. Diagnosis is made using chest radiography. The natural history of isolated pneumomediastinum is benign; however, it can be associated with more serious injuries, such as disruption of the tracheobronchial tree or a perforated digestive viscus. Patients with isolated pneumomediastinum should be monitored with serial chest radiographs. Patients may return to full activity once their chest radiographs have returned to normal, they exhibit no symptoms, and they have regained their stamina.

  7. A systematic process to prioritize prevention activities sustaining progress toward the reduction of military injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Hooper, Tomoko I; Brennan, Fred H; Craig, Stephen C; Girasek, Deborah C; Schaefer, Richard A; Barbour, Galen; Yew, Kenneth S; Jones, Bruce H

    2010-01-01

    To sustain progress toward injury reduction and other health promotion goals, public health organizations need a systematic approach based on data and an evaluation of existing scientific evidence on prevention. This paper describes a process and criteria developed to systematically and objectively define prevention program and policy priorities. Military medical surveillance data were obtained and summarized, and a working group of epidemiology and injury experts was formed. After reviewing the available data, the working group used predefined criteria to score leading military unintentional injury causes on five main criteria that assessed factors contributing to program and policy success: (1) importance of the problem, (2) effectiveness of existing prevention strategies, (3) feasibility of establishing programs and policies, (4) timeliness of implementation and results, and (5) potential for evaluation. Injury problems were ranked by total median score. Causes with the highest total median scores were physical training (34 points), military parachuting (32 points), privately-owned vehicle crashes (31 points), sports (29 points), falls (27 points), and military vehicle crashes (27 points). Using a data-driven, criteria-based process, three injury causes (physical training, military parachuting, and privately owned-vehicle crashes) with the greatest potential for successful program and policy implementation were identified. Such information is useful for public health practitioners and policymakers who must prioritize among health problems that are competing for limited resources. The process and criteria could be adapted to systematically assess and prioritize health issues affecting other communities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Factors influencing emergency medicine physicians' management of sports-related concussions: a community-wide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Stephen; Kothari, Rashmi; Koestner, Amy; Mohney, Gretchen; Baker, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Numerous guidelines to grade and manage sports-related concussions have been published. However, little is known about how frequently they are implemented in the emergency department. This study evaluates the current practices of emergency physicians (EPs) in managing sports-related concussions. To evaluate the current practice of EP evaluation and management of sports-related concussions. All EPs and emergency medicine residents in Kalamazoo County were surveyed regarding their management of sports-related concussions. The surveys obtained demographic data, participants' use of guidelines, and the importance of clinical and non-clinical factors in deciding when to allow a player to return to play. Of the 73 EP respondents, only 23% used a nationally recognized guideline, with no significant difference between attending and resident EPs. The symptomatic complaints of loss of consciousness, amnesia of the event, and difficulty concentrating were ranked most important by EPs in assessing patients with sports-related concussions. Among non-clinical factors, residents were significantly more likely than attendings to report that medical-legal, parental, and players' concerns were more likely to influence their decision in allowing a patient to return to play. EPs take into consideration important clinical factors in assessing patients with sports-related concussion. However, almost 75% do not use any nationally recognized guideline in their evaluation. Residents are more likely than attendings to be influenced by non-clinical factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sustained release of estrogens from PEGylated nanoparticles for treatment of secondary spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, John

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition which causes neurological damage and can result in paralysis. SCI results in immediate mechanical damage to the spinal cord, but secondary injuries due to inflammation, oxidative damage, and activated biochemical pathways leading to apoptosis exacerbate the injury. The only currently available treatment, methylprednisolone, is controversial because there is no convincing data to support its therapeutic efficacy for SCI treatment. In the absence of an effective SCI treatment option, 17beta-estradiol has gained significant attention for its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic abilities, all events associated with secondary. Sadly, 17beta-estradiol is associated with systemic adverse effects preclude the use of free estrogen even for local administration due to short drug half-life in the body. Biodegradable nanoparticles can be used to increase half-life after local administration and to bestow sustained release. Sustained release using PEGylated biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles constructed from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) will endow a consistent, low, but effective dose to be delivered locally. This will limit systemic effects due to local administration and low dose, sustained release. PLGA was chosen because it has been used extensively for sustained release, and has a record of safety in humans. Here, we show the in vitro efficacy of PEGylated nanoparticles loaded with 17beta-estradiol for treatment of secondary SCI. We achieved a high loading efficiency and controlled release from the particles over a several day therapeutic window. The particles also show neuroprotection in two in vitro cell culture models. Both the dose and pretreatment time with nanoparticles was evaluated in an effort to translate the treatment into an animal model for further study.

  10. Complications of ocular paintball injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, S; Weakley, D; Wilson, C

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the ocular complications of paintball injuries in children. The clinical course of four children with traumatic ocular paintball injuries was evaluated. All patients underwent a complete ocular examination. Their age, injuries sustained, surgical procedure(s) performed, presence of protective eyewear at the time of injury, and final visual outcome was assessed. The presence of directly related anterior and posterior segment abnormalities were also evaluated. Four boys sustained traumatic paintball injuries. Average patient age was 11.25 years (range: 10-12 years). None of the children were wearing ocular or facial protection at the time of the initial injury. All patients had hyphema and traumatic cataract, and some form of retinal pathology (vitreous hemorrhage, epiretinal membrane, retinal hemorrhage, and choroidal rupture). One child had a partial-thickness corneal laceration that did not require surgical intervention. All other patients underwent ophthalmic surgery. Final visual acuity was 20/30 or better in two patients, and 20/100 or worse in the others. The cause of decreased visual acuity in these children was directly related to macular pathology. Ocular injuries resulting from paintball impact are often severe and usually occur when the participants are not wearing eye protection or this protection becomes dislodged. Treatment of these injuries is sometimes limited to an attempt to salvage what remains of useful vision. Unfortunately, most of these sports-related injuries could have been prevented if patients wore adequate eye protection when involved in this sport.

  11. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy: A Potentially Unrecognized Diagnosis after Sports-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Ritchie, Lesley; Cordingley, Dean; Essig, Marco; Mansouri, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic optic neuropathy is a rare cause of visual disturbance after head injury that can be difficult to distinguish from coexisting vestibulo-ocular dysfunction because of the overlap in presenting symptoms in patients with these conditions. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl who sustained a head injury during a ringette game leading to blurred vision and diplopia persisting 5 months after injury. Clinical history and physical examination findings were consistent with a traumatic optic neuropathy, convergence insufficiency, and postconcussion syndrome. Neuroimaging was normal. The patient was managed using a multidisciplinary approach. At 6 months of follow-up, neuro-ophthalmological examination demonstrated evidence of permanent partial optic nerve injury, and formal neuropsychological testing fell primarily within normal limits. The patient was advised to retire from collision sports. The authors discuss the value of a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and management of concussion patients presenting with persistent visual symptoms.

  12. Predictors of postconcussion syndrome after sports-related concussion in young athletes: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Clinton D; Zuckerman, Scott L; Lee, Young M; King, Lauren; Beaird, Susan; Sills, Allen K; Solomon, Gary S

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Sport-related concussion (SRC) is a major public health problem. Approximately 90% of SRCs in high school athletes are transient; symptoms recover to baseline within 1 week. However, a small percentage of patients remain symptomatic several months after injury, with a condition known as postconcussion syndrome (PCS). The authors aimed to identify risk factors for PCS development in a cohort of exclusively young athletes (9-18 years of age) who sustained SRCs while playing a sport. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective case-control study by using the Vanderbilt Sports Concussion Clinic database. They identified 40 patients with PCS and matched them by age at injury and sex to SRC control patients (1 PCS to 2 control). PCS patients were those experiencing persistent symptoms at 3 months after an SRC. Control patients were those with documented resolution of symptoms within 3 weeks of an SRC. Data were collected in 4 categories: 1) demographic variables; 2) key medical, psychiatric, and family history; 3) acute-phase postinjury symptoms (at 0-24 hours); and 4) subacute-phase postinjury features (at 0-3 weeks). The chi-square Fisher exact test was used to assess categorical variables, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate continuous variables. Forward stepwise regression models (Pin = 0.05, Pout = 0.10) were used to identify variables associated with PCS. RESULTS PCS patients were more likely than control patients to have a concussion history (p = 0.010), premorbid mood disorders (p = 0.002), other psychiatric illness (p = 0.039), or significant life stressors (p = 0.036). Other factors that increased the likelihood of PCS development were a family history of mood disorders, other psychiatric illness, and migraine. Development of PCS was not predicted by race, insurance status, body mass index, sport, helmet use, medication use, and type of symptom endorsement. A final logistic regression analysis of candidate variables showed PCS to be

  13. The effect of preinjury sleep difficulties on neurocognitive impairment and symptoms after sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufrinko, Alicia; Pearce, Kelly; Elbin, R J; Covassin, Tracey; Johnson, Eric; Collins, Michael; Kontos, Anthony P

    2015-04-01

    Researchers have reported that sleep duration is positively related to baseline neurocognitive performance. However, researchers have yet to examine the effect of preinjury sleep difficulties on postconcussion impairments. To compare neurocognitive impairment and symptoms of athletes with preinjury sleep difficulties to those without after a sport-related concussion (SRC). Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. The sample included 348 adolescent and adult athletes (age, mean ± SD, 17.43 ± 2.34 years) with a diagnosed SRC. The sample was divided into 2 groups: (1) 34 (10%) participants with preinjury sleep difficulties (sleeping less as well as having trouble falling asleep; SLEEP SX) and (2) 231 (66%) participants without preinjury sleep difficulties (CONTROL). The remaining 84 (24%) participants with minimal sleep difficulties (1 symptom) were excluded. Participants completed the Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT) and Postconcussion Symptom Scale (PCSS) at baseline and 3 postinjury intervals (2, 5-7, and 10-14 days after injury). A series of repeated-measures analyses of covariance with Bonferroni correction, controlling for baseline non-sleep-related symptoms, were conducted to compare postinjury neurocognitive performance between groups. Follow-up exploratory t tests examined between-group differences at each time interval. A series of analyses of variance were used to examine total PCSS score, sleep-related, and non-sleep-related symptoms across time intervals between groups. Groups differed significantly in PCSS scores across postinjury intervals for reaction time (P SLEEP SX group performing worse than controls at 5-7 days (mean ± SD, 0.70 ± 0.32 [SLEEP SX], 0.60 ± 0.14 [CONTROL]) and 10-14 days (0.61 ± 0.17 [SLEEP SX]; 0.57 ± 0.10 [CONTROL]) after injury. Groups also differed significantly on verbal memory performance (P = .04), with the SLEEP SX (68.21 ± 18.64) group performing worse than the CONTROL group (76.76 ± 14

  14. Age Differences in Recovery After Sport-Related Concussion: A Comparison of High School and Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lindsay D; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Barr, William B; Hammeke, Thomas A; Randolph, Christopher; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Wang, Yanzhi; McCrea, Michael A

    2016-02-01

    Younger age has been hypothesized to be a risk factor for prolonged recovery after sport-related concussion, yet few studies have directly evaluated age differences in acute recovery. To compare clinical recovery patterns for high school and collegiate athletes. Prospective cohort study. Large, multicenter prospective sample collected from 1999-2003 in a sports medicine setting. Concussed athletes (n = 621; 545 males and 76 females) and uninjured controls (n = 150) participating in high school and collegiate contact and collision sports (79% in football, 15.7% in soccer, and the remainder in lacrosse or ice hockey). Participants underwent evaluation of symptoms (Graded Symptom Checklist), cognition (Standardized Assessment of Concussion, paper-and-pencil neuropsychological tests), and postural stability (Balance Error Scoring System). Athletes were evaluated preinjury and followed serially at several time points after concussive injury: immediately, 3 hours postinjury, and at days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 45 or 90 (with neuropsychological measures administered at baseline and 3 postinjury time points). Comparisons of concussed high school and collegiate athletes with uninjured controls suggested that high school athletes took 1 to 2 days longer to recover on a cognitive (Standardized Assessment of Concussion) measure. Comparisons with the control group on other measures (symptoms, balance) as well as direct comparisons between concussed high school and collegiate samples revealed no differences in the recovery courses between the high school and collegiate groups on any measure. Group-level recovery occurred at or before 7 days postinjury on all assessment metrics. The findings suggest no clinically significant age differences exist in recovery after sport-related concussion, and therefore, separate injury-management protocols are not needed for high school and collegiate athletes.

  15. Performance of primary repair on colon injuries sustained from low-versus high-energy projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazovic, Ranko; Radojevic, Nemanja; Curovic, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Among various reasons, colon injuries may be caused by low- or high-energy firearm bullets, with the latter producing a temporary cavitation phenomenon. The available treatment options include primary repair and two-stage management, but recent studies have shown that primary repair can be widely used with a high success rate. This paper investigates the differences in performance of primary repair on these two types of colon injuries. Two groups of patients who sustained colon injuries due to single gunshot wounds, were retrospectively categorized based on the type of bullet. Primary colon repair was performed in all patients selected based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria (Stone and Fabian's criteria). An almost absolute homogeneity was attained among the groups in terms of age, latent time before surgery, and four trauma indexes. Only one patient from the low-energy firearm projectile group (4%) developed a postsurgical complication versus nine patients (25.8%) from the high-energy group, showing statistically significant difference (p = 0.03). These nine patients experienced the following postsurgical complications: pneumonia, abscess, fistula, suture leakage, and one multiorgan failure with sepsis. Previous studies concluded that one-stage primary repair is the best treatment option for colon injuries. However, terminal ballistics testing determined the projectile's path through the body and revealed that low-energy projectiles caused considerably lesser damage than their high-energy counterparts. Primary colon repair must be performed definitely for low-energy short firearm injuries but very carefully for high-energy injuries. Given these findings, we suggest that the treatment option should be determined based not only on the bullet type alone but also on other clinical findings. PMID:26874437

  16. Military personnel sustaining Lisfranc injuries have high rates of disability separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, George C; Hanley, M G; Pavey, G J; Rue, J-Ph

    2017-06-01

    Lisfranc injuries are relatively uncommon midfoot injuries disproportionately affecting young, active males. Previous studies in civilian populations have reported relatively good results with operative treatment. However, treatment results have not been specifically examined in military personnel, who may have higher physical demands than the general population. The purpose of this study was to examine rates of return to military duty following surgical treatment of isolated Lisfranc injuries. Surgical records and radiographic images from all active duty US military personnel treated for an isolated Lisfranc injury between January 2005 and July 2014 were examined. Demographic information, injury data, surgical details and subsequent return to duty information were recorded. The primary outcome was ability to return to unrestricted military duty following treatment. The secondary outcome was secondary conversion to a midfoot arthrodesis following initial open reduction internal fixation. Twenty-one patients meeting inclusion criteria were identified. Median patient age was 23 years, and mean follow-up was 43 months. Within this cohort, 14 patients were able to return to military service, while seven required a disability separation from the armed forces. Of the 18 patients who underwent initial fixation, eight were subsequently revised to midfoot arthrodesis for persistent pain. Military personnel sustaining Lisfranc injuries have high rates of persistent pain and disability, even after optimal initial surgical treatment. Military surgeons should counsel patients on the career-threatening nature of this condition and high rates of secondary procedures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. [The application of ultrasonography to estimate blood vessel injury of upper limbs sustaining electric burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jia-ke; Li, Li-gen; Chen, Yue-xiu; Hu, Xiao-juan; Yang, Yong-ming

    2003-12-01

    To explore a new method in estimating extent and degree of arterial injury in upper limbs sustaining high tension electric burns. Eighteen patients (twenty-four upper limbs) with high tension electricity injury were admitted from December 1998 to September 2002, The damaged limbs consisted of four parts: wrist wound part, 5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm parts around wrist wound, where the radial and ulnar arteries were detected using B ultrasound and color WP Doppler examination. The changes of endangium, vessel diameter, thickness of the vessel wall and volume of blood flow were recorded respectively. The parameters of normal radial and ulnar arteries were also determined as normal control. B ultrasound and color WP Doppler examination showed that the endangium in radial and ulnar arteries become coarse, edema or exfoliation. The vessel wall was thicker than that of the normal control and the thickness was heterogeneity. The vessel wall could be necrosis in severe patient and the vessel cavity was stricture or beaded. Thrombosis or occlusion could occur at the site of severe injury area in vessel. The decrease in volume of blood flow was observed. The condition of the radial and ulnar arteries become well apart from 10 - 15 cm of wrist wound. The ultrasonography can be used to detect the changes in endangium, diameter, thickness of the vessel wall, blood flow volume in injury blood vessel caused by electric burn injury. It is helpful in judging the degree and extent of injury vessel and could be a safe, non-invasive diagnostic method and is worth popularizing.

  18. Longitudinal Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life following Adolescent Sports-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kelly; Selci, Erin; Chu, Stephanie; Fineblit, Samuel; Ritchie, Lesley; Ellis, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    To examine initial and longitudinal health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adolescent sports-related concussion (SRC) patients, a prospective observational case-series study was conducted among adolescent SRC patients who were evaluated at a multi-disciplinary pediatric concussion program. Health-related quality of life was measured using the child self-report Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) generic score scale (age 13-18 version) and the PedsQL Cognitive Functioning scale. Initial and longitudinal HRQOL outcomes were compared between patients who did and did not develop post-concussion syndrome (PCS). A total of 63 patients met the inclusion criteria during the study period. The mean age of the cohort was 14.57 years (standard deviation, 1.17) and 61.9% were male. The median time from injury to initial consultation was 6.5 days (interquartile range, 5, 11). At initial consultation, impairments in physical and cognitive HRQOL but not social or emotional HRQOL were observed. Initial symptom burden and length of recovery were associated with greater impairment in physical and cognitive HRQOL. Patients who went on to develop PCS had significantly worse physical and cognitive HRQOL at initial consultation and demonstrated a slower rate of recovery in these domains, compared with those who recovered in less than 30 days. Adolescent SRC was associated with HRQOL impairments that correlated with clinical outcomes. No persistent impairments in HRQOL were detected among patients who achieved physician-documented clinical recovery. Future studies are needed to evaluate the clinical utility of HRQOL measurement in the longitudinal management of adolescent SRC and PCS patients.

  19. Rest and Return to Activity After Sport-Related Concussion: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Tamara C Valovich; Lewis, Joy H; Whelihan, Kate; Bacon, Cailee E Welch

    2017-03-01

    To systematically review the literature regarding rest and return to activity after sport-related concussion. The search was conducted in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, Educational Resources Information Center, Ovid MEDLINE, and PubMed using terms related to concussion, mild traumatic brain injury, physical and cognitive rest, and return to activity. Studies were included if they were published in English; were original research; and evaluated the use of, compliance with, or effectiveness of physical or cognitive rest or provided empirical evidence supporting the graded return-to-activity progression. The study design, patient or participant sample, interventions used, outcome measures, main results, and conclusions were extracted, as appropriate, from each article. Articles were categorized into groups based on their ability to address one of the primary clinical questions of interest: use of rest, rest effectiveness, compliance with recommendations, or outcome after graded return-to-activity progression. A qualitative synthesis of the results was provided, along with summary tables. Our main findings suggest that rest is underused by health care providers, recommendations for rest are broad and not specific to individual patients, an initial period of moderate physical and cognitive rest (eg, limited physical activity and light mental activity) may improve outcomes during the acute postinjury phase, significant variability in the use of assessment tools and compliance with recommended return-to-activity guidelines exists, and additional research is needed to empirically evaluate the effectiveness of graded return-to-activity progressions. Furthermore, there is a significant need to translate knowledge of best practices in concussion management to primary care providers.

  20. What is the definition of sports-related concussion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrory, Paul; Feddermann-Demont, Nina; Dvořák, Jiří; Cassidy, J David; McIntosh, Andrew; Vos, Pieter E; Echemendia, Ruben J; Meeuwisse, Willem; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2017-06-01

    Various definitions for concussion have been proposed, each having its strengths and weaknesses. We reviewed and compared current definitions and identified criteria necessary for an operational definition of sports-related concussion (SRC) in preparation of the 5th Concussion Consensus Conference (Berlin, Germany). We also assessed the role of biomechanical studies in informing an operational definition of SRC. This is a systematic literature review. Data sources include MEDLINE, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials and SPORT Discus (accessed 14 September 2016). Eligibility criteria were studies reporting (clinical) criteria for diagnosing SRC and studies containing SRC impact data. Out of 1601 articles screened, 36 studies were included (2.2%), 14 reported on criteria for SRC definitions and 22 on biomechanical aspects of concussions. Six different operational definitions focusing on clinical findings and their dynamics were identified. Biomechanical studies were obtained almost exclusively on American football players. Angular and linear head accelerations linked to clinically confirmed concussions demonstrated considerable individual variation. SRC is a traumatic brain injury that is defined as a complex pathophysiological process affecting the brain, induced by biomechanical forces with several common features that help define its nature. Limitations identified include that the current criteria for diagnosing SRC are clinically oriented and that there is no gold/standard to assess their diagnostic properties. A future, more valid definition of SRC would better identify concussed players by demonstrating high predictive positive/negative values. Currently, the use of helmet-based systems to study the biomechanics of SRC is limited to few collision sports. New approaches need to be developed to provide objective markers for SRC. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  1. Predicting Recovery Patterns After Sport-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teel, Elizabeth F; Marshall, Stephen W; Shankar, Viswanathan; McCrea, Michael; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2017-03-01

    Clinicians sometimes treat concussed individuals who have amnesia, loss of consciousness (LOC), a concussion history, or certain symptom types more conservatively, but it is unclear whether recovery patterns differ in individuals with these characteristics. To determine whether (1) amnesia, LOC, and concussion history influence the acute recovery of symptoms, cognition, and balance; and (2) cognition and balance are influenced by acute symptom type. Cohort study. Seven sports at 26 colleges and 210 high schools. A total of 8905 collegiate (n = 1392) and high school (n = 7513) athletes. The Graded Symptom Checklist, Standardized Assessment of Concussion, and Balance Error Scoring System were administered to all athletes during the preseason. To allow us to track recovery patterns, athletes diagnosed with a concussion (n = 375) repeated these assessments immediately after the injury, 3 hours postinjury, 1 day postinjury, and at 2, 3, 5, 7, and 90 days after injury. Athletes who experienced amnesia had markedly greater deficits in and a slower recovery trajectory on measures of symptoms, cognition, and balance. Athletes with 2 or more prior concussions demonstrated poorer balance than those with no previous history. Otherwise, LOC and concussion history largely did not affect symptoms, cognition, or balance. Greater deficits in balance scores were observed in athletes with all symptom types. Regardless of these characteristics, most athletes recovered within 7 to 10 days. Athletes who experienced amnesia had more symptoms and greater deficits in cognition and balance. Symptoms and cognitive or balance deficits were not consistently associated with LOC or concussion history. Acute symptoms had a strong influence on balance scores and, to a lesser extent, on cognition. However, we found no evidence to support more cautious return-to-play decisions for athletes with these characteristics, as group recovery occurred within normal timelines. Our study supports current

  2. Individuals sustaining snowboarding and skiing accidents have different maxillofacial injury profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Mike T

    2010-12-01

    Facial trauma: how dangerous are skiing and snowboarding?. Tuli T, Haechl O, Berger N, Laimer K, Jank S, Kloss F, Brandstätter A, Gassner R. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2010;68(2):293-9. REVIEWER NAME: Mike T. John, DDS, MPH, PhD. To compare the prevalence of maxillofacial injury types in individuals who sustained snowboarding and skiing accidents. Information not available. Retrospective case series. Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence. Not applicable. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Children's and parents' opinions on the sport-related food environment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M; Signal, L; Edwards, R; Hoek, J

    2017-09-01

    Sport is a key setting for interventions to address child obesity given its obesogenic nature. Understanding children's and parents' opinions on the sport-related food environment is critical in developing effective programmes and policies to improve children's health. This systematic review synthesizes quantitative and qualitative research examining children's and parents' opinions on the sport-related food environment. During July 2016, a range of electronic databases of academic and grey literature were searched. Thirty-two publications (11 including children, 17 parents and 4 both) were included for review. The publications were assessed using the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity framework to categorize the sport-related food environment into the physical, sociocultural, economic and political environments. The literature available investigating children's and parents' opinions of the sport-related food environment suggests that many children and parents consider the environment neither conducive to nor supportive of children's healthy food behaviours or wider health and well-being. Both groups would likely support actions to change and improve it. This systematic review found that original research specifically investigating children's and parents' perspectives on almost all aspects of the sport-related food environment is limited. Thus, there is scope for further investigation into this important part of children's food environments. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  4. Establishing a clinical service for the management of sports-related concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Erin; Collins, Michael W; Mucha, Anne; Troutman-Ensecki, Cara

    2014-10-01

    The clinical management of sports-related concussions is a specialized area of interest with a lack of empirical findings regarding best practice approaches. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Sports Concussion Program was the first of its kind; 13 years after its inception, it remains a leader in the clinical management and research of sports-related concussions. This article outlines the essential components of a successful clinical service for the management of sports-related concussions, using the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Sports Concussion Program as a case example. Drawing on both empirical evidence and anecdotal conclusions from this high-volume clinical practice, this article provides a detailed account of the inner workings of a multidisciplinary concussion clinic with a comprehensive approach to the management of sports-related concussions. A detailed description of the evaluation process and an in-depth analysis of targeted clinical pathways and subtypes of sports-related concussions effectively set the stage for a comprehensive understanding of the assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation model used in Pittsburgh today.

  5. Objective vestibular testing of children with dizziness and balance complaints following sports-related concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangwei; Brodsky, Jacob R

    2015-06-01

    To conduct objective assessment of children with balance and vestibular complaints following sports-related concussions and identify the underlying deficits by analyzing laboratory test outcomes. Case series with chart review. Pediatric tertiary care facility. Medical records were reviewed of 42 pediatric patients with balance and/or vestibular complaints following sports-related concussions who underwent comprehensive laboratory testing on their balance and vestibular function. Patients' characteristics were summarized and results analyzed. More than 90% of the children with protracted dizziness or imbalance following sports-related concussion had at least 1 abnormal finding from the comprehensive balance and vestibular evaluation. The most frequent deficit was found in dynamic visual acuity test, followed by Sensory Organization Test and rotational test. Patient's balance problem associated with concussion seemed to be primarily instigated by vestibular dysfunction. Furthermore, semicircular canal dysfunction was involved more often than dysfunction of otolith organs. Yet, children experienced a hearing loss following sports-related concussion. Vestibular impairment is common among children with protracted dizziness or imbalance following sports-related concussion. Our study demonstrated that proper and thorough evaluation is imperative to identify these underlying deficits and laboratory tests were helpful in the diagnosis and recommendation of following rehabilitations. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  6. Consumption of sport-related dietary supplements among NCAA Division 1 female student athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housman, Jeff; Dorman, Steve; Pruitt, Buzz; Ranjita, Misra; Perko, Michael

    2011-07-01

    To determine factors that influence sport-related dietary supplement consumption among NCAA Division 1 female student athletes and to estimate the plausibility of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) for predicting the use of sport-related dietary supplements among NCAA Division 1 female student athletes. Self-report data were collected by questionnaire from 207 NCAA Division 1 female student athletes. Parameter estimates of 3 TPB-based models were calculated using Mplus software. The TPB-based models explained 64-66% and 18% of variance in behavioral intention and behavior, respectively, with subjective norm being the strongest predictor of dietary supplement consumption intention. Results support plausibility for the TPB to predict sport-related dietary supplement consumption among NCAA Division 1 female student athletes.

  7. Epidemiology of US high school sports-related fractures, 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, David M; Yard, Ellen E; Collins, Christy L; Fields, Sarah K; Comstock, R Dawn

    2010-07-01

    To describe the epidemiology of fractures among US high school athletes participating in 9 popular sports. Descriptive epidemiologic study. Sports injury data for the 2005-2009 academic years were collected using an Internet-based injury surveillance system, Reporting Information Online (RIO). A nationally representative sample of 100 US high schools. Injuries sustained as a function of sport and sex. Fracture injury rates, body site, outcome, surgery, and mechanism. Fractures (n = 568 177 nationally) accounted for 10.1% of all injuries sustained by US high school athletes. The highest rate of fractures was in football (4.61 per 10 000 athlete exposures) and the lowest in volleyball (0.52). Boys were more likely than girls to sustain a fracture in basketball (rate ratio, 1.35,; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.72) and soccer (rate ratio, 1.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.71). Overall, the most frequently fractured body sites were the hand/finger (28.3%), wrist (10.4%), and lower leg (9.3%). Fractures were the most common injury to the nose (76.9%), forearm (56.4%), hand/finger (41.7%), and wrist (41.6%). Most fractures resulted in >3 weeks' time lost (34.3%) or a medical disqualification from participation (24.2%) and were more likely to result in >3 weeks' time lost and medical disqualification than all other injuries combined. Fractures frequently required expensive medical diagnostic imaging examinations such as x-ray, computed tomographic scan, and magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, 16.1% of fractures required surgical treatment, accounting for 26.9% of all injuries requiring surgery. Illegal activity was noted in 9.3% of all fractures with the highest proportion of fractures related to illegal activity in girls' soccer (27.9%). Fractures are a major concern for US high school athletes. They can severely affect the athlete's ability to continue sports participation and can impose substantial medical costs on the injured athletes' families. Targeted

  8. Comparison of the incidence, nature and cause of injuries sustained on grass and new generation artificial turf by male and female football players. Part 2: training injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Colin W; Dick, Randall W; Corlette, Jill; Schmalz, Rosemary

    2007-08-01

    To compare the incidence, nature, severity and cause of training injuries sustained on new generation artificial turf and grass by male and female footballers. The National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System was used for a two-season (August to December) prospective study involving American college and university football teams (2005 season: men 52 teams, women 64 teams; 2006 season: men 54 teams, women 72 teams). Injury definitions and recording procedures were compliant with the international consensus statement for epidemiological studies of injuries in football. Athletic trainers recorded details of the playing surface and the location, diagnosis, severity and cause of all training injuries. The number of days lost from training and match play was used to define the severity of an injury. Training exposures (player hours) were recorded on a team basis. The overall incidence of training injuries for men was 3.34 injuries/1000 player hours on artificial turf and 3.01 on grass (incidence ratio 1.11; p = 0.21) and for women it was 2.60 injuries/1000 player hours on artificial turf and 2.79 on grass (incidence ratio 0.93; p = 0.46). For men, the mean severity of injuries that were not season ending injuries was 9.4 days (median 5) on artificial turf and 7.8 days (median 4) on grass and, for women, 10.5 days (median 4) on artificial turf and 10.0 days (median 5) on grass. Joint (non-bone)/ligament/cartilage and muscle/tendon injuries to the lower limbs were the most common general categories of injury on artificial turf and grass for both male and female players. Most training injuries were acute (men: artificial turf 2.92, grass 2.63, p = 0.24; women: artificial turf 1.94, grass 2.23, p = 0.21) and resulted from player-to-player contact (men: artificial turf 1.08, grass 0.85, p = 0.10; women: artificial turf 0.47, grass 0.56; p = 0.45). There were no major differences between the incidence, severity, nature or cause of training injuries

  9. Diffuse white matter tract abnormalities in clinically normal ageing retired athletes with a history of sports-related concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Sebastien; Henry, Luke C; Bedetti, Christophe; Larson-Dupuis, Camille; Gagnon, Jean-François; Evans, Alan C; Théoret, Hugo; Lassonde, Maryse; De Beaumont, Louis

    2014-11-01

    Sports-related concussions have been shown to lead to persistent subclinical anomalies of the motor and cognitive systems in young asymptomatic athletes. In advancing age, these latent alterations correlate with detectable motor and cognitive function decline. Until now, the interacting effects of concussions and the normal ageing process on white matter tract integrity remain unknown. Here we used a tract-based spatial statistical method to uncover potential white matter tissue damage in 15 retired athletes with a history of concussions, free of comorbid medical conditions. We also investigated potential associations between white matter integrity and declines in cognitive and motor functions. Compared to an age- and education-matched control group of 15 retired athletes without concussions, former athletes with concussions exhibited widespread white matter anomalies along many major association, interhemispheric, and projection tracts. Group contrasts revealed decreases in fractional anisotropy, as well as increases in mean and radial diffusivity measures in the concussed group. These differences were primarily apparent in fronto-parietal networks as well as in the frontal aspect of the corpus callosum. The white matter anomalies uncovered in concussed athletes were significantly associated with a decline in episodic memory and lateral ventricle expansion. Finally, the expected association between frontal white matter integrity and motor learning found in former non-concussed athletes was absent in concussed participants. Together, these results show that advancing age in retired athletes presenting with a history of sports-related concussions is linked to diffuse white matter abnormalities that are consistent with the effects of traumatic axonal injury and exacerbated demyelination. These changes in white matter integrity might explain the cognitive and motor function declines documented in this population. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University

  10. Ankle injuries among United States high school sports athletes, 2005-2006

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Alex J; Collins, Christy L; Yard, Ellen E; Fields, Sarah K; Comstock, R Dawn

    2007-01-01

    Ankle injuries are the most common sport-related injuries. To date, no studies have been published that use national data to present a cross-sport, cross-sex analysis of ankle injuries among US high school athletes...

  11. Comparison of the incidence, nature and cause of injuries sustained on grass and new generation artificial turf by male and female football players. Part 1: match injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Colin W; Dick, Randall W; Corlette, Jill; Schmalz, Rosemary

    2007-08-01

    To compare the incidence, nature, severity and cause of match injuries sustained on grass and new generation artificial turf by male and female footballers. The National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System was used for a two-season (August to December) prospective study of American college and university football teams (2005 season: men 52 teams, women 64 teams; 2006 season: men 54 teams, women 72 teams). Injury definitions and recording procedures were compliant with the international consensus statement for epidemiological studies of injuries in football. Athletic trainers recorded details of the playing surface and the location, diagnosis, severity and cause of all match injuries. The number of days lost from training and match play was used to define the severity of an injury. Match exposures (player hours) were recorded on a team basis. The overall incidence of match injuries for men was 25.43 injuries/1000 player hours on artificial turf and 23.92 on grass (incidence ratio 1.06; p = 0.46) and for women was 19.15 injuries/1000 player hours on artificial turf and 21.79 on grass (incidence ratio = 0.88; p = 0.16). For men, the mean severity of non-season ending injuries was 7.1 days (median 5) on artificial turf and 8.4 days (median 5) on grass and, for women, 11.2 days (median 5) on artificial turf and 8.9 days (median 5) on grass. Joint (non-bone)/ligament/cartilage and contusion injuries to the lower limbs were the most common general categories of match injury on artificial turf and grass for both male and female players. Most injuries were acute (men: artificial turf 24.60, grass 22.91; p = 0.40; women: artificial turf 18.29, grass 20.64; p = 0.21) and resulted from player-to-player contact (men: artificial turf 14.73, grass 13.34; p = 0.37; women: artificial turf 10.72; grass 11.68; p = 0.50). There were no major differences in the incidence, severity, nature or cause of match injuries sustained on new generation artificial turf and

  12. Urinary Neutrophil Gelatinase–Associated Lipocalin (NGAL Distinguishes Sustained From Transient Acute Kidney Injury After General Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Au

    2016-05-01

    Discussion: Urinary NGAL levels measured 2 to 3 hours after surgery were able to distinguish the kinetics of creatinine (sustained AKI vs. transient AKI over the subsequent week. Transient AKI is an easily reversible state that is likely not associated with substantial tubular injury and therefore NGAL release. Using AKIN criteria, both transient and sustained AKI are classified as AKI even though our data demonstrate that they are possibly different entities.

  13. Impact of Sport-related Games on High School Students’ Communication Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozturk Ozden Tepekoylu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Recent studies underline the fact that adolescents are, at many times, likely to experience serious communication problems with their families and close environments. So, the aim of this study is to determine positive impact of sport-related games, which are performed as extracurricular activities, on high school students’ communication skills. In the study, pre, & post-tests was utilized with the control group’s experimental patterns. Two participant groups were made up of totally 30 high school students, 15 of whom would be in the experimental group and the rest of whom were in the control group. The former group was given sport- related 20 applications for 10 weeks during which the latter group would not deal with any extracurricular activities. Meanwhile, before and after the applications, data was collected by means of “The Communication Skills Scale” which was developed by Korkut (1996 and then analysed through “two-way ANCOVA” test techniques. Results clarify that the considerable gap in scores of the students’ pre, & post-tests perception concerning their communication skills are clearly attributed to sport-related games and it was also established that scores of the students in the experimental group were meaningfully higher than ones in the control group. However, perception of communication skills in the both groups was not significantly different by sex of the students. Moreover, the common effect of sex and participation on sport- related games was not found statistically meaningful in terms of communication skills. Consequently, it could be said that sport-related games impact positively communication skills.

  14. Sticks and stones may break my bones: work-related orthopaedic injuries sustained during obstetrics and gynaecology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoong, W; Sanchez-Crespo, J; Rob, J; Parikh, M; Melendez, J; Pillai, R; Opriou, D

    2008-07-01

    Backache is a common cause of morbidity among doctors and 50% of the obstetricians and gynaecologists suffering from this attribute it to work practice and posture. Occupational injuries remain poorly studied among obstetricians and gynaecologists and we have therefore tried to assess the extent and demographics of work-related injuries sustained during training by sending an eight-item questionnaire to 418 Registrar grade trainees in the London area. A low 23.2% response rate (97/418) was obtained, despite second questionnaires being sent to initial non-responders. Out of the 97 responders, 28 (28.7%) had suffered injuries at work at least once throughout their career. There was female preponderance in those reporting injuries, with a female to male ratio of 3:1. Of the 28 positive responders, 11 were UK graduates, 7 EU and the remaining 10 from Colombia, West Indies, India and Sudan. The mean age was 32.5 +/- 4.2 years, with 21 of the 28 (75%) being senior trainees (post-MRCOG). The injuries reported were: forearm (4); wrist (7); thumb (3); hands (1) shoulder and neck (9), ankle (1) and lower back (6). Of these, 18 sought medical help and received treatment for these injuries, which included long-term physiotherapy, although no-one required surgery. Eight were forced to take time off work, with a cumulative total of 80 days; one had to prolong her training by 3 months. Seven trainees sustained their injuries (e.g. ligamentous strain of wrist and scaphoid fracture) while performing caesarean sections, while forceps deliveries were the cause of six occupational injuries (e.g. ligamentous strain of sacroiliac joint). Work-related injuries can have adverse effects on training and workforce. Awareness of correct surgical techniques and adoption of ergonomic posture when performing procedures may help to minimise the risk of a work-related injury.

