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Sample records for sustaining mutant p53

  1. Mutant p53 in Cancer: New Functions and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Patricia A.J.; Vousden, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Many different types of cancer show a high incidence of TP53 mutations, leading to the expression of mutant p53 proteins. There is growing evidence that these mutant p53s have both lost wild-type p53 tumor suppressor activity and gained functions that help to contribute to malignant progression. Understanding the functions of mutant p53 will help in the development of new therapeutic approaches that may be useful in a broad range of cancer types. PMID:24651012

  2. Molecularly targeted therapies for p53-mutant cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dekuang; Tahaney, William M; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Savage, Michelle I; Brown, Powel H

    2017-11-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is lost or mutated in approximately half of human cancers. Mutant p53 not only loses its anti-tumor transcriptional activity, but also often acquires oncogenic functions to promote tumor proliferation, invasion, and drug resistance. Traditional strategies have been taken to directly target p53 mutants through identifying small molecular compounds to deplete mutant p53, or to restore its tumor suppressive function. Accumulating evidence suggest that cancer cells with mutated p53 often exhibit specific functional dependencies on secondary genes or pathways to survive, providing alternative targets to indirectly treat p53-mutant cancers. Targeting these genes or pathways, critical for survival in the presence of p53 mutations, holds great promise for cancer treatment. In addition, mutant p53 often exhibits novel gain-of-functions to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we review and discuss strategies targeting mutant p53, with focus on targeting the mutant p53 protein directly, and on the progress of identifying genes and pathways required in p53-mutant cells.

  3. Family feud in chemosensitvity: p73 and mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Meredith S

    2004-03-01

    The importance of p53 in chemotherapy-induced apoptosis of cancer cells is well established. p53 plays a critical role in the cellular response to DNA damage by regulating genes involved in cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and genomic stability. As a result, p53 tumor status is a critical determinant of both responses to anti-cancer treatment and clinical prognosis. Interestingly, tumors expressing certain mutant forms of p53 ("gain of function") are particularly resistant to chemotherapy, even when compared to cells that lack any detectable p53. Until recently, the explanation for this enhanced chemoresistance was not clear. Recent studies have shown that the p53 homologues, p73 and p63, are also activated by chemotherapies, leading to tumor cell death. Now the discovery that mutant p53 interacts with p73, and that regulation of this interaction by a p53 polymorphism can modulate chemosensitvity provide a new model for how p53-family interactions can influence the response of tumors to anti-cancer therapies. Since p53 mutations are found in more than 50% of human tumors, strategies aimed at manipulating these interactions may prove useful in enhancing the chemotherapy response, and perhaps, overcoming chemoresistance.

  4. Mutant p53 as a target for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Michael J; Synnott, Naoise C; Crown, John

    2017-09-01

    TP53 (p53) is the single most frequently altered gene in human cancers, with mutations being present in approximately 50% of all invasive tumours. However, in some of the most difficult-to-treat cancers such as high-grade serous ovarian cancers, triple-negative breast cancers, oesophageal cancers, small-cell lung cancers and squamous cell lung cancers, p53 is mutated in at least 80% of samples. Clearly, therefore, mutant p53 protein is an important candidate target against which new anticancer treatments could be developed. Although traditionally regarded as undruggable, several compounds such as p53 reactivation and induction of massive apoptosis-1 (PRIMA-1), a methylated derivative and structural analogue of PRIMA-1, i.e. APR-246, 2-sulfonylpyrimidines such as PK11007, pyrazoles such as PK7088, zinc metallochaperone-1 (ZMC1), a third generation thiosemicarbazone developed by Critical Outcome Techonologies Inc. (COTI-2) as well as specific peptides have recently been reported to reactive mutant p53 protein by converting it to a form exhibiting wild-type properties. Consistent with the reactivation of mutant p53, these compounds have been shown to exhibit anticancer activity in preclinical models expressing mutant p53. To date, two of these compounds, i.e. APR-246 and COTI-2 have progressed to clinical trials. A phase I/IIa clinical trial with APR-246 reported no major adverse effect. Currently, APR-246 is undergoing a phase Ib/II trial in patients with advanced serous ovarian cancer, while COTI-2 is being evaluated in a phase I trial in patients with advanced gynaecological cancers. It remains to be shown however, whether any mutant p53 reactivating compound has efficacy for the treatment of human cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nuclear inclusion bodies of mutant and wild-type p53 in cancer: a hallmark of p53 inactivation and proteostasis remodelling by p53 aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Frederik; Saiz Rubio, Mirian; Hompes, Daphne; Naus, Evelyne; De Baets, Greet; Langenberg, Tobias; Hipp, Mark S; Houben, Bert; Claes, Filip; Charbonneau, Sarah; Delgado Blanco, Javier; Plaisance, Stephane; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Ramkissoon, Lori; Simons, Colinda; van den Brandt, Piet; Weijenberg, Matty; Van England, Manon; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Amant, Frederic; D'Hoore, André; Ligon, Keith L; Sagaert, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2017-05-01

    Although p53 protein aggregates have been observed in cancer cell lines and tumour tissue, their impact in cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we extensively screened for p53 aggregation phenotypes in tumour biopsies, and identified nuclear inclusion bodies (nIBs) of transcriptionally inactive mutant or wild-type p53 as the most frequent aggregation-like phenotype across six different cancer types. p53-positive nIBs co-stained with nuclear aggregation markers, and shared molecular hallmarks of nIBs commonly found in neurodegenerative disorders. In cell culture, tumour-associated stress was a strong inducer of p53 aggregation and nIB formation. This was most prominent for mutant p53, but could also be observed in wild-type p53 cell lines, for which nIB formation correlated with the loss of p53's transcriptional activity. Importantly, protein aggregation also fuelled the dysregulation of the proteostasis network in the tumour cell by inducing a hyperactivated, oncogenic heat-shock response, to which tumours are commonly addicted, and by overloading the proteasomal degradation system, an observation that was most pronounced for structurally destabilized mutant p53. Patients showing tumours with p53-positive nIBs suffered from a poor clinical outcome, similar to those with loss of p53 expression, and tumour biopsies showed a differential proteostatic expression profile associated with p53-positive nIBs. p53-positive nIBs therefore highlight a malignant state of the tumour that results from the interplay between (1) the functional inactivation of p53 through mutation and/or aggregation, and (2) microenvironmental stress, a combination that catalyses proteostatic dysregulation. This study highlights several unexpected clinical, biological and therapeutically unexplored parallels between cancer and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great

  6. Mutant p53 accumulates in cycling and proliferating cells in the normal tissues of p53 R172H mutant mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leushacke, Marc; Li, Ling; Wong, Julin S.; Chiam, Poh Cheang; Rahmat, Siti Aishah Binte; Mann, Michael B.; Mann, Karen M.; Barker, Nick; Lozano, Guillermina; Terzian, Tamara; Lane, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 is regulated primarily at the protein level. In normal tissues its levels are maintained at a very low level by the action of specific E3 ligases and the ubiquitin proteosome pathway. The mutant p53 protein contributes to transformation, metastasis and drug resistance. High levels of mutant p53 can be found in tumours and the accumulation of mutant p53 has previously been reported in pathologically normal cells in human skin. We show for the first time that similarly elevated levels of mutant p53 can be detected in apparently normal cells in a mutant p53 knock-in mouse model. In fact, in the small intestine, mutant p53 spontaneously accumulates in a manner dependent on gene dosage and cell type. Mutant p53 protein is regulated similarly to wild type p53, which can accumulate rapidly after induction by ionising radiation or Mdm2 inhibitors, however, the clearance of mutant p53 protein is much slower than wild type p53. The accumulation of the protein in the murine small intestine is limited to the cycling, crypt base columnar cells and proliferative zone and is lost as the cells differentiate and exit the cell cycle. Loss of Mdm2 results in even higher levels of p53 expression but p53 is still restricted to proliferating cells in the small intestine. Therefore, the small intestine of these p53 mutant mice is an experimental system in which we can dissect the molecular pathways leading to p53 accumulation, which has important implications for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:26255629

  7. Integrative genome analysis of somatic p53 mutant osteosarcomas identifies Ets2-dependent regulation of small nucleolar RNAs by mutant p53 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourebrahim, Rasoul; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Bin; Gao, Ruli; Xiong, Shunbin; Lin, Patrick P; McArthur, Mark J; Ostrowski, Michael C; Lozano, Guillermina

    2017-09-15

    TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. Many mutant p53 proteins exert oncogenic gain-of-function (GOF) properties that contribute to metastasis, but the mechanisms mediating these functions remain poorly defined in vivo. To elucidate how mutant p53 GOF drives metastasis, we developed a traceable somatic osteosarcoma mouse model that is initiated with either a single p53 mutation (p53R172H) or p53 loss in osteoblasts. Our study confirmed that p53 mutant mice developed osteosarcomas with increased metastasis as compared with p53-null mice. Comprehensive transcriptome RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of 16 tumors identified a cluster of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that are highly up-regulated in p53 mutant tumors. Regulatory element analysis of these deregulated snoRNA genes identified strong enrichment of a common Ets2 transcription factor-binding site. Homozygous deletion of Ets2 in p53 mutant mice resulted in strong down-regulation of snoRNAs and reversed the prometastatic phenotype of mutant p53 but had no effect on osteosarcoma development, which remained 100% penetrant. In summary, our studies identify Ets2 inhibition as a potential therapeutic vulnerability in p53 mutant osteosarcomas. © 2017 Pourebrahim et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Mutant p53 promotes cell spreading and migration via ARHGAP44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinjin; Jiao, Jian; Xu, Wei; Ji, Lei; Jiang, Dongjie; Xie, Shaofang; Kubra, Syeda; Li, Xiaotao; Fu, Junjiang; Xiao, Jianru; Zhang, Bianhong

    2017-09-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 protein is either lost or mutated in about half of all human cancers. Loss of p53 function is well known to influence cell spreading, migration and invasion. While expression of mutant p53 is not equivalent to p53 loss, mutant p53 can acquire new functions to drive cell spreading and migration via different mechanisms. In our study, we found that mutant p53 significantly increased cell spreading and migration when comparing with p53-null cells. RNA-Seq analysis suggested that Rho GTPase activating protein 44 (ARHGAP44) is a new target of mutant p53, which suppressed ARHGAP44 transcription. ARHGAP44 has GAP activity and catalyze GTP hydrolysis on Cdc42. Higher level of GTP-Cdc42 was correlated with increase expression of mutant p53 and reduced ARHGAP44. Importantly, wt-ARHGAP44 but not mutant ARHGAP44 (R291A) suppressed mutant p53 mediated cell spreading and migration. Bioinformatics analysis indicated lower expression of ARHGAP44 in lung carcinoma compared with normal tissues, which was verified by RT-qPCR using specimens from patients. More interestingly, ARHGAP44 mRNA level was lower in tumors with mutant p53 than those with normal p53. Collectively, our results disclose a new mechanism by which mutant p53 stimulates cell spreading and migration.

  9. Mutant Mice Lacking the p53 C-Terminal Domain Model Telomere Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simeonova, I.; Jaber, S.; Draskovic, I.; Bardot, B.; Fang, M.; Bouarich-Bourimi, R.; Lejour, V.; Charbonnier, L.; Soudais, C.; Bourdon, J.C.; Huerre, M.; Londono-Vallejo, A.; Toledo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in p53, although frequent in human cancers, have not been implicated in telomere-related syndromes. Here, we show that homozygous mutant mice expressing p53(Delta31), a p53 lacking the C-terminal domain, exhibit increased p53 activity and suffer from aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis,

  10. Mutant p53 drives pancreatic cancer metastasis through cell-autonomous PDGF receptor β signaling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weissmueller, Susann; Manchado, Eusebio; Saborowski, Michael; Morris, 4th, John P; Wagenblast, Elvin; Davis, Carrie A; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Pfister, Neil T; Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; Kitzing, Thomas; Aust, Daniela; Markert, Elke K; Wu, Jianmin; Grimmond, Sean M; Pilarsky, Christian; Prives, Carol; Biankin, Andrew V; Lowe, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    ...) as both necessary and sufficient to mediate these effects. Mutant p53 induced PDGFRb through a cell-autonomous mechanism involving inhibition of a p73/NF-Y complex that represses PDGFRb expression in p53-deficient, noninvasive cells...

  11. Systematic and comprehensive analysis of mutant p53 proteins in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The gene p53 is a well-known tumour suppressor gene that prevents cancer formation. It is the most commonly mutated gene among individuals with a diagnosis of cancer. Through recent advances in DNA sequencing abilities, researchers are now in a position to take a patient's tumour and identify the exact mutation in ...

  12. Ensemble-based computational approach discriminates functional activity of p53 cancer and rescue mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Demir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor protein p53 can lose its function upon single-point missense mutations in the core DNA-binding domain ("cancer mutants". Activity can be restored by second-site suppressor mutations ("rescue mutants". This paper relates the functional activity of p53 cancer and rescue mutants to their overall molecular dynamics (MD, without focusing on local structural details. A novel global measure of protein flexibility for the p53 core DNA-binding domain, the number of clusters at a certain RMSD cutoff, was computed by clustering over 0.7 µs of explicitly solvated all-atom MD simulations. For wild-type p53 and a sample of p53 cancer or rescue mutants, the number of clusters was a good predictor of in vivo p53 functional activity in cell-based assays. This number-of-clusters (NOC metric was strongly correlated (r(2 = 0.77 with reported values of experimentally measured ΔΔG protein thermodynamic stability. Interpreting the number of clusters as a measure of protein flexibility: (i p53 cancer mutants were more flexible than wild-type protein, (ii second-site rescue mutations decreased the flexibility of cancer mutants, and (iii negative controls of non-rescue second-site mutants did not. This new method reflects the overall stability of the p53 core domain and can discriminate which second-site mutations restore activity to p53 cancer mutants.

  13. Mutant p53 upregulates alpha-1 antitrypsin expression and promotes invasion in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, R; Tarulli, G A; Sheng, L; Lokman, N A; Ricciardelli, C; Pishas, K I; Selinger, C I; Kohonen-Corish, M R J; Cooper, W A; Turner, A G; Neilsen, P M; Callen, D F

    2017-08-01

    Missense mutations in the TP53 tumor-suppressor gene inactivate its antitumorigenic properties and endow the incipient cells with newly acquired oncogenic properties that drive invasion and metastasis. Although the oncogenic effect of mutant p53 transcriptome has been widely acknowledged, the global influence of mutant p53 on cancer cell proteome remains to be fully elucidated. Here, we show that mutant p53 drives the release of invasive extracellular factors (the 'secretome') that facilitates the invasion of lung cancer cell lines. Proteomic characterization of the secretome from mutant p53-inducible H1299 human non-small cell lung cancer cell line discovered that the mutant p53 drives its oncogenic pathways through modulating the gene expression of numerous targets that are subsequently secreted from the cells. Of these genes, alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) was identified as a critical effector of mutant p53 that drives invasion in vitro and in vivo, together with induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers expression. Mutant p53 upregulated A1AT transcriptionally through the involvement with its family member p63. Conditioned medium containing secreted A1AT enhanced cell invasion, while an A1AT-blocking antibody attenuated the mutant p53-driven migration and invasion. Importantly, high A1AT expression correlated with increased tumor stage, elevated p53 staining and shorter overall survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients. Collectively, these findings suggest that A1AT is an indispensable target of mutant p53 with prognostic and therapeutic potential in mutant p53-expressing tumors.

  14. Mutant p53 Amplifies Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family Signaling to Promote Mammary Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallowitz, Alisha R; Li, Dun; Lobko, Anthony; Mott, Daniel; Nemajerova, Alice; Marchenko, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    The EGFR family (ErbB2/Her2 and EGFR/ErbB1/Her1) often modulates the transcriptional program involved in promoting mammary tumorigenesis. In humans, the majority of ErbB2-positive sporadic breast cancers harbor p53 mutations, which correlate with poor prognosis. Also, the extremely high incidence of ErbB2-positive breast cancer in women with p53 germline mutations (Li-Fraumeni syndrome) suggests a key role of mutant p53 specifically in ErbB2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis. To examine the role of mutant p53 during ErbB2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis, a mutant p53 allele (R172H) was introduced into the (MMTV)-ErbB2/Neu mouse model system. Interestingly, we show in heterozygous p53 mice that mutant p53 R172H is a more potent activator of ErbB2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis than simple loss of p53. The more aggressive disease in mutant p53 animals was reflected by earlier tumor onset, increased mammary tumor multiplicity, and shorter survival. These in vivo and in vitro data provide mechanistic evidence that mutant p53 amplifies ErbB2 and EGFR signaling to promote the expansion of mammary stem cells and induce cell proliferation. This study identifies mutant p53 as an essential player in ErbB2 and EGFR-mediated mammary tumorigenesis and indicates the potential translational importance of targeting mutant p53 in this subset of patients with breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Cytoskeleton-Anchoring of Conformational Mutant-Like p53, but Not Shorter Isoforms p53β and p47 (ΔN40p53) in Senescent Human Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Cytoskeleton anchoring of conformational mutant-like p53 is prominent in human senescent cells. The present research investigated the structural basis of vimentin cytoskeleton- anchoring of human p53. GFP-fused wild type p53, mutant p53, those of the various truncated isoforms including p53β and p47, were expressed in the vimentin-expressing cells: mouse fibroblasts, COS-7 cells, young and senescent human fibroblasts, and HeLa cells (non-vimentin-expressing). A cancer-specific mutant p53V143A-GFP expressed in mouse fibroblasts, exclusively anchored on the vimentin cytoskeleton. Class I mutant p53R175C-GFP and class II mutant p53R175S-GFP localized in the nuclei of COS-7 cells. A class III mutant p53R175X-GFP (X: D, F, W or Y), cancer-specific mutant p53V143A-GFP and p53R249S-GFP, exclusively anchored on the vimentin cytoskeleton of COS-7 cells. The deletions of p53R249S and p53V143A at the Cterminus (ΔC63) exclusively promoted the nuclear import of the deleted mutant p53 in COS-7 and HeLa cells, whereas the deletions at the N-terminus (ΔN40) or C-terminus (ΔC33) were ineffective. Thus, the cancer-specific mutant p53R249S and p53V143A adopt distinct mutant conformation and thereby the C-terminal region (aa331-360) potently interacts with the vimentin cytoskeleton and HeLa cells' cytoskeleton. Wild type p53-GFP exclusively localized in the nuclei of growing young fibroblast, in contrast to the significant cytoplasmic retention in senescent human fibroblasts. The deletion of p53 at the N-terminus or at the C-terminus (ΔN40 or ΔC63) results in a significant nuclear import of the shorter isoforms, p53β and p47. Senescent fibroblasts promote p53 to adopt a hotspot mutant like-conformation which significantly overrides the nuclear import due to the potent cytoskeleton-anchoring. Interestingly, the shorter p53 isoforms can escape from the cytoskeleton-anchoring. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Therapeutic targeting of p53: all mutants are equal, but some mutants are more equal than others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabapathy, Kanaga; Lane, David P

    2017-09-26

    TP53, which encodes the tumour-suppressor protein p53, is the most frequently mutated gene across all cancer types. The presence of mutant p53 predisposes to cancer development, promotes the survival of cancer cells, and is associated with ineffective therapeutic responses and unfavourable prognoses. Despite these effects, no drug that abrogates the oncogenic functions of mutant p53 has yet been approved for the treatment of cancer. Current investigational therapeutic strategies are mostly aimed at restoring the wild-type activity of mutant p53, based on the assumption that all p53 mutants are functionally equal. Our increasing knowledge of mutant forms of p53, however, supports the antithetical hypothesis that not all p53 mutants have equivalent cellular effects; hence, a judicious approach to therapeutic targeting of mutant p53 is required. In this Review, we propose a categorization of the major classes of p53 mutants based on their functionality in tumour suppression and response to therapy. The emerging picture is that the mutations across TP53 form a 'rainbow of mutants', with varying degrees of functionality and different pathobiological consequences, necessitating the use of diverse therapeutic strategies to selectively target specific classes of mutation. The utility of this knowledge of TP53 mutations in developing selective therapeutic options, and in facilitating clinical decision-making is discussed.

  17. Binding kinetics of mutant p53R175H with wild type p53 and p63: A Surface Plasmon Resonance and Atomic Force Spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2017-09-01

    The oncogenic mutant p53R175H, one of the most frequently occurring in human cancers and usually associated with poor prognosis and chemo resistance, can exert a dominant negative effect over p53 family members, namely wild type p53, p63 and p73, inhibiting their oncosuppressive function. Novel anticancer strategies based on drugs able to prevent the formation of complexes between p53R175H and the p53 family members call for a deeper knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of their interaction. To this aim, p53R175H/p63 and p53R175H/p53 complexes were investigated in vitro by using Surface Plasmon Resonance and Atomic Force Spectroscopy, two emerging and complementary techniques able to provide interaction kinetic information, in near physiological conditions and without any labelling. Both approaches show that p53R175H forms a very specific and highly stable bimolecular complex with both p63 and p53; with these interactions being characterized by a very high affinity with equilibrium dissociation constant, KD, of about 10-9M. These kinetics results, discussed also in connection with those previously reported for the interaction of p53R175H with p73, could inspire the design of suitable anticancer drugs able to antagonize the interaction of p53R175H with the p53 family members, by restoring then their anti-tumour function. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Effect of Mutant p53 Proteins on Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Matilda; Ambroise, Gorbatchev; Ouchida, Amanda Tomie; Lima Queiroz, Andre; Smith, Dominique; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Muller, Patricia A; Norberg, Erik; Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin

    2017-12-15

    TP53 is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancers. Unlike other tumor suppressors that are frequently deleted or acquire loss-of-function mutations, the majority of TP53 mutations in tumors are missense substitutions, which lead to the expression of full-length mutant proteins that accumulate in cancer cells and may confer unique gain-of-function (GOF) activities to promote tumorigenic events. Recently, mutant p53 proteins have been shown to mediate metabolic changes as a novel GOF to promote tumor development. There is a strong rationale that the GOF activities, including alterations in cellular metabolism, might vary between the different p53 mutants. Accordingly, the effect of different mutant p53 proteins on cancer cell metabolism is largely unknown. In this study, we have metabolically profiled several individual frequently occurring p53 mutants in cancers, focusing on glycolytic and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Our investigation highlights the diversity of different p53 mutants in terms of their effect on metabolism, which might provide a foundation for the development of more effective targeted pharmacological approaches toward variants of mutant p53. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. A Mutant-p53/Smad complex opposes p63 to empower TGFbeta-induced metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Maddalena; Cordenonsi, Michelangelo; Montagner, Marco; Dupont, Sirio; Wong, Christine; Hann, Byron; Solari, Aldo; Bobisse, Sara; Rondina, Maria Beatrice; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Parenti, Anna R; Rosato, Antonio; Bicciato, Silvio; Balmain, Allan; Piccolo, Stefano

    2009-04-03

    TGFbeta ligands act as tumor suppressors in early stage tumors but are paradoxically diverted into potent prometastatic factors in advanced cancers. The molecular nature of this switch remains enigmatic. Here, we show that TGFbeta-dependent cell migration, invasion and metastasis are empowered by mutant-p53 and opposed by p63. Mechanistically, TGFbeta acts in concert with oncogenic Ras and mutant-p53 to induce the assembly of a mutant-p53/p63 protein complex in which Smads serve as essential platforms. Within this ternary complex, p63 functions are antagonized. Downstream of p63, we identified two candidate metastasis suppressor genes associated with metastasis risk in a large cohort of breast cancer patients. Thus, two common oncogenic lesions, mutant-p53 and Ras, selected in early neoplasms to promote growth and survival, also prefigure a cellular set-up with particular metastasis proclivity by TGFbeta-dependent inhibition of p63 function.

  20. NAT10 is upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and enhances mutant p53 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qijiong; Liu, Xiaofeng; Jin, Kemin; Lu, Min; Zhang, Chunfeng; Du, Xiaojuan; Xing, Baocai

    2017-08-31

    N-acetyltransferase 10 (NAT10) is a histone acetyltransferase which is involved in a wide range of cellular processes. Recent evidences indicate that NAT10 is involved in the development of human cancers. Previous study showed that NAT10 acetylates the tumor suppressor p53 and regulates p53 activation. As Tp53 gene is frequently mutated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and associates with the occurrence and development of HCC, the relationship between NAT10 and HCC was investigated in this study. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blot analysis were performed to evaluate the NAT10 expression in HCC. Immunoprecipitation experiments were performed to verify the interaction of NAT10 with mutant p53 and Mdm2. RNA interference and Western blot were applied to determine the effect of NAT10 on mutant p53. Cell growth curve was used to examine the effect of NAT10 on HCC cell proliferation. NAT10 was upregulated in HCC and increased NAT10 expression was correlated with poor overall survival of the patients. NAT10 protein levels were significantly correlated with p53 levels in human HCC tissues. Furthermore, NAT10 increased mutant p53 levels by counteracting Mdm2 action in HCC cells and promoted proliferation in cells carrying p53 mutation. Increased NAT10 expression levels are associated with shortened patient survival and correlated with mutant p53 levels. NAT10 upregulates mutant p53 level and might enhance its tumorigenic activity. Hence, we propose that NAT10 is a potential prognostic and therapeutic candidate for p53-mutated HCC.

  1. Mutant p53 exhibits trivial effects on mitochondrial functions which can be reactivated by ellipticine in lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Jianfeng; Robbins, Delira; Morris, Kerri; Sit, Amos; Liu, Yong-Yu; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2011-03-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that a fraction of the wild-type (wt) form of the tumor suppressor p53, can translocate to mitochondria due to genotoxic stress. The mitochondrial targets of wt p53 have also been studied. However, whether mutant p53, which exists in 50% of human cancers, translocates to mitochondria and affects mitochondrial functions is unclear. In this study, we used doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic drug, to treat five human lymphoma cell lines with wt, mutant or deficient in p53, to induce p53 activation and mitochondrial translocation. Our results demonstrated that mutant p53, like wt p53, was induced upon doxorubicin treatment. Similarly, a fraction of mutant p53 also translocated to mitochondria. However, Complex I and II activities in the mitochondria were compromised only in wt p53-bearing cells after doxorubicin treatment, but not in mutant p53-bearing cells. Similarly, doxorubicin treatment caused greater cell death only in wt p53-bearing cells, but not in mutant p53-bearing cells. When p53 deficient Ramos cells were transfected with mutant p53 (249S), the cells showed resistance to doxorubicin-induced cell death and decreases in complex activities. To reactivate mutant p53 and reverse chemoresistance, ellipticine (5,11-dimethyl-6H-pyrido[4,3-b]carbazole) was used to treat mutant p53 cells. Ellipticine enhanced p53 mitochondrial translocation, decreased Complex I activity, and sensitized p53 mutant cells to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. In summary, our studies suggest that mutations in p53 may not hinder p53's mitochondrial translocation, but impair its effects on mitochondrial functions. Therefore, restoring mutant p53 by ellipticine may sensitize these cells to chemotherapy.

  2. Mutant p53 cooperates with knockdown of endogenous wild-type p53 to disrupt tubulogenesis in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Zhang

    Full Text Available Mutation of the p53 gene is the most common genetic alteration in human malignances and associated clinically with tumor progression and metastasis. To determine the effect of mutant p53 on epithelial differentiation, we developed three-dimensional culture (3-D of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells. We found that parental MDCK cells undergo a series of morphological changes and form polarized and growth-arrested cysts with hollow lumen, which resembles branching tubules in vitro. We also found that upon knockdown of endogenous wild-type p53 (p53-KD, MDCK cells still form normal cysts in 3-D culture, indicating that p53-KD alone is not sufficient to disrupt cysts formation. However, we found that ectopic expression of mutant R163H (human equivalent R175H or R261H (human equivalent R273H in MDCK cells leads to disruption of cyst polarity and formation of invasive aggregates, which is further compounded by knockdown of endogenous wild-type p53. Consistently, we found that expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT transcription factors (Snail-1, Slug and Twist is altered by mutant p53, which is also compounded by knockdown of wild-type p53. Moreover, the expression level of c-Met, the hepatocyte growth factor receptor and a key regulator of kidney cell tubulogenesis, is enhanced by combined knockdown of endogenous wild-type p53 and ectopic expression of mutant R163H or R261H but not by each individually. Together, our data suggest that upon inactivating mutation of the p53 gene, mutant p53 acquires its gain of function by altering morphogenesis and promoting cell migration and invasion in part by upregulating EMT and c-Met.

  3. Targeting the Prion-like Aggregation of Mutant p53 to Combat Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jerson L; Cino, Elio A; Soares, Iaci N; Ferreira, Vitor F; A P de Oliveira, Guilherme

    2018-01-16

    Prion-like behavior of several amyloidogenic proteins has been demonstrated in recent years. Despite having functional roles in some cases, irregular aggregation can have devastating consequences. The most commonly known amyloid diseases are Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs). The pathophysiology of prion-like diseases involves the structural transformation of wild-type (wt) proteins to transmissible forms that can convert healthy proteins, generating aggregates. The mutant form of tumor suppressor protein, p53, has recently been shown to exhibit prion-like properties. Within the context of p53 aggregation and the search for ways to avert it, this review emphasizes discoveries, approaches, and research from our laboratory and others. Although its standard functions are strongly connected to tumor suppression, p53 mutants and aggregates are involved in cancer progression. p53 aggregates are heterogeneous assemblies composed of amorphous aggregates, oligomers, and amyloid-like fibrils. Evidence of these structures in tumor tissues, the in vitro capability for p53 mutants to coaggregate with wt protein, and the detection of cell-to-cell transmission indicate that cancer has the basic characteristics of prion and prion-like diseases. Various approaches aim to restore p53 functions in cancer. Methods include the use of small-molecule and peptide stabilizers of mutant p53, zinc administration, gene therapy, alkylating and DNA intercalators, and blockage of p53-MDM2 interaction. A primary challenge in developing small-molecule inhibitors of p53 aggregation is the large number of p53 mutations. Another issue is the inability to recover p53 function by dissociating mature fibrils. Consequently, efforts have emerged to target the intermediate species of the aggregation reaction. Φ-value analysis has been used to characterize the kinetics of the early phases of p53 aggregation. Our experiments using high hydrostatic pressure (HHP

  4. Che-1 gene silencing induces osteosarcoma cell apoptosis by inhibiting mutant p53 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Wang, Dan, E-mail: danwangwdd@163.com; Li, Ning

    2016-04-22

    The transcriptional cofactor Che-1 is an RNA polymerase II (Pol II) which is involved in tumorigenesis, such as breast cancer and multiple myeloma. Che-1 can also regulate mutant p53 expression, which plays roles in many types of cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects and specific mechanism of Che-1 in the regulation of osteosarcoma (OS) cell growth. We found that Che-1 is highly expressed in several kinds of OS cells compared with osteoblast hFOB1.19 cells. MTT and flow cytometry assays showed that Che-1 depletion by siRNA markedly suppressed MG-63 and U2OS cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay verified the presence of Che-1 on the p53 promoter in MG-63 and U2OS cells carrying mutant p53. Further studies showed that Che-1 depletion inhibited mutant p53 expression. Notably, our study showed that the loss of Che-1 inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis in MG-63 cells by decreasing the level of mutant p53. Therefore, these findings open the possibility that silencing of Che-1 will have therapeutic benefit in OS. - Highlights: • Che-1 is highly expressed in several kinds of OS cells. • Che-1 depletion suppressed MG-63 and U2OS cell growth. • Che-1 is existed in the p53 promoter in MG-63 and U2OS cells. • Che-1 depletion inhibited mutant p53 expression. • Che-1 depletion inhibits cell growth by decreasing the level of mutant p53.

  5. Stathmin is overexpressed and regulated by mutant p53 in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hai-Long; Jin, Shu-Fang; Ju, Wu-Tong; Fu, Yong; Tu, Yao-Yao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Jiang-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhong, Lai-Ping

    2017-08-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the oncogenic function and regulatory mechanism of stathmin in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Two-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass chromatography were applied to screen differentiated proteins during carcinogenesis in OSCC. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assays, colony formation, migration, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and a xenograft model were used to detect the function of stathmin. The correlation between stathmin and p53 expression was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Mutant/wild type p53 plasmids and small interfering RNA were used to examine the regulation of stathmin. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and luciferase assays were performed to detect the transcriptional activation of stathmin by p53. Overexpression of stathmin was screened and confirmed in OSCC patients and cell lines. Silencing expression of stathmin inhibited proliferation, colony formation and migration and promoted apoptosis. Poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (cdc2) were activated after silencing the expression of stathmin. Suppression of tumorigenicity was also confirmed in vivo. Mutant p53 transcriptionally activated the expression of stathmin in HN6 and HN13 cancer cells, but not in HN30 cells harboring wild type p53. These results suggest that stathmin acts as an oncogene and is transcriptionally regulated by mutant p53, but not by wild-type p53. Stathmin could be a potential anti-tumor therapeutic target in OSCC.

  6. Noncanonical DNA motifs as transactivation targets by wild type and mutant p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J Jordan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Sequence-specific binding by the human p53 master regulator is critical to its tumor suppressor activity in response to environmental stresses. p53 binds as a tetramer to two decameric half-sites separated by 0-13 nucleotides (nt, originally defined by the consensus RRRCWWGYYY (n = 0-13 RRRCWWGYYY. To better understand the role of sequence, organization, and level of p53 on transactivation at target response elements (REs by wild type (WT and mutant p53, we deconstructed the functional p53 canonical consensus sequence using budding yeast and human cell systems. Contrary to early reports on binding in vitro, small increases in distance between decamer half-sites greatly reduces p53 transactivation, as demonstrated for the natural TIGER RE. This was confirmed with human cell extracts using a newly developed, semi-in vitro microsphere binding assay. These results contrast with the synergistic increase in transactivation from a pair of weak, full-site REs in the MDM2 promoter that are separated by an evolutionary conserved 17 bp spacer. Surprisingly, there can be substantial transactivation at noncanonical (1/2-(a single decamer and (3/4-sites, some of which were originally classified as biologically relevant canonical consensus sequences including PIDD and Apaf-1. p53 family members p63 and p73 yielded similar results. Efficient transactivation from noncanonical elements requires tetrameric p53, and the presence of the carboxy terminal, non-specific DNA binding domain enhanced transactivation from noncanonical sequences. Our findings demonstrate that RE sequence, organization, and level of p53 can strongly impact p53-mediated transactivation, thereby changing the view of what constitutes a functional p53 target. Importantly, inclusion of (1/2- and (3/4-site REs greatly expands the p53 master regulatory network.

  7. p53 increases caspase-6 expression and activation in muscle tissue expressing mutant huntingtin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Skotte, Niels H; Ladha, Safia

    2014-01-01

    a role in the peripheral phenotypes, such as muscle wasting observed in HD. We assessed skeletal muscle tissue from HD patients and well-characterized mouse models of HD. Cleavage of the caspase-6 specific substrate lamin A is significantly increased in skeletal muscle obtained from HD patients as well...... as in muscle tissues from two different HD mouse models. p53, a transcriptional activator of caspase-6, is upregulated in neuronal cells and tissues expressing mutant huntingtin. Activation of p53 leads to a dramatic increase in levels of caspase-6 mRNA, caspase-6 activity and cleavage of lamin A. Using mouse......-6 expression and activation is exacerbated in cells and tissues of both neuronal and peripheral origin expressing mutant huntingtin (Htt). These findings suggest that the presence of the mutant Htt protein enhances p53 activity and lowers the apoptotic threshold, which activates caspase-6...

  8. Various p53 mutant proteins differently regulate the Ras circuit to induce a cancer-related gene signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Hilla; Buganim, Yosef; Kogan-Sakin, Ira; Pomeraniec, Leslie; Assia, Yael; Madar, Shalom; Goldstein, Ido; Brosh, Ran; Kalo, Eyal; Beatus, Tsevi; Goldfinger, Naomi; Rotter, Varda

    2012-07-01

    Concomitant expression of mutant p53 and oncogenic Ras, leading to cellular transformation, is well documented. However, the mechanisms by which the various mutant p53 categories cooperate with Ras remain largely obscure. From this study we suggest that different mutant p53 categories cooperate with H-Ras in different ways to induce a unique expression pattern of a cancer-related gene signature (CGS). The DNA-contact p53 mutants (p53(R248Q) and p53(R273H)) exhibited the highest level of CGS expression by cooperating with NFκB. Furthermore, the Zn(+2) region conformational p53 mutants (p53(R175H) and p53(H179R)) induced the CGS by elevating H-Ras activity. This elevation in H-Ras activity stemmed from a perturbed function of the p53 transcription target gene, BTG2. By contrast, the L3 loop region conformational mutant (p53(G245S)) did not affect CGS expression. Our findings were further corroborated in human tumor-derived cell lines expressing Ras and the aforementioned mutated p53 proteins. These data might assist in future tailor-made therapy targeting the mutant p53-Ras axis in cancer.

  9. Targeting mutant p53 in cancer: a long road to precision therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Fiamma; Walerych, Dawid; Sal, Giannino Del

    2017-03-01

    The TP53 tumor suppressor is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. In recent years, a blooming of research efforts based on both cell lines and mouse models have highlighted how deeply mutant p53 proteins affect fundamental cellular pathways with cancer-promoting outcomes. Neomorphic mutant p53 activities spread over multiple levels, impinging on chromatin structure, transcriptional regulation and microRNA maturation, shaping the proteome and the cell's metabolic pathways, and also exerting cytoplasmic functions and displaying cell-extrinsic effects. These tumorigenic activities are inextricably linked with the blend of highly corrupted processes that characterize the tumor context. Recent studies indicate that successful strategies to extract core aspects of mutant p53 oncogenic potential and to identify unique tumor dependencies entail the superimposition of large-scale analyses performed in multiple experimental systems, together with a mindful use of animal models. This will hopefully soon lead to the long-awaited inclusion of mutant p53 as an actionable target of clinical antitumor therapies. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Mutant p53 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer: Preclinical investigation with the anti-p53 drug, PK11007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnott, Naoise C; Bauer, Matthias R; Madden, Stephen; Murray, Alyson; Klinger, Rut; O'Donovan, Norma; O'Connor, Darran; Gallagher, William M; Crown, John; Fersht, Alan R; Duffy, Michael J

    2017-10-22

    The identification of a targeted therapy for patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one of the most urgent needs in breast cancer therapeutics. The p53 gene is mutated in approximately 80% of patients with TNBC, and is a potential therapeutic target for patients with this form of breast cancer. The 2-sulfonylpyrimidine compound, PK11007, preferentially decreases viability in p53-compromised cancer cell lines. We investigated PK11007 as a potential new treatment for TNBC. IC50 values for inhibition of proliferation in a panel of 17 breast cell lines by PK11007 ranged from 2.3 to 42.2 μM. There were significantly lower IC50 values for TNBC than for non-TNBC cell lines (p = 0.03) and for p53-mutated cell lines compared with p53 WT cells (p = 0.003). Response to PK11007 however, was independent of the estrogen receptor (ER) or HER2 status of the cell lines. In addition to inhibiting cell proliferation, PK11007 induced apoptosis in p53 mutant cell lines. Using RNAseq and gene ontology analysis, we found that PK11007 altered the expression of genes enriched in pathways involved in regulated cell death, regulation of apoptosis, signal transduction, protein refolding and locomotion. The observations that PK11007 inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and altered genes involved in cell death are all consistent with the ability of PK11007 to reactivate mutant p53. Based on our data, we conclude that targeting mutant p53 with PK11007 is a potential approach for treating p53-mutated breast cancer, including the subgroup with TN disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. p53 increases caspase-6 expression and activation in muscle tissue expressing mutant huntingtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Skotte, Niels H; Ladha, Safia; Nguyen, Yen T N; Qiu, Xiaofan; Deng, Yu; Huynh, Khuong T; Engemann, Sabine; Nielsen, Signe M; Becanovic, Kristina; Leavitt, Blair R; Hasholt, Lis; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-02-01

    Activation of caspase-6 in the striatum of both presymptomatic and affected persons with Huntington's disease (HD) is an early event in the disease pathogenesis. However, little is known about the role of caspase-6 outside the central nervous system (CNS) and whether caspase activation might play a role in the peripheral phenotypes, such as muscle wasting observed in HD. We assessed skeletal muscle tissue from HD patients and well-characterized mouse models of HD. Cleavage of the caspase-6 specific substrate lamin A is significantly increased in skeletal muscle obtained from HD patients as well as in muscle tissues from two different HD mouse models. p53, a transcriptional activator of caspase-6, is upregulated in neuronal cells and tissues expressing mutant huntingtin. Activation of p53 leads to a dramatic increase in levels of caspase-6 mRNA, caspase-6 activity and cleavage of lamin A. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from YAC128 mice, we show that this increase in caspase-6 activity can be mitigated by pifithrin-α (pifα), an inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity, but not through the inhibition of p53's mitochondrial pro-apoptotic function. Remarkably, the p53-mediated increase in caspase-6 expression and activation is exacerbated in cells and tissues of both neuronal and peripheral origin expressing mutant huntingtin (Htt). These findings suggest that the presence of the mutant Htt protein enhances p53 activity and lowers the apoptotic threshold, which activates caspase-6. Furthermore, these results suggest that this pathway is activated both within and outside the CNS in HD and may contribute to both loss of CNS neurons and muscle atrophy.

  12. Gain-of-function mutant p53 activates small GTPase Rac1 through SUMOylation to promote tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xuetian; Zhang, Cen; Zhao, Yuhan; Liu, Juan; Lin, Alan W; Tan, Victor M; Drake, Justin M; Liu, Lianxin; Boateng, Michael N; Li, Jun; Feng, Zhaohui; Hu, Wenwei

    2017-08-15

    Tumor suppressor p53 is frequently mutated in human cancer. Mutant p53 often promotes tumor progression through gain-of-function (GOF) mechanisms. However, the mechanisms underlying mutant p53 GOF are not well understood. In this study, we found that mutant p53 activates small GTPase Rac1 as a critical mechanism for mutant p53 GOF to promote tumor progression. Mechanistically, mutant p53 interacts with Rac1 and inhibits its interaction with SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1), which in turn inhibits SENP1-mediated de-SUMOylation of Rac1 to activate Rac1. Targeting Rac1 signaling by RNAi, expression of the dominant-negative Rac1 (Rac1 DN), or the specific Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 greatly inhibits mutant p53 GOF in promoting tumor growth and metastasis. Furthermore, mutant p53 expression is associated with enhanced Rac1 activity in clinical tumor samples. These results uncover a new mechanism for Rac1 activation in tumors and, most importantly, reveal that activation of Rac1 is an unidentified and critical mechanism for mutant p53 GOF in tumorigenesis, which could be targeted for therapy in tumors containing mutant p53. © 2017 Yue et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. p53 mutation is common in microsatellite stable, BRAF mutant colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Catherine E; Umapathy, Aarti; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Greco, Sonia A; Zhen Zhao, Zhen; Mallitt, Kylie-Ann; Buttenshaw, Ron L; Montgomery, Grant W; Leggett, Barbara A; Whitehall, Vicki L J

    2012-04-01

    The majority of "serrated pathway" colorectal cancers have mutation of the BRAF oncogene and display the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Half these cancers have microsatellite instability (MSI) and an excellent prognosis. In the absence of MSI (microsatellite stable, MSS), BRAF mutation has been associated with a particularly poor prognosis. "Traditional pathway" cancers are BRAF wild type. Mutation of p53 is common and this correlates with advanced stage. We therefore hypothesized that p53 mutation would be common in MSS/BRAF mutant colorectal cancer. One thousand and eighty-one colorectal cancers were screened for BRAF mutation to identify two BRAF mutant study groups (MSI: n = 77; MSS: n = 69) and a BRAF wild type control group (n = 101). These were screened for p53 mutation by high resolution melt analysis and classified for CIMP and MGMT methylation by quantitative methylation specific PCR. Molecular data were compared to patient age, gender, tumor location and stage. p53 was mutated significantly more frequently in MSS/BRAF mutant (28/69, 40.6%) compared to MSI/BRAF mutant cancers (13/77, 16.9%), but this mutation rate did not differ from MSS/BRAF wild type cancers (47/101, 46.5%)(p cancers (41/54, 75.9%), but was more common than in MSS/BRAF wild type cancers (3/85, 3.5%) (p cancers were more commonly proximal (38/54, 70.3%), but were similar to MSS/BRAF wild type cancers in terms of patient age, gender distribution and stage at presentation. MSS/BRAF mutant cancers share molecular and clinical features of both the serrated and traditional pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  14. Mutant p53 disrupts the stress MAP kinase activation circuit induced by ASK1-dependent stabilization of Daxx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tetsuya; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Inoue, Masahiro; Horikoshi, Nobuko T; Shindoh, Masanobu; Rogers, Buck E.; Usheva, Anny; Horikoshi, Nobuo

    2009-01-01

    Daxx is a regulatory protein for apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) which activates Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways in response to stressors such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Here we show that TNFα treatment induces the accumulation of Daxx protein through ASK1 activation by preventing its proteasome-dependent degradation. ASK1 directly phosphorylates Daxx at Ser176 and Ser184 and Daxx is required for the sustained activation of JNK. Tumorigenic mutant p53, which binds to Daxx and inhibits Daxx-dependent activation of ASK1, prevents Daxx phosphorylation and stabilization. When mutant p53 was depleted in cancer cells, Daxx was accumulated and the cell killing effect of TNFα was restored. Our results indicate that Daxx not only activates ASK1 but also is a downstream target of ASK1 and that accumulated Daxx further activates ASK1. Thus, the Daxx-ASK1 positive feedback loop amplifying JNK/p38 signaling plays an important role for cell killing effects of stressors, such as TNFα. Tumorigenic mutant p53 disrupts this circuit and makes cells more tolerable to stresses, as its gain-of-function mechanism. PMID:19789335

  15. Infection with E1B-mutant adenovirus stabilizes p53 but blocks p53 acetylation and activity through E1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savelyeva, I.; Dobbelstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    Wild-type adenovirus type 5 eliminates p53 through the E1B-55 kDa and E4-34 kDa gene products. Deletion or mutation of E1B-55 kDa has long been thought to confer p53-selective replication of oncolytic viruses. We show here that infection with E1B-defective adenovirus mutants induces massive...... acetylation in infected cells. Mutating either of these E1A regions, in addition to E1B, partially restored p21 mRNA levels. Our findings argue that adenovirus attenuates p53-mediated p21 induction, through at least two E1B-independent mechanisms. Other virus species and cancer cells may employ analogous...

  16. Mutant p53 disrupts the stress MAP kinase activation circuit induced by ASK1-dependent stabilization of Daxx

    OpenAIRE

    Kitamura, Tetsuya; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Inoue, Masahiro; Horikoshi, Nobuko T; Shindoh, Masanobu; Rogers, Buck E.; Usheva, Anny; Horikoshi, Nobuo

    2009-01-01

    Daxx is a regulatory protein for apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) which activates Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways in response to stressors such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Here we show that TNFα treatment induces the accumulation of Daxx protein through ASK1 activation by preventing its proteasome-dependent degradation. ASK1 directly phosphorylates Daxx at Ser176 and Ser184 and Daxx is required for the sustained activation of JNK. Tumorigenic mutant p53, which b...

  17. [The Expression of Pokemon in Endometrial Carcinoma Tissue and the Correlation with Mutant p53].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tian-jin; Wang, Ping

    2016-05-01

    To detect the expression of Pokemon in endometrial carcinoma (EC), to provide preliminary theoretical basis for clarifying pathogenesis and searching for effective targets. Ninety-eight cases of endometrial tissue paraffin specimens form July 2012 to July 2014 in West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, were collected, including: EC group, consisting of adenocarcinoma 23 cases, adenosquamous 12 cases, serous 3 cases, mucinous 11 cases and clear cell 9 cases, and control group, consisting of atypical hyperplasia endometrium 20 cases and normal endometrium 20 cases (secretory 10 cases, hyperplasia 10 cases). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of Pokemonin each section, analyzing the correlation of Pokemon expression with clinicopathologic characteristics and p53 expression. The positive rate of Pokemon in normal endometrium was 25% (5/20), significantly lower than that in atypical hyperplasia endometrium (60.0%, 12/20) and EC (93.1%, 54/58) (P Pokemon in III-IV stage, type II and Ki-67 ≥ 50 EC tissue was much higher (P = 0.012, 0.023, 0.029). In type II EC tissue, the correlation index between Pokemon and p53 is 0.669 (P = 0.000). The over expression of Pokemon upregulates the expression of mutant p53, which may be one of the carcinogenesis modes in type II EC.

  18. Rosiglitazone enhances the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Shu-Jun, E-mail: chiusj@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Institute of Radiation Sciences, Tzu Chi Technology College, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Hsaio, Ching-Hui; Tseng, Ho-Hsing; Su, Yu-Han [Department of Life Science, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Shih, Wen-Ling [Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jeng-Woei; Chuah, Jennifer Qiu-Yu [Department of Life Science, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)

    2010-04-09

    Combined-modality treatment has improved the outcome in cases of various solid tumors, and radiosensitizers are used to enhance the radiotherapeutic efficiency. Rosiglitazone, a synthetic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors {gamma} used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes, has been shown to reduce tumor growth and metastasis in human cancer cells, and may have the potential to be used as a radiosensitizer in radiotherapy for human colorectal cancer cells. In this study, rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of p53-wild type HCT116 cells but not p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Interestingly, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiosensitivity in p53-mutant HT-29 cells but not HCT116 cells, and prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and enhanced radiation-induced cell growth inhibition in HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with rosiglitazone also suppressed radiation-induced H2AX phosphorylation in response to DNA damage and AKT activation for cell survival; on the contrary, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiation-induced caspase-8, -9, and -3 activation and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells. In addition, pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk, attenuated the levels of caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in radiation-exposed cancer cells in combination with rosiglitazone pretreatment. Our results provide proof for the first time that rosiglitazone suppresses radiation-induced survival signals and DNA damage response, and enhances the radiation-induced apoptosis signaling cascade. These findings can assist in the development of rosiglitazone as a novel radiosensitizer.

  19. Wild-type and mutant p53 mediate cisplatin resistance through interaction and inhibition of active caspase-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Jacqueline L.Y.; Saidin, Suzan; Lane, David P.; Leong, Sai Mun; Noll, Jacqueline E.; Neilsen, Paul M.; Phua, Yi Ting; Gabra, Hani; Lim, Tit Meng

    2013-01-01

    The p53 gene has been implicated in many cancers due to its frequent mutations as well as mutations in other genes whose proteins directly affect p53’s functions. In addition, high expression of p53 [wild-type (WT) or mutant] has been found in the cytoplasm of many tumor cells, and studies have associated these observations with more aggressive tumors and poor prognosis. Cytoplasmic mis-localization of p53 subsequently reduced its transcriptional activity and this loss-of-function (LOF) was used to explain the lack of response to chemotherapeutic agents. However, this hypothesis seemed inadequate in explaining the apparent selection for tumor cells with high levels of p53 protein, a phenomenon that suggests a gain-of-function (GOF) of these mis-localized p53 proteins. In this study, we explored whether the direct involvement of p53 in the apoptotic response is via regulation of the caspase pathway in the cytoplasm. We demonstrate that p53, when present at high levels in the cytoplasm, has an inhibitory effect on caspase-9. Concurrently, knockdown of endogenous p53 caused an increase in the activity of caspase-9. p53 was found to interact with the p35 fragment of caspase-9, and this interaction inhibits the caspase-9 activity. In a p53-null background, the high-level expression of both exogenous WT and mutant p53 increased the resistance of these cells to cisplatin, and the data showed a correlation between high p53 expression and caspase-9 inhibition. These results suggest the inhibition of caspase-9 as a potential mechanism in evading apoptosis in tumors with high-level p53 expression that is cytoplasmically localized. PMID:23255126

  20. Silencing of mutant p53 by siRNA induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human bladder cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Hai-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is the most frequently mutated tumor-suppressor gene in human cancers. It has been reported that mutations in p53 result not only in the loss of its ability as a tumor suppressor, but also in the gain of novel cancer-related functions that contribute to oncogenesis. The present study evaluated the potential of silencing of mutant p53 by small interfering RNA in the treatment of bladder cancer cells in vitro. Methods We used the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay to assess cell viability and flow cytometry to detect cell cycle alterations and apoptosis. The related molecular mechanisms were assessed by western blotting. We also used the MTT assay and flow cytometry to investigate if silencing of mutant p53 by knockdown with small interfering (siRNA would change the sensitivity to cisplatin treatment. Results Using 5637 and T24 human bladder cancer cell lines characterized by mutations in p53, we found that silencing of the mutant p53 by RNA interference induced evident inhibition of cell proliferation and viability, which was related to the induction of G2 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, our study also showed that the p53-targeting siRNA cooperated with cisplatin in the inhibition of bladder cancer cells. Conclusions These findings suggest that RNA interference targeting mutant p53 may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  1. Restoration of Wild-Type Activity to Mutant p53 in Prostate Cancer: A Novel Therapeutic Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manfredi, James

    2006-01-01

    A summary is presented of research performed during the first year of a project to determine feasibility of approaches to restore wild-type transcriptional activity on mutant p53 proteins found in human prostate tumors...

  2. Restoration of Wild-Type Activity to Mutant p53 in Prostate Cancer: A Novel Therapeutic Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manfredi, James J

    2008-01-01

    A summary is presented of research performed during three years of a project to determine feasibility of approaches to restore wild-type transcriptional activity on mutant p53 proteins found in human prostate tumors...

  3. Assessing mutant p53 in primary high-grade serous ovarian cancer using immunohistochemistry and massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Alexander J; Dwight, Trisha; Gill, Anthony J; Dickson, Kristie-Ann; Zhu, Ying; Clarkson, Adele; Gard, Gregory B; Maidens, Jayne; Valmadre, Susan; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick; Marsh, Deborah J

    2016-05-18

    The tumour suppressor p53 is mutated in cancer, including over 96% of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Mutations cause loss of wild-type p53 function due to either gain of abnormal function of mutant p53 (mutp53), or absent to low mutp53. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) enables increased accuracy of detection of somatic variants in heterogeneous tumours. We used MPS and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to characterise HGSOCs for TP53 mutation and p53 expression. TP53 mutation was identified in 94% (68/72) of HGSOCs, 62% of which were missense. Missense mutations demonstrated high p53 by IHC, as did 35% (9/26) of non-missense mutations. Low p53 was seen by IHC in 62% of HGSOC associated with non-missense mutations. Most wild-type TP53 tumours (75%, 6/8) displayed intermediate p53 levels. The overall sensitivity of detecting a TP53 mutation based on classification as 'Low', 'Intermediate' or 'High' for p53 IHC was 99%, with a specificity of 75%. We suggest p53 IHC can be used as a surrogate marker of TP53 mutation in HGSOC; however, this will result in misclassification of a proportion of TP53 wild-type and mutant tumours. Therapeutic targeting of mutp53 will require knowledge of both TP53 mutations and mutp53 expression.

  4. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Luo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects.

  5. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects. PMID:22174618

  6. [6]-Gingerol Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Cell Death of Mutant p53-expressing Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yon Jung; Wen, Jing; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo

    2006-01-01

    [6]-Gingerol, a major phenolic compound derived from ginger, has anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities. While several molecular mechanisms have been described to underlie its effects on cells in vitro and in vivo, the underlying mechanisms by which [6]-gingerol exerts anti-tumorigenic effects are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the action of [6]-gingerol on two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, HPAC expressing wild-type (wt) p53 and BxPC-3 expressing mutated p53. We found that [6]-gingerol inhibited the cell growth through cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in both cell lines. Western blot analyses indicated that [6]-gingerol decreased both Cyclin A and Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) expression. These events led to reduction in Rb phosphorylation followed by blocking of S phase entry. p53 expression was decreased by [6]-gingerol treatment in both cell lines suggesting that the induction of Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21cip1, was p53-independent. [6]-Gingerol induced mostly apoptotic death in the mutant p53-expressing cells, while no signs of early apoptosis were detected in wild type p53-expressing cells and this was related to the increased phosphorylation of AKT. These results suggest that [6]-gingerol can circumvent the resistance of mutant p53-expressing cells towards chemotherapy by inducing apoptotic cell death while it exerts cytostatic effect on wild type p53-expressing cells by inducing temporal growth arrest. PMID:17066513

  7. Mutant p53 Protein and the Hippo Transducers YAP and TAZ: A Critical Oncogenic Node in Human Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraiuolo, Maria; Verduci, Lorena; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    p53 protein is a well-known tumor suppressor factor that regulates cellular homeostasis. As it has several and key functions exerted, p53 is known as “the guardian of the genome” and either loss of function or gain of function mutations in the TP53 coding protein sequence are involved in cancer onset and progression. The Hippo pathway is a key regulator of developmental and regenerative physiological processes but if deregulated can induce cell transformation and cancer progression. The p53 and Hippo pathways exert a plethora of fine-tuned functions that can apparently be in contrast with each other. In this review, we propose that the p53 status can affect the Hippo pathway function by switching its outputs from tumor suppressor to oncogenic activities. In detail, we discuss: (a) the oncogenic role of the protein complex mutant p53/YAP; (b) TAZ oncogenic activation mediated by mutant p53; (c) the therapeutic potential of targeting mutant p53 to impair YAP and TAZ oncogenic functions in human cancers. PMID:28467351

  8. Mutant p53: a novel target for the treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnott, N C; Murray, A; McGowan, P M; Kiely, M; Kiely, P A; O'Donovan, N; O'Connor, D P; Gallagher, W M; Crown, J; Duffy, M J

    2017-01-01

    The identification and validation of a targeted therapy for patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is currently one of the most urgent needs in breast cancer therapeutics. One of the key reasons for the failure to develop a new therapy for this subgroup of breast cancer patients has been the difficulty in identifying a highly prevalent, targetable molecular alteration in these tumors. Recently however, the p53 gene was found to be mutated in approximately 80% of basal/TNBC, raising the possibility that targeting the mutant p53 protein product might be a new approach for the treatment of this form of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer activity of PRIMA-1 and PRIMA-1MET (APR-246), two compounds which were previously reported to reactivate mutant p53 and convert it to a form with wild-type (WT) properties. Using a panel of 18 breast cancer cell lines and 2 immortalized breast cell lines, inhibition of proliferation by PRIMA-1 and PRIMA-1MET was found to be cell-line dependent, but independent of cell line molecular subtype. Although response was independent of molecular subtype, p53 mutated cell lines were significantly more sensitive to PRIMA-1MET than p53 WT cells (p = 0.029). Furthermore, response (measured as IC50 value) correlated significantly with p53 protein level as measured by ELISA (p = 0.0089, r=-0.57, n = 19). In addition to inhibiting cell proliferation, PRIMA-1MET induced apoptosis and inhibited migration in a p53 mutant-dependent manner. Based on our data, we conclude that targeting mutant p53 with PRIMA-1MET is a potential new approach for treating p53-mutated breast cancer, including the subgroup with triple-negative (TN) disease. © 2016 UICC.