  15. Athletes' age, sex, and years of education moderate the acute neuropsychological impact of sports-related concussion: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougan, Brooke K; Horswill, Mark S; Geffen, Gina M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine which pre-existing athlete characteristics, if any, are associated with greater deficits in functioning following sports-related concussion, after controlling for factors previously shown to moderate this effect (e.g., time since injury). Ninety-one independent samples of concussion were included in a fixed+systematic effects meta-analysis (n = 3,801 concussed athletes; 5,631 controls). Moderating variables were assessed using analogue-to-ANOVA and meta-regression analyses. Post-injury assessments first conducted 1-10 days following sports-related concussion revealed significant neuropsychological dysfunction, postural instability and post-concussion symptom reporting (d = -0.54, -1.10, and -1.14, respectively). During this interval, females (d = -0.87), adolescent athletes competing in high school competitions (d = -0.60), and those with 10 years of education (d = -1.32) demonstrated larger post-concussion neuropsychological deficits than males (d = -0.42), adults (d = -0.25), athletes competing at other levels of competition (d = -0.43 to -0.41), or those with 16 years of education (d = -0.15), respectively. However, these sub-groups' differential impairment/recovery beyond 10 days could not be reliably quantified from available literature. Pre-existing athlete characteristics, particularly age, sex and education, were demonstrated to be significant modifiers of neuropsychological outcomes within 10 days of a sports-related concussion. Implications for return-to-play decision-making and future research directions are discussed.

  16. Characteristics of upper extremity injuries sustained by falling during snowboarding: a study of 1918 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Koun; Wakahara, Kazuhiko; Fukuta, Masashi; Matsumoto, Kazu; Sumi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Katsuji; Miyamoto, Kei

    2010-07-01

    Little epidemiological research on characteristics of upper extremity injuries resulting from snowboarding has been conducted, particularly in relation to snowboarding stance, falling direction, and the side of the body where the injury occurs. Snowboarding stance and the direction of the fall may influence the frequency of the side or the location of the upper extremity injury. Descriptive epidemiology study. This study analyzed the information obtained from 1918 patients with fractures or dislocations of the upper extremity (excluding the fingers and scapula) sustained during snowboarding/sliding between 2000 and 2008. Diagnosis, injured part and side, stance (regular or goofy), and falling directions were prospectively analyzed. Associations among these parameters were also analyzed. As characterized by skill level, patients were beginners (57.9%), intermediates (38.0%), and experts (4.0%). Eighty-eight percent had not received instruction from licensed instructors. Diagnoses included wrist fractures (53.7%), upper arm fractures (16.8%), shoulder dislocations (11.5%), and elbow dislocations (9.8%). In sum, 1742 (90.8%) patients were in regular stance when they fell, whereas 176 (9.2%) were in goofy stance. There was a significant difference in the prevalence of the injured side between the 2 stances. When the injured sides were classified according to the sliding direction, wrist fractures (61.7%) occurred on the side opposite the sliding direction, whereas shoulder dislocations (65.6%), upper arm fractures (82.9%), and elbow dislocations (79.8%) occurred on the same side as the sliding direction. When the injured sides were classified according to the falling direction, wrist fractures (68.1%) and elbow dislocations (63.5%) occurred because of backward falls, and shoulder dislocations (68.9%) and upper arm fractures (60.7%) occurred because of forward falls. Two snowboarding stances as well as 2 falling directions had a significant influence on the frequency of

  17. Analysis of sports related mTBI injuries caused by elastic wave propagation through brain tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Case, D.; Richer, E.

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive concussions and sub-concussions suffered by athletes have been linked to a series of sequelae ranging from traumatic encephalopathy to dementia pugilistica. A detailed finite element model of the human head was developed based on standard libraries of medical imaging. The model includes realistic material properties for the brain tissue, bone, soft tissue, and CSF, as well as the structure and properties of a protective helmet. Various impact scenarios were studied, with a focus on...

  18. Analysis of pelvic fracture pattern and overall orthopaedic injury burden in children sustaining pelvic fractures based on skeletal maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaath, M K; Koury, K L; Gibson, P D; Lelkes, V M; Hwang, J S; Ippolito, J A; Adams, M R; Sirkin, M S; Reilly, M C

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to review pelvic fractures and concomitant orthopaedic injuries in children who have a patent triradiate cartilage (TRO) compared with children whose triradiate cartilage has closed (TRC). We hypothesise that these injuries will differ, leading to correlated alterations in management. Using a database, we retrospectively reviewed patients aged below 18 years with pelvic fractures presenting to our Level 1 trauma center. Radiographs and CT scans were reviewed to identify orthopaedic injuries and categorise pelvic injuries using the modified Torode classification between the two groups. A total of 178 patients met inclusion criteria (60 TRO and 118 TRC). Mean age ± SD for TRO and TRC groups were 8 ± 4 years and 16 ± 2 years, respectively. TRO patients were more likely to present as a pedestrian struck by a vehicle (odds ratio (OR) 6.0; p < 0.001) and less likely to present after a motor vehicle collision (OR 0.2; p < 0.001). TRO patients were more likely to sustain rami fractures (OR 2.1; p = 0.020) and Torode IIIA injuries (OR 3.6; p < 0.001). They were less likely to sustain acetabular fractures (OR 0.5; p = 0.042), sacral fractures (OR 0.4; p = 0.009), hip dislocations (p = 0.002) and Torode IV injuries (OR 0.4; p = 0.004). TRO patients were less likely to be treated operatively for their pelvic (OR 0.3; p = 0.013) and orthopaedic injuries (OR 0.4; p = 0.006). We suggest that patients with open triradiate cartilage are unique. Their pelvic injuries may be treated more conservatively as they have a greater potential for periosteal healing and bone remodelling. Patients with closed triradiate cartilage should be treated similarly to adults, as they share a similar mechanism of injury and need for operative fixation.

  19. Characteristics of the injuries of Syrian refugees sustained during the civil war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocamer Şimşek, Betül; Dokur, Mehmet; Uysal, Erdal; Çalıker, Necdet; Gökçe, Oruç Numan; Deniz, İbrahim Kürşat; Uğur, Murat; Geyik, Murat; Kaya, Mehmet; Dağlı, Güner

    2017-05-01

    the most widely seen among civilians brought to Turkey because of gunshot injuries sustained during the Civil War in Syria. The number of emergency operations performed in the study sample was high, and critical care follow-up durations were long. In addition, the NISS and ASA scores of mortal cases were fairly high.

  20. Chest injuries associated with earthquakes: an analysis of injuries sustained during the 2008 Wen-Chuan earthquake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jia; Guo, Ying-Qiang; Zhang, Er-Yong; Tan, Jin; Shi, Ying-Kang

    2010-08-01

    The goal of this study was to analyze the patterns, therapeutic modalities, and short-term outcomes of patients with chest injuries in the aftermath of the Wen-Chuan earthquake, which occurred on May 12, 2008 and registered 8.0 on the Richter scale. Of the 1522 patients who were referred to the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from May 12 to May 27, 169 patients (11.1%) had suffered major chest injuries. The type of injury, the presence of infection, Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS 2005), New Injury Severity Score (NISS), treatment, and short-term outcome were all documented for each case. Isolated chest injuries were diagnosed in 129 patients (76.3%), while multiple injuries with a major chest trauma were diagnosed in 40 patients (23.7%). The mean AIS and the median NISS of the hospitalized patients with chest injuries were 2.5 and 13, respectively. The mortality rate was 3.0% (5 patients). Most of the chest injuries were classified as minor to moderate trauma; however, coexistent multiple injuries and subsequent infection should be carefully considered in medical response strategies. Coordinated efforts among emergency medical support groups and prior training in earthquake preparedness and rescue in earthquake-prone areas are therefore necessary for efficient evacuation and treatment of catastrophic casualties.

  1. Sport-related domestic violence : exploring the complex relationship between sporting events and domestic violence

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Damien John; Neville, Fergus Gilmour

    2014-01-01

    The link between sport and violence is widely acknowledged. While the focus has been on “player violence” and “crowd violence” it is recognised that a variety of other incidents of sports-related violence exist, including domestic violence. Empirical and anecdotal evidence point toward increased rates of domestic violence among male athletes. Moreover, there is evidence that domestic violence also increases around sporting events in wider society; however, the evidence is at times contradicto...

  2. Do family physicians, emergency department physicians, and pediatricians give consistent sport-related concussion management advice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Jacqueline; Carson, James D; Garel, Alisha; Libfeld, Paula; Snow, Catherine L; Law, Marcus; Frémont, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    To identify differences and gaps in recommendations to patients for the management of sport-related concussion among FPs, emergency department physicians (EDPs), and pediatricians. A self-administered, multiple-choice survey was e-mailed to FPs, EDPs, and pediatricians. The survey had been assessed for content validity. Two community teaching hospitals in the greater Toronto area in Ontario. Two hundred seventy physicians, including FPs, EDPs, and pediatricians, were invited to participate. Identification of sources of concussion management information, usefulness of concussion diagnosis strategies, and whether physicians use common terminology when explaining cognitive rest strategies to patients after sport-related concussions. The response rate was 43.7%. Surveys were completed by 70 FPs, 23 EDPs, and 11 pediatricians. In total, 49% of FP, 52% of EDP, and 27% of pediatrician respondents reported no knowledge of any consensus statements on concussion in sport, and 54% of FPs, 86% of EDPs, and 78% of pediatricians never used the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool, version 2. Only 49% of FPs, 57% of EDPs, and 36% of pediatricians always advised cognitive rest. This study identified large gaps in the knowledge of concussion guidelines and implementation of recommendations for treating patients with sport-related concussions. Although some physicians recommended physical and cognitive rest, a large proportion failed to consistently advise this strategy. Better knowledge transfer efforts should target all 3 groups of physicians. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  3. Concussion Increases Odds of Sustaining a Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Injury After Return to Play Among Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, M Alison; Peterson, Kaitlin; Biese, Kevin; Sanfilippo, Jennifer; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Bell, David R

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have identified abnormalities in brain and motor functioning after concussion that persist well beyond observed clinical recovery. Recent work suggests subtle deficits in neurocognition may impair neuromuscular control and thus potentially increase risk of lower extremity musculoskeletal injury after concussion. To determine the odds of sustaining an acute lower extremity musculoskeletal injury during the 90-day period after return to play from concussion in a cohort of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I collegiate athletes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Included in this study were 87 cases of concussion among 75 athletes (58 men; 17 women) participating in NCAA Division I football, soccer, hockey, softball, basketball, wrestling, or volleyball at a single institution from 2011 to 2014. The 90-day period after return to play for each case of concussion was reviewed for acute noncontact lower extremity musculoskeletal injury. Each 90-day period after return to play was matched to the same 90-day period in up to 3 controls. Control athletes without a history of concussion in the previous year were matched to concussed athletes by sport team/sex, games played, and position. A total of 182 control (136 men; 46 women) 90-day periods were reviewed for acute injury. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess the association between concussion and subsequent risk of acute lower extremity musculoskeletal injury. The incidence of acute lower extremity musculoskeletal injury was higher among recently concussed athletes (15/87; 17%) compared with matched controls (17/182; 9%). The odds of sustaining an acute lower extremity musculoskeletal injury during the 90-day period after return to play were 2.48 times higher in concussed athletes than controls during the same 90-day period (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.04-5.91; P = .04). Concussed athletes have increased odds of sustaining an acute lower extremity musculoskeletal

  4. Characterization of spinal injuries sustained by American service members killed in Iraq and Afghanistan: a study of 2,089 instances of spine trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Newcomb, Ronald L; Pallis, Mark P; Cleveland, Andrew W; Serrano, Jose A; Bader, Julia O; Waterman, Brian R; Belmont, Philip J

    2013-04-01

    This study sought to characterize spine injuries among soldiers killed in Iraq or Afghanistan whose autopsy results were stored by the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System. The Armed Forces Medical Examiner System data set was queried to identify American military personnel who sustained a spine injury in conjunction with wounds that resulted in death during deployment in Iraq or Afghanistan from 2003 to 2011. Demographic and injury-specific characteristics were abstracted for each individual identified. The raw incidence of spinal injuries was calculated and correlations were drawn between the presence of spinal trauma and military specialty, mechanism and manner of injury, and wounds in other body regions. Significant associations were also sought for specific injury patterns, including spinal cord injury, atlantooccipital injury, low lumbar vertebral fractures, and lumbosacral dissociation. Statistical calculations were performed using χ statistic, z test, t test with Satterthwaite correction, and multivariate logistic regression. Among 5,424 deceased service members, 2,089 (38.5%) were found to have sustained at least one spinal injury. Sixty-seven percent of all fatalities with spinal injury were caused by explosion, while 15% occurred by gunshot. Spinal fracture was the most common type of injury (n = 2,328), while spinal dislocations occurred in 378, and vertebral column transection occurred in 223. Fifty-two percent sustained at least one cervical spine injury, and spinal cord injury occurred in 40%. Spinal cord injuries were more likely to occur as a result of gunshot (p injuries (p spinal injury risk and the periods 2003 to 2007 and 2008 to 2011, although atlantooccipital injuries and spinal cord injury were significantly reduced beginning in 2008 (p spinal trauma in modern warfare seems to be higher than previously reported. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  5. EEG indices correlate with sustained attention performance in patients affected by diffuse axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelli, Stefania; Barbieri, Riccardo; Reni, Gianluigi; Zucca, Claudio; Bianchi, Anna Maria

    2017-11-09

    The aim of this study is to assess the ability of EEG-based indices in providing relevant information about cognitive engagement level during the execution of a clinical sustained attention (SA) test in healthy volunteers and DAI (diffused axonal injury)-affected patients. We computed three continuous power-based engagement indices (P β /P α , 1/P α , and P β / (P α + P θ )) from EEG recordings in a control group (n = 7) and seven DAI-affected patients executing a 10-min Conners' "not-X" continuous performance test (CPT). A correlation analysis was performed in order to investigate the existence of relations between the EEG metrics and behavioral parameters in both the populations. P β /P α and 1/P α indices were found to be correlated with reaction times in both groups while P β / (P α + P θ ) and P β /P α also correlated with the errors rate for DAI patients. In line with previous studies, time course fluctuations revealed a first strong decrease of attention after 2 min from the beginning of the test and a final fading at the end. Our results provide evidence that EEG-derived indices extraction and evaluation during SA tasks are helpful in the assessment of attention level in healthy subjects and DAI patients, offering motivations for including EEG monitoring in cognitive rehabilitation practice. Graphical abstract Three EEG-derived indices were computed from four electrodes montages in a population of seven healthy volunteers and a group of seven DAI-affected patients. Results show a significant correlation between the time course of the indices and behavioral parameters, thus demonstrating their usefulness in monitoring mental engagement level during a sustained attention task.

  6. Sport-related achievement motivation and alcohol outcomes: an athlete-specific risk factor among intercollegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Cameron C; Martens, Matthew P; Cadigan, Jennifer M; Takamatsu, Stephanie K; Treloar, Hayley R; Pedersen, Eric R

    2013-12-01

    Intercollegiate athletes report greater alcohol consumption and more alcohol-related problems than their non-athlete peers. Although college athletes share many of the same problems faced by non-athletes, there are some consequences that are unique to athletes. Studies have demonstrated that alcohol negatively affects athletic performance including increased dehydration, impeded muscle recovery, and increased risk for injury. Beyond risk factors for alcohol misuse that may affect college students in general, research has begun to examine risk factors that are unique to collegiate athletes. For example, research has found that off-season status, the leadership role, and athlete-specific drinking motives are associated with increased alcohol use. Given these findings, it is possible that other athlete-specific variables influence alcohol misuse. One such variable may be sport achievement orientation. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between sport achievement orientation and alcohol outcomes. Given previous research regarding seasonal status and gender, these variables were examined as moderators. Varsity athletes (n=263) completed the Sport Orientation Questionnaire, which assesses sport-related achievement orientation on three scales (Competitiveness, Win Orientation, and Goal Orientation). In addition, participants completed measures of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. Results indicated that Competitiveness, Win Orientation, and Goal Orientation were all significantly associated with alcohol use, but not alcohol-related problems. Moreover, these relationships were moderated by seasonal status and gender. These interactions, clinical implications, and limitations are discussed. © 2013.

  7. Delayed Presentation of Isolated Complete Pancreatic Transection as a Result of Sport-Related Blunt Trauma to the Abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Healey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blunt abdominal trauma is a rare but well-recognized cause of pancreatic transection. A delayed presentation of pancreatic fracture following sport-related blunt trauma with the coexisting diagnostic pitfalls is presented. Case Report: A 17-year-old rugby player was referred to our specialist unit after having been diagnosed with traumatic pancreatic transection, having presented 24 h after a sporting injury. Despite haemodynamic stability, at laparotomy he was found to have a diffuse mesenteric hematoma involving the large and small bowel mesentery, extending down to the sigmoid colon from the splenic flexure, and a large retroperitoneal hematoma arising from the pancreas. The pancreas was completely severed with the superior border of the distal segment remaining attached to the splenic vein that was intact. A distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation and evacuation of the retroperitoneal hematoma was performed. Discussion/Conclusion: Blunt pancreatic trauma is a serious condition. Diagnosis and treatment may often be delayed, which in turn may drastically increase morbidity and mortality. Diagnostic difficulties apply to both paraclinical and radiological diagnostic methods. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in such cases, with a multi-modality diagnostic approach and prompt surgical intervention as required.

  8. Sport-Related Achievement Motivation and Alcohol Outcomes: An Athlete-Specific Risk Factor among Intercollegiate Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Cameron C.; Martens, Matthew P.; Cadigan, Jennifer M.; Takamatsu, Stephanie K.; Treloar, Hayley R.; Pedersen, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Intercollegiate athletes report greater alcohol consumption and more alcohol-related problems than their non-athlete peers. Although college athletes share many of the same problems faced by non-athletes, there are some consequences that are unique to athletes. Studies have demonstrated that alcohol negatively affects athletic performance including increased dehydration, impeded muscle recovery, and increased risk for injury. Beyond risk factors for alcohol misuse that may affect college students in general, research has begun to examine risk factors that are unique to collegiate athletes. For example, research has found that off-season status, the leadership role, and athlete-specific drinking motives are associated with increased alcohol use. Given these findings, it is possible that other athlete-specific variables influence alcohol misuse. One such variable may be sport achievement orientation. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between sport achievement orientation and alcohol outcomes. Given previous research regarding seasonal status and gender, these variables were examined as moderators. Varsity athletes (n = 263) completed the Sport Orientation Questionnaire, which assesses sport-related achievement orientation on three scales (Competitiveness, Win Orientation, and Goal Orientation). In addition, participants completed measures of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. Results indicated that Competitiveness, Win Orientation, and Goal Orientation were all significantly associated with alcohol use, but not alcohol-related problems. Moreover, these relationships were moderated by seasonal status and gender. These interactions, clinical implications, and limitations are discussed. PMID:24064192

  9. Rehabilitation interventions after mild head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie

    2005-12-01

    This review examines current management and rehabilitation strategies for mild traumatic brain injury, with emphasis on the need to address multiple potential causative factors in order to enhance outcomes and to conduct more controlled efficacy studies. Whilst most individuals who sustain mild traumatic brain injury make a good recovery, a proportion experience significant ongoing disability. In some cases this is due to diffuse axonal injury and cognitive impairment, but in others symptoms are exacerbated by factors such as pain, stress, personality issues or litigation, or in children, previous head injury, behavioural or learning difficulties. Provision of information early after injury results in reduced symptom reporting in adults and children. There is also a need, however, to address these other factors in treatment. Psychological therapy using a cognitive behavioural approach may be helpful, but controlled evaluations of such interventions have been lacking. Recent uncontrolled studies have examined the impact of computer-mediated interventions to remediate visual and verbal processing and oculomotor problems and the impact of quantitative electroencephalography. More rigorous efficacy studies of these approaches are needed. Guidelines for management of sports-related concussion and timing of return to play also require a more solid scientific basis. The evidence base for management of mild traumatic brain injury is still very limited. There is a need to conduct more carefully controlled prospective studies and examine the influence of factors not directly related to the brain injury as a basis for formulating more uniform management guidelines.

  10. An evaluation of Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) athletes' self-reported practice of playing while concussed, knowledge about and attitudes towards sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lindsay; Thomas, Audrey Alforque; Molcho, Michal

    2016-01-20

    Sports-related concussions are now recognized as a major public health concern. However, despite the association of concussion with short- and long-term health consequences, many young athletes still lack basic knowledge about concussion and seem to believe that concussions may be "toughed out" and do not require medical attention. This study assessed self-reported practice of playing in training or a match while concussed among Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) athletes in Ireland aged 13-25 years old (M=19.19, SD=3.54). This study also assessed knowledge about and attitudes towards sports-related concussion in GAA players in Ireland. Using a self-report questionnaire, data were captured electronically on GAA athletes aged 13-25 years old (n=80) regarding knowledge about the detection, assessment and management of sports-related concussion, as well as participant's attitudes towards concussion and self-reported practice of playing in training or a match while concussed. Data were collected from June to August 2013. This study revealed that approximately one in four athletes reported having played while concussed in practice or during a match. Males were significantly more likely to play while concussed than females (40.9% and 17.2%, respectively). Results from this study indicated participants lack a complete understanding of concussion, as common misconceptions about concussion prevailed. Analyses revealed that participants generally have safe attitudes towards concussion and concussion management. Generating awareness of the potential short- and long-term health consequences of concussion, coupled with the promotion of safer attitudes towards this injury, could minimize the number of players who return-to-play pre-maturely and promote a more safety-conscious sports culture in Ireland.

  11. Initial and sustained brain responses to threat anticipation in blood-injection-injury phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Brinkmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-injection-injury (BII phobia differs from other subtypes of specific phobia in that it is associated with elevated disgust-sensitivity as well as specific autonomic and brain responses during processing of phobia-relevant stimuli. To what extent these features play a role already during threat anticipation is unclear. In the current fMRI experiment, 16 female BII phobics and 16 female healthy controls anticipated the presentation of phobia-specific and neutral pictures. On the behavioral level, anxiety dominated the anticipatory period in BII phobics relative to controls, while both anxiety and disgust were elevated during picture presentation. By applying two different models for the analysis of brain responses to anticipation of phobia-specific versus neutral stimuli, we found initial and sustained increases of activation in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, insula, lateral and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC, thalamus and visual areas, as well as initial activation in the amygdala for BII phobics as compared to healthy controls. These results suggest that BII phobia is characterized by activation of a typical neural defense network during threat anticipation, with anxiety as the predominant emotion.

  12. Initial and sustained brain responses to threat anticipation in blood-injection-injury phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Leonie; Poller, Hendrik; Herrmann, Martin J; Miltner, Wolfgang; Straube, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Blood-injection-injury (BII) phobia differs from other subtypes of specific phobia in that it is associated with elevated disgust-sensitivity as well as specific autonomic and brain responses during processing of phobia-relevant stimuli. To what extent these features play a role already during threat anticipation is unclear. In the current fMRI experiment, 16 female BII phobics and 16 female healthy controls anticipated the presentation of phobia-specific and neutral pictures. On the behavioral level, anxiety dominated the anticipatory period in BII phobics relative to controls, while both anxiety and disgust were elevated during picture presentation. By applying two different models for the analysis of brain responses to anticipation of phobia-specific versus neutral stimuli, we found initial and sustained increases of activation in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), insula, lateral and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), thalamus and visual areas, as well as initial activation in the amygdala for BII phobics as compared to healthy controls. These results suggest that BII phobia is characterized by activation of a typical neural defense network during threat anticipation, with anxiety as the predominant emotion.

  13. Management of acute lateral ankle ligament injury in the athlete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; McCollum, Graham A.; Calder, James D. F.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2013-01-01

    Inversion injuries involve about 25 % of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and about 50 % of these injuries are sport-related. This article reviews the acute lateral ankle injuries with special emphasis on a rationale for treatment of these injuries in athletes. A narrative review was

  14. A computational study of injury severity and pattern sustained by overweight drivers in frontal motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Il Hwan; Shum, Phillip C; Shih, Alan M; Pintar, Frank; Shen, Wei; Ma, Xiaoguang; Laud, Purushottam W; Heymsfield, Steven B; Allison, David B; Zhu, Shankuan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the role of body mass and subcutaneous fat in injury severity and pattern sustained by overweight drivers. Finite element models were created to represent the geometry and properties of subcutaneous adipose tissue in the torso with data obtained from reconstructed magnetic resonance imaging data-sets. The torso adipose tissue models were then integrated into the standard multibody dummy models together with increased inertial parameters and sizes of the limbs to represent overweight occupants. Frontal crash simulations were carried out considering a variety of occupant restraint systems and regional body injuries were measured. The results revealed that differences in body mass and fat distribution have an impact on injury severity and pattern. Even though the torso adipose tissue of overweight subjects contributed to reduce abdominal injury, the momentum effect of a greater body mass of overweight subjects was more dominant over the cushion effect of the adipose tissue, increasing risk of other regional body injuries except abdomen. Through statistical analysis of the results, strong correlations (p risks (p < 0.001) of head, thorax and lower extremity injury than observed in non-overweight males. The findings have important implications for improving the vehicle and occupant safety systems designed for the increasing global obese population.

  15. Resistance Training in Youth: Laying the Foundation for Injury Prevention and Physical Literacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zwolski, Christin; Quatman-Yates, Catherine; Paterno, Mark V

    2017-01-01

    Context: The rising incidence of physical activity– and sports-related injuries has prompted the present-day investigation of resistance training as a potential means of injury prevention and physical literacy development among youth...

  16. Cranial nerve IX and X impairment after a sports-related Jefferson (C1) fracture in a 16-year-old male: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettling, Samuel D; Morscher, Melanie A; Masin, Jeffrey S; Adamczyk, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Jefferson (C1) fractures are rare cervical spine injuries that usually do not result in cranial nerve (CN) impairment. However, case reports of Collet-Sicard syndrome (impairment of CNs IX-XII) and impairment of CNs IX, X, and XII have been reported. All reported cases involved adult patients in high-impact collisions, such as motor vehicle accidents or falls. To our knowledge, a Jefferson fracture with selective CN impairment due to a low-energy, sports-related injury in a pediatric patient has not been reported. Chart and radiographic data for a single case were reviewed and reported in a retrospective study approved by the Institutional Review Board of the participating hospital. A 16-year-old male was diagnosed with a Jefferson fracture after a head-to-chest football collision. On computed tomography, the distance between the atlas transverse process and styloid process of the skull was 5 mm right and 10 mm left. Before halo fixation, the patient had vague complaints of dysphagia. These complaints worsened which led to the diagnosis of CN IX and X impairment and placement of a feeding tube. The fracture healed uneventfully, the dysphagia symptoms resolved, and the halo fixation and feeding tube were removed. The patient returned to all activities, but was instructed to avoid participation in contact sports. This was the first report of selective CN impairment in a pediatric patient with a Jefferson fracture resulting from a low-impact sports-related injury. Careful monitoring of the patient complaints led to appropriate treatment. Further studies into the spatial relationship between the transverse process of the atlas in relation to the styloid process of the skull may be warranted. Level V, case report.

  17. Modern pain neuroscience in clinical practice: applied to post-cancer, paediatric and sports-related pain

    OpenAIRE

    Malfliet, Anneleen; Leysen, Laurence; Pas, Roselien; Kuppens, Kevin; Nijs, Jo; van Wilgen, Paul; Huysmans, Eva; Goudman, Lisa; Ickmans, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Highlights ? Generalized hypersensitivity in post-cancer, sports-related and pediatric pain. ? Rationale for pain education, stress management and cognition targeted exercises. ? Need to change from a biomedical or psychosocial to an integrated approach.

  18. Rehabilitation of basketball injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard A; Chimes, Gary P

    2006-08-01

    Basketball is one of the most popular sports in the United States and throughout the world, and therefore represents one of the most common sources of sports-related injuries. Basketball injuries should be managed by the same general rehabilitation principles as other sports injuries. Additionally, the clinician should be aware not only of general sports injuries but of those injuries most commonly seen in basketball players. By maintaining knowledge of the most common basketball injuries as well as their diagnosis and treatment, the clinician can help to optimize the athlete's return to play and enjoyment of the sport.

  19. Does Acupressure Hit the Mark? A Three-Arm Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Acupressure for Pain and Anxiety Relief in Athletes With Acute Musculoskeletal Sports Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mącznik, Aleksandra K; Schneiders, Anthony G; Athens, Josie; Sullivan, S John

    2017-07-01

    Injuries are a common consequence of sports and recreational activity. The optimal management of symptoms is a crucial element of sports injury management. Acupressure has previously been shown to effectively decrease symptoms of musculoskeletal injury, thus may be considered a potentially useful intervention in the management of sport-related injuries. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of acupressure in decreasing pain and anxiety in acutely injured athletes. A prospective 3-arm randomized placebo-controlled trial. A sports injury clinic, Dunedin, New Zealand. Seventy-nine athletes who sustained a sport-related musculoskeletal injury on the day. Three minutes of either acupressure, sham acupressure, or no acupressure. The primary outcomes of pain and anxiety intensity were measured before and immediately after the intervention on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Pain and anxiety relief, satisfaction with treatment, willingness to repeat a similar treatment, and belief in the effect of acupressure were secondary outcomes measured on Likert scales after the intervention. The acupressure group reported 11 mm less pain (95% CI: 5-17) on average than the sham acupressure group, and 9 mm less (95% CI: 3-16) than the control group as a result of the intervention (P sports injury when measured on the VAS, but did not change anxiety levels.

  20. The relevance of sport-related behaviour patterns in the family for the sport participation of youth in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Hayoz, Christelle Vanessa; Klostermann, Claudia; Schlesinger, Torsten; Nagel, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Despite various efforts to promote sport participation among youth, social inequalities still exist. An explanation for these social inequalities could be traced back to transgenerational transmission of sport-related values and behaviour patterns in a family (Baur, 1989). Therefore, children’s socialisation to sport is strongly influenced by the parents’ sport-related values and sport behaviour (Burrmann, 2005). However, findings of previous studies are inconsistent, and the daily sport-rela...

  1. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF KNEE INJURIES AMONG US HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES, 2005/06–2010/11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, David M.; Collins, Christy L.; Best, Thomas M.; Flanigan, David C.; Fields, Sarah K.; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Purpose US high school athletes sustain millions of injuries annually. Detailed patterns of knee injuries, among the most costly sports injuries, remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that patterns of knee injuries in US high school sports differ by sport and gender. Methods US High school sports-related injury data were collected for 20 sports using the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System, High School RIO™. Knee injury rates, rate ratios, and injury proportion ratios were calculated. Results From 2005/06–2010/11, 5,116 knee injuries occurred during 17,172,376 athlete exposures (AEs) for an overall rate of 2.98 knee injuries per 10,000 AEs. Knee injuries were more common in competition than practice (RR 3.53, 95% CI 3.34–3.73). Football had the highest knee injury rate (6.29 per 10,000 AEs) followed by girls’ soccer (4.53) and girls’ gymnastics (4.23). Girls had significantly higher knee injury rates than boys in gender-comparable sports (soccer, volleyball, basketball, baseball/softball, lacrosse, swimming and diving, and track and field) (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.39–1.65). The most commonly involved structure was the MCL (reported in 36.1% of knee injuries), followed by the patella/patellar tendon (29.5%), ACL (25.4%), meniscus (23.0%), LCL (7.9%), and PCL (2.4%). Girls were significantly more likely to sustain ACL injuries in gender-comparable sports (RR 2.38, 95% CI 1.91–2.95). Overall, 21.2% of knee injuries were treated with surgery; girls were more often treated with surgery than boys in gender-comparable sports (IPR 1.30, 95% CI 1.11–1.53). Conclusions Knee injury patterns differ by sport and gender. Continuing efforts to develop preventive interventions could reduce the burden of these injuries. PMID:23059869

  2. Epidemiology of knee injuries among boys and girls in US high school athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jay G; Fields, Sarah K; Yard, Ellen E; Comstock, R Dawn

    2008-06-01

    The knee joint is the second most commonly injured body site and the leading cause of high school sports-related surgeries. Knee injuries are among the most economically costly sports injuries and may require subsequent surgery or extensive and expensive rehabilitation. To report the incidence, risk, and severity of high school knee injuries across sports, genders, and type of exposure. Descriptive epidemiology study. During the 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 school years, 100 US high schools were randomly selected for a nationally representative sample. Certified athletic trainers tracked injuries using an online injury surveillance system, High School RIO, in 9 high school sports. There were 1383 knee injuries reported during 3,551131 athlete exposures for a rate of 3.89 knee injuries per 10,000 athlete exposures. Although boys had a higher overall rate of knee injury (rate ratio, 1.38; confidence interval, 1.22-1.55), girls were twice as likely to sustain knee injuries requiring surgery (major knee injuries) than were boys (injury proportion ratio, 1.98; confidence interval, 1.45-2.70) and twice as likely to incur noncontact major knee injuries (injury proportion ratio, 1.98; confidence interval, 1.23-3.19) as were boys. Although illegal play was identified as a contributing factor in only 5.7% of all knee injuries, 20% of knee injuries resulting from illegal play required surgery. Knee injury rates and patterns varied by sport, gender, and type of exposure. Identified gender differences included differences in injury rates, injury severity, and basic injury mechanism. Further surveillance is crucial for the development of targeted, evidence-based injury prevention strategies to reduce the morbidity and economic impact of knee surgeries.

  3. Sport Injuries for Females: Incidence and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindig, Louise E.

    Comparisons between sport-related injuries for male and female athletes are discussed in relation to statistics gathered by the National Athletic Injury/Illness Reporting System (NAIRS) and other sources. Tables display data on: (1) athletic injuries and fatalities in colleges and universities by sport, l975-76; (2) average annual frequency of…

  4. High School Football Injury Surveillance Studies, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Athletic Trainers' Association, Inc., Greenville, NC.

    This series of newsletters and fact sheets provides information on the incidence of sport-related injuries in scholastic sports. The following topics are addressed: (1) how the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) measures the number and severity of injuries; (2) facts about NATA; (3) injuries to high school football players; (4)…

  5. Intractable epilepsy and craniocerebral trauma: analysis of 163 patients with blunt and penetrating head injuries sustained in war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Hadi; Hashemi-Fesharaki, Sohrab; Razaghi, Soodeh; Najafi, Masomeh; Kolivand, Peir Hossein; Kovac, Stjepana; Gorji, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Post-traumatic epileptic seizure is a common complication of brain trauma including military injuries. We present clinical characteristics and correlates of post-traumatic epilepsy in 163 head-injured veterans suffering from intractable epilepsy due to blunt or penetrating head injuries sustained during the Iraq-Iran war. The medical records of 163 war veterans who were admitted by the Epilepsy Department of the Shefa Neuroscience Center between 2005 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up period after developing epilepsy was 17.2 years. The time interval between the trauma and the first seizure was shorter and the seizure frequency was higher in epileptic patients suffering from penetrating head trauma. There was no difference in seizure type between epileptic patients traumatised by blunt or penetrating injury. Patients with seizure frequency of more than 30 per month mostly had simple partial seizure. Frontal and parietal semiologies were observed more frequently in patients with penetrating trauma, whereas patients with blunt trauma showed a higher temporal semiology. The most common brain lesion observed by CT scan was encephalomalacia followed by porencephaly and focal atrophy. There was no association between intracerebral retained fragments and different characteristic features of epilepsy. Patients with military brain injury carry a high risk of intractable post-traumatic epilepsy decades after their injury, and thus require a long-term medical follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain functions after sports-related concussion: insights from event-related potentials and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Nadia; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Bottari, Carolina; Johnston, Karen; Ptito, Alain

    2010-10-01

    The high incidence of concussions in contact sports and their impact on brain functions are a major cause for concern. To improve our understanding of brain functioning after sports-related concussion, advanced functional assessment techniques, namely event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), have been recently used in research studies. Contrary to neuropsychological tests that measure verbal and/or motor responses, ERPs and fMRI assess the neural activities associated with cognitive/behavioral demands, and thus provide access to better comprehension of brain functioning. In fact, ERPs have excellent temporal resolution, and fMRI identifies the involved structures during a task. This article describes ERP and fMRI techniques and reviews the results obtained with these tools in sports-related concussion. Although these techniques are not yet readily available, they offer a unique clinical approach, particularly for complex cases (ie, athletes with multiple concussions, chronic symptoms) and objective measures that provide valuable information to guide management and return-to-play decision making.