  9. Prediction of P53 mutants (multiple sites transcriptional activity based on structural (2D&3D properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Geetha Ramani

    Full Text Available Prediction of secondary site mutations that reinstate mutated p53 to normalcy has been the focus of intense research in the recent past owing to the fact that p53 mutants have been implicated in more than half of all human cancers and restoration of p53 causes tumor regression. However laboratory investigations are more often laborious and resource intensive but computational techniques could well surmount these drawbacks. In view of this, we formulated a novel approach utilizing computational techniques to predict the transcriptional activity of multiple site (one-site to five-site p53 mutants. The optimal MCC obtained by the proposed approach on prediction of one-site, two-site, three-site, four-site and five-site mutants were 0.775,0.341,0.784,0.916 and 0.655 respectively, the highest reported thus far in literature. We have also demonstrated that 2D and 3D features generate higher prediction accuracy of p53 activity and our findings revealed the optimal results for prediction of p53 status, reported till date. We believe detection of the secondary site mutations that suppress tumor growth may facilitate better understanding of the relationship between p53 structure and function and further knowledge on the molecular mechanisms and biological activity of p53, a targeted source for cancer therapy. We expect that our prediction methods and reported results may provide useful insights on p53 functional mechanisms and generate more avenues for utilizing computational techniques in biological data analysis.

  10. Impedimetric detection of mutant p53 biomarker-driven metastatic breast cancers under hyposmotic pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglu Shi

    Full Text Available In cancer cells, the oncogenic mutant p53 (mtp53 protein is present at high levels and gain-of-function (GOF activities with more expression of mtp53 proteins contribute to tumor growth and metastasis. Robust analytical approaches that probe the degree of metastasis of cancer cells in connection with the mtp53 activity will be extremely useful not only for establishing a better cancer prognosis but also understanding the fundamental mechanism of mtp53 oncogenic action. Here we assessed the influence of mtp53 in breast cancers to the mechanical property of breast cancer cells. Recently, ovarian and kidney cancer cell lines have been shown to have higher cellular elasticity as compared to normal cells assessed by monitoring the degree of deformation under hyposmotic pressure. To make fast detection in large scale, the impedance measurement was applied to monitor the swelling ratio of cells with time. The results showed that knockdown of mtp53 leads to decrease in cell swelling. In addition, by means of two types of impedimetric detection systems we consistently detected enhancement of impedance signal in mtp53-expressing breast cancer cells. Based on this observation we hypothesize that highly expressed mtp53 in metastatic mutant breast cancers can promote tumor progression by making cells more deformable and easier to spread out through extracellular matrix. The identification via the electric measurement can be accomplished within 10 minutes. All results in this report suggest that electric probing for the extent of the mtp53 expression of breast cancer cells may serve as a meaningful fingerprint for the cancer diagnostics, and this outcome will also have an important clinical implication for the development of mtp53-based targeting for tumor detection and treatment.

  11. Synergistic anti-tumor effects of nitroreductase mutants and p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Razmkhah

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Combination of T41L/F70A NTR with p53 may have more advantages for treatment of different types of cancers compared to the other NTRs and p53 alone. The present study results may open new windows for getting desired outcome in gene therapy of different types of cancer.

  12. Mutant presenilin2 promotes apoptosis through the p53/miR-34a axis in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liu-Hong; Tu, Qiu-Yun; Deng, Xiao-Hua; Xia, Jian; Hou, De-Ren; Guo, Ke; Zi, Xiao-Hong

    2017-05-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders have attracted attention in last decades due to their high incidence in the world. The p53/miR-34a axis triggers apoptosis and suppresses viability in multiple types of cells, but little is known about its role in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we showed that presenilin (PS)-2, a major gene associated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) could trigger the apoptosis through the p53/miR-34a axis in PC12 cells. First we found that PC12 cell viability was downregulated by PS-2 and mutant PS-2 overexpression, especially by mutant PS-2 overexpression. Then, we established a mutant PS-2-overexpressing PC12 cell line and confirmed that mutant PS-2 induced not only p53 but also miR-34a expression. The transfection of miR-34a inhibitor reversed PS-2-induced effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Mutant PS-2 overexpression promoted caspase-3 expression, reduced Sirt1 and Bcl-2 expression, all of which were miR-34a downstream genes related with cell apoptosis. Moreover, mutant PS-2 also activated the p53/miR-34a axis and induced apoptosis in AD transgenic mice brain. These results implied that mutant PS-2 might promote the apoptosis of neuronal cells through triggering the p53/miR-34a axis. Altogether our results provide a novel insight into neurodegenerative disease and deepen our understandings of AD pathogenic processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Restore Wild-Type Functions to P53 Mutants Using an RNA-Based Combinatorial Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Green, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    The p53 protein is a transcription factor and a suppressor regulating the expression of a wide range of genes involved in apoptosis, growth control, and inhibiting the proliferation of tumor cells in animal models...

  14. Liver-specific expressions of HBx and src in the p53 mutant trigger hepatocarcinogenesis in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Wei Lu

    Full Text Available Hepatocarcinogenesis is a multistep process that starts from fatty liver and transitions to fibrosis and, finally, into cancer. Many etiological factors, including hepatitis B virus X antigen (HBx and p53 mutations, have been implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, potential synergistic effects between these two factors and the underlying mechanisms by which they promote hepatocarcinogenesis are still unclear. In this report, we show that the synergistic action of HBx and p53 mutation triggers progressive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC formation via src activation in zebrafish. Liver-specific expression of HBx in wild-type zebrafish caused steatosis, fibrosis and glycogen accumulation. However, the induction of tumorigenesis by HBx was only observed in p53 mutant fish and occurred in association with the up-regulation and activation of the src tyrosine kinase pathway. Furthermore, the overexpression of src in p53 mutant zebrafish also caused hyperplasia, HCC, and sarcomatoid HCC, which were accompanied by increased levels of the signaling proteins p-erk, p-akt, myc, jnk1 and vegf. Increased expression levels of lipogenic factors and the genes involved in lipid metabolism and glycogen storage were detected during the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis in the HBx and src transgenic zebrafish. The up-regulation of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, tumor progression and other molecular hallmarks of human liver cancer were found at later stages in both HBx and src transgenic, p53 mutant zebrafish. Together, our study demonstrates that HBx and src overexpression induced hepatocarcinogenesis in p53 mutant zebrafish. This phenomenon mimics human HCC formation and provides potential in vivo platforms for drug screening for therapies for human liver cancer.

  15. Expression patterns of maspin and mutant p53 are associated with the development of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pengming; Wu, Qibin; Ruan, Guanyu; Zheng, Xiu; Song, Yiyi; Zhun, Jianfan; Wu, Lixiang; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2016-11-01

    Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a group of conditions that originate from the abnormal proliferation of trophoblastic cells. GTDs encompass hydatidiform moles (HMs) and gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN). GTNs are a group of malignant diseases that require chemotherapy, or more aggressive treatment. There is a requirement for more tumor markers to predict the development of GTN from HMs. The current study evaluated the expression of maspin and tumor protein p53 (p53) in GTD, and their role in predicting the development of GTN. Expression of maspin and mutant p53 (m-p53) was detected by immunohistochemistry in 48 normal first trimester placentas, matched for gestational age to 49 HMs that regressed, 39 malignant HMs and 11 invasive moles or choriocarcinomas. Spearman's rank correlation analysis and logistic regression were performed on the expression patterns of maspin and m-p53, and on the clinical prognostic factors in GTD. Compared with normal placenta levels, the expression levels of maspin were decreased, whereas the expression levels of m-p53 were increased in GTDs (P0.05). In HMs, maspin expression was inversely correlated with serum β human chorionic gonadotropin, uterine size and diameter of theca-lutein cysts; however, m-p53 expression demonstrated a positive correlation with these factors (all P<0.05). Compared with the high-risk metastatic group (FIGO score ≥7), the low-risk group (FIGO score <7) exhibited a higher rate of positive maspin expression (P=0.041), and the frequency of positive m-p53 expression was significantly higher in patients with an advanced FIGO stages (FIGO stage ≥III) compared with patients in early stages (FIGO stage ≤II; 87.9 vs. 58.8%; P=0.019). The combination of maspin negative expression with m-p53 positive expression had an 84% specificity value, 76% positive predictive value and 70% negative predictive value for the development of GTN. In conclusion, maspin-negative and m-p53-positive expression is

  16. Effects of the Kava Chalcone Flavokawain A Differ in Bladder Cancer Cells with Wild-type versus Mutant p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yaxiong; Simoneau, Anne R.; Xie, Jun; Shahandeh, Babbak; Zi, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    Flavokawain A is the predominant chalcone from kava extract. We have assessed the mechanisms of flavokawain A's action on cell cycle regulation. In a p53 wild-type, low-grade, and papillary bladder cancer cell line (RT4), flavokawain A increased p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1, which resulted in a decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) kinase activity and subsequent G1 arrest. The increase of p21/WAF1 protein corresponded to an increased mRNA level, whereas p27/KIP1 accumulation was associated with the down-regulation of SKP2 and then increased the stability of the p27/KIP1 protein. The accumulation of p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1 was independent of cell cycle position and thus not a result of the cell cycle arrest. In contrast, flavokawain A induced a G2-M arrest in six p53 mutant-type, high-grade bladder cancer cell lines (T24, UMUC3, TCCSUP, 5637, HT1376, and HT1197). Flavokawain A significantly reduced the expression of CDK1-inhibitory kinases, Myt1 and Wee1, and caused cyclin B1 protein accumulation leading to CDK1 activation in T24 cells. Suppression of p53 expression by small interfering RNA in RT4 cells restored Cdc25C expression and down-regulated p21/WAF1 expression, which allowed Cdc25C and CDK1 activation and then led to a G2-M arrest and an enhanced growth-inhibitory effect by flavokawain A. Consistently, flavokawain A also caused a pronounced CDK1 activation and G2-M arrest in p53 knockout but not in p53 wild-type HCT116 cells. This selectivity of flavokawain A for inducing a G2-M arrest in p53-defective cells deserves further investigation as a new mechanism for the prevention and treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:19138991

  17. Effects of the kava chalcone flavokawain A differ in bladder cancer cells with wild-type versus mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yaxiong; Simoneau, Anne R; Xie, Jun; Shahandeh, Babbak; Zi, Xiaolin

    2008-11-01

    Flavokawain A is the predominant chalcone from kava extract. We have assessed the mechanisms of flavokawain A's action on cell cycle regulation. In a p53 wild-type, low-grade, and papillary bladder cancer cell line (RT4), flavokawain A increased p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1, which resulted in a decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) kinase activity and subsequent G(1) arrest. The increase of p21/WAF1 protein corresponded to an increased mRNA level, whereas p27/KIP1 accumulation was associated with the down-regulation of SKP2, which then increased the stability of the p27/KIP1 protein. The accumulation of p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1 was independent of cell cycle position and thus not a result of the cell cycle arrest. In contrast, flavokawain A induced a G(2)-M arrest in six p53 mutant-type, high-grade bladder cancer cell lines (T24, UMUC3, TCCSUP, 5637, HT1376, and HT1197). Flavokawain A significantly reduced the expression of CDK1-inhibitory kinases, Myt1 and Wee1, and caused cyclin B1 protein accumulation leading to CDK1 activation in T24 cells. Suppression of p53 expression by small interfering RNA in RT4 cells restored Cdc25C expression and down-regulated p21/WAF1 expression, which allowed Cdc25C and CDK1 activation, which then led to a G(2)-M arrest and an enhanced growth-inhibitory effect by flavokawain A. Consistently, flavokawain A also caused a pronounced CDK1 activation and G(2)-M arrest in p53 knockout but not in p53 wild-type HCT116 cells. This selectivity of flavokawain A for inducing a G(2)-M arrest in p53-defective cells deserves further investigation as a new mechanism for the prevention and treatment of bladder cancer.

  18. Reactivation of mutant p53: Constraints on mechanism highlighted by principal component analysis of the DNA binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaray, Zahra; ElSawy, Karim M; Lane, David P; Essex, Jonathan W; Verma, Chandra

    2016-10-01

    Most p53 mutations associated with cancer are located in its DNA binding domain (DBD). Many structures (X-ray and NMR) of this domain are available in the protein data bank (PDB) and a vast conformational heterogeneity characterizes the various free and complexed states. The major difference between the apo and the holo-complexed states appears to lie in the L1 loop. In particular, the conformations of this loop appear to depend intimately on the sequence of DNA to which it binds. This conclusion builds upon recent observations that implicate the tetramerization and the C-terminal domains (respectively TD and Cter) in DNA binding specificity. Detailed PCA analysis of the most recent collection of DBD structures from the PDB have been carried out. In contrast to recommendations that small molecules/drugs stabilize the flexible L1 loop to rescue mutant p53, our study highlights a need to retain the flexibility of the p53 DNA binding surface (DBS). It is the adaptability of this region that enables p53 to engage in the diverse interactions responsible for its functionality. Proteins 2016; 84:1443-1461. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Impaired TGF-beta induced growth inhibition contributes to the increased proliferation rate of neural stem cells harboring mutant p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Praveen; Naumann, Ulrike; Aigner, Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    -beta by loss of function experiments using NPCs derived from p53 mutant mice, as well as pharmacological inhibition of TGF-beta signaling using TGF-beta receptor inhibitors. NPC derived from p53 mutant mice showed increased clonogenicity and more rapid proliferation than their wildtype counterparts. Further...

  20. A Novel PTEN/Mutant p53/c-Myc/Bcl-XL Axis Mediates Context-Dependent Oncogenic Effects of PTEN with Implications for Cancer Prognosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Huang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatase and tensin homolog located on chromosome 10 (PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressors in human cancer including in glioblastoma. Here, we show that PTEN exerts unconventional oncogenic effects in glioblastoma through a novel PTEN/mutant p53/c-Myc/Bcl-XL molecular and functional axis. Using a wide array of molecular, genetic, and functional approaches, we demonstrate that PTEN enhances a transcriptional complex containing gain-of-function mutant p53, CBP, and NFY in human glioblastoma cells and tumor tissues. The mutant p53/CBP/NFY complex transcriptionally activates the oncogenes c-Myc and Bcl-XL, leading to increased cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and clonogenicity. Disruption of the mutant p53/c-Myc/Bcl-XL axis or mutant p53/CBP/NFY complex reverses the transcriptional and oncogenic effects of PTEN and unmasks its tumor-suppressive function. Consistent with these data, we find that PTEN expression is associated with worse patient survival than PTEN loss in tumors harboring mutant p53 and that a small molecule modulator of p53 exerts greater antitumor effects in PTEN-expressing cancer cells. Altogether, our study describes a new signaling pathway that mediates context-dependent oncogenic/tumor-suppressive role of PTEN. The data also indicate that the combined mutational status of PTEN and p53 influences cancer prognosis and anticancer therapies that target PTEN and p53.

  1. Tumor-specific signaling to p53 is mimicked by Mdm2 inactivation in zebrafish: insights from mdm2 and mdm4 mutant zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, J S; Liew, H P; Guo, L; Lane, D P

    2015-01-01

    In mice, the deletion of either Mdm2 or Mdm4 results in a p53-dependent embryonic lethality. We used zinc-finger nucleases to construct mutations in the mdm2 and mdm4 genes of zebrafish. Although the loss of mdm2 results in a p53-dependent early embryonic lethality, mdm4 mutant fish are viable and grow to adulthood. We also found that an in-frame five-amino acid deletion in mdm2 creates a novel hypomorphic allele. The lethal phenotype observed in the mdm2 mutant fish could be partially rescued by injecting mRNA encoding functional Mdm2, and this required the E3 ligase activity of the protein. Complete rescue was obtained by crossing the mdm2 mutant fish onto a p53M214K mutant background. Although p53 mutant fish on a wild-type mdm2 background were shown to accumulate high levels of p53 protein specifically in tumor tissues, we detected extensive staining of p53 in many normal tissues of the mdm2–p53M214K double-mutant fish. Our results are suggestive of the hypothesis that p53 protein accumulates during tumor formation as a result of tumor-specific inactivation of the Mdm2 pathway. PMID:25746004

  2. PRIMA-1Met/APR-246 induces apoptosis and tumor growth delay in small cell lung cancer expressing mutant p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Selivanova, Galina; Christensen, Camilla Laulund

    2011-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis, necessitating the need to develop new and efficient treatment modalities. PRIMA-1(Met) (p53-dependent reactivation of massive apoptosis), also known as APR-246, is a small molecule, which restores tumor suppressor fu...... function to mutant p53 and induces cancer cell death in various cancer types. Since p53 is mutated in more than 90% of SCLC, we investigated the ability of PRIMA-1(Met) to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in SCLC with different p53 mutations....

  3. Mutant p53 Gains Its Function via c-Myc Activation upon CDK4 Phosphorylation at Serine 249 and Consequent PIN1 Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peng; Zeng, Shelya X; Zhou, Xiang; Chen, Tianjian; Zhou, Fen; Cao, Bo; Jung, Ji Hoon; Del Sal, Giannino; Luo, Shiwen; Lu, Hua

    2017-11-23

    TP53 missense mutations significantly influence the development and progression of various human cancers via their gain of new functions (GOF) through different mechanisms. Here we report a unique mechanism underlying the GOF of p53-R249S (p53-RS), a p53 mutant frequently detected in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that is highly related to hepatitis B infection and aflatoxin B1. A CDK inhibitor blocks p53-RS's nuclear translocation in HCC, whereas CDK4 interacts with p53-RS in the G1/S phase of the cells, phosphorylates it, and enhances its nuclear localization. This is coupled with binding of a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (PIN1) to p53-RS, but not the p53 form with mutations of four serines/threonines previously shown to be crucial for PIN1 binding. As a result, p53-RS interacts with c-Myc and enhances c-Myc-dependent rDNA transcription key for ribosomal biogenesis. These results unveil a CDK4-PIN1-p53-RS-c-Myc pathway as a novel mechanism for the GOF of p53-RS in HCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Histone modifications affect differential regulation of TGFβ- induced NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) by wild-type and mutant p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Howard E.; Ma, Wei Feng; Korzeniowska, Agnieszka; Park, Jonathan J.; Bhagwat, Medha A.; Leto, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we showed wild-type (WT) and mutant (mut) p53 differentially regulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by NADPH oxidase-4 (NOX4): p53-WT suppresses TGFβ-induced NOX4, ROS and cell migration, whereas tumor-associated mut-p53 proteins enhance NOX4 expression and cell migration. Here, we extended our findings on the effects of p53 on NOX4 in several tumors and examined the basis of NOX4 transcriptional regulation by p53 and SMAD3. Statistical analysis of expression data from primary tumors available from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) detected correlations between mut-p53 and increased NOX4 expression. Furthermore, by altering p53 levels in cell culture models we showed several common tumor-associated mutant forms support TGFβ/SMAD3-dependent NOX4 expression. Deletion analysis revealed two critical SMAD3 binding elements (SBE) required for mut-p53-dependent NOX4 induction, whereas p53-WT caused dose-dependent suppression of NOX4 transcription. ChIP analysis revealed SMAD3 and p53-WT or mut-p53 associate with SBEs and p53 response elements in a TGFβ-dependent manner. Interestingly, the repressive effects of p53-WT on NOX4 were relieved by mutation of its transactivation domain or histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor treatment. Overexpression of p300, a transcriptional co-regulator and histone acetyltransferase (HAT), enhanced p53-mediated NOX4 induction, whereas HAT-inactive p300 reduced NOX4 expression. Mut-p53 augmented TGFβ-stimulated histone acetylation within the NOX4 promoter. Finally, wound assays demonstrated NOX4 and p300 promote TGFβ/mut-p53-mediated cell migration. Our studies provide new insight into TGFβ/SMAD3 and mut-p53-mediated NOX4 induction involving epigenetic control of NOX4 in tumor cell migration, suggesting NOX4 is a potential therapeutic target to combat tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:28574838

  5. p53 constrains progression to anaplastic thyroid carcinoma in a Braf-mutant mouse model of papillary thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, David G.; Vernon, Amanda; Santiago, Philip M.; Martinez-McFaline, Raul; Bhutkar, Arjun; Crowley, Denise M.; McMahon, Martin; Sadow, Peter M.; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) has among the worst prognoses of any solid malignancy. The low incidence of the disease has in part precluded systematic clinical trials and tissue collection, and there has been little progress in developing effective therapies. v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) mutations cooccur in a high proportion of ATCs, particularly those associated with a precursor papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). To develop an adult-onset model of BRAF-mutant ATC, we generated a thyroid-specific CreER transgenic mouse. We used a Cre-regulated BrafV600E mouse and a conditional Trp53 allelic series to demonstrate that p53 constrains progression from PTC to ATC. Gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses of murine tumors identified the cardinal features of human ATC including loss of differentiation, local invasion, distant metastasis, and rapid lethality. We used small-animal ultrasound imaging to monitor autochthonous tumors and showed that treatment with the selective BRAF inhibitor PLX4720 improved survival but did not lead to tumor regression or suppress signaling through the MAPK pathway. The combination of PLX4720 and the mapk/Erk kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD0325901 more completely suppressed MAPK pathway activation in mouse and human ATC cell lines and improved the structural response and survival of ATC-bearing animals. This model expands the limited repertoire of autochthonous models of clinically aggressive thyroid cancer, and these data suggest that small-molecule MAPK pathway inhibitors hold clinical promise in the treatment of advanced thyroid carcinoma. PMID:24711431

  6. The execution of the transcriptional axis mutant p53, E2F1 and ID4 promotes tumor neo-angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontemaggi, Giulia; Dell'Orso, Stefania; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Shay, Tal; Melucci, Elisa; Fazi, Francesco; Terrenato, Irene; Mottolese, Marcella; Muti, Paola; Domany, Eytan; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Strano, Sabrina; Blandino, Giovanni

    2009-10-01

    ID4 (inhibitor of DNA binding 4) is a member of a family of proteins that function as dominant-negative regulators of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. Growing evidence links ID proteins to cell proliferation, differentiation and tumorigenesis. Here we identify ID4 as a transcriptional target of gain-of-function p53 mutants R175H, R273H and R280K. Depletion of mutant p53 protein severely impairs ID4 expression in proliferating tumor cells. The protein complex mutant p53-E2F1 assembles on specific regions of the ID4 promoter and positively controls ID4 expression. The ID4 protein binds to and stabilizes mRNAs encoding pro-angiogenic factors IL8 and GRO-alpha. This results in the increase of the angiogenic potential of cancer cells expressing mutant p53. These findings highlight the transcriptional axis mutant p53, E2F1 and ID4 as a still undefined molecular mechanism contributing to tumor neo-angiogenesis.

  7. p53 deficiency alters the yield and spectrum of radiation-induced lacZ mutants in the brain of transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particle radiation in the galacto-cosmic environment poses a significant risk in space exploration and the evaluation of radiation-induced genetic damage in tissues, especially in the central nervous system, is an important consideration in long-term manned space missions. We used a plasmid-based transgenic mouse model system, with the pUR288 lacZ transgene integrated in the genome of every cell of C57Bl/6(lacZ) mice, to evaluate the genetic damage induced by iron particle radiation. In order to examine the importance of genetic background on the radiation sensitivity of individuals, we cross-bred p53 wild-type lacZ transgenic mice with p53 nullizygous mice, producing lacZ transgenic mice that were either hemizygous or nullizygous for the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Animals were exposed to an acute dose of 1 Gy of iron particles and the lacZ mutation frequency (MF) in the brain was measured at time intervals from 1 to 16 weeks post-irradiation. Our results suggest that iron particles induced an increase in lacZ MF (2.4-fold increase in p53+/+ mice, 1.3-fold increase in p53+/- mice and 2.1-fold increase in p53-/- mice) and that this induction is both temporally regulated and p53 genotype dependent. Characterization of mutants based on their restriction patterns showed that the majority of the mutants arising spontaneously are derived from point mutations or small deletions in all three genotypes. Radiation induced alterations in the spectrum of deletion mutants and reorganization of the genome, as evidenced by the selection of mutants containing mouse genomic DNA. These observations are unique in that mutations in brain tissue after particle radiation exposure have never before been reported owing to technical limitations in most other mutation assays.

  8. An in silico algorithm for identifying stabilizing pockets in proteins: test case, the Y220C mutant of the p53 tumor suppressor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Dennis; Bauer, Matthias R; Fersht, Alan R; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-09-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein performs a critical role in stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to oncogenic stress. The function of p53 can be compromised by mutation, leading to increased risk of cancer; approximately 50% of cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene, the majority of which are in the core DNA-binding domain. The Y220C mutation of p53, for example, destabilizes the core domain by 4 kcal/mol, leading to rapid denaturation and aggregation. The associated loss of tumor suppressor functionality is associated with approximately 75 000 new cancer cases every year. Destabilized p53 mutants can be 'rescued' and their function restored; binding of a small molecule into a pocket on the surface of mutant p53 can stabilize its wild-type structure and restore its function. Here, we describe an in silico algorithm for identifying potential rescue pockets, including the algorithm's integration with the Dynameomics molecular dynamics data warehouse and the DIVE visual analytics engine. We discuss the results of the application of the method to the Y220C p53 mutant, entailing finding a putative rescue pocket through MD simulations followed by an in silico search for stabilizing ligands that dock into the putative rescue pocket. The top three compounds from this search were tested experimentally and one of them bound in the pocket, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance, and weakly stabilized the mutant. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. miR-338-3p confers 5-fluorouracil resistance in p53 mutant colon cancer cells by targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jia; Li, Jie; Tang, Kaijie; Zhang, Huahua; Guo, Bo; Hou, Ni; Huang, Chen

    2017-11-15

    Evidence demonstrate that p53 mutations and microRNAs (miRs) are important components of 5-FU resistance in colorectal cancer (CRC). miR-338-3p has been reported associated with cancer prognosis. However whether or not it influences chemotherapy sensitivity and the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. Here, three types of human colon cancer cell lines, HT29 (mutant p53), HCT116 (wild-type p53), and HCT116 p53-/- (deficient p53), were treated with 5-FU. We showed that expression of miR-338-3p was correlated with apoptosis and 5-FU resistance in colon cancer cells. Ectopic expression of miR-338-3p conferred resistance to 5-FU in HCT116 cells. Further experiments indicated that miR-338-3p mediated 5-FU resistance through down-regulation of mTOR expression. Moreover, inhibition of miR-338-3p in HT29 and HCT116 p53-/- cells increased their sensitivity to 5-FU treatment. Furthermore, we detected autophagy changes in our experiment because mTOR was known prominently regulating autophagy and the competition between autophagy and apoptosis in response to 5-FU was a mechanism influencing 5-FU sensitivity. Our results reveal a critical and novel role of miR-338-3p in the correlation of 5-FU resistance with p53 status. Moreover, the miR-338-3p inhibitor has the potential to overcome 5-FU resistance in p53 mutant colon cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gain of oncogenic function of p53 mutants induces invasive phenotypes in human breast cancer cells by silencing CCN5/WISP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Gopal; Banerjee, Snigdha; Dhar, Kakali; Tawfik, Ossama; Mayo, Matthew S; Vanveldhuizen, Peter J; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2008-06-15

    CCN5/WISP-2 is overexpressed in noninvasive breast cancer cells and tissue samples, whereas its expression is minimal or undetected in invasive conditions. CCN5/WISP-2 has been considered as an antiinvasive gene because CCN5/WISP-2 silencing augments the invasive phenotypes in vitro. However, the mechanism of silencing of CCN5 during the progression of the disease has been elusive. Because p53 mutations are associated with breast cancer progression and have been shown to correlate inversely with CCN5/WISP-2 expression in other cancer cell types, the objective of this study was to explore whether p53 mutants suppress CCN5 expression in breast tumor cells resulting in the progression of this disease. We found CCN5 expression is inversely correlated with the mutational activation of p53 in human breast tumor cells. The ectopic expression of p53 mutants in ER-positive noninvasive breast tumor cells silenced the CCN5/WISP-2 expression and enhanced invasive phenotypes, including the induction of morphologic changes from the epithelial-to-mesenchymal type along with the alterations of hallmark proteins of these cell types and an augmentation of the migration of these cells. The suppression of CCN5 by the p53 mutants can be nullified by estrogen signaling in these cells through the transcriptional activation of the CCN5 gene. Moreover, the invasive changes can be imitated by blocking the CCN5/WISP-2 expression through RNA interference or can be reversed by the addition of CCN5/WISP-2 recombinant protein in the culture. Thus, these studies suggest that CCN5 inactivation could be an essential molecular event for p53 mutant-induced invasive phenotypes.

  11. Analyse complète et systématique des protéines mutantes p53 dans ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Une fois l'identification terminée, l'objectif ultime est de cribler des composés qui perturbent ces interactions afin de trouver de nouvelles stratégies thérapeutiques pour traiter les patients qui présentent ces mutations p53 précises. Enfin, les conclusions du projet s'étendront possiblement à d'autres cancers associés aux ...

  12. Effects of Temperature on the p53-DNA Binding Interactions and Their Dynamical Behavior: Comparing the Wild Type to the R248Q Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Khaled; Issack, Bilkiss B.; Stepanova, Maria; Tuszynski, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Background The protein p53 plays an active role in the regulation of cell cycle. In about half of human cancers, the protein is inactivated by mutations located primarily in its DNA-binding domain. Interestingly, a number of these mutations possess temperature-induced DNA-binding characteristics. A striking example is the mutation of Arg248 into glutamine or tryptophan. These mutants are defective for binding to DNA at 310 K although they have been shown to bind specifically to several p53 response elements at sub-physiological temperatures (298–306 K). Methodology/Principal Findings This important experimental finding motivated us to examine the effects of temperature on the structure and configuration of R248Q mutant and compare it to the wild type protein. Our aim is to determine how and where structural changes of mutant variants take place due to temperature changes. To answer these questions, we compared the mutant to the wild-type proteins from two different aspects. First, we investigated the systems at the atomistic level through their DNA-binding affinity, hydrogen bond networks and spatial distribution of water molecules. Next, we assessed changes in their long-lived conformational motions at the coarse-grained level through the collective dynamics of their side-chain and backbone atoms separately. Conclusions The experimentally observed effect of temperature on the DNA-binding properties of p53 is reproduced. Analysis of atomistic and coarse-grained data reveal that changes in binding are determined by a few key residues and provide a rationale for the mutant-loss of binding at physiological temperatures. The findings can potentially enable a rescue strategy for the mutant structure. PMID:22110706

  13. Effects of temperature on the p53-DNA binding interactions and their dynamical behavior: comparing the wild type to the R248Q mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Barakat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The protein p53 plays an active role in the regulation of cell cycle. In about half of human cancers, the protein is inactivated by mutations located primarily in its DNA-binding domain. Interestingly, a number of these mutations possess temperature-induced DNA-binding characteristics. A striking example is the mutation of Arg248 into glutamine or tryptophan. These mutants are defective for binding to DNA at 310 K although they have been shown to bind specifically to several p53 response elements at sub-physiological temperatures (298-306 K. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This important experimental finding motivated us to examine the effects of temperature on the structure and configuration of R248Q mutant and compare it to the wild type protein. Our aim is to determine how and where structural changes of mutant variants take place due to temperature changes. To answer these questions, we compared the mutant to the wild-type proteins from two different aspects. First, we investigated the systems at the atomistic level through their DNA-binding affinity, hydrogen bond networks and spatial distribution of water molecules. Next, we assessed changes in their long-lived conformational motions at the coarse-grained level through the collective dynamics of their side-chain and backbone atoms separately. CONCLUSIONS: The experimentally observed effect of temperature on the DNA-binding properties of p53 is reproduced. Analysis of atomistic and coarse-grained data reveal that changes in binding are determined by a few key residues and provide a rationale for the mutant-loss of binding at physiological temperatures. The findings can potentially enable a rescue strategy for the mutant structure.

  14. P53 and MITF/Bcl-2 identified as key pathways in the acquired resistance of NRAS-mutant melanoma to MEK inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, Ahmad; Krayem, Mohammad; Salès, François; Hussein, Nader; Badran, Bassam; Robert, Caroline; Awada, Ahmad; Journe, Fabrice; Ghanem, Ghanem E

    2017-09-01

    Activating mutations in Neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) are found in 15-30% of melanomas and are associated with a poor prognosis. Although MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitors used as single agents showed a limited clinical benefit in patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma due to their rather cytostatic effect and high toxicity, their combination with other inhibitors of pathways known to cooperate with MEK inhibition may maximise their antitumour activity. Similarly, in a context where p53 is largely inactivated in melanoma, hyperexpression of Microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF) and its downstream anti-apoptotic targets may be the cause of the restraint cytotoxic effects of MEK inhibitors. Indeed, drug combinations targeting both mutant BRAF and MITF or one of its important targets Bcl-2 were effective in mutant BRAF melanoma but had no effect on acquired resistance. Therefore, we aimed to further investigate the downstream MITF targets that can explain this anti-apoptotic effect and to evaluate in parallel the effect of p53 reactivation on the promotion of apoptosis under MEK inhibition in a panel of Q61NRAS-mutant melanoma cells. First, we showed that MEK inhibition (pimasertib) led to a significant inhibition of cell proliferation but with a limited effect on apoptosis that could be explained by the systematic MITF upregulation. Mimicking the MITF effect via cyclic adenosine monophosphate activation conferred resistance to MEK inhibition and upregulated Bcl-2 expression. In addition, acquired resistance to MEK inhibition was associated with a strong activation of the anti-apoptotic signalling MITF/Bcl-2. More importantly, selective Bcl-2 inhibition by ABT-199 or Bcl-2 knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 system annihilated the acquired resistance and restored the sensitivity of NRAS-mutant melanoma cells to MEK inhibition. Strikingly and similarly, direct p53 reactivation (PRIMA-1Met, APR-246) also broke resistance and synergised with MEK

  15. Effects of the Kava Chalcone Flavokawain A Differ in Bladder Cancer Cells with Wild-type versus Mutant p53

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yaxiong; Simoneau, Anne R.; Xie, Jun; Shahandeh, Babbak; Zi, Xiaolin

    2008-01-01

    Flavokawain A is the predominant chalcone from kava extract. We have assessed the mechanisms of flavokawain A's action on cell cycle regulation. In a p53 wild-type, low-grade, and papillary bladder cancer cell line (RT4), flavokawain A increased p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1, which resulted in a decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) kinase activity and subsequent G1 arrest. The increase of p21/WAF1 protein corresponded to an increased mRNA level, whereas p27/KIP1 accumulation was associated wi...

  16. Whole Genome Pathway Analysis Identifies an Association of Cadmium Response Gene Loss with Copy Number Variation in Mutant p53 Bearing Uterine Endometrial Carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Ryan Delaney

    Full Text Available Massive chromosomal aberrations are a signature of advanced cancer, although the factors promoting the pervasive incidence of these copy number alterations (CNAs are poorly understood. Gatekeeper mutations, such as p53, contribute to aneuploidy, yet p53 mutant tumors do not always display CNAs. Uterine Corpus Endometrial Carcinoma (UCEC offers a unique system to begin to evaluate why some cancers acquire high CNAs while others evolve another route to oncogenesis, since about half of p53 mutant UCEC tumors have a relatively flat CNA landscape and half have 20-90% of their genome altered in copy number.We extracted copy number information from 68 UCEC genomes mutant in p53 by the GISTIC2 algorithm. GO term pathway analysis, via GOrilla, was used to identify suppressed pathways. Genes within these pathways were mapped for focal or wide distribution. Deletion hotspots were evaluated for temporal incidence.Multiple pathways contributed to the development of pervasive CNAs, including developmental, metabolic, immunological, cell adhesion and cadmium response pathways. Surprisingly, cadmium response pathway genes are predicted as the earliest loss events within these tumors: in particular, the metallothionein genes involved in heavy metal sequestration. Loss of cadmium response genes were associated with copy number changes and poorer prognosis, contrasting with 'copy number flat' tumors which instead exhibited substantive mutation.Metallothioneins are lost early in the development of high CNA endometrial cancer, providing a potential mechanism and biological rationale for increased incidence of endometrial cancer with cadmium exposure. Developmental and metabolic pathways are altered later in tumor progression.

  17. CPe-III-S Metabolism in Vitro and in Vivo and Molecular Simulation of Its Metabolites Using a p53-R273H Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhaohui; Wen, Haichao; Wang, Cen; Zhai, Lijuan; Cheng, Aiqing; Kou, Xiaohong

    2016-09-28

    It was previously found that CPe-III-S, synthesized according to the chickpea peptide CPe-III (RQSHFANAQP), exhibited an antiproliferative effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the antiproliferative mechanism of CPe-III-S. CPe-III-S was treated by pepsin and trypsin in a simulated gastrointestinal digestion environment as well as in an animal experiment. With HPLC-ESI-MS analysis, three peptide fragments of Ser-His, His-Phe, and Ala-Asn-Ala-Gln were identified. Ser-His was the only common product from both in vitro and in vivo environments. The specific bindings between three peptides and p53-R273H were performed by molecular docking, and the molecular dynamic simulation between Ser-His and p53-R273H revealed the stability of the binding complex. The binding free energy of the complex was -12.56 ± 1.03 kcal/mol with a reliable hydrogen bond between the ligand and Thr284 of p53. Ser-His may restore mutant p53-R273H activity or inhibit its binding with a downstream signal. This metabolite is a potential anticancer factor for suppressing cell proliferation.

  18. Up-regulation of the embryonic self-renewal network through reversible polyploidy in irradiated p53-mutant tumour cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmina, Kristine, E-mail: kristine@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Jankevics, Eriks, E-mail: eriks@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Huna, Anda, E-mail: anima-l@inbox.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Perminov, Dmitry, E-mail: perminov@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Radovica, Ilze, E-mail: ilze@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Klymenko, Tetyana, E-mail: TKlymenko@picr.man.ac.uk [Paterson Institute of Cancer Research, Manchester University, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Ivanov, Andrey, E-mail: a.ivanov@beatson.gla.ac.uk [Beatson Institute, Glasgow Centre for Cancer Research, Glasgow University, G61 4LG (United Kingdom); Jascenko, Elina, E-mail: ejascenko@gmail.com [Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis, Riga, LV-1006 (Latvia); Scherthan, Harry, E-mail: harryscherthan@bundeswehr.org [Inst. fuer Radiobiologie der Bundeswehr in Verbindung mit der Univ. Ulm, Munich (Germany); Cragg, Mark, E-mail: m.s.cragg@soton.ac.uk [Cancer Sciences Division, Southampton University School of Medicine, General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD (United Kingdom); Erenpreisa, Jekaterina, E-mail: katrina@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia)

    2010-08-01

    We have previously documented that transient polyploidy is a potential cell survival strategy underlying the clonogenic re-growth of tumour cells after genotoxic treatment. In an attempt to better define this mechanism, we recently documented the key role of meiotic genes in regulating the DNA repair and return of the endopolyploid tumour cells (ETC) to diploidy through reduction divisions after irradiation. Here, we studied the role of the pluripotency and self-renewal stem cell genes NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in this polyploidy-dependent survival mechanism. In irradiation-resistant p53-mutated lymphoma cell-lines (Namalwa and WI-L2-NS) but not sensitive p53 wild-type counterparts (TK6), low background expression of OCT4 and NANOG was up-regulated by ionising radiation with protein accumulation evident in ETC as detected by OCT4/DNA flow cytometry and immunofluorescence (IF). IF analysis also showed that the ETC generate PML bodies that appear to concentrate OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 proteins, which extend into complex nuclear networks. These polyploid tumour cells resist apoptosis, overcome cellular senescence and undergo bi- and multi-polar divisions transmitting the up-regulated OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 self-renewal cassette to their descendents. Altogether, our observations indicate that irradiation-induced ETC up-regulate key components of germ-line cells, which potentially facilitate survival and propagation of the tumour cell population.

  19. Mitotic Arrest and Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells Induced by Origanum majorana Extract: Upregulation of TNF-α and Downregulation of Survivin and Mutant p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dhaheri, Yusra; Eid, Ali; AbuQamar, Synan; Attoub, Samir; Khasawneh, Mohammad; Aiche, Ghenima; Hisaindee, Soleiman; Iratni, Rabah

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we investigated the effect of Origanum majorana ethanolic extract on the survival of the highly proliferative and invasive triple-negative p53 mutant breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Results We found that O. majorana extract (OME) was able to inhibit the viability of the MDA-MB-231 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The effect of OME on cellular viability was further confirmed by the inhibition of colony growth. We showed, depending on the concentration used, that OME elicited different effects on the MDA-MB 231 cells. Concentrations of 150 and 300 µg/mL induced an accumulation of apoptotic–resistant population of cells arrested in mitotis and overexpressing the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21 and the inhibitor of apoptosis, survivin. On the other hand, higher concentrations of OME (450 and 600 µg/mL) triggered a massive apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway, including the activation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), caspase 8, caspase 3, and cleavage of PARP, downregulation of survivin as well as depletion of the mutant p53 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, OME induced an upregulation of γ-H2AX, a marker of double strand DNA breaks and an overall histone H3 and H4 hyperacetylation. Conclusion Our findings provide strong evidence that O. majorana may be a promising chemopreventive and therapeutic candidate against cancer especially for highly invasive triple negative p53 mutant breast cancer; thus validating its complementary and alternative medicinal use. PMID:23451065

  20. Mitotic arrest and apoptosis in breast cancer cells induced by Origanum majorana extract: upregulation of TNF-α and downregulation of survivin and mutant p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusra Al Dhaheri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the present study, we investigated the effect of Origanum majorana ethanolic extract on the survival of the highly proliferative and invasive triple-negative p53 mutant breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. RESULTS: We found that O. majorana extract (OME was able to inhibit the viability of the MDA-MB-231 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The effect of OME on cellular viability was further confirmed by the inhibition of colony growth. We showed, depending on the concentration used, that OME elicited different effects on the MDA-MB 231 cells. Concentrations of 150 and 300 µg/mL induced an accumulation of apoptotic-resistant population of cells arrested in mitotis and overexpressing the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21 and the inhibitor of apoptosis, survivin. On the other hand, higher concentrations of OME (450 and 600 µg/mL triggered a massive apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway, including the activation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, caspase 8, caspase 3, and cleavage of PARP, downregulation of survivin as well as depletion of the mutant p53 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, OME induced an upregulation of γ-H2AX, a marker of double strand DNA breaks and an overall histone H3 and H4 hyperacetylation. CONCLUSION: Our findings provide strong evidence that O. majorana may be a promising chemopreventive and therapeutic candidate against cancer especially for highly invasive triple negative p53 mutant breast cancer; thus validating its complementary and alternative medicinal use.

  1. Spectra of spontaneous and X-ray-induced mutations at the hprt locus in related human lymphoblast cell lines that express wild-type or mutant p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, E.N.; Xia, F.; Kelsey, K.T.; Liber, H.L. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Previous work showed that WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells are radioresistant but more sensitive to X-ray-induced mutation than the closely related line TK6. In addition, WTK1 cells contain a mutant p53 while in TK6 cells p53 is wild-type. In this work, we examined the spectra of 68 X-ray-induced and 56 spontaneous mutants at the hemizygous hprt locus in WTK1 cells. The induced spectra were classified by Southern blot and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR); there were 19 point mutations (28%) with an unaltered Southern blot or PCR pattern, 26 (38%) partial deletions or rearrangements and 23 (34%) complete gene deletions. The spontaneous spectrum included 25 (45%) point mutations, 22 (39%) partial deletions and 9 (16%) complete gene deletions. These spectra of mutations were compared to those of TK6 cells. Although distinct differences in the spectra of mutations at the tk locus were reported previously, overall there is no significant difference in the spectra of X-ray-induced or spontaneous mutations at the hprt locus in these two cell lines. While there was an increase in the proportion of large-scale changes that occurred at tk after X irradiation, the spectrum of mutations at the hprt locus shows all classes of mutations increasing proportionately in WTK1 cells. However, the proportion of internal partial deletion mutations at the hprt locus was about 2 times more frequent in WTK1 than in TK6 cells. 39 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. p53 Isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Marie P.; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Normal function of the p53 pathway is ubiquitously lost in cancers either through mutation or inactivating interaction with viral or cellular proteins. However, it is difficult in clinical studies to link p53 mutation status to cancer treatment and clinical outcome, suggesting that the p53 pathway is not fully understood. We have recently reported that the human p53 gene expresses not only 1 but 12 different p53 proteins (isoforms) due to alternative splicing, alternative initiation of translation, and alternative promoter usage. p53 isoform proteins thus contain distinct protein domains. They are expressed in normal human tissues but are abnormally expressed in a wide range of cancer types. We have recently reported that p53 isoform expression is associated with breast cancer prognosis, suggesting that they play a role in carcinogenesis. Indeed, the cellular response to damages can be switched from cell cycle arrest to apoptosis by only manipulating p53 isoform expression. This may provide an explanation to the hitherto inconsistent relationship between p53 mutation, treatment response, and outcome in breast cancer. However, the molecular mechanism is still unknown. Recent reports suggest that it involves modulation of gene expression in a p53-dependent and -independent manner. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about the biological activities of p53 isoforms and propose a molecular mechanism conciliating our current knowledge on p53 and integrating p63 and p73 isoforms in the p53 pathway. PMID:21779513

  3. The Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid DHA Induces Simultaneous Apoptosis and Autophagy via Mitochondrial ROS-Mediated Akt-mTOR Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells Expressing Mutant p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyeon Shin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA induces autophagy-associated apoptotic cell death in wild-type p53 cancer cells via regulation of p53. The present study investigated the effects of DHA on PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines harboring mutant p53. Results show that, in addition to apoptosis, DHA increased the expression levels of lipidated form LC3B and potently stimulated the autophagic flux, suggesting that DHA induces both autophagy and apoptosis in cancer cells expressing mutant p53. DHA led to the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS, as shown by the mitochondrial ROS-specific probe mitoSOX. Similarly, pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC markedly inhibited both the autophagy and the apoptosis triggered by DHA, indicating that mitochondrial ROS mediate the cytotoxicity of DHA in mutant p53 cells. Further, DHA reduced the levels of phospho-Akt and phospho-mTOR in a concentration-dependent manner, while NAC almost completely blocked that effect. Collectively, these findings present a novel mechanism of ROS-regulated apoptosis and autophagy that involves Akt-mTOR signaling in prostate cancer cells with mutant p53 exposed to DHA.

  4. The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA induces simultaneous apoptosis and autophagy via mitochondrial ROS-mediated Akt-mTOR signaling in prostate cancer cells expressing mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Soyeon; Jing, Kaipeng; Jeong, Soyeon; Kim, Nayeong; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Heo, Jun-Young; Park, Ji-Hoon; Seo, Kang-Sik; Han, Jeongsu; Park, Jong-Il; Kweon, Gi-Ryang; Park, Seung-Kiel; Wu, Tong; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Lim, Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) induces autophagy-associated apoptotic cell death in wild-type p53 cancer cells via regulation of p53. The present study investigated the effects of DHA on PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines harboring mutant p53. Results show that, in addition to apoptosis, DHA increased the expression levels of lipidated form LC3B and potently stimulated the autophagic flux, suggesting that DHA induces both autophagy and apoptosis in cancer cells expressing mutant p53. DHA led to the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), as shown by the mitochondrial ROS-specific probe mitoSOX. Similarly, pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) markedly inhibited both the autophagy and the apoptosis triggered by DHA, indicating that mitochondrial ROS mediate the cytotoxicity of DHA in mutant p53 cells. Further, DHA reduced the levels of phospho-Akt and phospho-mTOR in a concentration-dependent manner, while NAC almost completely blocked that effect. Collectively, these findings present a novel mechanism of ROS-regulated apoptosis and autophagy that involves Akt-mTOR signaling in prostate cancer cells with mutant p53 exposed to DHA.

  5. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shi-Wei [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chun-Ying [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yen-Ting [Department of Medical Research and Education, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kao, Jun-Kai [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Husan-Wen [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chuan-Hsun [Department of Surgical Oncology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nutrition Therapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, Shu-Mei [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Ju [Department of Dermatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jau-Ling [Department of Bioscience Technology, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Shieh, Jeng-Jer, E-mail: shiehjj@vghtc.gov.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Education and Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  6. Increased ID4 expression, accompanied by mutant p53 accumulation and loss of BRCA1/2 proteins in triple-negative breast cancer, adversely affects survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thike, Aye A; Tan, Puay H; Ikeda, Murasaki; Iqbal, Jabed

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) expression is down-regulated in a significant proportion of non-hereditary breast cancers, in the absence of any mutation. This phenomenon is more pronounced in oestrogen (ER)-negative tumours. Recent studies have suggested that inhibitor of DNA binding 4 (ID4), as well as p53, participate in the transcriptional regulation of BRCA1. Immunohistochemical expression of ID4, BRCA1, BRCA2 and p53 in 699 women with triple-negative breast cancer was investigated using tissue microarrays. The prognostic role of these biomarkers was also evaluated. Survival outcomes were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared between groups with log-rank statistics. Loss of BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression and overexpression of ID4 and p53 was observed in 75%, 90%, 95% and 66% of tumours, respectively. ID4 expression was increased in higher tumour grade (P P P = 0.037) and p53 accumulation (P triple-negative breast cancers (P = 0.041) and basal-like triple-negative breast cancers (P = 0.026). There is frequent ID4 expression and concomitant loss of BRCA proteins in triple-negative breast cancer. We hypothesize that strong ID4 expression could be useful as a prognostic marker in triple-negative breast cancer, predicting early tumour recurrence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Predictive value of mutant p53 expression index obtained from nonenhanced computed tomography measurements for assessing invasiveness of ground-glass opacity nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wei Wang,1 Jian Li,2 Ransheng Liu,1 Aixu Zhang,1 Zhiyong Yuan1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiology, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Purpose: To predict p53 expression index (p53-EI based on measurements from computed tomography (CT for preoperatively assessing pathologies of nodular ground-glass opacities (nGGOs. Methods: Information of 176 cases with nGGOs on high-resolution CT that were pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma was collected. Diameters, total volumes (TVs, maximum (MAX, average (AVG, and standard deviation (STD of CT attenuations within nGGOs were measured. p53-EI was evaluated through immunohistochemistry with Image-Pro Plus 6.0. A multiple linear stepwise regression model was established to calculate p53-EI prediction from CT measurements. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to compare the diagnostic performance of variables in differentiating preinvasive adenocarcinoma (PIA, minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA, and invasive adenocarcinoma (IAC. Results: Diameters, TVs, MAX, AVG, and STD showed significant differences among PIAs, MIAs, and IACs (all P-values <0.001, with only MAX being incapable to differentiate MIAs from IACs (P=0.106. The mean p53-EIs of PIAs, MIAs, and IACs were 3.4±2.0, 7.2±1.9, and 9.8±2.7, with significant intergroup differences (all P-values <0.001. An equation was established by multiple linear regression as: p53-EI prediction =0.001* TVs +0.012* AVG +0.022* STD +9.345, through which p53-EI predictions were calculated to be 4.4%±1.0%, 6.8%±1.3%, and 8.5%±1.4% for PIAs, MIAs, and IACs (Kruskal–Wallis test P<0.001; Tamhane’s T2 test: PIA vs MIA P<0.001, MIA vs IAC P<0.001, respectively. Although not significant, p53-EI prediction

  8. Inhibiting p53 Acetylation Reduces Cancer Chemotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shunsheng; Koh, Xin Yu; Goh, Hui Chin; Rahmat, Siti Aishah B; Hwang, Le-Ann; Lane, David P

    2017-08-15

    Chemotoxicity due to unwanted p53 activation in the bone marrow remains an unmet clinical challenge. Doxorubicin, a first-line chemotherapy drug, often causes myelosuppression in patients, thus limiting its effectiveness. In this study, we discovered that C646, a reversible p300 inhibitor, downregulates p53 transcription and selectively protects noncancerous cells from p53-dependent apoptosis. C646 treatment blocked acetylation of specific lysine residues that regulate p53 activity. Exploitation of differential p53 genetic backgrounds between human hematopoietic and colorectal cancer cells improved the therapeutic index of doxorubicin with C646 cotreatment. C646 administration in mice afflicted with p53-mutant tumors protected them from doxorubicin-induced neutropenia and anemia while retaining antitumor efficacy. We deduce that temporary and reversible inhibition of p53 acetylation in cancer subjects, especially those with p53-mutant tumors, may protect them from severe chemotoxicity while allowing treatment regimens to effectively proceed. Cancer Res; 77(16); 4342-54. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. USP3 stabilizes p53 protein through its deubiquitinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Song; Shao, Shize; Wang, Longqiang; Liu, Haijun; Hou, Haitao; Wang, Yanan; Wang, Huan; Huang, Xiangpeng; Lv, Renhua

    2017-10-14

    p53 is the guardian of the genome integrity and the degradation of p53 protein is mediated by MDM2. Here we report that USP3 interacts with p53 and regulates p53 stability. Depletion of USP3 lead to accelerated degradation of p53 in normal cells thereby enhanced cell proliferation and transformation. Reconstitution of wildtype USP3, but not the USP3 C168S mutant, restored the stability of p53 protein and inhibited cell proliferation and transformation. These findings suggest that USP3 is an important regulator of p53 and regulates normal cell transformation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. OTUD5 regulates p53 stability by deubiquitinating p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judong Luo

    Full Text Available The p53 tumour suppressor protein is a transcription factor that prevents oncogenic progression by activating the expression of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest genes in stressed cells. The stability of p53 is tightly regulated by ubiquitin-dependent degradation, driven mainly by its negative regulators ubiquitin ligase MDM2.In this study, we have identified OTUD5 as a DUB that interacts with and deubiquitinates p53. OTUD5 forms a direct complex with p53 and controls level of ubiquitination. The function of OTUD5 is required to allow the rapid activation of p53-dependent transcription and a p53-dependent apoptosis in response to DNA damage stress.As a novel deubiquitinating enzyme for p53, OTUD5 is required for the stabilization and the activation of a p53 response.

  11. Expression of inhibitors of apoptosis family protein in 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced hamster buccal-pouch squamous-cell carcinogenesis is associated with mutant p53 accumulation and epigenetic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsue, Shui-Sang; Wang, Wen-Chen; Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Lin, Li-Min

    2008-10-01

    Fifty outbred Syrian golden hamsters were equally divided into three experimental groups and two control groups. The pouches of the experimental groups were painted bilaterally with a 0.5% 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) solution thrice a week for 3, 7 and 14 weeks. One of the control groups was applied with mineral oil while another control group remained untreated throughout the experiment. Neither survivin nor cIAP2 could be detected in any of the control tissues, whereas survivin and cIAP2 were found to be significantly increased in 3-, 7- and 14-week DMBA-treated pouches compared with the control pouches. Expression of XIAP, cIAP1 and NAIP were noted for both the control and 3-, 7- and 14-week DMBA-treated pouches, but levels were found to be significantly elevated in the experimental groups compared with the control pouches. p53 was not detected in any control tissues, but was significantly increased in 3-, 7- and 14-week DMBA-treated pouches. Direct sequencing revealed a point mutation (C-->G) of p53 for pouch tissues treated with DMBA for 3 and 7 weeks, and there was a wide variation in the p53 sequence of the 14-week DMBA-treated pouch tissues, as compared with the control tissues. The control tissues had a survivin- and cIAP2-methylated allele, whereas the DMBA-treated tissues showed no evidence of survivin- and cIAP2-methylation. Neither the control nor DMBA-treated pouches showed evidence of XIAP-, cIAP1- or NAIP-methylation. Our results suggest that the expression of inhibitors of apoptosis family in DMBA-induced hamster buccal-pouch squamous-cell carcinogenesis may be modulated by both genetic (mutant p53) and epigenetic mechanisms.

  12. Emerging Non-Canonical Functions and Regulation by p53: p53 and Stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivos, David J; Mayo, Lindsey D

    2016-11-26

    Since its discovery nearly 40 years ago, p53 has ascended to the forefront of investigated genes and proteins across diverse research disciplines and is recognized most exclusively for its role in cancer as a tumor suppressor. Levine and Oren (2009) reviewed the evolution of p53 detailing the significant discoveries of each decade since its first report in 1979. In this review, we will highlight the emerging non-canonical functions and regulation of p53 in stem cells. We will focus on general themes shared among p53's functions in non-malignant stem cells and cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and the influence of p53 on the microenvironment and CSC niche. We will also examine p53 gain of function (GOF) roles in stemness. Mutant p53 (mutp53) GOFs that lead to survival, drug resistance and colonization are reviewed in the context of the acquisition of advantageous transformation processes, such as differentiation and dedifferentiation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell senescence and quiescence. Finally, we will conclude with therapeutic strategies that restore wild-type p53 (wtp53) function in cancer and CSCs, including RING finger E3 ligases and CSC maintenance. The mechanisms by which wtp53 and mutp53 influence stemness in non-malignant stem cells and CSCs or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are poorly understood thus far. Further elucidation of p53's effects on stemness could lead to novel therapeutic strategies in cancer research.

  13. A p53 Super-tumor Suppressor Reveals a Tumor Suppressive p53-Ptpn14-Yap Axis in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Stephano S; Valente, Liz J; Raj, Nitin; Seoane, Jose A; Flowers, Brittany M; McClendon, Jacob; Bieging-Rolett, Kathryn T; Lee, Jonghyeob; Ivanochko, Danton; Kozak, Margaret M; Chang, Daniel T; Longacre, Teri A; Koong, Albert C; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Kim, Seung K; Vogel, Hannes; Wood, Laura D; Hruban, Ralph H; Curtis, Christina; Attardi, Laura D

    2017-10-09

    The p53 transcription factor is a critical barrier to pancreatic cancer progression. To unravel mechanisms of p53-mediated tumor suppression, which have remained elusive, we analyzed pancreatic cancer development in mice expressing p53 transcriptional activation domain (TAD) mutants. Surprisingly, the p5353,54 TAD2 mutant behaves as a "super-tumor suppressor," with an enhanced capacity to both suppress pancreatic cancer and transactivate select p53 target genes, including Ptpn14. Ptpn14 encodes a negative regulator of the Yap oncoprotein and is necessary and sufficient for pancreatic cancer suppression, like p53. We show that p53 deficiency promotes Yap signaling and that PTPN14 and TP53 mutations are mutually exclusive in human cancers. These studies uncover a p53-Ptpn14-Yap pathway that is integral to p53-mediated tumor suppression. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. p53-based Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, David P.; Cheok, Chit Fang; Lain, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Inactivation of p53 functions is an almost universal feature of human cancer cells. This has spurred a tremendous effort to develop p53 based cancer therapies. Gene therapy using wild-type p53, delivered by adenovirus vectors, is now in widespread use in China. Other biologic approaches include the development of oncolytic viruses designed to replicate and kill only p53 defective cells and also the development of siRNA and antisense RNA's that activate p53 by inhibiting the function of the negative regulators Mdm2, MdmX, and HPV E6. The altered processing of p53 that occurs in tumor cells can elicit T-cell and B-cell responses to p53 that could be effective in eliminating cancer cells and p53 based vaccines are now in clinical trial. A number of small molecules that directly or indirectly activate the p53 response have also reached the clinic, of which the most advanced are the p53 mdm2 interaction inhibitors. Increased understanding of the p53 response is also allowing the development of powerful drug combinations that may increase the selectivity and safety of chemotherapy, by selective protection of normal cells and tissues. PMID:20463003

  15. TBP-like Protein (TLP) Disrupts the p53-MDM2 Interaction and Induces Long-lasting p53 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Ryo; Tamashiro, Hiroyuki; Takano, Kazunori; Takahashi, Hiro; Suzuki, Hidefumi; Saito, Shinta; Kojima, Waka; Adachi, Noritaka; Ura, Kiyoe; Endo, Takeshi; Tamura, Taka-Aki

    2017-02-24

    Stress-induced activation of p53 is an essential cellular response to prevent aberrant cell proliferation and cancer development. The ubiquitin ligase MDM2 promotes p53 degradation and limits the duration of p53 activation. It remains unclear, however, how p53 persistently escapes MDM2-mediated negative control for making appropriate cell fate decisions. Here we report that TBP-like protein (TLP), a member of the TBP family, is a new regulatory factor for the p53-MDM2 interplay and thus for p53 activation. We found that TLP acts to stabilize p53 protein to ensure long-lasting p53 activation, leading to potentiation of p53-induced apoptosis and senescence after genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, TLP interferes with MDM2 binding and ubiquitination of p53. Moreover, single cell imaging analysis shows that TLP depletion accelerates MDM2-mediated nuclear export of p53. We further show that a cervical cancer-derived TLP mutant has less p53 binding ability and lacks a proliferation-repressive function. Our findings uncover a role of TLP as a competitive MDM2 blocker, proposing a novel mechanism by which p53 escapes the p53-MDM2 negative feedback loop to modulate cell fate decisions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Role of p53 in Cell Death and Human Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Toshinori; Nakagawara, Akira

    2011-01-01

    p53 is a nuclear transcription factor with a pro-apoptotic function. Since over 50% of human cancers carry loss of function mutations in p53 gene, p53 has been considered to be one of the classical type tumor suppressors. Mutant p53 acts as the dominant-negative inhibitor toward wild-type p53. Indeed, mutant p53 has an oncogenic potential. In some cases, malignant cancer cells bearing p53 mutations display a chemo-resistant phenotype. In response to a variety of cellular stresses such as DNA damage, p53 is induced to accumulate in cell nucleus to exert its pro-apoptotic function. Activated p53 promotes cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair and/or apoptosis to prevent the propagation of cells with serious DNA damage through the transactivation of its target genes implicated in the induction of cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. Thus, the DNA-binding activity of p53 is tightly linked to its tumor suppressive function. In the present review article, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of p53 and also p53-mediated therapeutic strategies to cure malignant cancers. PMID:24212651

  17. Chronic p53-independent p21 expression causes genomic instability by deregulating replication licensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galanos, Panagiotis; Vougas, Konstantinos; Walter, David

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1) (p21) is a cell-cycle checkpoint effector and inducer of senescence, regulated by p53. Yet, evidence suggests that p21 could also be oncogenic, through a mechanism that has so far remained obscure. We report that a subset of atypical cancerous......-normal cellular models showed that after an initial senescence-like phase, a subpopulation of p21-expressing proliferating cells emerged, featuring increased genomic instability, aggressiveness and chemoresistance. Mechanistically, sustained p21 accumulation inhibited mainly the CRL4-CDT2 ubiquitin ligase...... cells strongly expressing p21 showed proliferation features. This occurred predominantly in p53-mutant human cancers, suggesting p53-independent upregulation of p21 selectively in more aggressive tumour cells. Multifaceted phenotypic and genomic analyses of p21-inducible, p53-null, cancerous and near...

  18. Emerging Non-Canonical Functions and Regulation by p53: p53 and Stemness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Olivos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery nearly 40 years ago, p53 has ascended to the forefront of investigated genes and proteins across diverse research disciplines and is recognized most exclusively for its role in cancer as a tumor suppressor. Levine and Oren (2009 reviewed the evolution of p53 detailing the significant discoveries of each decade since its first report in 1979. In this review, we will highlight the emerging non-canonical functions and regulation of p53 in stem cells. We will focus on general themes shared among p53’s functions in non-malignant stem cells and cancer stem-like cells (CSCs and the influence of p53 on the microenvironment and CSC niche. We will also examine p53 gain of function (GOF roles in stemness. Mutant p53 (mutp53 GOFs that lead to survival, drug resistance and colonization are reviewed in the context of the acquisition of advantageous transformation processes, such as differentiation and dedifferentiation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and stem cell senescence and quiescence. Finally, we will conclude with therapeutic strategies that restore wild-type p53 (wtp53 function in cancer and CSCs, including RING finger E3 ligases and CSC maintenance. The mechanisms by which wtp53 and mutp53 influence stemness in non-malignant stem cells and CSCs or tumor-initiating cells (TICs are poorly understood thus far. Further elucidation of p53’s effects on stemness could lead to novel therapeutic strategies in cancer research.

  19. Lung tumors with distinct p53 mutations respond similarly to p53 targeted therapy but exhibit genotype-specific statin sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrell, Frances K.; Kerr, Emma M.; Gao, Meiling; Thorpe, Hannah; Doherty, Gary J.; Cridge, Jake; Shorthouse, David; Speed, Alyson; Samarajiwa, Shamith; Hall, Benjamin A.; Griffiths, Meryl; Martins, Carla P.

    2017-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma accounts for ∼40% of lung cancers, the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and current therapies provide only limited survival benefit. Approximately half of lung adenocarcinomas harbor mutations in TP53 (p53), making these mutants appealing targets for lung cancer therapy. As mutant p53 remains untargetable, mutant p53-dependent phenotypes represent alternative targeting opportunities, but the prevalence and therapeutic relevance of such effects (gain of function and dominant-negative activity) in lung adenocarcinoma are unclear. Through transcriptional and functional analysis of murine KrasG12D-p53null, -p53R172H (conformational), and -p53R270H (contact) mutant lung tumors, we identified genotype-independent and genotype-dependent therapeutic sensitivities. Unexpectedly, we found that wild-type p53 exerts a dominant tumor-suppressive effect on mutant tumors, as all genotypes were similarly sensitive to its restoration in vivo. These data show that the potential of p53 targeted therapies is comparable across all p53-deficient genotypes and may explain the high incidence of p53 loss of heterozygosity in mutant tumors. In contrast, mutant p53 gain of function and their associated vulnerabilities can vary according to mutation type. Notably, we identified a p53R270H-specific sensitivity to simvastatin in lung tumors, and the transcriptional signature that underlies this sensitivity was also present in human lung tumors, indicating that this therapeutic approach may be clinically relevant. PMID:28790158

  20. Ninjurin 1 has two opposing functions in tumorigenesis in a p53-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee Jung; Zhang, Jin; Yan, Wensheng; Cho, Seong-Jun; Lucchesi, Christopher; Chen, Mingyi; Huang, Eric C; Scoumanne, Ariane; Zhang, Weici; Chen, Xinbin

    2017-10-24

    WT p53 is critical for tumor suppression, whereas mutant p53 promotes tumor progression. Nerve injury-induced protein 1 (Ninj1) is a target of p53 and forms a feedback loop with p53 by repressing p53 mRNA translation. Here, we show that loss of Ninj1 increased mutant p53 expression and, subsequently, enhanced cell growth and migration in cells carrying a mutant p53. In contrast, loss of Ninj1 inhibited cell growth and migration in cells carrying a WT p53. To explore the biological significance of Ninj1, we generated a cohort of Ninj1-deficient mice and found that Ninj1+/- mice were prone to systemic inflammation and insulitis, but not to spontaneous tumors. We also found that loss of Ninj1 altered the tumor susceptibility in both mutant p53 and p53-null background. Specifically, in a mutant p53(R270H) background, Ninj1 deficiency shortened the lifespan, altered the tumor spectrum, and increased tumor burden, likely via enhanced expression of mutant p53. In a p53-null background, Ninj1 deficiency significantly increased the incidence of T-lymphoblastic lymphoma. Taken together, our data suggest that depending on p53 genetic status, Ninj1 has two opposing functions in tumorigenesis and that the Ninj1-p53 loop may be targeted to manage inflammatory diseases and cancer. Published under the PNAS license.

  1. Stability of p53 homologs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Brandt

    Full Text Available Most proteins have not evolved for maximal thermal stability. Some are only marginally stable, as for example, the DNA-binding domains of p53 and its homologs, whose kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities are strongly correlated. Here, we applied high-throughput methods using a real-time PCR thermocycler to study the stability of several full-length orthologs and paralogs of the p53 family of transcription factors, which have diverse functions, ranging from tumour suppression to control of developmental processes. From isothermal denaturation fluorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry, we found that full-length proteins showed the same correlation between kinetic and thermodynamic stability as their isolated DNA-binding domains. The stabilities of the full-length p53 orthologs were marginal and correlated with the temperature of their organism, paralleling the stability of the isolated DNA-binding domains. Additionally, the paralogs p63 and p73 were significantly more stable and long-lived than p53. The short half-life of p53 orthologs and the greater persistence of the paralogs may be biologically relevant.

  2. Blocking of p53-Snail Binding, Promoted by Oncogenic K-Ras, Recovers p53 Expression and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hye Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Differentially from other kinds of Ras, oncogenic K-Ras, which is mutated approximately 30% of human cancer, does not induce apoptosis and senescence. Here, we provide the evidence that oncogenic K-Ras abrogates p53 function and expression through induction of Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related mediated Snail stabilization. Snail directly binds to DNA binding domain of p53 and diminishes the tumor-suppressive function of p53. Thus, elimination of Snail through si-RNA can induce p53 in K-Ras-mutated cells, whereas Snail and mutant K-Ras can suppress p53 in regardless of K-Ras status. Chemicals, isolated from inhibitor screening of p53-Snail binding, can block the Snail-mediated p53 suppression and enhance the expression of p53 as well as the transcriptional activity of p53 in an oncogenic K-Ras-dependent manner. Among the chemicals, two are very similar in structure. These results can answer why K-Ras can coexist with wild type p53 and propose the Snail-p53 binding as the new therapeutic target for K-Ras-mutated cancers including pancreatic, lung, and colon cancers.

  3. Vitis vinifera peel and seed gold nanoparticles exhibit chemopreventive potential, antioxidant activity and induce apoptosis through mutant p53, Bcl-2 and pan cytokeratin down-regulation in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, J Grace; Narendhirakannan, R T

    2017-05-01

    Several studies suggest surface modifications of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by capping agents or surface coatings could play an important role in biological systems, and site directed delivery. The present study was carried out to assess the antioxidant and apoptotic activities of the Vitis vinifera peel and seed gold nanoparticles in experimentally induced cancer in Swiss albino mice. 12-dimethylbenz [a] anthracene (DMBA) (single application) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) (thrice a week) were applied on the dorsal area of the skin to induce skin papillomagenesis in Swiss albino mice for 16 weeks. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized using Vitis vinifera peel and seed aqueous extracts and characterized by Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses. On topical application, peel and seed gold nanoparticles demonstrated chemopreventive potential by significantly (pgold nanoparticles treated mice. The down-regulated expression of mutant p53, Bcl-2 and the levels of pan-cytokeratins might have facilitated the process of apoptosis in the chemical carcinogenesis process. The results were supported by the histopathological evaluation which exhibited mild dysplasia and acanthosis in the skin tissues of Vitis vinifera peel and seed AuNPs treated mice. Based on the present study, the chemopreventive action of Vitis vinifera peel and seed AuNPs is probably due to its ability to stimulate the antioxidant enzymes within the cells and suppressed abnormal skin cell proliferation that occurred during DMBA-induced skin papillomagenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Evidence for allosteric variants of wild-type p53, a tumour suppressor protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, A.; Milner, J.

    1990-01-01

    A tumour suppressor function for p53 is indicated in human lung cancer and in carcinoma of the colorectum. Loss of suppressor function, by mutation of the p53 gene, is associated with activation of p53 as an oncogene. The suppressor (wild type) and oncogenic (mutant) forms of the murine p53 protein are distinguishable at the molecular level by reactivity with anti-p53 monoclonal antibodies. For example, activated mutant p53 fails to react with PAb246 (p53-246 degrees). We now demonstrate that...

  5. Battle Against Cancer: An Everlasting Saga of p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Hao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the most life-threatening diseases characterized by uncontrolled growth and spread of malignant cells. The tumor suppressor p53 is the master regulator of tumor cell growth and proliferation. In response to various stress signals, p53 can be activated and transcriptionally induces a myriad of target genes, including both protein-encoding and non-coding genes, controlling cell cycle progression, DNA repair, senescence, apoptosis, autophagy and metabolism of tumor cells. However, around 50% of human cancers harbor mutant p53 and, in the majority of the remaining cancers, p53 is inactivated through multiple mechanisms. Herein, we review the recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of p53 signaling, particularly the newly identified ribosomal stress—p53 pathway, and the development of chemotherapeutics via activating wild-type p53 or restoring mutant p53 functions in cancer. A full understanding of p53 regulation will aid the development of effective cancer treatments.

  6. Malign Melanomda Serum P53 Onkoprotein Düzeyleri

    OpenAIRE

    Özbek, Uğur; Şengün, Zeynep; Kurul, Sıdıka; Aydıner, Adnan; Ertürk, Nurcan; Topuz, Erkan

    1994-01-01

    p53, SV 40 trasforme edilmiş hücrelerde bulunmuş ve tanımlanmış bir nukleer fosfoproteindir. P53'ün mutasyona uğramış ya da 'wild-type' formu, hücre bölünmesinde negatif regülatör rolü olan bir tümör-supressör gen olarak kabul edilir. P53 geninin yüksek oranda korunmuş dizilerinden birinde nokta mutasyonu ortaya çıktığında, aktive olmuş onkogen ürünü özellikleri gösteren bir mutant protein eksprese edilir. p53 proteini monoklonal antikorlarla ayırt edilebilir. Mutant p53 serum ...

  7. PRIMA-1 and PRIMA-1Met (APR-246: From Mutant/Wild Type p53 Reactivation to Unexpected Mechanisms Underlying Their Potent Anti-Tumor Effect in Combinatorial Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Perdrix

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available p53 protects cells from genetic assaults by triggering cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Inactivation of p53 pathway is found in the vast majority of human cancers often due to somatic missense mutations in TP53 or to an excessive degradation of the protein. Accordingly, reactivation of p53 appears as a quite promising pharmacological approach and, effectively, several attempts have been made in that sense. The most widely investigated compounds for this purpose are PRIMA-1 (p53 reactivation and induction of massive apoptosis and PRIMA-1Met (APR-246, that are at an advanced stage of development, with several clinical trials in progress. Based on publications referenced in PubMed since 2002, here we review the reported effects of these compounds on cancer cells, with a specific focus on their ability of p53 reactivation, an overview of their unexpected anti-cancer effects, and a presentation of the investigated drug combinations.

  8. Functional four-base A/T gap core sequence CATTAG of P53 response elements specifically bound tetrameric P53 differently than two-base A/T gap core sequence CATG bound both dimeric and tetrameric P53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bi-He; Chen, Jang-Yi; Lu, Mei-Hua; Chang, Li-Tze; Lin, Hwang-Chi; Chang, Yu-Ming; Chao, Chung-Faye

    2009-04-01

    The consensus sequence of p53 is repeated half sites of PuPuPuC(A/T)(A/T)GPyPyPy. GtAGCAttAGCCCAGACATGTCC is a 14-3-3sigma promoter p53 regulation site; the first core sequence is CAttAG, and the second is CATG. Both mutants GtAGgAttAGCCCAGACATGTCC and GtAGCAttAGCCCAGACATcTCC can be activated by p53 as a 1.5-fold half site. The original p53 regulated site on the 14-3-3sigma promoter is a whole site, and CATTAG is a functional core sequence. The p53-binding affinity and the activity of CATTAG were lower than for the mutant CATATG core sequence. Wild-type p53 acts as a tetramer to bind to the whole site; however, it also can bind to a half site by one of its dimers. Wild-type p53 can only bind to a half site with core sequence CATG but not to CATATG. The 1.5-fold half site or whole site with core sequence CATATG can be bound by wild-type p53. A p53 mutant, A344, forms dimeric p53; it can only bind to CATG, and not to CATATG. Therefore, tetrameric and dimeric p53 can bind to a two-base A/T gap core sequence, but only tetrameric p53 can bind to a four-base A/T gap core sequence.

  9. p53 isoform Δ113p53 is a p53 target gene that antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity via BclxL activation in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jun; Ng, Sok Meng; Chang, Changqing; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Lane, David P; Peng, Jinrong

    2009-01-01

    p53 is a well-known tumor suppressor and is also involved in processes of organismal aging and developmental control. A recent exciting development in the p53 field is the discovery of various p53 isoforms. One p53 isoform is human Δ133p53 and its zebrafish counterpart Δ113p53. These N-terminal-truncated p53 isoforms are initiated from an alternative p53 promoter, but their expression regulation and physiological significance at the organismal level are not well understood. We show here that ...

  10. Thymidylate synthase inhibition induces p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptotic responses in human urinary bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Karkoulis, Panagiotis K; Konstantakou, Eumorphia G; Melachroinou, Sophia; Thanasopoulou, Angeliki; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Margaritis, Lukas H; Anastasiadou, Ema; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E

    2011-02-01

    In search for more effective clinical protocols, the antimetabolite drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been successfully included in new regimens of bladder cancer combination chemotherapy. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of 5-FU treatment on apoptosis induction in wild-type and mutant p53 urinary bladder cancer cells. We have used MTT-based assays, FACS analysis, Western blotting and semi-quantitative RT-PCR in RT4 and RT112 (grade I, wild-type p53), as well as in T24 (grade III, mutant p53) and TCCSUP (grade IV, mutant p53) human urinary bladder cancer cell lines. In the urothelial bladder cancer cell lines RT4 and T24, 5-FU-induced TS inhibition proved to be associated with cell type-dependent (a) sensitivity to the drug, (b) Caspase-mediated apoptosis, (c) p53 stabilization and activation, as well as Rb phosphorylation and E2F1 expression and (d) transcriptional regulation of p53 target genes and their cognate proteins, while an E2F-dependent transcriptional network did not seem to be critically engaged in such type of responses. We have shown that in the wild-type p53 context of RT4 cells, 5-FU-triggered apoptosis was prominently efficient and mainly regulated by p53-dependent mechanisms, whereas the mutant p53 environment of T24 cells was able to provide notable levels of resistance to apoptosis, basically ascribed to E2F-independent, and still unidentified, pathways. Nevertheless, the differential vulnerability of RT4 and T24 cells to 5-FU administration could also be associated with cell-type-specific transcriptional expression patterns of certain genes critically involved in 5-FU metabolism.

  11. p53: an overview of over two decades of study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, P L; Looi, L M

    2001-06-01

    results achieved in tumour therapy where introduction of wild type p53 gene has resulted in regression of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Many other notable developments in this field include description of p53 homologues, "gain of function" mutants, p53 polymorphisms, angiogenesis-inhibiting properties of wild type p53 protein etc.

  12. On p53 revival using system oriented drug dosage design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseeb, Muhammad; Azam, Shumaila; Bhatti, A I; Azam, Rizwan; Ullah, Mukhtar; Fazal, Sahar

    2017-02-21

    We propose a new paradigm in the drug design for the revival of the p53 pathway in cancer cells. It is shown that the current strategy of using small molecule based Mdm2 inhibitors is not enough to adequately revive p53 in cancerous cells, especially when it comes to the extracting pulsating behavior of p53. This fact has come to notice when a novel method for the drug dosage design is introduced using system oriented concepts. As a test case, small molecule drug Mdm2 repressor Nutlin 3a is considered. The proposed method determines the dose of Nutlin to revive p53 pathway functionality. For this purpose, PBK dynamics of Nutlin have also been integrated with p53 pathway model. The p53 pathway is the focus of researchers for the last thirty years for its pivotal role as a frontline cancer suppressant protein due to its effect on cell cycle checkpoints and cell apoptosis in response to a DNA strand break. That is the reason for finding p53 being absent in more than 50% of tumor cancers. Various drugs have been proposed to revive p53 in cancer cells. Small molecule based drugs are at the foremost and are the subject of advanced clinical trials. The dosage design of these drugs is an important issue. We use control systems concepts to develop the drug dosage so that the cancer cells can be treated in appropriate time. We investigate by using a computational model how p53 protein responds to drug Nutlin 3a, an agent that interferes with the MDM2-mediated p53 regulation. The proposed integrated model describes in some detail the regulation network of p53 including the negative feedback loop mediated by MDM2 and the positive feedback loop mediated by Mdm2 mRNA as well as the reversible represses of MDM2 caused by Nutlin. The reported PBK dynamics of Nutlin 3a are also incorporated to see the full effect. It has been reported that p53 response to stresses in two ways. Either it has a sustained (constant) p53 response, or there are oscillations in p53 concentration. The

  13. Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Topors regulates p53 stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Hongchang; Zhou, Zinan; Wang, Wen-Horng; Deng, Anping; Andrisani, Ourania; Liu, Xiaoqi

    2009-07-10

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) overexpression is associated with tumorigenesis by an unknown mechanism. Likewise, Plk1 was suggested to act as a negative regulator of tumor suppressor p53, but the mechanism remains to be determined. Herein, we have identified topoisomerase I-binding protein (Topors), a p53-binding protein, as a Plk1 target. We show that Plk1 phosphorylates Topors on Ser(718) in vivo. Significantly, expression of a Plk1-unphosphorylatable Topors mutant (S718A) leads to a dramatic accumulation of p53 through inhibition of p53 degradation. Topors is an ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase (SUMO E3) ligase. Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Topors inhibits Topors-mediated sumoylation of p53, whereas p53 ubiquitination is enhanced, leading to p53 degradation. These results demonstrate that Plk1 modulates Topors activity in suppressing p53 function and identify a likely mechanism for the tumorigenic potential of Plk1.

  14. Plk1-mediated Phosphorylation of Topors Regulates p53 Stability*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Hongchang; Zhou, Zinan; Wang, Wen-Horng; Deng, Anping; Andrisani, Ourania; Liu, Xiaoqi

    2009-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) overexpression is associated with tumorigenesis by an unknown mechanism. Likewise, Plk1 was suggested to act as a negative regulator of tumor suppressor p53, but the mechanism remains to be determined. Herein, we have identified topoisomerase I-binding protein (Topors), a p53-binding protein, as a Plk1 target. We show that Plk1 phosphorylates Topors on Ser718 in vivo. Significantly, expression of a Plk1-unphosphorylatable Topors mutant (S718A) leads to a dramatic accumulation of p53 through inhibition of p53 degradation. Topors is an ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase (SUMO E3) ligase. Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Topors inhibits Topors-mediated sumoylation of p53, whereas p53 ubiquitination is enhanced, leading to p53 degradation. These results demonstrate that Plk1 modulates Topors activity in suppressing p53 function and identify a likely mechanism for the tumorigenic potential of Plk1. PMID:19473992

  15. Acetylation Is Indispensable for p53 Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yi; Zhao, Wenhui; Chen, Yue; Zhao, Yingming; Gu, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The activation of the tumor suppressor p53 facilitates the cellular response to genotoxic stress; however, the p53 response can only be executed if its interaction with its inhibitor Mdm2 is abolished. There have been conflicting reports on the question of whether p53 posttranslational modifications, such as phosphorylation or acetylation, are essential or only play a subtle, fine-tuning role in the p53 response. Thus, it remains unclear whether p53 modification is absolutely required for its...

  16. A Novel p53 Phosphorylation Site within the MDM2 Ubiquitination Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Jennifer A.; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Bramham, Janice; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.; Verma, Chandra; Hupp, Ted R.

    2010-01-01

    The p53 DNA-binding domain harbors a conformationally flexible multiprotein binding site that regulates p53 ubiquitination. A novel phosphorylation site exists within this region at Ser269, whose phosphomimetic mutation inactivates p53. The phosphomimetic p53 (S269D) exhibits characteristics of mutant p53: stable binding to Hsp70 in vivo, elevated ubiquitination in vivo, inactivity in DNA binding and transcription, increased thermoinstability using thermal shift assays, and λmax of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence at 403 nm rather than 346 nm, characteristic of wild type p53. These data indicate that p53 conformational stability is regulated by a phosphoacceptor site within an exposed flexible surface loop and that this can be destabilized by phosphorylation. To test whether other motifs within p53 have similarly evolved, we analyzed the effect of Ser215 mutation on p53 function because Ser215 is another inactivating phosphorylation site in the conformationally flexible PAb240 epitope. The p53S215D protein is inactive like p53S269D, whereas p53S215A is as active as p53S269A. However, the double mutant p53S215A/S269A was transcriptionally inactive and more thermally unstable than either individual Ser-Ala loop mutant. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that (i) solvation of phospho-Ser215 and phospho-Ser269 by positive charged residues or solvent water leads to local unfolding, which is accompanied by local destabilization of the N-terminal loop and global destabilization of p53, and (ii) the double alanine 215/269 mutation disrupts hydrogen bonding normally stabilized by both Ser215 and Ser269. These data indicate that p53 has evolved two serine phosphoacceptor residues within conformationally flexible epitopes that normally stabilize the p53 DNA-binding domain but whose phosphorylation induces a mutant conformation to wild type p53. PMID:20847049

  17. p53 gain-of-function mutations increase Cdc7-dependent replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Arindam; Ghatak, Dishari; Das, Sumit; Banerjee, Taraswi; Paul, Anindita; Butti, Ramesh; Gorain, Mahadeo; Ghuwalewala, Sangeeta; Roychowdhury, Anirban; Alam, Sk Kayum; Das, Pijush; Chatterjee, Raghunath; Dasgupta, Maitrayee; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Kundu, Gopal C; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2017-11-01

    Cancer-associated p53 missense mutants confer gain of function (GOF) and promote tumorigenesis by regulating crucial signaling pathways. However, the role of GOF mutant p53 in regulating DNA replication, a commonly altered pathway in cancer, is less explored. Here, we show that enhanced Cdc7-dependent replication initiation enables mutant p53 to confer oncogenic phenotypes. We demonstrate that mutant p53 cooperates with the oncogenic transcription factor Myb in vivo and transactivates Cdc7 in cancer cells. Moreover, mutant p53 cells exhibit enhanced levels of Dbf4, promoting the activity of Cdc7/Dbf4 complex. Chromatin enrichment of replication initiation factors and subsequent increase in origin firing confirm increased Cdc7-dependent replication initiation in mutant p53 cells. Further, knockdown of CDC7 significantly abrogates mutant p53-driven cancer phenotypes in vitro and in vivo Importantly, high CDC7 expression significantly correlates with p53 mutational status and predicts poor clinical outcome in lung adenocarcinoma patients. Collectively, this study highlights a novel functional interaction between mutant p53 and the DNA replication pathway in cancer cells. We propose that increased Cdc7-dependent replication initiation is a hallmark of p53 gain-of-function mutations. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Pathologies Associated with the p53 Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, Andrei V.; Komarova, Elena A.

    2010-01-01

    Although p53 is a major cancer preventive factor, under certain extreme stress conditions it may induce severe pathologies. Analyses of animal models indicate that p53 is largely responsible for the toxicity of ionizing radiation or DNA damaging drugs contributing to hematopoietic component of acute radiation syndrome and largely determining severe adverse effects of cancer treatment. p53-mediated damage is strictly tissue specific and occurs in tissues prone to p53-dependent apoptosis (e.g., hematopoietic system and hair follicles); on the contrary, p53 can serve as a survival factor in tissues that respond to p53 activation by cell cycle arrest (e.g., endothelium of small intestine). There are multiple experimental indications that p53 contributes to pathogenicity of acute ischemic diseases. Temporary reversible suppression of p53 by small molecules can be an effective and safe approach to reduce severity of p53-associated pathologies. PMID:20595398

  19. Arginine methylation regulates the p53 response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Martin; Durant, Stephen T; Cho, Er-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the p53 tumour suppressor protein in response to DNA damage leads to apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Enzymatic modifications are widely believed to affect and regulate p53 activity. We describe here a level of post-translational control that has an important functional consequence...... on the p53 response. We show that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 5, as a co-factor in a DNA damage responsive co-activator complex that interacts with p53, is responsible for methylating p53. Arginine methylation is regulated during the p53 response and affects the target gene specificity...... of p53. Furthermore, PRMT5 depletion triggers p53-dependent apoptosis. Thus, methylation on arginine residues is an underlying mechanism of control during the p53 response....

  20. Lung tumors with distinct p53 mutations respond similarly to p53 targeted therapy but exhibit genotype-specific statin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrell, Frances K; Kerr, Emma M; Gao, Meiling; Thorpe, Hannah; Doherty, Gary J; Cridge, Jake; Shorthouse, David; Speed, Alyson; Samarajiwa, Shamith; Hall, Benjamin A; Griffiths, Meryl; Martins, Carla P

    2017-08-08

    Lung adenocarcinoma accounts for ∼40% of lung cancers, the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and current therapies provide only limited survival benefit. Approximately half of lung adenocarcinomas harbor mutations in TP53 (p53), making these mutants appealing targets for lung cancer therapy. As mutant p53 remains untargetable, mutant p53-dependent phenotypes represent alternative targeting opportunities, but the prevalence and therapeutic relevance of such effects (gain of function and dominant-negative activity) in lung adenocarcinoma are unclear. Through transcriptional and functional analysis of murine Kras(G12D) -p53(null) , -p53(R172H) (conformational), and -p53(R270H) (contact) mutant lung tumors, we identified genotype-independent and genotype-dependent therapeutic sensitivities. Unexpectedly, we found that wild-type p53 exerts a dominant tumor-suppressive effect on mutant tumors, as all genotypes were similarly sensitive to its restoration in vivo. These data show that the potential of p53 targeted therapies is comparable across all p53-deficient genotypes and may explain the high incidence of p53 loss of heterozygosity in mutant tumors. In contrast, mutant p53 gain of function and their associated vulnerabilities can vary according to mutation type. Notably, we identified a p53(R270H) -specific sensitivity to simvastatin in lung tumors, and the transcriptional signature that underlies this sensitivity was also present in human lung tumors, indicating that this therapeutic approach may be clinically relevant. © 2017 Turrell et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sara M.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer. PMID:25545885

  2. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Reed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer.

  3. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Sara M. [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Quelle, Dawn E., E-mail: dawn-quelle@uiowa.edu [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Pathology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer.

  4. Gene p53 mutations, protein p53, and anti-p53 antibodies as biomarkers of cancer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Waldemar; Nowakowska-Swirta, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    The finding that gene mutations and changes in their expression form the basis of cancer processes, has prompted molecular epidemiologists to use biomarkers for detecting damaged genes or proteins synthesized under their control in easily available cellular material or systemic liquids. Mutations in the suppressor gen p53 are thought to be essential for cancer development. This gen is one of the most important regulators of transcription, cellular cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis detected till now. Inactivation of gene p53 leads to uncontrolled cell divisions, and further to transformation of normal cells into the carcinous ones. Observations that mutations in gene p53 appear under conditions of occupational and environmental exposures to chemical and physical carcinogens, such as vinyl chloride, radon, or aflatoxin B1, have proved to be of enormous importance for the occupational and environmental health. Changes in expression of gene p53, and also its mutations, cause variations of cellular protein p53 concentration. Higher cellular protein p53 levels are associated with increased protein transfer to the extracellular liquid and to blood. It has been observed that increased blood serum protein p53 concentrations may have a prognostic value in early diagnosis of lung cancer. The results of a number of studies confirm that accumulation of a mutated form of protein p53, and presumably also large quantities of wild forms of that protein in the cells, may be a factor that triggers the production of anti-p53 antibodies. Statistical analysis showed that anti-p53 antibodies can be regarded as a specific biomarker of cancer process. The prevalence of anti-p53 antibodies correlated with the degree of cancer malignancy. The increased incidence of anti-p53 antibodies was also associated with higher frequency of mutations in gene p53. There are some reports confirming that anti-p53 antibodies emerging in blood serum in the subclinical phase of cancer development may be

  5. 9-Hydroxyellipticine alters the conformation and DNA binding characteristics of mutated p53 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugikawa, E; Tsunoda, S; Nakanishi, N; Ohashi, M

    2001-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is a phosphoprotein which shows growth and transformation suppression functions. Mutational loss of p53 function is the most frequently detected genetic event in human cancers. We examined whether 9-hydroxyellipticine (9HE), a cytotoxic agent, affected the tertiary structure of mutant p53 and DNA binding characteristics. Although several types of p53 mutants were resistant to degradation by calpain, the p53 mutants treated with 9HE were markedly sensitive to calpain as well as wild-type p53. Furthermore, mutant p53 proteins isolated from 9HE-treated cells regained the ability to bind a wild-type-specific p53 DNA consensus sequence. Wild-type p53 proteins prepared from both untreated and 9HE-treated cells bound the p53 consensus sequence and were degradaded by calpain equally well. These results suggest that 9HE affects the tertiary structure of mutated p53, which results in the restoration of DNA binding characteristics.

  6. Identification of p53 and Its Isoforms in Human Breast Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorka Milićević

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In breast carcinoma, disruption of the p53 pathway is one of the most common genetic alterations. The observation that the p53 can express multiple protein isoforms adds a novel level of complexity to the outcome of p53 mutations. p53 expression was analysed by Western immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies DO-7, Pab240, and polyclonal antiserum CM-1. The more frequently p53-positive nuclear staining has been found in the invasive breast tumors. One of the most intriguing findings is that mutant p53 appears as discrete dot-shaped regions within the nucleus of breast cancer cells. In many malignant cells, the nucleolar sequestration of p53 is evident. These observations support the view that the nucleolus is involved directly in the mediation of p53 function or indirectly by the control of the localization of p53 interplayers. p53 expressed in the nuclear fraction of breast cancer cells revealed a wide spectrum of isoforms. p53 isoforms ΔNp53 (47 kDa and Δ133p53β (35 kDa, known as dominant-negative repressors of p53 function, were detected as the most predominant variants in nuclei of invasive breast carcinoma cells. The isoforms expressed also varied between individual tumors, indicating potential roles of these p53 variants in human breast cancer.

  7. Identification of p53 in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseva, Angelina V; Moll, Ute M

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a master regulator of cell death pathways and has transcription-dependent and transcription-independent modes of action. Mitochondria are major signal transducers in apoptosis and are critical for p53-dependent cell death. Our lab and others have discovered that a fraction of stress-induced wild-type p53 protein rapidly translocates to mitochondria upon various stress stimuli and exerts p53-dependent apoptosis. Suborganellar localization by various methods shows that p53 localizes to the surface of mitochondria. Direct targeting of p53 to mitochondria is sufficient to induce apoptosis in p53-null cells, without requiring further DNA damage. Recently, p53 has been also shown to localize to other mitochondrial compartments such as the mitochondrial matrix where it plays a role in maintaining mitochondrial genome integrity. Here, we describe subcellular fractionation as a classic technique for detecting mitochondrial p53 in cell extracts. It consists of cell homogenization by hypo-osmotic swelling, removal of nuclear components by low-speed centrifugation, and mitochondrial isolation by a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. Additionally, we describe a method for submitochondrial fractionation, performed by phosphate buffer mediated swelling/shrinking. p53 and other mitochondrial proteins can then be detected by standard immunoblotting procedures. The quality of mitochondrial isolates/subfractions can be verified for purity and intactness.

  8. Loss of p53 Ser18 and Atm results in embryonic lethality without cooperation in tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Armata

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation at murine Serine 18 (human Serine 15 is a critical regulatory process for the tumor suppressor function of p53. p53Ser18 residue is a substrate for ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM and ATM-related (ATR protein kinases. Studies of mice with a germ-line mutation that replaces Ser18 with Ala (p53(S18A mice have demonstrated that loss of phosphorylation of p53Ser18 leads to the development of tumors, including lymphomas, fibrosarcomas, leukemia and leiomyosarcomas. The predominant lymphoma is B-cell lymphoma, which is in contrast to the lymphomas observed in Atm(-/- animals. This observation and the fact that multiple kinases phosphorylate p53Ser18 suggest Atm-independent tumor suppressive functions of p53Ser18. Therefore, in order to examine p53Ser18 function in relationship to ATM, we analyzed the lifespan and tumorigenesis of mice with combined mutations in p53Ser18 and Atm. Surprisingly, we observed no cooperation in survival and tumorigenesis in compound p53(S18A and Atm(-/- animals. However, we observed embryonic lethality in the compound mutant animals. In addition, the homozygous p53Ser18 mutant allele impacted the weight of Atm(-/- animals. These studies examine the genetic interaction of p53Ser18 and Atm in vivo. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate a role of p53Ser18 in regulating embryonic survival and motor coordination.

  9. Dial 9-1-1 for p53: Mechanisms of p53 Activation by Cellular Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Ljungman, Mats

    2000-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein, p53, is part of the cell's emergency team that is called upon following cellular insult. How do cells sense DNA damage and other cellular stresses and what signal transduction pathways are used to alert p53? How is the resulting nuclear accumulation of p53 accomplished and what determines the outcome of p53 induction? Many posttranslational modifications of p53, such as phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, acetylation and ribosylation, have been shown to occur fol...

  10. p53 mutations in urinary bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Berggren, P; Steineck, G; Adolfsson, J; Hansson, J; Jansson, O; Larsson, P; Sandstedt, B; Wijkstr?m, H; Hemminki, K

    2001-01-01

    We have screened for mutations in exons 5?8 of the p53 gene in a series consisting of 189 patients with urinary bladder neoplasms. 82 (44%) neoplasms were lowly malignant (Ta, G1?G2a) and 106 (56%) were highly malignant (G2b?G4 or ?T1). Only one mutation was in a lowly malignant urinary bladder neoplasm, in total we found p53 mutations in 26 (14%) of the 189 patients. 30% of the samples had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for one or both of the p53 exogenic (CA)n repeat and the p53 intragenic (A...

  11. Lysosomal destabilization in p53-induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei; Dalen, Helge; Lotem, Joseph; Kama, Rachel; Sachs, Leo; Brunk, Ulf T.

    2002-01-01

    The tumor suppressor wild-type p53 can induce apoptosis. M1-t-p53 myeloid leukemic cells have a temperature-sensitive p53 protein that changes its conformation to wild-type p53 after transfer from 37°C to 32°C. We have now found that these cells showed an early lysosomal rupture after transfer to 32°C. Mitochondrial damage, including decreased membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, and the appearance of apoptotic cells occurred later. Lysosomal rupture, mitochondrial damage, and apop...

  12. p53 regulates cytoskeleton remodeling to suppress tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Keigo; Ebata, Takahiro; Guo, Alvin Kunyao; Tobiume, Kei; Wolf, Steven John; Kawauchi, Keiko

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cells possess unique characteristics such as invasiveness, the ability to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and an inherent stemness. Cell morphology is altered during these processes and this is highly dependent on actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is, therefore, important for determination of cell fate. Mutations within the TP53 (tumor suppressor p53) gene leading to loss or gain of function (GOF) of the protein are often observed in aggressive cancer cells. Here, we highlight the roles of p53 and its GOF mutants in cancer cell invasion from the perspective of the actin cytoskeleton; in particular its reorganization and regulation by cell adhesion molecules such as integrins and cadherins. We emphasize the multiple functions of p53 in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton remodeling in response to the extracellular microenvironment, and oncogene activation. Such an approach provides a new perspective in the consideration of novel targets for anti-cancer therapy.

  13. An adaptive molecular timer in p53-meidated cell fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Ping; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    The tumor suppressor p53 decides cellular outcomes in the DNA damage response. It is intriguing to explore the link between p53 dynamics and cell fates. We developed a theoretical model of p53 signaling network to clarify the mechanism of cell fate decision mediated by its dynamics. We found that the interplay between p53-Mdm2 negative feedback loop and p53-PTEN-Mdm2 positive feedback loop shapes p53 dynamics. Depending on the intensity of DNA damage, p53 shows three modes of dynamics: persistent pulses, two-phase dynamics with pulses followed by sustained high levels and straightforward high levels. Especially, p53 shows two-phase dynamics upon moderated damage and the required number of p53 pulses before apoptosis induction decreases with increasing DNA damage. Our results suggested there exists an adaptive molecular timer that determines whether and when the apoptosis switch should be triggered. We clarified the mechanism behind the switching of p53 dynamical modes by bifurcation analysis. Moreover, we reproduced the experimental results that drug additions alter p53 pulses to sustained p53 activation and leads to senescence. Our work may advance the understanding the significance of p53 dynamics in tumor suppression. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175084, 11204126 and 31361163003).

  14. p53 as a retrovirus-induced oxidative stress modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Wong, Paul K Y

    2015-01-01

    Infection of astrocytes by the neuropathogenic mutant of Moloney murine leukemia virus, ts1, exhibits increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and signs of oxidative stress compared with uninfected astrocytes. Previously, we have demonstrated that ts1 infection caused two separate events of ROS upregulation. The first upregulation occurs during early viral establishment in host cells and the second during the virus-mediated apoptotic process. In this study, we show that virus-mediated ROS upregulation activates the protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated, which in turn phosphorylates serine 15 on p53. This activation of p53 however, is unlikely associated with ts1-induced cell death. Rather p53 appears to be involved in suppressing intracellular ROS levels in astrocytes under oxidative stress. The activated p53 appears to delay retroviral gene expression by suppressing NADPH oxidase, a superoxide-producing enzyme. These results suggest that p53 plays a role as a retrovirus-mediated oxidative stress modulator. © 2015 The Authors.

  15. Expression of p53 in oligodendrogliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Kros (Johan); J.J.C.J. Godschalk (J. J C J); K.K. Krishnadath (Kausilia); C.G. van Eden (C.)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe expression of the nuclear protein p53 in oligodendrogliomas was investigated by immunohistochemistry, using a monoclonal anti-p53 antibody (DO-7) on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material in 84 histologically verified cases, and compared with the histopathological grade and

  16. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Zaika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40. Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections.

  17. Small-molecule CB002 restores p53 pathway signaling and represses colorectal cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Colby; Zhang, Shengliang; Hernandez Borrero, Liz J; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2017-09-17

    Much effort is currently focused on the p53 pathway. p53 is a key tumor suppressor, which is mutated or lost in many human cancers. Restoration of the p53 pathway holds the potential to induce selective cell death in tumor cells without harming normal cells that have intact p53 pathways. Most tumor cells express mutated p53 or suppress p53 by overexpression of MDM2. In this study, a compound referred to as CB002 with one closely related compound from the Chembridge library were evaluated for tumor cytotoxicity without affecting normal cells by restoration of the p53 pathway. A decrease of mutant p53 protein expression, restoration of inactivated p53, or some activation of p73 are candidate mechanisms this agent could cause tumor cell apoptosis and growth arrest. We further show that CB002 activates p53 pathway signaling in part via p73 in p53 mutant cancer cell lines. However, it is important to note that we have not established a role for p73 in the anti-tumor effect of CB002 or R1. CB002 causes tumor cell death with synergistic effects with traditional chemotherapeutics CPT-11 and 5-FU.

  18. Both p53-PUMA/NOXA-Bax-mitochondrion and p53-p21cip1 pathways are involved in the CDglyTK-mediated tumor cell suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhendong, E-mail: zdyu@hotmail.com [Department of Clinical laboratory, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Guangdong (China); Wang, Hao [Department of pathology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Libin; Tang, Aifa; Zhai, Qinna; Wen, Jianxiang; Yao, Li [Department of Clinical laboratory, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Guangdong (China); Li, Pengfei, E-mail: lipengfei@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of pathology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2009-09-04

    CDglyTK fusion suicide gene has been well characterized to effectively kill tumor cells. However, the exact mechanism and downstream target genes are not fully understood. In our study, we found that CDglyTK/prodrug treatment works more efficiently in p53 wild-type (HONE1) cells than in p53 mutant (CNE1) cells. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system to either knockdown or overexpress p53 and its target genes in these cells. Consistent results showed that both p53-PUMA/NOXA/Bcl2-Bax and p53-p21 pathways contribute to the CDglyTK induced tumor cell suppression. Our work for the first time addressed the role of p53 related genes in the CDglyTK/prodrug system.

  19. p53, oxidative stress, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongping; Xu, Yang

    2011-09-15

    Mammalian aging is associated with elevated levels of oxidative damage of DNA, proteins, and lipids as a result of unbalanced prooxidant and antioxidant activities. Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidative stress is a major physiological inducer of aging. p53, the guardian of the genome that is important for cellular responses to oxidative stresses, might be a key coordinator of oxidative stress and aging. In response to low levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits antioxidant activities to eliminate oxidative stress and ensure cell survival; in response to high levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits pro-oxidative activities that further increase the levels of stresses, leading to cell death. p53 accomplishes these context-dependent roles by regulating the expression of a panel of genes involved in cellular responses to oxidative stresses and by modulating other pathways important for oxidative stress responses. The mechanism that switches p53 function from antioxidant to prooxidant remains unclear, but could account for the findings that increased p53 activities have been linked to both accelerated aging and increased life span in mice. Therefore, a balance of p53 antioxidant and prooxidant activities in response to oxidative stresses could be important for longevity by suppressing the accumulation of oxidative stresses and DNA damage.

  20. Toca-1 is suppressed by p53 to limit breast cancer cell invasion and tumor metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Harish; Brien, Colin D; Truesdell, Peter; Watt, Kathleen; Meens, Jalna; Schick, Colleen; Germain, Doris; Craig, Andrew W B

    2014-12-30

    Transducer of Cdc42-dependent actin assembly-1 (Toca-1) recruits actin regulatory proteins to invadopodia, and promotes breast tumor metastasis. Since metastatic breast tumors frequently harbor mutations in the tumor suppressor p53, we tested whether p53 regulates Toca-1 expression. Normal mammary epithelial cells (HBL-100, MCF10A) and breast cancer cell lines expressing wild-type (WT) p53 (DU4475, MTLn3) were treated with camptothecin or Nutlin-3 to stabilize p53 to test effects on Toca-1 mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were performed to identify p53 binding site in Toca-1 gene. Stable silencing of p53 and Toca-1 were performed in MTLn3 cells to test effects on invadopodia and cell invasion in vitro, and tumor metastasis in vivo. We observed that breast cancer cell lines with mutant p53 have high levels of Toca-1 compared to those with WT p53. Stabilization of WT p53 led to further reduction in Toca-1 mRNA and protein levels in normal breast epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. ChIP assays revealed p53 binding within intron 2 of toca1, and reduced histone acetylation within its promoter region upon p53 upregulation or activation. Stable silencing of WT p53 in MTLn3 cells led to increased extracellular matrix degradation and cell invasion compared to control cells. Interestingly, the combined silencing of p53 and Toca-1 led to a partial rescue of these effects of p53 silencing in vitro and reduced lung metastases in mice. In human breast tumors, Toca-1 levels were high in subtypes with frequent p53 mutations, and high Toca-1 transcript levels correlated with increased risk of relapse. Based on these findings, we conclude that loss of p53 tumor suppressor function in breast cancers leads to upregulation of Toca-1, and results in enhanced risk of developing metastatic disease.

  1. Targeting the p53 signaling pathway in cancer therapy - The promises, challenges, and perils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegh, Alexander H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Research over the past three decades has identified p53 as a multifunctional transcription factor, which regulates the expression of >2,500 target genes. p53 impacts myriad, highly diverse cellular processes, including the maintenance of genomic stability and fidelity, metabolism, longevity, and represents one of the most important and extensively studied tumor suppressors. Activated by various stresses, foremost genotoxic damage, hypoxia, heat shock and oncogenic assault, p53 blocks cancer progression by provoking transient or permanent growth arrest, by enabling DNA repair or by advancing cellular death programs. This potent and versatile anti-cancer activity profile, together with genomic and mutational analyses documenting inactivation of p53 in more than 50% of human cancers, motivated drug development efforts to (re-) activate p53 in established tumors. Areas covered In this review the complexities of p53 signaling in cancer are summarized. Current strategies and challenges to restore p53’s tumor suppressive function in established tumors, i.e. adenoviral gene transfer and small molecules to activate p53, to inactivate p53 inhibitors and to restore wild type function of p53 mutant proteins are discussed. Expert opinion It is indubitable that p53 represents an attractive target for the development of anti-cancer therapies. Whether p53 is ‘druggable’, however, remains an area of active research and discussion, as p53 has pro-survival functions and chronic p53 activation accelerates aging, which may compromise the long-term homeostasis of an organism. Thus, the complex biology and dual functions of p53 in cancer prevention and age-related cellular responses pose significant challenges on the development of p53-targeting cancer therapies. PMID:22239435

  2. Mechanisms of p53-Mediated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    terminus. Cell 81:1021–1029. 27. Juan , L. J., W. J. Shia, M. H. Chen, W. M. Yang, E. Seto, Y. S. Lin, and C. W. VOL. 25, 2005 THE C TERMINUS REGULATES p53...functionally resembles p53. Nat. Med. 4:839–843. 45. Pariat, M., S. Carillo, M. Molinari, C. Salvat , L. Debussche, L. Bracco, J. Milner, and M. Piechaczyk. 1997...apoptosis. Nature 2000;408:377-81. 27. Juan LJ, Shia WJ, Chen MH, et al. Histone deacetylases specifically down-regulate p53- dependent gene

  3. [Expression of protein p53 in workers occupationally exposed to benzidine and bladder cancer patients.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun-lin; Xiang, Cui-qin; Zhang, Yun-ying; Qin, Yi-qiu; Liu, Cha-qin; Chen, Ji-gang; Zhang, Sheng-nian

    2005-02-01

    To study expression of mutant p53 protein in workers occupationally exposed to benzidine and bladder cancer patients. Mutant p53 protein in serum from the workers occupationally exposed to benzidine and bladder cancer patients were determined with Immuno-PCR, while exfoliated urothelial cells in the urine samples were classified with Papanicolau grading. Positive rate of mutant p53 protein increased with the exposed intensity index in workers occupationally exposed to benzidine. The positive rate of mutant p53 protein in bladder cancer patients (83.3%) was significantly higher than that in the group 1 of exposed intensity index. The average scanning integrals of PCR amplified band in the group of bladder cancer patients and group 2 of exposed intensity index were both higher than that in the group 1 significantly. Workers in the groups of different exposed intensity indices were further stratified according to Papanicolau grades. In the group 2 of exposed intensity index, the average scanning integrals of PCR amplified band in the stratum of Papanicolau grade II and III were significantly higher than that in the strata of Papanicolau grade I. And in the group 3 of exposed intensity index, the positive rate of mutant p53 protein in the strata of Papanicolau grade III was higher than that in the strata of Papanicolau grade I significantly. The increase of exposed intensity may not only result in the positive rate of mutant p53 protein, but also the quantity of mutant p53 protein in serum within the low range of benzidine exposure. Once the exposed intensity was beyond that spectrum, the positive rate of mutant p53 protein in serum and the average scanning integrals of PCR amplified band were no longer enhanced with the increase of exposed intensity. There was tight correlation between Papanicolau grade of exfoliated urothelial cells and the positive rate or the quantity of mutant p53 protein for the higher benzidine exposure intensity.

  4. Nutlin-3 downregulates p53 phosphorylation on serine392 and induces apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xinli; Liu, Jingli; Ren, Laifeng; Mao, Nan; Tan, Fang; Ding, Nana; Yang, Jing; Li, Mingyuan

    2014-04-01

    Drug-resistance and imbalance of apoptotic regulation limit chemotherapy clinical application for the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. The reactivation of p53 is an attractive therapeutic strategy in cancer with disrupted-p53 function. Nutlin-3, a MDM2 antagonist, has antitumor activity in various cancers. The post-translational modifications of p53 are a hot topic, but there are some controversy ideas about the function of phospho-Ser392-p53 protein in cancer cell lines in response to Nutlin-3. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between Nutlin-3 and phospho-Ser392-p53 protein expression levels in SMMC-7721 (wild-type TP53) and HuH-7 cells (mutant TP53). We demonstrated that Nutlin-3 induced apoptosis through down-regulation phospho-Ser392-p53 in two HCC cells. The result suggests that inhibition of p53 phosphorylation on Ser392 presents an alternative for HCC chemotherapy.

  5. Proteasomal degradation of p53 by human papillomavirus E6 oncoprotein relies on the structural integrity of p53 core domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Bernard

    Full Text Available The E6 oncoprotein produced by high-risk mucosal HPV stimulates ubiquitinylation and proteasome-dependent degradation of the tumour suppressor p53 via formation of a trimeric complex comprising E6, p53, and E6-AP. p53 is also degraded by its main cellular regulator MDM2. The main binding site of p53 to MDM2 is situated in the natively unfolded N-terminal region of p53. By contrast, the regions of p53 implicated in the degradation by viral E6 are not fully identified to date. Here we generated a series of mutations (Y103G, Y107G, T155A, T155V, T155D, L264A, L265A targeting the central folded core domain of p53 within a region opposite to its DNA-binding site. We analysed by in vitro and in vivo assays the impact of these mutations on p53 degradation mediated by viral E6 oncoprotein. Whereas all mutants remained susceptible to MDM2-mediated degradation, several of them (Y103G, Y107G, T155D, L265A became resistant to E6-mediated degradation, confirming previous works that pointed to the core domain as an essential region for the degradation of p53. In parallel, we systematically checked the impact of the mutations on the transactivation activity of p53 as well as on the conformation of p53, analysed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, circular dichroism (CD, and antibody probing. These measurements suggested that the conformational integrity of the core domain is an essential parameter for the degradation of p53 by E6, while it is not essential for the degradation of p53 by MDM2. Thus, the intracellular stability of a protein may or may not rely on its biophysical stability depending on the degradation pathway taken into consideration.

  6. AdDelta24 and the p53-expressing variant AdDelta24-p53 achieve potent anti-tumor activity in glioma when combined with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idema, Sander; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Noske, David P; Heukelom, Stan; Moeniralm, Sharif; Gerritsen, Winald R; Vandertop, W Peter; Dirven, Clemens M F

    2007-12-01

    The conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAd) AdDelta24-p53 replicates selectively in Rb mutant cells, and encodes the p53 suppressor protein. It has shown improved oncolytic potency compared to the parental control AdDelta24. As exogenous p53 has been shown to enhance radiosensitivity, the combination of AdDelta24-p53 and AdDelta24 with radiotherapy was assessed in vitro and in vivo against the therapy resistant gliomas. In glioma cells, multicellular spheroids and animal xenografts the efficacy of combination therapy was assessed. P53 phosphorylation, induction of apoptosis and viral replication were determined following single or combination therapies. In vitro, AdDelta24-p53 was more effective against glioma cells than the control AdDelta24. Addition of irradiation equally increased the efficacy of both AdDelta24-p53 and AdDelta24 resulting in improved oncolysis compared to single agent treatment. Radiotherapy did not significantly change the replication kinetics of AdDelta24-p53 or AdDelta24. No detectable increase in p53 phosphorylation was observed but combination of radiotherapy and AdDelta24-p53 caused an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. In vivo, combination therapy with either AdDelta24 or AdDelta24-p53 significantly increased the number of mice demonstrating tumor regression (100%) as well as long-term survival (50%). No differences between viruses were noted. Exogenous p53 expression does not appear to increase the synergistic interaction of CRAds combined with radiotherapy. These results however do indicate that radiotherapy provides the time frame in which AdDelta24 and AdDelta24-p53 can eradicate established tumors that would otherwise escape treatment, and establishes the need to combine these modalities to form an effective anti-cancer treatment.

  7. p53 switches off pluripotency on differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tongxiang; Lin, Yi

    2017-02-28

    The role of p53 as "a guardian of the genome" has been well established in somatic cells. However, its role in pluripotent stem cells remains much more elusive. Here, we discuss research progress in understanding the role of p53 in pluripotent stem cells and in pluripotent stem cell-like cancer stem cells. The p53 protein, which plays a key role in embryonic stem cells, was first discovered in 2005. Landmark studies of p53-related reprogramming elucidated this protein's importance in induced pluripotent stem cells in 2009. The p53-related safety concerns in pluripotent stem cells have been raised in stem cell-based therapy although the use of iPSCs in therapeutic application is promising. Because cancer stem cells have profiles similar to those of pluripotent stem cells, we also describe potential strategies for studies in cancer stem cells and cancer treatments. The new discoveries of p53 family proteins in pluripotent stem cells have made possible stable progress in stem cell transplantation efficiency and safety, as well as treatment strategies targeting cancer stem cells based on pluripotent stem cell technology.

  8. The MDM2-p53 pathway revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Subhasree; Qin, Jiangjiang; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.; Wang, Minghai; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2013-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a key transcription factor regulating cellular pathways such as DNA repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and senescence. It acts as an important defense mechanism against cancer onset and progression, and is negatively regulated by interaction with the oncoprotein MDM2. In human cancers, the TP53 gene is frequently mutated or deleted, or the wild-type p53 function is inhibited by high levels of MDM2, leading to downregulation of tumor suppressive p53 pathways. Thus, the inhibition of MDM2-p53 interaction presents an appealing therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. However, recent studies have revealed the MDM2-p53 interaction to be more complex involving multiple levels of regulation by numerous cellular proteins and epigenetic mechanisms, making it imperative to reexamine this intricate interplay from a holistic viewpoint. This review aims to highlight the multifaceted network of molecules regulating the MDM2-p53 axis to better understand the pathway and exploit it for anticancer therapy. PMID:23885265

  9. Interaction between transactivation domain of p53 and middle part of TBP-like protein (TLP is involved in TLP-stimulated and p53-activated transcription from the p21 upstream promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Maeda

    Full Text Available TBP-like protein (TLP is involved in transcriptional activation of an upstream promoter of the human p21 gene. TLP binds to p53 and facilitates p53-activated transcription from the upstream promoter. In this study, we clarified that in vitro affinity between TLP and p53 is about one-third of that between TBP and p53. Extensive mutation analyses revealed that the TLP-stimulated function resides in transcription activating domain 1 (TAD1 in the N-terminus of p53. Among the mutants, #22.23, which has two amino acid substitutions in TAD1, exhibited a typical mutant phenotype. Moreover, #22.23 exhibited the strongest mutant phenotype for TLP-binding ability. It is thus thought that TLP-stimulated and p53-dependent transcriptional activation is involved in TAD1 binding of TLP. #22.23 had a decreased transcriptional activation function, especially for the upstream promoter of the endogenous p21 gene, compared with wild-type p53. This mutant did not facilitate p53-dependent growth repression and etoposide-mediated cell-death as wild-type p53 does. Moreover, mutation analysis revealed that middle part of TLP, which is requited for p53 binding, is involved in TLP-stimulated and p53-dependent promoter activation and cell growth repression. These results suggest that activation of the p21 upstream promoter is mediated by interaction between specific regions of TLP and p53.