  7. A longitudinal investigation of sports-related risk factors for disordered eating in aesthetic sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krentz, E M; Warschburger, P

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated a higher risk of disordered eating in certain types of elite sports such as aesthetic sports (e.g., rhythmical gymnastics, figure skating). But even though some studies on risk factors for disordered eating in sports exist, most research on this topic is based on cross-sectional data with limitations on causal inferences. We examined sports-related risk factors for disordered eating in a 1-year longitudinal study with two assessment points. The participants were 65 adolescent athletes from aesthetic sports (mean age 14.0  ±.2.2 years) who completed measures of disordered eating, social pressure from the sports environment, sports-related body dissatisfaction, desire to be leaner to improve sports performance, and emotional distress resulting from missed exercise sessions. All variables were relatively stable in the mean. Individual changes in the desire to be leaner to improve sports performance were associated with individual changes in disordered eating. Furthermore, a cross-lagged partial correlation analysis showed that the desire to be leaner to improve sports performance was predictive of disordered eating and not vice versa. The results of our study indicate that athletes are more at risk for disordered eating if they believe it is possible to enhance their sports performance through weight regulation. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Patterns of Recovery Following Sport-Related Concussion in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Laura; Harvey, Janice; Seabrook, Jamie A

    2016-05-01

    Time to symptom resolution, return to school, and return to play after a sport-related concussion in children and adolescents (8-17 years of age) was examined using a retrospective cohort design. A total of 198 patients aged 8 to 17 years were included, with a mean age of 13.5 years (SD = 2.2). Patients aged 8 to 12 years were symptom-free in a median of 12.0 (range 1-60) days whereas 13- to 17-year olds were symptom-free in a median of 14.0 (range 1-300) days (P = .04). Patients aged 8 to 12 years returned to learn in a median of 4.0 (range 0-30) days compared with 2.5 (range 0-55.0) days in 13- to 17-year-olds (P = .86). Patients aged 8 to 12 years returned to play in a median of 14.0 (range 4-75) days compared with a median of 19.5 (range 5-75) days in 13- to 17-year-olds (P = .06). These results indicate that children and adolescents generally take 2 to 4 weeks to recover from a sport-related concussion. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Survival from sports-related sudden cardiac arrest: In sports facilities versus outside of sports facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijon, Eloi; Bougouin, Wulfran; Karam, Nicole; Beganton, Frankie; Lamhaut, Lionel; Perier, Marie-Cécile; Benameur, Nordine; Tafflet, Muriel; Beal, Guillaume; Hagege, Albert; Le Heuzey, Jean-Yves; Desnos, Michel; Spaulding, Christian; Carré, Francois; Dumas, Florence; Celermajer, David S; Cariou, Alain; Jouven, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    We sought to evaluate frequency, characteristics, and outcomes of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) during sports activities according to the location of occurrence (in sports facilities vs those occurring outside of sports facilities). This is an observational 5-year prospective national French survey of subjects 10 to 75 years old presenting with SCA during sports (2005-2010), in 60 French administrative regions (covering a population of 35 million people). Of the 820 SCA during sports, 426 SCAs (52%) occurred in sports facilities. Overall, a substantially higher survival rate at hospital discharge was observed among SCA in sports facilities (22.8%, 95% CI 18.8-26.8) compared to those occurring outside (8.0%, 95% CI 5.3-10.7) (P sports facilities were younger (42.1 vs 51.3 years, P sports facilities (9.3 vs 13.6, P=0.03), and the proportion of initially shockable rhythm was higher (58.8% vs 33.1%, P sports facilities was mainly explained by concomitant circumstances of occurrence (adjusted odds ratio 1.48, 95% CI 0.88-2.49, P = .134). Sports-related SCA is not a homogeneous entity. The 3-fold higher survival rate reported among sports-related SCA is mainly due to cases that occur in sports facilities, whereas SCA during sports occurring outside of sports facilities has the usual very low rate of survival. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Evaluation of skiing and snowboarding injuries sustained in terrain parks versus traditional slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, M Alison; Evans, Michael D; Rivara, Frederick P

    2010-04-01

    This study compares skiing and snowboarding injuries in terrain parks versus slopes at two ski areas, 2000-05. A total of 3953 (26.7%) injuries occurred in terrain parks, predominantly among young male snowboarders. Terrain park injuries were more likely to be severe, involving head (RR 1.31, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.48) or back (RR 1.96, 95% CI 1.67 to 2.29).

  11. Prediction of work resumption and sustainability up to 1 year after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Myrthe E; Scheenen, Myrthe E; van der Horn, Harm J; Timmerman, Marieke E; Hageman, Gerard; Roks, Gerwin; Spikman, Jacoba M; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2017-10-31

    To study return to work (RTW) after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) at several intervals after injury and to predict RTW on the basis of occupational factors in addition to demographic, personality, and injury-related factors at 6 and 12 months after injury. This was a prospective cohort study (UPFRONT study, n = 1,151) of patients with mTBI admitted to the emergency department. Patients received questionnaires at 2 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months after injury. RTW was divided into 3 levels: complete (cRTW), partial (pRTW), and no RTW. Rates of cRTW increased from 34% at 2 weeks to 77% at 12 months after injury, pRTW varied from 8% to 16% throughout the year. Logistic regression (complete vs incomplete RTW) demonstrated that apart from previously identified predictors such as demographics (e.g., age and education) and injury characteristics (e.g., cause and severity of injury) and indicators of psychological distress, occupational factors were of influence on work resumption after 6 months (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.82), At 12 months, however, the model was based solely on the presence of extracranial injuries and indicators of maladaptation after injury (AUC = 0.81). RTW after mTBI is a gradual process, with varying levels of RTW throughout the first year after injury. Different predictors were relevant for short- vs long-term work resumption, with occupational factors influencing short-term RTW. However, for both short- and long-term RTW, posttraumatic complaints and signs of psychological distress early after injury were relevant predictors, allowing early identification of patients at risk for problematic work resumption. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Sport and Sex-Specific Reporting Trends in the Epidemiology of Concussions Sustained by High School Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallmo, Michael S; Weiner, Joseph A; Hsu, Wellington K

    2017-08-02

    Approximately 300,000 U.S. adolescents sustain concussions annually while participating in organized athletics. This study aimed to track sex and sport-specific trends among high school sports-related concussions over time, to identify whether a particular sport predisposes athletes to a higher risk, and to assess whether traumatic brain injury law enactments have been successful in improving recognition. Injury data for academic years 2005 to 2014 were collected from annual reports generated by High School RIO (Reporting Information Online). The relative proportions of total estimated concussions to total estimated injuries were compared using an injury proportion ratio. The concussion rate was defined as the number of concussions per 10,000 athlete exposures (1 athlete participating in 1 practice or competition), with rates compared using a rate ratio. To evaluate the impact of legislation on sports-related concussions in this population, trends in concussion rates and proportions were analyzed before enactment (academic years 2005-2009) and after enactment (academic years 2010-2014). Between 2005-2006 and 2014-2015, a significant increase (p concussions for all sports combined, the overall concussion rate (rate ratio, 2.30 [95% confidence interval, 2.04 to 2.59]), and the overall proportion of concussions (injury proportion ratio, 2.68 [95% confidence interval, 2.66 to 2.70]) was seen. Based on the injury proportion ratio, during the 2014-2015 academic year, concussions were more common in girls' soccer than in any other sport (p concussion prevention and recognition measures continue to be emphasized in high school contact sports. The data in our study suggest that significant increases in the overall rate and proportion of reported concussions during the past decade could have been affected by traumatic brain injury legislation. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that girls' soccer players may have an even greater risk of sustaining a concussion

  13. Training the child athlete: physical fitness, health and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Cordelia W; Micheli, Lyle J

    2011-09-01

    The number of children and adolescents participating in organised athletic activities worldwide is increasing. However, physical fitness levels among youth are lower today than in previous decades. The combination of increased exposure and decreased preparedness for sports participation has led to an epidemic of both acute and chronic sports-related injuries in this population. Poor physical fitness, in addition to having negative health consequences, seems to be a risk factor for sports-related injury. Accurate injury surveillance data are required to better define the magnitude of the problem of injury in youth sports, as well as to identify specific risk factors for injury. From these data, targeted intervention strategies incorporating fitness training may be developed with the goal of preventing sports-related injury. Preliminary experience with several specific injury patterns--anterior cruciate ligament injuries and ankle sprains--has demonstrated the efficacy of such targeted prevention strategies.

  14. Role of advanced neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers and genetic testing in the assessment of sport-related concussion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Michael; Meier, Timothy; Huber, Daniel; Ptito, Alain; Bigler, Erin; Debert, Chantel T; Manley, Geoff; Menon, David; Chen, Jen-Kai; Wall, Rachel; Schneider, Kathryn J; McAllister, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    To conduct a systematic review of published literature on advanced neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers and genetic testing in the assessment of sport-related concussion (SRC). Computerised searches of Medline, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Scopus and Cochrane Library from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2016 were done. There were 3222 articles identified. In addition to medical subject heading terms, a study was included if (1) published in English, (2) represented original research, (3) involved human research, (4) pertained to SRC and (5) involved data from neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers or genetic testing collected within 6 months of injury. Ninety-eight studies qualified for review (76 neuroimaging, 16 biomarkers and 6 genetic testing). Separate reviews were conducted for neuroimaging, biomarkers and genetic testing. A standardised data extraction tool was used to document study design, population, tests employed and key findings. Reviewers used a modified quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS-2) tool to rate the risk of bias, and a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to rate the overall level of evidence for each search. Results from the three respective reviews are compiled in separate tables and an interpretive summary of the findings is provided. Advanced neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers and genetic testing are important research tools, but require further validation to determine their ultimate clinical utility in the evaluation of SRC. Future research efforts should address current gaps that limit clinical translation. Ultimately, research on neurobiological and genetic aspects of SRC is predicted to have major translational significance to evidence-based approaches to clinical management of SRC, much like applied clinical research has had over the past 20 years. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  15. Sports-related testing protocols are required to reveal trunk stability adaptations in high-level athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbado, David; Barbado, Luis C; Elvira, Jose L L; Dieën, Jaap H van; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J

    2016-09-01

    Trunk/core stability is considered a key component of training programs, because it could contribute to prevention of low-back and lower-limb injuries and to sports performance. Based on the specificity principle, sports-related trunk stability tests would be required in elite sports performance. However, there may be some generic qualities underlying trunk stability that can be assessed with nonspecific protocols, which are broadly used in sport and rehabilitation. To assess whether specific tests are needed in a high-performance context, we analyzed the influence of specialization in sports with large but qualitatively different balance control demands (judo and kayaking) on trunk stability and compared high-performance athletes with recreational athletes without a specific training history. Twenty-five judokas, sixteen kayakers and thirty-seven recreational athletes performed two trunk stability protocols: sudden loading, to assess trunk responses to external and unexpected perturbations; stable and unstable sitting, to assess the participant's ability to control trunk while sitting. Within-session test-retest reliability analyses were performed to support the between-groups comparison. Judokas showed lower angular displacement (0.199rad) against posterior loading than kayakers (0.221rad) probably because they are frequently challenged by higher sudden loads while they are pushed or pulled. Kayakers showed lower error (7.33mm), probably because they train and compete seated on unstable surfaces. Importantly, judokas and kayakers obtained better results than recreational athletes only in those tests designed according to the specific demands of each sport (psport training induces specific trunk stability adaptations, which are not revealed through nonspecific tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Shock-absorbing insoles reduce the incidence of lower limb overuse injuries sustained during Royal Marine training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Carol; Reece, Allyson; Roiz de Sa, Dan

    2013-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the incidence of lower limb overuse injuries (LLOIs) sustained during Royal Marine training could be reduced by issuing the recruits with shock-absorbing insoles (SAIs) to wear in their military boots. This was a retrospective longitudinal trial conducted in two phases. Injury data from 1,416 recruits issued with standard Saran insoles and 1,338 recruits issued with SAI were compared. The recruits in the two groups were of similar height, body mass, and aerobic fitness and followed the same training course. The incidence of LLOI sustained by the recruits was lower (p tibial periostitis, tenosynovitis of foot, achilles tendonopathy, other tendonopathy and anterior knee pain were lower (p Tibial stress fracture incidence was lower (p < 0.05) in the SAI Group but metatarsal and femoral stress fracture incidences were the same for the two insole groups. Thus, issuing SAIs to military recruits undertaking a sustained, arduous physical training program with a high incidence of LLOI would provide a beneficial reduction in the incidence of LLOI. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  17. Comparison of the incidence, nature and cause of injuries sustained on dirt field and artificial turf field by amateur football players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kordi Ramin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data on the incidence, nature, severity and cause of match football injuries sustained on dirt field are scarce. The objectives of this study was to compare the incidence, nature, severity and cause of match injuries sustained on dirt field and artificial turf field by amateur male football players. Methods A prospective two-cohort design was employed. Participants were 252 male football players (mean age 27 years, range 18-43 in 14 teams who participated in a local championship carried on a dirt field and 216 male football players (mean age 28 years, range 17-40 in 12 teams who participated in a local championship carried on a artificial turf field in the same zone of the city. Injury definitions and recording procedures were compliant with the international consensus statement for epidemiological studies of injuries in football. Results The overall incidence of match injuries for men was 36.9 injuries/1000 player hours on dirt field and 19.5 on artificial turf (incidence rate ratio 1.88; 95% CI 1.19-3.05. Most common injured part on dirt field was ankle (26.7% and on artificial turf was knee (24.3%. The most common injury type in the dirt field was skin injuries (abrasion and laceration and in the artificial turf was sprain and ligament injury followed by haematoma/contusion/bruise. Most injuries were acute (artificial turf 89%, dirt field 91% and resulted from player-to-player contact (artificial turf 59.2%, dirt field 51.4%. Most injuries were slight and minimal in dirt field cohort but in artificial turf cohort the most injuries were mild. Conclusions There were differences in the incidence and type of football match injuries sustained on dirt field and artificial turf.

  18. Protective Equipment and Player Characteristics Associated With the Incidence of Sport-Related Concussion in High School Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuine, Timothy A.; Hetzel, Scott; McCrea, Michael; Brooks, M. Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of sport-related concussion (SRC) in high school football is well documented. However, limited prospective data are available regarding how player characteristics and protective equipment affect the incidence of SRC. Purpose To determine whether the type of protective equipment (helmet and mouth guard) and player characteristics affect the incidence of SRC in high school football players. Design Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods Certified athletic trainers (ATs) at each high school recorded the type of helmet worn (brand, model, purchase year, and recondition status) by each player as well as information regarding players’ demographics, type of mouth guard used, and history of SRC. The ATs also recorded the incidence and days lost from participation for each SRC. Incidence of SRC was compared for various helmets, type of mouth guard, history of SRC, and player demographics. Results A total of 2081 players (grades 9–12) enrolled during the 2012 and/or 2013 football seasons (2287 player-seasons) and participated in 134,437 football (practice or competition) exposures. Of these players, 206 (9%) sustained a total of 211 SRCs (1.56/1000 exposures). There was no difference in the incidence of SRC (number of helmets, % SRC [95% CI]) for players wearing Riddell (1171, 9.1% [7.6%–11.0%]), Schutt (680, 8.7% [6.7%–11.1%]), or Xenith (436, 9.2% [6.7%–12.4%]) helmets. Helmet age and recondition status did not affect the incidence of SRC. The rate of SRC (hazard ratio [HR]) was higher in players who wore a custom mouth guard (HR = 1.69 [95% CI, 1.20–2.37], P football players. Players who had sustained an SRC within the previous 12 months were more likely to sustain an SRC than were players without a history of SRC. Sports medicine providers who work with high school football players need to realize that factors other than the type of protective equipment worn affect the risk of SRC in high school players. PMID:25060072

  19. Sustained Inflation at Birth Did Not Alter Lung Injury from Mechanical Ventilation in Surfactant-Treated Fetal Lambs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Noah H.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Miura, Yuichiro; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Jobe, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sustained inflations (SI) are used with the initiation of ventilation at birth to rapidly recruit functional residual capacity and may decrease lung injury and the need for mechanical ventilation in preterm infants. However, a 20 second SI in surfactant-deficient preterm lambs caused an acute phase injury response without decreasing lung injury from subsequent mechanical ventilation. Hypothesis A 20 second SI at birth will decrease lung injury from mechanical ventilation in surfactant-treated preterm fetal lambs. Methods The head and chest of fetal sheep at 126±1 day GA were exteriorized, with tracheostomy and removal of fetal lung fluid prior to treatment with surfactant (300 mg in 15 ml saline). Fetal lambs were randomized to one of four 15 minute interventions: 1) PEEP 8 cmH2O; 2) 20 sec SI at 40 cmH2O, then PEEP 8 cmH2O; 3) mechanical ventilation with 7 ml/kg tidal volume; or 4) 20 sec SI then mechanical ventilation at 7 ml/kg. Fetal lambs remained on placental support for the intervention and for 30 min after the intervention. Results SI recruited a mean volume of 6.8±0.8 mL/kg. SI did not alter respiratory physiology during mechanical ventilation. Heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HSP60, and total protein in lung fluid similarly increased in both ventilation groups. Modest pro-inflammatory cytokine and acute phase responses, with or without SI, were similar with ventilation. SI alone did not increase markers of injury. Conclusion In surfactant treated fetal lambs, a 20 sec SI did not alter ventilation physiology or markers of lung injury from mechanical ventilation. PMID:25419969

  20. Effects of low-dose IV ketamine on peripheral and central pain from major limb injuries sustained in combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polomano, Rosemary C; Buckenmaier, Chester C; Kwon, Kyung H; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Rupprecht, Christine; Goldberg, Cynthia; Gallagher, Rollin M

    2013-07-01

    Examine response patterns to low-dose intravenous (IV) ketamine continuous infusions on multiple pain outcomes, and demonstrate effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of ketamine administration on general wards. Retrospective case series of consecutive patients given low-dose IV ketamine continuous infusions. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC. Nineteen eligible inpatients with neuropathic pain from major limb injuries sustained in combat with inadequate pain control from multimodal analgesia. A 3-day IV infusion of ketamine at doses ≤ 120 μg/kg/h. Daily present (PPI), average (API), and worst (WPI) pain intensity (0-10), global pain relief (GPR) (1 "no relief" to 5 "complete relief"), daily assessments of adverse events, and daily opioid requirements measured during therapy. A significant reduction in PPI (P injury pain were safe and effective, and demonstrated response patterns over time and by baseline pain score stratification and presence or absence of PLP. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Epidemiology of injuries sustained by players during the 16th Under-17 South American Soccer Championship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangrazio, O; Forriol, F

    2016-01-01

    We performed an epidemiological study of the traumatic injuries during the XVI South American U-17 Football Championship, 2015. Observational surveys submitted by the 10 teams medical services of 220 players. Thirty-five games were held and 116 goals (3.31 per game) were recorded. 103 lesions, ie, 2.94 per game or 32.7 injuries per 1,000 min were recorded. Fifty-six were from direct contact and 66 requiring treatment. 36% of the injuries were punished by fault and 26% of the injuries also saw card. Injuries were most common in the ankle (15 cases), Achilles tendon (14 cases) and thigh (14 cases), followed by trauma to the knee and foot (7 cases each), face and the lumbar region (6 cases each), being rare in the upper extremity. Injuries during Soccer World Cup are difficult to predict and prevent, but serious injuries are rare. Is necessary to establish protocols that get adequate health care at all levels to solve problems produce, both in training and during the competition, and be prepared to solve the serious problems that may arise. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Field of Genes: An Investigation of Sports-Related Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jennifer K.; Royal, Charmaine D.

    2012-01-01

    Sports-related genetic testing is a sector of the diverse direct-to-consumer (DTC) industry that has not yet been examined thoroughly by academic scholars. A systematic search was used to identify companies in this sector and content analysis of online information was performed. More than a dozen companies were identified. Marketing practices observed generally did not target parents for child testing, and marketing images were mild compared to images used in popular media. Information was provided at a high reading level (industry-wide Flesh-Kincaid Grade Levels > 11). While ~75% of companies provide privacy policies and terms of service prior to purchase and ~40% provide scientific citations for their tests, e-commerce generally may adequately protect DTC genetics consumers without new federal legislation or regulation. PMID:25562204

  3. Source-domain spectral EEG analysis of sports-related concussion via Measure Projection Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkan, Ozgur; Virji-Babul, Naznin; Miyakoshi, Makoto; Makeig, Scott; Garudadri, Harinath

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated EEG-based source-level spectral differences between adolescents with sports-related concussions and healthy age matched controls. We transformed resting state EEG collected in both groups to the source domain using Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and computed the component process power spectra. For group-level analysis in the source domain, we used a probabilistic framework, Measure Projection Analysis (MPA), that has advantages over parametric k-means clustering of brain sources. MPA revealed that some frontal brain sources in the concussed group had significantly more power in the beta band (p<;0.005) and significantly less delta (p<;0.01) and theta band power (p<;0.05) than the healthy control group. These results suggest that a shift in spectral profile toward higher frequencies in some frontal brain regions might distinguish individuals with concussion from healthy controls.

  4. Field of Genes: An Investigation of Sports-Related Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Wagner

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sports-related genetic testing is a sector of the diverse direct-to-consumer (DTC industry that has not yet been examined thoroughly by academic scholars. A systematic search was used to identify companies in this sector and content analysis of online information was performed. More than a dozen companies were identified. Marketing practices observed generally did not target parents for child testing, and marketing images were mild compared to images used in popular media. Information was provided at a high reading level (industry-wide Flesh-Kincaid Grade Levels > 11. While ~75% of companies provide privacy policies and terms of service prior to purchase and ~40% provide scientific citations for their tests,

  5. Epidemiology of Injuries Sustained as a Result of Intentional Player Contact in High School Football, Ice Hockey, and Lacrosse: 2005-2006 Through 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Justin H; Murray, Monica F; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Pierpoint, Lauren A; Welton, K Linnea; McCarty, Eric C; Comstock, R Dawn

    2017-12-01

    Lacrosse and ice hockey are quickly growing in popularity, while football remains the most popular sport among high school student-athletes. Injuries remain a concern, given the physical nature of these contact sports. To describe the rates and patterns of injuries sustained as a result of intentional player contact in United States high school boys' football, ice hockey, and lacrosse. Descriptive epidemiology study. We conducted a secondary analysis of High School RIO (Reporting Information Online) data, including exposure and injury data collected from a large sample of high schools in the United States from 2005-2006 through 2015-2016. Data were analyzed to calculate rates, assess patterns, and evaluate potential risk factors for player-to-player contact injuries. A total of 34,532 injuries in boys' football, ice hockey, and lacrosse occurred during 9,078,902 athlete-exposures (AEs), for a rate of 3.80 injuries per 1000 AEs in the 3 contact sports of interest. The risk of injuries was found to be greater in competition compared with practice for all 3 sports, with the largest difference in ice hockey (rate ratio, 8.28) and the smallest difference in lacrosse (rate ratio, 3.72). In all 3 contact sports, the most commonly injured body site in competition and practice caused by both tackling/checking and being tackled/checked was the head/face. However, a significantly greater proportion of concussions sustained in football were the result of tackling compared with being tackled (28.2% vs 24.1%, respectively). In addition, a significantly greater proportion of concussions were sustained in competition compared with practice for all 3 sports. This study is the first to collectively compare injury rates and injury patterns sustained from intentional player-to-player contact in boys' high school football, ice hockey, and lacrosse. Notably, there was a relatively high risk of injuries and concussions during football practices.

  6. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  7. Near Point of Convergence After a Sport-Related Concussion: Measurement Reliability and Relationship to Neurocognitive Impairment and Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Kelly L; Sufrinko, Alicia; Lau, Brian C; Henry, Luke; Collins, Michael W; Kontos, Anthony P

    2015-12-01

    Convergence insufficiency (CI) is a common binocular vision deficit after a sport-related concussion (SRC). CI may result in visual discomfort and vision-mediated functional difficulties such as slowed reading and compromised attention, leading to impaired academic, work, and sport performance. To test the reliability of repeated near point of convergence (NPC) measurements in a sample of athletes after an SRC; compare the symptoms and cognitive impairment of athletes with normal NPC to those with CI after an SRC; and explore the relationship among age, sex, learning disability, migraine history, and CI. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 78 athletes (mean age, 14.31 ± 2.77 years) who were seen a mean 5.79 ± 5.63 days after an SRC were administered 3 trials of an NPC assessment, along with neurocognitive (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing [ImPACT]) and symptom assessments. Patients were divided into normal NPC (NPC ≤ 5 cm; n = 45) and CI (NPC >5 cm; n = 33) groups. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) assessed the consistency of NPC across the 3 trials. The ANOVAs were employed to examine differences on neurocognitive composites and symptoms between the normal NPC and CI groups. Stepwise regressions (controlling for age and symptom scores on the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale [PCSS]) were conducted to evaluate the predictive utility of the NPC distance for neurocognitive impairment. Groups did not differ on demographic or injury characteristics. NPC differed between trial 1 and trials 2 (P = .02) and 3 (P = .01) for the CI group but not the normal NPC group. Internal consistency was high across NPC measurements (ICC range, 0.95-0.98). Patients with CI performed worse on verbal memory (P = .02), visual motor speed (P = .02), and reaction time (P = .001, η(2) = .13) and had greater total symptom scores (P = .02) after the injury. Results of hierarchical

  8. Athletic trainers' management practices and referral patterns for adolescent athletes after sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richelle M; Welch, Cailee E; Weber, Michelle L; Parsons, John T; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C

    2014-09-01

    Athletic trainers (ATs) play an important role in the evaluation, management, and referral of student-athletes after sport-related concussion. Understanding factors that influence ATs' patient care decisions is important to ensure best practices are followed. To identify ATs' current concussion management practices and referral patterns for adolescent student-athletes after sport-related concussion as well as the factors associated with those practices. Cross-sectional study. Level 3. A total of 851 participants from a convenience sample of 3286 ATs employed in the secondary school setting (25.9% response rate) completed the Athletic Trainers' Beliefs, Attitudes, and Knowledge of Pediatric Athletes with Concussions (BAKPAC-AT) survey. The BAKPAC-AT consists of several questions to assess ATs' concussion management, referral practices, and established relationships with other health care professionals. The majority of ATs had a written concussion policy (82.4%, n = 701) and standing orders approved by their directing physician (67.3%, n = 573); 75.1% (n = 639) of ATs conduct baseline testing, with the majority using computerized neurocognitive tests (71.2%, n = 606). Follow-up concussion testing was employed by 81.8% (n = 696). Years of certification (P = 0.049) and type of secondary school (P = 0.033) predicted ATs' use of baseline testing. Nearly half of the respondents (48.8%, n = 415) refer 100% of concussion cases to a physician. The most influential factors that lead to a referral were state law (40.3%, n = 343), personal preference (34.7%, n = 295), and school district policy (24.8%, n = 211). Of the ATs surveyed, most were engaged in baseline and follow-up testing, primarily with neurocognitive tests. Most ATs refer patients to physicians after concussion. While state regulation and personal preference were primary factors influencing referral decisions, it is unclear at what point of care the referral occurs.

  9. A systematic review of the biomarker S100B: implications for sport-related concussion management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Stefanie; Podlog, Leslie W; Hamson-Utley, J Jordan; Strathmann, Frederick G; Strüder, Heiko K

    2014-01-01

    Elevated levels of the astroglial protein S100B have been shown to predict sport-related concussion. However, S100B levels within an athlete can vary depending on the type of physical activity (PA) engaged in and the methodologic approach used to measure them. Thus, appropriate reference values in the diagnosis of concussed athletes remain undefined. The purpose of our systematic literature review was to provide an overview of the current literature examining S100B measurement in the context of PA. The overall goal is to improve the use of the biomarker S100B in the context of sport-related concussion management. PubMed, SciVerse Scopus, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, and Cochrane. We selected articles that contained (1) research studies focusing exclusively on humans in which (2) either PA was used as an intervention or the test participants or athletes were involved in PA and (3) S100B was measured as a dependent variable. We identified 24 articles. Study variations included the mode of PA used as an intervention, sample types, sample-processing procedures, and analytic techniques. Given the nonuniformity of the analytical methods used and the data samples collected, as well as differences in the types of PA investigated, we were not able to determine a single consistent reference value of S100B in the context of PA. Thus, a clear distinction between a concussed athlete and a healthy athlete based solely on the existing S100B cutoff value of 0.1 μg/L remains unclear. However, because of its high sensitivity and excellent negative predictive value, S100B measurement seems to have the potential to be a diagnostic adjunct for concussion in sports settings. We recommend that the interpretation of S100B values be based on congruent study designs to ensure measurement reliability and validity.

  10. What domains of clinical function should be assessed after sport-related concussion? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddermann-Demont, Nina; Echemendia, Ruben J; Schneider, Kathryn J; Solomon, Gary S; Hayden, K Alix; Turner, Michael; Dvořák, Jiří; Straumann, Dominik; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2017-06-01

    Sport-related concussion (SRC) is a clinical diagnosis made after a sport-related head trauma. Inconsistency exists regarding appropriate methods for assessing SRC, which focus largely on symptom-scores, neurocognitive functioning and postural stability. Systematic literature review. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane-DSR, Cochrane CRCT, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus (accessed July 9, 2016). Original (prospective) studies reporting on postinjury assessment in a clinical setting and evaluation of diagnostic tools within 2 weeks after an SRC. Forty-six studies covering 3284 athletes were included out of 2170 articles. Only the prospective studies were considered for final analysis (n=33; 2416 athletes). Concussion diagnosis was typically made on the sideline by an (certified) athletic trainer (55.0%), mainly on the basis of results from a symptom-based questionnaire. Clinical domains affected included cognitive, vestibular and headache/migraine. Headache, fatigue, difficulty concentrating and dizziness were the symptoms most frequently reported. Neurocognitive testing was used in 30/33 studies (90.9%), whereas balance was assessed in 9/33 studies (27.3%). The overall quality of the studies was considered low. The absence of an objective, gold standard criterion makes the accurate diagnosis of SRC challenging. Current approaches tend to emphasise cognition, symptom assessment and postural stability with less of a focus on other domains of functioning. We propose that the clinical assessment of SRC should be symptom based and interdisciplinary. Whenever possible, the SRC assessment should incorporate neurological, vestibular, ocular motor, visual, neurocognitive, psychological and cervical aspects. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Sports Participation and Alcohol Use: Associations With Sports-Related Identities and Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Heim, Derek; Levy, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Studies indicate that those participating in sports are a high-risk population for hazardous alcohol use. Previous research identifies psychosocial drivers underpinning this link between sports participation and risky drinking behavior; however, the evidence is restricted to cross-sectional prevalence studies. Theoretical evaluations suggest that psychologically constructed identities are a defining factor for behaviors in this context. Therefore, the present study sought to examine longitudinally the relationships among sports-related identities, well-being, and alcohol behaviors in those participating in sports. Respondents completed self-report questionnaires on their alcohol consumption, drinking motives, athlete identity (personal identity), sports group identification (social identity), and general well-being. A sample of 475 participants (male = 55.6%; mean age = 20.2 years) provided data at Time 1 for cross-sectional analysis. Longitudinal associations were conducted with 92 participants (male = 42.4%; mean age = 20.8 years) who provided follow-up data (Time 1 and 6 months later). Cross-sectional results revealed an association between social identity and alcohol consumption, which was fully mediated by positive reinforcement drinking motives. Correlation analysis found a significant positive relationship between Time 1 alcohol consumption and social identity 6 months later. Furthermore, social identity was positively associated with consumption, whereas athlete identity was negatively associated therewith. Finally, well-being was positively associated only with sports group identification over time. Our findings suggest that sport-related drinking may be an avenue for building group identification, and this identification is linked to well-being.

  12. Sports-related sudden cardiac deaths in the young population of Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asatryan, Babken; Vital, Cristina; Kellerhals, Christoph; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Gräni, Christoph; Trachsel, Lukas D; Schmied, Christian M; Saguner, Ardan M; Eser, Prisca; Herzig, David; Bolliger, Stephan; Michaud, Katarzyna; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    In Switzerland, ECG screening was first recommended for national squad athletes in 1998. Since 2001 it has become mandatory in selected high-risk professional sports. Its impact on the rates of sports-related sudden cardiac death (SCD) is unknown. We aimed to study the incidence, causes and time trends of sports-related SCD in comparison to SCD unrelated to exercise in Switzerland. We reviewed all forensic reports of SCDs of the German-speaking region of Switzerland in the age group of 10 to 39 years, occurring between 1999 and 2010. Cases were classified into three categories based on whether or not deaths were associated with sports: no sports (NONE), recreational sports (REC), and competitive sports (COMP). Over the 12-year study period, 349 SCD cases were recorded (mean age 30±7 years, 76.5% male); 297 cases were categorized as NONE, 31 as REC, and 21 as COMP. Incidences of SCD per 100,000 person-years [mean (95% CI)] were the lowest in REC [0.43 (0.35-0.56)], followed by COMP [1.19 (0.89-1.60)] and NONE [2.46 (2.27-2.66)]. In all three categories, coronary artery disease (CAD) with or without acute myocardial infarction (MI) was the most common cause of SCD. Three professional athletes were identified in COMP category which all had SCD due to acute MI. There were no time trends, neither in overall, nor in cause-specific incidences of SCD. The incidence of SCD in young individuals in Switzerland is low, both related and unrelated to sports. In regions, like Switzerland, where CAD is the leading cause of SCD associated with competitions, screening for cardiovascular risk factors in addition to the current PPS recommendations might be indicated to improve detection of silent CAD and further decrease the incidence of SCD.

  13. The impact of sustained hot weather on risk of acute work-related injury in Melbourne, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Judith Anne; MacFarlane, Ewan M.; Sim, Malcolm R.; Smith, Peter

    2018-02-01

    It has been reported that weather-related high ambient temperature is associated with an increased risk of work-related injury. Understanding this relationship is important because work-related injuries are a major public health problem, and because projected climate changes will potentially expose workers to hot days, including consecutive hot days, more often. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of exposure to sustained periods of hot weather on work-related injury risk for workers in Melbourne, Australia. A time-stratified case crossover study design was utilised to examine the association between two and three consecutive days and two and three consecutive nights of hot weather and the risk of work-related injury, using definitions of hot weather ranging from the 60th to the 95th percentile of daily maximum and minimum temperatures for the Melbourne metropolitan area, 2002-2012. Workers' compensation claim data was used to identify cases of acute work-related injury. Overall, two and three consecutive days of hot weather were associated with an increased risk of injury, with this effect becoming apparent at a daily maximum temperature of 27.6 °C (70th percentile). Three consecutive days of high but not extreme temperatures were associated with the strongest effect, with a 15% increased risk of injury (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.30) observed when daily maximum temperature was ≥33.3 °C (90th percentile) for three consecutive days, compared to when it was not. At a threshold of 35.5 °C (95th percentile), there was no significant association between temperature and injury for either two or three consecutive days of heat. These findings suggest that warnings to minimise harm to workers from hot weather should be given, and prevention protocol initiated, when consecutive warm days of temperatures lower than extreme heat temperatures are forecast, and well before the upper ranges of ambient daytime temperatures are reached.

  14. The impact of sustained hot weather on risk of acute work-related injury in Melbourne, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Judith Anne; MacFarlane, Ewan M.; Sim, Malcolm R.; Smith, Peter

    2017-09-01

    It has been reported that weather-related high ambient temperature is associated with an increased risk of work-related injury. Understanding this relationship is important because work-related injuries are a major public health problem, and because projected climate changes will potentially expose workers to hot days, including consecutive hot days, more often. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of exposure to sustained periods of hot weather on work-related injury risk for workers in Melbourne, Australia. A time-stratified case crossover study design was utilised to examine the association between two and three consecutive days and two and three consecutive nights of hot weather and the risk of work-related injury, using definitions of hot weather ranging from the 60th to the 95th percentile of daily maximum and minimum temperatures for the Melbourne metropolitan area, 2002-2012. Workers' compensation claim data was used to identify cases of acute work-related injury. Overall, two and three consecutive days of hot weather were associated with an increased risk of injury, with this effect becoming apparent at a daily maximum temperature of 27.6 °C (70th percentile). Three consecutive days of high but not extreme temperatures were associated with the strongest effect, with a 15% increased risk of injury (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.30) observed when daily maximum temperature was ≥33.3 °C (90th percentile) for three consecutive days, compared to when it was not. At a threshold of 35.5 °C (95th percentile), there was no significant association between temperature and injury for either two or three consecutive days of heat. These findings suggest that warnings to minimise harm to workers from hot weather should be given, and prevention protocol initiated, when consecutive warm days of temperatures lower than extreme heat temperatures are forecast, and well before the upper ranges of ambient daytime temperatures are reached.

  15. Injuries sustained after falls from bridges across the United States-Mexico border at El Paso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Susan F; Tyroch, Alan H

    2012-05-01

    To compare demographics and motivations for falls from bridges at the United States-Mexico border and in El Paso County, Texas, and to analyze injuries and injury patterns to support intentionality and to provide treatment recommendations. A retrospective observational review was conducted of hospital admissions to a trauma center after falls from bridges from 1995 to 2009. Statistical methods used were chi-square testing, T-test for means comparison, univariate correlations, and regression analysis. Of the 97 evaluated patients, 81.4% fell from U.S.-Mexico border bridges, including one patient who fell from a railway bridge; 74.7% of those falling from border bridges had a non-U.S. address, contrasting with 22.2% of those who fell within the United States. Falls over the border were associated with more immigration-related motivations and fewer suicide attempts. Injuries included lower extremities in 76 (78.4%) and thoracolumbar spine in 27 (27.8%) patients; 16 patients with a thoracolumbar spine fracture (59.3%) also had a lower extremity injury. Mean hospital length of stay was 7.2 days. Mean injury severity score was 8.45 (range 1-43). Age, injury severity score, and pelvic fracture increased the hospital length of stay. Patients fell while emigrating-immigrating based on residence and motivating factors. A dyad of lower extremity and thoracolumbar spine injuries coincided in 59.3% of those with a thoracolumbar spine injury; thoracolumbar spine imaging of patients evaluated after falls from bridges is recommended. Proposed prevention strategies include posting signs on bridges and installing catch-net safety barriers.