  10. A unique role for p53 in the regulation of M2 macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Ng, D S W; Mah, W-C; Almeida, F F; Rahmat, S A; Rao, V K; Leow, S C; Laudisi, F; Peh, M T; Goh, A M; Lim, J S Y; Wright, G D; Mortellaro, A; Taneja, R; Ginhoux, F; Lee, C G; Moore, P K; Lane, D P

    2015-01-01

    P53 is critically important in preventing oncogenesis but its role in inflammation in general and in the function of inflammatory macrophages in particular is not clear. Here, we show that bone marrow-derived macrophages exhibit endogenous p53 activity, which is increased when macrophages are polarized to the M2 (alternatively activated macrophage) subtype. This leads to reduced expression of M2 genes. Nutlin-3a, which destabilizes the p53/MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) complex, promotes p53 activation and further downregulates M2 gene expression. In contrast, increased expression of M2 genes was apparent in M2-polarized macrophages from p53-deficient and p53 mutant mice. Furthermore, we show, in mice, that p53 also regulates M2 polarization in peritoneal macrophages from interleukin-4-challenged animals and that nutlin-3a retards the development of tolerance to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. P53 acts via transcriptional repression of expression of c-Myc (v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog) gene by directly associating with its promoter. These data establish a role for the p53/MDM2/c-MYC axis as a physiological ‘brake' to the M2 polarization process. This work reveals a hitherto unknown role for p53 in macrophages, provides further insight into the complexities of macrophage plasticity and raises the possibility that p53-activating drugs, many of which are currently being trialled clinically, may have unforeseen effects on macrophage function. PMID:25526089

  11. An N-terminal Region of Mot-2 Binds to p53 In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Kaul, Sunil C.; Reddel, Roger R.; Mitsui, Youji; Wadhwa, Renu

    2001-01-01

    The mouse mot-2 protein was earlier shown to bind to the tumor suppressor protein, p53. The mot-2 binding site of p53 was mapped to C-terminal amino acid residues 312–352, which includes the cytoplasmic sequestration domain. In the present study, we have found that both mot-1 and mot-2 bind to p53 in vitro. By using His-tagged deletion mutant proteins, the p53-binding domain of mot-2 was mapped to its Nterminal amino acid residues 253–282, which are identical in mot-1 and mot-2 proteins. Some...

  12. Mdm2 RING mutation enhances p53 transcriptional activity and p53-p300 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary V Clegg

    Full Text Available The p53 transcription factor and tumor suppressor is regulated primarily by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which ubiquitinates p53 to target it for proteasomal degradation. Aside from its ubiquitin ligase function, Mdm2 has been believed to be capable of suppressing p53's transcriptional activity by binding with and masking the transactivation domain of p53. The ability of Mdm2 to restrain p53 activity by binding alone, without ubiquitination, was challenged by a 2007 study using a knockin mouse harboring a single cysteine-to-alanine point mutation (C462A in Mdm2's RING domain. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts with this mutation, which abrogates Mdm2's E3 ubiquitin ligase activity without affecting its ability to bind with p53, were unable to suppress p53 activity. In this study, we utilized the Mdm2(C462A mouse model to characterize in further detail the role of Mdm2's RING domain in the control of p53. Here, we show in vivo that the Mdm2(C462A protein not only fails to suppress p53, but compared to the complete absence of Mdm2, Mdm2(C462A actually enhances p53 transcriptional activity toward p53 target genes p21/CDKN1A, MDM2, BAX, NOXA, and 14-3-3σ. In addition, we found that Mdm2(C462A facilitates the interaction between p53 and the acetyltransferase CBP/p300, and it fails to heterodimerize with its homolog and sister regulator of p53, Mdmx, suggesting that a fully intact RING domain is required for Mdm2's inhibition of the p300-p53 interaction and for its interaction with Mdmx. These findings help us to better understand the complex regulation of the Mdm2-p53 pathway and have important implications for chemotherapeutic agents targeting Mdm2, as they suggest that inhibition of Mdm2's E3 ubiquitin ligase activity may be sufficient for increasing p53 activity in vivo, without the need to block Mdm2-p53 binding.

  13. Aurora A mediates cross-talk between N- and C-terminal post-translational modifications of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Sally Anne; Milner, Jo

    2011-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase Aurora A is known to interact with and phosphorylate tumor suppressor p53 at Serine 215 (S215), inhibiting the transcriptional activity of p53. We show that Aurora A positively regulates human p53 protein levels and, using isogenic p53 wild-type and p53-null colorectal carcinoma cells, further show that p53 regulates human Aurora A protein expression. S215 is located in the DNA-binding core of p53 and at the center of the cryptic epitope for PAb240 antibody, which is used to detect mutant and denatured p53. Following denaturing SDS PAGE, the PAb240 epitope was detectable by immunoblotting in only two out of eight cell lines. The efficacy of novel p53-targeted anticancer therapies may be influenced by the conformational state of p53, therefore, the initial determination of p53 status may be relevant. We found no correlation between phosphorylation of p53 at S215 and PAb240 antibody recognition. However, phosphorylation at S37 was positively associated with PAb240 reactivity. More importantly, we provide the first evidence of Aurora A-mediated cross-talk between N- and C-terminal p53 post-translational modifications. As p53 and Aurora A are targets for anticancer therapy the impact of their reciprocal relationship and Aurora A-induced post-translational modification of p53 should be considered. PMID:22157150

  14. p53-dependent non-coding RNA networks in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, C J; Hotz-Wagenblatt, A; Hüllein, J; Sellner, L; Jethwa, A; Stolz, T; Slabicki, M; Lee, K; Sharathchandra, A; Benner, A; Dietrich, S; Oakes, C C; Dreger, P; te Raa, D; Kater, A P; Jauch, A; Merkel, O; Oren, M; Hielscher, T; Zenz, T

    2015-10-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor p53 lead to chemotherapy resistance and a dismal prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Whereas p53 targets are used to identify patient subgroups with impaired p53 function, a comprehensive assessment of non-coding RNA targets of p53 in CLL is missing. We exploited the impaired transcriptional activity of mutant p53 to map out p53 targets in CLL by small RNA sequencing. We describe the landscape of p53-dependent microRNA/non-coding RNA induced in response to DNA damage in CLL. Besides the key p53 target miR-34a, we identify a set of p53-dependent microRNAs (miRNAs; miR-182-5p, miR-7-5p and miR-320c/d). In addition to miRNAs, the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) nuclear enriched abundant transcript 1 (NEAT1) and long intergenic non-coding RNA p21 (lincRNA-p21) are induced in response to DNA damage in the presence of functional p53 but not in CLL with p53 mutation. Induction of NEAT1 and lincRNA-p21 are closely correlated to the induction of cell death after DNA damage. We used isogenic lymphoma cell line models to prove p53 dependence of NEAT1 and lincRNA-p21. The current work describes the p53-dependent miRNome and identifies lncRNAs NEAT1 and lincRNA-p21 as novel elements of the p53-dependent DNA damage response machinery in CLL and lymphoma.

  15. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing of Biorecognition Interactions within the Tumor Suppressor p53 Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Cannistraro, Salvatore; Bizzarri, Anna Rita

    2017-11-20

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique to study the kinetics of biomolecules undergoing biorecognition processes, particularly suited for protein-protein interactions of biomedical interest. The potentiality of SPR was exploited to sense the interactions occurring within the network of the tumor suppressor p53, which is crucial for maintaining genome integrity and whose function is inactivated, mainly by down regulation or by mutation, in the majority of human tumors. This study includes p53 down-regulators, p53 mutants and also the p53 family members, p63 and p73, which could vicariate p53 protective function. Furthermore, the application of SPR was extended to sense the interaction of p53 with anti-cancer drugs, which might restore p53 function. An extended review of previous published work and unpublished kinetic data is provided, dealing with the interaction between the p53 family members, or their mutants and two anticancer molecules, Azurin and its cell-penetrating peptide, p28. All the kinetic results are discussed in connection with those obtained by a complementary approach operating at the single molecule level, namely Atomic Force Spectroscopy and the related literature data. The overview of the SPR kinetic results may significantly contribute to a deeper understanding of the interactions within p53 network, also in the perspective of designing suitable anticancer drugs.

  16. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing of Biorecognition Interactions within the Tumor Suppressor p53 Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Moscetti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR is a powerful technique to study the kinetics of biomolecules undergoing biorecognition processes, particularly suited for protein-protein interactions of biomedical interest. The potentiality of SPR was exploited to sense the interactions occurring within the network of the tumor suppressor p53, which is crucial for maintaining genome integrity and whose function is inactivated, mainly by down regulation or by mutation, in the majority of human tumors. This study includes p53 down-regulators, p53 mutants and also the p53 family members, p63 and p73, which could vicariate p53 protective function. Furthermore, the application of SPR was extended to sense the interaction of p53 with anti-cancer drugs, which might restore p53 function. An extended review of previous published work and unpublished kinetic data is provided, dealing with the interaction between the p53 family members, or their mutants and two anticancer molecules, Azurin and its cell-penetrating peptide, p28. All the kinetic results are discussed in connection with those obtained by a complementary approach operating at the single molecule level, namely Atomic Force Spectroscopy and the related literature data. The overview of the SPR kinetic results may significantly contribute to a deeper understanding of the interactions within p53 network, also in the perspective of designing suitable anticancer drugs.

  17. Hsf1 Is Required for the Nuclear Translocation of p53 Tumor Suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Li

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the p53 tumor suppressor is most frequently inactivated by genetic mutations, exclusion from the nucleus is also seen in human tumors. We have begun to examine p53 nuclear importation by isolating a series of mutant cells in which the temperature-sensitive murine p53Val135 mutant is sequestered in the cytoplasm. We previously showed that that three of them (ALTR12, ALTR19, and ALTR25 constituted a single complementation group. Here, we found that ALTR12 cells are more sensitive to heat stress than either ALTR19 or ALTR25 and that there was a complete lack of induction of Hsp70 in response to heat shock. Western blot analysis showed no expression of the Hsf1 transcription factor, and neither heat shock nor azetidine could induce p53 nuclear localization in ALTR12 cells but did in parental A1–5 cells. Suppression of Hsf1 in A1–5 cells with quercetin or an Hsf1 siRNA reduced p53 nuclear importation and inhibited p53-mediated activation of a p21 reporter. Most convincingly, p53 nuclear importation could be restored in ALTR12 cells by introducing an exogenous Hsf1 gene. Collectively, our result suggests that Hsf1 is required for p53 nuclear importation and activation and implies that heat shock factors play a role in the regulation of p53.

  18. HPV and p53 in cervical cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Ngan, H Y; Stanley, M; Liu, S S; Ma, H K

    1994-01-01

    Objective - To determine the prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 E6 by DNA detection and p53 abnormal protein expression in cervical cancers in Hong Kong. Materials and methods - Seventy-three squamous cell cervical cancer biopsy were analysed. Detection of HPV DNA was carried out by the polymerase chain reaction and Southern blotting (PCR/SB) technique using primers to the HPV16 and 18 E6 region and consensus primers to the L1 region. Abnormal expression of the p53 protein was detected by immunohist...

  19. A novel dysfunctional p53 mutation in the human neuroblastoma cell line TGW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Hisahiko; Arita, Michitsune; Min, Zhenghua; Zhong, Xioling; Iwasaki, Iwao; Hirano, Keihachiro; Shimatake, Hiroyuki; Hemmi, Hiromichi

    2003-12-01

    Mutations of p53 are rare in primary and advanced neuroblastomas. The p53 gene was studied in a TGW cell line established from a TNB1 xenograft, derived from metastasized neuroblastoma. The p53 protein level in TGW was elevated at baseline. Treatment with doxorubicin to induce genotoxic stress neither altered the p53 protein level nor induced p21 protein within 24 hours. DNA sequencing analysis revealed a novel triplet deletion mutation at codon 282 (R282del) of the p53 gene, a mutation also found in TNB1, indicating that the mutation occurred in the relapsed tumor. The mutant was incapable of transactivation and had no effect on the transactivational activity of the wild-type p53 gene product in reporter assays using a plasmid possessing a p53 responsive element of p21, bax or mdm2. These results suggest that the mutant p53R282del found in TGW is a non-functional mutant and has no dominant negative nature.

  20. The p53HMM algorithm: using profile hidden markov models to detect p53-responsive genes

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    Yu Xin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A computational method (called p53HMM is presented that utilizes Profile Hidden Markov Models (PHMMs to estimate the relative binding affinities of putative p53 response elements (REs, both p53 single-sites and cluster-sites. These models incorporate a novel "Corresponded Baum-Welch" training algorithm that provides increased predictive power by exploiting the redundancy of information found in the repeated, palindromic p53-binding motif. The predictive accuracy of these new models are compared against other predictive models, including position specific score matrices (PSSMs, or weight matrices. We also present a new dynamic acceptance threshold, dependent upon a putative binding site's distance from the Transcription Start Site (TSS and its estimated binding affinity. This new criteria for classifying putative p53-binding sites increases predictive accuracy by reducing the false positive rate. Results Training a Profile Hidden Markov Model with corresponding positions matching a combined-palindromic p53-binding motif creates the best p53-RE predictive model. The p53HMM algorithm is available on-line: http://tools.csb.ias.edu Conclusion Using Profile Hidden Markov Models with training methods that exploit the redundant information of the homotetramer p53 binding site provides better predictive models than weight matrices (PSSMs. These methods may also boost performance when applied to other transcription factor binding sites.

  1. Urodele p53 tolerates amino acid changes found in p53 variants linked to human cancer

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    Villiard Éric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urodele amphibians like the axolotl are unique among vertebrates in their ability to regenerate and their resistance to develop cancers. It is unknown whether these traits are linked at the molecular level. Results Blocking p53 signaling in axolotls using the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, inhibited limb regeneration and the expression of p53 target genes such as Mdm2 and Gadd45, suggesting a link between tumor suppression and regeneration. To understand this relationship we cloned the p53 gene from axolotl. When comparing its sequence with p53 from other organisms, and more specifically human we observed multiple amino acids changes found in human tumors. Phylogenetic analysis of p53 protein sequences from various species is in general agreement with standard vertebrate phylogeny; however, both mice-like rodents and teleost fishes are fast evolving. This leads to long branch attraction resulting in an artefactual basal emergence of these groups in the phylogenetic tree. It is tempting to assume a correlation between certain life style traits (e.g. lifespan and the evolutionary rate of the corresponding p53 sequences. Functional assays of the axolotl p53 in human or axolotl cells using p53 promoter reporters demonstrated a temperature sensitivity (ts, which was further confirmed by performing colony assays at 37°C. In addition, axolotl p53 was capable of efficient transactivation at the Hmd2 promoter but has moderate activity at the p21 promoter. Endogenous axolotl p53 was activated following UV irradiation (100 j/m2 or treatment with an alkylating agent as measured using serine 15 phosphorylation and the expression of the endogenous p53 target Gadd45. Conclusion Urodele p53 may play a role in regeneration and has evolved to contain multiple amino acid changes predicted to render the human protein defective in tumor suppression. Some of these mutations were probably selected to maintain p53 activity at low temperature. However

  2. Inactivation and inducible oncogenic mutation of p53 in gene targeted pigs.

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    Simon Leuchs

    Full Text Available Mutation of the tumor suppressor p53 plays a major role in human carcinogenesis. Here we describe gene-targeted porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and live pigs carrying a latent TP53(R167H mutant allele, orthologous to oncogenic human mutant TP53(R175H and mouse Trp53(R172H, that can be activated by Cre recombination. MSCs carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele were analyzed in vitro. Homozygous cells were p53 deficient, and on continued culture exhibited more rapid proliferation, anchorage independent growth, and resistance to the apoptosis-inducing chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin, all characteristic of cellular transformation. Cre mediated recombination activated the latent TP53(R167H allele as predicted, and in homozygous cells expressed mutant p53-R167H protein at a level ten-fold greater than wild-type MSCs, consistent with the elevated levels found in human cancer cells. Gene targeted MSCs were used for nuclear transfer and fifteen viable piglets were produced carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele in heterozygous form. These animals will allow study of p53 deficiency and expression of mutant p53-R167H to model human germline, or spontaneous somatic p53 mutation. This work represents the first inactivation and mutation of the gatekeeper tumor suppressor gene TP53 in a non-rodent mammal.

  3. Genistein induces apoptosis by stabilizing intracellular p53 protein through an APE1-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianwu; Zhang, Chong; Qing, Yi; Cheng, Yi; Jiang, Xiaolin; Li, Mengxia; Yang, Zhenzhou; Wang, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Genistein (GEN) has been previously shown to have a proapoptotic effect on cancer cells through a p53-dependent pathway, the mechanism of which remains unclear. One of its intracellular targets, APE1, protects against apoptosis under genotoxic stress and interacts with p53. In this current study, we explored the mechanism of the proapoptotic effect of GEN by examining the APE1-p53 protein-protein interaction. We initially showed that the p53 protein level was elevated in GEN-treated human non-small lung cancer A549 cells and cervical cancer HeLa cells. By examining both protein synthesis and degradation, we found that GEN enhances p53 intracellular stability by interfering with the interaction of APE1 and p53, which provided a plausible explanation for how GEN initiates apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that the interaction between APE1 and p53 is important for the degradation of p53 and is dependent on the redox domain of APE1 by utilizing the redox domain mutant APE1 C65A. Our data suggest that the degradation of wild-type p53 is blocked when the redox domain of APE1 is masked or interrupted. Based on this evidence, we hereby report a novel mechanism of p53 degradation through an APE1-mediated, redox-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An N-terminal Region of Mot-2 Binds to p53 In Vitro

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    Sunil C. Kaul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The mouse mot-2 protein was earlier shown to bind to the tumor suppressor protein, p53. The mot-2 binding site of p53 was mapped to C-terminal amino acid residues 312–352, which includes the cytoplasmic sequestration domain. In the present study, we have found that both mot-1 and mot-2 bind to p53 in vitro. By using His-tagged deletion mutant proteins, the p53-binding domain of mot-2 was mapped to its Nterminal amino acid residues 253–282, which are identical in mot-1 and mot-2 proteins. Some peptides containing the p53-binding region of mot-2 were able to compete with the full-length protein for p53 binding. The data provided rationale for in vitro binding of mot-1 and mot-2 proteins to p53 and supported the conclusion that inability of mot-1 protein to bind p53 in vivo depends on secondary structure or its binding to other cellular factors. Most interestingly, the p53-binding region of mot-2 was common to its MKT-077, a cationic dye that exhibits antitumor activity, binding region. Therefore it is most likely that MKT-077-induced nuclear translocation and restoration of wild-type p53 function in transformed cells takes place by a competitional mechanism.

  5. Oncogenic intra-p53 family member interactions in human cancers

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    Maria eFerraiuolo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The p53 gene family members p53, p73 and p63 display several isoforms derived from the presence of internal promoters and alternative splicing events. They are structural homologues but hold peculiar functional properties. p53, p73 and p63 are tumor suppressor genes that promote differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. p53, unlike p73 and p63, is frequently mutated in cancer often displaying oncogenic gain of function (GOF activities correlated with the induction of proliferation, invasion, chemoresistance and genomic instability in cancer cells. These oncogenic functions are promoted either by the aberrant transcriptional cooperation of mutant p53 (mutp53 with transcription cofactors (e.g., NF-Y, E2F1, Vitamin D Receptor (VDR, Ets-1, NF-kB and YAP or by the interaction with the p53 family members, p73 and p63, determining their functional inactivation. The instauration of these aberrant transcriptional networks leads to increased cell growth, low activation of DNA damage response pathways (DNA damage response (DDR, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs response, enhanced invasion and high chemoresistance to different conventional chemotherapeutic treatments. Several studies have clearly shown that different cancers harboring mutant p53 proteins exhibit a poor prognosis when compared to those carrying wild type p53 (wt-p53 protein. The interference of mutantp53/p73 and/or mutantp53/p63 interactions, thereby restoring p53, p73 and p63 tumor suppression functions, could be among the potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of mutant p53 human cancers.

  6. Diverse p53/DNA binding modes expand the repertoire of p53 response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Pratik; Beno, Itai; Xi, Zhiqun; Stein, Yan; Golovenko, Dmitrij; Kessler, Naama; Rotter, Varda; Shakked, Zippora; Haran, Tali E

    2017-10-03

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 acts as a transcription factor, binding sequence-specifically to defined DNA sites, thereby activating the expression of genes leading to diverse cellular outcomes. Canonical p53 response elements (REs) are made of two decameric half-sites separated by a variable number of base pairs (spacers). Fifty percent of all validated p53 REs contain spacers between 1 and 18 bp; however, their functional significance is unclear at present. Here, we show that p53 forms two different tetrameric complexes with consensus or natural REs, both with long spacers: a fully specific complex where two p53 dimers bind to two specific half-sites, and a hemispecific complex where one dimer binds to a specific half-site and the second binds to an adjacent spacer sequence. The two types of complexes have comparable binding affinity and specificity, as judged from binding competition against bulk genomic DNA. Structural analysis of the p53 REs in solution shows that these sites are not bent in both their free and p53-bound states when the two half-sites are either abutting or separated by spacers. Cell-based assay supports the physiological relevance of our findings. We propose that p53 REs with long spacers comprise separate specific half-sites that can lead to several different tetrameric complexes. This finding expands the universe of p53 binding sites and demonstrates that even isolated p53 half-sites can form tetrameric complexes. Moreover, it explains the manner in which p53 binds to clusters of more than one canonical binding site, common in many natural REs.

  7. WDR5 positively regulates p53 stability by inhibiting p53 ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qingqing; Li, Zengpeng; Chen, Jianming

    2017-05-27

    WD40 repeat protein WDR5 is a core component of the Set/MLL histone methyltransferase complex which catalyzes histone H3 Lys4 trimethylation and activates gene transcription in human cells. WDR5 promotes Set/MLL complex assembly and mediates the complex binding to Lys4-dimethylated histone H3 tail. Most earlier studies report that WDR5 exerts profound effects on various cellular and organismal processes mainly through epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. However, the functions of WDR5 in lung cancer remain largely unknown. Here, we report that WDR5 positively regulates p53 stability by inhibiting p53 ubiquitination in human lung cancer A549 cells. Overexpression of WDR5 dramatically increases p53 protein levels and its half-life in A549 cells, while depletion of WDR5 with WDR5-specific siRNAs significantly decreases p53 protein levels. We also observe that WDR5 is required for p53 induction in response to cisplatin treatment. Mechanistically, WDR5 colocalizes with p53 and inhibits p53 ubiquitination, resulting in p53 stabilization. Consequently, overexpression of WDR5 induces G1 phase arrest in A549 cells, and knocking down WDR5 by siRNAs reduces the population at G1 phase. Furthermore, p53 expression levels is at least in part determined by the p53 positive regulator WDR5 in some cancer cells. Taken together, these data suggest that WDR5 is directly involved in p53 signaling pathway. Our studies provide a new insight into WDR5 functions in A549 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. p53 transactivation and the impact of mutations, cofactors and small molecules using a simplified yeast-based screening system.

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    Virginia Andreotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The p53 tumor suppressor, which is altered in most cancers, is a sequence-specific transcription factor that is able to modulate the expression of many target genes and influence a variety of cellular pathways. Inactivation of the p53 pathway in cancer frequently occurs through the expression of mutant p53 protein. In tumors that retain wild type p53, the pathway can be altered by upstream modulators, particularly the p53 negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Given the many factors that might influence p53 function, including expression levels, mutations, cofactor proteins and small molecules, we expanded our previously described yeast-based system to provide the opportunity for efficient investigation of their individual and combined impacts in a miniaturized format. The system integrates i variable expression of p53 proteins under the finely tunable GAL1,10 promoter, ii single copy, chromosomally located p53-responsive and control luminescence reporters, iii enhanced chemical uptake using modified ABC-transporters, iv small-volume formats for treatment and dual-luciferase assays, and v opportunities to co-express p53 with other cofactor proteins. This robust system can distinguish different levels of expression of WT and mutant p53 as well as interactions with MDM2 or 53BP1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that the small molecules Nutlin and RITA could both relieve the MDM2-dependent inhibition of WT p53 transactivation function, while only RITA could impact p53/53BP1 functional interactions. PRIMA-1 was ineffective in modifying the transactivation capacity of WT p53 and missense p53 mutations. This dual-luciferase assay can, therefore, provide a high-throughput assessment tool for investigating a matrix of factors that can influence the p53 network, including the effectiveness of newly developed small molecules, on WT and tumor-associated p53 mutants as well as interacting proteins.

  9. S100A4 interacts with p53 in the nucleus and promotes p53 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orre, L M; Panizza, E; Kaminskyy, V O; Vernet, E; Gräslund, T; Zhivotovsky, B; Lehtiö, J

    2013-12-05

    S100A4 is a small calcium-binding protein that is commonly overexpressed in a range of different tumor types, and it is widely accepted that S100A4 has an important role in the process of cancer metastasis. In vitro binding assays has shown that S100A4 interacts with the tumor suppressor protein p53, indicating that S100A4 may have additional roles in tumor development. In the present study, we show that endogenous S100A4 and p53 interact in complex samples, and that the interaction increases after inhibition of MDM2-dependent p53 degradation using Nutlin-3A. Further, using proximity ligation assay, we show that the interaction takes place in the cell nucleus. S100A4 knockdown experiments in two p53 wild-type cell lines, A549 and HeLa, resulted in stabilization of p53 protein, indicating that S100A4 is promoting p53 degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that S100A4 knockdown leads to p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Thus, our data add a new layer to the oncogenic properties of S100A4 through its inhibition of p53-dependent processes.

  10. Extensive Post-translational Modification of Active and Inactivated Forms of Endogenous p53*

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHart, Caroline J.; Chahal, Jasdave S.; Flint, S. J.; Perlman, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein accumulates to very high concentrations in normal human fibroblasts infected by adenovirus type 5 mutants that cannot direct assembly of the viral E1B 55-kDa protein-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets p53 for degradation. Despite high concentrations of nuclear p53, the p53 transcriptional program is not induced in these infected cells. We exploited this system to examine select post-translational modifications (PTMs) present on a transcriptionally inert population of endogenous human p53, as well as on p53 activated in response to etoposide treatment of normal human fibroblasts. These forms of p53 were purified from whole cell lysates by means of immunoaffinity chromatography and SDS-PAGE, and peptides derived from them were subjected to nano-ultra-high-performance LC-MS and MS/MS analyses on a high-resolution accurate-mass MS platform (data available via ProteomeXchange, PXD000464). We identified an unexpectedly large number of PTMs, comprising phosphorylation of Ser and Thr residues, methylation of Arg residues, and acetylation, ubiquitinylation, and methylation of Lys residues—for example, some 150 previously undescribed modifications of p53 isolated from infected cells. These modifications were distributed across all functional domains of both forms of the endogenous human p53 protein, as well as those of an orthologous population of p53 isolated from COS-1 cells. Despite the differences in activity, including greater in vitro sequence-specific DNA binding activity exhibited by p53 isolated from etoposide-treated cells, few differences were observed in the location, nature, or relative frequencies of PTMs on the two populations of human p53. Indeed, the wealth of PTMs that we have identified is consistent with a far greater degree of complex, combinatorial regulation of p53 by PTM than previously anticipated. PMID:24056736

  11. An unexpected inhibition of antiviral signaling by virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 in pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Steuerwald, Nury; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2015-01-01

    Virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 transgene expression has been successfully used in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other oncolytic viruses (OVs) to enhance their anticancer activities. However, p53 is also known to inhibit virus replication via enhanced type I interferon (IFN) antiviral responses. To examine whether p53 transgenes enhance antiviral signaling in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we engineered novel VSV recombinants encoding human p53 or the previously described chimeric p53-CC, which contains the coiled-coil (CC) domain from breakpoint cluster region (BCR) protein and evades the dominant-negative activities of endogenously expressed mutant p53. Contrary to an expected enhancement of antiviral signaling by p53, our global analysis of gene expression in PDAC cells showed that both p53 and p53-CC dramatically inhibited type I IFN responses. Our data suggest that this occurs through p53-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Importantly, VSV-encoded p53 or p53-CC did not inhibit antiviral signaling in non-malignant human pancreatic ductal cells, which retain their resistance to all VSV recombinants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of p53-mediated inhibition of antiviral signaling, and it suggests that OV-encoded p53 can simultaneously produce anticancer activities while assisting, rather than inhibiting, virus replication in cancer cells. PMID:25965802

  12. An unexpected inhibition of antiviral signaling by virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Steuerwald, Nury; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2015-09-01

    Virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 transgene expression has been successfully used in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other oncolytic viruses (OVs) to enhance their anticancer activities. However, p53 is also known to inhibit virus replication via enhanced type I interferon (IFN) antiviral responses. To examine whether p53 transgenes enhance antiviral signaling in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we engineered novel VSV recombinants encoding human p53 or the previously described chimeric p53-CC, which contains the coiled-coil (CC) domain from breakpoint cluster region (BCR) protein and evades the dominant-negative activities of endogenously expressed mutant p53. Contrary to an expected enhancement of antiviral signaling by p53, our global analysis of gene expression in PDAC cells showed that both p53 and p53-CC dramatically inhibited type I IFN responses. Our data suggest that this occurs through p53-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Importantly, VSV-encoded p53 or p53-CC did not inhibit antiviral signaling in non-malignant human pancreatic ductal cells, which retained their resistance to all tested VSV recombinants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of p53-mediated inhibition of antiviral signaling, and it suggests that OV-encoded p53 can simultaneously produce anticancer activities while assisting, rather than inhibiting, virus replication in cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. p53 regulation and activity in mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Solozobova, Valeriya

    2010-01-01

    P53 is a tumour development p53. The aim of this work was to study the regulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells and its activation in response to DNA damage. p53 was found that p53 becomes transcriptionally active in ES cells after DNA damage. Embryonic stem cells contain a relatively high amount of p53 protein and p53 RNA. After differentiation p53 level is rapidly downregulated. The high abundance of p53 in undifferentiated ES cells is a result of enhanced translation.

  14. Predicting positive p53 cancer rescue regions using Most Informative Positive (MIP active learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A Danziger

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Many protein engineering problems involve finding mutations that produce proteins with a particular function. Computational active learning is an attractive approach to discover desired biological activities. Traditional active learning techniques have been optimized to iteratively improve classifier accuracy, not to quickly discover biologically significant results. We report here a novel active learning technique, Most Informative Positive (MIP, which is tailored to biological problems because it seeks novel and informative positive results. MIP active learning differs from traditional active learning methods in two ways: (1 it preferentially seeks Positive (functionally active examples; and (2 it may be effectively extended to select gene regions suitable for high throughput combinatorial mutagenesis. We applied MIP to discover mutations in the tumor suppressor protein p53 that reactivate mutated p53 found in human cancers. This is an important biomedical goal because p53 mutants have been implicated in half of all human cancers, and restoring active p53 in tumors leads to tumor regression. MIP found Positive (cancer rescue p53 mutants in silico using 33% fewer experiments than traditional non-MIP active learning, with only a minor decrease in classifier accuracy. Applying MIP to in vivo experimentation yielded immediate Positive results. Ten different p53 mutations found in human cancers were paired in silico with all possible single amino acid rescue mutations, from which MIP was used to select a Positive Region predicted to be enriched for p53 cancer rescue mutants. In vivo assays showed that the predicted Positive Region: (1 had significantly more (p<0.01 new strong cancer rescue mutants than control regions (Negative, and non-MIP active learning; (2 had slightly more new strong cancer rescue mutants than an Expert region selected for purely biological considerations; and (3 rescued for the first time the previously unrescuable p53 cancer

  15. Structurally diverse MDM2-p53 antagonists act as modulators of MDR-1 function in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Zhao, Y; Halliday, G C; Berry, P; Rousseau, R F; Middleton, S A; Nichols, G L; Del Bello, F; Piergentili, A; Newell, D R; Lunec, J; Tweddle, D A

    2014-08-12

    A frequent mechanism of acquired multidrug resistance in human cancers is overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters such as the Multi-Drug Resistance Protein 1 (MDR-1). Nutlin-3, an MDM2-p53 antagonist, has previously been reported to be a competitive MDR-1 inhibitor. This study assessed whether the structurally diverse MDM2-p53 antagonists, MI-63, NDD0005, and RG7388 are also able to modulate MDR-1 function, particularly in p53 mutant neuroblastoma cells, using XTT-based cell viability assays, western blotting, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Verapamil and the MDM2-p53 antagonists potentiated vincristine-mediated growth inhibition in a concentration-dependent manner when used in combination with high MDR-1-expressing p53 mutant neuroblastoma cell lines at concentrations that did not affect the viability of cells when given alone. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses showed that verapamil, Nutlin-3, MI-63 and NDD0005, but not RG7388, led to increased intracellular levels of vincristine in high MDR-1-expressing cell lines. These results show that in addition to Nutlin-3, other structurally unrelated MDM2-p53 antagonists can also act as MDR-1 inhibitors and reverse MDR-1-mediated multidrug resistance in neuroblastoma cell lines in a p53-independent manner. These findings are important for future clinical trial design with MDM2-p53 antagonists when used in combination with agents that are MDR-1 substrates.

  16. The p53 Isoform Δ133p53β Promotes Cancer Stem Cell Potential

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    Nikola Arsic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSC are responsible for cancer chemoresistance and metastasis formation. Here we report that Δ133p53β, a TP53 splice variant, enhanced cancer cell stemness in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, while its depletion reduced it. Δ133p53β stimulated the expression of the key pluripotency factors SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG. Similarly, in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, aggressiveness was coupled with enhanced CSC potential and Δ133p53β expression. Like in MCF-7 cells, SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression were positively regulated by Δ133p53β in these cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with etoposide, a cytotoxic anti-cancer drug, increased CSC formation and SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression via Δ133p53, thus potentially increasing the risk of cancer recurrence. Our findings show that Δ133p53β supports CSC potential. Moreover, they indicate that the TP53 gene, which is considered a major tumor suppressor gene, also acts as an oncogene via the Δ133p53β isoform.

  17. The p53 Isoform Δ133p53β Promotes Cancer Stem Cell Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsic, Nikola; Gadea, Gilles; Lagerqvist, E. Louise; Busson, Muriel; Cahuzac, Nathalie; Brock, Carsten; Hollande, Frederic; Gire, Veronique; Pannequin, Julie; Roux, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer stem cells (CSC) are responsible for cancer chemoresistance and metastasis formation. Here we report that Δ133p53β, a TP53 splice variant, enhanced cancer cell stemness in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, while its depletion reduced it. Δ133p53β stimulated the expression of the key pluripotency factors SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG. Similarly, in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, aggressiveness was coupled with enhanced CSC potential and Δ133p53β expression. Like in MCF-7 cells, SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression were positively regulated by Δ133p53β in these cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with etoposide, a cytotoxic anti-cancer drug, increased CSC formation and SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression via Δ133p53, thus potentially increasing the risk of cancer recurrence. Our findings show that Δ133p53β supports CSC potential. Moreover, they indicate that the TP53 gene, which is considered a major tumor suppressor gene, also acts as an oncogene via the Δ133p53β isoform. PMID:25754205

  18. FTIR Microspectroscopy Probes Particle-Radiation Effect on HCT116 cells (p53+/+, p53-/-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingwen; Zhang, Fengqiu; Huang, Qing

    2018-02-01

    p53 is a crucial tumor suppressor and plays an important role in cell cycle arrest, DNA damage repair, promotion of cell senescence and apoptosis, prevention of DNA damage and maintaining genomic stability and integrity. It has been reported that p53 might also be related to radiation sensitivity, for which the involved effects and processes could be further examined biochemically at the molecular level. In this study, we explored a new spectroscopic approach to probe the radiation-induced biological effects related to p53. Infrared microspectroscopy was used to detect the metabolic changes related to p53 under particle radiation. After alpha-particle irradiation of HCT116 cells (p53+/+, p53-/-), cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in the cancer cells were observed using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microspectroscopy imaging. A remarkable difference in radiosensitivity between the two genotypes of cells was observed as well. This work provides a biochemical analysis of the p53-related radiation effects in cells and demonstrates the potential usefulness of FTIR microspectroscopy in the field of radiation research.

  19. Wildtype p53-specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses in Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune

    2011-01-01

    Mutation in the p53 gene based on single amino acid substitutions is a frequent event in human cancer. Accumulated mutant p53 protein is released to antigen presenting cells of the immune system and anti-p53 immune responses even against wt p53 is induced and observed in a number of human cancer...... patients. Detection of antibodies against wt p53 protein has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker and discovery of new T-cell epitopes has enabled design of cancer vaccination protocols with promising results. Here, we identified wt p53-specific antibodies in various cancer patients......(264-272) in breast cancer patients and against HLA-A*01:01 binding peptide wt p53(226-234) and HLA-B*07:02 binding peptide wt p53(74-82) in renal cell cancer and breast cancer patients, respectively. Finally, we analyzed antibody and T-cell responses against wt p53 15-mer peptides in patients with metastatic renal...

  20. p53 Mutation suppresses adult neurogenesis in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoe, Yasuko; Okuyama, Teruhiro [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yoshihito [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Keio University, 35, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Kubo, Takeo [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Takeuchi, Hideaki, E-mail: takeuchi@biol.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Progenitor migration is accompanied by an increase in their numbers in the adult brain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 Mutation suppressed an increase in the number of the migrated progenitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The decreased progenitor number is not due to enhanced cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 Mutation did not affect proliferation of stem cells. -- Abstract: Tumor suppressor p53 negatively regulates self-renewal of neural stem cells in the adult murine brain. Here, we report that the p53 null mutation in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) suppressed neurogenesis in the telencephalon, independent of cell death. By using 5-bromo-29-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry, we identified 18 proliferation zones in the brains of young medaka fish; in situ hybridization showed that p53 was expressed selectively in at least 12 proliferation zones. We also compared the number of BrdU-positive cells present in the whole telencephalon of wild-type (WT) and p53 mutant fish. Immediately after BrdU exposure, the number of BrdU-positive cells did not differ significantly between them. One week after BrdU-exposure, the BrdU-positive cells migrated from the proliferation zone, which was accompanied by an increased number in the WT brain. In contrast, no significant increase was observed in the p53 mutant brain. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (dUTP) nick end-labeling revealed that there was no significant difference in the number of apoptotic cells in the telencephalon of p53 mutant and WT medaka, suggesting that the decreased number of BrdU-positive cells in the mutant may be due to the suppression of proliferation rather than the enhancement of neural cell death. These results suggest that p53 positively regulates neurogenesis via cell proliferation.

  1. p53 Aggregates penetrate cells and induce the co-aggregation of intracellular p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolyn J Forget

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are unique pathologies in which the infectious particles are prions, a protein aggregate. The prion protein has many particular features, such as spontaneous aggregation, conformation transmission to other native PrP proteins and transmission from an individual to another. Protein aggregation is now frequently associated to many human diseases, for example Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or type 2 diabetes. A few proteins associated to these conformational diseases are part of a new category of proteins, called prionoids: proteins that share some, but not all, of the characteristics associated with prions. The p53 protein, a transcription factor that plays a major role in cancer, has recently been suggested to be a possible prionoid. The protein has been shown to accumulate in multiple cancer cell types, and its aggregation has also been reproduced in vitro by many independent groups. These observations suggest a role for p53 aggregates in cancer development. This study aims to test the «prion-like» features of p53. Our results show in vitro aggregation of the full length and N-terminally truncated protein (p53C, and penetration of these aggregates into cells. According to our findings, the aggregates enter cells using macropinocytosis, a non-specific pathway of entry. Lastly, we also show that once internalized by the cell, p53C aggregates can co-aggregate with endogenous p53 protein. Together, these findings suggest prion-like characteristics for p53 protein, based on the fact that p53 can spontaneously aggregate, these aggregates can penetrate cells and co-aggregate with cellular p53.

  2. Inhibition of p53-induced apoptosis without affecting expression of p53-regulated genes

    OpenAIRE

    Lotem, Joseph; Gal, Hilah; Kama, Rachel; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo; Givol, David

    2003-01-01

    Using DNA microarray and clustering of expressed genes we have analyzed the mechanism of inhibition of wild-type p53-induced apoptosis by the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) and the calcium mobilizer thapsigargin (TG). Clustering analysis of 1,786 genes, the expression level of which changed after activation of wild-type p53 in the absence or presence of IL-6 or TG, showed that these compounds did not cause a general inhibition of the ability of p53 to up-regulate or down-regulate gene ex...

  3. Early p53-positive foci as indicators of tumor risk in ultraviolet-exposed hairless mice: kinetics of induction, effects of DNA repair deficiency, and p53 heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebel, H; Mosnier, L O; Berg, R J; Westerman-de Vries, A; van Steeg, H; van Kranen, H J; de Gruijl, F R

    2001-02-01

    p53 mutations appear to be early events in skin carcinogenesis induced by chronic UVB irradiation. Clusters of epidermal cells that express p53 in mutant conformation ("p53 positive foci") are easily detected by immunohistochemical staining long before the appearance of skin carcinomas or their precursor lesions. In a hairless mouse model, we determined the dose-time dependency of the induction of these p53+ foci and investigated the relationship with the induction of skin carcinomas. The density of p53+ foci may be a good direct indicator of tumor risk. Hairless SKH1 mice were exposed to either of two regimens of daily UVB (500 or 250 J/m2 broadband UV from Philips TL12 lamps; 54% UVB 280-315 nm). With the high-dose regimen, the average number of p53+ foci in a dorsal skin area (7.2 cm2) increased rapidly from 9.0 +/- 2.1 (SE) at 15 days to 470 +/- 80 (SE) at 40 days. At half that daily dose, the induction of p53+ foci was slower by a factor of 1.49 +/- 0.15, very similar to a previously observed slower induction of squamous cell carcinomas by a factor of 1.54 +/- 0.02. In a double-log plot of the average number of p53 + foci versus time, the curves for the two exposure regimens ran parallel (slope, 3.7 +/- 0.7), similar to the curves for the number of tumors versus time (slope, 6.9 +/- 0.8). The difference in slopes (3.7 versus 6.9) is in line with the contention that more rate-limiting steps are needed to develop a tumor than a p53+ focus. By the time the first tumors appear (around 7-8 weeks with the high daily dose), the dorsal skin contains >100 p53+ foci/cm2. To further validate the density of p53+ foci as a direct measure of tumor risk, we carried out experiments with transgenic mice with an enhanced susceptibility to UV carcinogenesis, homozygous Xpa knockout mice (deficient in nucleotide excision repair) and heterozygousp53 knockout mice (i.a. partially deficient in apoptosis). In both of these cancer-prone strains, the p53+ foci were induced at markedly

  4. A novel radiation-induced p53 mutation is not implicated in radiation resistance via a dominant-negative effect.

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    Yunguang Sun

    Full Text Available Understanding the mutations that confer radiation resistance is crucial to developing mechanisms to subvert this resistance. Here we describe the creation of a radiation resistant cell line and characterization of a novel p53 mutation. Treatment with 20 Gy radiation was used to induce mutations in the H460 lung cancer cell line; radiation resistance was confirmed by clonogenic assay. Limited sequencing was performed on the resistant cells created and compared to the parent cell line, leading to the identification of a novel mutation (del at the end of the DNA binding domain of p53. Levels of p53, phospho-p53, p21, total caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 3 in radiation resistant cells and the radiation susceptible (parent line were compared, all of which were found to be similar. These patterns held true after analysis of p53 overexpression in H460 cells; however, H1299 cells transfected with mutant p53 did not express p21, whereas those given WT p53 produced a significant amount, as expected. A luciferase assay demonstrated the inability of mutant p53 to bind its consensus elements. An MTS assay using H460 and H1299 cells transfected with WT or mutant p53 showed that the novel mutation did not improve cell survival. In summary, functional characterization of a radiation-induced p53 mutation in the H460 lung cancer cell line does not implicate it in the development of radiation resistance.

  5. Correlation between osteosarcoma and the expression of WWOX and p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pingtao; Wang, Mingyue; Li, Li; Jin, Tao

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of the expression of WWOX and p53 on the growth of MG-63 osteosarcoma cells and to explore the correlation between osteosarcoma and the expression of WWOX and p53. WWOX and p53-overexpressing MG-63 osteosarcoma cell lines were established by transfection and named the MW and MP cell lines, respectively. Untransfected MG-63 cells (blank control) were used as control. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot analysis were used to detect the expression of WWOX and wild-type p53 mRNA and protein, respectively. The effects of WWOX and p53 (wild-type) on the activity of MG-63 cells were determined by MTT assay and flow cytometry. The expression of mutant p53 protein in 65 cases of osteosarcoma was detected by immunohistochemistry to analyze the correlation between p53 and the development of osteosarcoma. qPCR showed that WWOX and p53 mRNA was overexpressed in MW and MP cells, respectively. Western blot analysis showed that the levels of WWOX and p53 protein in MW and MP cells were higher than in the blank control group. MTT assay showed that the cell proliferation ability of MW and MP cells was significantly lower than in the blank control group. Flow cytometry showed that 78.49% of MW and 66.76% of MP cells were arrested in the G0/G1 phase. Immunohistochemistry showed that mutant p53 was highly expressed in osteosarcoma, with a positive expression rate of 47.7%. The expression rate was positively correlated with the pathological grade of cancer. In conclusion, WWOX can affect the cell cycle of MG-63 osteosarcoma cells to inhibit cell proliferation, which provides new insights into gene therapy for osteosarcoma. The two types of the p53 gene have different functions in the development of osteosarcoma. Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor, while mutant p53, which is overexpressed in malignant osteosarcoma, has a carcinogenic effect associated with the degree of osteosarcoma.

  6. C. elegans CEP-1/p53 and BEC-1 are involved in DNA repair.

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    Sandy Hoffman

    Full Text Available p53 is a transcription factor that regulates the response to cellular stress. Mammalian p53 functions as a tumor suppressor. The C. elegans p53, cep-1, regulates DNA-damage induced germline cell death by activating the transcription of egl-1 and ced-13. We used the C. elegans model to investigate how, in the whole animal, different forms of DNA damage can induce p53-dependent versus p53-independent cell death and DNA repair. DNA damage was induced by ultraviolet type C (UVC radiation, or 10-decarbamoyl mitomycin C (DMC, an agent known to induce mammalian p53-independent cell death. Wild-type or cep-1 loss-of-function mutant animals were assayed for germline cell death and DNA lesions. Wild-type animals displayed greater removal of UVC-lesions over time, whereas cep-1 mutant animals displayed increased UVC-lesion retention. The cep-1 mutation increased UVC-lesion retention directly correlated with a reduction of progeny viability. Consistent with DMC inducing p53-independent cell death in mammalian cells DMC induced a C. elegans p53-independent germline cell death pathway. To examine the influence of wild-type CEP-1 and DNA damage on C. elegans tumors we used glp-1(ar202gf/Notch germline tumor mutants. UVC treatment of glp-1 mutant animals activated the CEP-1 target gene egl-1 and reduced tumor size. In cep-1(gk138;glp-1(ar202gf animals, UVC treatment resulted in increased susceptibility to lesions and larger tumorous germlines. Interestingly, the partial knockdown of bec-1 in adults resulted in a CEP-1-dependent increase in germline cell death and an increase in DNA damage. These results strongly support cross-talk between BEC-1 and CEP-1 to protect the C. elegans genome.

  7. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    double mutations, four of which were tandem mutations on the same allele. No double mutations were found in tumors from nonsmoking patients. None of the mutations in smokers were G:C-->T:A transversions, which would be anticipated for exposure to the suspected cigarette smoke carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl....... The results suggest that, although cigarette smoke exposure may not significantly alter the kinds of mutations sustained in the p53 gene, it may act to increase the extent of DNA damage per mutagenic event....

  8. The tobacco carcinogen NNK disturbs mitotic chromosome alignment by interrupting p53 targeting to the centrosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Eun; Jang, Yu Lim; Jang, Chang-Young

    2017-11-05

    The tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is the most potent risk factor among tobacco-related carcinogens in lung cancer progression and outcomes. Although genetic mutations and chromosome instability have been detected in NNK-induced lung tumors, the oncogenic mechanisms of NNK are not fully understood. Here, we show that NNK increases chromosomal instability by disrupting spindle microtubule (MT) attachment to the kinetochore (KT) and spindle dynamics. Mechanistically, NNK blocks the targeting of p53 to the centrosome during mitosis, leading to chromosome alignment defects in metaphase. Therefore, lung cancer cells with wild-type p53, such as A594 and H226B, are more resistant to the NNK treatment than p53-mutant lung cancer cells, such as A1299 and H226Br. Although NNK does not affect the levels or transcriptional activity of p53, the reduction of the p53 level at the centrosome exacerbates the NNK-induced chromosome alignment defect in A549 and H226B cells. Therefore, p53 protects against NNK-induced chromosome instability by modulating the function of centrosome-localized p53 and not by modulating transcriptional activity. We conclude that NNK may increase the risk of lung cancer progression and poorer outcomes in patients with p53 mutations by perturbing proper mitotic progression and chromosome integrity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. p53 Maintains Genomic Stability by Preventing Interference between Transcription and Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Qiao Xin Yeo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor maintains genomic stability, typically acting through cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. We discovered a function of p53 in preventing conflicts between transcription and replication, independent of its canonical roles. p53 deficiency sensitizes cells to Topoisomerase (Topo II inhibitors, resulting in DNA damage arising spontaneously during replication. Topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A-DNA complexes preferentially accumulate in isogenic p53 mutant or knockout cells, reflecting an increased recruitment of TOP2A to regulate DNA topology. We propose that p53 acts to prevent DNA topological stress originating from transcription during the S phase and, therefore, promotes normal replication fork progression. Consequently, replication fork progression is impaired in the absence of p53, which is reversed by transcription inhibition. Pharmacologic inhibition of transcription also attenuates DNA damage and decreases Topo-II-DNA complexes, restoring cell viability in p53-deficient cells. Together, our results demonstrate a function of p53 that may underlie its role in tumor suppression.

  10. Abrogation of p53-mediated transactivation by SV40 large T antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, K; Minowa, A; Sugasawa, K; Takano, T; Hanaoka, F

    1993-03-01

    p53 is known to bind specifically to the 44-bp human DNA sequence in an immunoprecipitation assay. We show here that the transcription of the reporter CAT gene linked with the herpesvirus thymidine kinase (tk) promoter containing the 44-base sequence is enhanced by mouse wild-type but not mutant-type p53 in F9 and p53-null Saos-2 cells. The p53-mediated transactivation was dramatically abrogated by introduction of SV40 large T antigen (SVLT) in Saos-2 cells in which p53 was clearly associated with SVLT. Furthermore, the p53-SVLT complex did not bind to the 44-base sequence at all. Thus, SVLT sequesters the transactivation function of the wild-type p53 by inhibiting the binding of p53 to the 44-base sequence. This is good evidence to show 'loss of functions' in the product of a tumor-suppressor oncogene by a dominant oncogene product at a molecular level.

  11. The p53-MDM2 network: from oscillations to apoptosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    developed a class of small molecules known as nutlins which occupy the p53 binding pocket in MDM2, thus preventing the binding of MDM2 to p53 and facilitating the activation of the p53 pathways in human cancer cell lines. The efficacy of the strategy has been demonstrated in experiments paving. Figure 4. Pulses of p53 ...

  12. Cell-Cycle-Specific Function of p53 in Fanconi Anemia Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation

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    Xiaoli Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Overactive p53 has been proposed as an important pathophysiological factor for bone marrow failure syndromes, including Fanconi anemia (FA. Here, we report a p53-dependent effect on hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC proliferation in mice deficient for the FA gene Fanca. Deletion of p53 in Fanca−/− mice leads to replicative exhaustion of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC in transplant recipients. Using Fanca−/− HSCs expressing the separation-of-function mutant p53515C transgene, which selectively impairs the p53 function in apoptosis but keeps its cell-cycle checkpoint activities intact, we show that the p53 cell-cycle function is specifically required for the regulation of Fanca−/− HSC proliferation. Our results demonstrate that p53 plays a compensatory role in preventing FA HSCs from replicative exhaustion and suggest a cautious approach to manipulating p53 signaling as a therapeutic utility in FA.

  13. The p53 target Wig-1 regulates p53 mRNA stability through an AU-rich element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilborg, Anna; Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Wilhelm, Margareta T

    2009-01-01

    The p53 target gene Wig-1 encodes a double-stranded-RNA-binding zinc finger protein. We show here that Wig-1 binds to p53 mRNA and stabilizes it through an AU-rich element (ARE) in the 3' UTR of the p53 mRNA. This effect is mirrored by enhanced p53 protein levels in both unstressed cells and cells...... exposed to p53-activating stress agents. Thus, the p53 target Wig-1 is a previously undescribed ARE-regulating protein that acts as a positive feedback regulator of p53, with implications both for the steady-state levels of p53 and for the p53 stress response. Our data reveal a previously undescribed link...... between the tumor suppressor p53 and posttranscriptional gene regulation via AREs in mRNA....

  14. Isg15 controls p53 stability and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Fu; Wee, Sheena; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lane, David P; Bulavin, Dmitry V

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of p53 is a cornerstone in the control of its functions as a tumor suppressor. This process is attributed to ubiquitin-dependent modification of p53. In addition to polyubiquitination, we found that p53 is targeted for degradation through ISGylation. Isg15, a ubiquitin-like protein, covalently modifies p53 at 2 sites in the N and C terminus, and ISGylated p53 can be degraded by the 20S proteasome. ISGylation primarily targets a misfolded, dominant-negative p53, and Isg15 deletion in normal cells results in suppression of p53 activity and functions. We propose that Isg15-dependent degradation of p53 represents an alternative mechanism of controlling p53 protein levels, and, thus, it is an attractive pathway for drug discovery. PMID:24844324

  15. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  16. Pax3 stimulates p53 ubiquitination and degradation independent of transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Dan Wang

    Full Text Available Pax3 is a developmental transcription factor that is required for neural tube and neural crest development. We previously showed that inactivating the p53 tumor suppressor protein prevents neural tube and cardiac neural crest defects in Pax3-mutant mouse embryos. This demonstrates that Pax3 regulates these processes by blocking p53 function. Here we investigated the mechanism by which Pax3 blocks p53 function.We employed murine embryonic stem cell (ESC-derived neuronal precursors as a cell culture model of embryonic neuroepithelium or neural crest. Pax3 reduced p53 protein stability, but had no effect on p53 mRNA levels or the rate of p53 synthesis. Full length Pax3 as well as fragments that contained either the DNA-binding paired box or the homeodomain, expressed as GST or FLAG fusion proteins, physically associated with p53 and Mdm2 both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, Splotch Pax3, which causes neural tube and neural crest defects in homozygous embryos, bound weakly, or not at all, to p53 or Mdm2. The paired domain and homeodomain each stimulated Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and p53 degradation in the absence of the Pax3 transcription regulatory domains, whereas Splotch Pax3 did not stimulate p53 ubiquitination or degradation.Pax3 inactivates p53 function by stimulating its ubiquitination and degradation. This process utilizes the Pax3 paired domain and homeodomain but is independent of DNA-binding and transcription regulation. Because inactivating p53 is the only required Pax3 function during neural tube closure and cardiac neural crest development, and inactivating p53 does not require Pax3-dependent transcription regulation, this indicates that Pax3 is not required to function as a transcription factor during neural tube closure and cardiac neural crest development. These findings further suggest novel explanations for PAX3 functions in human diseases, such as in neural crest-derived cancers and Waardenburg syndrome types 1 and 3.

  17. Glycogen synthase kinase3 beta phosphorylates serine 33 of p53 and activates p53's transcriptional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Brendan D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 protein is activated by genotoxic stress, oncogene expression and during senescence, p53 transcriptionally activates genes involved in growth arrest and apoptosis. p53 activation is regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation of the N-terminal transactivation domain. Here, we have examined how Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK3, a protein kinase involved in tumorigenesis, differentiation and apoptosis, phosphorylates and regulates p53. Results The 2 isoforms of GSK3, GSK3α and GSK3β, phosphorylate the sequence Ser-X-X-X-Ser(P when the C-terminal serine residue is already phosphorylated. Several p53 kinases were examined for their ability to create GSK3 phosphorylation sites on the p53 protein. Our results demonstrate that phosphorylation of serine 37 of p53 by DNA-PK creates a site for GSK3β phosphorylation at serine 33 in vitro. GSK3α did not phosphorylate p53 under any condition. GSK3β increased the transcriptional activity of the p53 protein in vivo. Mutation of either serine 33 or serine 37 of p53 to alanine blocked the ability of GSK3β to regulate p53 transcriptional activity. GSK3β is therefore able to regulate p53 function in vivo. p53's transcriptional activity is commonly increased by DNA damage. However, GSK3β kinase activity was inhibited in response to DNA damage, suggesting that GSK3β regulation of p53 is not involved in the p53-DNA damage response. Conclusions GSK3β can regulate p53's transcriptional activity by phosphorylating serine 33. However, GSK3β does not appear to be part of the p53-DNA damage response pathway. Instead, GSK3β may provide the link between p53 and non-DNA damage mechanisms for p53 activation.

  18. P53 alters the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity for oxidized graphene in human B-lymphoblastoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibone, Dayton Matthew

    Widespread use of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industry, medicine, and consumer products raises concern about potential adverse impacts on human health. The p53 tumor suppressor protein is crucial to maintaining cellular and genetic stability to prevent carcinogenesis. Here, we show that oxygen functionalized graphene (f-G) absorption and p53 functional status correlate with cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human B-lymphoblastoid cells. Trends in f-G absorption by were dose-dependent. Cells with functional p53 exposed to f-G arrested in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, suppressed f-G induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and had elevated apoptosis. While compared to p53 competent cells, the p53 deficient cells exposed to f-G accumulated in S-phase of the cell cycle, had elevated ROS levels, and evaded apoptosis. The f-G genotoxicity was evident as increased loss-of-heterozygosity mutants independent of p53 status, and structural chromosome damage in p53 deficient cells. These findings have broad implications for the safety and efficacy of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industrial, consumer products and biomedical applications.