  16. Renal Trauma from Recreational Accidents Manifests Different Injury Patterns than Urban Renal Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Granville L.; Slack, Sean; McWilliams, Kelly L.; Black, Aaron; Nicholson, Tristan M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The majority of blunt renal trauma is a consequence of motor vehicle collisions and falls. Prior publications based on urban series have shown that significant renal injuries are almost always accompanied by gross hematuria alone or microscopic hematuria with concomitant hypotension. We present a series of blunt renal trauma sustained during recreational pursuits, and describe the mechanisms, injury patterns and management. Materials and Methods Database review from 1996 to 2009 identified 145 renal injuries. Children younger than age 16 years, and trauma involving licensable motor vehicles, penetrating injuries and work related injuries were excluded from analysis. Grade, hematuria, hypotension, age, gender, laterality, mechanism, management, injury severity score and associated injuries were recorded. Results We identified 106 patients meeting the criteria and 85% of the injuries were snow sport related. Age range was 16 to 76 years and 92.5% of patients were male. There were 39 grade 1 injuries, 30 grade 2, 22 grade 3, 12 grade 4 and 3 grade 5 injuries. Gross hematuria was present in 56.7%, 77.2% and 83.3% of grade 2, grade 3 and grade 4 injuries, respectively. None of the patients with grade 2 or greater injuries and microscopic hematuria had hypotension except 1 grade 5 pedicle injury. The nephrectomy and renorrhaphy rate for grade 1 to grade 4 injuries was 0%. Conclusions Compared to urban series of blunt renal trauma, recreationally acquired injuries appear to follow different patterns, including a paucity of associated injuries or hypotension. If imaging were limited to the presence of gross hematuria, or microscopic hematuria with hypotension, 23% of grade 2 to grade 4 injuries would be missed. Men are at higher risk than women. However, operative intervention is rarely helpful. PMID:22591969

  17. The nature and extent of war injuries sustained by combat specialty personnel killed and wounded in Afghanistan and Iraq, 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Dunn, John C; Bader, Julia O; Belmont, Philip J

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies regarding combat wounding have a limited translational capacity due to inclusion of soldiers from all military branches and occupational specialties as well as a lack of information regarding soldiers who died in theater. A search was performed of the Department of Defense Trauma Registry and Armed Forces Medical Examiner data set for the years 2003 to 2011 to identify all injured personnel with the military specialty 19D (cavalry scout). A manual search was conducted for each record identified, and age, rank, location and manner of injury, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and extent of wounding were abstracted. The incidence of injuries by body region and rates for specific types of wounds were determined. Statistically significant associations between rank, location of injury, manner of injury, body region involved, and injury mechanism were assessed using χ2 analysis. Associations between ISS, rank, manner of injury, and survival were evaluated by t test with Satterthwaite correction. A total of 701 casualties were identified with 3,189 distinct injuries. Mean (SD) age of injured personnel was 25.9 (6.0) years. Thirty-five percent of the cohort was composed of soldiers who died in theater. Explosions were the most common mechanism of injury (70%), while 18% of wounds occurred owing to gunshot. Extremity wounds and injuries to the head and neck represented 34% of casualty burden. Thoracic trauma occurred in 16%, and abdominal injuries occurred in 17%. Wounds with a frequency exceeding 5% included skin, extremity, facial, brain, and gastrointestinal injuries. Vascular injury occurred in 4%. Gunshot wounds were a greater cause of injury in Afghanistan (p = 0.001) and resulted in a higher percentage of thoracic injuries (p trauma sustained by combat-specific personnel seems to be different from that experienced by all soldiers deployed to a war zone.

  18. Peripheral Total Tau in Military Personnel Who Sustain Traumatic Brain Injuries During Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Anlys; Lejbman, Natasha; Jeromin, Andreas; French, Louis M; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Cashion, Ann; Mysliwiec, Vincent; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Gill, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Approximately one-third of military personnel who deploy for combat operations sustain 1 or more traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), which increases the risk for chronic symptoms of postconcussive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression and for the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Elevated concentrations of tau are observed in blood shortly following a TBI, but, to our knowledge, the role of tau elevations in blood in the onset and maintenance of chronic symptoms after TBI has not been investigated. To assess peripheral tau levels in military personnel exposed to TBI and to examine the relationship between chronic neurological symptoms and tau elevations. Observational assessment from September 2012 to August 2014 of US military personnel at the Madigan Army Medical Center who had been deployed within the previous 18 months. Plasma total tau concentrations were measured using a novel ultrasensitive single-molecule enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Classification of participants with and without self-reported TBI was made using the Warrior Administered Retrospective Casualty Assessment Tool. Self-reported symptoms of postconcussive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression were determined by the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist Military Version, and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, respectively. Group differences in tau concentrations were determined through analysis of variance models, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve determined the sensitivity and specificity of tau concentrations in predicting TBI and chronic symptoms. Seventy participants with self-reported TBI on the Warrior Administered Retrospective Casualty Assessment Tool and 28 control participants with no TBI exposure were included. Concentration of total tau in peripheral blood. Concentrations of plasma tau were significantly elevated in the 70 participants with self

  19. Eye and Orbital Injuries in Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Jonathan A; Easterbrook, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Sports-related eye and orbital injuries continue to occur regularly and may have serious consequences. They are completely preventable when appropriate protection is worn, particularly with polycarbonate lenses. Eye protection is available for most sports and should be worn in accordance with the standards of regional authorities. It is important for first responders to identify red flags in the history and physical examination of an injured athlete for urgent referral to an ophthalmologist. Common sports-related eye injuries include corneal abrasion, subconjunctival hemorrhage, hyphema, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal tears and detachment. The mechanism and treatment of these injuries are discussed in further detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sport-Related Concussion and Occupational Therapy: Expanding the Scope of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Sport participation is a common occupation for many children and youth and can lead to improved physical and psychosocial health. Despite these benefits, it exposes children and youth to the increased risk of injury. Concussion, also referred to as mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is one of the most common sports injuries reported in the…

  1. Dentoalveolar trauma in Glasgow: an audit of mechanism and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Graeme; Bell, Aileen; McGlashan, Gregor; Vincent, Carolyn; Welbury, Richard R

    2007-08-01

    Traumatic dental injuries in children often require multiple follow-up visits to the dentist and may have long-term consequences for the developing dentition. The aim of this audit was to examine age, gender, location, time of year, mechanism of injury and type of injury sustained in relation to dentoalveolar trauma in children attending the paediatric dental trauma clinic at Glasgow Dental Hospital from 2002 to 2004, and to compare our findings with data in the published literature. Males suffered 60% of all dental trauma, 79% of sporting injuries and 85% of assaults. The injuries in males were more severe, representing 65% of enamel dentine and pulp fractures, 100% of crown root fractures and 66% of crown root and pulp fractures. A peak for trauma was seen in the 8-11-year-old group (43%). The majority of injuries in the under four age group resulted from falls (87%). Taken as a whole, falls accounted for 49%, sports related injuries 18%, bicycle and scooter 13%, assault 7%, and road traffic accidents 1.5% of all injuries. They also accounted for a far higher percentage of intrusive luxations (67%). The largest proportion of injuries occurred during the summer months (33%). Sixty-four percent of children suffered trauma to more than one tooth. Fifty-eight percent of injuries involved the dental hard tissues and pulp and the majority of these (82%) were crown fractures. Most subjects (82%) suffered trauma to their periodontal tissues, (26% concussion or subluxation, 26% lateral luxation and 23% avulsion). Injuries to the supporting bone were uncommon. Sixty-six percent of all injuries occurred outdoors. Our findings were similar to a number of published studies, but in contrast to several others. More consistency is required in the collection and reporting of trauma data to be able to draw meaningful conclusions by comparison.

  2. Penetrating cardiac injury: sustaining health by building team resilience in growing civilian violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Manjunath Maruti; Prasad, K Shiv Krishna; Deo, Vishant; Uniyal, Madhur

    2016-09-02

    Penetrating cardiac injury (PCI) is gradually increasing in developing countries owing to large-scale manufacturing of illegal country-made weapons. These injuries are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Logistically it is difficult to have all organ-based specialists arrive together and attend every critically injured patient round-the-clock in developing countries. It is therefore important for doctors (physicians, surgeons and anaesthetists) to be trained for adequate management of critically injured patients following trauma. We report the approach towards 2 cases of haemodynamically unstable PCI managed by a team of trauma doctors. Time lag (duration between injury and arrival at hospital) and quick horizontal resuscitation are important considerations in the treatment. By not referring these patients to different hospitals the team actually reduced the time lag, and a quick life-saving surgery by trauma surgeons (trained in torso surgery) offered these almost dying patients a chance of survival. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Prevention Practice Differences Among Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries Who Rarely Versus Frequently Sustain Pressure Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael L.; Marini, Irmo; Slate, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are common among people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and not only are costly to treat but also affect the quality of life of those affected by them. Despite a plethora of literature on prevention, there are few wellness studies focusing on the practices of people who do not develop pressure ulcers. This preliminary study sought to…

  4. Injuries sustained by passengers travelling in the cargo area of light ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Despite its inherently dangerous nature, the practice of transporting passengers in the cargo area of light delivery vehicles (LDVs) is widespread in South Africa. Objective. To review the patterns and outcome of injuries associated with events involving LDVs transporting passengers. Methods. All patients ...

  5. Preferred "Learning Styles" in Students Studying Sports-Related Programmes in Higher Education in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Derek; Jones, Gareth; Peters, John

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the "preferred learning styles" and their relationship with grades for students undertaking sports-related undergraduate programmes at a higher education institution in the UK. Preferred "learning styles" in students in this discipline have been identified as auditory, kinaesthetic and group, although…

  6. Incidence and etiology of sports-related sudden cardiac death in Denmark--implications for preparticipation screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Theilade, Juliane

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on incidences of sports-related sudden cardiac death (SrSCD) are few and data are needed for the discussion of preparticipation screening for cardiac disease. OBJECTIVE: We sought to chart the incidence and etiology of SrSCD in the young in Denmark (population 5.4 million...

  7. School Nurses' Familiarity and Perceptions of Academic Accommodations for Student-Athletes Following Sport-Related Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michelle L.; Welch, Cailee E.; Parsons, John T.; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate school nurses' familiarity and perceptions regarding academic accommodations for student-athletes following sport-related concussion. School nurses (N = 1,246) accessed the survey School Nurses' Beliefs, Attitudes and Knowledge of Pediatric Athletes with Concussions (BAKPAC-SN). The BAKPAC-SN contained…

  8. [CLAVICLE FRACTURES IN CHILDREN--CIRCUMSTANCES AND CAUSES OF INJURY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antabak, Anko; Matković, Nikša; Papeš, Dino; Karlo, Robert; Romić, Ivan; Fuchs, Nino; Madarić, Miroslav; Stilinović, Marina; Stanić, Lana; Luetić, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    Clavicle fractures in children occur twice as often as in adults. During a child's growth period they account for 10-15% of all fractures sustained. The questions which should be asked are how these fractures are sustained and under which circumstances are the children injured. In the study 256 children with clavicle fractures treated during the period 2008-2013 were analyzed. The underlying cause and place of injuries were classified using the ICD-10 classification system, using environmental causes of injury. The circumstances were in each case accidental injury. Environmental causes were traffic accidents (V01-V99) or mishaps/accidents (W00-X59). Fracture injuries were caused in traffic accidents in 24 (9.4%), and in mishaps/accidents in 232 (90.6%) children. Of the injuries caused by mishaps/accidents, in 204 children these were caused by falls (W00-W19). In 123 of them the injuries were caused by falls from a ground level, and in 81 were from a greater height. Direct blow injuries, caused by another person or a blunt instrument, weere the causes of fractures seen in 28 children. Place of fracture sustainment was dominantly at home. This was followed by injuries sustained outside in recreational areas, while least were suffered at school or kindergarden facilities. Bicycle riding was the cause of clavicle fractures in 48 children, which was 18.7% of all fractures seen. Sports related injuries and fractures were seen in 47 (18.4%) out of 256 children: 30 in football, 10 in defensive sports (wrestling, judo, karate), three in hockey, while basketball and gymnastics accounted for two each. Preschool children were injured more often while in the care of their parents while school aged children were adaquately protected, but in after-school activities they were often injured. The most common injuries after school were those suffered in traffic accidents and recreational sports activities. In the adolescent period, the most common injuries seen were again those in

  9. Sensitivity and specificity of subacute computerized neurocognitive testing and symptom evaluation in predicting outcomes after sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Brian C; Collins, Michael W; Lovell, Mark R

    2011-06-01

    Concussions affect an estimated 136 000 high school athletes yearly. Computerized neurocognitive testing has been shown to be appropriately sensitive and specific in diagnosing concussions, but no studies have assessed its utility to predict length of recovery. Determining prognosis during subacute recovery after sports concussion will help clinicians more confidently address return-to-play and academic decisions. To quantify the prognostic ability of computerized neurocognitive testing in combination with symptoms during the subacute recovery phase from sports-related concussion. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. In sum, 108 male high school football athletes completed a computer-based neurocognitive test battery within 2.23 days of injury and were followed until returned to play as set by international guidelines. Athletes were grouped into protracted recovery (>14 days; n = 50) or short-recovery (≤14 days; n = 58). Separate discriminant function analyses were performed using total symptom score on Post-Concussion Symptom Scale, symptom clusters (migraine, cognitive, sleep, neuropsychiatric), and Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing neurocognitive scores (verbal memory, visual memory, reaction time, processing speed). Multiple discriminant function analyses revealed that the combination of 4 symptom clusters and 4 neurocognitive composite scores had the highest sensitivity (65.22%), specificity (80.36%), positive predictive value (73.17%), and negative predictive value (73.80%) in predicting protracted recovery. Discriminant function analyses of total symptoms on the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale alone had a sensitivity of 40.81%; specificity, 79.31%; positive predictive value, 62.50%; and negative predictive value, 61.33%. The 4 symptom clusters alone discriminant function analyses had a sensitivity of 46.94%; specificity, 77.20%; positive predictive value, 63.90%; and negative predictive value, 62.86%. Discriminant function

  10. Toward objective markers of concussion in sport: a review of white matter and neurometabolic changes in the brain after sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimou, Stefan; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2014-03-01

    Abstract Sports-related concussion is an issue that has piqued the public's attention of late as concerns surrounding potential long-term sequelae as well as new methods of characterizing the effects of this form of injury continue to develop. For the most part, diagnosis of concussion is based on subjective clinical measures and thus is prone to under-reporting. In the current environment, where conventional imaging modalities, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are unable to elucidate the degree of white matter damage and neurometabolic change, a discussion of two advanced imaging techniques-diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)-is undertaken with a view to highlighting their potential utility. Our aim is to outline a variety of the approaches to concussion research that have been employed, with special attention given to the clinical considerations and acute complications attributed to concussive injury. DTI and MRS have been at the forefront of research as a result of their noninvasiveness and ease of acquisition, and hence it is thought that the use of these neuroimaging modalities has the potential to aid clinical decision making and management, including guiding return-to-play protocols.

  11. Asymmetric interpersonal coupling in a cyclic sports-related movement task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerhoff, L Rens A; De Poel, Harjo J

    2014-06-01

    In interactive sports, teammates and/or opponents mutually tune their behavior. Expert performance thus implies certain interactive abilities, which critically depend on perceptual coupling. To illustrate this assertion, we examined the coordination dynamics with asymmetric interaction of dyads performing a sports-related cyclical movement task. In pairs, basketball players performed lateral defensive slides in in-phase, until a cue prompted them to switch to antiphase coordination. We assessed how these switches were mediated by phase adaptations of each agent under bidirectional (i.e., agents facing one another) and unidirectional (i.e., one agent facing the back of the other) visual interaction conditions. This imposed asymmetry in visual coupling exemplified an imbalance in the interaction (or 'interact-ability') between two agents. The results concurred the asymmetric coupling: during the switch the agent facing the other adapted his phasing more than the other agent. Furthermore, also in the bidirectional condition the coupling revealed dyad-intrinsic asymmetries (e.g., related to implicit follower-leader strategies). Together, this illustrates that interpersonal coordination is characterized by asymmetric coupling between the agents, and highlights how mutual perception of pertinent information mediates interpersonal coordination. This study offered a first step towards analyzing interpersonal coordination dynamics in relation to 'interact-ability'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence and etiology of sports-related sudden cardiac death in Denmark - Implications for preparticipation screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Theilade, Juliane

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies on incidences of sports-related sudden death (SrSCD) are few and data are needed for the discussion of preparticipation screening for cardiac disease. Objective We sought to chart the incidence and etiology of SrSCD in the young in Denmark (population 5.4 million) and to compare...... this to the incidence of sudden cardiac death SCD in the background population. Methods Al 5,662 death certificates for decedents in the perio 2000 to 2006 in the age group 12 to 35 years in Denmark were read independently by 2 physicians to identify cases of SCD. Information from autopsy reports, selected hospital......SCD were found, 8 of which had antecedent symptoms. The incidence rate was 1.21 (95% confidence inrterval (CI): 0.68 to 2.00) per 100,000 athlete person-years. The most common autopsy findings were arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 4), sudden unexplained death (n = 4) and coronary artery...

  13. Rest and treatment/rehabilitation following sport-related concussion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kathryn J; Leddy, John J; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Seifert, Tad; McCrea, Michael; Silverberg, Noah D; Feddermann-Demont, Nina; Iverson, Grant L; Hayden, Alix; Makdissi, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence regarding rest and active treatment/rehabilitation following sport-related concussion (SRC). Systematic review. MEDLINE (OVID), CINAHL (EbscoHost), PsycInfo (OVID), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (OVID), SPORTDiscus (EbscoHost), EMBASE (OVID) and Proquest DissertationsandTheses Global (Proquest) were searched systematically. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: (1) original research; (2) reported SRC as the diagnosis; and (3) evaluated the effect of rest or active treatment/rehabilitation. Review articles were excluded. Twenty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria (9 regarding the effects of rest and 19 evaluating active treatment). The methodological quality of the literature was limited; only five randomised controlled trials (RCTs) met the eligibility criteria. Those RCTs included rest, cervical and vestibular rehabilitation, subsymptom threshold aerobic exercise and multifaceted collaborative care. A brief period (24-48 hours) of cognitive and physical rest is appropriate for most patients. Following this, patients should be encouraged to gradually increase activity. The exact amount and duration of rest are not yet well defined and require further investigation. The data support interventions including cervical and vestibular rehabilitation and multifaceted collaborative care. Closely monitored subsymptom threshold, submaximal exercise may be of benefit. PROSPERO 2016:CRD42016039570. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Efficacy of amantadine treatment on symptoms and neurocognitive performance among adolescents following sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Cara Camiolo; Collins, Michael; Lovell, Mark; Kontos, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of amantadine in the treatment of symptoms and neurocognitive performance in adolescents following sports-related concussion. A clinical sample of 25 male (n = 11) and female (n = 14) adolescent subjects with an age-, sex-, and concussion history-matched group of 25 male (n = 11) and female (n = 14) control subjects. Outpatient concussion clinic. Retrospective, case-control design. Treatment group consisted of patients treated with 100 mg of amantadine twice daily (200 mg total per day) following a period of rest. Matched controls were evaluated and treated conservatively without medication at the same concussion program prior to the start of the current amantadine protocol. Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Test computerized neurocognitive test battery and symptom report. Results support significantly greater improvements from pre- to posttest in reported symptoms, verbal memory, and reaction time performance for the amantadine group than the matched controls. There were no significant differences for visual memory or visual motor processing speed. This study provides empirical support for amantadine as an effective pharmacologic treatment of certain concussion-related cognitive deficits and symptoms in athletes with protracted recovery of more than 3 weeks.

  15. Depression as a Modifying Factor in Sport-Related Concussion: A Critical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gary S; Kuhn, Andrew W; Zuckerman, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    Since its third iteration in 2008, the international Concussion in Sport Group (CISG) has delineated several 'modifying factors' that have the potential to influence the management of sport-related concussions (SRC). One of these factors is co- and pre-morbidities, which includes migraines, mental health disorders, attention-deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), learning disability, and sleep disorders. Mental health disorders, and in particular, depression, have received some attention in the management of SRC and in this review we summarize the empirical evidence for its inclusion as a modifying factor. This review is divided into three main bodies of findings: (1) the incidence and prevalence of depression and depressive symptoms in non-concussed and concussed athletes, with comparison made to the general population; (2) managing the post-concussion athlete and accounting for premorbid depressive symptoms; and (3) depression as a long-term effect of repetitive head trauma. Overall, it has been reported that certain subpopulations of athletes have similar or even higher rates of depressive symptoms when compared to the general population. The challenge of accounting for these baseline-depressive symptoms while managing the post-concussive athlete is stressed. And lastly, the prevalence of depression and its relationship to concussion in later-life is discussed.

  16. Evaluation and management of sport-related concussions in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R; Parachuri, Venu; Shettigar, Amrith

    2017-07-01

    Sport-related concussions in young athletes are common, generally under reported and often go unrecognized. Concussion in sport may result either from a direct impact to the head or from indirect forces transmitted to the brain from impact elsewhere on the body. Concussions may also result from sudden acceleration, deceleration or rotational forces to the brain. The key features of concussion include confusion, impaired memory and reduced speed of information processing. Recovery may occur from a few days to several weeks or months. Both physical and cognitive rests are recommended for recovery. Long-term cognitive and behavioral complications are a concern. Preventive strategies include education, modification of sport rules, use of equipment such as headgears, face masks and mouth guards, and neck muscle training. Evidence is limited to support effectiveness of these preventive measures with the exception of rule modification in some sports. Laws have been enacted that require medical evaluation and clearance prior to return to play; however, evidence thus far does not show that laws have been effective in reducing the incidence of concussions in sport. More research is needed in all areas of preventive measures. Sports participation is a complex personal decision on the part of adolescent and his or her family. They should be provided with all information on inherent risks so that they can make an informed decision.

  17. Balance Assessment in Sports-Related Concussion: Evaluating Test-Retest Reliability of the Equilibrate System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Mitchell J; Lee, Young M; Zuckerman, Scott L; Apple, Rachel P; Germanos, Theodore; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the test-retest reliability of a novel computer-based, portable balance assessment tool, the Equilibrate System (ES), used to diagnose sports-related concussion. Twenty-seven students participated in ES testing consisting of three sessions over 4 weeks. The modified Balance Error Scoring System was performed. For each participant, test-retest reliability was established using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ES test-retest reliability from baseline to week 2 produced an ICC value of 0.495 (95% CI, 0.123-0.745). Week 2 testing produced ICC values of 0.602 (95% CI, 0.279-0.803) and 0.610 (95% CI, 0.299-0.804), respectively. All other single measures test-retest reliability values produced poor ICC values. Same-day ES testing showed fair to good test-retest reliability while interweek measures displayed poor to fair test-retest reliability. Testing conditions should be controlled when using computerized balance assessment methods. ES testing should only be used as a part of a comprehensive assessment.

  18. Computerized neurocognitive testing in the management of sport-related concussion: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Jacob E; McCrea, Michael A; Cullum, C Munro

    2013-12-01

    Since the late nineties, computerized neurocognitive testing has become a central component of sport-related concussion (SRC) management at all levels of sport. In 2005, a review of the available evidence on the psychometric properties of four computerized neuropsychological test batteries concluded that the tests did not possess the necessary criteria to warrant clinical application. Since the publication of that review, several more computerized neurocognitive tests have entered the market place. The purpose of this review is to summarize the body of published studies on psychometric properties and clinical utility of computerized neurocognitive tests available for use in the assessment of SRC. A review of the literature from 2005 to 2013 was conducted to gather evidence of test-retest reliability and clinical validity of these instruments. Reviewed articles included both prospective and retrospective studies of primarily sport-based adult and pediatric samples. Summaries are provided regarding the available evidence of reliability and validity for the most commonly used computerized neurocognitive tests in sports settings.

  19. Prognostic indicators of social outcomes in persons who sustained an injury in a road traffic crash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Bamini; Jagnoor, Jagnoor; Harris, Ian A; Nicholas, Michael; Casey, Petrina; Blyth, Fiona; Maher, Christropher G; Cameron, Ian D

    2015-05-01

    There is a lack of longitudinal studies with adequate sample size and follow-up period which have objectively assessed social outcomes among those with mild or moderate musculoskeletal injury or that are not limited to hospital inpatients. We aimed to address this gap by prospectively assessing the potential predictors of return to pre-injury work and daily activities. Persons with mild/moderate musculoskeletal injuries from a vehicle-related crash were surveyed within the first 3 months after the crash (baseline; n=364), and at 12 (n=284) and 24 months (n=252). Participants self-reported return to work, and whether it was return to full or modified duties at work. Analyses were restricted to 170 participants who reported being in pre-injury paid work and had provided information at either 12 months only or at both 12 and 24 months. Return to usual activities was assessed using the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) scale 'Usual Activities' dimension. Twenty-four months after injury 82% (n=121) had returned to work. After multivariable adjustment, not being admitted to hospital was associated with 44% higher likelihood of returning to work at 24 months. Not having any pre-injury chronic illness was associated with returning to work after 24 months, multivariable-adjusted risk ratio (RR), 1.21 (95% confidence intervals, CI: 1.02-1.45). Each 1-SD increase in Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-12 Mental Component Summary (SF-12 MCS) score at baseline was associated with returning to work at 24 months RR 1.13 (95% CI: 1.02-1.25). Younger age, higher SF-12 physical component summary (PCS), and EQ-5D visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were mutually independent predictors of returning to usual activities 24 months later. A range of bio-psychosocial factors, particularly quality of life measures, independently predicted social outcomes including return to work and return to usual daily activities. These determinants could be measured early in the recovery

  20. Descriptive Epidemiology of Injuries Sustained in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's and Women's Volleyball, 2013-2014 to 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Christine M; Weintraub, Gil S; Gregory, Andrew J; Djoko, Aristarque; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-10-01

    There were 18,844 volleyball players in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the 2014-2015 academic year. Little research has examined sex-based differences among these athletes. To examine injury epidemiology in NCAA men's and women's volleyball athletes. Descriptive epidemiology study. Level 3. Injury surveillance data from the 2013-2014 through 2014-2015 academic years were obtained from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program for 6 men's and 33 women's collegiate volleyball teams. Injury rates per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs) and injury rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% CIs were calculated. Time-loss (TL) injuries resulted in participation restriction for at least 24 hours, and non-time-loss (NTL) injuries resulted in participation restriction of less than 24 hours. Overall, 83 and 510 injuries were reported in men and women, respectively, leading to injury rates of 4.69 and 7.07 per 1000 AEs. The injury rate was greater in women than men (IRR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.19-1.90). TL injury rates were 1.75 and 2.62 per 1000 AEs for men and women, respectively. The ankle was the most commonly injured body part among TL injuries (men, 25.8%; women, 24.3%); the knee was the most commonly injured body part among NTL injuries (men, 25.5%; women, 16.3%). Among TL injuries, common diagnoses included sprains (men, 25.8%; women, 31.2%) and concussions (men, 19.4%; women, 14.8%). Most TL concussions were due to ball contact (men, 83.3%; women, 53.6%). Compared with men, women had a greater NTL overuse injury rate (IRR, 3.47; 95% CI, 1.61-7.46). Compared with women, men had a greater TL injury rate associated with ball contact (IRR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.07-4.68). There are differences in injury patterns and rates between male and female intercollegiate volleyball players. Although a limited-contact sport, a notable number of concussions were sustained, mostly from ball contact. Understanding injury patterns may aid clinicians in injury diagnosis, management, and prevention.

  1. Assessing the opinions of subjects with or without sustained hand injury about toe-to-thumb transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Kucuker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic finger amputations may lead to significant functional and aesthetic impairment yet when compared with the number of finger amputations, toe-to-hand transplantation numbers are very low. Material Method: In this study we aimed to assess the thoughts of healthy subjects, with or without previously sustained hand injury, about toe-to-hand transplantation and re-assess their thoughts following a brief informative description of the surgery. Results: We found that after visual briefing, willingness to undergo toe-to-hand transplantation dramatically increased. Conclusion: Visual briefings including video presentations have a great impact on eliminating negative prejudgement. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(3.000: 58-62

  2. Epidemiology of severe injuries among United States high school athletes: 2005-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Cory J; Collins, Christy L; Yard, Ellen E; Comstock, R Dawn

    2009-09-01

    Over 7 million students participate in high school athletics annually. Despite numerous health benefits, high school athletes are at risk for injury. Severe injury rates and patterns differ by gender and type of exposure. Study Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Sports-related injury data were collected during the 2005-2007 academic years from 100 nationally representative United States high schools via RIO (Reporting Information Online). Severe injury was defined as any injury that resulted in the loss of more than 21 days of sports participation. Participating certified athletic trainers (ATCs) reported 1378 severe injuries during 3 550 141 athlete-exposures (0.39 severe injuries per 1000 athletic exposures). Football had the highest severe injury rate (0.69), followed by wrestling (0.52), girls' basketball (0.34), and girls' soccer (0.33). The rate in all boys' sports (0.45) was higher than all girls' sports (0.26) (rate ratio [RR], 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54-1.98; P sports (soccer, basketball, and baseball/softball), girls sustained a higher severe injury rate (0.29) than boys (0.23) (RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.08-1.52; P = .006). More specifically, girls' basketball had a higher rate (0.34) than boys' basketball (0.24) (RR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.10-1.86; P = .009). Differences between boys' and girls' soccer and baseball/softball were not statistically significant. The severe injury rate was greater in competition (0.79) than practice (0.24) (RR, 3.30; 95% CI, 2.97-3.67; P sports injuries, 0.3% resulted in medical disqualification for the athletes' career, and an additional 56.8% resulted in medical disqualification for the entire season. One in 4 (28.3%) severe injuries required surgery, with over half (53.9%) being knee surgeries. Severe injury rates and patterns varied by sport, gender, and type of exposure. Because severe injuries negatively affect athletes' health and often place an increased burden on the health care system, future research should

  3. The incidence and nature of injuries sustained on grass and 3rd generation artificial turf: a pilot study in elite Saudi National Team footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutawa, M; Scott, M; George, K P; Drust, B

    2014-02-01

    To compare the incidence, severity and nature of injuries sustained by Saudi National Team footballers during match-play and training on natural grass and 3rd generation (3G) artificial turf. Injury data was collected on all Saudi National Team players competing at the Gulf Cup (Yemen December 2010: 3G) and the Asian Cup (Qatar January 2011; grass). A total of 49 players were studied (mean ± SD; Age 27 ± 4 yr; body mass 71.4 ± 6.7 kg; height 176.8 ± 6.3 cm; professional playing experience 9 ± 3 yr) of which 31 competed at the Gulf Cup, 32 at the Asian Cup (14 at both). A prospective cohort design was used to investigate the incidence, nature and severity of injuries sustained with data collected using a standardised injury questionnaire. All data were collected by the team physiotherapist with the definition of injury set at any injury that required player and clinician contact. Injury and exposure data were collected and reported for games, training and all football activity. A total of 82 injuries [incidence - 56.1 per 1000 h total game and training exposure] were recorded at the Asian Cup (grass) and 72 injuries [incidence - 37.9 per 1000 h total game and training exposure] were recorded at the Gulf Cup (3G). Incidence data for training, game and all football exposure injury rates were higher when playing on grass. The vast majority of injuries on both surfaces were very minor that, whilst requiring medical attention, did not result in loss of match/training exposure. Injuries that resulted in 1-3 days absence from training or game play had similar incidence rates (Grass: 7.4 vs. 3G: 7.4 injuries per 1000 h exposure). More severe injuries were less frequent but with a higher incidence when playing on grass. Lower limb injuries were the most common in both tournaments with a higher incidence on grass (Grass: 14.2 vs. 3G: 7.9 injuries per 1000 h exposure). Muscle injuries were the most frequent of all injuries with similar incidence rates on

  4. Mental fatigue after very severe closed head injury: Sustained performance, mental effort, and distress at two levels of workload in a driving simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, H.; Hoedemaeker, M.; Brouwer, W.H.; Mulder, L.J.M.; Cremer, R.; Veldman, J.B.P.

    1999-01-01

    In patients with very severe closed head injury (CHI), returning to work is often problematic. The present study focuses on a persistent complaint of these patients, viz. mental fatigue. To study this, the effect of sustained workload is assessed in a continuous dynamic divided attention task. Three

  5. Mental fatigue after very severe closed head injury : Sustained performance, mental effort, and distress at two levels of workload in a driving simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, H; Hoedemaeker, M; Brouwer, WH; Mulder, LJM; Veldman, JBP

    In patients with very severe closed head injury (CHI), returning to work is often problematic. The present study focuses on a persistent complaint of these patients, viz. mental fatigue. To study this, the effect of sustained workload is assessed in a continuous dynamic divided attention task. Three

  6. Bladder management of patients with spinal cord injuries sustained in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Yi Luo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study’s aim is provide an overview of the patients who suffered spinal cord injury (SCI after the magnitude 8.0 Wenchuan earthquake, including each patient’s demographic and epidemiological characteristics, bladder management status, and quality of life (QOL. We also assessed the relationships between bladder management methods, symptomatic urinary tract infection (SUTI, and QOL. Two years after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, a cross-sectional face-to-face survey was conducted on 180 patients with SCI. A self-administered questionnaire and the WHOQOL-BREF assessment were used to assess injury-related information, bladder management methods, and SUTI. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-square test and analysis of variance. A p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. This study found that a male-to-female ratio of approximately 1.2:1, including 98 (54.4% male patients and 82 (45.6% female patients. Thoracic-level injuries were seen in 82 patients (45.56%, 60 (33.33% patients had lumbar-level injuries, 18 (8.33% patients had thoracolumbar-level injuries, and a small number of patients had cervical- or sacral-level injuries. Sixty-two patients (34.44% demonstrated normal voiding, 65 (36.11% required manually assisted voiding, 29 (16.11% required catheterization, and 24 (13.33% used aurine-collecting apparatus. The prevalence of SUTI was 43.89%. Patients who emptied their bladder via manually assisted voiding, catheterization, or with the use of a urine-collecting apparatus demonstrated higher rates of SUTI compared with patients who voided normally (p < 0.05; the patients who required catheterization had higher rates of SUTI compared with patients who required manually assisted voiding (p < 0.05. When manually assisted voiding and catheterization were compared with the use a urine-collecting apparatus, no statistically significant differences were observed in terms of the risk of developing SUTI. The patients

  7. Natural and traumatic sports-related fatalities: a 10-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, E E; Riedel, A; Püeschel, K

    2008-07-01

    To identify the most common causes of death during sports activity in the population of Hamburg, Germany, and to identify which groups of sportspeople are particularly in danger of dying during sports and in which types of sport most fatalities occur. We performed a 10-year autopsy-based retrospective study of all 48,335 fatalities in Hamburg and the surrounding areas that were subjected to police investigations between 1997 and 2006 and screened for sports-related deaths. The main outcome measure was cause of death depending on form of sport, age and risk factors. Most of the fatalities were male. In natural deaths, cardiac causes were the most frequent causes found, with running and football being the most frequent forms of sport in which death had occurred. In some of the cases, sports medical examinations had been performed before death, certifying eligibility for the respective activity. Traumatic deaths were found in all age groups, with younger age groups more likely to have traumatic than natural deaths, and as expected, occurred more commonly in "risky" outdoor activities. Although exercise can have beneficial effects on health, fatalities related to sports activity occur. Cardiac disease is the main cause of sudden death from natural causes. In patients with pre-existing coronary heart disease, left ventricular hypertrophy constitutes a risk factor for exercise-related sudden death. Traumatic deaths often happen on holiday outside the person's country of dwelling, and are most commonly attributable to drowning and blunt trauma. Preparticipation medical screening cannot always prevent fatal incidents during sports activity. Postmortem macroscopic and histological examination can clarify the cause of death and legal issues.

  8. Impact of a State Law on Physician Practice in Sports-Related Concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Michael R; Raybould, Toby; Jamal-Allial, Aziza; Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Lee, Jarone; Gervasini, Alice; Ginsburg, Richard; Mandell, Mark; Donelan, Karen; Masiakos, Peter T

    2016-11-01

    To determine physician-reported adherence to and support of the 2010 Massachusetts youth concussion law, as well as barriers to care and clinical practice in the context of legislation. Primary care physicians (n = 272) in a large pediatric network were eligible for a cross-sectional survey in 2014. Survey questions addressed key policy and practice provisions: concussion knowledge, state regulations and training, practice patterns, referrals, patient characteristics, and barriers to care. Analyses explored relationships between practice and policy, adjusting for physician demographic and practice characteristics. The survey response rate was 64% among all responders (173 of 272). A total of 146 respondents who had evaluated, treated, or referred patients with a suspected sports-related concussion in the previous year were eligible for analysis. The vast majority (90%) of providers agreed that the current Massachusetts laws regarding sports concussions are necessary and support the major provisions. Three-quarters (74%) had taken a required clinician training course on concussions. Those who took training courses were significantly more likely to develop individualized treatment plans (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.1-11.0). Physician training did not improve screening of youth with concussion for depression or substance use. Most physicians (77%) advised patients to refrain from computer, telephone, or television for various time periods. Physicians reported limited communication with schools. Primary care physicians report being comfortable with the diagnosis and management of concussions, and support statewide regulations; however, adherence to mandated training and specific legal requirements varied. Broader and more frequent training may be necessary to align current best evidence with clinical care and state-mandated practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Policies, Procedures, and Practices Regarding Sport-Related Concussion in Community College Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddack, Michael; DeWolf, Ryan; Covassin, Tracey; Kontos, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    College sport organizations and associations endorse concussion-management protocols and policies. To date, little information is available on concussion policies and practices at community college institutions. To assess and describe current practices and policies regarding the assessment, management, and return-to-play criteria for sport-related concussion (SRC) among member institutions of the California Community College Athletic Association (CCCAA). Cross-sectional study. Web-based survey. A total of 55 head athletic trainers (ATs) at CCCAA institutions. Data about policies, procedures, and practices regarding SRC were collected over a 3-week period in March 2012 and analyzed using descriptive statistics, the Fisher exact test, and the Spearman test. Almost half (47%) of ATs stated they had a policy for SRC assessment, management, and return to play at their institution. They reported being in compliance with baseline testing guidelines (25%), management guidelines (34.5%), and return-to-play guidelines (30%). Nearly 31% of ATs described having an SRC policy in place for academic accommodations. Conference attendance was positively correlated with institutional use of academic accommodations after SRC (r = 0.44, P = .01). The number of meetings ATs attended and their use of baseline testing were also positively correlated (r = 0.38, P = .01). At the time of this study, nearly half of CCCAA institutions had concussion policies and 31% had academic-accommodation policies. However, only 18% of ATs at CCCAA institutions were in compliance with all of their concussion policies. Our findings demonstrate improvements in the management of SRCs by ATs at California community colleges compared with previous research but a need for better compliance with SRC policies.