  19. Lack of major genome instability in tumors of p53 null rats.

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    Roel Hermsen

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is often associated with loss of tumor suppressor genes (such as TP53, genomic instability and telomere lengthening. Previously, we generated and characterized a rat p53 knockout model in which the homozygous rats predominantly develop hemangiosarcomas whereas the heterozygous rats mainly develop osteosarcomas. Using genome-wide analyses, we find that the tumors that arise in the heterozygous and homozygous Tp53C273X mutant animals are also different in their genomic instability profiles. While p53 was fully inactivated in both heterozygous and homozygous knockout rats, tumors from homozygous animals show very limited aneuploidy and low degrees of somatic copy number variation as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. In addition, complex structural rearrangements such as chromothripsis and breakage-fusion-bridge cycles were never found in tumors from homozygous animals, while these were readily detectable in tumors from heterozygous animals. Finally, we measured telomere length and telomere lengthening pathway activity and found that tumors of homozygous animals have longer telomeres but do not show clear telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT activity differences as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. Taken together, our results demonstrate that host p53 status in this rat p53 knockout model has a large effect on both tumor type and genomic instability characteristics, where full loss of functional p53 is not the main driver of large-scale structural variations. Our results also suggest that chromothripsis primarily occurs under p53 heterozygous rather than p53 null conditions.

  20. The role of p53 gene family in reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenwei

    2009-12-01

    The p53 family of genes (p53, p63, and p73) is conserved over evolutionary time scales. Although the functions of p53 gene and its protein as a tumor suppressor have been firmly established, the earliest functions for the p53 ancestral genes in worms and flies are to ensure germ-line genomic integrity and the fidelity of the developmental process. In vertebrates, the p53 family of genes retains those functions in germ-line genomic integrity but have added important functions in regulation of reproduction. Loss of the p53, p63, or p73 genes in female mice leads to a significant decrease of fertility. The p53 gene product regulates maternal reproduction at the implantation stage of the embryo. p63 and p73 play important roles in monitoring the genomic quality of oocytes. The p53 pathway appears to play a similar role in human fertility. In humans, certain alleles containing a functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the p53 pathway are under positive evolutionary selection. Selected alleles of these SNPs in the p53 pathway are associated with decreased fertility. This important function of the p53 pathway in reproduction provides a plausible explanation for the evolution of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene and the positive selection of some alleles in the p53 gene and its pathway. These observations provide a good possible example of antagonistic pleiotrophy for fertility, tumor suppression, and longevity.

  1. Expression of TP53 isoforms p53β or p53γ enhances chemosensitivity in TP53(null cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Silden

    Full Text Available The carboxy-terminal truncated p53 alternative spliced isoforms, p53β and p53γ, are expressed at disparate levels in cancer and are suggested to influence treatment response and therapy outcome. However, their functional role in cancer remains to be elucidated. We investigated their individual functionality in the p53(null background of cell lines H1299 and SAOS-2 by stable retroviral transduction or transient transfection. Expression status of p53β and p53γ protein was found to correlate with increased response to camptothecin and doxorubicin chemotherapy. Decreased DNA synthesis and clonogenicity in p53β and p53γ congenic H1299 was accompanied by increased p21((CIP1/WAF1, Bax and Mdm2 proteins. Chemotherapy induced p53 isoform degradation, most prominent for p53γ. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib substantially increased basal p53γ protein level, while the level of p53β protein was unaffected. Treatment with dicoumarol, a putative blocker of the proteasome-related NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductase NQO1, effectively attenuated basal p53γ protein level in spite of bortezomib treatment. Although in vitro proliferation and clonogenicity assays indicated a weak suppressive effect by p53β and p53γ expression, studies of in vivo subcutaneous H1299 tumor growth demonstrated a significantly increased growth by expression of either p53 isoforms. This study suggests that p53β and p53γ share functionality in chemosensitizing and tumor growth enhancement but comprise distinct regulation at the protein level.

  2. Radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis in bladder cancer cells with wild-type- p53 but not in p53-mutated bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Shirakawa, Toshiro; Zhang, Zhujun; Matsumoto, Akira; Fujisawa, Masato; Okada, Hiroshi; Kamidono, Sadao; Gotoh, Akinobu

    2003-12-01

    Purpose. It has been reported in several studies that the absence in cancer cells of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, mutations of which are frequently found in bladder cancer, increases their resistance to ionizing radiation. Other studies, however, suggest that mutations of the p53 gene could increase the radiosensitivity of cancer cells, although the evidence is still inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between p53 status and radiation response in five different bladder cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods. Five different human bladder cancer cell lines (KK47: with wt- p53, RT4: with wt- p53, T24: with mutated p53, 5637: with mutated p53, UM-UC-3: with mutated p53) were used in the study. Cells were irradiated with 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8 Gy, then trypsinized and re-plated for clonogenic survival assay, quantitative RT-PCR assay, flow-cytometry analysis and TUNEL assay. Results. The clonogenic assay demonstrated that KK47 and RT4 had significantly higher radiosensitivity than other cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that radiation induced increased expression of p53, Bax, and p21 mRNA in KK47 and RT4. After irradiation, G1 cell-cycle arrest was observed in KK47 and RT4 under flow cytometry analysis, while T24, 5637, and UM-UC-3 showed an increase in the proportion of G2 cells. Increased cell apoptosis was also observed under TUNEL assay in KK47 and RT4, but not in other cell lines. It was demonstrated that ionizing radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis in bladder cancer cells with wt- p53 but not in those with mutated p53.

  3. Restriction of human herpesvirus 6B replication by p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Bundgaard, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) induces significant accumulation of p53 in both the nucleus and cytoplasm during infection. Activation of p53 by DNA damage is known to induce either growth arrest or apoptosis; nevertheless, HHV-6B-infected cells are arrested in their cell cycle independently of p53......, and only a minor fraction of the infected cells undergoes apoptosis. Using pifithrin-alpha, a p53 inhibitor, and p53-null cells, this study showed that infected epithelial cells accumulated viral transcripts and proteins to a significantly higher degree in the absence of active p53. Moreover, HHV-6B......-induced cytopathic effects were greatly enhanced in the absence of p53. This suggests that, in epithelial cells, some of the functions of p53 leading to cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis are restrained by HHV-6B infection, whereas other cellular defences, causing inhibition of virus transcription, are partially...

  4. [P53 protein in adenocarcinoma of the large intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, P; Pawłowska-Wakowicz, B; Cybulski, M; Berbeć, H

    1997-01-01

    P53 gen mutations play significant role in neoplastic transformation of colorectal mucosa. We investigated p53 immunostaining in 80 cases of spontaneous human colorectal adenocarcinomas (with monoclonal DO7 antibody and LSAB+ kit). We found positive, nuclear p53 immunostaining in 64% of nonmucinous adenocarcinoma tissues and in 19% of mucinous adenocarcinomas tissues. P53 protein deposits were most often found in colorectal adenocarcinomas localised in rectum (66.67%) and in advanced (Dukes C, D) colorectal adenocarcinomas (59.38%) as well. There was no statistical significance between the p53 positive immunostaining and the histological differentiation of the colorectal adenocarcinomas. The overall survival of patients with tumours positive for p53 protein was significantly shorter than that of patients with colorectal cancers negative for p53 protein. We conclude that p53 immunohistochemical analysis may be treated as a supplementary prognostic marker for patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma, especially it may be useful for adjuvant therapy selection.

  5. Modeling the basal dynamics of p53 system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Tingzhe; Yang, Weiwei; Liu, Jing; Shen, Pingping

    2011-01-01

    .... Most previous models have ignored the basal dynamics of p53 under nonstressed conditions. To explore the basal dynamics of p53, we constructed a stochastic delay model by incorporating two negative feedback loops...

  6. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  7. Imiquimod activates p53-dependent apoptosis in a human basal cell carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Hao; Mu, Szu-Wei; Jiang, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Sin-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Huang, Jau-Ling; Wu, Chun-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ju; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2016-03-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 controls DNA repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy and numerous other cellular processes. Imiquimod (IMQ), a synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 ligand for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC), eliminates cancer cells by activating cell-mediated immunity and directly inducing apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells. To evaluate the role of p53 in IMQ-induced cell death in skin cancer cells. The expression, phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p53 were detected by real-time PCR, luciferase reporter assay, cycloheximide chase analysis, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Using BCC/KMC1 cell line as a model, the upstream signaling of p53 activation was dissected by over-expression of TLR7/8, the addition of ROS scavenger, ATM/ATR inhibitors and pan-caspase inhibitor. The role of p53 in IMQ-induced apoptosis and autophagy was assessed by genetically silencing p53 and evaluated by a DNA content assay, immunoblotting, LC3 puncta detection and acridine orange staining. IMQ induced p53 mRNA expression and protein accumulation, increased Ser15 phosphorylation, promoted nuclear translocation and up-regulated its target genes in skin cancer cells in a TLR7/8-independent manner. In BCC/KMC1 cells, the induction of p53 by IMQ was achieved through increased ROS production to stimulate the ATM/ATR-Chk1/Chk2 axis but was not mediated by inducing DNA damage. The pharmacological inhibition of ATM/ATR significantly suppressed IMQ-induced p53 activation and apoptosis. Silencing of p53 significantly decreased the IMQ-induced caspase cascade activation and apoptosis but enhanced autophagy. Mutant p53 skin cancer cell lines were more resistant to IMQ-induced apoptosis than wildtype p53 skin cancer cell lines. IMQ induced ROS production to stimulate ATM/ATR pathways and contributed to p53-dependent apoptosis in a skin basal cell carcinoma cell line BCC/KMC1. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology

  8. CLCA2 as a p53-Inducible Senescence Mediator

    OpenAIRE

    Chizu Tanikawa; Hidewaki Nakagawa; Yoichi Furukawa; Yusuke Nakamura; Koichi Matsuda

    2012-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently mutated in multiple cancer tissues. Activated p53 protein regulates its downstream genes and subsequently inhibits malignant transformation by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, and senescence. However, genes involved in the p53-mediated senescence pathway are not yet fully elucidated. Through the screening of two genome-wide expression profile data sets, one for cells in which exogenous p53 was introduced and the other for sen...

  9. Prima-1 induces apoptosis in bladder cancer cell lines by activating p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila B. Piantino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Bladder cancer represents 3% of all carcinomas in the Brazilian population and ranks second in incidence among urological tumors, after prostate cancer. The loss of p53 function is the main genetic alteration related to the development of high-grade muscle-invasive disease. Prima-1 is a small molecule that restores tumor suppressor function to mutant p53 and induces cancer cell death in various cancer types. Our aim was to investigate the ability of Prima-1 to induce apoptosis after DNA damage in bladder cancer cell lines. METHOD: The therapeutic effect of Prima-1 was studied in two bladder cancer cell lines: T24, which is characterized by a p53 mutation, and RT4, which is the wild-type for the p53 gene. Morphological features of apoptosis induced by p53, including mitochondrial membrane potential changes and the expression of thirteen genes involved in apoptosis, were assessed by microscopic observation and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. RESULTS: Prima-1 was able to reactivate p53 function in the T24 (p53 mt bladder cancer cell line and promote apoptosis via the induction of Bax and Puma expression, activation of the caspase cascade and disruption of the mitochondrial membrane in a BAK-independent manner. CONCLUSION: Prima-1 is able to restore the transcriptional activity of p53. Experimental studies in vivo may be conducted to test this molecule as a new therapeutic agent for urothelial carcinomas of the bladder, which characteristically harbor p53 mutations.

  10. CP-31398 inhibits the growth of p53-mutated liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Yu-Nan; Yan, Jun-Wei; Yan, Jing-Jun; Wu, Qian; Song, Yu-Hu

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Previous studies demonstrated that CP-31398 restored the native conformation of mutant p53 and trans-activated p53 downstream genes in tumor cells. However, the research on the application of CP-31398 to liver cancer has not been reported. Here, we investigated the effects of CP-31398 on the phenotype of HCC cells carrying p53 mutation. The effects of CP-31398 on the characteristic of p53-mutated HCC cells were evaluated through analyzing cell cycle, cell apoptosis, cell proliferation, and the expression of p53 downstream genes. In tumor xenografts developed by PLC/PRF/5 cells, the inhibition of tumor growth by CP-31398 was analyzed through gross morphology, growth curve, and the expression of p53-related genes. Firstly, we demonstrated that CP-31398 inhibited the growth of p53-mutated liver cancer cells in a dose-dependent and p53-dependent manner. Then, further study showed that CP-31398 re-activated wild-type p53 function in p53-mutated HCC cells, which resulted in inhibitive response of cell proliferation and an induction of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Finally, in vivo data confirmed that CP-31398 blocked the growth of xenografts tumors through transactivation of p53-responsive downstream molecules. Our results demonstrated that CP-31398 induced desired phenotypic change of p53-mutated HCC cells in vitro and in vivo, which revealed that CP-31398 would be developed as a therapeutic candidate for HCC carrying p53 mutation.

  11. The role of the tumor suppressor p53 in spermatogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, T. L.; Roepers-Gajadien, H. L.; Gademan, I. S.; van Buul, P. P.; Gil-Gomez, G.; Rutgers, D. H.; de rooij, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    The p53 protein appeared to be involved in both spermatogonial cell proliferation and radiation response. During normal spermatogenesis in the mouse, spermatogonia do not express p53, as analyzed by immunohistochemistry. However, after a dose of 4 Gy of X-rays, a distinct p53 staining was present in

  12. p53 specific (auto)immunity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauwen, Marjolein Monique

    2008-01-01

    Self-tolerance to p53 is a major potential limitation for the activation of the endogenous T-cell repertoire. So far, p53 specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell immunity has been described in cancer patients and healthy individuals. However, the restrictions of tolerance on the recruitment of p53 specific T

  13. P53 MUTATIONS IN HUMAN LUNG-TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MILLER, CW; ASLO, A; KOK, K; YOKOTA, J; BUYS, CHCM; TERADA, M; KOEFFLER, HP; Simon, K.

    1992-01-01

    Mutation of one p53 allele and loss of the normal p53 allele [loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] occur in many tumors including lung cancers. These alterations apparently contribute to development of cancer by interfering with the tumor suppressor activity of p53. We directly sequenced amplified DNA in

  14. p53 expression in colorectal carcinoma in relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It has been shown that colorectal carcinoma is increasing in incidence in African countries. This could be due to change in life style. Molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer commonly involves mutation in p53 gene which leads to expression of p53 protein in tumor cells. Expression of p53 protein has been ...

  15. Oncogenicity evaluation of resveratrol in p53(+/-) (p53 knockout) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, T L; Cwik, M J; Morrissey, R L; Kapetanovic, I; Crowell, J A; Booth, T D; McCormick, D L

    2007-01-01

    A six-month study was conducted in p53(+/-) mice to evaluate the possible oncogenicity of resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a cancer chemopreventive agent present in grapes and other foods. p53(+/-) mice (25/sex/group) received daily gavage exposure to vehicle only (negative control), resveratrol doses of 1000, 2000, or 4000 mg/kg/day, or p-cresidine (400 mg/kg/day; positive control). No mortality was seen in mice receiving the low dose of resveratrol. However, the mid and high doses induced mortality associated with impaction of the test article in the gastrointestinal tract. Resveratrol had no effect on body weight, food consumption, or clinical signs in surviving mice in any dose group, but induced dose-related increases in liver weight and serum cholesterol in both sexes. Mild anemia was seen in male mice at the high dose only; hematologic effects were not seen in females. Histopathology identified the kidney (hydronephrosis) and urinary bladder (epithelial hyperplasia) as target tissues for resveratrol toxicity. The incidences of both benign and malignant tumors in mice exposed to resveratrol were comparable to those in vehicle controls. By contrast, the positive control article, p-cresidine, induced urinary bladder cancer in both sexes. When administered to p53(+/-) mice at its maximum tolerated dose, resveratrol demonstrates no evidence of oncogenicity.

  16. Mutations in the WRN Gene in Mice Accelerate Mortality in a p53-Null Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, David B.; Beard, Caroline; Johnson, Brad; Marciniak, Robert A.; Dausman, Jessie; Bronson, Roderick; Buhlmann, Janet E.; Lipman, Ruth; Curry, Ruth; Sharpe, Arlene; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Guarente, Leonard

    2000-01-01

    Werner's syndrome (WS) is a human disease with manifestations resembling premature aging. The gene defective in WS, WRN, encodes a DNA helicase. Here, we describe the generation of mice bearing a mutation that eliminates expression of the C terminus of the helicase domain of the WRN protein. Mutant mice are born at the expected Mendelian frequency and do not show any overt histological signs of accelerated senescence. These mice are capable of living beyond 2 years of age. Cells from these animals do not show elevated susceptibility to the genotoxins camptothecin or 4-NQO. However, mutant fibroblasts senesce approximately one passage earlier than controls. Importantly, WRN−/−;p53−/− mice show an increased mortality rate relative to WRN+/−;p53−/− animals. We consider possible models for the synergy between p53 and WRN mutations for the determination of life span. PMID:10757812

  17. CP-31398 prevents the growth of p53-mutated colorectal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xingxing; Kong, Xinjuan; Yan, Junwei; Yan, Jingjun; Zhang, Yunan; Wu, Qian; Chang, Ying; Shang, Haitao; Dou, Qian; Song, Yuhu; Liu, Fang

    2015-03-01

    Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Small molecule CP-31398 was shown to restore mutant p53 tumor suppressor functions in cancer cells. Here, we determined the effects of CP-31398 on the growth of p53-mutated colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in vitro and in vivo. CRC cells which carry p53 mutation in codon 273 were treated with CP-31398 and the control, and the effects of CP-31398 on cell cycle, cell apoptosis, and proliferation were determined. The expression of p53-responsive downstream genes was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot. CP-31398 was administrated into xenograft tumors created by the inoculation of HT-29 cells, and then the effect of CP-31398 on the growth of xenograft tumors was examined. CP-31398 induced p53 downstream target molecules in cultured HT-29 cells, which resulted in the inhibition of CRC cell growth assessed by the determination of cell cycle, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. In xenograft tumors, CP-31398 modulated the expression of Bax, Bcl-2, caspase 3, cyclin D, and Mdm2 and then blocked the growth of xenograft tumors. CP-31398 would be developed as a therapeutic candidate for p53-mutated CRC due to the restoration of mutant p53 tumor suppressor functions.

  18. Census and evaluation of p53 target genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M

    2017-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 functions primarily as a transcription factor. Mutation of the TP53 gene alters its response pathway, and is central to the development of many cancers. The discovery of a large number of p53 target genes, which confer p53’s tumor suppressor function, has led to increasingly complex models of p53 function. Recent meta-analysis approaches, however, are simplifying our understanding of how p53 functions as a transcription factor. In the survey presented here, a total set of 3661 direct p53 target genes is identified that comprise 3509 potential targets from 13 high-throughput studies, and 346 target genes from individual gene analyses. Comparison of the p53 target genes reported in individual studies with those identified in 13 high-throughput studies reveals limited consistency. Here, p53 target genes have been evaluated based on the meta-analysis data, and the results show that high-confidence p53 target genes are involved in multiple cellular responses, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, metabolism, autophagy, mRNA translation and feedback mechanisms. However, many p53 target genes are identified only in a small number of studies and have a higher likelihood of being false positives. While numerous mechanisms have been proposed for mediating gene regulation in response to p53, recent advances in our understanding of p53 function show that p53 itself is solely an activator of transcription, and gene downregulation by p53 is indirect and requires p21. Taking into account the function of p53 as an activator of transcription, recent results point to an unsophisticated means of regulation. PMID:28288132

  19. Activation of p53 transcriptional activity by SMRT: a histone deacetylase 3-independent function of a transcriptional corepressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikesavan, Anbu Karani; Karmakar, Sudipan; Pardo, Patricia; Wang, Liguo; Liu, Shuang; Li, Wei; Smith, Carolyn L

    2014-04-01

    The silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) is an established histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent transcriptional corepressor. Microarray analyses of MCF-7 cells transfected with control or SMRT small interfering RNA revealed SMRT regulation of genes involved in DNA damage responses, and the levels of the DNA damage marker γH2AX as well as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage were elevated in SMRT-depleted cells treated with doxorubicin. A number of these genes are established p53 targets. SMRT knockdown decreased the activity of two p53-dependent reporter genes as well as the expression of p53 target genes, such as CDKN1A (which encodes p21). SMRT bound directly to p53 and was recruited to p53 binding sites within the p21 promoter. Depletion of GPS2 and TBL1, components of the SMRT corepressor complex, but not histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) decreased p21-luciferase activity. p53 bound to the SMRT deacetylase activation domain (DAD), which mediates HDAC3 binding and activation, and HDAC3 could attenuate p53 binding to the DAD region of SMRT. Moreover, an HDAC3 binding-deficient SMRT DAD mutant coactivated p53 transcriptional activity. Collectively, these data highlight a biological role for SMRT in mediating DNA damage responses and suggest a model where p53 binding to the DAD limits HDAC3 interaction with this coregulator, thereby facilitating SMRT coactivation of p53-dependent gene expression.

  20. Mechanism of DNA–binding loss upon single-point mutation in p53

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    understanding of protein−DNA recognition, the mechanism(s) underlying the loss in protein−DNA binding affinity/ specificity upon ... Keywords. p53 mutants; protein-DNA interactions; molecular dynamics simulations; free energy decomposition. Abbreviations ...... Garbuzynskiy S O, Melnik B S, Lobanov M Y, Finkelstein A V.

  1. Disparate chromatin landscapes and kinetics of inactivation impact differential regulation of p53 target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Nathan P; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2010-09-01

    The p53 transcription factor regulates the expression of genes involved in cellular responses to stress, including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The p53 transcriptional program is extremely malleable, with target gene expression varying in a stress- and cell type-specific fashion. The molecular mechanisms underlying differential p53 target gene expression remain elusive. Here we provide evidence for gene-specific mechanisms affecting expression of three important p53 target genes. First we show that transcription of the apoptotic gene PUMA is regulated through intragenic chromatin boundaries, as revealed by distinct histone modification territories that correlate with binding of the insulator factors CTCF, Cohesins and USF1/2. Interestingly, this mode of regulation produces an evolutionary conserved long non-coding RNA of unknown function. Second, we demonstrate that the kinetics of transcriptional competence of the cell cycle arrest gene p21 and the apoptotic gene FAS are markedly different in vivo, as predicted by recent biochemical dissection of their core promoter elements in vitro. After a pulse of p53 activity in cells, assembly of the transcriptional apparatus on p21 is rapidly reversed, while FAS transcriptional activation is more sustained. Collectively these data add to a growing list of p53-autonomous mechanisms that impact differential regulation of p53 target genes.

  2. Human neuroblastoma cells with acquired resistance to the p53 activator RITA retain functional p53 and sensitivity to other p53 activating agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaelis, M.; Rothweiler, F.; Agha, B.; Barth, S.; Voges, Y.; Loeschmann, N.; von Deimling, A.; Breitling, R.; Doerr, H. Wilhelm; Roedel, F.; Speidel, D.; Cinatl, J.; Cinatl Jr., J.; Stephanou, A.

    Adaptation of wild-type p53 expressing UKF-NB-3 cancer cells to the murine double minute 2 inhibitor nutlin-3 causes de novo p53 mutations at high frequency (13/20) and multi-drug resistance. Here, we show that the same cells respond very differently when adapted to RITA, a drug that, like nutlin-3,

  3. p53 Over-expression and p53 mutations in colon carcinomas: Relation to dietary risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuil, D.W.; Kampman, E.; Kraats, A.A. van; Balder, H.F.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that dietary factors may differently affect p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to colon cancer. Results of such studies may depend on the method used to assess p53 status. This case-control study of 185 colon-cancer cases and 259 controls examines this

  4. Screening of medicinal plant phytochemicals as natural antagonists of p53-MDM2 interaction to reactivate p53 functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Ashfaq, Usman A; Qasim, Muhammad; Yasmeen, Erum; Ul Qamar, Muhammad T; Anwar, Farooq

    2017-10-01

    In most types of cancer, overexpression of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) often leads to inactivation of p53. The crystal structure of MDM2, with a 109-residue amino-terminal domain, reveals that MDM2 has a core hydrophobic region to which p53 binds as an amphipathic α helix. The interface depends on the steric complementarity between MDM2 and the hydrophobic region of p53. Especially, on p53's triad, amino acids Phe19, Trp23 and Leu26 bind to the MDM2 core. Results from studies suggest that the structural motif of both p53 and MDM2 can be attributed to similarities in the amphipathic α helix. Thus, in the current investigation it is hypothesized that the similarity in the structural motif might be the cause of p53 inactivation by MDM2. Hence, molecular docking and phytochemical screening approaches are appraised to inhibit the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2 and to stop p53-MDM2 interaction, resulting in reactivation of p53 activity. For this purpose, a library of 2295 phytochemicals were screened against p53-MDM2 to find potential candidates. Of these, four phytochemicals including epigallocatechin gallate, alvaradoin M, alvaradoin E and nordihydroguaiaretic acid were found to be potential inhibitors of p53-MDM2 interaction. The screened phytochemicals, derived from natural extracts, may have negligible side effects and can be explored as potent antagonists of p53-MDM2 interactions, resulting in reactivation of the normal transcription of p53.

  5. Chemical Variations on the p53 Reactivation Theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. A. Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the tumor suppressor genes, p53 is one of the most studied. It is widely regarded as the “guardian of the genome”, playing a major role in carcinogenesis. In fact, direct inactivation of the TP53 gene occurs in more than 50% of malignancies, and in tumors that retain wild-type p53 status, its function is usually inactivated by overexpression of negative regulators (e.g., MDM2 and MDMX. Hence, restoring p53 function in cancer cells represents a valuable anticancer approach. In this review, we will present an updated overview of the most relevant small molecules developed to restore p53 function in cancer cells through inhibition of the p53-MDMs interaction, or direct targeting of wild-type p53 or mutated p53. In addition, optimization approaches used for the development of small molecules that have entered clinical trials will be presented.

  6. p53 interaction with JMJD3 results in its nuclear distribution during mouse neural stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Solá

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Conserved elements of apoptosis are also integral components of cellular differentiation. In this regard, p53 is involved in neurogenesis, being required for neurite outgrowth in primary neurons and for axonal regeneration in mice. Interestingly, demethylases regulate p53 activity and its interaction with co-activators by acting on non-histone proteins. In addition, the histone H3 lysine 27-specific demethylase JMJD3 induces ARF expression, thereby stabilizing p53 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We hypothesized that p53 interacts with key regulators of neurogenesis to redirect stem cells to differentiation, as an alternative to cell death. Specifically, we investigated the potential cross-talk between p53 and JMJD3 during mouse neural stem cell (NSC differentiation. Our results demonstrated that JMJD3 mRNA and protein levels were increased early in mouse NSC differentiation, when JMJD3 activity was readily detected. Importantly, modulation of JMJD3 in NSCs resulted in changes of total p53 protein, coincident with increased ARF mRNA and protein expression. ChIP analysis revealed that JMJD3 was present at the promoter and exon 1 regions of ARF during neural differentiation, although without changes in H3K27me3. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a direct interaction between p53 and JMJD3, independent of the C-terminal region of JMJD3, and modulation of p53 methylation by JMJD3-demethylase activity. Finally, transfection of mutant JMJD3 showed that the demethylase activity of JMJD3 was crucial in regulating p53 cellular distribution and function. In conclusion, JMJD3 induces p53 stabilization in mouse NSCs through ARF-dependent mechanisms, directly interacts with p53 and, importantly, causes nuclear accumulation of p53. This suggests that JMJD3 and p53 act in a common pathway during neurogenesis.

  7. The proline rich domain of p53 is dispensable for MGMT-dependent DNA repair and cell survival following alkylation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Katherine; Yang, Mao; Dillon, Christopher P; Samson, Leona L; Green, Douglas R

    2017-11-01

    In addition to promoting cell death and senescence, p53 also has important cellular survival functions. A mutant p53, lacking a proline-rich domain (p53ΔP), that is deficient in controlling both cell death and cell cycle arrest, was employed to determine the biological means by which p53 mediates survival upon DNA damage. While p53ΔP and p53-/- cells were equally resistant to many DNA damaging agents, p53ΔP cells showed an exquisite resistance to high doses of the alkylating agent Diazald (N-Methyl-N-(p-tolylsulfonyl)nitrosamide), as compared to cells completely deficient for p53 function. We determined that p53ΔP was capable of transcribing the repair gene, MGMT (O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) after irradiation or alkylation damage, resulting in DNA repair and cell survival. Consistent with these observations, p53ΔP mice show enhanced survival after IR relative to p53-/- mice. Suppression or deletion of MGMT expression in p53ΔP cells inhibited DNA repair and survival after alkylation damage, whereas MGMT overexpression in p53-deficient cells facilitated DNA repair and conferred survival advantage. This study shows that when cell death and cell cycle arrest pathways are inhibited, p53 can still mediate MGMT-dependent repair, to promote cell survival upon DNA damage.

  8. Human bladder cancer cells undergo cisplatin-induced apoptosis that is associated with p53-dependent and p53-independent responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantakou, Eumorphia G; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E; Karkoulis, Panagiotis K; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Margaritis, Lukas H; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J

    2009-08-01

    Cisplatin is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent and a powerful component of standard treatment regimens for several human malignancies including bladder cancer. DNA-Pt adducts produced by cisplatin are mainly responsible for cellular toxicity and induction of apoptosis. Identification of the mechanisms that control sensitivity to cisplatin is central to improving its therapeutic index and to successfully encountering the acquired resistance frequently emerging during therapy. In the present study, using MTT-based assays, Western blotting and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we examined the apoptosis-related cellular responses to cisplatin exposure in two human urinary bladder cancer cell lines characterized by different malignancy grade and p53 genetic status. Both RT4 (grade I; wild-type p53) and T24 (grade III; mutant p53) cell types proved to be vulnerable to cisplatin apoptotic activity, albeit in a grade-dependent and drug dose-specific manner, as demonstrated by the proteolytic processing profiles of Caspase-8, Caspase-9, Caspase-3, and the Caspase repertoire characteristic substrates PARP and Lamin A/C, as well. The differential resistance of RT4 and T24 cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis was associated with an RT4-specific phosphorylation (Ser15; Ser392) pattern of p53, together with structural amputations of the Akt and XIAP anti-apoptotic regulators. Furthermore, cisplatin administration resulted in a Granzyme B-mediated proteolytic cleavage of Hsp90 molecular chaperone, exclusively occurring in RT4 cells. To generate functional networks, expression analysis of a number of genes, including Bik, Bim, Bcl-2, FAP-1, Fas, FasL, TRAIL, Puma, Caspase-10, ATP7A, ATP7B and MRP1, was performed, strongly supporting the role of p53-dependent and p53-independent transcriptional responses in cisplatin-induced apoptosis of bladder cancer cells.

  9. Targeting the p53 Pathway in Ewing Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Neilsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumour suppressor plays a pivotal role in the prevention of oncogenic transformation. Cancers frequently evade the potent antitumour surveillance mechanisms of p53 through mutation of the TP53 gene, with approximately 50% of all human malignancies expressing dysfunctional, mutated p53 proteins. Interestingly, genetic lesions in the TP53 gene are only observed in 10% of Ewing Sarcomas, with the majority of these sarcomas expressing a functional wild-type p53. In addition, the p53 downstream signaling pathways and DNA-damage cell cycle checkpoints remain functionally intact in these sarcomas. This paper summarizes recent insights into the functional capabilities and regulation of p53 in Ewing Sarcoma, with a particular focus on the cross-talk between p53 and the EWS-FLI1 gene rearrangement frequently associated with this disease. The development of several activators of p53 is discussed, with recent evidence demonstrating the potential of small molecule p53 activators as a promising systemic therapeutic approach for the treatment of Ewing Sarcomas with wild-type p53.

  10. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  11. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressy, Christian; Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2017-06-16

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53) or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73) were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  12. p53: key conductor of all anti-acne therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2017-09-19

    This review based on translational research predicts that the transcription factor p53 is the key effector of all anti-acne therapies. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) enhance p53 expression. Tetracyclines and macrolides via inhibiting p450 enzymes attenuate ATRA degradation, thereby increase p53. Benzoyl peroxide and hydrogen peroxide elicit oxidative stress, which upregulates p53. Azelaic acid leads to mitochondrial damage associated with increased release of reactive oxygen species inducing p53. p53 inhibits the expression of androgen receptor and IGF-1 receptor, and induces the expression of IGF binding protein 3. p53 induces FoxO1, FoxO3, p21 and sestrin 1, sestrin 2, and tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), the key inducer of isotretinoin-mediated sebocyte apoptosis explaining isotretinoin's sebum-suppressive effect. Anti-androgens attenuate the expression of miRNA-125b, a key negative regulator of p53. It can thus be concluded that all anti-acne therapies have a common mode of action, i.e., upregulation of the guardian of the genome p53. Immortalized p53-inactivated sebocyte cultures are unfortunate models for studying acne pathogenesis and treatment.

  13. p53 RNA interactions: new clues in an old mystery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kasandra J-L; Maher, L James

    2007-11-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is typically considered to be a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factor. However, reports over the last 15 years have described RNA binding by p53 in a variety of contexts, suggesting the possibility of new p53 functions. It is clear that p53-RNA interactions are mediated by a nucleic acid-binding domain of p53 independent of the sequence-specific core domain responsible for DNA recognition. Reports disagree on several aspects of the putative RNA interaction, including sequence specificity and biological relevance. Here we review the history and recent advances in the study of p53-RNA interactions. We argue that p53-RNA interactions are sequence nonspecific and depend on incomplete post-translational modification of the p53 C-terminal domain when the protein is expressed in heterologous systems. It is unknown what fraction of p53 protein exists in a state competent for RNA binding in vivo. Thus, potential physiological roles of p53-RNA interactions remain mysterious.

  14. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  15. P53 family members modulate the expression of PRODH, but not PRODH2, via intronic p53 response elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Raimondi

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 was previously shown to markedly up-regulate the expression of the PRODH gene, encoding the proline dehydrogenase (PRODH enzyme, which catalyzes the first step in proline degradation. Also PRODH2, which degrades 4-hydroxy-L-proline, a product of protein (e.g. collagen catabolism, was recently described as a p53 target. Here, we confirmed p53-dependent induction of endogenous PRODH in response to genotoxic damage in cell lines of different histological origin. We established that over-expression of TAp73β or TAp63β is sufficient to induce PRODH expression in p53-null cells and that PRODH expression parallels the modulation of endogenous p73 by genotoxic drugs in several cell lines. The p53, p63, and p73-dependent transcriptional activation was linked to specific intronic response elements (REs, among those predicted by bioinformatics tools and experimentally validated by a yeast-based transactivation assay. p53 occupancy measurements were validated in HCT116 and MCF7 human cell lines. Conversely, PRODH2 was not responsive to p63 nor p73 and, at best, could be considered a weak p53 target. In fact, minimal levels of PRODH2 transcript induction by genotoxic stress was observed exclusively in one of four p53 wild-type cell lines tested. Consistently, all predicted p53 REs in PRODH2 were poor matches to the p53 RE consensus and showed very weak responsiveness, only to p53, in the functional assay. Taken together, our results highlight that PRODH, but not PRODH2, expression is under the control of p53 family members, specifically p53 and p73. This supports a deeper link between proteins of the p53-family and metabolic pathways, as PRODH modulates the balance of proline and glutamate levels and those of their derivative alpha-keto-glutarate (α-KG under normal and pathological (tumor conditions.

  16. Cancer cell sensitivity to bortezomib is associated with survivin expression and p53 status but not cancer cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanan-Khan Asher A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin is known playing a role in drug resistance. However, its role in bortezomib-mediated inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis is unclear. There are conflicting reports for the effect of bortezomib on survivin expression, which lacks of a plausible explanation. Methods: In this study, we tested cancer cells with both p53 wild type and mutant/null background for the relationship of bortezomib resistance with survivin expression and p53 status using MTT assay, flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, western blots and RNAi technology. Results We found that cancer cells with wild type p53 show a low level expression of survivin and are sensitive to treatment with bortezomib, while cancer cells with a mutant or null p53 show a high level expression of survivin and are resistant to bortezomib-mediated apoptosis induction. However, silencing of survivin expression utilizing survivin mRNA-specific siRNA/shRNA in p53 mutant or null cells sensitized cancer cells to bortezomib mediated apoptosis induction, suggesting a role for survivin in bortezomib resistance. We further noted that modulation of survivin expression by bortezomib is dependent on p53 status but independent of cancer cell types. In cancer cells with mutated p53 or p53 null, bortezomib appears to induce survivin expression, while in cancer cells with wild type p53, bortezomib downregulates or shows no significant effect on survivin expression, which is dependent on the drug concentration, cell line and exposure time. Conclusions Our findings, for the first time, unify the current inconsistent findings for bortezomib treatment and survivin expression, and linked the effect of bortezomib on survivin expression, apoptosis induction and bortezomib resistance in the relationship with p53 status, which is independent of cancer cell types. Further mechanistic studies along with this line may impact the optimal clinical application of bortezomib in

  17. Senescence and aging: the critical roles of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufini, A; Tucci, P; Celardo, I; Melino, G

    2013-10-24

    p53 functions as a transcription factor involved in cell-cycle control, DNA repair, apoptosis and cellular stress responses. However, besides inducing cell growth arrest and apoptosis, p53 activation also modulates cellular senescence and organismal aging. Senescence is an irreversible cell-cycle arrest that has a crucial role both in aging and as a robust physiological antitumor response, which counteracts oncogenic insults. Therefore, via the regulation of senescence, p53 contributes to tumor growth suppression, in a manner strictly dependent by its expression and cellular context. In this review, we focus on the recent advances on the contribution of p53 to cellular senescence and its implication for cancer therapy, and we will discuss p53's impact on animal lifespan. Moreover, we describe p53-mediated regulation of several physiological pathways that could mediate its role in both senescence and aging.

  18. "Super p53" mice display retinal astroglial changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J Salazar

    Full Text Available Tumour-suppressor genes, such as the p53 gene, produce proteins that inhibit cell division under adverse conditions, as in the case of DNA damage, radiation, hypoxia, or oxidative stress (OS. The p53 gene can arrest proliferation and trigger death by apoptosis subsequent to several factors. In astrocytes, p53 promotes cell-cycle arrest and is involved in oxidative stress-mediated astrocyte cell death. Increasingly, astrocytic p53 is proving fundamental in orchestrating neurodegenerative disease pathogenesis. In terms of ocular disease, p53 may play a role in hypoxia due to ischaemia and may be involved in the retinal response to oxidative stress (OS. We studied the influence of the p53 gene in the structural and quantitative characteristics of astrocytes in the retina. Adult mice of the C57BL/6 strain (12 months old were distributed into two groups: 1 mice with two extra copies of p53 ("super p53"; n = 6 and 2 wild-type p53 age-matched control, as the control group (WT; n = 6. Retinas from each group were immunohistochemically processed to locate the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. GFAP+ astrocytes were manually counted and the mean area occupied for one astrocyte was quantified. Retinal-astrocyte distribution followed established patterns; however, morphological changes were seen through the retinas in relation to p53 availability. The mean GFAP+ area occupied by one astrocyte in "super p53" eyes was significantly higher (p<0.05; Student's t-test than in the WT. In addition, astroglial density was significantly higher in the "super p53" retinas than in the WT ones, both in the whole-retina (p<0,01 Student's t-test and in the intermediate and peripheral concentric areas of the retina (p<0.05 Student's t-test. This fact might improve the resistance of the retinal cells against OS and its downstream signalling pathways.

  19. TRIM65 negatively regulates p53 through ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Ma, Chengyuan [Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Zhou, Tong [Department of Endocrinology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Liu, Ying [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Sun, Luyao [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Yu, Zhenxiang, E-mail: zhenxiangyu2015@gmail.com [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China)

    2016-04-22

    Tripartite-motif protein family member 65 (TRIM65) is an important protein involved in white matter lesion. However, the role of TRIM65 in human cancer remains less understood. Through the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) gene alteration database, we found that TRIM65 is upregulated in a significant portion of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients. Our cell growth assay revealed that TRIM65 overexpression promotes cell proliferation, while knockdown of TRIM65 displays opposite effect. Mechanistically, TRIM65 binds to p53, one of the most critical tumor suppressors, and serves as an E3 ligase toward p53. Consequently, TRIM65 inactivates p53 through facilitating p53 poly-ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Notably, chemotherapeutic reagent cisplatin induction of p53 is markedly attenuated in response to ectopic expression of TRIM65. Cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown is more significant in p53 positive H460 than p53 negative H1299 cells, and knockdown of p53 in H460 cells also shows compromised cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown, indicating that p53 is required, at least in part, for TRIM65 function. Our findings demonstrate TRIM65 as a potential oncogenic protein, highly likely through p53 inactivation, and provide insight into development of novel approaches targeting TRIM65 for NSCLC treatment, and also overcoming chemotherapy resistance. - Highlights: • TRIM65 expression is elevated in NSCLC. • TRIM65 inactivates p53 through mediating p53 ubiquitination and degradation. • TRIM65 attenuates the response of NSCLC cells to cisplatin.

  20. Analysis of p53- immunoreactivity in astrocytic brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkarenko T.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available P53 is an antioncogene with the frequently occured mutations in human tumor cells, leading to corresponding protein overexpression which can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Researches dedicated to the investigation of possibilities of using this technique gave controversial results. The authors investigated features of p53 protein expression in astrocytic brain tumors with different degrees of malignancy. Analyzed the relationship of the expression level of p53 by tumor cells with clinical parameters and Ki-67 proliferation index (PI as well. Tissues were collected from 52 cases with diagnosed astrocytic brain tumors. The sections were immunohistochemically stained with p53 and Ki-67. For each marker, 1000 tumor cells were counted and the ratio of positive tumor cells was calculated using software package ImageJ 1,47v. In normal brain tissue p53- expression was not identified. p53-immunoreactive tumor cells were detected in 25% (1/4 pilocytic astrocytomas, 33.3% (2/6 of diffuse astrocytomas, 53.8% (7/13 anaplastic astrocytomas, 58.6% (17/29 glioblastomas. A high proportion of p53-immunoreactive cells (> 30% was observed only in glioblastomas. The level of p53-imunoreactivity was not related to the age, gender and Grade WHO (p> 0,05. Spearman correlation coefficient between the relative quantity of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive nuclei showed weak direct correlation (0.023, but the one was not statistically significant (p> 0,05. The level of p53-imunoreactivity is not dependent from age and sex of patients, Grade (WHO and proliferative activity (p>0,05 but the high level of p53-immunoreactive cells (>30% is found in glioblastoma specimens only, that may be due to the accumulation of mutations in DNA of tumor cells. There is insignificant weak relationship between relative quantities of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive tumor cells (p>0,05.

  1. Chk2 and p53 regulate the transmission of healed chromosomes in the Drosophila male germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon W A Titen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available When a dicentric chromosome breaks in mitosis, the broken ends cannot be repaired by normal mechanisms that join two broken ends since each end is in a separate daughter cell. However, in the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a broken end may be healed by de novo telomere addition. We find that Chk2 (encoded by lok and P53, major mediators of the DNA damage response, have strong and opposite influences on the transmission of broken-and-healed chromosomes: lok mutants exhibit a large increase in the recovery of healed chromosomes relative to wildtype control males, but p53 mutants show a strong reduction. This contrasts with the soma, where mutations in lok and p53 have the nearly identical effect of allowing survival and proliferation of cells with irreparable DNA damage. Examination of testes revealed a transient depletion of germline cells after dicentric chromosome induction in the wildtype controls, and further showed that P53 is required for the germline to recover. Although lok mutant males transmit healed chromosomes at a high rate, broken chromosome ends can also persist through spermatogonial divisions without healing in lok mutants, giving rise to frequent dicentric bridges in Meiosis II. Cytological and genetic analyses show that spermatid nuclei derived from such meiotic divisions are eliminated during spermiogenesis, resulting in strong meiotic drive. We conclude that the primary responsibility for maintaining genome integrity in the male germline lies with Chk2, and that P53 is required to reconstitute the germline when cells are eliminated owing to unrepaired DNA damage.

  2. Evolution of the p53-MDM2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åberg, Emma; Saccoccia, Fulvio; Grabherr, Manfred; Ore, Wai Ying Josefin; Jemth, Per; Hultqvist, Greta

    2017-08-03

    The p53 signalling pathway, which controls cell fate, has been extensively studied due to its prominent role in tumor development. The pathway includes the tumor supressor protein p53, its vertebrate paralogs p63 and p73, and their negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4. The p53/p63/p73-MDM system is ancient and can be traced in all extant animal phyla. Despite this, correct phylogenetic trees including both vertebrate and invertebrate species of the p53/p63/p73 and MDM families have not been published. Here, we have examined the evolution of the p53/p63/p73 protein family with particular focus on the p53/p63/p73 transactivation domain (TAD) and its co-evolution with the p53/p63/p73-binding domain (p53/p63/p73BD) of MDM2. We found that the TAD and p53/p63/p73BD share a strong evolutionary connection. If one of the domains of the protein is lost in a phylum, then it seems very likely to be followed by loss of function by the other domain as well, and due to the loss of function it is likely to eventually disappear. By focusing our phylogenetic analysis to p53/p63/p73 and MDM proteins from phyla that retain the interaction domains TAD and p53/p63/p73BD, we built phylogenetic trees of p53/p63/p73 and MDM based on both vertebrate and invertebrate species. The trees follow species evolution and contain a total number of 183 and 98 species for p53/p63/p73 and MDM, respectively. We also demonstrate that the p53/p63/p73 and MDM families result from whole genome duplications. The signaling pathway of the TAD and p53/p63/p73BD in p53/p63/p73 and MDM, respectively, dates back to early metazoan time and has since then tightly co-evolved, or disappeared in distinct lineages.

  3. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0036 TITLE: Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Carol S. Lim University of Utah...Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0036 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Carol S. Lim...ABSTRACT In this final report, we show gene therapy using re-engineered super p53 (p53-CC constructs) kills some ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro

  4. NQO1 stabilizes p53 through a distinct pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Asher, Gad; Lotem, Joseph; Kama, Rachel; Sachs, Leo; Shaul, Yosef

    2002-01-01

    Wild-type p53 is a tumor-suppressor gene that encodes a short-lived protein that, upon accumulation, induces growth arrest or apoptosis. Accumulation of p53 occurs mainly by posttranslational events that inhibit its proteosomal degradation. We have reported previously that inhibition of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) activity by dicoumarol induces degradation of p53, indicating that NQO1 plays a role in p53 stabilization. We now have found that wild-type NQO1, but not the inactive p...

  5. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    OpenAIRE

    Fatouma Alimirah; Ravichandran Panchanathan; Jianming Chen; Xiang Zhang; Shuk-Mei Ho; Divaker Choubey

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer (PC) is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in hu...

  6. A naturally occurring 4-bp deletion in the intron 4 of p53 creates a spectrum of novel p53 isoforms with anti-apoptosis function

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Hui; Tao, Ting; Huang, Delai; Ou, Zhao; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2014-01-01

    p53 functions as a tumor suppressor by transcriptionally regulating the expression of genes involved in controlling cell proliferation or apoptosis. p53 and its isoform ?133p53/?113p53 form a negative regulation loop in that p53 activates the expression of ?133p53/?113p53 while ?133p53/?113p53 specifically antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity. This pathway is especially important to safeguard the process of embryogenesis because sudden activation of p53 by DNA damage signals or developmental st...

  7. Tobacco, alcohol, and p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia

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    Mansukhani Mahesh

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 tumor suppressor gene is commonly mutated in colorectal cancer. While the effect of p53 mutations on colorectal cancer prognosis has been heavily studied, less is known about how epidemiologic risk factors relate to p53 status, particularly in early colorectal neoplasia prior to clinically invasive colorectal cancer (including adenomas, carcinoma in situ (CIS, and intramucosal carcinoma. Methods We examined p53 status, as measured by protein overexpression, in 157 cases with early colorectal neoplasia selected from three New York City colonoscopy clinics. After collecting paraffin-embedded tissue blocks, immunohistochemistry was performed using an anti-p53 monoclonal mouse IgG2a [BP53-12-1] antibody. We analyzed whether p53 status was different for risk factors for colorectal neoplasia relative to a polyp-free control group (n = 508. Results p53 overexpression was found in 10.3%, 21.7%, and 34.9%, of adenomatous polyps, CIS, and intramucosal cases, respectively. Over 90% of the tumors with p53 overexpression were located in the distal colon and rectum. Heavy cigarette smoking (30+ years was associated with cases not overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1–2.9 but not with those cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.4–2.6. Heavy beer consumption (8+ bottles per week was associated with cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.3–12.0 but not with cases without p53 overexpression (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 0.7–3.7. Conclusion Our findings that p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia may be positively associated with alcohol intake and inversely associated with cigarette smoking are consistent with those of several studies of p53 expression and invasive cancer, and suggest that there may be relationships of smoking and alcohol with p53 early in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence.

  8. Absence of p53 enhances growth defects and etoposide sensitivity of human cells lacking the Bloom syndrome helicase BLM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Sairei; Adachi, Noritaka; Koyama, Hideki

    2007-07-01

    The Bloom syndrome helicase BLM and the tumor-suppressor protein p53 play important roles in preserving genome integrity. Here, we knock out the genes for BLM and p53 in a human pre-B-cell line, Nalm-6. We show that p53 plays an important role in cell proliferation, but not apoptosis, when BLM is absent. Intriguingly, despite the apoptotic function of p53, BLM(/)TP53(/) cells were more sensitive than either single mutant to etoposide, an anticancer agent that poisons DNA topoisomerase II. Our results suggest a direct, BLM-independent role for p53 in etoposide-induced, topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage in human cells.

  9. Functional consequence of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkoori, Venkat R; Manne, Upender; Chaturvedi, Lakshmi S; Basson, Marc D; Haan, Pam; Coffey, Daniel; Bumpers, Harvey L

    2017-09-29

    The codon 72 polymorphism in p53 has been implicated in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, prognosis and CRC health disparities. We examined the functional consequence of this polymorphism in CRC. Plasmids (pCMV6) that express different phenotypes of p53 [p53 wild type (wt) at codon 72 (R72wt), R72wt with mutation at codon 273 cysteine (R72273Cys), p53 mutation at codon 72 (P72wt) and P72wt with mutation at codon 273 (P72273Cys)] were constructed. The CRC cell line Caco2, which does not express p53 for in vitro studies, was used as host. CRC xenografts were established in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice using established cell lines. CRC surgical specimens, corresponding normal colon, and tumor xenografts were sequenced for codon 72 polymorphism of p53. Proteins signaling mechanisms were evaluated to assess the functional consequence of P72 phenotype of p53. This study demonstrated a significantly increased survival of cells expressing P72wt, mutant phenotype, versus R72wt phenotype. WB analyses revealed that P72wt induced activation of p38 and RAF/MEK/ extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAP kinases. Activation of CREB was found to be higher in tumors that exhibit P72 phenotype. Metastatic lesions of CRC expressed more phospho-CREB than non-metastatic lesions. The expression of P72wt promoted CRC metastasis. P72 contributes to the aggressiveness of CRC. Because P72 is over-expressed in CRC, specifically in African-American patients, this suggests a role for P72 in cancer health disparities. This work was supported by NIH/NCI Workforce Diversity Grant R21-CA171251 & U54CA118948.

  10. Rbm24, a target of p53, is necessary for proper expression of p53 and heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Yanhong; Xu, Enshun; Mohibi, Shakur; de Anda, Danielle Michelle; Jiang, Yuqian; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xinbin

    2018-01-22

    Activation of p53-dependent apoptosis is critical for tumor suppression but aberrant activation of p53 also leads to developmental defects and heart failure. Here, we found that Rbm24 RNA-binding protein, a target of p53, regulates p53 mRNA translation. Mechanistically, we found that through binding to p53 mRNA and interaction with translation initiation factor eIF4E, Rbm24 prevents eIF4E from binding to p53 mRNA and inhibits the assembly of translation initiation complex. Importantly, we showed that mice deficient in Rbm24 die in utero due to the endocardial cushion defect in the heart at least in part due to aberrant activation of p53-dependent apoptosis. We also showed that the heart developmental defect in Rbm24-null mice can be partially rescued by p53 deficiency through decreased apoptosis in the heart. Together, we postulate that the p53-Rbm24 loop is critical for the heart development and may be explored for mitigating congenital heart diseases and heart failure.

  11. Restoration of p53 using the novel MDM2-p53 antagonist APG115 suppresses dedifferentiated papillary thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haibo; Luo, Dingyuan; Zhang, Lin; Lin, Xiaofeng; Luo, Qiuyun; Yi, Hanjie; Wang, Jing; Yan, Xianglei; Li, Baoxia; Chen, Yuelei; Liu, Xingguang; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Sheng; Qiu, Miaozhen; Yang, Dajun; Jiang, Ningyi

    2017-06-27

    Dedifferentiated papillary thyroid cancer (DePTC) is characterized by aggressive growth, recurrence, distant metastasis, and resistance to radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. DePTC is also accompanied by poor prognosis and high early-mortality. Nevertheless, most DePTC cells show intact p53 downstream functionality. In cells with wild-type p53, the murine double minute2 (MDM2) protein interacts with p53 and abrogates its activity. Inhibition of the MDM2-p53 interaction restores p53 activity and leads to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Restoring p53 function by inhibiting its interaction with p53 suppressors such as MDM2 is thus a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of DePTC. The novel MDM2-p53 interaction antagonist APG115 is an analogue of SAR405838, and is being tested in a phase I clinical trial. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of APG115 as a single-agent to treat DePTC. APG115 diminished the viability of p53 wild-type DePTC cells and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In a human xenograft mouse model, APG115 elicited robust tumor regression and cell apoptosis. These data demonstrate that further research is warranted to determine whether APG115 can be used to effectively treat DePTC patients.

  12. Overexpression of p53 in Nigerian breast cancers and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mutation of the tumour suppressor gene, p53, is implicated in most cancers. This gene has also been associated with high tumour grade in breast cancers. African women are known to generally have high grade tumours. This study sought to determine the expression of p53 protein as well as the relationship ...

  13. Fermentative metabolism impedes p53-dependent apoptosis in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is known that the Warburg effect and Crabtree effect aredisplayed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, during growth on abundant glucose. Beyond this similarity, it was also demonstratedthat expression of human pro-apoptotic proteins in S. cerevisiae such as Bax and p53 caused apoptosis. Here, wedemonstrate that p53 ...

  14. Transcription pattern of p53-targeted DNA repair genes in the hypoxia-tolerant subterranean mole rat Spalax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Imad; Malik, Assaf; Manov, Irena; Joel, Alma; Band, Mark; Avivi, Aaron

    2013-04-12

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 induces growth arrest and/or apoptosis in response to DNA damage/hypoxia. Inactivation of p53 confers a selective advantage to tumor cells under a hypoxic microenvironment during tumor progression. The subterranean blind mole rat, Spalax, spends its life underground at low-oxygen tensions, hence developing a wide range of respiratory/molecular adaptations to hypoxic stress, including critical changes in p53 structure and signaling pathway. The highly conserved p53 Arg(R)-172 is substituted by lysine (K) in Spalax, identical with a tumor-associated mutation. Functionality assays revealed that Spalax p53 is unable to activate apoptotic target genes but is still capable of activating cell cycle arrest genes. Furthermore, we have shown that the transcription patterns of representative p53-induced genes (Apaf1 and Mdm2) in Spalax are influenced by hypoxia. Cell cycle arrest allows the cells to repair DNA damage via different DNA repair genes. We tested the transcription pattern of three p53-related DNA repair genes (p53R2, Mlh1, and Msh2) under normoxia and short-acute hypoxia in Spalax, C57BL/6 wild-type mice, and two strains of mutant C57BL/6 mice, each carrying a different mutation at the R172 position. Our results show that while wild-type/mutant mice exhibit strong hypoxia-induced reductions of repair gene transcript levels, no such inhibition is found in Spalax under hypoxia. Moreover, unlike mouse p53R2, Spalax p53R2 transcript levels are strongly elevated under hypoxia. These results suggest that critical repair functions, which are known to be inhibited under hypoxia in mice, remain active in Spalax, as part of its unique hypoxia tolerance mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. p16 and p53 in HPV-positive versus HPV-negative oral squamous cell carcinoma: do pathways differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vineeta; Husain, Nuzhat; Akhtar, Naseem; Khan, Mohammad Yahia; Sonkar, Abhinav A; Kumar, Vijay

    2017-10-01

    p16 overexpression and wild-type p53 expression are associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) in cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. Role of HPV-related carcinogenesis in the etiology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is still vague in Indian population. We aimed to explore the expression pattern of p16 and p53 in HPV-positive and HPV-negative OSCC to elicit differences, if any. Further their effect on survival of patients was studied. Thirty-one consecutive HPV-positive as well as 31 age and sex-matched HPV-negative OSCC cases from a case series of 369 histologically diagnosed cases of OSCC were included in this study. HPV was detected by two methods, viz. real-time PCR and conventional PCR in biopsy samples. p16 and p53 protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and p16 mRNA expression was quantified with real-time PCR using SYBR Green assay. p16 was expressed in six (19.4%) HPV-positive and in four (12.9%) HPV-negative cases. Overall mutant-type p53 expression in 62 OSCC cases was 54.8%. Out of ten p16-positive cases, eight expressed mutant-type p53 and only two cases expressed wild-type p53. Risk factors including oral tobacco consumption and alcohol were present in all these ten p16-positive cases. Survival of patients was not affected by HPV, p16 and p53 status. Presence of mutant-type p53 and exposure to tobacco-related risk factors in both HPV-positive and negative cases suggest existence of p53-related carcinogenesis in HPV-positive cases in Indian population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The role of p53-microRNA 200-Moesin axis in invasion and drug resistance of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Farheen; Mezhal, Fatima; El Hasasna, Hussain; Nair, Vidhya A; Aravind, S R; Saber Ayad, Maha; El-Serafi, Ahmed; Abdel-Rahman, Wael M

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to analyze the expression of microRNAs in relation to p53 status in breast cancer cells and to delineate the role of Moesin in this axis. We used three isogenic breast carcinoma cell lines MCF7 (with wild-type p53), 1001 (MCF7 with mutated p53), and MCF7-E6 (MCF7 in which p53 function was disrupted). MicroRNA expression was analyzed using microarray analysis and confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The 1001 clone with mutant p53 showed 22 upregulated and 25 downregulated microRNAs. The predicted targets of these 47 microRNAs were >700 human genes belonging to interesting functional groups such as stem cell development and maintenance. The most significantly downregulated microRNAs in the p53-mutant cell line were from the miR-200 family. We focused on miR-200c which targets many transcripts involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition including Moesin. We found that Moesin was expressed in 1001 but not in its p53 wild-type parental MCF7 consistent with the observed mesenchymal features in the 1001, such as vimentin positivity, E-cadherin negativity, and ZEB1 positivity in addition to the morphological changes. After Moesin silencing, the p53-mutant cells 1001 reverted from mesenchymal-to-epithelial phenotype and showed subtle reduction in migration and invasion and loss of ZEB1 and SNAIL expression. Interestingly, Moesin silencing restored the 1001 sensitivity to Doxorubicin. These results indicate that loss of miR-200c, as a consequence of p53 mutation, can upregulate Moesin oncogene and thus promote carcinogenesis. Moesin may play a role in metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer.