  10. Family History of Migraine Associated With Posttraumatic Migraine Symptoms Following Sport-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufrinko, Alicia; McAllister-Deitrick, Jamie; Elbin, R J; Collins, Michael W; Kontos, Anthony P

    To determine whether family history of migraine increased the likelihood of posttraumatic migraine (PTM) symptom presentation in adolescents following concussion, and examine the influence of family history of migraine and PTM on postinjury outcomes. Outpatient concussion clinic. A total of 153 patients with concussion (103 males and 50 females) aged 15.72 ± 1.48 years (range 12-18 years). Cross-sectional, observational study of patients presenting for initial evaluation 4.72 ± 3.05 days (range 1-14) postinjury. Computerized neurocognitive testing, symptom report, and vestibular/oculomotor screening. Patients with a family history of migraine were 2.6 times (odds ratio = 2.60, confidence interval = 1.35-5.02, P = .003) more likely to present with PTM compared with patients without a family history. Results of multivariate analyses of covariance, controlling for concussion history, revealed significant main effects for PTM on (1) Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT)/Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS) (F = 15.43, P history of migraine on ImPACT/PCSS (P = .22) and VOMS (P = .83) or interaction between family history of migraine and PTM on ImPACT/PCSS (P = .84) and VOMS (P = .52). Family history of migraine is associated with PTM symptoms following sport-related concussion, suggesting a genetic predisposition for migraine may serve as a catalyst or trigger for onset of PTM. However, only presence of PTM, rather than family history of migraine, was related to worse neurocognitive and vestibular/oculomotor outcomes.

  11. Sports-related sudden cardiac death in Switzerland classified by static and dynamic components of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräni, Christoph; Chappex, Nina; Fracasso, Tony; Vital, Cristina; Kellerhals, Christoph; Schmied, Christian; Saguner, Ardan M; Trachsel, Lukas D; Eser, Prisca; Michaud, Katarzyna; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Sports-related sudden cardiac deaths (SrSCDs) occur most frequently in highly dynamic and/or static sports. We aimed to assess the incidence and characteristics of SrSCDs in Switzerland and to compare SrSCD occurrence according to sports categories with the sports participation behaviour in the general population. Between 1999 and 2010, forensic reports of SrSCDs in young individuals (10-39 years of age) were retrospectively reviewed and categorised based on peak static (increasing from I to III) and dynamic sports components (increasing from A to C). Data were compared to the sports participation behaviour of the Swiss population. Sixty-nine SrSCDs were identified. Forty-eight (69.6%) occurred during recreational sports (REC) and 21 (30.4%) during competitive sports (COMP). Incidences (per 100,000 athlete person-years) for COMP and REC were 0.90 and 0.52, respectively (p = 0.001). Most SrSCDs occurred in IC (23 cases, 33.3%), followed by IIC (13, 18.9%), IIIA and IIIC (11 each, 15.9%), IIIB (6, 8.7%), IIA (4, 5.8%) and IB sports categories (1, 1.5%). No SrSCDs were found in IA and IIB sports categories. Incidences between sports categories (IIIA 0.25, IB 0.25, IC 0.18, IIC 0.33 and IIIC 0.25) were not significantly different except to IIA (0.94, p sports category. Coronary artery disease (CAD) was the most common underlying pathology of SrSCD. In this Swiss cohort, incidence of SrSCD was very low and similar in all sports categories classified by their static and dynamic components. However, the incidence was higher in COMP compared to REC, and CAD proved to be the most common underlying cause of SrSCD. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  12. Incidence of Sports-Related Concussion Among NCAA Women’s Ice Hockey Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Emily M.; Kroshus, Emily; Hu, Caroline H.; Gedman, Marissa; Collins, Jamie E.; Matzkin, Elizabeth G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: There are limited data on the incidence of concussion and concussion symptom nondisclosure among collegiate women’s ice hockey athletes. Purpose: To determine the incidence of sports-related concussion (SRC) in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) women’s ice hockey athletes. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: An anonymous online survey was completed by 459 NCAA women’s ice hockey athletes. Players reported diagnosed concussions as well as incidents where they experienced an impact or blow to the head followed by symptoms associated with a concussion; reports spanned the duration of the 2014-2015 season and throughout players’ organized hockey career. Results: About half (n = 219, 47.7%) of respondents reported at least 1 diagnosed concussion over the duration of their entire organized ice hockey career. A total of 13.3% (n = 61) of respondents reported a diagnosed concussion during the 2014-2015 season. The incidence rate was 1.18 (95% CI, 0.92-1.51) per 1000 athlete-exposures to a game or practice and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.45-0.74) per 1000 hours of ice time. One-third (34.2%, n = 157) of players reported at least 1 impact where they experienced concussion-like symptoms during the 2014-2015 season; 82.8% of these players reported that they continued to play after at least 1 of these impacts, and 66.8% of players reported at least 1 impact where they never disclosed any symptoms. Conclusion: There is a high incidence of SRC in collegiate women’s ice hockey and a concerning level of symptom nondisclosure. Additional research is needed to understand the causes of concussion and reasons for the lack of symptom disclosure, including factors specific to female athletes and contextual issues specific to women’s collegiate ice hockey. PMID:28812036

  13. Incidence of Sports-Related Concussion Among NCAA Women's Ice Hockey Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Emily M; Kroshus, Emily; Hu, Caroline H; Gedman, Marissa; Collins, Jamie E; Matzkin, Elizabeth G

    2017-07-01

    There are limited data on the incidence of concussion and concussion symptom nondisclosure among collegiate women's ice hockey athletes. To determine the incidence of sports-related concussion (SRC) in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) women's ice hockey athletes. Descriptive epidemiology study. An anonymous online survey was completed by 459 NCAA women's ice hockey athletes. Players reported diagnosed concussions as well as incidents where they experienced an impact or blow to the head followed by symptoms associated with a concussion; reports spanned the duration of the 2014-2015 season and throughout players' organized hockey career. About half (n = 219, 47.7%) of respondents reported at least 1 diagnosed concussion over the duration of their entire organized ice hockey career. A total of 13.3% (n = 61) of respondents reported a diagnosed concussion during the 2014-2015 season. The incidence rate was 1.18 (95% CI, 0.92-1.51) per 1000 athlete-exposures to a game or practice and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.45-0.74) per 1000 hours of ice time. One-third (34.2%, n = 157) of players reported at least 1 impact where they experienced concussion-like symptoms during the 2014-2015 season; 82.8% of these players reported that they continued to play after at least 1 of these impacts, and 66.8% of players reported at least 1 impact where they never disclosed any symptoms. There is a high incidence of SRC in collegiate women's ice hockey and a concerning level of symptom nondisclosure. Additional research is needed to understand the causes of concussion and reasons for the lack of symptom disclosure, including factors specific to female athletes and contextual issues specific to women's collegiate ice hockey.

  14. Are Canadian clinicians providing consistent sport-related concussion management advice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, James D; Rendely, Alexandra; Garel, Alisha; Meaney, Christopher; Stoller, Jacqueline; Kaicker, Jatin; Hayden, Leigh; Moineddin, Rahim; Frémont, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    To compare the knowledge and use of recommendations for the management of sport-related concussion (SRC) among sport and exercise medicine physicians (SEMPs) and emergency department physicians (EDPs) to assess the success of SRC knowledge transfer across Canada. A self-administered, multiple-choice survey accessed via e-mail by SEMPs and EDPs. The survey had been assessed for content validity. Canada. The survey was completed between May and July 2012 by SEMPs who had passed the diploma examination of the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine and by EDPs who did not hold this diploma. Knowledge and identification of sources of concussion management information, use of concussion diagnosis strategies, and whether physicians use common and consistent terminology when explaining cognitive rest strategies to patients after an SRC. There was a response rate of 28% (305 of 1085). The SEMP and EDP response rates were 41% (147 of 360) and 22% (158 of 725), respectively. Of the responses, 41% of EDPs and 3% of SEMPs were unaware of any consensus statements on concussion in sport; 74% of SEMPs used the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool, version 2 (SCAT2), "usually or always," whereas 88% of EDPs never used the SCAT2. When queried about how cognitive rest could best be achieved after an SRC, no consistent answer was documented. Differences and a lack of consistency in the implementation of recommendations for SRC patients were identified for SEMPs and EDPs. It appears that the SCAT2 is used more in the SEMP setting than in the emergency context. Further knowledge transfer efforts and research should address the barriers to achieving more consistent advice given by physicians who attend SRC patients. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  15. Social cognition and its relationship to functional outcomes in patients with sustained acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubukata S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Shiho Ubukata,1,2 Rumi Tanemura,2 Miho Yoshizumi,1 Genichi Sugihara,1 Toshiya Murai,1 Keita Ueda1 1Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 2Department of Rehabilitation Science, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan Abstract: Deficits in social cognition are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, little is known about how such deficits affect functional outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between social cognition and functional outcomes in patients with TBI. We studied this relationship in 20 patients with TBI over the course of 1 year post-injury. Patients completed neurocognitive assessments and social cognition tasks. The social cognition tasks included an emotion-perception task and three theory of mind tasks: the Faux Pas test, Reading the Mind in the Eyes (Eyes test, and the Moving-Shapes paradigm. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique was used to assess functional outcomes. Compared with our database of normal subjects, patients showed impairments in all social cognition tasks. Multiple regression analysis revealed that theory of mind ability as measured by the Eyes test was the best predictor of the cognitive aspects of functional outcomes. The findings of this pilot study suggest that the degree to which a patient can predict what others are thinking is an important measure that can estimate functional outcomes over 1 year following TBI. Keywords: Eyes test, social emotion perception, social function, social participation, theory of mind

  16. NK1.1+ cells promote sustained tissue injury and inflammation after trauma with hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuhua; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Scott, Melanie; Manson, Joanna; Loughran, Patricia; Ramadan, Mostafa; Demetris, Anthony J; Billiar, Timothy R

    2017-07-01

    Various cell populations expressing NK1.1 contribute to innate host defense and systemic inflammatory responses, but their role in hemorrhagic shock and trauma remains uncertain. NK1.1+ cells were depleted by i.p. administration of anti-NK1.1 (or isotype control) on two consecutive days, followed by hemorrhagic shock with resuscitation and peripheral tissue trauma (HS/T). The plasma levels of IL-6, MCP-1, alanine transaminase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were measured at 6 and 24 h. Histology in liver and gut were examined at 6 and 24 h. The number of NK cells, NKT cells, neutrophils, and macrophages in liver, as well as intracellular staining for TNF-α, IFN-γ, and MCP-1 in liver cell populations were determined by flow cytometry. Control mice subjected to HS/T exhibited end organ damage manifested by marked increases in circulating ALT, AST, and MCP-1 levels, as well as histologic evidence of hepatic necrosis and gut injury. Although NK1.1+ cell-depleted mice exhibited a similar degree of organ damage as nondepleted animals at 6 h, NK1.1+ cell depletion resulted in marked suppression of both liver and gut injury by 24 h after HS/T. These findings indicate that NK1.1+ cells contribute to the persistence of inflammation leading to end organ damage in the liver and gut. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  17. Eye Injuries in High School and Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Barry P; Pierpoint, Lauren A; Boden, Rebecca G; Comstock, R Dawn; Kerr, Zachary Y

    Although eye injuries constitute a small percentage of high school and college sports injuries, they have the potential to be permanently debilitating. Eye injury rates will vary by sport, sex, and between the high school and college age groups. Descriptive epidemiology study. Level 3. Data from eye injury reports in high school and college athletes were obtained from the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System, High School Reporting Information Online (HS RIO) database over a 10-year span (2005-2006 through 2014-2015 school years) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP) over an 11-year span (2004-2005 through 2014-2015 school years). Injury rates per 100,000 athlete-exposures (AEs), injury rate ratios (RRs), and 95% CIs were calculated. Distributions of eye injuries by diagnosis, mechanism, time loss, and surgery needs were also examined. A total of 237 and 273 eye injuries were reported in the HS RIO and the NCAA ISP databases, respectively. The sports with the highest eye injury rates (per 100,000 AEs) for combined high school and college athletes were women's basketball (2.36), women's field hockey (2.35), men's basketball (2.31), and men's wrestling (2.07). Overall eye injury rates at the high school and college levels were 0.68 and 1.84 per 100,000 AEs, respectively. Eye injury rates were higher in competition than practice in high school (RR, 3.47; 95% CI, 2.69-4.48) and college (RR, 3.13; 95% CI, 2.45-3.99). Most injuries were contusions (high school, 35.9%; college, 33.3%) and due to contact (high school, 89.9%; college, 86.4%). Only a small percentage of injuries resulted in time loss over 21 days (high school, 4.2%; college, 3.0%). Eye injury rates and patterns vary by sport, sex, and between the high school and college age groups. Although severe injuries do occur, most eye injuries sustained by high school and college athletes are minor, with limited time loss and full recovery

  18. Epidemiology of Injuries Sustained as a Result of Intentional Player Contact in High School Football, Ice Hockey, and Lacrosse: 2005-2006 Through 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Justin H.; Murray, Monica F.; Kraeutler, Matthew J.; Pierpoint, Lauren A.; Welton, K. Linnea; McCarty, Eric C.; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lacrosse and ice hockey are quickly growing in popularity, while football remains the most popular sport among high school student-athletes. Injuries remain a concern, given the physical nature of these contact sports. Purpose: To describe the rates and patterns of injuries sustained as a result of intentional player contact in United States high school boys’ football, ice hockey, and lacrosse. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of High School RIO (Reporting Information Online) data, including exposure and injury data collected from a large sample of high schools in the United States from 2005-2006 through 2015-2016. Data were analyzed to calculate rates, assess patterns, and evaluate potential risk factors for player-to-player contact injuries. Results: A total of 34,532 injuries in boys’ football, ice hockey, and lacrosse occurred during 9,078,902 athlete-exposures (AEs), for a rate of 3.80 injuries per 1000 AEs in the 3 contact sports of interest. The risk of injuries was found to be greater in competition compared with practice for all 3 sports, with the largest difference in ice hockey (rate ratio, 8.28) and the smallest difference in lacrosse (rate ratio, 3.72). In all 3 contact sports, the most commonly injured body site in competition and practice caused by both tackling/checking and being tackled/checked was the head/face. However, a significantly greater proportion of concussions sustained in football were the result of tackling compared with being tackled (28.2% vs 24.1%, respectively). In addition, a significantly greater proportion of concussions were sustained in competition compared with practice for all 3 sports. Conclusion: This study is the first to collectively compare injury rates and injury patterns sustained from intentional player-to-player contact in boys’ high school football, ice hockey, and lacrosse. Notably, there was a relatively high risk of injuries and

  19. Health-related quality of life 24 months after sustaining a minor musculoskeletal injury in a road traffic crash: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Bamini; Jagnoor, Jagnoor; Harris, Ian A; Nicholas, Michael; Casey, Petrina; Blyth, Fiona; Maher, Christopher G; Cameron, Ian D

    2017-04-03

    A better understanding of the long-term factors that independently predict poorer quality of life following mild to moderate musculoskeletal injuries is needed. We aimed to establish the predictors of quality of life (including sociodemographic, health, psychosocial, and pre-injury factors) 24 months after a noncatastrophic road traffic injury. In a prospective cohort study of 252 participants with mild/moderate injury sustained in a road traffic crash, quality of life was measured 24 months following the baseline survey. A telephone-administered questionnaire obtained information on various potential explanatory variables. Health-related quality of life was measured using the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) and Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-12 (SF-12). Multivariable linear regression analyses determined the associations between explanatory variables and quality of life measures. Mean SF-12 physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores increased by 7.3 and 2.5 units, respectively, from baseline to 24-month follow-up. Each 10-year increase in baseline age was independently associated with 3.1-unit (P life measures (EQ-5D summary and/or VAS scores and/ or SF-12 MCS) included marital status, smoking, hospital admission, pre-injury health (anxiety/depression and chronic illness), and whiplash injury. Sociodemographic indicators, pre-injury health, and biopsychosocial correlates were independently associated with health-related quality of life 24 months following a noncatastrophic road traffic crash injury.

  20. The relevance of sport-related behaviour patterns in the family for the sport participation of youth in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Hayoz, Christelle Vanessa; Klostermann, Claudia; Schlesinger, Torsten; Nagel, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Despite various efforts to promote sport participation among youth, social inequalities still exist. An explanation for these social inequalities could be traced back to transgenerational transmission of sportrelated values and behaviour patterns in a family (Baur, 1989). Therefore, children’s socialisation to sport is strongly influenced by the parents’ sport-related values and sport behaviour (Burrmann, 2005). However, findings of previous studies are inconsistent, and the daily sport-re...

  1. A review of synthetic playing surfaces, the shoe-surface interface, and lower extremity injuries in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Samuel A; Fabricant, Peter D; Khair, M Michael; Haleem, Amgad M; Drakos, Mark C

    2012-11-01

    The evolution of synthetic playing surfaces began in the 1960s and has had an impact on field use, shoe-surface dynamics, and the incidence of sports-related injuries. Modern third-generation turfs are being installed in recreational facilities and professional stadiums worldwide. Currently, > two-thirds of National Football League teams, > 100 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I football teams, and > 1000 high schools in the United States have installed synthetic playing surfaces. Those in favor of such playing surfaces note their unique combination of versatility and durability; they can be used in both ideal and inclement weather conditions. However, the more widespread installation and use of these surfaces have raised questions and concerns regarding the impact of artificial turf on the type and severity of sports-related injuries. There appears to be no question that the shoe-surface interface has a significant impact on such injuries. Independent variables such as weather conditions, contact versus noncontact sport, shoe design, and field wear complicate many of the results reported in the literature, thereby preventing an accurate assessment of the true risk(s) associated with certain shoe-surface combinations. Historically, studies suggest that artificial turf is associated with a higher incidence of injury. Furthermore, reliable biomechanical data suggest that both the torque and strain experienced by lower extremity joints generated by artificial surfaces may be more than those generated by natural grass fields. Recent data from the National Football League support this theory and suggest that elite athletes may sustain more injuries, even when playing on the newer artificial surfaces. By contrast, some reports based on data collected from lower-level athletes suggest that artificial turf may protect against injury. This review discusses the history of artificial surfaces, the biomechanics of the shoe-surface interface, and some common

  2. Epidemiology of high school and collegiate football injuries in the United States, 2005-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Prasad R; Fields, Sarah K; Collins, Christy L; Dick, Randall W; Comstock, R Dawn

    2007-08-01

    Football, one of the most popular sports among male high school students in the United States, is a leading cause of sports-related injuries, with an injury rate almost twice that of basketball, the second most popular sport. Injury patterns will vary between competition and practice exposures and between levels of play (ie, high school vs. National Collegiate Athletic Association [NCAA]). Descriptive epidemiology study. Football-related injury data were collected over the 2005-2006 school year from 100 nationally representative high schools via High School RIO (Reporting Information Online) and from 55 Division I, II, and III colleges via the NCAA Injury Surveillance System. Nationally, an estimated 517,726 high school football-related injuries (1881 unweighted injuries) occurred during the 2005-2006 season. The rate of injury per 1000 athlete-exposures was greater during high school competitions (12.04) than during practices (2.56). The rate of injury per 1000 athlete-exposures was also greater during collegiate competitions (40.23) than during practices (5.77). While the overall rate of injury per 1000 athlete-exposures was greater in the NCAA (8.61) than in high school (4.36), high school football players sustained a greater proportion of fractures and concussions. Running plays were the leading cause of injury, with running backs and linebackers being the positions most commonly injured. Patterns of football injuries vary, especially by type of exposure and level of play. Future studies should continue to compare differences in injury patterns in high school and collegiate football, with particular emphasis placed on high-risk plays (running plays) and positions (running backs and linebackers).

  3. Effects of Traditional Versus Horizontal Inertial Flywheel Power Training on Common Sport-Related Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Hoyo Moisés

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the effects of power training using traditional vertical resistance exercises versus direction specific horizontal inertial flywheel training on performance in common sport-related tasks. Twenty-three healthy and physically active males (age: 22.29 ± 2.45 years volunteered to participate in this study. Participants were allocated into either the traditional training (TT group where the half squat exercise on a smith machine was applied or the horizontal flywheel training (HFT group performing the front step exercise with an inertial flywheel. Training volume and intensity were matched between groups by repetitions (5-8 sets with 8 repetitions and relative intensity (the load that maximized power (Pmax over the period of six weeks. Speed (10 m and 20 m, countermovement jump height (CMJH, 20 m change of direction ability (COD and strength during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC were assessed before and after the training program. The differences between groups and by time were assessed using a two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures, followed by paired t-tests. A significant group by time interaction (p=0.004 was found in the TT group demonstrating a significantly higher CMJH. Within-group analysis revealed statistically significant improvements in a 10 m sprint (TT: −0.17 0.27 s vs. HFT: −0.11 0.10 s, CMJH (TT: 4.92 2.58 cm vs. HFT: 1.55 2.44 cm and MVIC (TT: 62.87 79.71 N vs. HFT: 106.56 121.63 N in both groups (p < 0.05. However, significant differences only occurred in the 20 m sprint time in the TT group (−0.04 0.12 s; p = 0.04. In conclusion, the results suggest that TT at the maximal peak power load is more effective than HFT for counter movement jump height while both TT and HFT elicited significant improvements in 10 m sprint performance while only TT significantly improved 20 m sprint performance.

  4. Socioeconomic status and outcomes after sport-related concussion: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Zalneraitis, Brian Holt; Totten, Douglas J; Rubel, Kolin E; Kuhn, Andrew W; Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Bonfield, Christopher M; Sills, Allen K; Solomon, Gary S

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE A significant proportion of patients experience long-term symptoms after sport-related concussion (SRC), and several factors have been associated with this protracted recovery. Limited data exist on the role of socioeconomic status (SES) on SRC outcomes. The objective in this study was to conduct a preliminary investigation to determine the effect of SES on outcomes after SRC in student-athletes treated at a regional sports concussion center. METHODS A retrospective cohort study of 282 middle school, high school, and collegiate student-athletes was conducted. An attempt was made to contact all patients seen at a comprehensive SRC center between January 2012 and May 2015 for in-depth interviews. Subsequent demographic data were collected. The SES was defined as follows: cost of living percentile, median income percentile, percentage of college graduates, percentage of homeowners, county type, and insurance status. Outcomes after SRC were defined as follows: days of symptom duration, days of missed school, and days of missed practice. Statistically controlled covariates included sex, race, age, body mass index, concussion history, neuropsychiatric history, and type of sport. RESULTS A total of 282 student-athletes consented and were studied. The median age was 15.8 years (range 11.6-22.2 years) and 61.4% of student-athletes were male. A previous concussion was incurred by 34.0% of student-athletes. Football was the most common sport (32.3%), followed by soccer (16.3%), and basketball (15.6%). The median symptom duration was 21 days (range 1-365 days); the median missed school days was 2 (range 0-90 days); and median for days of missed practice was 10 (range 0-150 days). After multivariate Cox regression analysis, no relationship between any of the 6 SES variables and symptom duration or missed practice was seen. However, individuals with private insurance had more missed days of school than those with public insurance (hazard ratio 0.46, 95% CI 0.26-0.83, p

  5. Sleep disturbance and neurocognitive function during the recovery from a sport-related concussion in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyun, Regina O; Milewski, Matthew D; Hafeez, Imran

    2015-03-01

    Sleep disturbances are a hallmark sign after a sport-related concussion (SRC). Poor sleep has been shown to adversely affect baseline neurocognitive test scores, but it is not comprehensively understood how neurocognitive function is affected by disrupted sleep during recovery from a concussion. To identify the correlation between adolescent athletes' neurocognitive function and their self-reported sleep quantity and sleep disturbance symptoms during recovery from SRC. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognition Testing (ImPACT) data were retrospectively collected for 545 adolescent athletes treated for SRC at a sports medicine concussion clinic. Patients were stratified into groups based on 2 criteria: self-reported sleep duration and self-reported sleep disturbance symptoms during postinjury ImPACT testing. Sleep duration was classified as short (9 hours). Sleep disturbance symptoms were self-reported as part of the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS) as either sleeping less than normal, sleeping more than normal, or having trouble falling asleep. One-way analyses of variance were conducted to examine the effects that sleep duration as well as self-reported sleep disturbance symptoms had on composite scores. A total of 1067 ImPACT tests were analyzed: test 1, 545; test 2, 380; and test 3, 142. Sleeping fewer than 7 hours the night before testing correlated with higher PCSS scores (P sleeping longer than 9 hours correlated with worse visual memory (P = .01), visual motor speed (P sleep disturbance symptoms, patients demonstrated worse composite scores during ImPACT testing when they self-reported sleeping more than normal (ImPACT test 1: verbal memory, P memory, P memory, P sleep had been disrupted. Adolescent patients who perceive that their sleep is somehow disrupted after SRC may report a greater number of concussion symptoms during their recovery. In addition, the study results suggest that sleeping more

  6. Baseline neurocognitive testing in sports-related concussions: the importance of a prior night's sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, D Jake; Zuckerman, Scott L; Kutscher, Scott J; Gregory, Andrew J; Solomon, Gary S

    2014-02-01

    The management of sports-related concussions (SRCs) utilizes serial neurocognitive assessments and self-reported symptom inventories to assess recovery and safety for return to play (RTP). Because postconcussive RTP goals include symptom resolution and a return to neurocognitive baseline levels, clinical decisions rest in part on understanding modifiers of this baseline. Several studies have reported age and sex to influence baseline neurocognitive performance, but few have assessed the potential effect of sleep. We chose to investigate the effect of reported sleep duration on baseline Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) performance and the number of patient-reported symptoms. We hypothesized that athletes receiving less sleep before baseline testing would perform worse on neurocognitive metrics and report more symptoms. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. We retrospectively reviewed 3686 nonconcussed athletes (2371 male, 1315 female; 3305 high school, 381 college) with baseline symptom and ImPACT neurocognitive scores. Patients were stratified into 3 groups based on self-reported sleep duration the night before testing: (1) short, MANCOVA) with an α level of .05 was used to assess the influence of sleep duration on baseline ImPACT performance. A univariate ANCOVA was performed to investigate the influence of sleep on total self-reported symptoms. When controlling for age and sex as covariates, the MANCOVA revealed significant group differences on ImPACT reaction time, verbal memory, and visual memory scores but not visual-motor (processing) speed scores. An ANCOVA also revealed significant group differences in total reported symptoms. For baseline symptoms and ImPACT scores, subsequent pairwise comparisons revealed these associations to be most significant when comparing the short and intermediate sleep groups. Our results indicate that athletes sleeping fewer than 7 hours before baseline testing perform worse on 3 of 4 Im

  7. Basketball injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Peter A

    2005-01-01

    To identify and quantify, to the best extent possible from the existing literature, injury characteristics and factors (risk; protective) associated with injury in young basketball players. Database searches principally involving Medline and SportDiscus. In addition, web-based searching and filtering of the reference lists of papers found in the preliminary searches were utilized. Few well-controlled studies of this population have been conducted. However, from the information available: basketball is the most frequent cause of sports-related emergency department visits for youth and adolescents; the risk of being injured in a game is greater than for practice; girls are more likely to be injured than boys, especially with knee and ankle injuries and the knee injuries are more likely to be severe; acute injuries are more common than chronic; strains/sprains are the most common types of injuries but overall time loss is minimal, indicating that the majority of pediatric basketball injuries are minor (less than 7 days away from activity). Intervention studies show that: mouthguards reduce orofacial/dental injuries; mouthguard use can be increased in young players; neuromuscular training can reduce the incidence of knee injuries in female participants; postural sway is related to risk of ankle injury. The current state of epidemiological research involving youth and adolescent basketball injuries is poor. With an increasing number of young participants, in situations ranging from informal play and physical education classes to organized community and school teams, the need for comprehensive and authoritative information on risk and protective factors is significant.

  8. Posttraumatic migraine as a predictor of recovery and cognitive impairment after sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Anthony P; Elbin, R J; Lau, Brian; Simensky, Steven; Freund, Brin; French, Jonathan; Collins, Michael W

    2013-07-01

    Although previous research has demonstrated that patients with posttraumatic migraine (PTM) after concussion report more symptoms and cognitive deficits after injury than do those without PTM, it is not known whether these effects persist beyond the first week of injury or whether PTM predicts recovery time. To determine whether PTM during the first week after injury predicts (1) cognitive impairment and symptoms in the second week after injury and (2) overall recovery time. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Participants were 138 male high school football players with a mean age of 15.96 years (SD, 1.18 years; range, 13-19 years). They were classified into 3 groups: PTM (headache, nausea, and photosensitivity or phonosensitivity), headache (headache without the other PTM symptoms), or no headache (no headache or PTM symptoms). The Immediate Post-concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT) was used to assess cognitive performance and symptoms at baseline, postinjury days 1-7, and postinjury days 8-14. Recovery time data were collected from medical records. The PTM group performed worse on verbal memory than did the headache group at 8-14 days after injury. The PTM group performed worse on visual memory, reaction time, and symptoms than did the other groups at 1-7 days and 8-14 days after injury. The PTM group was 7.3 times (95% confidence interval, 1.80-29.91) more likely to have protracted recovery (>20 days) than the no headache group and 2.6 times (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.54) more likely than the headache group. Results suggest that PTM is associated with cognitive impairments and protracted recovery and that headache alone is not a good predictor of recovery.

  9. Incorporating virtual reality graphics with brain imaging for assessment of sport-related concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobounov, Semyon; Sebastianelli, Wayne; Newell, Karl M

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing concern that traditional neuropsychological (NP) testing tools are not sensitive to detecting residual brain dysfunctions in subjects suffering from mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBI). Moreover, most MTBI patients are asymptomatic based on anatomical brain imaging (CT, MRI), neurological examinations and patients' subjective reports within 10 days post-injury. Our ongoing research has documented that residual balance and visual-kinesthetic dysfunctions along with its underlying alterations of neural substrates may be detected in "asymptomatic subjects" by means of Virtual Reality (VR) graphics incorporated with brain imaging (EEG) techniques.

  10. Higher Fat Mass Is Associated With a History of Knee Injury in Youth Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Clodagh M; Whittaker, Jackie L; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Reimer, Raylene A; Woodhouse, Linda J; Ghali, Brianna; Doyle-Baker, Patricia K; Emery, Carolyn A

    2017-02-01

    Study Design Historical cohort study. Background History of a knee joint injury and increased fat mass are risk factors for joint disease. Objective The objective of this study was to examine differences in adiposity, physical activity, and cardiorespiratory fitness between youths with a 3- to 10-year history of sport-related intra-articular knee injury and uninjured controls. Methods One hundred young adults (aged 15-26 years; 55% female) with a sport-related intra-articular knee injury sustained 3 to 10 years previously and 100 controls matched for age, sex, and sport, who had no history of intra-articular knee injury, were recruited. Fat mass index (FMI) and abdominal fat (fat mass at the L1 to L4 vertebral levels) were derived using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness were measured using the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire and the multistage 20-meter shuttle run test for aerobic fitness, respectively. Results Previously injured participants demonstrated higher FMI (within-pair difference, 1.05 kg/m2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.53, 1.57) and abdominal fat (461 g; 95% CI: 228, 694) than uninjured controls. In multivariable linear regression analysis, previous injury was significantly associated with increased FMI. This increase was attenuated in those who participated in higher levels of physical activity or had higher estimated maximum volume of oxygen. Conclusion As a risk factor for osteoarthritis in an already susceptible group, excess adiposity is an undesirable trait in the potential pathway to joint disease. Increasing physical activity in this population may be a potential intervention to reduce adiposity thus impede disease initiation and/or progression. Level of Evidence Level 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(2):80-87. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7101.

  11. The "value added" of neurocognitive testing after sports-related concussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kampen, Derk A.; Lovell, Mark R.; Pardini, Jamie E.; Collins, Michael W.; Fu, Freddie H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Neurocognitive testing has been endorsed as a "cornerstone" of concussion management by recent Vienna and Prague meetings of the Concussion in Sport Group. Neurocognitive testing is important given the potential unreliability of athlete self-report after injury. Relying only on athletes'

  12. Injury Recurrence Among High School Athletes in the United States: A Decade of Patterns and Trends, 2005-2006 Through 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, K Linnea; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Pierpoint, Lauren A; Bartley, Justin H; McCarty, Eric C; Comstock, R Dawn

    2018-01-01

    As participation in high school athletics increases, so does the number of adolescents experiencing sports-related injury. Understanding injury patterns is an important component to developing and evaluating prevention and rehabilitation programs. To analyze recurrent injury rates and patterns among high school athletes, to compare recurrent injuries with new injuries, and to evaluate injury trends over time. Descriptive epidemiology study. High school sports injury data on 24 sports were collected from 2005-2006 through 2015-2016 via the High School RIO (Reporting Information Online) surveillance system. Injury rates were calculated as number of injuries per 10,000 athletic exposures (AEs). Injury rate ratios and injury proportion ratios (IPRs) were calculated to compare differences among subgroups. Overall, 78,005 injuries were sustained during 40,195,806 AEs, for an injury rate of 19.41 per 10,000 AEs. Of these, 69,821 (89.5%) were new injuries, and 8184 (10.5%) were recurrent. The ankle was the most commonly injured body part among recurrent injuries, while the head/face was the most common body part that sustained new injuries. Ligament sprains were more often recurrent, while concussions were more commonly diagnosed as new, although concussions represented 16.7% of recurrent injuries. Trends for recurrent injuries over time were relatively stable. The proportion of athletes who had >3 weeks of time loss or medical disqualification (15.8% vs 13.3%; IPR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.13-1.26) or who voluntarily withdrew from sport (2.5% vs 1.1%; IPR, 2.33; 95% CI, 2.00-2.73) was significantly greater for recurrent injuries than new injuries. Furthermore, a greater proportion of recurrent injuries resulted in surgery (8.1% vs 6.0%; IPR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.24-1.46). Although only 10.5% of all injuries were recurrent, they more frequently resulted in missing >3 weeks of playing time and were more often managed surgically when compared with new injuries. The rate of recurrent

  13. Primary versus delayed repair for bile duct injuries sustained during cholecystectomy: results of a survey of the Association Francaise de Chirurgie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannelli, Antonio; Paineau, Jacques; Hamy, Antoine; Schneck, Anne-Sophie; Schaaf, Caroline; Gugenheim, Jean

    2013-08-01

    Bile duct injuries (BDIs) sustained during a cholecystectomy still remain a major surgical problem, and it is still not clear whether the injury should be repaired immediately or a delayed repair is preferred. A retrospective national French survey was conducted to compare the results of immediate (at time of cholecystectomy), early (within 45 days after a cholecystectomy) and late (beyond 45 days after a cholecystectomy) surgical repair for BDI sustained during a cholecystectomy. Forty-seven surgical centres provided 640 cases of bile duct injury sustained during a cholecystectomy of which 543 were analysed for the purpose of the present study. The timing of repair was immediate in 194 cases (35.7%), early in 216 cases (39.8%) and late in 133 cases (24.5%). The type of repair was a suture repair in 157 cases (81%), and a bilio-digestive reconstruction in 37 cases (19%) for immediate repair; a suture repair in 119 cases (55.1%) and a bilio-digestive anastomosis in 96 cases (44.9%) for the early repair; and a bilio-digestive reconstruction in 129 cases (97%) and a suture repair in 4 cases (3%) for late repair. A second procedure was required in 110 cases (56.7%) for immediate repair, 80 cases (40.7%) for early repair (P < 0.05) and in 9 cases (6.8%) for late repair (P < 0.001). The timing of surgical repair for a bile duct injury sustained during a cholecystectomy influences significantly the rate of a second procedure and a late repair should be preferred option. © 2012 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  14. Association between Time of Day of Sports-Related Physical Activity and the Onset of Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shan; Zhang, Zhen; Long, Qingqing; Ma, Yao; Lian, Xiaoqing; Yang, Yang; Gao, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Liansheng

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the association between the time of day of sports-related physical activity and the onset of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a coronary artery disease (CAD) population in China. Between February 2014 and March 2015, a total of 696 patients from Nanjing, China, who had CAD were studied and divided into two groups (Non-AMI and AMI groups). The work-related activity and sports-related physical activity information were obtained from a self-reporting predesigned patient questionnaire. Sports-related physical activity was associated with a lower risk of the onset of AMI, after adjusting the established and potential confounders, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 0.67 (95% CI, 0.47-0.94) compared with those who did not have any sports-related physical activity. A dose-response relationship was observed for intensity, duration, and frequency of sports-related physical activity. Further stratification analysis revealed that the protective effects of sports-related physical activity were significant in the morning and evening groups, and patients who exercised in the evening were at a lower risk of AMI than those doing sports-related physical activity in the morning. The adjusted ORs for doing sports-related physical activity in the morning and evening groups were 0.60(0.36-0.98) and 0.56(0.37-0.87), respectively, compared with inactivity (all Psports-related physical activity in the evening had an adjusted OR of 0.93 (95% CI, 0.54-1.64, P = 0.824) compared with in the morning group. Sports-related physical activity is associated with a lower risk of onset of AMI than inactivity in Chinese people. For CAD patients, we suggest they participate in sports-related physical activity of high intensity, long duration, and high frequency. Doing sports-related physical activity in the evening and in the morning have similar benefits on the prevention of the onset of AMI.

  15. Imaging of Muscle Injuries in Sports Medicine: Sports Imaging Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank W.; Robinson, Philip; Tol, Johannes L.; Regatte, Ravindar R.; Crema, Michel D.

    2017-01-01

    In sports-related muscle injuries, the main goal of the sports medicine physician is to return the athlete to competition-balanced against the need to prevent the injury from worsening or recurring. Prognosis based on the available clinical and imaging information is crucial. Imaging is crucial to

  16. [Volleyball sport school injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, K; Rossner, D; Gössling, T; Richter, M; Krettek, C

    2004-12-01

    significant number of all school sport related injuries. Upper extremity injuries account for the vast majority of all injuries especially during individual game play. Blunt trauma and fractures are most prevalent among school sport injuries in soccer. Preventive measures such as preservation of a high level of attention when scheduling a sport lesson, safety measures, and awareness of the possible severe injuries and knowledge in basic life support are mandatory to implement in school sports, since ball sport is proven to be very valuable for the physical and psychological development of the children. The role of preventive finger taping in volleyball school sport has to be evaluated in prospective clininal trials.

  17. 'Learning Styles' and 'Approaches to Studying' in Sports-Related Programmes: Relationships to Academic Achievement and Implications for Successful Learning, Teaching and Assessment: Project Report Summary

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, D.M.; Jones, Gareth; Peters, John

    2005-01-01

    There are relatively few recent investigations that have addressed the issues of preferred learning styles and approaches to studying in sports-related disciplines such as: Sports Studies; Sports and Exercise Science; Coaching Science; Sport and Leisure Management and Outdoor Recreation Management. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine student learning across a range of sport-related programmes at a UK University College. It applied tools from two related, but different, educatio...

  18. A qualitative investigation into nurses' perceptions of factors influencing staff injuries sustained during physical interventions employed in response to service user violence within one secure learning disability service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Andrew; Smith, Debra; Johnson, Paula

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to examine learning disability nurses' perceptions of incidents involving physical intervention, particularly factors contributing to injuries sustained by this group. This article reports on a qualitative study undertaken within one secure NHS Trust to respond to concerns about staff injuries sustained during physical interventions to prevent incidents of service user violence from escalating out of control. The context of the study relates to increasing debate about the most effective approaches to incidents of violence and agression. A qualitative research design was utilized for the study. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 20 participants, two from each of the 10 incidents involving staff injury sustained during physical intervention. Four themes were produced by the analysis, the first, knowledge and understanding, contextualized the other three, which related to the physical intervention techniques employed, the interpretation of the incident and the impact on staff. Service user violence consistently poses nurses with the challenge of balancing the need to respond in order to maintain the safety of everyone whilst simultaneous supporting and caring for people with complex needs. This study highlights the need for further exploration of the contributory factors to the escalation of potentially violent situations. Services may have good systems in place for responding to and managing service user violence but appear less effective in understanding the reasons for and developing strategies to prevent violence occurring. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Helmets and Mouth Guards: The Role of Personal Equipment in Preventing Sport-Related Concussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Baugh, Christine M.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; McKee, Ann C.; Stern, Robert A.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Every year, millions of athletes in the United States experience concussions. With athletes at all levels of play getting bigger, faster, and stronger, it has been suggested that newer technologies may provide an opportunity to reduce the risk and severity of these all too frequent injuries. Although helmets have been shown to decrease the rate of catastrophic head injuries, and mouth guards have decreased the risk of dental and oral injuries, the protective effect of helmets and mouth guards on concussions has not been conclusively demonstrated. In this review, the current literature pertaining to the effect that equipment has on concussions is evaluated. Understanding the role that this equipment plays in preventing concussions is complicated by many factors, such as selection bias in non-randomized studies, variations in playing style, and risk compensation in sports with mandatory protective equipment. At this point, there is little evidence supporting the use of specific helmets or mouth guards to prevent concussions outside of specific sports such as cycling, skiing, and snowboarding. Improving coach and player education about proper concussion management, encouraging neck strengthening exercises, and minimizing high-risk impacts may provide a more fruitful avenue to reduce concussions in sports. PMID:21074089

  20. A systematic review of college student-athlete drinking: Prevalence rates, sport-related factors, and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Matthew P; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Beck, Niels C

    2006-10-01

    Alcohol use among college students has become a considerable public health problem. Among this group, intercollegiate athletes are at a particularly high risk for excessive alcohol consumption and resulting negative alcohol-related consequences. The purpose of our review was to systematically examine three main issues related to alcohol consumption among intercollegiate athletes: (a) the prevalence rates and alcohol consumption patterns of this group, especially in comparison with those of collegiate nonathletes; (b) the various factors that might motivate or encourage alcohol use among intercollegiate athletes, primarily sport-related individual and environmental variables; and (c) considerations for conducting alcohol-related interventions with intercollegiate athletes.

  1. Road Traffic Related Injury Research and Informatics. New Opportunities for Biomedical and Health Informatics as a Contribution to the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shorbaji, N; Haux, R; Krishnamurthy, R; Marschollek, M; Mattfeld, D C; Bartolomeos, K; Reynolds, T A

    2015-01-01

    The United Nations has recently adopted 17 sustainable development goals for 2030, including ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages, and making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. Road injuries remain among the ten leading causes of death in the world, and are projected to increase with rapidly increasing motorisation globally. Lack of comprehensive data on road injuries has been identified as one of the barriers for effective implementation of proven road safety interventions. Building, linking and analysing electronic patient records in conjunction with establishing injury event and care registries can substantially contribute to healthy lives and safe transportation. Appropriate use of new technological approaches and health informatics best practices could provide significant added value to WHO's global road safety work and assist Member States in identifying prevention targets, monitoring progress and improving quality of care to reduce injury-related deaths. This paper encourages the initiation of new multidisciplinary research at a global level.

  2. Protective effect of SP600125 against liver cell injury in rats under repeated and sustained high +Gz exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-bing LI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of JNK inhibitor SP600125 on expression of JNK/c-jun in liver cells of rats under repeated and sustained high +Gz exposure and its mechanism of the effect. Methods Eighteen inbred adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group, +10Gz group and SP600125 group (n=6. The rats in +10Gz group and SP600125 group were fixed to the rotating arm of a centrifuge with head towards the axis. The increase rate of acceleration was 1G/s with a peak-time of 3 minutes, and the +Gz exposure was repeated 5 times with an interval of 30 minutes. SP600125 was given to rats of SP600125 group 30 minutes before the first centrifugation by intraperitoneal injection. All of the animals were sacrificed 30 minutes after centrifugation. Blood samples were collected from inferior vena cava to determine the plasma level of aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT. The expression of c-jun mRNA was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRTPCR. The expressions of p-JNK, JNK, p-c-jun and c-jun protein were determined by Western blotting. The morphological change in the liver tissue was observed after HE staining. Results The plasma level of ALT and AST, expression level of c-jun mRNA and p-JNK, p-c-jun, c-jun protein in the liver tissue of SP600125 group were significantly higher than those of control group (P0.05. HE staining revealed disorganized hepatic cords, irregular liver cells, vacuolar changes, and marked edema of hepatocytes, and collapsed hepatic sinusoids in +10Gz group, but these changes were alleviated obviously in SP600125 group. Conclusion SP600125 could alleviate the liver cell injury in rats under repeated and sustained high +Gz exposure. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.2577-7402.2014.11.02

  3. Is body mass index a risk factor for sport injury in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Sarah A; Kang, Jian; Emery, Carolyn A

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between sport injury and body mass index in adolescents (12-19 years). Secondary analysis of data collected in junior and senior high school surveys in Alberta, Canada. Participants (n=4339) included students from 59 schools. All sport injury was defined as injury reported in the past one year. Medically treated injury, as any more serious sport related injury reported in the last year that required medical attention. Overweight, obese, and healthy was defined using international cut points, as the exposure. Multivariate logistic regression analysis controlling for clustering by school, and adjusting for potential risk factors was used. There was a 34% increased risk for all sport injury in obese adolescents compared to healthy adolescents [odds ratio (OR)=1.34 (95% CI: 1.02-1.80)]. There was increased risk for all sport injury and medically treated injury with hours of participation, where the highest group had a 4-fold increase in risk (OR=4.17, 95%CI: 2.77-6.30 and OR=3.80, 95%CI: 2.54-5.69, respectively). There was also increased risk for both all sport injury and medically treated injury in Caucasians compared to non-Caucasians [OR=1.45 (95%CI: 1.15-1.82), OR=1.94 (95%CI: 1.59-2.37), respectively], as well as for club/team play compared to less elite play [OR=1.87 (95%CI: 1.43-2.44) and OR=2.12 (95%CI: 1.57-2.87), respectively]. The risk of sustaining a sport injury in obese adolescents was greater compared to those of healthy weight. There is also a greater risk with increasing hours of play, in Caucasian adolescents, and those that play at a higher sporting level. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving sustained low-efficiency diafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnollareddy, Mahipal G; Roberts, Michael S; Lipman, Jeffrey; Robertson, Thomas A; Peake, Sandra L; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-02-01

    Fluconazole is a widely used antifungal agent in critically ill patients. It is predominantly (60-80%) excreted unchanged in urine. Sustained low-efficiency diafiltration (SLED-f) is increasingly being utilised in critically ill patients because of its practical advantages over continuous renal replacement therapy. To date, the effect of SLED-f on fluconazole pharmacokinetics and dosing has not been studied. The objective of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving SLED-f and to compare this with other forms of renal replacement therapy. Serial blood samples were collected at pre- and post-filter ports within the SLED-f circuit during SLED-f and from an arterial catheter before and after SLED-f from three patients during one session. Fluconazole concentrations were measured using a validated chromatography method. Median clearance (CL) and 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) were 2.1L/h and 152 mg·h/L, respectively, whilst receiving SLED-f. Moreover, 72% of fluconazole was cleared by a single SLED-f session (6h) compared with previous reports of 33-38% clearance by a 4-h intermittent haemodialysis session. CL and AUC0-24 were comparable with previous observations in a pre-dilution mode of continuous venovenous haemodiafiltration. The observed rebound concentration of fluconazole post SLED-f was 200mg daily are likely to be required to achieve the PK/PD target for common pathogens because of significant fluconazole clearance by SLED-f. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. MUSCULAR OXIDATIVE CAPACITY IN OVARIECTOMIZED RATS DISCUSSION ON THE ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE OF FEMALE ATHLETES WITH SPORTS-RELATED-AMENORRHEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuo Yasui

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ovariectomy on intramuscular energy metabolism in adult rats. Based on the results, we discussed the skeletal muscle metabolism in female athlete with sports related amenorrhea. Twenty-five adult (20-week-old Sprague-Dawley female rats were used. Fifteen rats underwent ovariectomy (OVX group, and the other ten rats were sham-operated (Sham group. One and four weeks after surgery, muscular oxidative capacity was measured using 31P-MR spectra of the gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus (GPS muscles group at rest and during electric stimulation. Wet weight and maximum tension of the whole GPS muscles group were also measured. From the MRS measurements, the muscle oxidative capacity in the OVX group was significantly lower than that in the Sham group (p < 0.05 at both one and four weeks after surgery. The muscle's wet weight one week after surgery in the OVX group was the same as the Sham group, while four weeks after surgery it was significantly greater than that in the Sham group (p < 0.05. There were no significant differences in maximum tension among the groups. In conclusion, in adult rats the oxidative capacity decreased due to ovariectomy despite the increase in muscle weight. It is suggested that the muscular endurance capacity in female adult athletes with sports related amenorrhea may deteriorate.

  6. Outcomes associated with early post-traumatic osteoarthritis and other negative health consequences 3-10 years following knee joint injury in youth sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, J L; Woodhouse, L J; Nettel-Aguirre, A; Emery, C A

    2015-07-01

    Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) commonly affects the knee joint. Although the risk of PTOA substantially increases post-joint injury, there is little research examining PTOA outcomes early in the period between joint injury and disease onset. Improved understanding of this interval would inform secondary prevention strategies aimed at preventing and/or delaying PTOA progression. This study examines the association between sport-related knee injury and outcomes related to development of PTOA, 3-10 years post-injury. This preliminary analysis of the first year of a historical cohort study includes 100 (15-26 years) individuals. Fifty with a sport-related intra-articular knee injury sustained 3-10 years previously and 50 uninjured age, sex and sport matched controls. The primary outcome was the 'Symptoms' sub-scale of the Knee Osteoarthritis and Injury Outcome Score (KOOS). Secondary outcomes included; the remaining KOOS subscales, body mass index (BMI), hip abductor/adductor and knee extensor/flexor strength, estimated aerobic capacity (VO2max) and performance scores on three dynamic balance tests. Descriptive statistics (mean within-pair difference; 95% Confidence interval (CI) and conditional odds ratio (OR, 95% CI; BMI) were used to compare study groups. Injured participants demonstrated poorer KOOS outcomes [symptoms -9.4 (-13.6, -5.2), pain -4.0 (-6.8, -1.2), quality-of-life -8.0 (-11.0, -5.1), daily living -3.0 (-5.0, -1.1) and sport/recreation -6.9 (-9.9, -3.8)], were 3.75 times (95% CI 1.24, 11.3) more likely to be overweight/obese and had lower triple single leg hop scores compared to controls. No significant group differences existed for remaining balance scores, estimated VO2max, hip or knee strength ratios or side-to-side difference in hip abductor/adductor or quadricep/hamstring strength. This study provides preliminary evidence that youth/young adults following sport-related knee injury report more symptoms and poorer function, and are at

  7. Epidemiology of Sports-Related Concussion in NCAA Athletes From 2009-2010 to 2013-2014: Incidence, Recurrence, and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Kerr, Zachary Y; Yengo-Kahn, Aaron; Wasserman, Erin; Covassin, Tracey; Solomon, Gary S

    2015-11-01

    The epidemiology of sports-related concussion (SRC) among student-athletes has been extensively researched. However, recent data at the collegiate level are limited. To describe the epidemiology of SRC in 25 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports. Descriptive epidemiology study. SRC data from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program during the 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 academic years were analyzed. Concussion injury rates, rate ratios (RRs), and injury proportion ratios were reported with 95% CIs. National estimates were also calculated to examine linear trends across time. During the study period, 1670 SRCs were reported, representing a national estimate of 10,560 SRCs reported annually. Among the 25 sports, the overall concussion rate was 4.47 per 10,000 athlete-exposures (AEs) (95% CI, 4.25-4.68). Overall, more SRCs occurred in competitions (53.2%). The competition rate (12.81 per 10,000 AEs) was larger than the practice rate (2.57 per 10,000 AEs) (competition vs practice, RR = 4.99; 95% CI, 4.53-5.49). Of all SRCs, 9.0% were recurrent. Most SRCs occurred from player contact (68.0%). The largest concussion rates were in men's wrestling (10.92 per 10,000 AEs; 95% CI, 8.62-13.23), men's ice hockey (7.91 per 10,000 AEs; 95% CI, 6.87-8.95), women's ice hockey (7.50 per 10,000 AEs; 95% CI, 5.91-9.10), and men's football (6.71 per 10,000 AEs; 95% CI, 6.17-7.24). However, men's football had the largest annual estimate of reported SRCs (n = 3417), followed by women's soccer (n = 1113) and women's basketball (n = 998). Among all SRCs, a linear trend did not exist in national estimates across time (P = .17). However, increases were found within specific sports, such as men's football, women's ice hockey, and men's lacrosse. The estimated number of nationally reported SRCs has increased within specific sports. However, it is unknown whether these increases are attributable to increased reporting or frequency of concussions. Many sports report more SRCs in practice

  8. Neuromuscular Control Deficits and the Risk of Subsequent Injury after a Concussion: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, David R; Lynall, Robert C; Buckley, Thomas A; Herman, Daniel C

    2018-02-17

    An emerging area of research has identified that an increased risk of musculoskeletal injury may exist upon returning to sports after a sport-related concussion. The mechanisms underlying this recently discovered phenomenon, however, remain unknown. One theorized reason for this increased injury risk includes residual neuromuscular control deficits that remain impaired despite clinical recovery. Thus, the objectives of this review were: (1) to summarize the literature examining the relationship between concussion and risk of subsequent injury and (2) to summarize the literature for one mechanism with a theorized association with this increased injury risk, i.e., neuromuscular control deficits observed during gait after concussion under dual-task conditions. Two separate reviews were conducted consistent with both specified objectives. Studies published before 9 December, 2016 were identified using PubMed, Web of Science, and Academic Search Premier (EBSCOhost). Inclusion for the objective 1 search included dependent variables of quantitative measurements of musculoskeletal injury after concussion. Inclusion criteria for the objective 2 search included dependent variables pertaining to gait, dynamic balance control, and dual-task function. A total of 32 studies were included in the two reviews (objective 1 n = 10, objective 2 n = 22). According to a variety of study designs, athletes appear to have an increased risk of sustaining a musculoskeletal injury following a concussion. Furthermore, dual-task neuromuscular control deficits may continue to exist after patients report resolution of concussion symptoms, or perform normally on other clinical concussion tests. Therefore, musculoskeletal injury risk appears to increase following a concussion and persistent motor system and attentional deficits also seem to exist after a concussion. While not yet experimentally tested, these motor system and attentional deficits may contribute to the risk of sustaining a

  9. Risk factors for posterior lateral meniscus root tears in anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feucht, Matthias J; Bigdon, Sebastian; Mehl, Julian; Bode, Gerrit; Müller-Lantzsch, Catharina; Südkamp, Norbert P; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    To identify risk factors for posterior lateral meniscus root tears (PLRT) in patients with a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A database of 268 patients undergoing primary ACL reconstruction between 2011 and 2013 was used to identify all patients with isolated ACL tears and patients with an associated PLRT. Patients with other concomitant injuries and patients who underwent surgery >6 months after the injury were excluded. Univariate analysis was performed by comparing the two groups with regard to gender, age, age groups (30 years), height, weight, body mass index (BMI), BMI groups (30), type of injury (high-impact sports, low-impact sports, and not sports-related), and mechanism of injury (non-contact vs. contact). Multivariate logistic regression was carried out to identify independent risk factors for PLRT and to calculate odds ratios (ORs). One-hundred and forty-two patients met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of those, 120 (85%) had an isolated ACL tear and 22 (15%) had an associated PLRT. No significant differences between patients with and without a PLRT were found for age, age groups, height, weight, BMI, BMI groups, and type of injury (p > 0.05). Univariate analysis revealed a statistically significant difference between both groups for gender distribution (p = 0.034) and mechanism of injury (p contact mechanism being more common in patients with PLRT. The sole independent risk factor for an associated PLRT identified in the multivariate logistic regression analysis was a contact mechanism with an OR of 17.52. An associated PLRT is more common in male patients and patients who sustained a contact injury. Patients with a contact injury mechanism have an approximately 17-fold increased risk for a PLRT compared to patients with a non-contact injury. Special attention for this injury pattern is therefore necessary in those patients, and early referral to magnetic resonance imaging or arthroscopy is recommended. IV.

  10. Protective equipment and player characteristics associated with the incidence of sport-related concussion in high school football players: a multifactorial prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuine, Timothy A; Hetzel, Scott; McCrea, Michael; Brooks, M Alison

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of sport-related concussion (SRC) in high school football is well documented. However, limited prospective data are available regarding how player characteristics and protective equipment affect the incidence of SRC. To determine whether the type of protective equipment (helmet and mouth guard) and player characteristics affect the incidence of SRC in high school football players. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Certified athletic trainers (ATs) at each high school recorded the type of helmet worn (brand, model, purchase year, and recondition status) by each player as well as information regarding players' demographics, type of mouth guard used, and history of SRC. The ATs also recorded the incidence and days lost from participation for each SRC. Incidence of SRC was compared for various helmets, type of mouth guard, history of SRC, and player demographics. A total of 2081 players (grades 9-12) enrolled during the 2012 and/or 2013 football seasons (2287 player-seasons) and participated in 134,437 football (practice or competition) exposures. Of these players, 206 (9%) sustained a total of 211 SRCs (1.56/1000 exposures). There was no difference in the incidence of SRC (number of helmets, % SRC [95% CI]) for players wearing Riddell (1171, 9.1% [7.6%-11.0%]), Schutt (680, 8.7% [6.7%-11.1%]), or Xenith (436, 9.2% [6.7%-12.4%]) helmets. Helmet age and recondition status did not affect the incidence of SRC. The rate of SRC (hazard ratio [HR]) was higher in players who wore a custom mouth guard (HR = 1.69 [95% CI, 1.20-2.37], P football players. Players who had sustained an SRC within the previous 12 months were more likely to sustain an SRC than were players without a history of SRC. Sports medicine providers who work with high school football players need to realize that factors other than the type of protective equipment worn affect the risk of SRC in high school players. © 2014 The Author(s).

  11. The influence of injury cause, contact-sport participation, and personal knowledge on expectation of outcome from mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmed, Shannon L; Sullivan, Karen A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of injury cause, contact-sport participation, and prior knowledge of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) on injury beliefs and chronic symptom expectations of mTBI. A total of 185 non-contact-sport players (non-CSPs) and 59 contact-sport players (CSPs) with no history of mTBI were randomly allocated to one of two conditions in which they read either a vignette depicting a sport-related mTBI (mTBIsport) or a motor-vehicle-accident-related mTBI (mTBIMVA). The vignettes were otherwise standardized to convey the same injury parameters (e.g., duration of loss of consciousness). After reading a vignette, participants reported their injury beliefs (i.e., perceptions of injury undesirability, chronicity, and consequences) and their expectations of chronic postconcussion syndrome (PCS) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Non-CSPs held significantly more negative beliefs and expected greater PTSD symptomatology and greater PCS affective symptomatology from an mTBIMVA vignette thann mTBIsport vignette, but this difference was not found for CSPs. Unlike CSPs, non-CSPs who personally knew someone who had sustained an mTBI expected significantly less PCS symptomatology than those who did not. Despite these different results for non-CSPs and CSPs, overall, contact-sport participation did not significantly affect injury beliefs and symptom expectations from an mTBIsport. Expectations of persistent problems after an mTBI are influenced by factors such as injury cause even when injury parameters are held constant. Personal knowledge of mTBI, but not contact sport participation, may account for some variability in mTBI beliefs and expectations. These factors require consideration when assessing mTBI outcome.

  12. Athletic trainers' familiarity with and perceptions of academic accommodations in secondary school athletes after sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richelle M; Welch, Cailee E; Parsons, John T; McLeod, Tamara C Valovich

    2015-03-01

    Sport-related concussion can affect athletes' sport participation and academic success. With the recent emphasis on cognitive rest, student-athletes may benefit from academic accommodations (AA) in the classroom; however, athletic trainers' (ATs') perceived familiarity with, and use of, AA is unknown. To assess secondary school ATs' perceived familiarity with, attitudes and beliefs about, and incorporation of AA for student-athletes after sport-related concussion. A secondary purpose was to determine whether employment status altered familiarity and use of AA. Cross-sectional study. Online survey. Of 3286 possible respondents, 851 secondary school ATs accessed the survey (response rate = 25.9%; 308 men [36.2%], 376 women [44.2%], 167 respondents [19.6%] with sex information missing; age = 37.3 ± 10.1 years). Participants were solicited via e-mail to complete the Beliefs, Attitudes and Knowledge Following Pediatric Athlete Concussion among Athletic Trainers employed in the secondary school setting (BAKPAC-AT) survey. The BAKPAC-AT assessed ATs' perceived familiarity, perceptions, and roles regarding 504 plans, Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), and returning student-athletes to the classroom. Independent variables were employment status (full time versus part time), employment model (direct versus outreach), years certified, and years of experience in the secondary school setting. The dependent variables were participants' responses to the AA questions. Spearman rank-correlation coefficients were used to assess relationships and Mann-Whitney U and χ(2) tests (P sport-related concussions they managed received AA. Respondents employed directly by the school were more familiar with 504 plans (P < .001) and IEPs (P < .001) and had a greater belief that ATs should have a role in AA. Both the number of years certified and the years of experience at the secondary school were significantly correlated with perceived familiarity regarding 504 plans and IEPs. The ATs

  13. Diagnosis of Acute Groin Injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serner, Andreas; Tol, Johannes L; Jomaah, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute groin injuries are common in high-intensity sports, but there are insufficient data on injury characteristics such as injury mechanisms and clinical and radiological findings. PURPOSE: To describe these characteristics in a cohort of athletes. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study......; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS: A total of 110 male athletes (mean age, 25.6 ± 4.7 years) with sports-related acute groin pain were prospectively included within 7 days of injury from August 2012 to April 2014. Standardized history taking, a clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and....../or ultrasound (US) were performed. RESULTS: The most frequent injury mechanism in soccer was kicking (40%), and change of direction was most frequent in other sports (31%). Clinically, adductor injuries accounted for 66% of all injuries and primarily involved the adductor longus on imaging (91% US, 93% MRI...

  14. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a potential late effect of sport-related concussive and subconcussive head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavett, Brandon E; Stern, Robert A; McKee, Ann C

    2011-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a form of neurodegeneration believed to result from repeated head injuries. Originally termed dementia pugilistica because of its association with boxing, the neuropathology of CTE was first described by Corsellis in 1973 in a case series of 15 retired boxers. CTE has recently been found to occur after other causes of repeated head trauma, suggesting that any repeated blows to the head, such as those that occur in American football, hockey, soccer, professional wrestling, and physical abuse, can also lead to neurodegenerative changes. These changes often include cerebral atrophy, cavum septi pellucidi with fenestrations, shrinkage of the mammillary bodies, dense tau immunoreactive inclusions (neurofibrillary tangles, glial tangles, and neuropil neurites), and, in some cases, a TDP-43 proteinopathy. In association with these pathologic changes, disordered memory and executive functioning, behavioral and personality disturbances (eg, apathy, depression, irritability, impulsiveness, suicidality), parkinsonism, and, occasionally, motor neuron disease are seen in affected individuals. No formal clinical or pathologic diagnostic criteria for CTE currently exist, but the distinctive neuropathologic profile of the disorder lends promise for future research into its prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Is Lifelong Knee Joint Force from Work, Home, and Sport Related to Knee Osteoarthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R. Ratzlaff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the association of cumulative lifetime knee joint force on the risk of self-reported medically-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (OA. Methods. Exposure data on lifetime physical activity type (occupational, household, sport/recreation and dose (frequency, intensity, duration were collected from 4,269 Canadian men and women as part of the Physical Activity and Joint Heath cohort study. Subjects were ranked in terms of the “cumulative peak force index”, a measure of lifetime mechanical knee force. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to obtain adjusted effects for mean lifetime knee force on the risk of knee OA. Results. High levels of total lifetime, occupational and household-related force were associated with an increased in risk of OA, with odds ratio’s ranging from approximately 1.3 to 2. Joint injury, high BMI and older age were related to risk of knee OA, consistent with previous studies. Conclusions. A newly developed measure of lifetime mechanical knee force from physical activity was employed to estimate the risk of self-reported, medically-diagnosed knee OA. While there are limitations, this paper suggests that high levels of total lifetime force (all domains combined, and occupational force in men and household force in women were risk factors for knee OA.

  16. An epidemiological study on pattern of thoraco-abdominal injuries sustained in fatal road traffic accidents of Bangalore: Autopsy-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Bayapa Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The statistical profile reflects a global estimate of 5.1 million deaths in 2000, which was due to injuries that accounted for 10% of deaths due to all causes. Out of this, a quarter of injury-related deaths occurred in the South-East Asian region. Road Traffic Accident (RTA is one among the top 5 causes of morbidity and mortality in South-East Asian countries. Most common cause of blunt abdominal trauma in India is road traffic accident followed by pedestrian accidents, abdominal blows, and fall from heights. Aims: To analyze the epidemiology and pattern of fatal thoraco-abdominal injuries in road traffic accidents. Materials and Methods: An autopsy-based cross-sectional study conducted. A purposive sampling technique was applied to select the study sample of 100 post-mortems of road traffic accident between November 2008 and May 2010 subjected to medico-legal autopsy at the department of Forensic Medicine, KIMS Hospital Bangalore. Results: The majority of the victims were aged 21 to 40 years, 50 (50.0%, most of the victims were male 92 (92.0%; and male/female ratio was 11.5:1. Commonest offending agents in heavy motor vehicles were 54 (54.0%. Bony cage sustained injuries were observed in 71; out of this, fractures of ribs were observed in 45 (63.3% victims, clavicle in 14 (19.7%, sternum was 6 (8.4%, and vertebrae 6 (8.4% of fatal road traffic accidents. Internal thoracic injuries were observed in 26 cases. Among internal thoracic injuries, lungs were the most commonly involved organ 24 (92.3% followed by the heart 2 (7.6%. Lung sustained more lacerations 19 (79.1% than contusions 5 (20.8%. Internal abdominal injuries were observed in 49 cases. In road traffic accidents, the most commonly injured abdominal organs were solid organs such as liver 16 (32.6% followed by spleen 9 (18.3%. Conclusions: Majority of the times in road traffic accidents, young and productive males were injured or lost their life. This study may help the

  17. Current concepts in sports injury rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Himmat Dhillon; Sidak Dhilllon; Dhillon, Mandeep S

    2017-01-01

    In the modern era, rehabilitation after sports injury has become a domain for specialists, and its evolution has necessarily brought together the sports physiotherapist, the sports physician, and the orthopedic surgeon. The changing profile of sports related injury, as well as limited availability of facilities for rehabilitation in many areas of India, is a matter of concern. Elite sportspersons have some protection, but the average athlete is often left to fend for himself. Key factors in s...

  18. Current Concepts in Sports Injury Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Dhillon, Himmat; Dhilllon, Sidak; Dhillon, Mandeep S

    2017-01-01

    In the modern era, rehabilitation after sports injury has become a domain for specialists, and its evolution has necessarily brought together the sports physiotherapist, the sports physician, and the orthopedic surgeon. The changing profile of sports related injury, as well as limited availability of facilities for rehabilitation in many areas of India, is a matter of concern. Elite sportspersons have some protection, but the average athlete is often left to fend for himself. Key factors in s...

  19. More than 50% of players sustained a time-loss injury (>1 day of lost training or playing time) during the 2012 Super Rugby Union Tournament: a prospective cohort study of 17,340 player-hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwellnus, Martin P; Thomson, Alan; Derman, Wayne; Jordaan, Esme; Readhead, Clint; Collins, Rob; Morris, Ian; Strauss, Org; Van der Linde, Ewoudt; Williams, Arthur

    2014-09-01

    Professional Rugby Union is a contact sport with a high risk of injury. To document the incidence and nature of time-loss injuries during the 2012 Super Rugby tournament. Prospective cohort study. 2012 Super Rugby tournament (Australia, New Zealand, South Africa). 152 players from 5 South African teams. Team physicians collected daily injury data through a secure, web-based electronic platform. Data included size of the squad, type of day, main player position, training or match injury, hours of play (training and matches), time of the match injury, mechanism of injury, main anatomical location of the injury, specific anatomical structure of the injury, the type of injury, the severity of the injury (days lost). The proportion (%) of players sustaining a time-loss injury during the tournament was 55%, and 25% of all players sustained >1 injury. The overall incidence rate (IR/1000 player-hours) of injuries was 9.2. The IR for matches (83.3) was significantly higher than for training (2.1) and the IR was similar for forwards and backs. Muscle/tendon (50%) and joint/ligament (32.7%) injuries accounted for >80% of injuries. Most injuries occurred in the lower (48.1%) and upper limb (25.6%). 42% of all injuries were moderate (27.5%) or severe (14.8%), and tackling (26.3%) and being tackled (23.1%) were the most common mechanisms of injury. The IR of injuries was unrelated to playing at home compared with away (locations ≥6 h time difference). 55% of all players were injured during the 4-month Super Rugby tournament (1.67 injuries/match). Most injuries occurred in the lower (knee, thigh) or upper limb (shoulder, clavicle). 42% of injuries were severe enough for players to not play for >1 week. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. School nurses' familiarity and perceptions of academic accommodations for student-athletes following sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michelle L; Welch, Cailee E; Parsons, John T; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate school nurses' familiarity and perceptions regarding academic accommodations for student-athletes following sport-related concussion. School nurses (N = 1,246) accessed the survey School Nurses' Beliefs, Attitudes and Knowledge of Pediatric Athletes with Concussions (BAKPAC-SN). The BAKPAC-SN contained several questions pertaining to concussion management and academic accommodations. There were significant differences regarding personal experience as well as familiarity of academic accommodations (p academic accommodations (r = .210, p academic accommodations (p = .027) and 504 plans (p = .001) than school nurses employed at multiple schools. Health care professionals should collaborate to effectively manage a concussed patient and should consider academic accommodations to ensure whole-person health care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Working memory capacity among collegiate student athletes: effects of sport-related head contacts, concussions, and working memory demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayers, Lester B; Redick, Thomas S; Chiffriller, Sheila H; Simone, Ashley N; Terraforte, Keith R

    2011-06-01

    To measure working memory capacity among a cohort of collegiate athletes and to compare results between athletes competing in head-contact-prone sports with those not subject to repeated head contacts. A secondary objective was to determine the effect of sport-related concussion on working memory capacity. Ambidirectional cohort study. Athletics department at an American university. Student athletes competing in various sports. None. Automated operation span test scores. Working memory capacity is not impaired in student athletes who participate in head-contact-prone sports or in student athletes with a history of diagnosed concussion, even those who are multiconcussed. Our results suggest that athletes competing in sports that impose significant working memory loading score higher on the automated operation span test than do other athletes. Further research is required to determine the value of measuring working memory capacity in acutely concussed, symptomatic athletes.

  2. Sport-related concussions in adolescent athletes: a critical public health problem for which prevention remains an elusive goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R; Fidrocki, Diana; Parachuri, Venu

    2017-07-01

    Sport-related concussions in young athletes are common, generally under reported and often unrecognized. Preventive strategies include education, modification of sport rules, use of equipment such as headgears, face masks and mouth guards, and neck muscle training. Evidence is limited to support effectiveness of these preventive measures with the exception of rule modification in some sports. In the United States, laws have been enacted that require medical evaluation and clearance prior to return to play; however, evidence thus far does not show that laws have been effective in reducing the incidence of concussions in sport. More research is needed in all areas of preventive measures. Sports participation is a complex personal decision on the part of the adolescent and his or her family. They should be provided with all information on inherent risks so that they can make an informed decision.

  3. Demyelination as a Target for Cell-Based Therapy of Chronic Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    following both sport -related and experimental blast TBI7. Taken together, these data suggest a model linking trauma, WM injury, and chronic...Mice model of blast traumatic brain injury injury: An imaging, behavior and pathological assessment. 2014 Summer Biomechanics , Bioengineering, and

  4. Safety of Active Rehabilitation for Persistent Symptoms After Pediatric Sport-Related Concussion: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Catherine; Iverson, Grant L; Purtzki, Jacqueline; Wong, Kathy; Kwan, Vivian; Gagnon, Isabelle; Silverberg, Noah D

    2017-10-05

    To examine the safety and tolerability of an active rehabilitation program for adolescents who are slow to recover from a sport-related concussion, and secondarily to estimate the treatment effect for this intervention. Single-site, parallel, open-label, randomized controlled trial comparing treatment as usual (TAU) to TAU plus active rehabilitation. Outpatient concussion clinic. Adolescents (N=19) aged 12 to 18 years with postconcussion symptoms lasting ≥1 month after a sports-related concussion. TAU consisted of symptom management and return-to-play advice, return-to-school facilitation, and physiatry consultation. The active rehabilitation program involved in-clinic subsymptom threshold aerobic training, coordination exercises, and visualization and imagery techniques with a physiotherapist (mean, 3.4 sessions) as well as a home exercise program, over 6 weeks. A blinded assessor systematically monitored for predetermined adverse events in weekly telephone calls over the 6-week intervention period. The treating physiotherapist also recorded in-clinic symptom exacerbations during aerobic training. The Post-Concussion Symptom Scale was the primary efficacy outcome. Nineteen participants were randomized, and none dropped out of the study. Of the 12 adverse events detected (6 in each group), 10 were symptom exacerbations from 1 weekly telephone assessment to the next, and 2 were emergency department visits. Four adverse events were referred to an external safety committee and deemed unrelated to the study procedures. In-clinic symptom exacerbations occurred in 30% (9/30) of aerobic training sessions, but resolved within 24 hours in all instances. In linear mixed modeling, active rehabilitation was associated with a greater reduction on the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale than TAU only. The results support the safety, tolerability, and potential efficacy of active rehabilitation for adolescents with persistent postconcussion symptoms. Copyright © 2017 American

  5. Are divided attention tasks useful in the assessment and management of sport-related concussion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register-Mihalik, Johna K; Littleton, Ashley C; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2013-12-01

    This article is a systematic review of the literature on divided attention assessment inclusive of a cognitive and motor task (balance or gait) for use in concussion management. The systematic review drew from published papers listed in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases. The search identified 19 empirical research papers meeting the inclusion criteria. Study results were considered for the psychometric properties of the paradigms, the influence of divided attention on measures of cognition and postural control and the comparison of divided attention task outcomes between individuals with concussion and healthy controls (all samples were age 17 years or older). The review highlights that the reliability of the tasks under a divided attention paradigm presented ranges from low to high (ICC: 0.1-0.9); however, only 3/19 articles included psychometric information. Response times are greater, gait strategies are less efficient, and postural control deficits are greater in concussed participants compared with healthy controls both immediately and for some period following concussive injury, specifically under divided attention conditions. Dual task assessments in some cases were more reliable than single task assessments and may be better able to detect lingering effects following concussion. Few of the studies have been replicated and applied across various age groups. A key limitation of these studies is that many include laboratory and time-intensive measures. Future research is needed to refine a time and cost efficient divided attention assessment paradigm, and more work is needed in younger (pre-teens) populations where the application may be of greatest utility.