  17. COX-2 and p53 in human sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Cyr, Diane; Luce, Danièle

    2008-01-01

    to development of cancer. Many signals that activate COX-2 also induce tumor suppressor p53, a transcription factor central in cellular stress response. We investigated COX-2 and p53 expressions by immunohistochemistry in 50 SNCs (23 adenocarcinomas, and 27 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC); 48 analyzed for COX-2......; 41 for p53). Occupational histories and smoking habits were available for majority of the cases. Most of the adenocarcinoma cases with exposure history data had been exposed to wood dust at work in the past (88%, 14/16). For smokers, 63% (12/19) presented with SSC, whereas 64% (7/11) of nonsmokers...... the exposures and p53 accumulation were found; however, the p53 accumulation pattern (p = 0.062 for wood dust exposure) resembled that of COX-2 expression. In summary, our findings show increased COX-2 expression in SNC adenocarcinoma with wood dust exposure, suggesting a role for inflammatory components...

  18. p53 in the DNA damage repair process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ashley B.; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in protecting from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  19. Lunatic Fringe and p53 Cooperatively Suppress Mesenchymal Stem-Like Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Chung

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Claudin-low breast cancer (CLBC is a poor prognosis molecular subtype showing stemness and mesenchymal features. We previously discovered that deletion of a Notch signaling modulator, Lunatic Fringe (Lfng, in the mouse mammary gland induced a subset of tumors resembling CLBC. Here we report that deletion of one copy of p53 on this background not only accelerated mammary tumor development but also led to a complete penetrance of the mesenchymal stem-like phenotype. All mammary tumors examined in the Lfng/p53 compound mutant mice displayed a mesenchymal/spindloid pathology. These tumors showed high level expressions of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT markers including Vimentin, Twist, and PDGFRα, a gene known to be enriched in CLBC. Prior to tumor onset, Lfng/p53 mutant mammary glands exhibited increased levels of Vimentin and E-cadherin, but decreased expressions of cytokeratin 14 and cytokeratin 8, accompanied by elevated basal cell proliferation and an expanded mammary stem cell-enriched population. Lfng/p53 mutant glands displayed increased accumulation of Notch3 intracellular fragment, up-regulation of Hes5 and down-regulation of Hes1. Analysis in human breast cancer datasets found the lowest HES1 and second lowest LFNG expressions in CLBC among molecular subtypes, and low level of LFNG is associated with poor survival. Immunostaining of human breast cancer tissue array found correlation between survival and LFNG immunoreactivity. Finally, patients carrying TP53 mutations express lower LFNG than patients with wild type TP53. Taken together, these data revealed genetic interaction between Lfng and p53 in mammary tumorigenesis, established a new mouse model resembling CLBC, and may suggest targeting strategy for this disease.

  20. HZE particle radiation induces tissue-specific and p53-dependent mutagenesis in transgenic animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic animals, with the integrated target gene, provide a unique approach for measuring and characterizing mutations in any tissue of the animal. We are using the plasmid-based lacZ transgenic mice with different p53 genetic background to examine radiation-induced genetic damage resulting from exposure to heavy particle radiation. We measured lacZ mutation frequencies (MF) in the brain and spleen tissues at various times after exposing animals to an acute dose of 1 Gy of 1GeV/amu iron particles. MF in the spleen of p53+/+ animals increased up to 2.6-fold above spontaneous levels at 8 weeks post irradiation. In contrast, brain MF from the same animals increased 1.7-fold above controls in the same period. In the p53-/- animals, brain MF increased to 2.2-fold above spontaneous levels at 1 week after treatment, but returned to control levels thereafter. Radiation also induced alterations in the spectrum of mutants in both tissues, accompanied by changes in the frequency of mutants with deletions extending past the transgene into mouse genomic DNA. Our results indicate that the accumulation of transgene MF after radiation exposure is dependant on the tissue examined as well as the p53 genetic background of the animals.

  1. p53-dependent and p53-independent anticancer activity of a new indole derivative in human osteosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappadone, C., E-mail: concettina.cappadone@unibo.it [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Stefanelli, C. [Department for Life Quality Studies, University of Bologna, Rimini Campus, Rimini (Italy); Malucelli, E. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Zini, M. [Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Onofrillo, C. [Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Locatelli, A.; Rambaldi, M.; Sargenti, A. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Merolle, L. [ELETTRA–Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); Farruggia, G. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Roma (Italy); Graziadio, A. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Montanaro, L. [Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Iotti, S. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Roma (Italy)

    2015-11-13

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, occurring most frequently in children and adolescents. The mechanism of formation and development of OS have been studied for a long time. Tumor suppressor pathway governed by p53 gene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Moreover, loss of wild-type p53 activity is thought to be a major predictor of failure to respond to chemotherapy in various human cancers. In previous studies, we described the activity of a new indole derivative, NSC743420, belonging to the tubulin inhibitors family, capable to induce apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle in the G2/M phase of various cancer cell lines. However, this molecule has never been tested on OS cell line. Here we address the activity of NSC743420 by examine whether differences in the p53 status could influence its effects on cell proliferation and death of OS cells. In particular, we compared the effect of the tested molecule on p53-wild type and p53-silenced U2OS cells, and on SaOS2 cell line, which is null for p53. Our results demonstrated that NSC743420 reduces OS cell proliferation by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. In particular, the molecule induces proliferative arrest that culminate to apoptosis in SaOS2 p53-null cells, while it brings a cytostatic and differentiating effect in U2OS cells, characterized by the cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. - Highlights: • The indole derivative NSC743420 induces antitumor effects on osteosarcoma cells. • p53 status could drive the activity of antitumor agents on osteosarcoma cells. • NSC743420 induces cytostatic and differentiating effects on U2OS cells. • NSC743420 causes apoptosis on p53-null SaOS2 cells.

  2. p53 selectively regulates developmental apoptosis of rod photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Vuong

    Full Text Available Retinal cells become post-mitotic early during post-natal development. It is likely that p53, a well-known cell cycle regulator, is involved in regulating the genesis, differentiation and death of retinal cells. Furthermore, retinal cells are under constant oxidative stress that can result in DNA damage, due to the extremely high level of metabolic activity associated with phototransduction. If not repaired, this damage may result in p53-dependent cell death and ensuing vision loss. In this study, the role of p53 during retinal development and in the post-mitotic retina is investigated. A previously described super p53 transgenic mouse that expresses an extra copy of the mouse p53 gene driven by its endogenous promoter is utilized. Another transgenic mouse (HIP that expresses the p53 gene in rod and cone photoreceptors driven by the human interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein promoter was generated. The electroretinogram (ERG of the super p53 mouse exhibited reduced rod-driven scotopic a and b wave and cone-driven photopic b wave responses. This deficit resulted from a reduced number of rod photoreceptors and inner nuclear layer cells. However, the reduced photopic signal arose only from lost inner retinal neurons, as cone numbers did not change. Furthermore, cell loss was non-progressive and resulted from increased apoptosis during retinal developmental as determined by TUNEL staining. In contrast, the continuous and specific expression of p53 in rod and cone photoreceptors in the mature retinas of HIP mice led to the selective loss of both rods and cones. These findings strongly support a role for p53 in regulating developmental apoptosis in the retina and suggest a potential role, either direct or indirect, for p53 in the degenerative photoreceptor loss associated with human blinding disorders.

  3. Wild-type alternatively spliced p53: binding to DNA and interaction with the major p53 protein in vitro and in cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Y.; Liu, Y; L. Lee; Miner, Z; Kulesz-Martin, M

    1994-01-01

    A p53 variant protein (p53as) generated from alternatively spliced p53 RNA is expressed in normal and malignant mouse cells and tissues, and p53as antigen activity is preferentially associated with the G2 phase of the cell cycle, suggesting that p53as and p53 protein may have distinct properties. Using p53as and p53 proteins translated in vitro, we now provide evidence that p53as protein has efficient sequence-specific DNA-binding ability. DNA binding by p53 protein is inefficient in comparis...

  4. Loss of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 causes increased tumour latency in p53-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Carmen; Mark, Manuel; Oliver, F.Javier; Huber, Aline; de Murcia, Gilbert; Ménissier-de Murcia, Josiane

    2001-01-01

    PARP-1-deficient mice display a severe defect in the base excision repair pathway leading to radiosensitivity and genomic instability. They are protected against necrosis induced by massive oxidative stress in various inflammatory processes. Mice lacking p53 are highly predisposed to malignancy resulting from defective cell cycle checkpoints, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis as well as from upregulation of the iNOS gene resulting in chronic oxidative stress. Here, we report the generation of doubly null mutant mice. We found that tumour-free survival of parp-1–/–p53–/– mice increased by 50% compared with that of parp- 1+/+p53–/– mice. Tumour formation in nude mice injected with oncogenic parp-1–/–p53–/– fibroblasts was significantly delayed compared with parp-1+/+p53–/– cells. Upon γ-irradiation, a partial restoration of S-phase radiosensitivity was found in parp-1–/–p53–/– primary fibroblasts compared with parp-1+/+p53–/– cells. In addition, iNOS expression and nitrite release were dramatically reduced in the parp-1–/–p53–/– mice compared with parp-1+/+p53–/– mice. The abrogation of the oxydated status of p53–/– cells, due to the absence of parp-1, may be the cause of the delay in the onset of tumorigenesis in parp-1–/–p53–/– mice. PMID:11432840

  5. A p53-bound enhancer region controls a long intergenic noncoding RNA required for p53 stress response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, C A; Léveillé, N; Rooijers, K; Wijchers, P J; Geeven, G; Tal, A; Melo, S A; de Laat, W; Agami, R

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide chromatin studies identified the tumor suppressor p53 as both a promoter and an enhancer-binding transcription factor. As an enhancer factor, p53 can induce local production of enhancer RNAs, as well as transcriptional activation of distal neighboring genes. Beyond the regulation of

  6. Fuzzy tandem repeats containing p53 response elements may define species-specific p53 target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Simeonova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary forces that shape regulatory networks remain poorly understood. In mammals, the Rb pathway is a classic example of species-specific gene regulation, as a germline mutation in one Rb allele promotes retinoblastoma in humans, but not in mice. Here we show that p53 transactivates the Retinoblastoma-like 2 (Rbl2 gene to produce p130 in murine, but not human, cells. We found intronic fuzzy tandem repeats containing perfect p53 response elements to be important for this regulation. We next identified two other murine genes regulated by p53 via fuzzy tandem repeats: Ncoa1 and Klhl26. The repeats are poorly conserved in evolution, and the p53-dependent regulation of the murine genes is lost in humans. Our results indicate a role for the rapid evolution of tandem repeats in shaping differences in p53 regulatory networks between mammalian species.

  7. Fuzzy tandem repeats containing p53 response elements may define species-specific p53 target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonova, Iva; Lejour, Vincent; Bardot, Boris; Bouarich-Bourimi, Rachida; Morin, Aurélie; Fang, Ming; Charbonnier, Laure; Toledo, Franck

    2012-06-01

    Evolutionary forces that shape regulatory networks remain poorly understood. In mammals, the Rb pathway is a classic example of species-specific gene regulation, as a germline mutation in one Rb allele promotes retinoblastoma in humans, but not in mice. Here we show that p53 transactivates the Retinoblastoma-like 2 (Rbl2) gene to produce p130 in murine, but not human, cells. We found intronic fuzzy tandem repeats containing perfect p53 response elements to be important for this regulation. We next identified two other murine genes regulated by p53 via fuzzy tandem repeats: Ncoa1 and Klhl26. The repeats are poorly conserved in evolution, and the p53-dependent regulation of the murine genes is lost in humans. Our results indicate a role for the rapid evolution of tandem repeats in shaping differences in p53 regulatory networks between mammalian species.

  8. p53: Biology and role for cellular radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahm-Daphi, J. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie und Onkologie

    2000-06-01

    Purpose: p53 is the most commonly mutated gene in human tumors with large impact on cellular biology and response to radiation. Many excellent reviews are available on various aspects but for several years none about the role of p53 for radiosensitivity. The latter is the aim of the present paper. Methods: Review of the literature. Results: p53 is a regulator of apoptosis mainly in hematopoetic tissue. In normal tissue and solid tumors presumably other functions have more impact on the cellular response. p53 controls cell-cycle progression after irradiation and also DNA-repair, namely homologous and non-homologous recombination. Mutations of p53 alter these functions which may be responsible for an enhanced cellular and tumor radioresistance. At present only few reports were able to show that under tightly controlled conditions loss of p53 wild-type function leads to enhanced radioresistance. A general proof is still lacking. Conclusion: The emerging picture in the year 2000 shows p53 as a central protein in a multi-enzyme multi-function network which is far from being fully understood. Although p53 appears to be a major regulator it is certainly not the unreplacable component the loss of which uniformly determines radioresistance. Only further understanding of modifiers and cooperators in the cell and in the specific tissue context will elucidate p53's role for radiosensitivity and radiotherapy. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: p53 ist das am haeufigsten mutierte Gen in menschlichen Tumoren mit grossem Einfluss auf die zellulaere Biologie und Strahlenantwort. Viele ausgezeichnete Uebersichten sind verfuegbar, aber seit Jahren keine, die die Rolle von p53 fuer die Strahlenempfindlichkeit beleuchtet. Dies ist das Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit. Methode: Literaturuebersicht. Ergebnis: p53 ist ein Regulator der Apoptose in haematopoetischen Gewerben. Im uebrigen Normalgewebe und in soliden Tumoren haben andere Funktionen groessere Bedeutung fuer die Zellantwort. Nach

  9. Cisplatinum and Taxol Induce Different Patterns of p53 Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Damia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modifications of p53 induced by two widely used anticancer agents, cisplatinum (DDP and taxol were investigated in two human cancer cell lines. Although both drugs were able to induce phosphorylation at serine 20 (Ser20, only DDP treatment induced p53 phosphorylation at serine 15 (Ser15. Moreover, both drug treatments were able to increase p53 levels and consequently the transcription of waf1 and mdm-2 genes, although DDP treatment resulted in a stronger inducer of both genes. Using two ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM cell lines, the role of ATM in druginduced p53 phosphorylations was investigated. No differences in drug-induced p53 phosphorylation could be observed, indicating that ATM is not the kinase involved in these phosphorylation events. In addition, inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity by wortmannin did not abolish p53 phosphorylation at Ser15 and Ser20, again indicating that DNA-PK is unlikely to be the kinase involved. After both taxol and DDP treatments, an activation of hCHK2 was found and this is likely to be responsible for phosphorylation at Ser20. In contrast, only DDP was able to activate ATR, which is the candidate kinase for phosphorylation of Ser15 by this drug. This data clearly suggests that differential mechanisms are involved in phosphorylation and activation of p53 depending on the drug type.

  10. CLCA2 as a p53-Inducible Senescence Mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chizu Tanikawa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available p53 is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently mutated in multiple cancer tissues. Activated p53 protein regulates its downstream genes and subsequently inhibits malignant transformation by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, and senescence. However, genes involved in the p53-mediated senescence pathway are not yet fully elucidated. Through the screening of two genome-wide expression profile data sets, one for cells in which exogenous p53 was introduced and the other for senescent fibroblasts, we have identified chloride channel accessory 2 (CLCA2 as a p53-inducible senescence-associated gene. CLCA2 was remarkably induced by replicative senescence as well as oxidative stress in a p53-dependent manner. We also found that ectopically expressed CLCA2 induced cellular senescence, and the down-regulation of CLCA2 by small interfering RNA caused inhibition of oxidative stress-induced senescence. Interestingly, the reduced expression of CLCA2 was frequently observed in various kinds of cancers including prostate cancer, whereas its expression was not affected in precancerous prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Thus, our findings suggest a crucial role of p53/CLCA2-mediated senescence induction as a barrier for malignant transformation.

  11. ZNF509S1 downregulates PUMA by inhibiting p53K382 acetylation and p53-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Han, Dohyun; Kim, Min-Kyeong; Kim, Youngsoo; Choi, Seo-Hyun; Song, Jiyang; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Kim, Kunhong; Hur, Man-Wook

    2017-09-01

    Expression of the POK family protein ZNF509L, and -its S1 isoform, is induced by p53 upon exposure to genotoxic stress. Due to alternative splicing of the ZNF509 primary transcript, ZNF509S1 lacks the 6 zinc-fingers and C-terminus of ZNF509L, resulting in only one zinc-finger. ZNF509L and -S1 inhibit cell proliferation by activating p21/CDKN1A and RB transcription, respectively. When cells are exposed to severe DNA damage, p53 activates PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) transcription. Interestingly, apoptosis due to transcriptional activation of PUMA by p53 is attenuated by ZNF509S1. Thus we investigated the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the transcriptional attenuation and anti-apoptotic effects of ZNF509S1. We show that ZNF509S1 modulation of p53 activity is important in PUMA gene transcription by modulating post-translational modification of p53 by p300. ZNF509S1 directly interacts with p53 and inhibits p300-mediated acetylation of p53 lysine K382, with deacetylation of p53 K382 leading to decreased DNA binding at the p53 response element 1 of the PUMA promoter. ZNF509S1 may play a role not only in cell cycle arrest, by activating RB expression, but also in rescuing cells from apoptotic death by repressing PUMA expression in cells exposed to severe DNA damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. p53 immunohistochemical staining patterns in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Dundy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mutation of p53 gene is one of the most common events in oral carcinogenesis. Accumulation of p53 protein has also been detected in premalignant lesions.Materials and Methods:  This study included 40 biopsy samples, which were received in department of pathology, Sarojini Naidu Medical College, Agra, to ascertain p53 expression by immunohistochemically, in patients with oral squamous cell carcinomas and to correlate its expression with histological grade, different sites in oral cavity and tobacco intake/smoking habits.Results: Out of 40 biopsies of oral mucosa, 03 showed normal oral mucosa and 37 were diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, most patients were in 5th and 6th decade and majority (86.5% of oral SCC were males with buccal mucosa being the most common site. There was a statistically significant difference in p53 expression between oral SCC and normal oral mucosa (p value <0.05. Of total 37 cases, 12 cases were well differentiated type, 16 moderately differentiated and 09 of poorly differentiated type of SCC. In each category, about two thirds were positive for p53 staining. Out of total 37 cases of oral SCC, 64.9% were positive and 35.1% were negative for p53 expression, 34 cases had positive history of tobacco intake/smoking habits, of which 23 cases were positive while 11 cases were negative for p53 staining.Conclusion: Abnormal p53 protein was detected in 64.9% of oral squamous cell carcinoma, but not in normal oral mucosa. p53 expression was associated with malignant transformation of oral mucosa. 

  13. POSTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS OF P53: UPSTREAM SIGNALING PATHWAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2003-10-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is posttranslational modified at >20 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the upstream signaling pathways whose activation in response to various genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses result in p53 posttranslational modifications.

  14. Targeting p53-MDM2-MDMX Loop for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qi; Zeng, Shelya X.; Lu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in anti-tumorigenesis and cancer therapy. It has been described as “the guardian of the genome”, because it is essential for conserving genomic stability by preventing mutation, and its mutation and inactivation are highly related to all human cancers. Two important p53 regulators, MDM2 and MDMX, inactivate p53 by directly inhibiting its transcriptional activity and mediating its ubiquitination in a feedback fashion, as their genes are also the tr...

  15. p53 and survival in early onset breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentile, M; Bergman Jungeström, M; Olsen, K E

    1999-01-01

    The p53 protein has proven to be central in tumorigenesis by its cell cycle regulatory properties and both gene mutations and protein accumulation have been associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. The present study was undertaken to investigate the prognostic significance of gene mutations......, p53 protein accumulation and of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TP53 locus in young (age ... (46%). Log rank analysis revealed no significant association between survival and TP53 mutations (in general), p53 protein accumulation or LOH. However, missense mutations localised to the zinc binding domain were significantly (P = 0.0007) associated with poorer prognosis. As indicated...

  16. p53/HMGB1 Complexes Regulate Autophagy and Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Livesey, Kristen M.; Kang, Rui; Vernon, Philip; Buchser, William; Loughran, Patricia; Watkins, Simon C.; Zhang, Lin; Manfredi, James J.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Li, Luyuan; Lotze, Michael T.; Tang, Daolin

    2012-01-01

    The balance between apoptosis (“programmed cell death”) and autophagy (“programmed cell survival”) is important in tumor development and response to therapy. Here we show that HMGB1 and p53 form a complex which regulates the balance between tumor cell death and survival. We demonstrate that knockout of p53 inHCT116 cells increases expression of cytosolic HMGB1 and induces autophagy. Conversely, knockout of HMGB1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts increases p53 cytosolic localization and decreases...

  17. Robustness of the p53 network and biological hackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Lewis; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Hubank, Michael; Tsoka, Sophia; Bogle, I David L; Papageorgiou, Lazaros G

    2005-06-06

    The p53 protein interaction network is crucial in regulating the metazoan cell cycle and apoptosis. Here, the robustness of the p53 network is studied by analyzing its degeneration under two modes of attack. Linear Programming is used to calculate average path lengths among proteins and the network diameter as measures of functionality. The p53 network is found to be robust to random loss of nodes, but vulnerable to a targeted attack against its hubs, as a result of its architecture. The significance of the results is considered with respect to mutational knockouts of proteins and the directed attacks mounted by tumour inducing viruses.

  18. The rare nonsense mutation in p53 triggers alternative splicing to produce a protein capable of inducing apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny M Makarov

    Full Text Available P53 protein is more frequently mutated in human tumours compared with the other proteins. While the majority of the p53 mutations, especially within its DNA-binding domain, lead to the loss of the wild-type function, there are accumulating data demonstrating that the p53 mutants gain tumour promoting activities; the latter triggers a revitalised interest in functional analysis of the p53 mutants. A systematic screening for p53 mutations in surgical materials from patients with glioma revealed a 378C>G mutation that creates a stop codon at the position of amino acid residue 126. The mutation eliminates the recognition site for the restriction endonuclease Sca I that allowed us to carry out RFLP analysis of DNA extracted from the clinical samples and suggests that this mutation is more frequent than is documented in the p53 databases. Both the ECV-304 and EJ cell lines, that probably originate from the bladder carcinoma T24 cell line, were confirmed to contain the homozygous 378C>G mutation but were shown to produce the p53 protein of expected full-length size detected by Western blotting. We provide evidence that the 378C>G mutation generates an alternative 3' splice site (ss which is more often used instead of the authentic upstream 3' ss, driving the production of mRNA encoding the protein with the single amino acid deletion (p53ΔY126. Using endogenous expression, we demonstrated that the p53ΔY126 protein is nearly as active as the wild type protein in inducing the p21/Waf1 expression and apoptosis.

  19. Giant cell glioblastoma is associated with altered aurora b expression and concomitant p53 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Achim; Geiger, Kathrin D; Wiedemuth, Ralf; Conseur, Katharina; Pietsch, Torsten; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Tatsuka, Masaaki; Hagel, Christian; Westphal, Manfred; Berger, Hilmar; Simon, Matthias; Weller, Michael; Schackert, Gabriele

    2010-06-01

    Giant cell glioblastoma (gcGB), a subtype of GB, is characterized by the presence of numerous multinucleated giant cells. The prognosis for gcGB is poor, but it may have a better clinical outcome compared with classic GB. The molecular alterations that lead to the multinucleated cell phenotype of gcGB have not been elucidated. Giant cell GB has a higher frequency of the tumor suppressor protein p53 mutations than GB, however, and a role for the mitotic Aurora B kinase has been suggested. We analyzed Aurora B expression in gcGB (n = 28) and GB (n = 54) patient tumor samples by immunohistochemistry; 17 gcGB and 22 GB samples were analyzed at the DNA and mRNA levels. No mutations in the Aurora B gene (AURKB) were found, but its mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in gcGB than in GB. Fifty-nine percent of gcGB samples but only 18% of the GB samples showed p53 mutations. Ectopic overexpression of Aurora B induced a significant increase inthe proportion of multinucleated cells in p53 mutant U373-MG, but not in p53 wild-type U87-MG, glioma cells. RNAi of p53 in U87-MG cells led to an increase in the fraction of multinucleated cells that was further augmented by ectopic overexpression of Aurora B. These results suggest that loss of p53 function and dysregulated Aurora B protein levels might represent factors that drive the development of multinucleated cells in gcGB.

  20. Prognostic significance and gene expression profiles of p53 mutations in microsatellite-stable stage III colorectal adenocarcinomas.

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    Venkat R Katkoori

    Full Text Available Although the prognostic value of p53 abnormalities in Stage III microsatellite stable (MSS colorectal cancers (CRCs is known, the gene expression profiles specific to the p53 status in the MSS background are not known. Therefore, the current investigation has focused on identification and validation of the gene expression profiles associated with p53 mutant phenotypes in MSS Stage III CRCs. Genomic DNA extracted from 135 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, was analyzed for microsatellite instability (MSI and p53 mutations. Further, mRNA samples extracted from five p53-mutant and five p53-wild-type MSS-CRC snap-frozen tissues were profiled for differential gene expression by Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Differentially expressed genes were further validated by the high-throughput quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA, and confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and by immunohistochemistry (IHC. Survival rates were estimated by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. A higher incidence of p53 mutations was found in MSS (58% than in MSI (30% phenotypes. Both univariate (log-rank, P = 0.025 and multivariate (hazard ratio, 2.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-5.08 analyses have demonstrated that patients with MSS-p53 mutant phenotypes had poor CRC-specific survival when compared to MSS-p53 wild-type phenotypes. Gene expression analyses identified 84 differentially expressed genes. Of 49 down-regulated genes, LPAR6, PDLIM3, and PLAT, and, of 35 up-regulated genes, TRIM29, FUT3, IQGAP3, and SLC6A8 were confirmed by qNPA, qRT-PCR, and IHC platforms. p53 mutations are associated with poor survival of patients with Stage III MSS CRCs and p53-mutant and wild-type phenotypes have distinct gene expression profiles that might be helpful in identifying aggressive subsets.

  1. BAK overexpression mediates p53-independent apoptosis inducing effects on human gastric cancer cells

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    Liu Jun

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BAK (Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer is a novel pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family. It has been reported that gastric tumors have reduced BAK levels when compared with the normal mucosa. Moreover, mutations of the BAK gene have been identified in human gastrointestinal cancers, suggesting that a perturbation of BAK-mediated apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. In this study, we explored the therapeutic effects of gene transfer mediated elevations in BAK expression on human gastric cancer cells in vitro. Methods Eukaryotic expression vector for the BAK gene was constructed and transferred into gastric cancer cell lines, MKN-45 (wild-type p53 and MKN-28 (mutant-type p53. RT-PCR and Western Blotting detected cellular BAK gene expression. Cell growth activities were detected by MTT colorimetry and flow cytometry, while apoptosis was assayed by electronic microscopy and TUNEL. Western Blotting and colorimetry investigated cellular caspase-3 activities. Results BAK gene transfer could result in significant BAK overexpression, decreased in vitro growth, cell cycle G0/G1 arrest, and induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. In transferred cells, inactive caspase-3 precursor was cleaved into the active subunits p20 and p17, during BAK overexpression-induced apoptosis. In addition, this process occurred equally well in p53 wild-type (MKN-45, or in p53 mutant-type (MKN-28 gastric cancer cells. Conclusions The data presented suggests that overexpression of the BAK gene can lead to apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro, which does not appear to be dependent on p53 status. The action mechanism of BAK mediated apoptosis correlates with activation of caspase-3. This could be served as a potential strategy for further development of gastric cancer therapies.

  2. A dynamic P53-MDM2 model with time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalas, Gh.I. [Department of Biophysics and Medical Informatics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Piata Eftimie Murgu, nr. 3, 300041 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: mihalas@medinfo.umft.ro; Neamtu, M. [Department of Forecasting, Economic Analysis, Mathematics and Statistics, West University of Timisoara, Str. Pestalozzi, nr. 14A, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: mihaela.neamtu@fse.uvt.ro; Opris, D. [Department of Applied Mathematics, West University of Timisoara, Bd. V. Parvan, nr. 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: opris@math.uvt.ro; Horhat, R.F. [Department of Biophysics and Medical Informatics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Piata Eftimie Murgu, nr. 3, 300041 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: rhorhat@yahoo.com

    2006-11-15

    Specific activator and repressor transcription factors which bind to specific regulator DNA sequences, play an important role in gene activity control. Interactions between genes coding such transcription factors should explain the different stable or sometimes oscillatory gene activities characteristic for different tissues. Starting with the model P53-MDM2 described into [Mihalas GI, Simon Z, Balea G, Popa E. Possible oscillatory behaviour in P53-MDM2 interaction computer simulation. J Biol Syst 2000;8(1):21-9] and the process described into [Kohn KW, Pommier Y. Molecular interaction map of P53 and MDM2 logic elements, which control the off-on switch of P53 in response to DNA damage. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2005;331:816-27] we enveloped a new model of this interaction. Choosing the delay as a bifurcation parameter we study the direction and stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions. Some numerical examples are finally given for justifying the theoretical results.

  3. p53 Abnormalities and Potential Therapeutic Targeting in Multiple Myeloma

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    P. J. Teoh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available p53 abnormalities are regarded as an independent prognostic marker in multiple myeloma. Patients harbouring this genetic anomaly are commonly resistant to standard therapy. Thus, various p53 reactivating agents have been developed in order to restore its tumour suppressive abilities. Small molecular compounds, especially, have gained popularity in its efficacy against myeloma cells. For instance, promising preclinical results have steered both nutlin-3 and PRIMA-1 into phase I/II clinical trials. This review summarizes different modes of p53 inactivation in myeloma and highlights the current p53-based therapies that are being utilized in the clinic. Finally, we discuss the potential and promise that the novel small molecules possess for clinical application in improving the treatment outcome of myeloma.

  4. p53 and disease: when the guardian angel fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royds, J A; Iacopetta, B

    2006-06-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53) is mutated more often in human cancers than any other gene yet reported. Of importance, it is mutated frequently in the common human malignancies of the breast and colorectum and also, but less frequently, in other significant human cancers such as glioblastomas. There is also one inherited cancer predisposing syndrome called Li-Fraumeni that is caused by TP53 mutations. In this review, we discuss the significance of p53 mutations in some of the above tumors with a view to outlining how p53 contributes to malignant progression. We also discuss the usefulness of TP53 status as a prognostic marker and its role as a predictor of response to therapy. Finally, we outline some evidence that abnormalities in p53 function contribute to the etiology of other non-neoplastic diseases.

  5. p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation vary according to time of irradiation of p53 + / - mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that in p53 (+ / -) mice that had been given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8 weeks of age, p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation, as manifested in T-cell receptor (TCR) variant fractions (VF) instability in mouse splenocytes, were biphasic, namely, induction of TCR-VF mutation reappeared at 44 weeks. The manifestation of the delayed effects and the measures of biological markers varied according to the timing of irradiation. We also reported that the decrease in function of the p53 gene was related to the effects of a delayed mutation. In the present study, we investigated the functions and mutations of the p53 gene in old age for p53 (+ / -) mice following irradiation at various ages. p53 (+ / -) mice were given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8, 28 or 40 weeks of age. There were significant differences for all variables tested at 8 weeks of age. This was similarly the case for mice irradiated at 28 weeks of age, in which there were also significant differences in TCR VF and the percentage of apoptosis. In mice irradiated at 40 weeks of age, there were significant differences for all considered variables except for the p53 allele. We demonstrated that the different patterns of delayed mutation of the p53 gene at 56 weeks of age depended on the age at which mice had undergone 3-Gy whole-body irradiation. Our conclusions are limited to variation in p53-dependent delayed effects according to the time of irradiation.

  6. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog regulates p53 in vivo in the adult mouse eye lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto; Ortega-Martínez, Marta; Sepúlveda-Saavedra, Julio; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose p53 is a transcription factor that plays an important role in preventing cancer development. p53 participates in relevant aspects of cell biology, including apoptosis and cell cycle control and must be strictly regulated to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog (Mdm2) is an important negative regulator of p53. The purpose of this study was to determine if Mdm2 regulates p53 in vivo in the adult lens. Methods We analyzed mice expressing human p53 transgene (Tgp53) selectively in the lens in the presence or absence of Mdm2. Mice with the required genotypes were obtained by crossing transgenic, mdm2+/−, and p53−/− mice. Eye phenotype and lens histology and ultrastructure were analyzed in adult mice. Results In a wild-type genetic background (mdm2+/+), lens damage and microphthalmia were observed only in mice homozygous for Tgp53 (t/t). However, in an mdm2 null background, just one allele of Tgp53 (mdm2−/−/Tgp53t/0 mice) was sufficient to cause lens damage and microphthalmia. Furthermore, Mdm2 in only one allele was sufficient to rescue these deleterious effects, since the mdm2+/−/Tgp53t/0 mice had eye size and lens morphology similar to the control mice. Conclusions Mdm2 regulates p53 in the adult lens in vivo. This information may have relevance for analyzing normal and pathological conditions of the lens, and designing cancer therapies targeting Mdm2–p53 interaction. PMID:24339722

  7. Irradiation selects for p53-deficient hematopoietic progenitors.

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    Andriy Marusyk

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of mutations that drive cancer evolution constitute a major focus of cancer research. Consequently, dominant paradigms attribute the tumorigenic effects of carcinogens in general and ionizing radiation in particular to their direct mutagenic action on genetic loci encoding oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. However, the effects of irradiation are not limited to genetic loci that encode oncogenes and tumor suppressors, as irradiation induces a multitude of other changes both in the cells and their microenvironment which could potentially affect the selective effects of some oncogenic mutations. P53 is a key tumor suppressor, the loss of which can provide resistance to multiple genotoxic stimuli, including irradiation. Given that p53 null animals develop T-cell lymphomas with high penetrance and that irradiation dramatically accelerates lymphoma development in p53 heterozygous mice, we hypothesized that increased selection for p53-deficient cells contributes to the causal link between irradiation and induction of lymphoid malignancies. We sought to determine whether ionizing irradiation selects for p53-deficient hematopoietic progenitors in vivo using mouse models. We found that p53 disruption does not provide a clear selective advantage within an unstressed hematopoietic system or in previously irradiated BM allowed to recover from irradiation. In contrast, upon irradiation p53 disruption confers a dramatic selective advantage, leading to long-term expansion of p53-deficient clones and to increased lymphoma development. Selection for cells with disrupted p53 appears to be attributable to several factors: protection from acute irradiation-induced ablation of progenitor cells, prevention of irradiation-induced loss of clonogenic capacity for stem and progenitor cells, improved long-term maintenance of progenitor cell fitness, and the disabling/elimination of competing p53 wild-type progenitors. These studies

  8. In the absence of Sonic hedgehog, p53 induces apoptosis and inhibits retinal cell proliferation, cell-cycle exit and differentiation in zebrafish.

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    Sergey V Prykhozhij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling regulates cell proliferation during vertebrate development via induction of cell-cycle regulator gene expression or activation of other signalling pathways, prevents cell death by an as yet unclear mechanism and is required for differentiation of retinal cell types. Thus, an unsolved question is how the same signalling molecule can regulate such distinct cell processes as proliferation, cell survival and differentiation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analysis of the zebrafish shh(-/- mutant revealed that in this context p53 mediates elevated apoptosis during nervous system and retina development and interferes with retinal proliferation and differentiation. While in shh(-/- mutants there is activation of p53 target genes and p53-mediated apoptosis, an increase in Hedgehog (Hh signalling by over-expression of dominant-negative Protein Kinase A strongly decreased p53 target gene expression and apoptosis levels in shh(-/- mutants. Using a novel p53 reporter transgene, I confirm that p53 is active in tissues that require Shh for cell survival. Proliferation assays revealed that loss of p53 can rescue normal cell-cycle exit and the mitotic indices in the shh(-/- mutant retina at 24, 36 and 48 hpf. Moreover, generation of amacrine cells and photoreceptors was strongly enhanced in the double p53(-/-shh(-/- mutant retina suggesting the effect of p53 on retinal differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Loss of Shh signalling leads to the p53-dependent apoptosis in the developing nervous system and retina. Moreover, Shh-mediated control of p53 activity is required for proliferation and cell cycle exit of retinal cells as well as differentiation of amacrine cells and photoreceptors.

  9. Regulation of Mammary Progenitor Cells by p53 and Parity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    pregnancy early in reproductive life can reduce breast cancer incidence in women by up to 50% 4. The research in our lab has shown that the p53 tum or...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Breast cancer is the most common tumor among women with inherited mutations in the p53 gene (Li-Fraumeni...4 Introduction Breast cancer is the m ost frequent cancer am ong women in the United S tates1. Understanding the biological

  10. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ABSTRACT In this final report, we show gene therapy using re-engineered super p53 (p53-CC constructs) kills some ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro ...a lead construct. Technical skills gained in the proposal include cell culture , transfections, microscopy, apoptosis assays, transcriptional assays...able to create ovarian tumors in mice. Our polymer-adenovirus constructs were optimized in vitro and in vivo, and did not show gross signs of toxicity

  11. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. Preliminary studies indicate that p53-CC causes robust apoptosis in Kuramochi and ID8 cells as well...measured using the 7AAD assay (late stage apoptosis ). IC50 values for taxol have been determined in ID8 (and SKOV3) cells. In ID8 cells (which will...be used to implant into mice for the syngeneic animal study), p53-CCmut causes the highest levels of apoptosis regardless of whether taxol is added

  12. Blocking of p53-Snail Binding, Promoted by Oncogenic K-Ras, Recovers p53 Expression and function

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Hye; Lee, Su-Jin; Jung, Yeon Sang; Xu, Yongbin; Kang, Ho Sung; Ha, Nam-Chul; Park, Bum-Joon

    2009-01-01

    Differentially from other kinds of Ras, oncogenic K-Ras, which is mutated approximately 30% of human cancer, does not induce apoptosis and senescence. Here, we provide the evidence that oncogenic K-Ras abrogates p53 function and expression through induction of Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related mediated Snail stabilization. Snail directly binds to DNA binding domain of p53 and diminishes the tumor-suppressive function of p53. Thus, elimination of Snail through si-RNA can induce p5...

  13. Tumor suppressor protein p53 exerts negative transcriptional regulation on human sodium iodide symporter gene expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Madhura G; Thakur, Bhushan; Derle, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Sushmita; Ray, Pritha; De, Abhijit

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant expression of human sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in breast cancer (BC) is well documented but the transcription factors (TF) regulating its aberrant expression is poorly known. We identify the presence of three p53 binding sites on the human NIS promoter sequence by conducting genome-wide TF analysis, and further investigate their regulatory role. The differences in transcription and translation were measured by real-time PCR, luciferase reporter assay, site-directed mutagenesis, in vivo optical imaging, and chromatin immunoprecipitation. The relation of NIS and p53 in clinical samples was judged by TCGA data analysis and immunohistochemistry. Overexpression of wild-type p53 as a transgene or pharmacological activation by doxorubicin drug treatment shows significant suppression of NIS transcription in multiple BC cell types which also results in lowered NIS protein content and cellular iodide intake. NIS repression by activated p53 is further confirmed by non-invasive bioluminescence imaging in live cell and orthotropic tumor model. Abrogation of p53-binding sites by directional mutagenesis confirms reversal of transcriptional activity in wild-type p53-positive BC cells. We also observe direct binding of p53 to these sites on the human NIS promoter. Importantly, TCGA data analysis of NIS and p53 co-expression registers an inverse relationship between the two candidates. Our data for the first time highlight the role of p53 as a negative regulator of functional NIS expression in BC, where the latter is a potential targeted radioiodine therapy candidate. Thus, the study provides an important insight into prospective clinical application of this approach that may significantly impact the patient with mutant versus wild-type p53 profile.

  14. Expression of p53 protein in pituitary adenomas

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    Oliveira M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivating mutations of TP53, a tumor suppressor gene, are associated with abnormal cell proliferation. Although p53 expression is common in many human malignancies, p53 protein has seldom been evaluated in pituitary tumors. When detected, the percentage of p53-positive cells is low, and, in general, it is exclusive for invasive lesions. The aim of the present study was to use immunohistochemistry to determine the presence of p53 protein in pituitary adenomas from tumor samples of 163 surgeries performed in 148 patients (40% male, 60% female. In 35% of the cases the adenoma was nonfunctional, while in the others it was associated with PRL, GH and/or ACTH endocrine hypersecretion syndrome. Macroadenomas were observed in 83.2% of the cases with available neuroimage evaluation, of which 28% invaded the cavernous, sphenoid and/or ethmoidal sinus, bone, third ventricle or subfrontal lobe. p53 protein was detected in 2/148 patients (1.3%. Immunohistochemistry was positive for PRL and GH in these cases. Due to the high percentage of invasive pituitary adenomas found in our study, the low frequency of p53 detection suggests that it is inadequate as a routine marker for aggressiveness and as a predictive factor of tumor behavior.

  15. Stimulus-Specific Transcriptional Regulation Within the p53 Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Aaron Joseph; Hoover, Jennifer Michelle; Szostek, Stephanie Aspen; Espinosa, Joaquín Maximiliano

    2010-01-01

    The p53 transcriptional network is composed of hundreds of effector genes involved in varied stress-response pathways, including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. It is not clear how distinct p53 target genes are differentially activated to trigger stress-specific biological responses. We analyzed the p53 transcriptional program upon activation by two DNA-damaging agents, UVC and doxorubicin, versus the non-genotoxic molecule Nutlin-3. In colorectal cancer cells, UVC triggers apoptosis, doxorubicin induces transient cell cycle arrest followed by apoptosis, and Nutlin-3 leads to cell cycle arrest with no significant apoptosis. Quantitative gene expression analysis allowed us to group p53 target genes into three main classes according to their activation profiles in each scenario. The CDK-inhibitor p21 was classified as a Class I gene, being significantly activated under cell cycle arrest conditions (i.e., doxorubicin and Nutlin-3) but not during UVC-induced apoptosis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the p21 locus indicates that the level of p53-dependent transcription is determined by the effects of stimulus-specific transcriptional coregulators acting downstream of p53 binding and histone acetylation. In particular, our analysis indicates that the subunits of the CDK-module of the human Mediator complex function as stimulus-specific positive coregulators of p21 transcription. PMID:17957141

  16. Characterization of p53 expression in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Michelle; Tee, Catherine; Zeng, Fanxing; Sherry, James P; Dixon, Brian; Bols, Niels C; Duncker, Bernard P

    2011-11-01

    The tumour suppressor protein p53 is a critical component of cell cycle checkpoint responses. It upregulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in response to DNA damage and other cellular perturbations, and promotes apoptosis when DNA repair pathways are overwhelmed. Given the high incidence of p53 mutations in human cancers, it has been extensively studied, though only a small fraction of these investigations have been in non-mammalian systems. For the present study, an anti-rainbow trout p53 polyclonal antibody was generated. A variety of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) tissues and cell lines were examined through western blot analysis of cellular protein extracts, which revealed relatively high p53 levels in brain and gills. To evaluate the checkpoint response of rainbow trout p53, RTbrain-W1 and RTgill-W1 cell lines were exposed to varying concentrations of the DNA damaging agent bleomycin and ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor hydroxyurea. In contrast to mammals, these checkpoint-inducing agents provoked no apparent increase in rainbow trout p53 levels. These results infer the presence of alternate DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in rainbow trout cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. p53 Modulates the Fate of Cardiac Progenitor Cells Ex Vivo and in the Diabetic Heart In Vivo

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    Ramaswamy Kannappan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available p53 is an important modulator of stem cell fate, but its role in cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs is unknown. Here, we tested the effects of a single extra-copy of p53 on the function of CPCs in the presence of oxidative stress mediated by doxorubicin in vitro and type-1 diabetes in vivo. CPCs were obtained from super-p53 transgenic mice (p53-tg, in which the additional allele is regulated in a manner similar to the endogenous protein. Old CPCs with increased p53 dosage showed a superior ability to sustain oxidative stress, repair DNA damage and restore cell division. With doxorubicin, a larger fraction of CPCs carrying an extra-copy of the p53 allele recruited γH2A.X reestablishing DNA integrity. Enhanced p53 expression resulted in a superior tolerance to oxidative stress in vivo by providing CPCs with defense mechanisms necessary to survive in the milieu of the diabetic heart; they engrafted in regions of tissue injury and in three days acquired the cardiomyocyte phenotype. The biological advantage provided by the increased dosage of p53 in CPCs suggests that this genetic strategy may be translated to humans to increase cellular engraftment and growth, critical determinants of successful cell therapy for the failing heart.

  18. Alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells correlate with metastatic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, C. Q.; Willey, J. C.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced lung cancer are not known. In the present study, alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human papillomavirus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by a single low dose of either alpha-particles or 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe were analyzed by PCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) coupled with sequencing analysis and immunoprecipitation assay. A total of nine primary and four secondary tumor cell lines, three of which were metastatic, together with the parental BEP2D and primary human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were studied. The immunoprecipitation assay showed overexpression of mutant p53 proteins in all the tumor lines but not in NHBE and BEP2D cells. PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis found band shifts and gene mutations in all four of the secondary tumors. A G-->T transversion in codon 139 in exon 5 that replaced Lys with Asn was detected in two tumor lines. One mutation each, involving a G-->T transversion in codon 215 in exon 6 (Ser-->lle) and a G-->A transition in codon 373 in exon 8 (Arg-->His), was identified in the remaining two secondary tumors. These results suggest that p53 alterations correlate with tumorigenesis in the BEP2D cell model and that mutations in the p53 gene may be indicative of metastatic potential.

  19. Li-Fraumeni Syndrome Disease Model: A Platform to Develop Precision Cancer Therapy Targeting Oncogenic p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruoji; Xu, An; Gingold, Julian; Strong, Louise C; Zhao, Ruiying; Lee, Dung-Fang

    2017-10-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare hereditary autosomal dominant cancer disorder. Germline mutations in TP53, the gene encoding p53, are responsible for most cases of LFS. TP53 is also the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers. Because inhibition of mutant p53 is considered to be a promising therapeutic strategy to treat these diseases, LFS provides a perfect genetic model to study p53 mutation-associated malignancies as well as to screen potential compounds targeting oncogenic p53. In this review we briefly summarize the biology of LFS and current understanding of the oncogenic functions of mutant p53 in cancer development. We discuss the strengths and limitations of current LFS disease models, and touch on existing compounds targeting oncogenic p53 and in vitro clinical trials to develop new ones. Finally, we discuss how recently developed methodologies can be integrated into the LFS induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) platform to develop precision cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. p53-competent cells and p53-deficient cells display different susceptibility to oxygen functionalized graphene cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibone, Dayton M; Mustafa, Thikra; Bourdo, Shawn E; Lafont, Andersen; Ding, Wei; Karmakar, Alokita; Nima, Zeid A; Watanabe, Fumiya; Casciano, Daniel; Morris, Suzanne M; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Biris, Alexandru S

    2017-11-01

    Due to the distinctive physical, electrical, and chemical properties of graphene nanomaterials, numerous efforts pursuing graphene-based biomedical and industrial applications are underway. Oxidation of pristine graphene surfaces mitigates its otherwise hydrophobic characteristic thereby improving its biocompatibility and functionality. Yet, the potential widespread use of oxidized graphene derivatives raises concern about adverse impacts on human health. The p53 tumor suppressor protein maintains cellular and genetic stability after toxic exposures. Here, we show that p53 functional status correlates with oxygen functionalized graphene (f-G) cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in vitro. The f-G exposed p53-competent cells, but not p53-deficient cells, initiated G0 /G1 phase cell cycle arrest, suppressed reactive oxygen species, and entered apoptosis. There was p53-dependent f-G genotoxicity evident as increased structural chromosome damage, but not increased gene mutation or chromatin loss. In conclusion, the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential for f-G in exposed cells was dependent on the p53 functional status. These findings have broad implications for the safe and effective implementation of oxidized graphene derivatives into biomedical and industrial applications. Published 2017. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Microsatellite instability and p53 mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachristos, A; Liloglou, T; Field, J K; Deligiorgi, E; Kouskouni, E; Spandidos, D A

    1999-01-01

    We have studied 27 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) to identify possible relationships between microsatellite instability (MSI), p53 mutations, and HBV infection in hepatocarcinogenesis. MSI was assessed using 19 polymorphic markers and the poly(A) tract BAT-26. All coding regions of p53 were examined for mutations. Tumors were also examined for presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA sequences; 66.6% of the samples exhibit MSI in at least one microsatellite locus and 44% in two or three loci. None of the tumors examined showed alterations in BAT-26. Moreover, 73.3% of samples with indication of HBV infection showed instability in at least one marker. No association between MSI and pathological profile was found. Five (18.5%) samples harbored mutations in p53, three missense, and two insertions, all in exons 5 and 8 not previously reported. No mutations were detected in codon 249, which has been linked with dietary intake of aflatoxins. Our results support the hypothesis that HCC is a "low" MSI tumor. Only 1/5 samples with MSI in more than two markers harbored a mutation in p53. Although the number of samples is too small to support a statistical significance, this finding may indicate an inverse relationship between p53 mutations and MSI in HCC.

  2. PERAN MUTASI GEN p53 PADA KARSINOGENESIS SEL BASAL KULIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadek Pramesti Dewi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Karsinoma sel basal (KSB merupakan keganasan kulit non-melanotik tersering dan mempunyai kaitan erat dengan paparan sinar ultra violet (UV. Keganasan ini berasal dari sel-sel pluripotensial stratum basalis epidermis maupun selubung akar folikel rambut. Gambaran klinis dan histopatologis terdiri dari KSB tipe klasik (noduler dan KSB varian (tipe superfisial, fibroepithelial, KSB dengan diferensiasi adneksal, basoskuamous, infiltrating, morpheaform.Kanker pada tubuh manusia muncul karena adanya mutasi genetik pada gen-gen yang terlibat dalamkontrol pertumbuhan sel, seperti onkogen, tumor suppressor gene, gen apoptosis, dan DNA repair gene.Pada kebanyakan kasus KSB, gen yang tersering mengalami mutasi adalah tumor suppressor genep53. Mutasi ini timbul akibat paparan langsung sinar UV, bergantung pada dosis, durasi dan intensitas paparan.Gen p53 dikenal dengan sebutan guardian of the genome, karena fungsinya sebagai sensor terhadapterjadinya kerusakan DNA. Adanya kerusakan DNA menginduksi aktivasi p53 untuk menghentikan siklus sel saat memasuki fase G1, sehingga memberikan kesempatan kepada DNA repair proteinbekerja memperbaiki kerusakan DNA. Lebih dari itu, p53 juga mengaktivasi gen GADD45 (growth arrest and DNA damage untuk membantu perbaikan DNA. Jika perbaikan gagal, p53 akanmengarahkan sel dengan DNA yang rusak ke mesin apoptosis.Pada sel-sel basal terpapar UV, gen p53 mengalami mutasi dan inaktivasi. Karena itu, sel-sel dengan DNA yang mengalami kerusakan non-lethal akan mengalami ekspansi klonal sehingga tumbuh menjadilesi pra kanker dan akhirnya kanker (KSB. [MEDICINA 2014;45:38-42

  3. Synergistic antitumor interaction between valproic acid, capecitabine and radiotherapy in colorectal cancer: critical role of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Pecori, Biagio; Roca, Maria Serena; Imbimbo, Serena; Bruzzese, Francesca; Leone, Alessandra; Muto, Paolo; Delrio, Paolo; Avallone, Antonio; Budillon, Alfredo; Di Gennaro, Elena

    2017-12-06

    Recurrence with distant metastases has become the predominant pattern of failure in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), thus the integration of new antineoplastic agents into preoperative fluoropyrimidine-based chemo-radiotherapy represents a clinical challenge to implement an intensified therapeutic strategy. The present study examined the combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) valproic acid (VPA) with fluoropyrimidine-based chemo-radiotherapy on colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. HCT-116 (p53-wild type), HCT-116 p53-/- (p53-null), SW620 and HT29 (p53-mutant) CRC cell lines were used to assess the antitumor interaction between VPA and capecitabine metabolite 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-DFUR) in combination with radiotherapy and to evaluate the role of p53 in the combination treatment. Effects on proliferation, clonogenicity and apoptosis were evaluated, along with γH2AX foci formation as an indicator for DNA damage. Combined treatment with equipotent doses of VPA and 5'-DFUR resulted in synergistic effects in CRC lines expressing p53 (wild-type or mutant). In HCT-116 p53-/- cells we observed antagonist effects. Radiotherapy further potentiated the antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic and DNA damage effects induced by 5'-DFUR/VPA combination in p53 expressing cells. These results highlighted the role of VPA as valuable candidate to be added to preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in LARC. On these bases we launched the ongoing phase I/II study of VPA and short-course radiotherapy plus capecitabine as preoperative treatment in low-moderate risk rectal cancer (V-shoRT-R3).

  4. Impact of the K24N mutation on the transactivation domain of p53 and its binding to MDM2

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Zhan, Yingqian A; Wu, Hongwei; Powell, Anne T.; Daughdrill, Gary W.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2014-01-01

    The level of the p53 transcription factor is negatively regulated by the E3 ubiguitin ligase murine double minute clone 2 (MDM2). The interaction between p53 and MDM2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity for most eukaryotes. Previous structural studies revealed that MDM2 binds to p53 transactivation domain (p53TAD) from residues 17 to 29. The K24N mutation of p53TAD changes a lysine at position 24 to an asparagine. This mutation occurs naturally in the bovine family and is also found in a rare form of human gestational cancer called choriocarcinoma. In this study we have investigated how the K24N mutation affects the affinity, structure, and dynamics of p53TAD binding to MDM2. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of p53TAD show the K24N mutant is more flexible and has less transient helical secondary structure than the wildtype. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements demonstrate that these changes in structure and dynamics do not significantly change the binding affinity for p53TAD-MDM2. Finally, free energy perturbation and standard molecular dynamics simulations suggest the negligible affinity change is due to a compensating interaction energy between the K24N mutant and MDM2 when it is bound. Overall, the data suggests that the K24N-MDM2 complex is able to at least partly compensate for an increase in the conformational entropy in unbound K24N with an increase in the bound state electrostatic interaction energy. PMID:23609977

  5. Structurally diverse MDM2–p53 antagonists act as modulators of MDR-1 function in neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Zhao, Y; Halliday, G C; Berry, P; Rousseau, R F; Middleton, S A; Nichols, G L; Del Bello, F; Piergentili, A; Newell, D R; Lunec, J; Tweddle, D A

    2014-01-01

    Background: A frequent mechanism of acquired multidrug resistance in human cancers is overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters such as the Multi-Drug Resistance Protein 1 (MDR-1). Nutlin-3, an MDM2–p53 antagonist, has previously been reported to be a competitive MDR-1 inhibitor. Methods: This study assessed whether the structurally diverse MDM2–p53 antagonists, MI-63, NDD0005, and RG7388 are also able to modulate MDR-1 function, particularly in p53 mutant neuroblastoma cells, using XTT-based cell viability assays, western blotting, and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Verapamil and the MDM2–p53 antagonists potentiated vincristine-mediated growth inhibition in a concentration-dependent manner when used in combination with high MDR-1-expressing p53 mutant neuroblastoma cell lines at concentrations that did not affect the viability of cells when given alone. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analyses showed that verapamil, Nutlin-3, MI-63 and NDD0005, but not RG7388, led to increased intracellular levels of vincristine in high MDR-1-expressing cell lines. Conclusions: These results show that in addition to Nutlin-3, other structurally unrelated MDM2–p53 antagonists can also act as MDR-1 inhibitors and reverse MDR-1-mediated multidrug resistance in neuroblastoma cell lines in a p53-independent manner. These findings are important for future clinical trial design with MDM2–p53 antagonists when used in combination with agents that are MDR-1 substrates. PMID:24921920

  6. Association of p53 protein expression with responses and survival of patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muro, Kei; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Boku, Narikazu; Chin, Keisho; Oda, Yasushi; Fujii, Takahiro; Hosokawa, Koichi; Yoshida, Shigeaki [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Hasebe, Takahiro

    1996-04-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to determine the clinical role of p53 mutations in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinomas treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The subjects of this study were 20 patients with previously untreated esophageal carcinomas with evidence of T4 disease and/or distant node metastases. Treatment comprised protracted 5-fluorouracil and 2-h cisplatinum infusions along with radiation treatment with a total radiation dose of 60 Gy. Tumor specimens from 18 of the 20 patients were analyzed immunohistochemically. Mutant p53 protein expression in the biopsy materials from the primary tumors was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal antibody, RSP53. Expression of p53 was detected immunohistochemically in 10 (56%) of the 18 esophageal tumors, the cancer cell nuclei of which were diffusely stained. There were no significant differences between the patient backgrounds of the p53-`positive` and `negative` groups. Four (40%) of the 10 patients with p53 expression achieved overall complete remissions (CRs) and 7 (70%) of these 10 achieved CRs of their primary tumors. In contrast, none of the 8 p53-negative patients achieved overall CRs and two (25%) achieved CRs of their primary tumors. The CR rates overall and of primary tumors tended to be higher in the p53-positive than negative group, but the differences were not significant. The survival rate for the 10 patients with p53 expression was better than that for the 8 negative ones (P>0.01): their median survival times were 12 and 4.5 months, respectively. Expression of p53 protein may be an indicator of a favorable prognosis in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinomas treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. (author).

  7. Role of p53 in the progression from ochratoxin A-induced DNA damage to gene mutations in the kidneys of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Ken; Hibi, Daisuke; Ishii, Yuji; Yokoo, Yuh; Takasu, Shinji; Kijima, Aki; Matsushita, Kohei; Masumura, Ken-ichi; Kodama, Yukio; Yanai, Tokuma; Sakai, Hiroki; Nohmi, Takehiko; Ogawa, Kumiko; Umemura, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    Carcinogenic doses of ochratoxin A (OTA) cause increases of mutant frequencies (MFs) of the red/gam gene (Spi(-)) in the kidneys of p53-deficient gpt delta mice, but not in p53-proficient mice. Here, we investigated the role of p53 in the progression from OTA-induced DNA damage to gene mutations. To this end, p53-proficient and -deficient mice were administered 5 mg/kg OTA for 3 days or 4 weeks by gavage. After 3 days of administration, comet assays were performed and there were no differences in the degrees of OTA-induced DNA damage between p53-proficient and -deficient mice. However, the frequencies of γ-H2AX-positive tubular epithelial cells in p53-deficient mice were significantly higher than those in p53-proficient mice, implying that p53 inhibited the progression from DNA damage to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Evaluation of global gene expression and relevant mRNA/protein expression levels demonstrated that OTA increased the expression of Cdkn1a, which encodes the p21 protein, in p53-proficient mice, but not in p53-deficient mice. Moreover, in p53-deficient mice, mRNA levels of cell cycle progression and DSB repair (homologous recombination repair [HR])-related genes were significantly increased. Thus, G1/S arrest due to activation of the p53/p21 pathway may contribute to the prevention of DSBs in p53-proficient mice. In addition, single base deletions/insertions/substitutions were predominant, possibly due to HR. Overall, these results suggested that OTA induced DSBs at the carcinogenic target site in mice and that p53/p21-mediated cell cycle control prevented an increase in the formation of DSBs, leading to gene mutations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The Role of Wild-Type p53 in Cisplatin-Induced Chk2 Phosphorylation and the Inhibition of Platinum Resistance with a Chk2 Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobing Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The major obstacle in platinum chemotherapy is the repair of platinum-damaged DNA that results in increased resistance, reduced apoptosis, and finally treatment failure. Our research goal is to determine and block the mechanisms of platinum resistance. Our recent studies demonstrate that several kinases in the DNA-repair pathway are activated after cells are exposed to cisplatin. These include ATM, p53, and Chk2. The increased Chk2 phosphorylation is modulated by p53 in a wild-type p53 model. Overexpression of p53 by cDNA transfection in wt-p53 (but not p53 deficient cells doubled the amount of Chk2 phosphorylation 48 hours after cisplatin treatment. p53 knockdown by specific siRNA greatly reduced Chk2 phosphorylation. We conclude that wild-type p53, in response to cisplatin stimulation, plays a role in the upstream regulation of Chk2 phosphorylation at Thr-68. Cells without normal p53 function survive via an alternative pathway in response to the exogenous influence of cisplatin. We strongly suggest that it is very important to include the p53 mutational status in any p53 involved studies due to the functional differentiation of wt p53 and p53 mutant. Inhibition of Chk2 pathway with a Chk2 inhibitor (C3742 increased cisplatin efficacy, especially those with defective p53. Our findings suggest that inhibition of platinum resistance can be achieved with a small-molecule inhibitor of Chk2, thus improving the therapeutic indices for platinum chemotherapy.

  9. G2-block after irradiation of cells with different p53 status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoelzer, Friedo [University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, Department of Radiology, Toxicology and Civil Protection, Faculty of Health and Social Studies, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); University Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Medical Radiobiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Jagetia, Ganesh [University Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Medical Radiobiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Mizoram University, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, Aizawl (India); Streffer, Christian [University Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Medical Radiobiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Although it is clear that functional p53 is not required for radiation-induced G{sub 2} block, certain experimental findings suggest a role for p53 in this context. For instance, as we also confirm here, the maximum accumulation in the G{sub 2} compartment after X-ray exposure occurs much later in p53 mutants than in wild types. It remains to be seen, however, whether this difference is due to a longer block in the G{sub 2} phase itself. We observed the movement of BrdU-labeled cells through G{sub 2} and M into G{sub 1}. From an analysis of the fraction of labeled cells that entered the second posttreatment cell cycle, we were able to determine the absolute duration of the G{sub 2} and M phases in unirradiated and irradiated cells. Our experiments with four cell lines, two melanomas and two squamous carcinomas, showed that the radiation-induced delay of transition through the G{sub 2} and M phases did not correlate with p53 status. We conclude that looking at the accumulation of cells in the G{sub 2} compartment alone is misleading when differences in the G{sub 2} block are investigated and that the G{sub 2} block itself is indeed independent of functional p53. (orig.) [German] Obwohl klar ist, dass ein funktionelles p53-Protein fuer die Ausbildung des strahleninduzierten G{sub 2}-Blocks nicht zwingend erforderlich ist, gibt es experimentelle Befunde, die nahe legen, dass p53 in diesem Zusammenhang doch eine gewisse Rolle spielt. Zum Beispiel bestaetigen wir hier fruehere Berichte, dass die Akkumulation von Zellen im G{sub 2}-Kompartiment bei p53-Mutanten deutlich spaeter nach Bestrahlung ihr Maximum erreicht als bei p53-Wildtypen. Es bleibt jedoch zu klaeren, ob dieser Unterschied seinen Grund in einem laengeren Block der G{sub 2}-Phase selbst hat. Beobachtet wurde die Bewegung von BrdU-markierten Zellen durch G{sub 2} und M nach G{sub 1}. Aus der zeitlichen Veraenderung des Anteils markierter Zellen im G{sub 1}-Kompartiment des naechsten Zellzyklus konnte die

  10. Combining oncolytic virotherapy with p53 tumor suppressor gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bressy, Christian; Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53) or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73) were engineered with the goal of gen...

  11. p53-Independent Cell Cycle and Erythroid Differentiation Defects in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells Haploinsufficient for Diamond Blackfan Anemia-Proteins: RPS19 versus RPL5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Adrianna L.; Husain-Krautter, Sehba; Nihrane, Abdallah; Blanc, Lionel; Ellis, Steven R.; Lipton, Jeffrey M.; Liu, Johnson M.

    2014-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare inherited bone marrow failure syndrome caused by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency. DBA exhibits marked phenotypic variability, commonly presenting with erythroid hypoplasia, less consistently with non-erythroid features. The p53 pathway, activated by abortive ribosome assembly, is hypothesized to contribute to the erythroid failure of DBA. We studied murine embryonic stem (ES) cell lines harboring a gene trap mutation in a ribosomal protein gene, either Rps19 or Rpl5. Both mutants exhibited ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency and polysome defects. Rps19 mutant ES cells showed significant increase in p53 protein expression; however, there was no similar increase in the Rpl5 mutant cells. Embryoid body formation was diminished in both mutants but nonspecifically rescued by knockdown of p53. When embryoid bodies were further differentiated to primitive erythroid colonies, both mutants exhibited a marked reduction in colony formation, which was again nonspecifically rescued by p53 inhibition. Cell cycle analyses were normal in Rps19 mutant ES cells, but there was a significant delay in the G2/M phase in the Rpl5 mutant cells, which was unaffected by p53 knockdown. Concordantly, Rpl5 mutant ES cells had a more pronounced growth defect in liquid culture compared to the Rps19 mutant cells. We conclude that the defects in our RPS19 and RPL5 haploinsufficient mouse ES cells are not adequately explained by p53 stabilization, as p53 knockdown appears to increase the growth and differentiation potential of both parental and mutant cells. Our studies demonstrate that gene trap mouse ES cells are useful tools to study the pathogenesis of DBA. PMID:24558476

  12. p53-Independent cell cycle and erythroid differentiation defects in murine embryonic stem cells haploinsufficient for Diamond Blackfan anemia-proteins: RPS19 versus RPL5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon A Singh

    Full Text Available Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA is a rare inherited bone marrow failure syndrome caused by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency. DBA exhibits marked phenotypic variability, commonly presenting with erythroid hypoplasia, less consistently with non-erythroid features. The p53 pathway, activated by abortive ribosome assembly, is hypothesized to contribute to the erythroid failure of DBA. We studied murine embryonic stem (ES cell lines harboring a gene trap mutation in a ribosomal protein gene, either Rps19 or Rpl5. Both mutants exhibited ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency and polysome defects. Rps19 mutant ES cells showed significant increase in p53 protein expression, however, there was no similar increase in the Rpl5 mutant cells. Embryoid body formation was diminished in both mutants but nonspecifically rescued by knockdown of p53. When embryoid bodies were further differentiated to primitive erythroid colonies, both mutants exhibited a marked reduction in colony formation, which was again nonspecifically rescued by p53 inhibition. Cell cycle analyses were normal in Rps19 mutant ES cells, but there was a significant delay in the G2/M phase in the Rpl5 mutant cells, which was unaffected by p53 knockdown. Concordantly, Rpl5 mutant ES cells had a more pronounced growth defect in liquid culture compared to the Rps19 mutant cells. We conclude that the defects in our RPS19 and RPL5 haploinsufficient mouse ES cells are not adequately explained by p53 stabilization, as p53 knockdown appears to increase the growth and differentiation potential of both parental and mutant cells. Our studies demonstrate that gene trap mouse ES cells are useful tools to study the pathogenesis of DBA.

  13. The p53 protein plays a central role in the mechanism of action of epigentic drugs that alter the methylation of cytosine residues in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Arnold J

    2017-01-31

    Both normal and cancerous cells, treated with drugs that block cytosine methylation of DNA, are preferentially killed by these drugs when they have p53 mutations and survive if they have a wild type protein. It appears that the wild type p53 protein functions to eliminate cells that undergo large epigenetic alterations and save other cells from death by this drug treatment. This has now been observed in cancerous cells in culture, tumors in animals and tumors in humans. AML cells with p53 mutations in humans treated with decitabine are killed by differentiation or senescense, but then relapse at a high rate becoming drug resistant. The mechanism of resistance to epigenetic drugs in p53 mutant cells, by possibly restoring a wild type p53 gene or restoring a defective p53 pathway, is now an interesting hypothesis to explore.

  14. Concurrent overexpression of serum p53 mutation related with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo-Peñuelas Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aims In the province of Cadiz (Spain, the adjusted mortality rate for gastric cancer in the coastal town of Barbate is 10/100.000 inhabitants, whereas in the inland town of Ubrique, the rate is twice as high. The rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection (H. pylori antibodies in the normal population was 54% in Ubrique, but only 32% in Barbate. In the two decades since its original discovery, p53 has found a singularly prominent place in our understanding of human gastric cancer and H. pylori cause accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the mucosa compartment. This study was designed to compare serum levels of p53 in a population characterized by high mortality due to stomach cancer and a high prevalence of H. pylori infection and another population in which mortality from this cause and the prevalence of H. pylori infection are low. Materials and methods 319 subjects from the low mortality population and 308 from the high mortality population were studied, as were 71 patients with stomach cancer. We measured serum immunoglobulin G antibody to H. pylori and serum mutant p53 protein and ceruloplasmin. Results The difference between the two populations in the prevalence of H. pylori infection was significant (p Conclusions There is a significant association between infection with H. pylori, elevated titers of H. pylori antibodies, and positivity for serum mutant p53 protein. Such information can significantly increase our basic knowledge in molecular pathology of gastric cancer and protection against H. pylori infection.

  15. Targeting polo-like kinase 1, a regulator of p53, in the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussey, Kimberly J; Bapat, Aditi; Linnehan, Claire; Wandoloski, Melissa; Dastrup, Erica; Rogers, Erik; Gonzales, Paul; Demeure, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive cancer with a 5 year survival rate of 20-30 %. Various factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ACC including dysregulation of the G2/M transition and aberrant activity of p53 and MDM2. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK-1) negatively modulates p53 functioning, promotes MDM2 activity through its phosphorylation, and is involved in the G2/M transition. Gene expression profiling of 44 ACC samples showed that increased expression of PLK-1 in 29 % of ACC. Consequently, we examined PLK-1's role in the modulation of the p53 signaling pathway in adrenocortical cancer. We used siRNA knock down PLK-1 and pharmacological inhibition of PLK-1 and MDM2 ACC cell lines SW-13 and H295R. We examined viability, protein expression, p53 transactivation, and induction of apoptosis. Knocking down expression of PLK-1 with siRNA or inhibition of PLK-1 by a small molecule inhibitor, BI-2536, resulted in a loss of viability of up to 70 % in the ACC cell lines H295R and SW-13. In xenograft models, BI-2536 demonstrated marked inhibition of growth of SW-13 with less inhibition of H295R. BI-2536 treatment resulted in a decrease in mutant p53 protein in SW-13 cells but had no effect on wild-type p53 protein levels in H295R cells. Additionally, inhibition of PLK-1 restored wild-type p53's transactivation and apoptotic functions in H295R cells, while these functions of mutant p53 were restored only to a smaller extent. Furthermore, inhibition of MDM2 with nutlin-3 reduced the viability of both the ACC cells and also reactivated wild-type p53's apoptotic function. Inhibition of PLK-1 sensitized the ACC cell lines to MDM2 inhibition and this dual inhibition resulted in an additive apoptotic response in H295R cells with wild-type p53. These preclinical studies suggest that targeting p53 through PLK-1 is an attractive chemotherapy strategy warranting further investigation in adrenocortical cancer.

  16. Structural studies of p53 inactivation by DNA-contact mutations and its rescue by suppressor mutations via alternative protein–DNA interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldar, Amir; Rozenberg, Haim; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Rohs, Remo; Shakked, Zippora

    2013-01-01

    A p53 hot-spot mutation found frequently in human cancer is the replacement of R273 by histidine or cysteine residues resulting in p53 loss of function as a tumor suppressor. These mutants can be reactivated by the incorporation of second-site suppressor mutations. Here, we present high-resolution crystal structures of the p53 core domains of the cancer-related proteins, the rescued proteins and their complexes with DNA. The structures show that inactivation of p53 results from the incapacity of the mutated residues to form stabilizing interactions with the DNA backbone, and that reactivation is achieved through alternative interactions formed by the suppressor mutations. Detailed structural and computational analysis demonstrates that the rescued p53 complexes are not fully restored in terms of DNA structure and its interface with p53. Contrary to our previously studied wild-type (wt) p53-DNA complexes showing non-canonical Hoogsteen A/T base pairs of the DNA helix that lead to local minor-groove narrowing and enhanced electrostatic interactions with p53, the current structures display Watson–Crick base pairs associated with direct or water-mediated hydrogen bonds with p53 at the minor groove. These findings highlight the pivotal role played by R273 residues in supporting the unique geometry of the DNA target and its sequence-specific complex with p53. PMID:23863845

  17. Insights into the Effect of the G245S Single Point Mutation on the Structure of p53 and the Binding of the Protein to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepre, Marco Gaetano; Omar, Sara Ibrahim; Grasso, Gianvito; Morbiducci, Umberto; Deriu, Marco Agostino; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2017-08-16

    The transcription factor p53 is a potent tumor suppressor dubbed as the "guardian of the genome" because of its ability to orchestrate protective biological outputs in response to a variety of oncogenic stresses. Mutation and thus inactivation of p53 can be found in 50% of human tumors. The majority are missense mutations located in the DNA binding region. Among them, G245S is known to be a structural hotspot mutation. To understand the behaviors and differences between the wild-type and mutant, both a dimer of the wild type p53 (wt-p53) and its G245S mutant (G245S-mp53), complexed with DNA, were simulated using molecular dynamics for more than 1 μs. wt-p53 and G245S-mp53 apo monomers were simulated for 1 μs as well. Conformational analyses and binding energy evaluations performed underline important differences and therefore provide insights to understand the G245S-mp53 loss of function. Our results indicate that the G245S mutation destabilizes several structural regions in the protein that are crucial for DNA binding when found in its apo form and highlight differences in the mutant-DNA complex structure compared to the wt protein. These findings not only provide means that can be applied to other p53 mutants but also serve as structural basis for further studies aimed at the development of cancer therapies based on restoring the function of p53.

  18. A role for p53 in selenium-induced senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The tumor suppressor p53 and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase play important roles in the senescence response to oncogene activation and DNA damage. We have previously shown that selenium-containing compounds can activate an ATM-dependent senescence response in MRC-5 normal fibroblasts...

  19. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: c-PTIO and 1400W, alone or in combination, inhibited cell growth and promoted apoptosis via sub-G1 cell cycle arrest mediated by decrease in NO•. Apoptosis was delayed and greatly reduced in magnitude in SK mel-28 cells, underscoring the importance of p53 modulation of the response. In both cell types, ...

  20. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Vogelstein, B. and Fornace, A.J., Jr. (1992). Cell 71:587-597. (6) Yonish-Rouach, E., Resnitsky, D., Lotem, J., Sachs, L., Kimchi , A., and Oren, M. (1991...Cell 70: 937-948. Yonish-Rouach, E., D. Resnitzky, J. Lotem, L. Sachs, A. Kimchi , and M. Oren. 1991. Wild-type p53 induces apoptosis of my- eloid

  1. Immunohistochemical detection of P53 and Mdm2 in vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola A Bakry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitiligo is a common depigmented skin disorder that is caused by selective destruction of melanocytes. It is generally accepted that the main function of melanin resides in the protection of skin cells against the deleterious effect of ultraviolet rays (UVRs. Association of vitiligo and skin cancer has been a subject of controversy. Occurrence of skin cancer in long-lasting vitiligo is rare despite multiple evidences of DNA damage in vitiliginous skin. Aim: To detect the expression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins in both depigmented and normally pigmented skin of vitiligo patients and to compare it to control subjects suffering from nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four patients with vitiligo and 30 age and sex-matched patients with nodulo-ulcerative basal cell carcinoma (BCC as a control group were selected. Both patients and control subjects had outdoor occupations. Skin biopsies were taken from each case and control subjects. Histopathological examination of Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections was done. Expression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins were examined immunohistochemically. Results: Both P53 and Mdm2 were strongly expressed in depigmented as well as normally pigmented skin of vitiligo patients. This expression involved the epidermis, skin adnexa and blood vessels with significant differences between cases and controls. Conclusions: The overexpression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins in both normally pigmented and depigmented skin of patients with vitiligo could contribute to the decreased occurrence of actinic damage and NMSC in these patients.

  2. Protecting the hedgerow: p53 and hedgehog pathway interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Louisa; Alman, Benjamin

    2010-02-01

    A common environment for the Hedgehog (Subfamily: erinaceinae) is a row of shrubs and trees often used on farms for enclosing or separating fields, called a hedgerow. Maintenance of a continuous shrub border is important for shielding crops from weather damage, but also provides an ideal protective habitat for the hedgehog. Similar to its mammalian counterpart, the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway requires a controlled environment to regulate proper functioning of the cell. When allowed to run wild, constitutive activation of the Hh pathway results in tumorigenesis in different tissues types, including brain, skin and cartilage. With an additional loss of p53 tumor suppressor activity, an increase in tumor incidence, size and metastasis have been observed. p53 has a number of functions that can suppress tumor formation and growth in most, if not all Hh-related cancers, such as the inhibition of cell cycle progression and cell survival. Furthermore, increasing evidence of an interaction between p53 and Hedgehog signalling pathways suggests a critical role for the tumor suppressor activity of p53 in "protecting the hedgerow".

  3. Artificial Macrocycles as Potent p53-MDM2 Inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estrada-Ortiz, Natalia; Neochoritis, Constantinos G.; Twarda-Clapa, Aleksandra; Musielak, Bogdan; Holak, Tad A.; Dömling, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Based on a combination of an Ugi four component reaction and a ring closing metathesis, a library of novel artificial macrocyclic inhibitors of the p53-MDM2 interaction was designed and synthesized. These macrocycles, alternatively to stapled peptides, target for the first time the large hydrophobic

  4. The p53-MDM2 network: from oscillations to apoptosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-07-05

    Jul 5, 2007 ... Keywords. Apoptosis; cancer; cell cycle; MDM2 overexpression; tumour suppressor ... In this paper, we give an overview of our studies on the p53-MDM2 module and the associated pathways from a systems biology perspective. We discuss a number of key predictions, related to some specific aspects of ...

  5. Morphological Heterogeneity of p53 Positive and p53 Negative Nuclei in Breast Cancers Stratified by Clinicopathological Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Friedrich

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to detect differences in nuclear morphology between nuclear populations as well as between tumours with different p53 expression in breast cancers with different clinicopathological features, which also reflect the stage of tumour progression. The p53 immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin sections from 88 tumour samples. After the cells had been localised by means of an image cytometry workstation and their immunostaining had been categorised visually, the sections were destained and stained by the Feulgen protocol. The nuclei were relocated and measured cytometrically by the workstation.

  6. Altered S-nitrosylation of p53 is responsible for impaired antioxidant response in skeletal muscle during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldelli, Sara; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2016-12-20

    p53 transcriptional activity has been proposed to regulate both homeostasis and sarcopenia of skeletal muscle during aging. However, the exact molecular function of p53 remains to be clearly defined. We demonstrated a requirement of nuclear p53 S-nitrosylation in inducing a nitric oxide/PGC-1α-mediated antioxidant pathway in skeletal muscle. Importantly, mutant form of p53-DNA binding domain (C124S) did not undergo nuclear S-nitrosylation and failed in inducing the expression of antioxidant genes (i.e. SOD2 and GCLC). Moreover, we found that during aging the nuclear S-nitrosylation of p53 significantly declines in gastrocnemius/soleus leading to an impairment of redox homeostasis of skeletal muscle. We suggested that decreased level of nuclear neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/Syntrophin complex, which we observed during aging, could be responsible for impaired nuclear S-nitrosylation. Taken together, our data indicate that altered S-nitrosylation of p53 during aging could be a contributing factor of sarcopenia condition and of other skeletal muscle pathologies associated with oxidative/nitrosative stress.

  7. CONVERGENCE OF P53 AND TGFβ SIGNALING ON ACTIVATING EXPRESSION OF THE TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENE MASPIN IN MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizhen Emily; Narasanna, Archana; Whitell, Corbin W.; Wu, Frederick Y.; Friedman, David B.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2014-01-01

    Using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, we identified the tumor suppressor gene maspin as a TGFβ target gene in human mammary epithelial cells. TGFβ upregulates maspin expression both at the RNA and protein levels. This upregulation required Smad2/3 function and intact p53 binding elements in the maspin promoter. DNA affinity immunoblot and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed the presence of both Smads and p53 at the maspin promoter in TGFβ-treated cells, suggesting that both transcription factors cooperate to induce maspin transcription. TGFβ did not activate maspin-luciferase reporter in p53-mutant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which exhibit methylation of the endogenous maspin promoter. Expression of ectopic p53, however, restored ligand-induced association of Smad2/3 with a transfected maspin promoter. Stable transfection of maspin inhibited basal and TGFβ-stimulated MDA-MB-231 cell motility. Finally, knockdown of endogenous maspin in p53 wild-type MCF10A/HER2 cells enhanced basal and TGFβ-stimulated motility. Taken together, these data support cooperation between the p53 and TGFβ tumor suppressor pathways in the induction of maspin expression, thus leading to inhibition of cell migration. PMID:17204482

  8. AATF/Che-1 acts as a phosphorylation-dependent molecular modulator to repress p53-driven apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höpker, Katja; Hagmann, Henning; Khurshid, Safiya; Chen, Shuhua; Hasskamp, Pia; Seeger-Nukpezah, Tamina; Schilberg, Katharina; Heukamp, Lukas; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Sos, Martin L; Thomas, Roman K; Lowery, Drew; Roels, Frederik; Fischer, Matthias; Liebau, Max C; Resch, Ulrike; Kisner, Tülay; Röther, Fabian; Bartram, Malte P; Müller, Roman Ulrich; Fabretti, Francesca; Kurschat, Peter; Schumacher, Björn; Gaestel, Matthias; Medema, René H; Yaffe, Michael B; Schermer, Bernhard; Reinhardt, H Christian; Benzing, Thomas

    2012-10-17

    Following genotoxic stress, cells activate a complex signalling network to arrest the cell cycle and initiate DNA repair or apoptosis. The tumour suppressor p53 lies at the heart of this DNA damage response. However, it remains incompletely understood, which signalling molecules dictate the choice between these different cellular outcomes. Here, we identify the transcriptional regulator apoptosis-antagonizing transcription factor (AATF)/Che-1 as a critical regulator of the cellular outcome of the p53 response. Upon genotoxic stress, AATF is phosphorylated by the checkpoint kinase MK2. Phosphorylation results in the release of AATF from cytoplasmic MRLC3 and subsequent nuclear translocation where AATF binds to the PUMA, BAX and BAK promoter regions to repress p53-driven expression of these pro-apoptotic genes. In xenograft experiments, mice exhibit a dramatically enhanced response of AATF-depleted tumours following genotoxic chemotherapy with adriamycin. The exogenous expression of a phospho-mimicking AATF point mutant results in marked adriamycin resistance in vivo. Nuclear AATF enrichment appears to be selected for in p53-proficient endometrial cancers. Furthermore, focal copy number gains at the AATF locus in neuroblastoma, which is known to be almost exclusively p53-proficient, correlate with an adverse prognosis and reduced overall survival. These data identify the p38/MK2/AATF signalling module as a critical repressor of p53-driven apoptosis and commend this pathway as a target for DNA damage-sensitizing therapeutic regimens.

  9. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol potentiates the effects of topoisomerase I poisons by suppressing Rad51 expression in a p53-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Grazia; Seelman, Sharon L; Qin, Li-Xuan; Schwartz, Gary K

    2008-04-01

    The results of a phase I clinical trial of the topoisomerase I (Topo I) poison CPT-11 followed by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol in patients with advanced solid tumors indicate that patients whose tumors were wild-type, but not mutant, for p53 obtained the most clinical benefit from this combination therapy. We elected to elucidate the mechanistic basis for this effect in isogenic-paired HCT116 colon cancer cells that were either wild-type (+/+) or null (-/-) for p53. With the combination therapy of SN-38 (the active metabolite of CPT-11) followed by flavopiridol, the induction of apoptosis was 5-fold greater in the p53+/+ cells compared with the p53-/- cells. This sequential treatment induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(15), which interacted with Rad51, a DNA repair protein involved in homologous recombination. Rad51 bound to p53-Ser(15) within the first 5 hours of combination therapy, and then was transcriptionally suppressed at 24 hours by flavopiridol only in p53+/+ cells. Microarray analysis also revealed suppression of Rad51 in a p53-dependent manner. Depletion of Rad51 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) sensitized both p53+/+ and p53-/- cells to SN-38-induced apoptosis with increase of gamma H2AX, a marker of DNA damage. Conversely, overexpression of Rad51 rescued p53+/+ cells from SN-->F-induced apoptosis. Because flavopiridol inhibits Cdk9, we found that inhibition of Cdk9 by DRB or by siRNA could recapitulate the flavopiridol effects, with suppression of Rad51 and induction of apoptosis only in p53+/+ cells. In conclusion, after DNA damage by Topo I poisons, flavopiridol targets homologous recombination through a p53-dependent down-regulation of Rad51, resulting in enhancement of apoptosis.

  10. A synthetic form of frizzled 8-associated antiproliferative factor enhances p53 stability through USP2a and MDM2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayoung Kim

    Full Text Available Frizzled 8-associated Antiproliferative Factor (APF is a sialoglycopeptide urinary biomarker of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS, a chronic condition of unknown etiology with variable symptoms that generally include pelvic and/or perineal pain, urinary frequency, and urgency. We previously reported that native human APF suppresses the proliferation of normal bladder epithelial cells through a mechanism that involves increased levels of p53. The goal of this study was to delineate the regulatory mechanism whereby p53 expression is regulated by APF. Two APF-responsive cell lines (T24 bladder carcinoma cells and the immortalized human bladder epithelial cell line, TRT-HU1 were treated with asialo-APF (as-APF, a chemically synthesized form of APF. Biochemical analysis revealed that as-APF increased p53 levels in two ways: by decreasing ubiquitin specific protease 2a (USP2a expression leading to enhanced ubiquitination of murine double minute 2 E3 ubiquitin ligase (MDM2, and by suppressing association of p53 with MDM2, thus impairing p53 ubiquitination. Biological responses to as-APF were suppressed by increased expression of wild type, but not mutant USP2a, which enhanced cell growth via upregulation of a cell cycle mediator, cyclin D1, at both transcription and protein levels. Consistent with this, gene silencing of USP2a with siRNA arrested cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that APF upregulates cellular p53 levels via functional attenuation of the USP2a-MDM2 pathway, resulting in p53 accumulation and growth arrest. These data also imply that targeting USP2a, MDM2, p53 and/or complex formation by these molecules may be relevant in the development of novel therapeutic approaches to IC/PBS.

  11. The structure formed by inverted repeats in p53 response elements determines the transactivation activity of p53 protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázda, Václav; Čechová, Jana; Battistin, M.; Coufal, Jan; Jagelská, Eva; Raimondi, I.; Inga, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 483, č. 1 (2017), s. 516-521 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21855S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : tumor-suppressor p53 * cruciform structures * dna-conformation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.466, year: 2016

  12. P53 mutation analysis of colorectal liver metastases : Relation to actual survival, angiogenic status, and p53 overexpression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, KP; Gouw, ASH; Peeters, PMJG; Bulthuis, M; Menkema, L; Porte, RJ; Slooff, MJH; van Goor, H; van den Berg, Anke

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate TP53 mutations with angiogenic status of the tumor and prognosis after liver surgery in patients with colorectal liver metastases and to correlate immunohistochemical staining of p53 protein with TP53 gene mutations. Experimental Design: Tumors of 44 patients with surgically

  13. Construction of a triple modified p53 containing DNA vaccine to enhance processing and presentation of the p53 antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, Geke A. P.; Meijer, Coby; Dam, Wendy A.; Roossink, Frank; Mulder, Nanno H.

    2009-01-01

    More effective and less toxic treatments are urgently needed in the treatment of patients with cancer. The turnout suppressor protein p53 is a tumour-associated antigen that could serve that purpose when applied in an immunologic approval to cancer. It is mutated in similar to 50% of the tumours

  14. Connection between cell phone use, p53 gene expression in different zones of glioblastoma multiforme and survival prognoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akhavan-Sigari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate p53 gene expression in the central and peripheral zones of glioblastoma multiforme using a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR technique in patients who use cell phones ≥3 hours a day and determine its relationship to clinicopathological findings and overall survival. Sixty-three patients (38 males and 25 females, diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, underwent tumor resection between 2008 and 2011. Patient ages ranged from 25 to 88 years, with a mean age of 55. The levels of expression of p53 in the central and peripheral zone of the GBM were quantified by RT-PCR. Data on p53 gene expression from the central and peripheral zone, the related malignancy and the clinicopatholagical findings (age, gender, tumor location and size, as well as overall survival, were analyzed. Forty-one out of 63 patients (65% with the highest level of cell phone use (≥3 hours/day had higher mutant type p53 expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma; the difference was statistically significant (P=0.034. Results from the present study on the use of mobile phones for ≥3 hours a day show a consistent pattern of increased risk for the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma, and that this increase was significantly correlated with shorter overall survival time. The risk was not higher for ipsilateral exposure. We found that the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma was increased in 65% of patients using cell phones ≥3 hours a day.

  15. Mutasi Gen P53: Faktor Prediktif Kanker Payudara?

    OpenAIRE

    Suyanto, Putri Y; Utomo, Ahmad R; Sandra, Ferry

    2008-01-01

    Farmakogenetik dalam terapi kanker adalah pemberian terapi kepada pasien berdasarkan status atau profil genetik dari sel kanker. Dengan demikian, pemberian kemoterapi diharapkan bisa lebih efektif dan meningkatkan kualitas hidup pasien dengan menghindari terapi yang diketahui secara genetik tidak memberikan keuntungan klinis. Pemeriksaan DNA gen p53 sebagai salah satu tumor suppresor gene yang termutasi pada hampir sebagian besar tumor diharapkan mampu menjadi faktor prediktif ketika dilakuka...

  16. P53-dependent antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of trichostatin A (TSA) in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajbouj, K; Mawrin, C; Hartig, R; Schulze-Luehrmann, J; Wilisch-Neumann, A; Roessner, A; Schneider-Stock, R

    2012-05-01

    Glioblastomas are known to be highly chemoresistant, but HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to be of therapeutic relevance for this aggressive tumor type. We treated U87 glioblastoma cells with trichostatin A (TSA) to define potential epigenetic targets for HDACi-mediated antitumor effects. Using a cDNA array analysis covering 96 cell cycle genes, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1) was identified as the major player in TSA-induced cell cycle arrest. TSA slightly inhibited proliferation and viability of U87 cells, cumulating in a G1/S cell cycle arrest. This effect was accompanied by a significant up-regulation of p53 and its transcriptional target p21(WAF1) and by down-regulation of key G1/S regulators, such as cdk4, cdk6, and cyclin D1. Nevertheless, TSA did not induce apoptosis in U87 cells. As expected, TSA promoted the accumulation of total acetylated histones H3 and H4 and a decrease in endogenous HDAC activity. Characterizing the chromatin modulation around the p21(WAF1) promoter after TSA treatment using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we found (1) a release of HDAC1, (2) an increase of acetylated H4 binding, and (3) enhanced recruitment of p53. p53-depleted U87 cells showed an abrogation of the G1/S arrest and re-entered the cell cycle. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that TSA induced the nuclear translocation of p21(WAF1) verifying a cell cycle arrest. On the other hand, a significant portion of p21(WAF1) was present in the cytoplasmic compartment causing apoptosis resistance. Furthermore, TSA-treated p53-mutant cell line U138 failed to show an induction in p21(WAF1), showed a deficient G2/M checkpoint, and underwent mitotic catastrophe. We suggest that HDAC inhibition in combination with other clinically used drugs may be considered an effective strategy to overcome chemoresistance in glioblastoma cells.

  17. Haploinsufficiency of Def activates p53-dependent TGFβ signalling and causes scar formation after partial hepatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Zhu

    Full Text Available The metazoan liver exhibits a remarkable capacity to regenerate lost liver mass without leaving a scar following partial hepatectomy (PH. Whilst previous studies have identified components of several different signaling pathways that are essential for activation of hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, the mechanisms that enable such regeneration to occur without accompanying scar formation remain poorly understood. Here we use the adult zebrafish liver, which can regenerate within two weeks following PH, as a new genetic model to address this important question. We focus on the role of Digestive-organ-expansion-factor (Def, a nucleolar protein which has recently been shown to complex with calpain3 (Capn3 to mediate p53 degradation specifically in the nucleolus, in liver regeneration. Firstly, we show that Def expression is up-regulated in the wild-type liver following amputation, and that the defhi429/+ heteroozygous mutant (def+/- suffers from haploinsufficiency of Def in the liver. We then show that the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines is up-regulated in the def+/- liver, which leads to distortion of the migration and the clearance of leukocytes after PH. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ signalling is thus activated in the wound epidermis in def+/- due to a prolonged inflammatory response, which leads to fibrosis at the amputation site. Fibrotic scar formation in def+/- is blocked by the over-expression of Def, by the loss-of-function of p53, and by treatment with anti-inflammation drug dexamethasone or TGFβ-signalling inhibitor SB431542. We finally show that the Def- p53 pathway suppresses fibrotic scar formation, at least in part, through the regulation of the expression of the pro-inflammatory factor, high-mobility group box 1. We conclude that the novel Def- p53 nucleolar pathway functions specifically to prevent a scar formation at the amputation site in a normal amputated liver.

  18. Haploinsufficiency of Def activates p53-dependent TGFβ signalling and causes scar formation after partial hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhihui; Chen, Jun; Xiong, Jing-Wei; Peng, Jinrong

    2014-01-01

    The metazoan liver exhibits a remarkable capacity to regenerate lost liver mass without leaving a scar following partial hepatectomy (PH). Whilst previous studies have identified components of several different signaling pathways that are essential for activation of hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, the mechanisms that enable such regeneration to occur without accompanying scar formation remain poorly understood. Here we use the adult zebrafish liver, which can regenerate within two weeks following PH, as a new genetic model to address this important question. We focus on the role of Digestive-organ-expansion-factor (Def), a nucleolar protein which has recently been shown to complex with calpain3 (Capn3) to mediate p53 degradation specifically in the nucleolus, in liver regeneration. Firstly, we show that Def expression is up-regulated in the wild-type liver following amputation, and that the defhi429/+ heteroozygous mutant (def+/-) suffers from haploinsufficiency of Def in the liver. We then show that the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines is up-regulated in the def+/- liver, which leads to distortion of the migration and the clearance of leukocytes after PH. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signalling is thus activated in the wound epidermis in def+/- due to a prolonged inflammatory response, which leads to fibrosis at the amputation site. Fibrotic scar formation in def+/- is blocked by the over-expression of Def, by the loss-of-function of p53, and by treatment with anti-inflammation drug dexamethasone or TGFβ-signalling inhibitor SB431542. We finally show that the Def- p53 pathway suppresses fibrotic scar formation, at least in part, through the regulation of the expression of the pro-inflammatory factor, high-mobility group box 1. We conclude that the novel Def- p53 nucleolar pathway functions specifically to prevent a scar formation at the amputation site in a normal amputated liver.

  19. p53's choice of myocardial death or survival: Oxygen protects infarct myocardium by recruiting p53 on NOS3 promoter through regulation of p53-Lys118 acetylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogna, Rajan; Madan, Esha; Khan, Mahmood; Pati, Uttam; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, an irreversible cardiac tissue damage, involves progressive loss of cardiomyocytes due to p53-mediated apoptosis. Oxygenation is known to promote cardiac survival through activation of NOS3 gene. We hypothesized a dual role for p53, which, depending on oxygenation, can elicit apoptotic death signals or NOS3-mediated survival signals in the infarct heart. p53 exhibited a differential DNA-binding, namely, BAX-p53RE in the infarct heart or NOS3-p53RE in the oxygenated heart, which was regulated by oxygen-induced, post-translational modification of p53. In the infarct heart, p53 was heavily acetylated at Lys118 residue, which was exclusively reversed in the oxygenated heart, apparently regulated by oxygen-dependent expression of TIP60. The inhibition of Lys118 acetylation promoted the generation of NOS3-promoting prosurvival form of p53. Thus, oxygenation switches p53-DNA interaction by regulating p53 core-domain acetylation, promoting a prosurvival transcription activity of p53. Understanding this novel oxygen-p53 survival pathway will open new avenues in cardioprotection molecular therapy. PMID:24096875

  20. p53's choice of myocardial death or survival: Oxygen protects infarct myocardium by recruiting p53 on NOS3 promoter through regulation of p53-Lys(118) acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogna, Rajan; Madan, Esha; Khan, Mahmood; Pati, Uttam; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2013-11-01

    Myocardial infarction, an irreversible cardiac tissue damage, involves progressive loss of cardiomyocytes due to p53-mediated apoptosis. Oxygenation is known to promote cardiac survival through activation of NOS3 gene. We hypothesized a dual role for p53, which, depending on oxygenation, can elicit apoptotic death signals or NOS3-mediated survival signals in the infarct heart. p53 exhibited a differential DNA-binding, namely, BAX-p53RE in the infarct heart or NOS3-p53RE in the oxygenated heart, which was regulated by oxygen-induced, post-translational modification of p53. In the infarct heart, p53 was heavily acetylated at Lys(118) residue, which was exclusively reversed in the oxygenated heart, apparently regulated by oxygen-dependent expression of TIP60. The inhibition of Lys(118) acetylation promoted the generation of NOS3-promoting prosurvival form of p53. Thus, oxygenation switches p53-DNA interaction by regulating p53 core-domain acetylation, promoting a prosurvival transcription activity of p53. Understanding this novel oxygen-p53 survival pathway will open new avenues in cardioprotection molecular therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd on behalf of EMBO.

  1. Probing the functional impact of sequence variation on p53-DNA interactions using a novel microsphere assay for protein-DNA binding with human cell extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A Noureddine

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor regulates its target genes through sequence-specific binding to DNA response elements (REs. Although numerous p53 REs are established, the thousands more identified by bioinformatics are not easily subjected to comparative functional evaluation. To examine the relationship between RE sequence variation -- including polymorphisms -- and p53 binding, we have developed a multiplex format microsphere assay of protein-DNA binding (MAPD for p53 in nuclear extracts. Using MAPD we measured sequence-specific p53 binding of doxorubicin-activated or transiently expressed p53 to REs from established p53 target genes and p53 consensus REs. To assess the sensitivity and scalability of the assay, we tested 16 variants of the p21 target sequence and a 62-multiplex set of single nucleotide (nt variants of the p53 consensus sequence and found many changes in p53 binding that are not captured by current computational binding models. A group of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was examined and binding profiles closely matched transactivation capability tested in luciferase constructs. The in vitro binding characteristics of p53 in nuclear extracts recapitulated the cellular in vivo transactivation capabilities for eight well-established human REs measured by luciferase assay. Using a set of 26 bona fide REs, we observed distinct binding patterns characteristic of transiently expressed wild type and mutant p53s. This microsphere assay system utilizes biologically meaningful cell extracts in a multiplexed, quantitative, in vitro format that provides a powerful experimental tool for elucidating the functional impact of sequence polymorphism and protein variation on protein/DNA binding in transcriptional networks.

  2. Increased prevalence of p53 overexpression from typical endometriosis to atypical endometriosis and ovarian cancer associated with endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáinz de la Cuesta, Ricardo; Izquierdo, Manuel; Cañamero, Marta; Granizo, Juan José; Manzarbeitia, Felix

    2004-03-15

    To evaluate the expression of p53, c-erb-B-2, MIB1 and Bcl-2 in normal endometrium, endometriosis, atypical endometriosis and ovarian cancer associated with endometriosis, looking for immunohistochemical markers that may help determine endometriosis with premalignant potential. Between 1948 and 1999, 410 epithelial ovarian cancers and 521 cases of endometriosis were surgically treated at Fundación Jiménez Díaz. Pathology reports and slides were reviewed. Four groups were defined: (1) endometriosis/cancer (n=17); (2) atypical endometriosis (n=6); (3) endometriosis (n=17); (4) endometrium (n=7). Tumors and controls were immunostained and evaluated for expression of p53, c-erb-B-2, MIB1 and Bcl-2. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square for linear trends, Fisher exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Of the 410 cancers, 17 (4.1%) had associated endometriosis and of the 521 endometriosis, 6 (1.2 %) had atypical changes. Fourteen of 17 (82.4%) cancers associated with endometriosis and all atypical endometriosis had p53 overexpression. Only 2 of 17 (11.8%) endometriosis and none of the endometriums had mutant p53 (P<0.01). We found a trend towards increased expression of MIB1 (0.073) in the cancer and atypical endometriosis groups, and no differences in expression of Bcl-2 or c-erb-B-2. The sensitivity and specificity of p53 as a marker for the diagnosis of atypical endometriosis and cancer associated with endometriosis were 87%; CI 95% (73.2-100%) and 92% (80.6-100%), respectively. When comparing all groups, the mean positive p53 and MIB1 cell count was statistically significant (P=0.01). Overexpression of p53 in atypical endometriosis and cancer associated with endometriosis is a common finding and may be used to identify endometriosis with premalignant potential.

  3. BTG2 is a tumor suppressor gene upregulated by p53 and PTEN in human bladder carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Chang, Kang-Shuo; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2017-12-13

    Although widely deemed as a tumor suppressor gene, the role of B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) in bladder cancer is still inconclusive. We investigated the role and regulatory mechanism of BTG2 in bladder cancer. BTG2 expression in human bladder tissues was determined by RT-qPCR and immunoblotting assays. Expressions of BTG2 and PTEN in bladder carcinoma cells were determined by immunoblotting, RT-qPCR, or reporter assays. The 3 H-thymidine incorporation assay, flow cytometry, and the xenograft animal model were used to determine the cell growth. BTG2 expression was lower in human bladder cancer tissues than normal bladder tissues. Highly differentiated bladder cancer cells, RT4, expressed higher BTG2 than the less-differentiated bladder cancer cells, HT1376 and T24. Overexpression of BTG2 in T24 cells inhibited cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Camptothecin and doxorubicin treatments in RT-4 cells or transient overexpression of p53 into p53-mutant HT1376 cells induced p53 and BTG2 expression. Further reporter assays with site-mutation of p53 response element from GGGAAAGTCC to GGAGTCC within BTG2 promoter area showed that p53-induced BTG2 gene expression was dependent on the p53 response element. Ectopic PTEN overexpression in T24 cells blocked the Akt signal pathway which attenuated cell growth via upregualtion of BTG2 gene expression, while reverse effect was found in PTEN-knockdown RT-4 cells. PTEN activity inhibitor (VO-OHpic) treatment decreased BTG2 expression in RT-4 and PTEN-overexpressed T24 cells. Our results suggested that BTG2 functioned as a bladder cancer tumor suppressor gene, and was induced by p53 and PTEN. Modulation of BTG2 expression seems a promising way to treat human bladder cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha determines gastric cancer chemosensitivity via modulation of p53 and NF-kappaB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Rohwer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reduced chemosensitivity of solid cancer cells represents a pivotal obstacle in clinical oncology. Hence, the molecular characterization of pathways regulating chemosensitivity is a central prerequisite to improve cancer therapy. The hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1alpha has been linked to chemosensitivity while the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. Therefore, we comprehensively analysed HIF-1alpha's role in determining chemosensitivity focussing on responsible molecular pathways. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: RNA interference was applied to inactivate HIF-1alpha or p53 in the human gastric cancer cell lines AGS and MKN28. The chemotherapeutic agents 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin were used and chemosensitivity was assessed by cell proliferation assays as well as determination of cell cycle distribution and apoptosis. Expression of p53 and p53 target proteins was analyzed by western blot. NF-kappaB activity was characterized by means of electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Inactivation of HIF-1alpha in gastric cancer cells resulted in robust elevation of chemosensitivity. Accordingly, HIF-1alpha-competent cells displayed a significant reduction of chemotherapy-induced senescence and apoptosis. Remarkably, this phenotype was completely absent in p53 mutant cells while inactivation of p53 per se did not affect chemosensitivity. HIF-1alpha markedly suppressed chemotherapy-induced activation of p53 and p21 as well as the retinoblastoma protein, eventually resulting in cell cycle arrest. Reduced formation of reactive oxygen species in HIF-1alpha-competent cells was identified as the molecular mechanism of HIF-1alpha-mediated inhibition of p53. Furthermore, loss of HIF-1alpha abrogated, in a p53-dependent manner, chemotherapy-induced DNA-binding of NF-kappaB and expression of anti-apoptotic NF-kappaB target genes. Accordingly, reconstitution of the NF-kappaB subunit p65 reversed the increased chemosensitivity of

  5. P53 and Rb tumor suppressor gene alterations in gastric cancer Alterações dos genes supressores tumorais p53 e Rb no câncer gástrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane Mattar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes has been frequently observed in gastric carcinogenesis. Our purpose was to study the involvement of p53, APC, DCC, and Rb genes in gastric carcinoma. METHOD: Loss of heterozygosity of the p53, APC, DCC and Rb genes was studied in 22 gastric cancer tissues using polymerase chain reaction; single-strand conformation polymorphism of the p53 gene exons 5-6 and exons 7-8 was studied using 35S-dATP, and p53 expression was detected using a histological immunoperoxidase method with an anti-p53 clone. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: No loss of heterozygosity was observed in any of these tumor suppressor genes; homozygous deletion was detected in the Rb gene in 23% (3/13 of the cases of intestinal-type gastric carcinoma. Eighteen (81.8% cases showed band mobility shifts in exons 5-6 and/or 7-8 of the p53 gene. The presence of the p53 protein was positive in gastric cancer cells in 14 cases (63.6%. Normal gastric mucosa showed negative staining for p53; thus, the immunoreactivity was likely to represent mutant forms. The correlation of band mobility shift and the immunoreactivity to anti-p53 was not significant (P = .90. There was no correlation of gene alterations with the disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: The inactivation of Rb and p53 genes is involved in gastric carcinogenesis in our environment. Loss of the Rb gene observed only in the intestinal-type gastric cancer should be further evaluated in association with Helicobacter pylori infection. The p53 gene was affected in both intestinal and diffuse histological types of gastric cancer.A inativação de genes supressores tumorais tem sido freqüentemente observada na carcinogênese gástrica. O nosso objetivo foi estudar o envolvimento dos genes p53, APC, DCC e Rb no câncer gástrico. MÉTODO: Vinte e dois casos de câncer gástrico foram estudados por PCR-LOH (reação de polimerase em cadeia- perda de alelo heterozigoto dos genes p53, APC, DCC e Rb; e por PCR-SSCP (rea

  6. Paracrine Apoptotic Effect of p53 Mediated by Tumor Suppressor Par-4

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    Ravshan Burikhanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The guardian of the genome, p53, is often mutated in cancer and may contribute to therapeutic resistance. Given that p53 is intact and functional in normal tissues, we harnessed its potential to inhibit the growth of p53-deficient cancer cells. Specific activation of p53 in normal fibroblasts selectively induced apoptosis in p53-deficient cancer cells. This paracrine effect was mediated by p53-dependent secretion of the tumor suppressor Par-4. Accordingly, the activation of p53 in normal mice, but not p53−/− or Par-4−/− mice, caused systemic elevation of Par-4, which induced apoptosis of p53-deficient tumor cells. Mechanistically, p53 induced Par-4 secretion by suppressing the expression of its binding partner, UACA, which sequesters Par-4. Thus, normal cells can be empowered by p53 activation to induce Par-4 secretion for the inhibition of therapy-resistant tumors.

  7. A dynamic p53-mdm2 model with distributed delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horhat, Raluca; Horhat, Raul Florin

    2014-12-01

    Specific activator and repressor transcription factors which bind to specific regulator DNA sequences, play an important role in gene activity control. Interactions between genes coding such transcripion factors should explain the different stable or sometimes oscillatory gene activities characteristic for different tissues. In this paper, the dynamic P53-Mdm2 interaction model with distributed delays is investigated. Both weak and Dirac kernels are taken into consideration. For Dirac case, the Hopf bifurcation is investigated. Some numerical examples are finally given for justifying the theoretical results.

  8. In vivo footprinting and DNA affinity chromatography for analysis of p53 DNA binding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Maria Patricia; Cain, Christine; Bargonetti, Jill

    2003-01-01

    p53 is a sequence-specific DNA binding protein. The p53 consensus is two copies of 5'- RRRC(A/T)(T/A)GYYY-3'. The interaction of p53 with specific DNA binding sites (DBS) has been analyzed extensively using electrophoretic mobility shift analysis (EMSA). These studies do not address the interaction of p53 with nuclear chromatin or the stability of p53-DBS interactions. In vivo footprinting examines the dynamic interactions of p53 protein in nuclear chromatin. p53 DBS affinity chromatography compares the stability of p53 from different cellular extracts with different DBS. Isogenic strains expressing high p53 levels, and deleted for p53, are required for controlled experiments using both methods. Different systems can be used to generate sufficient p53 protein (including DNA damage), and this results in the analysis of different forms of p53. A comparison of different cellular sources of high levels of p53 (in the presence and absence of DNA damage) vs different p53 DBS is required to appreciate the complexity of the regulation. Methods for comparing p53 from three different cellular sources with different DBS are presented here. The p53 research community needs to expand this analysis to complete the picture of how p53 differentially regulates transcription of target genes in nuclear chromatin.

  9. Induction of p53-Specific Immunity by a p53 Synthetic Long Peptide Vaccine in Patients Treated for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speetjens, Frank M.; Kuppen, PeterJ. K.; Welters, Marij. J. P.; Essahsah, Farah; van den Brink, Anne Marie E. G. Voet; Lantrua, M. Graziella Kallenberg; Valentijn, A. Rob P. M.; Oostendorp, Jaap; Fathers, Lorraine M.; Nijman, Hans W.; Drijfhout, Jan W.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor-associated self-antigen p53 is commonly overexpressed in cancer, including colorectal cancer, and can serve as a target for immunotherapy. The safety and immunogenicity of a p53 synthetic long peptide (p53-SLP) vaccine were investigated in patients treated for metastatic

  10. Biological activity and safety of adenoviral vector-expressed wild-type p53 after intratumoral injection in melanoma and breast cancer patients with p53-overexpressing tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dummer, R; Bergh, J; Karlsson, Y; Horovitz, JA; Mulder, NH; Huinin, DT; Burg, G; Hofbauer, G; Osanto, S

    p53 mutations are common genetic alterations in human cancer. Gene transfer of a wild-type (wt) p53 gene reverses the loss of normal p53 function in vitro and in vivo. A phase I dose escalation study of single intratumoral (i.t.) injection of a replication-defective adenoviral expression vector

  11. Expression of full-length p53 and its isoform Δp53 in breast carcinomas in relation to mutation status and clinical parameters

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    Deppert Wolfgang

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor suppressor gene p53 (TP53 controls numerous signaling pathways and is frequently mutated in human cancers. Novel p53 isoforms suggest alternative splicing as a regulatory feature of p53 activity. Results In this study we have analyzed mRNA expression of both wild-type and mutated p53 and its respective Δp53 isoform in 88 tumor samples from breast cancer in relation to clinical parameters and molecular subgroups. Three-dimensional structure differences for the novel internally deleted p53 isoform Δp53 have been predicted. We confirmed the expression of Δp53 mRNA in tumors using quantitative real-time PCR technique. The mRNA expression levels of the two isoforms were strongly correlated in both wild-type and p53-mutated tumors, with the level of the Δp53 isoform being approximately 1/3 of that of the full-length p53 mRNA. Patients expressing mutated full-length p53 and non-mutated (wild-type Δp53, "mutational hybrids", showed a slightly higher frequency of patients with distant metastasis at time of diagnosis compared to other patients with p53 mutations, but otherwise did not differ significantly in any other clinical parameter. Interestingly, the p53 wild-type tumors showed a wide range of mRNA expression of both p53 isoforms. Tumors with mRNA expression levels in the upper or lower quartile were significantly associated with grade and molecular subtypes. In tumors with missense or in frame mutations the mRNA expression levels of both isoforms were significantly elevated, and in tumors with nonsense, frame shift or splice mutations the mRNA levels were significantly reduced compared to those expressing wild-type p53. Conclusion Expression of p53 is accompanied by the functionally different isoform Δp53 at the mRNA level in cell lines and human breast tumors. Investigations of "mutational hybrid" patients highlighted that wild-type Δp53 does not compensates for mutated p53, but rather may be associated with a

  12. Heterogeneous Hydration of p53/MDM2 Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Water-mediated interactions play critical roles in biomolecular recognition processes. Explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the variational implicit-solvent model (VISM) are used to study those hydration properties during binding for the biologically important p53/MDM2 complex. Unlike simple model solutes, in such a realistic and heterogeneous solute–solvent system with both geometrical and chemical complexity, the local water distribution sensitively depends on nearby amino acid properties and the geometric shape of the protein. We show that the VISM can accurately describe the locations of high and low density solvation shells identified by the MD simulations and can explain them by a local coupling balance of solvent–solute interaction potentials and curvature. In particular, capillary transitions between local dry and wet hydration states in the binding pocket are captured for interdomain distance between 4 to 6 Å, right at the onset of binding. The underlying physical connection between geometry and polarity is illustrated and quantified. Our study offers a microscopic and physical insight into the heterogeneous hydration behavior of the biologically highly relevant p53/MDM2 system and demonstrates the fundamental importance of hydrophobic effects for biological binding processes. We hope our study can help to establish new design rules for drugs and medical substances. PMID:24803860

  13. p53 mutations occur in aggressive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazars, R; Spinardi, L; BenCheikh, M; Simony-Lafontaine, J; Jeanteur, P; Theillet, C

    1992-07-15

    Using a polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism approach we analyzed 96 human primary breast tumors for the presence of mutations in exons 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 of the p53 gene. These exons have been shown to comprise highly conserved sequences and the portion including exons 5 through 9 is believed to be the target for over 90% of the acquired mutations in human cancer. Eighteen tumors of the 96 (18.7%) tested showed reproducibly a variant band indicative of a mutation. Most (15 tumors) of the mutations were single nucleotide substitutions and G:C to A:T transitions were prevalent (6 tumors), G:C to T:A transversions came next (4 tumors), and guanines were always on the nontranscribed strand. Concomitant loss of the wild type allele and mutation of the other copy was observed in only 3 of 18 mutated cases; this is consistent with the heterogeneous cellular composition of breast tumors. Furthermore p53 mutations were correlated to estrogen and/or progesterone receptor negative tumors, thus indicating their relationships to aggressive breast cancer. No association could be observed with DNA amplification events in these tumors.

  14. The Inherited p53 Mutation in the Brazilian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achatz, Maria Isabel; Zambetti, Gerard P

    2016-12-01

    A common criticism of studying rare diseases is the often-limited relevance of the findings to human health. Here, we review ∼15 years of research into an unusual germline TP53 mutation (p.R337H) that began with its detection in children with adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC), a remarkably rare childhood cancer that is associated with poor prognosis. We have come to learn that the p.R337H mutation exists at a very high frequency in Southern and Southeastern Brazil, occurring in one of 375 individuals within a total population of ∼100 million. Moreover, it has been determined that carriers of this founder mutation display variable tumor susceptibility, ranging from isolated cases of pediatric ACC to Li-Fraumeni or Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) syndromes, thus representing a significant medical issue for this country. Studying the biochemical and molecular consequences of this mutation on p53 tumor-suppressor activity, as well as the putative additional genetic alterations that cooperate with this mutation, is advancing our understanding of how p53 functions in tumor suppression in general. These studies, which originated with a rare childhood tumor, are providing important information for guiding genetic counselors and physicians in treating their patients and are already providing clinical benefit. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  15. p53 immunostaining is correlated with reduced survival and is not correlated with gene mutations in resected pulmonary large cell carcinomas

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    L.M. Massoni Neto

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Malignancy of pulmonary large cell carcinomas (LCC increases from classic LCC through LCC with neuroendocrine morphology (LCCNM to large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (LCNEC. However, the histological classification has sometimes proved to be difficult. Because the malignancy of LCC is highly dependent on proteins with functions in the cell cycle, DNA repair, and apoptosis, p53 has been targeted as a potentially useful biological marker. p53 mutations in lung cancers have been shown to result in expression and protein expression also occurs in the absence of mutations. To validate the importance of both p53 protein expression (by immunostaining and p53 gene mutations in lung LCC (by PCR-single strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5, 6, 7, and 8 and to study their relationships with clinical factors and sub-classification we investigated the correlation of p53 abnormalities in 15 patients with LCC (5 classic LCC, 5 LCNEC, and 5 LCCNM who had undergone resection with curative intent. Of these patients, 5/15 expressed p53 and none had mutant p53 sequences. There was a negative survival correlation with positive p53 immunostaining (P = 0.05. After adjustment for stage, age, gender, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and histological subtypes by multivariate analysis, p53 expression had an independent impact on survival. The present study indicates that p53 assessment may provide an objective marker for the prognosis of LCC irrespective of morphological variants and suggests that p53 expression is important for outcome prediction in patients with the early stages of LCC. The results reported here should be considered to be initial results because tumors from only 15 patients were studied: 5 each from LCC, LCNEC and LCCNM. This was due to the rarity of these specific diseases.

  16. Phenotype Specific Analyses Reveal Distinct Regulatory Mechanism for Chronically Activated p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Jonathan M.; Menon, Suraj; Pérez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Tomimatsu, Kosuke; Bermejo-Rodriguez, Camino; Ito, Yoko; Chandra, Tamir; Narita, Masako; Lyons, Scott K.; Lynch, Andy G.; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya; Tavaré, Simon; Narita, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    The downstream functions of the DNA binding tumor suppressor p53 vary depending on the cellular context, and persistent p53 activation has recently been implicated in tumor suppression and senescence. However, genome-wide information about p53-target gene regulation has been derived mostly from acute genotoxic conditions. Using ChIP-seq and expression data, we have found distinct p53 binding profiles between acutely activated (through DNA damage) and chronically activated (in senescent or pro-apoptotic conditions) p53. Compared to the classical ‘acute’ p53 binding profile, ‘chronic’ p53 peaks were closely associated with CpG-islands. Furthermore, the chronic CpG-island binding of p53 conferred distinct expression patterns between senescent and pro-apoptotic conditions. Using the p53 targets seen in the chronic conditions together with external high-throughput datasets, we have built p53 networks that revealed extensive self-regulatory ‘p53 hubs’ where p53 and many p53 targets can physically interact with each other. Integrating these results with public clinical datasets identified the cancer-associated lipogenic enzyme, SCD, which we found to be directly repressed by p53 through the CpG-island promoter, providing a mechanistic link between p53 and the ‘lipogenic phenotype’, a hallmark of cancer. Our data reveal distinct phenotype associations of chronic p53 targets that underlie specific gene regulatory mechanisms. PMID:25790137

  17. Release of targeted p53 from the mitochondrion as an early signal during mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is an early response to low-level stressors. To investigate the fate of mitochondrial-sequestered p53, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) on a p53-deficient genetic background were transfected with p53-EGFP fusion protei...