  6. Persistent, long-term cerebral white matter changes after sports-related repetitive head impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Bazarian

    Full Text Available Repetitive head impacts (RHI sustained in contact sports are thought to be necessary for the long-term development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. Our objectives were to: 1 characterize the magnitude and persistence of RHI-induced white matter (WM changes; 2 determine their relationship to kinematic measures of RHI; and 3 explore their clinical relevance.Prospective, observational study of 10 Division III college football players and 5 non-athlete controls during the 2011-12 season. All subjects underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, physiologic, cognitive, and balance testing at pre-season (Time 1, post-season (Time 2, and after 6-months of no-contact rest (Time 3. Head impact measures were recorded using helmet-mounted accelerometers. The percentage of whole-brain WM voxels with significant changes in fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD from Time 1 to 2, and Time 1 to 3 was determined for each subject and correlated to head impacts and clinical measures.Total head impacts for the season ranged from 431-1,850. No athlete suffered a clinically evident concussion. Compared to controls, athletes experienced greater changes in FA and MD from Time 1 to 2 as well as Time 1 to 3; most differences at Time 2 persisted to Time 3. Among athletes, the percentage of voxels with decreased FA from Time 1 to 2 was positively correlated with several helmet impact measures. The persistence of WM changes from Time 1 to 3 was also associated with changes in serum ApoA1 and S100B autoantibodies. WM changes were not consistently associated with cognition or balance.A single football season of RHIs without clinically-evident concussion resulted in WM changes that correlated with multiple helmet impact measures and persisted following 6 months of no-contact rest. This lack of WM recovery could potentially contribute to cumulative WM changes with subsequent RHI exposures.

  7. Persistent, long-term cerebral white matter changes after sports-related repetitive head impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Zhu, Tong; Zhong, Jianhui; Janigro, Damir; Rozen, Eric; Roberts, Andrew; Javien, Hannah; Merchant-Borna, Kian; Abar, Beau; Blackman, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive head impacts (RHI) sustained in contact sports are thought to be necessary for the long-term development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Our objectives were to: 1) characterize the magnitude and persistence of RHI-induced white matter (WM) changes; 2) determine their relationship to kinematic measures of RHI; and 3) explore their clinical relevance. Prospective, observational study of 10 Division III college football players and 5 non-athlete controls during the 2011-12 season. All subjects underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), physiologic, cognitive, and balance testing at pre-season (Time 1), post-season (Time 2), and after 6-months of no-contact rest (Time 3). Head impact measures were recorded using helmet-mounted accelerometers. The percentage of whole-brain WM voxels with significant changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) from Time 1 to 2, and Time 1 to 3 was determined for each subject and correlated to head impacts and clinical measures. Total head impacts for the season ranged from 431-1,850. No athlete suffered a clinically evident concussion. Compared to controls, athletes experienced greater changes in FA and MD from Time 1 to 2 as well as Time 1 to 3; most differences at Time 2 persisted to Time 3. Among athletes, the percentage of voxels with decreased FA from Time 1 to 2 was positively correlated with several helmet impact measures. The persistence of WM changes from Time 1 to 3 was also associated with changes in serum ApoA1 and S100B autoantibodies. WM changes were not consistently associated with cognition or balance. A single football season of RHIs without clinically-evident concussion resulted in WM changes that correlated with multiple helmet impact measures and persisted following 6 months of no-contact rest. This lack of WM recovery could potentially contribute to cumulative WM changes with subsequent RHI exposures.

  8. The quality of sport-related services in institutions designed for children aged 3-6 years (pre-school education)

    OpenAIRE

    Šubr, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Title: The quality of sport-related services in institutions designed for children aged 3-6 years (pre-school education). Objectives The quality of objective of this work is to determine the quality of sport-related services in day-care centers in the Czech Republic. Methods: This marketing research is going to be conducted using standardized methods of SERVQUAL in the form of a written questionnaire, which is going to be left to the principals of selected day-care centers who will further ha...

  9. Does splenic embolization and grade of splenic injury impact nonoperative management in patients sustaining blunt splenic trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremitsky, Elan; Kao, Amy; Carlton, Chad; Rodriguez, Aurelio; Ong, Adrian

    2011-02-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) for blunt splenic trauma (BST) is an established practice. The impact of splenic embolization (SE) in the algorithm for NOM has not been well studied. This study evaluates the role of SE and spleen injury grade on failure of NOM. Retrospective cohort of trauma registry over a 7-year period (2000-2006) for patients who suffered BST was studied. Data including demographics, splenic injury grade, and SE were recorded. Characteristics were compared between the successful and failed NOM groups. Kaplan-Meier, life table, and Cox-proportional hazard regression analyses were performed. Of the 499 patients who suffered BST, 407 (81.6%) patients had successful NOM and 92 (18.4%) patients failed NOM (including splenectomies performed within 1 hour of admission). Failed NOM group had a higher splenic injury grade compared with the successful NOM group (P NOM occurred by 24 hours. Grade 3 and 4 injuries that failed NOM occurred by 150 hours. SE was protective against splenectomy (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.18, 95% confidence interval: 0.06-0.55, P = 0.004), whereas splenic injury grades III or higher was associated with increased risk of splenectomy (grade III: HR 5.26, P = 0.003; grade IV: HR 6.84, P = 0.002; grade V: HR 9.81, P = 0.002) compared with those with splenic injury grade I. Splenic embolization is a protective measure to reduce the failure of NOM. Spleen injury grade III and higher was significantly associated with NOM failure and would require a 5-day inpatient observation.

  10. Blunt cerebrovascular injury in rugby and other contact sports: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Trajan A; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Moore, Frederick A

    2014-01-01

    Contact sports have long been a part of human existence. The two earliest recorded organized contact games, both of which still exist, include Royal Shrovetide Football played since the 12(th) century in England and Caid played since 1308 AD in Ireland. Rugby is the premier contact sport played throughout the world with the very popular derivative American football being the premier contact sport of the North American continent. American football in the USA has on average 1,205,037 players at the high school and collegiate level per year while rugby in the USA boasts a playing enrollment of 457,983 at all levels. Recent media have highlighted injury in the context of competitive contact sports including their long-term sequelae such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) that had previously been underappreciated. Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) has become a recognized injury pattern for trauma; however, a paucity of data regarding this injury can be found in the sports trauma literature. We present a case of an international level scrum-half playing Rugby Union at club level for a local non-professional team, in which a player sustained a fatal BCVI followed by a discussion of the literature surrounding sport related BCVI.

  11. Severe abdominal injuries sustained in an adult wearing a pelvic seatbelt: a case report and review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Kelly, F

    2008-12-01

    In automobile accidents, the "seatbelt syndrome" (SBS) consists of a constellation of injuries, predominantly involving thoraco-lumbar vertebral fractures and intraabdominal organ injury. A recent amendment to Irish legislation has made the wearing of seatbelts mandatory for all rear seated passengers in an effort to protect children. Whilst rear seatbelts result in a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality following road traffic accidents (RTA), we present a case in which the rear lap seatbelt caused severe abdominal injuries. It is evident that the current rear seat lapbelt system is an inferior design associated with a significant morbidity and mortality when compared to three-point harness system and consideration should be given to replacing them in all motor vehicles.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intra-articular Findings After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Ice Hockey Versus Other Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluczynski, Melissa A; Kang, Jeansol V; Marzo, John M; Bisson, Leslie J

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of comorbid knee pathology has been examined for sports-related anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but it has not been examined in ice hockey players. To compare concomitant bone bruising, collateral ligament injuries, and intra-articular injuries in ACL injuries suffered during ice hockey versus other sports. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 20 patients with ACL injuries sustained during ice hockey were identified from a prospective registry, of which 95% were male and 90% had a contact mechanism of injury (MOI). Thirteen cases and 46 controls who sustained ACL injuries from ice hockey and other sports, respectively, were included. Inclusion criteria for cases and controls were male sex, contact MOI, no prior knee surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 6 weeks of injury, and surgery within 3 months of injury. Age, body mass index (BMI), MRI findings (bone bruising, medial and lateral collateral ligament [MCL, LCL] injuries), and arthroscopic findings (meniscus tears, chondral injuries) were compared for cases versus controls using t tests or exact chi-square tests. Age (22.9 ± 8.8 vs 23.4 ± 10.4 years, P = .88) and BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) (50% vs 65.9%, P = .66) did not differ between cases and controls. Cases had less lateral bone bruising (lateral femoral condyle: 54.6% vs 93%, P = .01; lateral tibial plateau: 72.7% vs 93%, P = .09) and no medial bone bruising (medial femoral condyle: 0% vs 7%, P = .06; medial tibial plateau: 0% vs 32.6%, P = .05) compared with controls. Cases had less frequent lateral meniscus tears than controls (23.1% vs 58.5%, P = .05). There were no significant differences in MCL (40% vs 31.2%, P = .77), LCL (0% vs 3.9%, P > .999), medial meniscus tears (7.7% vs 37%, P = .08), and chondral injuries (10% vs 9.4%, P > .999) for cases versus controls. Male ice hockey players with ACL injuries had less lateral femoral condyle and medial tibial plateau bone bruising compared with other sports

  13. Renal injury in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, F Clarke; Hunt, Jeremy J; Sevier, Thomas L

    2003-04-01

    Hematuria is the most common presenting sign of renal injury. Its presence in athletes may indicate a benign entity such as exercise-induced hematuria or a more serious injury in the presence of trauma. Exercise-induced hematuria can originate in the kidney, bladder, urethra, or prostate. The type of activity, as well as activity duration and intensity, contributes to its development. A wide differential diagnosis must be considered if hematuria persists longer than 24 to 72 hours. Trauma to the kidney can occur from a direct blow or deceleration; contact and collision sports are most commonly involved. Fortunately, most sports-related renal trauma is mild, and can be managed expectantly. A sporting injury rarely results in nephrectomy. Determining return to play for the athlete with a single kidney remains a controversial issue that requires patient education and an individualized approach.

  14. Too little sleep and an unhealthy diet could increase the risk of sustaining a new injury in adolescent elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rosen, P; Frohm, A; Kottorp, A; Fridén, C; Heijne, A

    2017-11-01

    Little is known about health variables and if these variables could increase the risk of injuries among adolescent elite athletes. The primary aim was to present overall data on self-perceived stress, nutrition intake, self-esteem, and sleep, as well as gender and age differences, on two occasions among adolescent elite athletes. A secondary aim was to study these health variables as potential risk factors on injury incidence. A questionnaire was e-mailed to 340 adolescent elite athletes on two occasions during a single school year: autumn semester and spring semester. The results show that during autumn semester, the recommended intake of fruits, vegetables, and fish was not met for 20%, 39%, and 43% of the adolescent elite athletes, respectively. The recommended amount of sleep during weekdays was not obtained by 19%. Multiple logistic regression showed that athletes sleeping more than 8 h of sleep during weekdays reduced the odds of injury with 61% (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.16-0.99) and athletes reaching the recommended nutrition intake reduced the odds with 64% (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.14-0.91). Our findings suggest that nutrition intake and sleep volume are of importance in understanding injury incidence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Prevalence and sport-related predictors of disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors: Moderating effects of sex and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, M-C; Maïano, C; Morin, A J S; Therme, P

    2014-08-01

    Very few studies examined the prevalence and sport-related predictors of disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors (DEABs) among adolescents involved in sport practice, and their results are mixed and inconclusive. These inconsistencies are most likely due to their methodological heterogeneity and to the fact that none of these studies took into consideration the potentially relevant characteristics of the sport practice context. This study attempts to answer this limitation among French adolescents not involved or involved in various sports contexts defined based on their organization, leanness-centration, and competitive level. Participants were 335 adolescents involved in sport practice, and 435 adolescents not involved in any form of regular sport practice. The DEABs were measured using the Eating Attitudes Test-26. Global results do not showed any significant association between the status of the participants and DEAB. However, these results drastically changed when we considered the potential moderating role of sex and age on these relations. Indeed, sports involvement in general, and involvement in leanness and competitive sports were found to exert sex- and age-differentiated effects on the risks of presenting clinically significant levels of DEAB. This study suggests the importance of monitoring, preventive, and early intervention mechanisms within the context of practice, particularly for adolescent girls. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Modern pain neuroscience in clinical practice: applied to post-cancer, paediatric and sports-related pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfliet, Anneleen; Leysen, Laurence; Pas, Roselien; Kuppens, Kevin; Nijs, Jo; Van Wilgen, Paul; Huysmans, Eva; Goudman, Lisa; Ickmans, Kelly

    In the last decade, evidence regarding chronic pain has developed exponentially. Numerous studies show that many chronic pain populations show specific neuroplastic changes in the peripheral and central nervous system. These changes are reflected in clinical manifestations, like a generalized hypersensitivity of the somatosensory system. Besides a hypersensitivity of bottom-up nociceptive transmission, there is also evidence for top-down facilitation of pain due to malfunctioning of the endogenous descending nociceptive modulatory systems. These and other aspects of modern pain neuroscience are starting to be applied within daily clinical practice. However, currently the application of this knowledge is mostly limited to the general adult population with musculoskeletal problems, while evidence is getting stronger that also in other chronic pain populations these neuroplastic processes may contribute to the occurrence and persistence of the pain problem. Therefore, this masterclass article aims at giving an overview of the current modern pain neuroscience knowledge and its potential application in post-cancer, paediatric and sports-related pain problems. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Attributes and stressors influencing the occurrence of sports injuries in college athletes

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 詩織; 中島, 宣行; 佐々木, 万丈

    2015-01-01

    We investigated differences in the frequency of sports injuries between individual and team competition players and between males and females, and we also examined the influence of subjective evaluation of stressors on sports injury frequency. College athletes (N=133) were asked to complete a scale of daily and competitive stressors and to answer a questionnaire on the frequency of sports-related injuries. Chi-square analyses revealed that there were no differences in injury frequency between...

  18. Incidence of Traumatic Brain Injury in a Ghanaian Tertiary Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    External cause of injury was classified according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD) guidelines as Road Traffic Accidents (RTA) (irrespective of type), fall from height, assault, gunshot, game or sport related accident and other causes. Road traffic accident accounts for relatively high incidence of hospitalized TBI.

  19. Socio-demographic characteristics of women sustaining injuries during pregnancy: a study from the Danish National Birth Cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Virk, Jasveer; Hsu, Paul; Olsen, Jørn

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe adverse birth outcomes associated with hospital-treated injuries that took place among women in the Danish National Birth Cohort. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants 90 452 women and their offspring selected from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Primary and secondary outcome measures To determine if injured women were more likely to deliver an infant preterm, with low birth weight, stillborn or have a spontaneous abortion, the authors estima...

  20. Deceleration during 'real life' motor vehicle collisions – a sensitive predictor for the risk of sustaining a cervical spine injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartwig Erich

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The predictive value of trauma impact for the severity of whiplash injuries has mainly been investigated in sled- and crash-test studies. However, very little data exist for real-life accidents. Therefore, the predictive value of the trauma impact as assessed by the change in velocity of the car due to the collision (ΔV for the resulting cervical spine injuries were investigated in 57 cases after real-life car accidents. Methods ΔV was determined for every car and clinical findings related to the cervical spine were assessed and classified according to the Quebec Task Force (QTF. Results In our study, 32 (56% subjects did not complain about symptoms and were therefore classified as QTF grade 0; 25 (44% patients complained of neck pain: 8 (14% were classified as QTF grade I, 6 (10% as QTF grade II, and 11 (19% as QTF grade IV. Only a slight correlation (r = 0.55 was found between the reported pain and ΔV. No relevant correlation was found between ΔV and the neck disability index (r = 0.46 and between ΔV and the QTF grade (r = 0.45 for any of the collision types. There was no ΔV threshold associated with acceptable sensitivity and specificity for the prognosis of a cervical spine injury. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that ΔV is not a conclusive predictor for cervical spine injury in real-life motor vehicle accidents. This is of importance for surgeons involved in medicolegal expertise jobs as well as patients who suffer from whiplash-associated disorders (WADs after motor vehicle accidents. Trial registration The study complied with applicable German law and with the principles of the Helsinki Declaration and was approved by the institutional ethics commission.

  1. Genitourinary Injuries Sustained by Female U.S. Service Members During Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-07

    Defense Trauma Registry (DODTR) was reviewed to identify all US SMs diagnosed with GU injury from 2001 to 2013. The DODTR includes data for wounded ...and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) a large number of female SMs have been wounded while serving in combat support roles. This included an...SMs treated at any US combat support hospital, the in-theater equivalent of a civilian trauma center. Female SMs with ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes and/or

  2. Ice Hockey Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Franklin H.; Simonet, William T.

    1988-01-01

    The article describes the mechanisms, management, and prevention of each type of injury to which hockey players are prone. It surveys the injuries sustained by ice hockey players and discusses treatment of specific injuries, including those injuries to the head, eye, shoulder, hand, thigh, scalp, and face. (JL)

  3. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Prevention of Pediatric Overuse Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.; Decoster, Laura C.; Loud, Keith J.; Micheli, Lyle J.; Parker, J. Terry; Sandrey, Michelle A.; White, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To provide certified athletic trainers, physicians, and other health care professionals with recommendations on best practices for the prevention of overuse sports injuries in pediatric athletes (aged 6–18 years). Background: Participation in sports by the pediatric population has grown tremendously over the years. Although the health benefits of participation in competitive and recreational athletic events are numerous, one adverse consequence is sport-related injury. Overuse or repetitive trauma injuries represent approximately 50% of all pediatric sport-related injuries. It is speculated that more than half of these injuries may be preventable with simple approaches. Recommendations: Recommendations are provided based on current evidence regarding pediatric injury surveillance, identification of risk factors for injury, preparticipation physical examinations, proper supervision and education (coaching and medical), sport alterations, training and conditioning programs, and delayed specialization. PMID:21391806

  4. Sex and growth effect on pediatric hip injuries presenting to sports medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracciolini, Andrea; Yen, Yi-Meng; d'Hemecourt, Pierre A; Lewis, Cara L; Sugimoto, Dai

    2016-07-01

    To compare sports-related hip injuries on the basis of sex and age in a cohort of young athletes. A 5% random probability sample of all new patients' charts over a 10-year time period was selected for investigation. The most common hip injury diagnoses, sport at time of injury, mechanism (acute/traumatic vs. overuse), and types (bony vs. soft tissue) were compared by sex and age (preadolescent vs. adolescent). Descriptive and χ-analyses were carried out. The interaction of sex and age with respect to hip injury over time was examined by two-way (sex, age) analysis of variance. A total of 2133 charts were reviewed; N=87 hip injuries. The main diagnoses for males included labral tear (23.1%), avulsion fracture (11.5%), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (11.5%), dislocation (7.7%), and tendonitis (7.7%). The main diagnoses for females were labral tear (59.0%), tendonitis (14.8%), snapping hip syndrome (6.6%), strain (4.9%), and bursitis (4.9%). The five most common sports/activities at the time of hip injury were dancing/ballet (23.0%), soccer (18.4%), gymnastics (9.2%), ice hockey (8.1%), and track and field (6.9%). Age by sex comparisons showed a greater proportion of the total hip injuries (38.5%) in males compared with females (8.2%) during preadolescence (5-12 years). However, in adolescence (13-17 years), the hip injury proportion was significantly higher in females (91.8%) compared with males (61.5%; PInjury mechanism and type differed by sex, with females sustaining more chronic/overuse (95.1%) and soft tissue type injuries (93.4%) compared with males (50.0 and 53.8%, respectively; Phip injury proportion as they progressed through puberty compared with males (analysis of variance sex-by-age interaction; PHip injury mechanism and type differed significantly between males and females during growth. Notably, the proportion of hip injuries in the young female athletes showed a significantly greater increase with advancing age compared with males. Hip injuries in

  5. Sports participation and high grade renal injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenbluth, Robert E; Spirnak, J Patrick; Elder, Jack S

    2002-12-01

    The risk of major renal injury resulting from various forms of sports participation is unknown. Urologists often recommend that children with a solitary kidney avoid contact sports. We reviewed our recent experience with pediatric renal trauma to determine if there is an association between different types of sports activity and high grade renal injury. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 68 consecutive children with blunt renal injury who were treated at 2 level I trauma centers. Injuries were graded using the renal injury scale of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. Records were reviewed for mechanism of injury, associated injuries, management and injury severity score. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test or Wilcoxon rank sum test. Of the 68 renal lesions 13 were grade I, 15 grade II, 15 grade III, 17 grade IV and 8 grade V. The most common cause of renal trauma was motor vehicle accidents, accounting for 21 injuries (30.1%). Accidents associated with nonmotorized sports activity accounted for 14 injuries (20.6%). Bicycle riding was the most common sports etiology, accounting for 8 of 14 cases (57.1%) at an age range of 5 to 15 years (mean 9.4). None of the bicycle injuries involved collision with a motor vehicle. Bicycling accounted for 1 grade I, 1 grade II, 1 grade III, 2 grade IV and 3 grade V injuries. Football, hockey and sledding were responsible for the remaining 6 sports related injuries. High grade renal injury (grade IV or V) was identified in 5 of 8 bicycle accidents (62.5%) and 1 of 6 nonbicycle sports related injuries (16.7%, p = 0.14). Injury severity scores ranged from 4 to 50 (mean 20.6) for bicycle renal injuries and 4 to 13 (mean 6.7) for nonbicycle sports related trauma (p sports related cause of renal injury in children and is associated with a significant risk of major renal injury. Families of children with a solitary kidney should be aware of this risk factor. Team contact sports are

  6. Incidence and etiology of sports-related sudden cardiac death in Denmark--implications for preparticipation screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Theilade, Juliane; Kristensen, Ingrid Bayer; Thomsen, Jørgen Lange; Ottesen, Gyda Lolk; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Haunsø, Stig; Prescott, Eva; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2010-10-01

    Studies on incidences of sports-related sudden cardiac death (SrSCD) are few and data are needed for the discussion of preparticipation screening for cardiac disease. We sought to chart the incidence and etiology of SrSCD in the young in Denmark (population 5.4 million) and to compare this to the incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the background population. All 5,662 death certificates for decedents in the period 2000 to 2006 in the age group 12 to 35 years in Denmark were read independently by 2 physicians to identify cases of SCD. Information from autopsy reports, selected hospital records, and multiple registries was used to identify cases of SCD and SrSCD. SrSCD was defined as SCD occurring during or within 1 hour after exercise in a competitive athlete. The size of the athlete population was estimated from national survey data. Fifteen (range 0 to 5 per year) cases of SrSCD were found, 8 of which had antecedent symptoms. The incidence rate was 1.21 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68 to 2.00) per 100,000 athlete person-years. The most common autopsy findings were arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 4), sudden unexplained death (n = 4), and coronary artery disease (n = 2). The incidence of SCD in the general population age 12 to 35 was 3.76 (95% CI: 3.42 to 4.14) per 100,000 person-years. In Denmark, SrSCD is a rare occurrence and the incidence rate is lower than that of SCD in the general population. This may imply a low value of preparticipation screening of athletes in Denmark. Copyright © 2010 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prospective evaluation of anatomic patellofemoral inlay resurfacing: clinical, radiographic, and sports-related results after 24 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Andreas B; Feucht, Matthias J; Meidinger, Gebhart; Schöttle, Philip B; Cotic, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    To prospectively evaluate the clinical, radiographic, and sports-related outcomes at 24 months after isolated and combined patellofemoral inlay resurfacing (PFIR). Between 2009 and 2010, 29 consecutive patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) were treated with the HemiCAP(®) Wave Patellofemoral Resurfacing System (Arthrosurface, Franklin, MA, USA). Based on preoperative findings, patients were divided into two groups: group I, isolated PFIR (n = 20); and group II, combined PFIR with concomitant procedures to address patellofemoral instability, patellofemoral malalignment, and tibiofemoral malalignment (n = 9). Patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 24 months postoperatively. Clinical outcomes included WOMAC, subjective IKDC, Pain VAS, Tegner activity score, and a self-designed sports questionnaire. Kellgren-Lawrence grading was used to assess progression of tibiofemoral OA. The Caton-Deschamps Index was used to assess differences in patellar height. Twenty-seven patients (93 %) were available for 24-month follow-up. Eighty-one per cent of the patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with the overall outcome. Significant improvements in the WOMAC, subjective IKDC, and Pain VAS were seen in the overall patient cohort and in both subgroups. The median Tegner score and sports frequency showed a significant increase in the overall patient cohort and in group II. The number of sports disciplines increased significantly in both subgroups. No significant progression of tibiofemoral OA or changes in patellar height were observed. Patellofemoral inlay resurfacing is an effective and safe procedure in patients with symptomatic patellofemoral OA. Significant improvements in functional scores and sports activity were found after both isolated and combined procedures. Prospective case series, Level III.

  8. Prospectively Identified Deficits in Sagittal Plane Hip-Ankle Coordination in Female Athletes who Sustain a Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Mark V.; Kiefer, Adam W.; Bonnette, Scott; Riley, Michael A.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Shockley, Kevin; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Athletes who return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are at increased risk of future ACL injury. Altered coordination of lower extremity motion may increase this risk. The purpose of this study was to prospectively determine if altered lower extremity coordination patterns exist in athletes who go on to sustain a 2nd anterior cruciate ligament injury. Methods Sixty-one female athletes who were medically cleared to return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were included. Hip-ankle coordination was assessed prior to return to sport with a dynamic postural coordination task. Within 12 months, 14 patients sustained a 2nd ACL injury. Fourteen matched subjects were selected for comparative analysis. Cross-recurrence quantification analysis characterized hip-ankle coordination patterns. A group × target speed (slow vs. fast) × leg (involved vs. uninvolved) analysis of variance was used to identify coordination differences. Findings A main effect of group (p = 0.02) indicated that the single injury group exhibited more stable hip-ankle coordination [166.2 (18.9)] compared to the 2nd injury group [108.4 (10.1)]. A leg × group interaction was also observed (p = .04). The affected leg of the single injury group exhibited more stable coordination [M = 187.1 (23.3)] compared to the affected leg of the 2nd injury group [M = 110.13 (9.8)], p = 0.03. Interpretation Hip-ankle coordination was altered in female athletes who sustained a 2nd anterior cruciate ligament injury after return to sport. Failure to coordinate lower extremity movement in the absence of normal knee proprioception may place the knee at high-risk. PMID:26416200

  9. Caring touch as a bodily anchor for patients after sustaining a motor vehicle accident with minor or no physical injuries - a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airosa, Fanny; Arman, Maria; Sundberg, Tobias; Öhlén, Gunnar; Falkenberg, Torkel

    2016-03-22

    Patients who sustain a motor vehicle accident may experience long-term distress, even if they are uninjured or only slightly injured. There is a risk of neglecting patients with minor or no physical injuries, which might impact future health problems. The aim of this study was to explore patients' subjective experiences and perspectives on pain and other factors of importance after an early nursing intervention consisting of "caring touch" (tactile massage and healing touch) for patients subjected to a motor vehicle accident with minor or no physical injuries. A mixed method approach was used. The qualitative outcomes were themes derived from individual interviews. The quantitative outcomes were measured by visual analogue scale for pain (VAS, 0-100), sense of coherence (SOC), post-traumatic stress (IES-R) and health status (EQ-5D index and EQ-5D self-rated health). Forty-one patients of in total 124 eligible patients accepted the invitation to participate in the study. Twenty-seven patients completed follow-up after 6 months whereby they had received up to eight treatments with either tactile massage or healing touch. Patients reported that caring touch may assist in trauma recovery by functioning as a physical "anchor" on the patient's way of suffering, facilitating the transition of patients from feeling as though their body is "turned off" to becoming "awake". By caring touch the patients enjoyed a compassionate care and experience moments of pain alleviation. The VAS pain ratings significantly decreased both immediately after the caring touch treatment sessions and over the follow-up period. The median scores for VAS (p injuries, a caring touch intervention is associated with patients' report of decreased pain and improved wellbeing up to 6 months after the accident. ClinicalTrials.gov Id: NCT02610205 . Date 25 November 2015.

  10. #Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (1.5 ATA in treating sports related TBI/CTE: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoller Kenneth P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite adequate evidence, including randomized controlled trials; hyperbaric oxygen is not yet recognized as efficacious for treating various forms of brain injury, specifically traumatic brain injury. Political-economic issues have kept this benign therapy from being widely adopted despite the lack of viable alternatives. Two football players with TBI/CTE are herewith shown to benefit from being treated with hyperbaric oxygen as documented by neurocognitive examinations and functional brain imaging, in one case treatment commenced decades after the brain injury. Perhaps the interest in HBOT by those participating in high-risk sports will help expand this orphan therapy into mainstream medicine.

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (1.5 ATA) in treating sports related TBI/CTE: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Kenneth P

    2011-07-05

    Despite adequate evidence, including randomized controlled trials; hyperbaric oxygen is not yet recognized as efficacious for treating various forms of brain injury, specifically traumatic brain injury. Political-economic issues have kept this benign therapy from being widely adopted despite the lack of viable alternatives. Two football players with TBI/CTE are herewith shown to benefit from being treated with hyperbaric oxygen as documented by neurocognitive examinations and functional brain imaging, in one case treatment commenced decades after the brain injury. Perhaps the interest in HBOT by those participating in high-risk sports will help expand this orphan therapy into mainstream medicine.

  12. A QEEG index of level of functional dependence for people sustaining acquired brain injury: the Seville Independence Index (SINDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Carrion, Jose; Martin-Rodriguez, Juan Francisco; Damas-Lopez, Jesus; Martin, Juan Manuel Barroso Y; Dominguez-Morales, Maria Del Rosario

    2008-01-01

    To find an easy-to-use, valid and reliable tool for evaluating the level of functional dependence of an individual with brain damage who seeks a diagnosis of his/her functional dependence in daily activities. Eighty-one patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) in post-acute phase, 40 traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 41 cerebral vascular accident (CVA), were assessed using quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) and grouped according to the FIM + FAM scale. Discriminant analysis was performed on QEEG variables to obtain a discriminant function with the best discriminative capacity between functionality groups. Discriminant analysis showed classification accuracy of 100% in the training set sample and 75% in an external cross-validation sample; 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity were reached. Coherence measures were the most numerous variables in the function. These results point out that the discriminant function may be a useful tool in objective evaluations of patients seeking a diagnosis of their level of dependence and that it could be included in current functionality assessment protocols.

  13. Injuries to children riding BMX bikes.

    OpenAIRE

    Illingworth, C M

    1984-01-01

    One hundred children presented over 40 days with BMX bike injuries, 40 of which had been sustained while trying to perform stunts. Injuries in this series were compared with previously reported injuries from accidents on ordinary bicycles. BMX bike injuries differed little from ordinary bike injuries except in the greater proportion of injuries due to stunts and the smaller incidence of head injuries.

  14. The effects of a state concussion law on the frequency of sport-related concussions as seen in two emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojian, Thomas; Violano, Pina; Hall, Matthew; Duncan, Charles

    2015-12-01

    Connecticut (CT) passed its original sport-related concussion (SRC) law (PA 10-62) in 2010. The law requires that a health-care professional evaluate high school athletes with concussion symptoms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two level 1 Trauma Center Emergency Department (ED) records for SRC before and after the Connecticut Public Act (CT PA) 10-62 to determine if the law had an effect on the presentation to the ED of SRCs. A retrospective analysis of two level 1 Trauma Center Emergency Departments database was performed. Monthly data on SRCs treated in the study EDs from July 2003 through June 2012 were collected and analyzed using the autoregressive integrated moving average model. The number of SRCs in the youth (under age 14 years), high school (age 14 to 18 years), and adult (age >18 years) populations prior to CT PA 10-62 was compared to the number of SRCs post implementation of CT PA 10-62 for each academic school year, fall sports season, and summertime. Monthly SRCs in high school students treated in the study EDs increased from 2.5 cases to 5.9 cases between pre and post implementation of CT PA 10-62 (p sport-related concussion law. The results suggest that the sport-related concussion law in Connecticut is effective in improving the evaluation and detection of SRCs in high school students.

  15. Imaging of Muscle Injuries in Sports Medicine: Sports Imaging Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank W; Robinson, Philip; Tol, Johannes L; Regatte, Ravindar R; Crema, Michel D

    2017-03-01

    In sports-related muscle injuries, the main goal of the sports medicine physician is to return the athlete to competition-balanced against the need to prevent the injury from worsening or recurring. Prognosis based on the available clinical and imaging information is crucial. Imaging is crucial to confirm and assess the extent of sports-related muscle injuries and may help to guide management, which directly affects the prognosis. This is especially important when the diagnosis or grade of injury is unclear, when recovery is taking longer than expected, and when interventional or surgical management may be necessary. Several imaging techniques are widely available, with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging currently the most frequently applied in sports medicine. This state of the art review will discuss the main imaging modalities for the assessment of sports-related muscle injuries, including advanced imaging techniques, with the focus on the clinical relevance of imaging features of muscle injuries. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  16. Kissing knees - factors behind the attraction. Knee abduction in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Cronström, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and patellofemoral pain (PFP) are common sports-related knee injuries. Their consequences include compromised health of the effected individual and substantial financial costs for society. Increased knee abduction or a knee medial to foot position (KMFP), so called “kissing knees”, during weight-bearing activities is reported to be more common in patients with ACL injury or PFP than in non-injured individuals and is also reported to be associated with g...

  17. Sustained delivery of activated Rho GTPases and BDNF promotes axon growth in CSPG-rich regions following spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI often results in permanent functional loss. This physical trauma leads to secondary events, such as the deposition of inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG within astroglial scar tissue at the lesion.We examined whether local delivery of constitutively active (CA Rho GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1 to the lesion site alleviated CSPG-mediated inhibition of regenerating axons. A dorsal over-hemisection lesion was created in the rat spinal cord and the resulting cavity was conformally filled with an in situ gelling hydrogel combined with lipid microtubes that slowly released constitutively active (CA Cdc42, Rac1, or Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Treatment with BDNF, CA-Cdc42, or CA-Rac1 reduced the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes, as well as CSPG deposition, at the interface of the implanted hydrogel and host tissue. Neurofilament 160kDa positively stained axons traversed the glial scar extensively, entering the hydrogel-filled cavity in the treatments with BDNF and CA-Rho GTPases. The treated animals had a higher percentage of axons from the corticospinal tract that traversed the CSPG-rich regions located proximal to the lesion site.Local delivery of CA-Cdc42, CA-Rac1, and BDNF may have a significant therapeutic role in overcoming CSPG-mediated regenerative failure after SCI.

  18. Second time around: Corticospinal responses following repeated sports-related concussions within the same season. A transcranial magnetic stimulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J Pearce

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: This multiple-case study has demonstrated that concussion result in increased intracortical inhibition and reduction in cognitive and motor performance. Further, TMS, in conjunction with tests of cognitive and motor performance, can be useful as a prognostic technique in assessing recovery from acute concussion injury.

  19. National Childhood Vaccine-Injury Compensation Act. Hearing before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress on S.2117 to Amend the Public Health Service Act to Provide for the Compensation of Children and Others Who Have Sustained Vaccine-Related Injury, and for Other Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    Statements are presented which were made at this hearing to amend the Public Health Service Act to provide for the compensation of children and others who have sustained vaccine-related injury. While the hearing focused on the costs and the regulatory burden that might be imposed by the legislation, the following areas were also addressed: (1) the…

  20. Volleyball injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eerkes, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the numbers of people playing indoor and beach volleyball since the early 1980s and, consequently, an increase in injuries. Most injuries are related to repetitive jumping and hitting the ball overhead. The ankle is the most commonly injured joint, but the knee, shoulder, low back, and fingers also are vulnerable. The shoulder in particular is subject to extreme torque when hitting and jump serving the ball. Some injuries have a predilection for those playing on sand versus those playing in an indoor court. The clinician caring for volleyball players should be aware of the types of injuries these players sustain and how to help them return to play promptly and appropriately. This article reviews the specific injuries that are most common as a result of participating in the sport of volleyball.

  1. Conditioning lesions before or after spinal cord injury recruit broad genetic mechanisms that sustain axonal regeneration: superiority to camp-mediated effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesch, Armin; Lu, Paul; Tsukada, Shingo; Alto, Laura Taylor; Roet, Kasper; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Dan; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies indicate that peripheral nerve conditioning lesions significantly enhance central axonal regeneration via modulation of cAMP-mediated mechanisms. To gain insight into the nature and temporal dependence of neural mechanisms underlying conditioning lesion effects on central axonal regeneration, we compared the efficacy of peripheral sciatic nerve crush lesions to cAMP elevations (in lumbar dorsal root ganglia) on central sensory axonal regeneration when administered either before or after cervical spinal cord lesions. We found significantly greater effects of conditioning lesions compared to cAMP elevations on central axonal regeneration when combined with cellular grafts at the lesion site and viral neurotrophin delivery; further, these effects persisted whether conditioning lesions were applied prior to or shortly after spinal cord injury. Indeed, conditioning lesions recruited extensively greater sets of genetic mechanisms of possible relevance to axonal regeneration compared to cAMP administration, and sustained these changes for significantly greater time periods through the post-lesion period. We conclude that cAMP-mediated mechanisms account for only a portion of the potency of conditioning lesions on central axonal regeneration, and that recruitment of broader genetic mechanisms can extend the effect and duration of cellular events that support axonal growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pushed to the Margins and Pushing Back: A Case Study of One Adult’s Reflections on Social Interactions After a Traumatic Brain Injury Sustained as an Adolescent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscigno, Cecelia I.; Van Liew, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a worldwide chronic health problem. Current empirical approaches to defining factors that contribute to a meaningful life after TBI have been limited to the biomedical perspective. Such a limited paradigm fails to address how people with TBI find meaning and act on and are acted on by the world in which they live. Between 2005 and 2007 an in-depth qualitative case study was conducted. The primary data source was a man’s retrospective journal writings about his life after sustaining a severe TBI. The qualitative perspective of symbolic interactionism framed this case study analysis. Meaning is strongly influenced by the ways in which the social world interacts with the injured person. Despite an accumulation of negative social experiences, a traumatically brain-injured person can also assign positive meanings to the quality of his or her life. This has been ignored or explained away as a defense mechanism in previous investigations. More studies that include unbiased methods able to capture subjective experiences and what they mean to individuals with TBI are needed. This information will lead to more relevant interventions and better outcome instruments for use with this population. PMID:18727337

  3. Nutritional support for patients sustaining traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In traumatic brain injury (TBI, the appropriate timing and route of feeding, and the efficacy of immune-enhancing formulae have not been well established. We performed this meta-analysis aiming to compare the effects of different nutritional support modalities on clinical outcomes of TBI patients. METHODS: We systematically searched Pubmed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library until October, 2012. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs and non-randomized prospective studies (NPSs that compared the effects of different routes, timings, or formulae of feeding on outcomes in TBI patients were selected. The primary outcomes included mortality and poor outcome. The secondary outcomes included the length of hospital stay, the length of ventilation days, and the rate of infectious or feeding-related complications. FINDINGS: 13 RCTs and 3 NPSs were included. The pooled data demonstrated that, compared with delayed feeding, early feeding was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of mortality (relative risk [RR] = 0.35; 95% CI, 0.24-0.50, poor outcome (RR = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.54-0.91, and infectious complications (RR = 0.77; 95% CI, 0.59-0.99. Compared with enteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition showed a slight trend of reduction in the rate of mortality (RR = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.34-1.09, poor outcome (RR = 0.73; 95% CI, 0.51-1.04, and infectious complications (RR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.66-1.22, whereas without statistical significances. The immune-enhancing formula was associated with a significant reduction in infection rate compared with the standard formula (RR = 0.54; 95% CI, 0.35-0.82. Small-bowel feeding was found to be with a decreasing rate of pneumonia compared with nasogastric feeding (RR = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.22-0.76. CONCLUSION: After TBI, early initiation of nutrition is recommended. It appears that parenteral nutrition is superior to enteral nutrition in improving outcomes. Our results lend support to

  4. Sport-Related Achievement Motivation and Alcohol Outcomes: An Athlete-Specific Risk Factor among Intercollegiate Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Cameron C.; Martens, Matthew. P.; Cadigan, Jennifer M.; Takamatsu, Stephanie K.; Treloar, Hayley R.; Pedersen, Eric R.

    2013-01-01

    Intercollegiate athletes report greater alcohol consumption and more alcohol-related problems than their non-athlete peers. Although college athletes share many of the same problems faced by non-athletes, there are some consequences that are unique to athletes. Studies have demonstrated that alcohol negatively affects athletic performance including increased dehydration, impeded muscle recovery, and increased risk for injury. Beyond risk factors for alcohol misuse that may affect college stud...

  5. [Alcohol and tobacco consumption in Spanish and Mexican adolescents and its relation to physical and sports-related activity and to the family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Risueño Abad, Jorge; Ruiz-Juan, Francisco; Zamarripa Rivera, Jorge Isabel

    2012-03-01

    To identify the influence of alcohol or tobacco consumption along with independent variables (sex and age; time and leisure activities; motivations, patterns, modalities, and goals of physical and sports-related activity; and behaviors within the family environment) in physical and sports-related activity among pupils enrolled in compulsory secondary education in Spain and Mexico. A questionnaire on habits related to physical and sports-related activity, consumption of alcoholic beverages or tobacco, and the influence of the family environment was answered by 3,249 Spanish pupils and 1,083 Mexican pupils between 12 and 16 years of age. A descriptive analysis and a multinomial logistic regression were carried out in order to ascertain the predictive capacity of the variables included in the model. In both countries, consumption increases with age. In comparative terms, there is a higher prevalence among Spanish pupils when consuming addictive substances. The Spanish pupils who are physically active are less likely to consume alcohol and tobacco; among their Mexican counterparts, there were no significant differences in this regard. The results show that in Spain, females consume alcoholic beverages and smoke more frequently than do males, who do so sporadically but in greater quantities. In Mexico, adolescent boys consume alcohol more regularly that do adolescent girls, although there are no differences in terms of quantity. In Spain, being physically active and engaging in sports is clearly related to consuming less. Being physically active acts as a protective agent against unhealthy habits. Among Mexican adolescents, no significant relationship between these factors has been found. Both in Spain and in Mexico, siblings and parents are the family members who have the greatest influence vis-à-vis alcohol and tobacco consumption. Furthermore, the trend towards simultaneous consumption of both substances has been proved.

  6. Imaging of rock climbing injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bianchi, Stefano; Cotten, Anne

    2005-12-01

    Competition climbing has grown increasingly in popularity, and many people are being drawn to this sport with a parallel increase in the occurrence of sport-related injuries. One of the most common and unique lesions occurring in the rock climbing population is the closed rupture of the flexor pulley system of the fingers. This lesion is strictly related to some climbing techniques in which the entire body weight is placed on fingerholds, which causes bowstringing of the flexor tendons with subsequent loss of strength across the full range of motion of the finger. This article summarizes the current literature regarding the application of imaging modalities in the diagnosis of rock climbing injuries with a specific focus on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Biomechanics of the sporting activity and resultant pathophysiologic and clinical considerations concerning flexor pulley system injuries are also discussed.

  7. Injury profile and injury risk factors in junior tennis players

    OpenAIRE

    Hjelm, Nina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to prospectively study injuries sustained by a cohort of junior players at all levels in a typical tennis club with respect to gender, anatomic location of injuries, type of injuries, and their degree of severity as well as cause of injuries, injury occasion and time of the year when injured. A further aim was to evaluate potential intrinsic as well as extrinsic injury risk factors in the same junior tennis players. All 12-18 year...

  8. Snowboarding injuries in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drkulec, John A.; Letts, Mervyn

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study injury patterns of snowboarding trauma in children. Design A retrospective case series. Setting A major pediatric trauma centre. Patients A cohort of 113 children (97 boys, 16 girls), mean age 13.9 years, who sustained 118 injuries secondary to snowboarding. Interventions All fractures were treated by immobilization in a cast; 19 children required a closed reduction. Outcome measures Sex and age of patients, mechanism of injury, injury sustained, treatments and complications. Results Falls on the outstretched hand from a loss of balance accounted for 66 (57%) of the injuries, uncontrolled falls for 42 (36%) and collisions for 5 (4%). Seventy-nine percent of the injuries were to the upper extremity, whereas 7% were to the lower extremity. Conclusions The predominance of snowboarding injuries of the upper extremity seen in children differs significantly from those in adults in whom lower extremity injuries are more common. PMID:11764877

  9. SCAT2 and SCAT3 scores at baseline and after sports-related mild brain injury/concussion: qualitative synthesis with weighted means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roger E; Alves, Jorge; Vaska, Marcus M; Magalhães, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    Identify all Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT2/3) studies, compare baseline and postconcussion results. Systematic review (qualitative synthesis, weighted means). 18 databases, 9 grey literature resources searched for SCAT2/3 data; 9150 articles identified, titles/abstracts assessed/data-entry independently by two reviewers. Any studies reporting partial/complete SCAT2/3 data. 21 studies with data (partial/complete data 16 SCAT2 (4087 athletes); 5 SCAT3 (891). Newcastle-Ottawa risk-of-bias scale: studies with maximum possible score of 4, 85% scored 3 or 4; studies with maximum possible score of 6, 75% scored 5 or 6. SCAT2 high schoolers: weighted mean score for symptoms 18.46 (22=no symptoms), Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) 26.14, Standardised Assessment of Concussion (SAC) 26.00 and SCAT2 total 88.63. Collegiate/adults weighted means: symptoms 20.09, BESS 25.54, SAC 27.51 and total SCAT2 91.20. Between-study and within-study variability similar to those of the high schoolers. Limited variability between genders. Only 2 studies report baseline and postconcussion scores and 9 partial scores, but data are too limited to provide weighted average scores. Group mean baseline SCAT scores for high school and collegiate athletes are similar, with minimal gender differences; baseline symptoms show more variability than other components. There are minimal data for elementary students and professionals, no data for adult non-collegiate athletes. Two studies provide preconcussion and postconcussion scores. No data on minimal significant clinical differences to guide players/coaches in withdrawing from a game in progress and deciding when recovery is complete and play can be resumed. The SCAT needs supplementing with clinical and neuropsychological return-to-play assessments.

  10. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Potential Late Effect of Sport-Related Concussive and Subconcussive Head Trauma1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavett, Brandon E.; Stern, Robert A.; McKee, Ann C.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a form of neurodegeneration that is believed to result from repeated head injuries. Originally termed dementia pugilistica due to its association with boxing, the neuropathology of CTE was first described by Corsellis in 1973 in a case series of 15 retired boxers. CTE has recently been found to occur following other causes of repeated head trauma, suggesting that any repeated blows to the head, such as those that occur due to American football, hockey, soccer, professional wrestling, and physical abuse, can also lead to neurodegenerative changes. These changes often include cerebral atrophy, cavum septum pellucidum with fenestrations, shrinkage of the mammillary bodies, dense tau immunoreactive inclusions (neurofibrillary tangles, glial tangles, and neuropil neurites), diffuse axonal injury, and, in some cases, a TDP-43 proteinopathy. In association with these pathological changes, affected individuals often exhibit disordered memory and executive functioning, behavioral and personality disturbances (e.g., apathy, depression, irritability, impulsiveness, suicidality), parkinsonism, and, occasionally, motor neuron disease. At the present time, there are no formal clinical or pathological diagnostic criteria for CTE, but the distinctive neuropathological profile of the disorder lends promise for future research into its prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:21074091

  11. The hemodynamic tolerability and feasibility of sustained low efficiency dialysis in the management of critically ill patients with acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisenbaum Rosane

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minimization of hemodynamic instability during renal replacement therapy (RRT in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI is often challenging. We examined the relative hemodynamic tolerability of sustained low efficiency dialysis (SLED and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT in critically ill patients with AKI. We also compared the feasibility of SLED administration with that of CRRT and intermittent hemodialysis (IHD. Methods This cohort study encompassed four critical care units within a single university-affiliated medical centre. 77 consecutive critically ill patients with AKI who were treated with CRRT (n = 30, SLED (n = 13 or IHD (n = 34 and completed at least two RRT sessions were included in the study. Overall, 223 RRT sessions were analyzed. Hemodynamic instability during a given session was defined as the composite of a > 20% reduction in mean arterial pressure or any escalation in pressor requirements. Treatment feasibility was evaluated based on the fraction of the prescribed therapy time that was delivered. An interrupted session was designated if Results Hemodynamic instability occurred during 22 (56.4% SLED and 43 (50.0% CRRT sessions (p = 0.51. In a multivariable analysis that accounted for clustering of multiple sessions within the same patient, the odds ratio for hemodynamic instability with SLED was 1.20 (95% CI 0.58-2.47, as compared to CRRT. Session interruption occurred in 16 (16.3, 30 (34.9 and 11 (28.2 of IHD, CRRT and SLED therapies, respectively. Conclusions In critically ill patients with AKI, the administration of SLED is feasible and provides comparable hemodynamic control to CRRT.

  12. Soda pop vending machine injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosio, M Q

    1988-11-11

    Fifteen male patients, 15 to 24 years of age, sustained injuries after rocking soda machines. The machines fell onto the victims, resulting in a variety of injuries. Three were killed. The remaining 12 required hospitalization for their injuries. Unless changes are made to safeguard these machines, people will continue to suffer severe and possibly fatal injuries from what are largely preventable accidents.

  13. The Adolescent Athlete: A Developmental Approach to Injury Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Damien; Broderick, Carolyn; Steinbeck, Katharine

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of long-term athlete development programs and early sport specialization, the training of elite athletes now spans the period of adolescence. Adolescence represents a period of physical, psychosocial and cognitive development, but also a time of physical and psychological vulnerability. Changes in skeletal and physiological attributes coincide with an increased risk of sport related injury. A window of vulnerability is shaped by the properties of the musculoskeletal system, the influence of pubertal hormones and the lag time between physical and cognitive development. This article aims to challenge the assumption of adolescence as a time of increased vigor alone, by highlighting the presence of specific vulnerabilities, and proposing that the hormonal, musculoskeletal, and neurocognitive changes of adolescence may represent intrinsic risk factors for sport related injury.

  14. Epidemiology of 3825 injuries sustained in six seasons of National Collegiate Athletic Association men's and women's soccer (2009/2010-2014/2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Karen G; Wasserman, Erin B; Dalton, Sara L; Gray, Aaron; Djoko, Aristarque; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-07-01

    To describe the epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) men's and women's soccer injuries during the 2009/2010-2014/2015 academic years. This descriptive epidemiology study used NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) data during the 2009/2010-2014/2015 academic years, from 44 men's and 64 women's soccer programmes (104 and 167 team seasons of data, respectively). Non-time-loss injuries were defined as resulting in soccer and 2271 women's soccer injuries with injury rates of 8.07/1000 athlete exposures (AE) and 8.44/1000AE, respectively. Injury rates for men and women did not differ in competitions (17.53 vs 17.04/1000AE; RR=1.03; 95% CI 0.94 to 1.13) or practices (5.47 vs 5.69/1000AE; RR=0.96; 95% CI 0.88 to 1.05). In total, 47.2% (n=733) of men's soccer injuries and 47.5% (n=1079) of women's were non-time loss. Most injuries occurred to the lower extremity and were diagnosed as sprains. Women had higher concussion rates (0.59 vs 0.34/1000AE; RR=1.76; 95% CI 1.32 to 2.35) than men. Non-time-loss injuries accounted for nearly half of the injuries in men's and women's soccer. Sex differences were found in competition injuries, specifically for concussion. Further study into the incidence, treatment and outcome of non-time-loss injuries may identify a more accurate burden of these injuries. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Subsequent Injuries Are More Common Than Injury Recurrences: An Analysis of 1 Season of Prospectively Collected Injuries in Professional Australian Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Caroline F; Cook, Jill; Kunstler, Breanne E; Akram, Muhammad; Orchard, John

    2017-07-01

    It is known that some people can, and do, sustain >1 injury over a playing season. However, there is currently little high-quality epidemiological evidence about the risk of, and relationships between, multiple and subsequent injuries. To describe the subsequent injuries sustained by Australian Football League (AFL) players over 1 season, including their most common injury diagnoses. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Within-player linked injury data on all date-ordered match-loss injuries sustained by AFL players during 1 full season were obtained. The total number of injuries per player was determined, and in those with >1 injury, the Subsequent Injury Classification (SIC) model was used to code all subsequent injuries based on their Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS) codes and the dates of injury. There were 860 newly recorded injuries in 543 players; 247 players (45.5%) sustained ≥1 subsequent injuries after an earlier injury, with 317 subsequent injuries (36.9% of all injuries) recorded overall. A subsequent injury generally occurred to a different body region and was therefore superficially unrelated to an index injury. However, 32.2% of all subsequent injuries were related to a previous injury in the same season. Hamstring injuries were the most common subsequent injury. The mean time between injuries decreased with an increasing number of subsequent injuries. When relationships between injuries are taken into account, there is a high level of subsequent (and multiple) injuries leading to missed games in an elite athlete group.

  16. Prospective observational research on the clinical profile and outcome analysis among a cohort of patients sustaining traumatic cervical spine and cord injury in a peripheral tertiary spine care centre in Nepal [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Munakomi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In developing nations like Nepal, spinal cord injury has multispectral consequences for both the patient and their family members. It has the tendency to cripple and handicap the patients, and burn out their caretakers, both physically and mentally. Furthermore, the centralization of health care with only a handful of dedicated rehabilitation centers throughout Nepal further places patients into disarray. This study was carried out as a pilot study to determine the modes of injury, age groups affected, clinical profiles and patterns of injury sustained, as well as the efficacy of managing a subset of patients, who have sustained cervical spine and cord injuries. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study comprising of 163 patients enrolled over a period of three years that were managed in the spine unit of College of Medical Sciences, Bharatpur, Nepal. Results: Road traffic accidents were implicated in 51% of these patients. 65% of them were in the age group of 30-39 years. Traumatic subluxation occurred in 73 patients with maximum involvement of the C4/5 region (28.76%. Good outcome was seen in patients with ASIA ‘C’ and ‘D’ with 55% of patients showed improvement from ‘C’ to ‘D’ and 95% of patients showed improvement from ‘D’ to ‘E’ at 1 year follow up. The overall mortality in the patients undergoing operative interventions was only 1.98%. Conclusions: The prevalence of cervical spine injuries in the outreach area is still significant. The outcome of managing these patients, even in the context of a resource limited setup in a spine unit outside the capital city of a developing nation, can be as equally as effective and efficient compared to the outcome from a well-equipped and dedicated spine unit elsewhere.

  17. Brain and cervical spine injuries occurring during organized sports activities in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, D A; Schut, L; Sutton, L N

    1984-03-01

    Eighty per cent of severe sports-related central nervous system trauma occurs as a result of collision sports, chiefly American football and rugby union football, followed by wrestling and gymnastics. Although serious head injury is uncommon, episodes of concussion are frequent; repeated concussion should be grounds for suggesting that the athlete give up collision sport. American and rugby union football are the sports mainly responsible for cervical spine injury with resultant quadriplegia.

  18. [Prevention of sports injuries. A realistic goal?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, E

    2000-11-01

    At present a great deal of energy is being expended to increase athletes' performance by constantly improving equipment and material. In comparison, the efforts to direct these investments at preventing sports-related injuries are not anywhere near as great. At the same time, top-level sports are currently so attractive, especially in financial terms, that many athletes attempt to compensate for inadequate talent with excessively intensive training. This explains the continued high incidence of sports injuries, e.g., in professional alpine skiing, although preventive measures in this discipline have attained great success in reducing anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Future measures must thus be aimed at establishing educational programs about situations of risk as well as convincing athletes and sports authorities of the importance of prevention in the realm of sports injuries.

  19. Eye Injuries--The A-B-C's and a Few X-Y-Z's for the Athletic Trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Lee

    Suggestions are given for diagnosing and treating sport-related injuries to the eye: (1) hyphema; (2) abrasion of the cornea; (3) subconjunctival hemorrhage; (4) traumatic iritis; (5) lacerations of the eyelids and brows; (6) eyelid margin lacerations; (7) traumatic retinal detachment; (8) superficial foreign body; (9) traumatic cataracts and…

  20. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of working memory in youth after sports-related concussion: is it still working?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keightley, Michelle L; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Gagnon, Isabelle; Leonard, Gabriel; Petrides, Michael; Ptito, Alain

    2014-03-01

    Abstract In children, the importance of detecting deficits after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion has grown with the increasing popularity of leisure physical activities and contact sports. Whereas most postconcussive symptoms (PCS) are similar for children and adults, the breadth of consequences to children remains largely unknown. To investigate the effect of mTBI on brain function, we compared working memory performance and related brain activity using blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 15 concussed youths and 15 healthy age-matched control subjects. Neuropsychological tests, self-perceived PCS, and levels of anxiety and depression were also assessed. Our results showed that, behaviorally, concussed youths had significantly worse performances on the working memory tasks, as well as on the Rey figure delayed recall and verbal fluency. fMRI results revealed that, compared to healthy children, concussed youths had significantly reduced task-related activity in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, and left superior parietal lobule during performance of verbal and nonverbal working memory tasks. Additionally, concussed youths also showed less activation than healthy controls in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, left thalamus, and left caudate nucleus during the nonverbal task. Regression analysis indicated that BOLD signal changes in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly correlated with performance such that greater activities in these regions, relative to the control condition, were associated with greater accuracy. Our findings confirmed functional alterations in brain activity after concussion in youths, a result similar to that observed in adults. However, significant differences were noted. In particular, the observation of reduced working memory accuracy suggests that youths may be unable to engage compensatory

  1. Youth Sport-Related Concussions: Perceived and Measured Baseline Knowledge of Concussions Among Community Coaches, Athletes, and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanos, Katherine N; Franco, John M; Larson, Dirk; Mara, Kristin; Laskowski, Edward R

    2017-12-01

    To assess concussion knowledge of athletes, coaches, and parents/guardians in a community setting and to understand trends/gaps in knowledge among subgroups to tailor efforts toward creating educational interventions. This prospective cross-sectional study involved 262 individuals (142 [55%] female): 115 athletes participating in noncontact and contact sports (ages 13-19 years), 15 coaches, and 132 parents. Recruitment occurred from August 30, 2015, through August 30, 2016, at 3 local high schools. Participants completed a questionnaire developed by the investigators to assess concussion experience and basic knowledge. Females, health care employees, and parents showed stronger concern for potential long-term sequelae of concussion, whereas athletes were most concerned about not being able to return to sport. Those with higher perceived concussion knowledge were slightly older (median age, 42.5 vs 33 years), more educated (college or higher: 42 [70%] vs 100 [50%]), and more likely to be health care workers (22 [37.9%] vs 34 [17.7%]) and scored higher on knowledge questions (average correct: 75.5% vs 60%). Most participants could identify potential concussion sequelae, but only 86 (34.3%) identified a concussion as a brain injury. Of the subgroups, coaches scored highest on knowledge questions. Those with a concussion history tended to consider themselves more knowledgeable but were also less concerned about sequelae. Overall, those with a concussion history scored slightly higher on knowledge questions (average correct: 69.8% vs 61.9%). Participants involved in contact sports were more likely to have had a concussion vs those in noncontact sports (57 [26%] vs 4 [10.3%]). Significant differences in perceived and actual concussion knowledge across different subgroups of study participants involved in high school sports were identified. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An Exploratory Study of Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinators' Knowledge and Experience of Working with Children Who Have Sustained a Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Julia; Ball, Heather

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to measure Special Educational Needs Co-ordinators' knowledge of the educational implications of acquired brain injury in children and young people and whether experience of working with pupils with a brain injury or additional training impacts upon this knowledge. Data was collected within one local authority in England using…

  3. Epidemiology of hospital-based emergency department visits due to sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalliah, Romesh P; Anderson, Ingrid M; Lee, Min Kyeong; Rampa, Sankeerth; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Allareddy, Veerajalandhar

    2014-08-01

    Sports-related injuries in adolescents incur a significant amount of hospital resources. Sports-related injuries are not an uncommon cause of ED visit; however, national estimates of such injuries in teenagers are unknown. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize emergency department (ED) visits that result from sports-related injuries among teenagers across the United States. This study describes the outcomes associated with sports-related injuries necessitating ED visits among teenagers at a national level. This is a descriptive epidemiology study. The 2008 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample data set, the largest all-payer health care database in the United States, was used to identify ED visits with external cause of injury related to sports occurring in patients aged 13 through 19 years. Outcomes examined included discharge status after the ED visit and presence of concomitant injuries. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize the estimates. Nationwide representative estimates were computed using the discharge weight variable. There were 432,609 ED visits by those between the ages of 13 and 19 years who experienced sports-related injuries, with total charges close to $447.4 million, with a mean total per-visit charge of $1205. The male patients accounted for 76.8% of the total ED visits. The most frequently occurring injuries were superficial injury or contusion (n = 118,250 ED visits); sprains and strains (n = 105,476); fracture of the upper limb (n = 63,151); open wounds of the head, the neck, and the trunk (n = 46,176); as well as intracranial injury (n = 30,726). Close to 29% of all ED visits occurred among those residing in geographical areas with median household income levels of greater than $64,000. After the ED visit, 1.6% were admitted to the same hospital, with a mean length of stay of 2.4 days and a mean hospital charge for ED visit and inpatient services of $22,703. The male patients composed 87.5% of the hospitalizations. The

  4. Automatic transmission vehicle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, M

    1973-04-07

    Four drivers sustained severe injuries when run down by their own automatic cars while adjusting the carburettor or throttle linkages. The transmission had been left in the "Drive" position and the engine was idling. This accident is easily avoidable.

  5. Emergency department reported head injuries from skiing and snowboarding among children and adolescents, 1996-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Janessa M; Whitehill, Jennifer M; Stream, Joshua O; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the incidence of snow-sports-related head injuries among children and adolescents reported to emergency departments (EDs), and to examine the trend from 1996 to 2010 in ED visits for snow-sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) among children and adolescents. A retrospective, population-based cohort study was conducted using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System for patients (aged ≤17 years) treated in EDs in the USA from 1996 to 2010, for TBIs associated with snow sports (defined as skiing or snowboarding). National estimates of snow sports participation were obtained from the National Ski Area Association and utilised to calculate incidence rates. Analyses were conducted separately for children (aged 4-12 years) and adolescents (aged 13-17 years). An estimated number of 78 538 (95% CI 66 350 to 90 727) snow sports-related head injuries among children and adolescents were treated in EDs during the 14-year study period. Among these, 77.2% were TBIs (intracranial injury, concussion or fracture). The annual average incidence rate of TBI was 2.24 per 10 000 resort visits for children compared with 3.13 per 10 000 visits for adolescents. The incidence of TBI increased from 1996 to 2010 among adolescents (p<0.003). Given the increasing incidence of TBI among adolescents and the increased recognition of the importance of concussions, greater awareness efforts may be needed to ensure safety, especially helmet use, as youth engage in snow sports.

  6. Patients Without Intraoperative Neuromonitoring (IONM) Alerts During VEPTR Implantation Did Not Sustain Neurological Injury During Subsequent Routine Expansions: A Retrospective Multicenter Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGreca, Jaren; Flynn, Tara; Cahill, Patrick J; Samdani, Amer; Vitale, Michael G; El-Hawary, Ron; Smith, John T; Phillips, Jonathan H; Flynn, John M; Glotzbecker, Michael; Garg, Sumeet

    2017-03-21

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of intraoperative neurological monitoring (IONM) alerts and neurological injury during vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) treatment and evaluate the utility of IONM during VEPTR expansion procedures in patients who have not previously had neurological injury or IONM alerts. After institutional review board approval, VEPTR procedures and IONM records were reviewed at 17 institutions for patients treated with VEPTR from 2005 to 2011. All consecutive cases in patients with minimum 2-year follow-up were included. Patients with prior history of growing rods or other invasive spine-based surgical treatment were excluded. Surgeries were categorized into implant, revision, expansion, and removal procedures. Cases with IONM alerts or neurological injury had additional detailed review. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. In total, 2355 consecutive VEPTR procedures (352 patients) consisting of 299 implant, 377 revision, 1587 expansion, and 92 removal procedures were included. In total, 620 VEPTR procedures had IONM, and 539 of those had IONM records available for review. IONM alerts occurred in 9/539 procedures (1.7%): 3/192 implants (1.6%), 3/58 revisions (5.2%), and 3/258 expansions (1.2%). New neurological injury occurred in 3/2355 procedures (0.1%), 3/352 patients (0.9%). All 3 injuries were in implant procedures, only 1 had an IONM alert. All 3 had upper extremity motor deficits (1 had sensory deficit also). All had full recovery at 17, 30, and 124 days postinjury. One patient without prior neurological injury or IONM alert had an IONM alert during expansion that resolved after an increase in blood pressure. The remaining IONM alerts during expansions were all in children with prior IONM alerts during implant, revision, or exchange procedures. The highest rate of neurological injury in VEPTR surgery was found for implant procedures. There were no instances of neurological injury during

  7. Ice hockey injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Brian W; Meeuwisse, Willem H

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the distribution and determinants of injuries reported in the pediatric ice hockey literature, and suggests potential injury prevention strategies and directions for further research. Thirteen electronic databases, the ISI Web of Science, and 'grey literature' databases were searched using a combination of Medical Subject Headings and text words to identify potentially relevant articles. The bibliographies of selected studies were searched to identify additional articles. Studies were selected for review based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. A comparison between studies on this topic area was difficult due to the variability in research designs, definition of injury, study populations, and measurements used to assess injury. The majority of injuries were sustained during games compared with practices. The two most commonly reported injuries were sprains/strains and contusions. Players competing at the Minor hockey, High School, and Junior levels of competition sustained most of their injuries to the upper extremity, head, and lower extremity, respectively. The primary mechanism of injury was body checking, followed by stick and puck contact. The frequency of catastrophic eye injuries has been significantly reduced with the world-wide mandation of full facial protection for all Minor hockey players. Specific hockey-related injury risk factors are poorly delineated and rarely studied among pediatric ice hockey players leaving large gaps in the knowledge of appropriate prevention strategies. Risk management strategies should be focused at avoiding unnecessary foreseeable risk, and controlling the risks inherent to the sport. Suggestions for injury prevention and future research are discussed.

  8. Lawnmower injuries in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Nora

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Power lawnmowers can pose significant danger of injury to both the operator and the bystander, from direct contact with the rotary blades or missile injury. Our objective was to review our experience with paediatric lawnmower-associated trauma, and the safety recommendations available to operators of power lawnmowers. METHODS: The patient cohort comprised paediatric (<16 years of age) patients treated for lawnmower-associated trauma, by the plastic surgery service, between 1996 and 2003. These patients were identified retrospectively. Age at the time of injury, location and extent of bony and soft tissue injuries sustained, treatment instituted and clinical outcome were recorded. Brochures and instruction manuals of six lawnmower manufacturers were reviewed, and safety recommendations noted. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were identified. The majority of injuries occurred from direct contact with the rotary blades (93%); the remaining child sustained a burn injury. Fourteen children (93%) required operative intervention. Seven patients (46%) sustained injuries resulting in amputation, two of whom had major limb amputations. All children, except the burns patient, underwent wound debridement and received antibiotic therapy. Reconstructive methods ranged from primary closure to free tissue transfer. Many patients required multiple procedures. In all instruction manuals, instructions to keep children and pets indoors or out of the yard when mowing were found. CONCLUSIONS: Lawnmower injuries can be devastating, particularly in children. Many victims have lasting deformities as a result of their injuries. Awareness of and stringent adherence to safety precautions during use of power lawnmowers can prevent many of these accidents.

  9. Brain Injury Association of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Only) 1-800-444-6443 Welcome to the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) Brain injury is not an event or an outcome. ... misunderstood, under-funded neurological disease. People who sustain brain injuries must have timely access to expert trauma ...

  10. Epidemiology of Sports-Related Concussions in National Collegiate Athletic Association Athletes From 2009-2010 to 2013-2014: Symptom Prevalence, Symptom Resolution Time, and Return-to-Play Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Erin B; Kerr, Zachary Y; Zuckerman, Scott L; Covassin, Tracey

    2016-01-01

    Limited data exist among collegiate student-athletes on the epidemiology of sports-related concussion (SRC) outcomes, such as symptoms, symptom resolution time, and return-to-play time. This study used the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP) to describe the epidemiology of SRC outcomes in 25 collegiate sports. Descriptive epidemiology study. SRC data from the NCAA ISP during the 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 academic years were analyzed regarding symptoms, time to resolution of symptoms, and time to return to play. Findings were also stratified by sex in sex-comparable sports (ie, ice hockey, soccer, basketball, lacrosse, baseball/softball) and whether SRCs were reported as recurrent. Of the 1670 concussions reported during the 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 academic years, an average (±SD) of 5.29 ± 2.94 concussion symptoms were reported, with the most common being headache (92.2%) and dizziness (68.9%). Most concussions had symptoms resolve within 1 week (60.1%); however, 6.2% had a symptom resolution time of over 4 weeks. Additionally, 8.9% of concussions required over 4 weeks before return to play. The proportion of SRCs that required at least 1 week before return to play increased from 42.7% in 2009-2010 to 70.2% in 2013-2014 (linear trend, P concussions in male athletes included amnesia and disorientation; a larger proportion of concussions in female athletes included headache, excess drowsiness, and nausea/vomiting. A total of 151 SRCs (9.0%) were reported as recurrent. The average number of symptoms reported with recurrent SRCs (5.99 ± 3.43) was greater than that of nonrecurrent SRCs (5.22 ± 2.88; P = .01). A greater proportion of recurrent SRCs also resulted in a long symptom resolution time (14.6% vs 5.4%, respectively; P concussion management practices in which team medical staff members withhold players from participation longer to ensure symptom resolution. Concussion symptoms may differ by sex and recurrence. Future

  11. Medical management of noncognitive sequelae of minor traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, G C

    1997-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) encompasses the postconcussion syndrome characterized by symptoms that include a variety of physical symptoms as well as cognitive and behavioral impairments. The focus of this discussion is on the medical management of posttraumatic headaches, posttraumatic seizures, dizziness, auditory impairments, anosmia, tremor, paraspinal pain, and visual symptoms. Adjustment disorders with disturbances of affect and emotion lability also may accompany mild TBI. All of these conditions may be approached with medications or a variety of therapy techniques or both. The approach to concussion in sports-related injuries is also reviewed.

  12. Low-dose baclofen therapy raised plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 concentrations, but not into the normal range in a predictable and sustained manner in men with chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William A; La Fountaine, Michael F; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M; Kirshblum, Steven C; Spungen, Ann M

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate, whether once-daily oral baclofen administration increases and/or sustains plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) concentration in 11 men with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) and IGF-1 deficiency (i.e. Plasma IGF-1 and self-reported side effects were measured at baseline and every other week for the duration of the study. The subjects were 43 ± 12 years old, had duration of injury of 20 ± 12 years; eight subjects had a complete motor injury, and eight had paraplegia. Nine of 11 subjects completed the 20 mg/day treatment and 5 subjects completed the 40 mg/day treatment. Plasma IGF-1 levels improved with each baclofen dose; however, only one subject increased from baseline and remained above the targeted physiological range of 250 ng/ml throughout treatment. A significant increase in IGF-1concentration was observed between baseline and week 2 (154 ± 63 vs. 217 ± 69 ng/ml; P plasma IGF-1 concentrations in the physiological range in men with chronic SCI.

  13. The Relationship between Concussion Knowledge and the High School Athlete's Intention to Report Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mary Ellen; Sanner, Jennifer E.

    2017-01-01

    Sports-related concussion or traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a frequent occurrence among high school athletes. Long-term and short-term effects of TBI on the athlete's developing brain can be minimized if the athlete reports and is effectively treated for TBI symptoms. Knowledge of concussion symptoms and a school culture of support are critical…

  14. Athletes broad dimensions of dispositional perfectionism: examining changes in life satisfaction and the mediating role of sport-related motivation and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, Patrick; Antl, Sheilah

    2008-06-01

    This study examined the associations of dispositional perfectionism, contextual motivation, sport-related coping, goal attainment, and changes in life satisfaction during a sport competition. A sample of 186 athletes completed measures of dispositional perfectionism, contextual motivation, and life satisfaction at Time 1 (before a competition) as well as measures of coping, goal attainment, and life satisfaction at Time 2 (after a competition). Results of structural equation modeling supported a model in which self-determined and non-self-determined motivation partially mediated the relationships between different dimensions of perfectionism and coping. It was also shown that disengagement-oriented coping mediated the negative relationship between evaluative concerns perfectionism and change in life satisfaction. In a similar way, goal attainment mediated the relationships of both task- and disengagement-oriented coping with change in life satisfaction. For the most part, these results are consistent with the motivational properties of evaluative concerns and personal standards perfectionism and with literature regarding coping and self-determination theory.

  15. Sports-related sudden cardiac death in a competitive and a noncompetitive athlete population aged 12 to 49 years: Data from an unselected nationwide study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, B.; Winkel, B. G.; Jabbari, R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Preparticipation screening programs have been suggested to reduce the numbers of sports-related sudden cardiac deaths (SrSCD). OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize all SrSCD aged 12-49 years and to address the difference in incidence rates between......SCD cases were identified. RESULTS In the 3-year period, there were 881 SCDs, of which we identified 44 SrSCD. In noncompetitive athletes aged 12-35 years, the incidence rate of SrSCD was 0.43 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.160.94) per 100,000 athlete person-years vs 2.95 (95% CI 1.......0-11.5) per 100.000 person-years. CONCLUSION The incidence rates of SrSCD in noncompetitive and competitive athletes are not different. The study showed an increase in the incidence rate of SrSCD in persons aged 36-49 years in both noncompetitive and competitive athletes compared to those aged 12-35 years...

  16. An alternative to the balance error scoring system: using a low-cost balance board to improve the validity/reliability of sports-related concussion balance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jasper O; Levy, Susan S; Seay, Seth W; Goble, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    Recent guidelines advocate sports medicine professionals to use balance tests to assess sensorimotor status in the management of concussions. The present study sought to determine whether a low-cost balance board could provide a valid, reliable, and objective means of performing this balance testing. Criterion validity testing relative to a gold standard and 7 day test-retest reliability. University biomechanics laboratory. Thirty healthy young adults. Balance ability was assessed on 2 days separated by 1 week using (1) a gold standard measure (ie, scientific grade force plate), (2) a low-cost Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB), and (3) the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS). Validity of the WBB center of pressure path length and BESS scores were determined relative to the force plate data. Test-retest reliability was established based on intraclass correlation coefficients. Composite scores for the WBB had excellent validity (r = 0.99) and test-retest reliability (R = 0.88). Both the validity (r = 0.10-0.52) and test-retest reliability (r = 0.61-0.78) were lower for the BESS. These findings demonstrate that a low-cost balance board can provide improved balance testing accuracy/reliability compared with the BESS. This approach provides a potentially more valid/reliable, yet affordable, means of assessing s