  18. Inhibition of p53-Dependent, but Not p53-Independent, Cell Death by U19 Protein from Human Herpesvirus 6B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Møller, Janni M. L.; Schleimann, Mariane H.; Bundgaard, Bettina; Bak, Rasmus O.; Øster, Bodil; Mikkelsen, Jacob G.; Hupp, Ted; Höllsberg, Per

    2013-01-01

    Infection with human herpesvirus (HHV)-6B alters cell cycle progression and stabilizes tumor suppressor protein p53. In this study, we have analyzed the activity of p53 after stimulation with p53-dependent and -independent DNA damaging agents during HHV-6B infection. Microarray analysis, Western blotting and confocal microscopy demonstrated that HHV-6B-infected cells were resistant to p53-dependent arrest and cell death after γ irradiation in both permissive and non-permissive cell lines. In contrast, HHV-6B-infected cells died normally through p53-independet DNA damage induced by UV radiation. Moreover, we identified a viral protein involved in inhibition of p53 during HHV-6B-infection. The protein product from the U19 ORF was able to inhibit p53-dependent signaling following γ irradiation in a manner similar to that observed during infection. Similar to HHV-6B infection, overexpression of U19 failed to rescue the cells from p53-independent death induced by UV radiation. Hence, infection with HHV-6B specifically blocks DNA damage-induced cell death associated with p53 without inhibiting the p53-independent cell death response. This block in p53 function can in part be ascribed to the activities of the viral U19 protein. PMID:23555634

  19. Assessment of the potential diagnostic value of serum p53 antibody for cancer: a meta-analysis.

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    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutant p53 protein over-expression has been reported to induce serum antibodies against p53. We assessed the diagnostic precision of serum p53 (s-p53 antibodies for diagnosis of cancer patients and compared the positive rates of the s-p53 antibody in different types of cancers. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed and Embase, through May 31, 2012. Studies were assessed for quality using QUADAS (quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy. The positive likelihood ratio (PLR and negative likelihood ratio (NLR were pooled separately and compared with overall accuracy measures using diagnostic odds ratios (DORs and Area under the curve(AUC. Meta regression and subgroup analyses were done, and heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. RESULTS: Of 1089 studies initially identified, 100 eligible studies with 23 different types of tumor met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis (cases = 15953, controls = 8694. However, we could conduct independent meta analysis on only 13 of 36 types of tumors. Approximately 56% (56/100 of the included studies were of high quality (QUADAS score≥8. The summary estimates for quantitative analysis of serum p53 antibody in the diagnosis of cancers were: PLR 5.75 (95% CI: 4.60-7.19, NLR 0.81 (95%CI: 0.79-0.83 and DOR 7.56 (95% CI: 6.02-9.50. However, for the 13 types of cancers on which meta-analysis was conducted, the ranges for PLR (2.33-11.05, NLR (0.74-0.97, DOR (2.86-13.80, AUC(0.29-0.81, and positive rate (4.47%-28.36% indicated significant heterogeneity. We found that breast, colorectal, esophageal, gastric, hepatic, lymphoma, lung and ovarian cancer had relatively reasonable diagnostic accuracy. The remaining results of the five types of cancers suggested that s-p53 antibody had limited value. CONCLUSIONS: The current evidence suggests that s-p53 antibody has potential diagnostic value for cancer, especially for breast, colorectal, esophageal, gastric, hepatic

  20. Distinguishing Low-Risk Luminal A Breast Cancer Subtypes with Ki-67 and p53 Is More Predictive of Long-Term Survival.

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    Se Kyung Lee

    Full Text Available Overexpression of p53 is the most frequent genetic alteration in breast cancer. Recently, many studies have shown that the expression of mutant p53 differs for each subtype of breast cancer and is associated with different prognoses. In this study, we aimed to determine the suitable cut-off value to predict the clinical outcome of p53 overexpression and its usefulness as a prognostic factor in each subtype of breast cancer, especially in luminal A breast cancer. Approval was granted by the Institutional Review Board of Samsung Medical Center. We analyzed a total of 7,739 patients who were surgically treated for invasive breast cancer at Samsung Medical Center between Dec 1995 and Apr 2013. Luminal A subtype was defined as ER&PR + and HER2- and was further subclassified according to Ki-67 and p53 expression as follows: luminal A (Ki-67-,p53-, luminal A (Ki-67+, p53-, luminal A (Ki-67 -, p53+ and luminal A (Ki-67+, p53+. Low-risk luminal A subtype was defined as negative for both Ki-67 and p53 (luminal A [ki-67-, p53-], and others subtypes were considered to be high-risk luminal A breast cancer. A cut-off value of 10% for p53 was a good predictor of clinical outcome in all patients and luminal A breast cancer patients. The prognostic role of p53 overexpression for OS and DFS was only significant in luminal A subtype. The combination of p53 and Ki-67 has been shown to have the best predictive power as calculated by the area under curve (AUC, especially for long-term overall survival. In this study, we have shown that overexpression of p53 and Ki-67 could be used to discriminate low-risk luminal A subtype in breast cancer. Therefore, using the combination of p53 and Ki-67 expression in discriminating low-risk luminal A breast cancer may improve the prognostic power and provide the greatest clinical utility.

  1. Gene expression profiles resulting from stable loss of p53 mirrors its role in tissue differentiation.

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    Oliver Couture

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene p53 is involved in a variety of cellular activities such as cellular stress responses, cell cycle regulation and differentiation. In our previous studies we have shown p53's transcription activating role to be important in osteoblast differentiation. There is still a debate in the literature as to whether p53 inhibits or promotes differentiation. We have found p53 heterozygous mice to show a p53 dependency on some bone marker gene expression that is absent in knockout mice. Mice heterozygous for p53 also show a higher incidence of osteosarcomas than p53 knockout mice. This suggests that p53 is able to modify the environment within osteoblasts. In this study we compare changes in gene expression resulting after either a transient or stable reduction in p53. Accordingly we reduced p53 levels transiently and stably in C2C12 cells, which are capable of both myoblast and osteoblast differentiation, and compared the changes in gene expression of candidate genes regulated by the p53 pathway. Using a PCR array to assay for p53 target genes, we have found different expression profiles when comparing stable versus transient knockdown of p53. As expected, several genes with profound changes after transient p53 loss were related to apoptosis and cell cycle regulation. In contrast, stable p53 loss produced a greater change in MyoD and other transcription factors with tissue specific roles, suggesting that long term loss of p53 affects tissue homeostasis to a greater degree than changes resulting from acute loss of p53. These differences in gene expression were validated by measuring promoter activity of different pathway specific genes involved in differentiation. These studies suggest that an important role for p53 is context dependent, with a stable reduction in p53 expression affecting normal tissue physiology more than acute loss of p53.

  2. p53 gene mutations and expression of p53 and mdm2 proteins in invasive breast carcinoma. A comparative analysis with clinico-pathological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, T; Schneider-Stock, R; Rys, J; Niezabitowski, A; Roessner, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze p53 gene mutations and the expression of p53 and mdm2 proteins in 31 randomly selected invasive breast carcinomas. The results were then correlated with tumor grade, stage, estrogen receptor status, nodal status, and DNA ploidy. The expression of the proteins p53 and mdm2 was determined immunohistochemically using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. Screening for p53 mutation involved analysis of the highly conserved regions of the p53 gene (exons 5-9) by the polymerase chain reaction/ single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique. PCR products with band shifts were directly sequenced. Immunohistochemical staining of p53 was positive in 9 cases (29.0%), only 2 of which showed a p53 gene mutation. These were identified as a C-->G transversion at the second position of codon 278 in exon 8 and an A-->G transition at the second position of codon 205 in exon 6. A third case with a mutation was observed (C-->T transition, position 1 of codon 250 in exon 7) that did not show p53 immunohistochemically. Of the 9 p53-positive tumors, 2 were moderately differentiated (grade II). The remaining tumors were poorly differentiated (7/9). By contrast, p53-negative carcinomas were well differentiated (grade I) in most cases (P = 0.02). DNA cytometry in 8 of the 9 p53-positive carcinomas revealed an aneuploid stem line. The majority of the p53-negative tumors were diploid (P = 0.01). Mdm2 oncoprotein was detected in 10 tumors (32.2%), 4 of which were p53-positive, including the 3 with mutations. The grading of the mdm2-positive tumors was moderate or poor, G1 carcinomas were always noted to be mdm2-negative (P = 0.04). Overexpression of p53 protein is a complex mechanism and does not merely indicate the detection of mutations in the p53 gene. This study has shown that p53 expression correlates with tumor grade and DNA ploidy. Mdm2 expression was also associated with the tumor grade. Immunohistological demonstration of the p53

  3. Radiosensitivity in lung cancer with focus on p53

    CERN Document Server

    Bergqvist, M

    2002-01-01

    In Sweden approximately 2800 new lung cancer patients are diagnosed every year. Radiotherapy is used with curative intention in certain groups of patients. The aim of this thesis is to study the basis of differences in radioresistance and the possibility to predict response to radiotherapy. In the first study we investigated, using the comet assay, four lung cancer cell lines with different sensitivity towards radiation. A clear dose-response relationship for radiation-induced DNA single strand and double strand breaks were found. All cell lines showed a remarkably efficient repair of both the DNA single strand and double strand breaks one hour after irradiation. However, further studies in one radioresistant and one radiosensitive cell line demonstrated that repair during the first 15 min had the best accordance with radiosensitivity measured as surviving fraction. In the second and third study, sequencing studies of the p53 gene were performed on cell lines as well as on tumour material. Cell lines that wer...

  4. Homologous and Nonhomologous Recombination Resulting in Deletion: Effects of p53 Status, Microhomology, and Repetitive DNA Length and Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebow, Dan; Miselis, Nathan; Liber, Howard L.

    2000-01-01

    Repetitive DNA elements frequently are precursors to chromosomal deletions in prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes. However, little is known about the relationship between repeated sequences and deletion formation in mammalian cells. We have created a novel integrated plasmid-based recombination assay to investigate repeated sequence instability in human cells. In a control cell line, the presence of direct or inverted repeats did not appreciably influence the very low deletion frequencies (2 × 10−7 to 9 × 10−7) in the region containing the repeat. Similar to what has been observed in lower eukaryotes, the majority of deletions resulted from the loss of the largest direct repeat present in the system along with the intervening sequence. Interestingly, in closely related cell lines that possess a mutant p53 gene, deletion frequencies in the control and direct-repeat plasmids were 40 to 300 times higher than in their wild-type counterparts. However, mutant p53 cells did not preferentially utilize the largest available homology in the formation of the deletion. Surprisingly, inverted repeats were approximately 10,000 times more unstable in all mutant p53 cells than in wild-type cells. Finally, several deletion junctions were marked by the addition of novel bases that were homologous to one of the preexisting DNA ends. Contrary to our expectations, only 6% of deletions in all cell lines could be classified as arising from nonhomologous recombination. PMID:10805745

  5. Reactivating p53 and Inducing Tumor Apoptosis (RITA Enhances the Response of RITA-Sensitive Colorectal Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin

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    Armin Wiegering

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma (CRC is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract with frequently dysregulated intracellular signaling pathways, including p53 signaling. The mainstay of chemotherapy treatment of CRC is 5-fluorouracil (5FU and oxaliplatin. The two anticancer drugs mediate their therapeutic effect via DNA damage-triggered signaling. The small molecule reactivating p53 and inducing tumor apoptosis (RITA is described as an activator of wild-type and reactivator of mutant p53 function, resulting in elevated levels of p53 protein, cell growth arrest, and cell death. Additionally, it has been shown that RITA can induce DNA damage signaling. It is expected that the therapeutic benefits of 5FU and oxaliplatin can be increased by enhancing DNA damage signaling pathways. Therefore, we highlighted the antiproliferative response of RITA alone and in combination with 5FU or oxaliplatin in human CRC cells. A panel of long-term established CRC cell lines (n = 9 including p53 wild-type, p53 mutant, and p53 null and primary patient-derived, low-passage cell lines (n = 5 with different p53 protein status were used for this study. A substantial number of CRC cells with pronounced sensitivity to RITA (IC50< 3.0 μmol/l were identified within established (4/9 and primary patient-derived (2/5 CRC cell lines harboring wild-type or mutant p53 protein. Sensitivity to RITA appeared independent of p53 status and was associated with an increase in antiproliferative response to 5FU and oxaliplatin, a transcriptional increase of p53 targets p21 and NOXA, and a decrease in MYC mRNA. The effect of RITA as an inducer of DNA damage was shown by a strong elevation of phosphorylated histone variant H2A.X, which was restricted to RITA-sensitive cells. Our data underline the primary effect of RITA, inducing DNA damage, and demonstrate the differential antiproliferative effect of RITA to CRC cells independent of p53 protein status. We found a substantial number

  6. The energy blockers bromopyruvate and lonidamine lead GL15 glioblastoma cells to death by different p53-dependent routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidescu, Magdalena; Macchioni, Lara; Scaramozzino, Gaetano; Cristina Marchetti, Maria; Migliorati, Graziella; Vitale, Rita; Corcelli, Angela; Roberti, Rita; Castigli, Emilia; Corazzi, Lanfranco

    2015-09-21

    The energy metabolism of tumor cells relies on aerobic glycolysis rather than mitochondrial oxidation. This difference between normal and cancer cells provides a biochemical basis for new therapeutic strategies aimed to block the energy power plants of cells. The effects produced by the energy blockers bromopyruvate (3BP) and lonidamine (LND) and the underlying biochemical mechanisms were investigated in GL15 glioblastoma cells. 3BP exerts early effects compared to LND, even though both drugs lead cells to death but by different routes. A dramatic decrease of ATP levels occurred after 1 hour treatment with 3BP, followed by cytochrome c and hexokinase II degradation, and by the decrease of both LC3I/LC3II ratio and p62, markers of an autophagic flux. In addition, Akt(Ser(473)) and p53(Ser(15)/Ser(315)) dephosphorylation occurred. In LND treatment, sustained ATP cellular levels were maintained up to 40 hours. The autophagic response of cells was overcome by apoptosis that was preceded by phosphatidylinositol disappearance and pAkt decrease. This last event favored p53 translocation to mitochondria triggering a p53-dependent apoptotic route, as observed at 48 and 72 hours. Adversely, in 3BP treatment, phospho-p53 dephosphorylation targeted p53 to MDM2-dependent proteolysis, thus channeling cells to irreversible autophagy.

  7. Binding of Amphipathic Cell Penetrating Peptide p28 to Wild Type and Mutated p53 as studied by Raman, Atomic Force and Surface Plasmon Resonance spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Sara; Santini, Simona; Yamada, Tohru; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Beattie, Craig W; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    Mutations within the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the tumor suppressor p53 are found in >50% of human cancers and may significantly modify p53 secondary structure impairing its function. p28, an amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide, binds to the DBD through hydrophobic interaction and induces a posttranslational increase in wildtype and mutant p53 restoring functionality. We use mutation analyses to explore which elements of secondary structure may be critical to p28 binding. Molecular modeling, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFS) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) were used to identify which secondary structure of site-directed and naturally occurring mutant DBDs are potentially altered by discrete changes in hydrophobicity and the molecular interaction with p28. We show that specific point mutations that alter hydrophobicity within non-mutable and mutable regions of the p53 DBD alter specific secondary structures. The affinity of p28 was positively correlated with the β-sheet content of a mutant DBD, and reduced by an increase in unstructured or random coil that resulted from a loss in hydrophobicity and redistribution of surface charge. These results help refine our knowledge of how mutations within p53-DBD alter secondary structure and provide insight on how potential structural alterations in p28 or similar molecules improve their ability to restore p53 function. Raman spectroscopy, AFS, SPR and computational modeling are useful approaches to characterize how mutations within the p53DBD potentially affect secondary structure and identify those structural elements prone to influence the binding affinity of agents designed to increase the functionality of p53. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Overexpression of SKI Oncoprotein Leads to p53 Degradation through Regulation of MDM2 Protein Sumoylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Boxiao; Sun, Yin; Huang, Jiaoti

    2012-01-01

    Protooncogene Ski was identified based on its ability to transform avian fibroblasts in vitro. In support of its oncogenic activity, SKI was found to be overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, although the exact molecular mechanism(s) responsible for its oncogenic activity is not fully understood. We found that SKI can negatively regulate p53 by decreasing its level through up-regulation of MDM2 activity, which is mediated by the ability of SKI to enhance sumoylation of MDM2. This stimulation of MDM2 sumoylation is accomplished through a direct interaction of SKI with SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2, Ubc9, resulting in enhanced thioester bond formation and mono-sumoylation of Ubc9. A mutant SKI defective in transformation fails to increase p53 ubiquitination and is unable to increase MDM2 levels and to increase mono-sumoylation of Ubc9, suggesting that the ability of SKI to enhance Ubc9 activity is essential for its transforming function. These results established a detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the ability of SKI to cause cellular transformation while unraveling a novel connection between sumoylation and tumorigenesis, providing potential new therapeutic targets for cancer. PMID:22411991

  9. Overexpression of SKI oncoprotein leads to p53 degradation through regulation of MDM2 protein sumoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Boxiao; Sun, Yin; Huang, Jiaoti

    2012-04-27

    Protooncogene Ski was identified based on its ability to transform avian fibroblasts in vitro. In support of its oncogenic activity, SKI was found to be overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, although the exact molecular mechanism(s) responsible for its oncogenic activity is not fully understood. We found that SKI can negatively regulate p53 by decreasing its level through up-regulation of MDM2 activity, which is mediated by the ability of SKI to enhance sumoylation of MDM2. This stimulation of MDM2 sumoylation is accomplished through a direct interaction of SKI with SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2, Ubc9, resulting in enhanced thioester bond formation and mono-sumoylation of Ubc9. A mutant SKI defective in transformation fails to increase p53 ubiquitination and is unable to increase MDM2 levels and to increase mono-sumoylation of Ubc9, suggesting that the ability of SKI to enhance Ubc9 activity is essential for its transforming function. These results established a detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the ability of SKI to cause cellular transformation while unraveling a novel connection between sumoylation and tumorigenesis, providing potential new therapeutic targets for cancer.

  10. Heterogeneous Biomedical Database Integration Using a Hybrid Strategy: A p53 Cancer Research Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Y. Bichutskiy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex problems in life science research give rise to multidisciplinary collaboration, and hence, to the need for heterogeneous database integration. The tumor suppressor p53 is mutated in close to 50% of human cancers, and a small drug-like molecule with the ability to restore native function to cancerous p53 mutants is a long-held medical goal of cancer treatment. The Cancer Research DataBase (CRDB was designed in support of a project to find such small molecules. As a cancer informatics project, the CRDB involved small molecule data, computational docking results, functional assays, and protein structure data. As an example of the hybrid strategy for data integration, it combined the mediation and data warehousing approaches. This paper uses the CRDB to illustrate the hybrid strategy as a viable approach to heterogeneous data integration in biomedicine, and provides a design method for those considering similar systems. More efficient data sharing implies increased productivity, and, hopefully, improved chances of success in cancer research. (Code and database schemas are freely downloadable, http://www.igb.uci.edu/research/research.html.

  11. Serum p53 antibody as a potential tumor marker in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Rei; Shimada, Hideaki; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Ishii, Jun; Katagiri, Toshio; Maeda, Tetsuya; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Nemoto, Tetsuo; Kaneko, Hironori

    2017-12-01

    Only a few studies have evaluated the clinicopathological significance of the p53 protein expression and s-p53-Abs level in patients with cholangiocarcinoma. We therefore analyzed the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of s-p53-Abs in patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. We prospectively evaluated s-p53-Abs levels before and after surgery in 61 patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma to determine the relationship between clinicopathological factors and the prognostic significance of s-p53-Abs. Among a total of 61 primary extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cases, 23% were positive for s-p53-Abs. Combination of s-p53-Abs with the conventional serum markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) significantly increased the rate of positive extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cases (57% for CEA and/or CA19-9 vs. 75% for CEA and/or CA19-9 and/or s-p53-Abs, P = 0.035). There were no significant differences in clinicopathological factors between the p53-seropositive and p53-seronegative patients. An immunohistochemical analysis showed the presence of significant associations between the intensity (P = 0.003) and extent (P = 0.001) of p53 immunoreactivity and p53-seropositivitly. Although s-p53-Abs was not a significant prognostic factor for the survival in either univariate or multivariate analyses, p53 immunoreactivity was independently associated with a poor survival. Among patients positive for s-p53-Abs before surgery, the s-p53-Abs levels were reduced after surgery in most. These findings suggested that s-p53-Abs might be associated with p53 immunoreactivity. In addition, s-p53-Abs may be useful for a diagnosis, but was not useful for predicting tumor recurrence or the survival. This study was registered as UMIN000014530.

  12. Nicotine-induced survival signaling in lung cancer cells is dependent on their p53 status while its down-regulation by curcumin is independent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puliyappadamba Vineshkumar T

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the most lethal cancer and almost 90% of lung cancer is due to cigarette smoking. Even though nicotine, one of the major ingredients of cigarette smoke and the causative agent for addiction, is not a carcinogen by itself, several investigators have shown that nicotine can induce cell proliferation and angiogenesis. We observed that the proliferative index of nicotine is different in the lung cancer cell lines H1299 (p53-/- and A549 (p53+/+ which indicates that the mode of up-regulation of survival signals by nicotine might be different in cells with and without p53. Results While low concentrations of nicotine induced activation of NF-κB, Akt, Bcl2, MAPKs, AP1 and IAPs in H1299, it failed to induce NF-κB in A549, and compared to H1299, almost 100 times higher concentration of nicotine was required to induce all other survival signals in A549. Transfection of WT-p53 and DN-p53 in H1299 and A549 respectively, reversed the mode of activation of survival signals. Curcumin down-regulated all the survival signals induced by nicotine in both the cells, irrespective of their p53 status. The hypothesis was confirmed when lower concentrations of nicotine induced NF-κB in two more lung cancer cells, Hop-92 and NCI-H522 with mutant p53 status. Silencing of p53 in A549 using siRNA made the cells susceptible to nicotine-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation as in A549 DN-p53 cells. Conclusions The present study reveals a detrimental role of nicotine especially in lung cancer patients with impaired p53 status and identifies curcumin as a potential chemopreventive.

  13. Cross-regulation of protein stability by p53 and nuclear receptor SHP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Yang

    Full Text Available We report here a novel interplay between tumor suppressor p53 and nuclear receptor SHP that controls p53 and SHP stability. Overexpression of p53 causes rapid SHP protein degradation, which does not require the presence of Mdm2 and is mediated by the proteosome pathway. Overexpressing SHP alone does not affect p53 stability. However, SHP destabilizes p53 by augmentation of Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase activity toward p53. The single amino acid substitution in the SHP protein SHPK170R increases SHP binding to p53 relative to SHP wild-type, whereas SHPG171A variant shows a diminished p53 binding. As a result of the cross-regulation, the tumor suppressor function of p53 and SHP in inhibition of colon cancer growth is compromised. Our findings reveal a unique scenario for a cross-inhibition between two tumor suppressors to keep their expression and function in check.

  14. Cytogenetic damage, oncogenic transformation and p53 induction in human epithelial cells in response to irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Mark

    Ionizing radiation can have several different effects on cells, some are almost instantaneous such as the generation of DNA damage, other cellular responses take a matter of minutes or hours - DNA repair protein induction/activation, and others may take months or even years to be manifested - carcinogenesis. Human epithelial cell lines derived from both normal, non-neoplastic tissues and from a malignant source were cultured in order to examine several effects of ionizing radiation on such cell types. Cells not from a malignant source were previously immortalized by viral infection or by transfection with viral sequences. Simian virus 40 immortalised uroepithelial cells (SV-HUC) were found to be approximately a factor of two fold more radioresistant than cells of malignant origin (T24) in terms of unrepaired clastogenic damage i.e. assessment of micronuclei levels following irradiation. SV-HUC lines unlike T24 cells are non-tumourigenic when inoculated into nude athymic mice. SV-HUC lines proved very resistant to full oncogenic transformation using radiation and chemical carcinogens. However, morphological alterations and decreased anchorage dependant growth was observed in post carcinogen treated cells after appropriate cell culture conditions were utilized. The progression from this phenotype to a fully tumourigenic one was not recorded in this study. The ability of ionizing radiation to induce increased levels of the nuclear phosphoprotein p53 was also assessed using several different cell lines. SV- HUC and T24 cell lines failed to exhibit any increased p53 stabilization following irradiation. One cell line, a human papilloma virus transformed line (HPV) did show an approximate two fold increase of the wild type p53 protein after treatment with radiation. Only the cell line HPV showed any cell cycle delay, resulting in accumulation of cells in the G2/M compartment in post irradiation cell cycle analysis. The status of p53 was also assessed i.e. wild type or

  15. Long Noncoding RNA PURPL Suppresses Basal p53 Levels and Promotes Tumorigenicity in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao Ling; Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F; Chaudhary, Ritu; Singh, Deepak K; Zong, Xinying; Gryder, Berkley; Sindri, Sivasish; Mo, Min; Schetter, Aaron; Wen, Xinyu; Parvathaneni, Swetha; Kazandjian, Dickran; Jenkins, Lisa M; Tang, Wei; Elloumi, Fathi; Martindale, Jennifer L; Huarte, Maite; Zhu, Yuelin; Robles, Ana I; Frier, Susan M; Rigo, Frank; Cam, Maggie; Ambs, Stefan; Sharma, Sudha; Harris, Curtis C; Dasso, Mary; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Lal, Ashish

    2017-09-05

    Basal p53 levels are tightly suppressed under normal conditions. Disrupting this regulation results in elevated p53 levels to induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and tumor suppression. Here, we report the suppression of basal p53 levels by a nuclear, p53-regulated long noncoding RNA that we termed PURPL (p53 upregulated regulator of p53 levels). Targeted depletion of PURPL in colorectal cancer cells results in elevated basal p53 levels and induces growth defects in cell culture and in mouse xenografts. PURPL associates with MYBBP1A, a protein that binds to and stabilizes p53, and inhibits the formation of the p53-MYBBP1A complex. In the absence of PURPL, MYBBP1A interacts with and stabilizes p53. Silencing MYBBP1A significantly rescues basal p53 levels and proliferation in PURPL-deficient cells, suggesting that MYBBP1A mediates the effect of PURPL in regulating p53. These results reveal a p53-PURPL auto-regulatory feedback loop and demonstrate a role for PURPL in maintaining basal p53 levels. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The chemoadjuvant potential of grape seed procyanidins on p53-related cell death in oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Chen, Su-Feng; Liu, Chia-Lin; Nieh, Shin

    2012-04-01

    To clarify the efficacy of grape seed procyanidin (GSP) on antiproliferative effects related to p53 functional status of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) for its chemoadjuvant potential. We used GSP to investigate SCC-25 cells with wild-type p53 gene and OEC-M1 cells with mutant p53 gene for the assessment of antiproliferative effects including cell viability, cell cycle, apoptosis, migration and invasion potential, and alterations of associated oncoproteins involved in cellular and molecular events. The findings suggest that GSP on OEC-M1 cells leads to cell cycle arrest by increasing the expression of p21(Cip1) /p27(Kip1) protein without functioning mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, whereas GSP on SCC-25 cells inhibits cell proliferation via both G1-phase arrest and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner as a result of alterations of Bcl-2. GSP also inhibits the migration and invasion of both cells, which are associated with the suppression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9. Antiproliferative effectiveness of GSP is closely associated with the p53 status of OSCC cells. GSP displays chemoadjuvant potential via cell cycle blockage and apoptotic induction. Our findings clearly suggest that GSP may play a role as a novel chemopreventive or therapeutic agent for OSCC. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Combined use of nuclear phosphoprotein c-Myc and cellular phosphoprotein p53 for hepatocellular carcinoma detection in high-risk chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, A M; El-Far, M; Abdelrazek, M A; Omran, M M; Attallah, A A; Elkhouly, A A; Elkenawy, H M; Farid, K

    2017-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a multistage process resulting from various genetic changes. We aimed to determine nuclear phosphoprotein c-Myc and cellular phosphoprotein p53 expression and to evaluate their importance in HCC diagnosis. One hundred and twenty chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients (60 non-HCC CHC patients and 60 HCC patients who had a single small (p53 were identified in liver tissues and serum samples using immunostaining, western blot and ELISA. Immunohistochemical detection of c-Myc and p53 with monospecific antibodies revealed intense and diffuse cytoplasmic staining patterns. Accumulated mutant proteins, released from tumour cells into the extracellular serum, were detected at 62 KDa, for c-Myc, and 53 KDa, for p53, using western blotting. In contrast to alpha feto-protein, there was a significant increase (p p53 (78.3% vs. 8.3%) in the malignant vs. non-malignant patients. The parallel combination of c-Myc and p53 reach the absolute sensitivity (100%), for more accurate and reliable HCC detection (specificity was 87%). c-Myc and p53 are potential HCC diagnostic biomarkers, and convenient combinations of them could improve diagnostic accuracy of HCC.

  18. P53 Mutations Change Phosphatidylinositol Acyl Chain Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Naguib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP second messengers relay extracellular growth cues through the phosphorylation status of the inositol sugar, a signal transduction system that is deregulated in cancer. In stark contrast to PIP inositol head-group phosphorylation, changes in phosphatidylinositol (PI lipid acyl chains in cancer have remained ill-defined. Here, we apply a mass-spectrometry-based method capable of unbiased high-throughput identification and quantification of cellular PI acyl chain composition. Using this approach, we find that PI lipid chains represent a cell-specific fingerprint and are unperturbed by serum-mediated signaling in contrast to the inositol head group. We find that mutation of Trp53 results in PIs containing reduced-length fatty acid moieties. Our results suggest that the anchoring tails of lipid second messengers form an additional layer of PIP signaling in cancer that operates independently of PTEN/PI3-kinase activity but is instead linked to p53.

  19. The critical role of catalase in prooxidant and antioxidant function of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M Y; Kim, H-B; Piao, C; Lee, K H; Hyun, J W; Chang, I-Y; You, H J

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is an important regulator of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, although downstream mediators of p53 remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that p53 and its downstream targets, p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (p53R2) and p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), physically and functionally interact with catalase for efficient regulation of intracellular ROS, depending on stress intensity. Under physiological conditions, the antioxidant functions of p53 are mediated by p53R2, which maintains increased catalase activity and thereby protects against endogenous ROS. After genotoxic stress, high levels of p53 and PIG3 cooperate to inhibit catalase activity, leading to a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance toward an oxidative status, which could augment apoptotic cell death. These results highlight the essential role of catalase in p53-mediated ROS regulation and suggest that the p53/p53R2–catalase and p53/PIG3–catalase pathways are critically involved in intracellular ROS regulation under physiological conditions and during the response to DNA damage, respectively. PMID:22918438

  20. Knockdown of p53 suppresses Nanog expression in embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelalim, Essam Mohamed, E-mail: emohamed@qf.org.qa [Qatar Biomedical Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, Doha 5825 (Qatar); Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Department of Cytology and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Tooyama, Ikuo [Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We investigate the role of p53 in ESCs in the absence of DNA damage. •p53 knockdown suppresses ESC proliferation. •p53 knockdown downregulates Nanog expression. •p53 is essential for mouse ESC self-renewal. -- Abstract: Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) express high levels of cytoplasmic p53. Exposure of mouse ESCs to DNA damage leads to activation of p53, inducing Nanog suppression. In contrast to earlier studies, we recently reported that chemical inhibition of p53 suppresses ESC proliferation. Here, we confirm that p53 signaling is involved in the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 induced downregulation of p21 and defects in ESC proliferation. Furthermore, p53 knockdown resulted in a significant downregulation in Nanog expression at 24 and 48 h post-transfection. p53 knockdown also caused a reduction in Oct4 expression at 48 h post-transfection. Conversely, exposure of ESCs to DNA damage caused a higher reduction of Nanog expression in control siRNA-treated cells than in p53 siRNA-treated cells. These data show that in the absence of DNA damage, p53 is required for the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal by regulating Nanog expression.

  1. Dysfunctional p53 deletion mutants in cell lines derived from Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerborn, Alexander; Moritz, Constanze; von Bonin, Frederike

    2006-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) is a distinct malignancy of the immune system. Despite the progress made in the understanding of the pathology of cHL, the transforming events remain to be elucidated. It has been proposed that mutations in the TP53 gene in biopsy material as well as cell lines...... derived from cHL are rare and therefore not notably involved in the pathogenesis of the malignant H&RS cells. Re-evaluating the expression in cHL-derived cell lines, we found that in 3/6 of these cell lines, TP53 transcripts are characterized by deletions within exon 4 (L428 cells) and nearly a complete...

  2. Impact of the K24N mutation on the transactivation domain of p53 and its binding to murine double-minute clone 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yingqian Ada; Wu, Hongwei; Powell, Anne T; Daughdrill, Gary W; Ytreberg, F Marty

    2013-10-01

    The level of the p53 transcription factor is negatively regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase murine double-minute clone 2 (MDM2). The interaction between p53 and MDM2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity for most eukaryotes. Previous structural studies revealed that MDM2 binds to p53 transactivation domain (p53TAD) from residues 17 to 29. The K24N mutation of p53TAD changes a lysine at position 24 to an asparagine. This mutation occurs naturally in the bovine family and is also found in a rare form of human gestational cancer called choriocarcinoma. In this study, we have investigated how the K24N mutation affects the affinity, structure, and dynamics of p53TAD binding to MDM2. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of p53TAD show that the K24N mutant is more flexible and has less transient helical secondary structure than the wild type. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements demonstrate that these changes in structure and dynamics do not significantly change the binding affinity for p53TAD-MDM2. Finally, free-energy perturbation and standard molecular dynamic simulations suggest the negligible affinity change is due to a compensating interaction energy between the K24N mutant and the MDM2 when it is bound. Overall, the data suggest that the K24N-MDM2 complex is able to, at least partly, compensate for an increase in the conformational entropy in unbound K24N with an increase in the bound-state electrostatic interaction energy. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Skp2B overexpression alters a prohibitin-p53 axis and the transcription of PAPP-A, the protease of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Chander

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the degradation of prohibitin by the SCF(Skp2B ubiquitin ligase results in a defect in the activity of p53. We also reported that MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice develop mammary gland tumors that are characterized by an increased proteolytic cleavage of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4, an inhibitor of IGF signaling. However, whether a link exists between a defect in p53 activity and proteolysis of IGFBP-4 was not established.We analyzed the levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A, the protease of IGFBP-4, in MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice and found that PAPP-A levels are elevated. Further, we found a p53 binding site in intron 1 of the PAPP-A gene and that both wild type and mutant p53 bind to this site. However, binding of wild type p53 results in the transcriptional repression of PAPP-A, while binding of mutant p53 results in the transcriptional activation of PAPP-A. Since MMTV-Skp2B mice express wild type p53 and yet show elevated levels of PAPP-A, at first, these observations appeared contradictory. However, further analysis revealed that the defect in p53 activity in Skp2B overexpressing cells does not only abolish the activity of wild type of p53 but actually mimics that of mutant p53. Our results suggest that in absence of prohibitin, the half-life of p53 is increased and like mutant p53, the conformation of p53 is denatured.These observations revealed a novel function of prohibitin as a chaperone of p53. Further, they suggest that binding of denatured p53 in intron 1 causes an enhancer effect and increases the transcription of PAPP-A. Therefore, these findings indicate that the defect in p53 function and the increased proteolysis of IGFBP-4, we had observed, represent two components of the same pathway, which contributes to the oncogenic function of Skp2B.

  4. Skp2B Overexpression Alters a Prohibitin-p53 Axis and the Transcription of PAPP-A, the Protease of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Harish; Halpern, Max; Resnick-Silverman, Lois; Manfredi, James J.; Germain, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Background We previously reported that the degradation of prohibitin by the SCFSkp2B ubiquitin ligase results in a defect in the activity of p53. We also reported that MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice develop mammary gland tumors that are characterized by an increased proteolytic cleavage of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4), an inhibitor of IGF signaling. However, whether a link exists between a defect in p53 activity and proteolysis of IGFBP-4 was not established. Methods and Results We analyzed the levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), the protease of IGFBP-4, in MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice and found that PAPP-A levels are elevated. Further, we found a p53 binding site in intron 1 of the PAPP-A gene and that both wild type and mutant p53 bind to this site. However, binding of wild type p53 results in the transcriptional repression of PAPP-A, while binding of mutant p53 results in the transcriptional activation of PAPP-A. Since MMTV-Skp2B mice express wild type p53 and yet show elevated levels of PAPP-A, at first, these observations appeared contradictory. However, further analysis revealed that the defect in p53 activity in Skp2B overexpressing cells does not only abolish the activity of wild type of p53 but actually mimics that of mutant p53. Our results suggest that in absence of prohibitin, the half-life of p53 is increased and like mutant p53, the conformation of p53 is denatured. Conclusions These observations revealed a novel function of prohibitin as a chaperone of p53. Further, they suggest that binding of denatured p53 in intron 1 causes an enhancer effect and increases the transcription of PAPP-A. Therefore, these findings indicate that the defect in p53 function and the increased proteolysis of IGFBP-4, we had observed, represent two components of the same pathway, which contributes to the oncogenic function of Skp2B. PMID:21829624

  5. p53 Codon 72 Gene Polymorphism Studies and p53 Expression by Immunohistochemistry in Oral Lesions as Risk Factor for Malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Nishi; Srivastava, Anand Narain; Fatima, Naseem; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Kumar, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    Background: Wild-type p53 nuclear phosphoproteins are critical cell cycle regulatory tumor-suppressor gene. Genetic mutation of p53 gene is common in several head–neck cancers, usually associated with smoking and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. In India, instead of HPV, tobacco/pan masala chewing is more commonly associated with oral cancer. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate p53 codon 72 gene polymorphism and expression of p53 by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in oral lesions as a risk factor for its association with malignancy. Materials and Methods: A total of 41 cases of oral lesions comprising 6 cases of leukoplakia and 35 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), between 30 and 60 years age and tobacco/pan masala chewers were taken. Molecular analysis of p53 codon 72 gene polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction – restriction fragment length polymorphism for Arg/Arg, Arg/Pro, and Pro/Pro. Tissue expression of p53 was done by IHC. Results: Genotype frequencies of 35 carcinoma cases of p53 Arg/Arg, Arg/Pro, and Pro/Pro were 23%, 57%, and 20%, respectively, and six leukoplakia cases of p53 Arg/Arg and Arg/Pro genotype were 50% and 50%, respectively. By IHC for expression of p53 out of 35 cases of OSCC biopsies, 17 (48.57%) had weak staining, 14 cases (40%) showed evidence of p53 protein staining, and four cases (11.42%) showed negative staining. Among six cases of leukoplakia, 3 (50%) showed weak staining and 3 (50%) showed negative results. Conclusion: The findings of the study indicate that there is no significant association between p53 codon 72 gene polymorphism with OSCC and leukoplakia associated with tobacco/pan masala chewing. PMID:29308362

  6. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferecatu, Ioana; Bergeaud, Marie; Rodriguez-Enfedaque, Aida; Le Floch, Nathalie [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Oliver, Lisa [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Rincheval, Vincent; Renaud, Flore [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vallette, Francois M. [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Mignotte, Bernard [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vayssiere, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.vayssiere@uvsq.fr [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France)

    2009-10-02

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  7. Substrate phosphorylation and feedback regulation in JFK-promoted p53 destabilization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Luyang; Shi, Lei; Wang, Feng; Huangyang, Peiwei; Si, Wenzhe; Yang, Jie; Yao, Zhi; Shang, Yongfeng

    2011-01-01

    .... Previously, we reported that JFK, the only Kelch domain-containing F-box protein in human, promotes ubiquitination and degradation of p53 and that unlike the other E3 ligases for p53, all of which...

  8. Interplay between PTB and miR-1285 at the p53 3′UTR modulates the levels of p53 and its isoform Δ40p53α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Aanchal; George, Biju; Iyyappan, Amrutha; Khan, Debjit

    2017-01-01

    Abstract p53 and its translational isoform Δ40p53 are involved in many important cellular functions like cell cycle, cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. Expression of both the isoforms can be regulated at different steps. In this study, we explored the role of 3′UTR in regulating the expression of these two translational isoforms. We report that the trans acting factor, Polypyrimidine Tract Binding protein (PTB), also interacts specifically with 3′UTR of p53 mRNA and positively regulates expression of p53 isoforms. Our results suggest that there is interplay between miRNAs and PTB at the 3′UTR under normal and stress conditions like DNA damage. Interestingly, PTB showed some overlapping binding regions in the p53 3′UTR with miR-1285. In fact, knockdown of miR-1285 as well as expression of p53 3′UTR with mutated miR-1285 binding sites resulted in enhanced association of PTB with the 3′UTR, which provides mechanistic insights of this interplay. Taken together, the results provide a plausible molecular basis of how the interplay between miRNAs and the PTB protein at the 3′UTR can play pivotal role in fine tuning the expression of the two p53 isoforms. PMID:28973454

  9. Das Tumorsuppressorprotein p53 - Rolle bei der Induktion von Apoptose und bei der Replikation von Adenoviren

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Philipp

    2003-01-01

    Das Tumorsuppressorgen p53 gehört zu den zentralen Steuereinheiten von Proliferation und Wachstum in der Zelle. Mutationen und funktioneller Verlust bei diesem Protein ist eng mit der Entstehung maligner Tumoren assoziiert. So kann man in über 50% aller soliden Tumoren Mutationen von p53 nachweisen. Es vermittelt seine Funktion hauptsächlich durch transkriptionelle Aktivierung p53-responsiver Gene. Folge der Aktivierung von p53 is...

  10. Downregulated long non-coding RNA MEG3 in breast cancer regulates proliferation, migration and invasion by depending on p53’s transcriptional activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin [West Biostatistics and Cost-effectiveness Research Center, Medical Insurance Office, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China); Li, Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China); Yang, Bangxiang, E-mail: b19933009@qq.coom [Department of Pain Management, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 610041, Sichuan (China)

    2016-09-09

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) was found to play critical roles in tumorigenesis, hence, screen of tumor-related lncRNAs, identification of their biological roles is important for understanding the processes of tumorigenesis. In this study, we identified the expressing difference of several tumor-related lncRNAs in breast cancer samples and found that, MEG3, which is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor tissues, is also downregulated in breast cancer samples compared with adjacent tissues. For figuring out the effect of MEG3 in breast cancer cells MCF7 and MB231, we overexpressed MEG3 in these cells, and found that it resulted the inhibition of proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion capacities by enhancing p53’s transcriptional activity on its target genes, including p21, Maspin and KAI1. MEG3 presented similar effects in MB157, which is a p53-null breast cancer cell line, when functional p53 but not p53R273H mutant, which lacks transcriptional activity, was introduced. Surprisingly, overexpression of MEG3 activates p53’s transcriptional activity by decreasing MDM2’s transcription level, and thus stabilizes and accumulates P53. Taken together, our findings indicate that MEG3 is downregulated in breast cancer tissues and affects breast cancer cells’ malignant behaviors, which indicate MEG3 a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer. - Highlights: • MEG3 RNA is widely downregulated in breast tumor tissue. • MEG3 regulates P53 indirectly through transcriptional regulation of MDM2. • Under unstressed condition, MEG3-related P53 accumulation transcriptionally activates p53’s target genes. • MEG3 expression level tightly regulates proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in breast tumor cells.

  11. p53 Efficiently Suppresses Tumor Development in the Complete Absence of Its Cell-Cycle Inhibitory and Proapoptotic Effectors p21, Puma, and Noxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz J. Valente

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Activation of apoptosis through transcriptional induction of Puma and Noxa has long been considered to constitute the critical (if not sole process by which p53 suppresses tumor development, although G1/S boundary cell-cycle arrest via induction of the CDK inhibitor p21 has also been thought to contribute. Recent analyses of mice bearing mutations that impair p53-mediated induction of select target genes have indicated that activation of apoptosis and G1/S cell-cycle arrest may, in fact, be dispensable for p53-mediated tumor suppression. However, the expression of Puma, Noxa, and p21 was not abrogated in these mutants, only reduced; therefore, the possibility that the reduced levels of these critical effectors of p53-mediated apoptosis and G1/S-cell-cycle arrest sufficed to prevent tumorigenesis could not be excluded. To resolve this important issue, we have generated mice deficient for p21, Puma, and Noxa (p21−/−puma−/−noxa−/− mice. Cells from these mice were deficient in their ability to undergo p53-mediated apoptosis, G1/S cell-cycle arrest, and senescence. Nonetheless, these animals remained tumor free until at least 500 days, in contrast to p53-deficient mice, which had all succumbed to lymphoma or sarcoma by 250 days. Interestingly, DNA lesions induced by γ-irradiation persisted longer in p53-deficient cells compared to wild-type or p21−/−puma−/−noxa−/− cells, and the former failed to transcriptionally activate several p53 target genes implicated in DNA repair. These results demonstrate beyond a doubt that the induction of apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and possibly senescence is dispensable for p53-mediated suppression of spontaneous tumor development and indicate that coordination of genomic stability and possibly other processes, such as metabolic adaptation, may instead be critical.

  12. Macrophage heme oxygenase-1-SIRT1-p53 axis regulates sterile inflammation in liver ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kojiro; Zhang, Min; Kageyama, Shoichi; Ke, Bibo; Fujii, Takehiro; Sosa, Rebecca A; Reed, Elaine F; Datta, Nakul; Zarrinpar, Ali; Busuttil, Ronald W; Araujo, Jesus A; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2017-12-01

    Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), characterized by exogenous antigen-independent local inflammation and hepatocellular death, represents a risk factor for acute and chronic rejection in liver transplantation. We aimed to investigate the molecular communication involved in the mechanism of liver IRI. We analyzed human liver transplants, primary murine macrophage cell cultures and IR-stressed livers in myeloid-specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene mutant mice, for anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective functions of macrophage-specific HO-1/SIRT1 (sirtuin 1)/p53 (tumor suppressor protein) signaling. Decreased HO-1 expression in human post-reperfusion liver transplant biopsies correlated with a deterioration in hepatocellular function (serum ALT; pp53/MDM2 (murine double minute 2) expression levels decreased (pp53, which in turn attenuated macrophage activation. In a murine model of hepatic warm IRI, myeloid-specific HO-1 deletion lacked SIRT1/p53, exacerbated liver inflammation and IR-hepatocellular death, whereas adjunctive SIRT1 activation restored p53 signaling and rescued livers from IR-damage. This bench-to-bedside study identifies a new class of macrophages activated via the HO-1-SIRT1-p53 signaling axis in the mechanism of hepatic sterile inflammation. This mechanism could be a target for novel therapeutic strategies in liver transplant recipients. Post-transplant low macrophage HO-1 expression in human liver transplants correlates with reduced hepatocellular function and survival. HO-1 regulates macrophage activation via the SIRT1-p53 signaling network and regulates hepatocellular death in liver ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thus targeting this pathway in liver transplant recipients could be of therapeutic benefit. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The novel fusion proteins, GnRH-p53 and GnRHIII-p53, expression and their anti-tumor effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyuan Jia

    Full Text Available p53, one of the most well studied tumor suppressor factor, is responsible to a variety of damage owing to the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the tumor cells. More than 50% of human tumors contain mutation or deletion of p53. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH, as the ligand of Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R, was used to deliver p53 into tumor cells. The p53 fusion proteins GnRH-p53 and GnRH iii-p53 were expressed and their targeted anti-tumor effects were determined. GnRH mediates its fusion proteins transformation into cancer cells. The intracellular delivery of p53 fusion proteins exerted the inhibition of the growth of H1299 cells in vitro and the reduction of tumor volume in vivo. Their anti-tumor effect was functioned by the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest induced by p53. Hence, the fusion protein could be a novel protein drug for anti-tumor therapy.

  14. Specific killing of P53 mutated tumor cell lines by a cross-reactive human HLA-A2-restricted P53-specific CTL line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Pedersen, L O; Poulsen, H S

    2001-01-01

    cancer cell lines. In addition, the recognition of 2 different p53 peptides by the same CTL clone suggests a promiscuous peptide recognition by the TCR involved. Taken together, these in vitro results suggest that vaccination with autologous DC pulsed with multiple p53 epitopes may induce an effective...

  15. FGFR3 and P53 characterize alternative genetic pathways in the pathogenesis of urothelial cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W. van Rhijn (Bas); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); A.N. Vis (André); W.J. Kirkels (Wim); E.R. Boeve; A.C. Jobsis; E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractFibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and P53 mutations are frequently observed in bladder cancer. We here describe the distribution of FGFR3 mutations and P53 overexpression in 260 primary urothelial cell carcinomas. FGFR3 mutations were observed in 59% and P53

  16. Suppression of p53 activity through the cooperative action of Ski and histone deacetylase SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasumichi; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Miyazawa, Keiji; Imamura, Takeshi

    2011-02-25

    Ski was originally identified as an oncogene based on the fact that Ski overexpression transformed chicken and quail embryo fibroblasts. Consistent with these proposed oncogenic roles, Ski is overexpressed in various human tumors. However, whether and how Ski functions in mammalian tumorigenesis has not been fully investigated. Here, we show that Ski interacts with p53 and attenuates the biological functions of p53. Ski overexpression attenuated p53-dependent transactivation, whereas Ski knockdown enhanced the transcriptional activity of p53. Interestingly, Ski bound to the histone deacetylase SIRT1 and stabilized p53-SIRT1 interaction to promote p53 deacetylation, which subsequently decreased the DNA binding activity of p53. Consistent with the ability of Ski to inactivate p53, overexpressing Ski desensitized cells to genotoxic drugs and Nutlin-3, a small-molecule antagonist of Mdm2 that stabilizes p53 and activates the p53 pathway, whereas knocking down Ski increased the cellular sensitivity to these agents. These results indicate that Ski negatively regulates p53 and suggest that the p53-Ski-SIRT1 axis is an attractive target for cancer therapy.

  17. The role of p53.S389 phosphorylation in DNA damage response pathways and tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    The results presented in this thesis provide new information on the role of the p53.S389A point mutation in chemical-induced tumorigenesis. After DNA damage, p53 protein levels increase due to several post-translational activation processes. Phosphorylation of p53.S389 seems to be partly required

  18. The Mdm2 and p53 genes are conserved in the Arachnids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, David P; Cheok, Chit Fang; Brown, Christopher J; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Ghadessy, Farid J; Verma, Chandra

    2010-02-15

    The p53 protein and its negative regulator the ubiquitin E3 ligase Mdm2 have been shown to be conserved from the T. adhaerens to man. In common with D. melanogaster and C. elegans, there is a single copy of the p53 gene in T. adhaerens, while in the vertebrates three p53-like genes can be found: p53, p63 and p73. The Mdm2 gene is not present within the fully sequenced and highly annotated genomes of C. elegans and D. melanogaster. However, it is present in Placazoanand the presence of multiple distinct p53 genes in the Sea anemone N. vectensis led us to examine the genomes of other phyla for p53 and Mdm2-like genes. We report here the discovery of an Mdm2-like gene and two distinct p53-like genes in the Arachnid Ioxodes scapularis (Northern Deer Tick). The two predicted Deer Tick p53 proteins are much more highly related to the human p53 protein in sequence than are the fruit fly and nematode proteins. One of the Deer Tick genes encodes a p53 protein that is initiated within the DNA binding domain of p53 and shows remarkable homology to the newly described N-terminally truncated delta isoforms of human and zebrafish p53.

  19. Substrate Phosphorylation and Feedback Regulation in JFK-promoted p53 Destabilization*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyang; Shi, Lei; Wang, Feng; Huangyang, Peiwei; Si, Wenzhe; Yang, Jie; Yao, Zhi; Shang, Yongfeng

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Previously, we reported that JFK, the only Kelch domain-containing F-box protein in human, promotes ubiquitination and degradation of p53 and that unlike the other E3 ligases for p53, all of which possess an intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity, JFK destabilizes p53 through the assembly of a Skp1-Cul1-F-box complex. Here, we report that the substrate recognition by JFK requires phosphorylation of p53 in its central core region by CSN (COP9 signalosome)-associated kinase. Significantly, inhibition of CSN-associated kinase activity or knockdown of CSN5 impairs JFK-promoted p53 degradation, enhances p53-dependent transcription, and promotes cell growth suppression, G1 arrest, and apoptosis. Moreover, we showed that JFK is transcriptionally regulated by p53 and forms an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop with p53. These data may shed new light on the functional connection between CSN, Skp1-Cul1-F-box ubiquitin ligase, and p53 and provide a molecular mechanism for the regulation of JFK-promoted p53 degradation. PMID:21127074

  20. Substrate phosphorylation and feedback regulation in JFK-promoted p53 destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyang; Shi, Lei; Wang, Feng; Huangyang, Peiwei; Si, Wenzhe; Yang, Jie; Yao, Zhi; Shang, Yongfeng

    2011-02-11

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Previously, we reported that JFK, the only Kelch domain-containing F-box protein in human, promotes ubiquitination and degradation of p53 and that unlike the other E3 ligases for p53, all of which possess an intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity, JFK destabilizes p53 through the assembly of a Skp1-Cul1-F-box complex. Here, we report that the substrate recognition by JFK requires phosphorylation of p53 in its central core region by CSN (COP9 signalosome)-associated kinase. Significantly, inhibition of CSN-associated kinase activity or knockdown of CSN5 impairs JFK-promoted p53 degradation, enhances p53-dependent transcription, and promotes cell growth suppression, G(1) arrest, and apoptosis. Moreover, we showed that JFK is transcriptionally regulated by p53 and forms an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop with p53. These data may shed new light on the functional connection between CSN, Skp1-Cul1-F-box ubiquitin ligase, and p53 and provide a molecular mechanism for the regulation of JFK-promoted p53 degradation.

  1. Abrogation of p53-induced apoptosis by the hepatitis B virus X gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X.W. Wang (Xin Wei); M.K. Gibson (Michael); W. Vermeulen (Wim); H. Yeh; K. Forrester; H.-W. Stürzbecher; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C.C. Harris

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe p53 tumor suppressor gene product is a transcriptional transactivator and a potent apoptotic inducer. The fact that many of the DNA tumor virus oncoproteins bind to p53 and affect these p53 functions indicates that this interaction is an important step in oncogenic transformation. We

  2. Role of p53 mutation in the effect of boron neutron capture therapy on oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Ken

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is a selective radiotherapy, being effective for the treatment of even advanced malignancies in head and neck regions as well as brain tumors and skin melanomas. To clarify the role of p53 gene, the effect of BNCT on oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells showing either wild- (SAS/neo or mutant-type (SAS/mp53 p53 was examined. Methods Cells were exposed to neutron beams in the presence of boronophenylalanine (BPA at Kyoto University Research Reactor. Treated cells were monitored for modulations in colony formation, proliferation, cell cycle, and expression of cell cycle-associated proteins. Results When SAS/neo and SAS/mp53 cells were subjected to BNCT, more suppressive effects on colony formation and cell viability were observed in SAS/neo compared with SAS/mp53 cells. Cell cycle arrest at the G1 checkpoint was observed in SAS/neo, but not in SAS/mp53. Apoptotic cells increased from 6 h after BNCT in SAS/neo and 48 h in SAS/mp53 cells. The expression of p21 was induced in SAS/neo only, but G2 arrest-associated proteins including Wee1, cdc2, and cyclin B1 were altered in both cell lines. Conclusion These results indicate that oral SCC cells with mutant-type are more resistant to BNCT than those with wild-type p53, and that the lack of G1 arrest and related apoptosis may contribute to the resistance. At a physical dose affecting the cell cycle, BNCT inhibits oral SCC cells in p53-dependent and -independent manners.

  3. Acute exercise induces tumour suppressor protein p53 translocation to the mitochondria and promotes a p53-Tfam-mitochondrial DNA complex in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Ayesha; Hood, David A

    2013-07-15

    The major tumour suppressor protein p53 plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial content and function in skeletal muscle. p53 has been shown to reside in the mitochondria complexed with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); however, the physiological repercussions of mitochondrial p53 remain unknown. We endeavoured to elucidate whether an acute bout of endurance exercise could mediate an increase in mitochondrial p53 levels. C57Bl6 mice (n = 6 per group) were randomly assigned to sedentary, acute exercise (AE, 15 m min(-1) for 90 min) or acute exercise + 3 h recovery (AER) groups. Exercise concomitantly increased the mRNA content of nuclear-encoded (PGC-1α, Tfam, NRF-1, COX-IV, citrate synthase) and mtDNA-encoded (COX-I) genes in the AE group, and further by ∼5-fold in the AER group. Nuclear p53 protein levels were reduced in the AE and AER groups, while in contrast, the abundance of p53 was drastically enhanced by ∼2.4-fold and ∼3.9-fold in subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondria, respectively, in the AER conditions. Within the mitochondria, the interaction of p53 with mtDNA at the D-loop and with Tfam was elevated by ∼4.6-fold and ∼3.6-fold, respectively, in the AER group. In the absence of p53, the enhanced COX-I mRNA content observed with AE and AER was abrogated. This study is the first to indicate that endurance exercise can signal to localize p53 to the mitochondria where it may serve to positively modulate the activity of the mitochondrial transcription factor Tfam. Our findings help us understand the mechanisms underlying the effects of exercise as a therapeutic intervention designed to trigger the pro-metabolic functions of p53.

  4. Spontaneous human squamous cell carcinomas are killed by a human cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone recognizing a wild-type p53-derived peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röpke, M; Hald, J; Guldberg, Per

    1996-01-01

    A cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone generated in vitro from the peripheral blood of a healthy HLA-A2-positive individual against a synthetic p53 protein-derived wild-type peptide (L9V) was shown to kill squamous carcinoma cell lines derived from two head and neck carcinomas, which expressed mutant...

  5. Substrate Phosphorylation and Feedback Regulation in JFK-promoted p53 Destabilization*

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Luyang; Shi, Lei; Wang, Feng; Huangyang, Peiwei; Si, Wenzhe; Yang, Jie; Yao, Zhi; Shang, Yongfeng

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Previously, we reported that JFK, the only Kelch domain-containing F-box protein in human, promotes ubiquitination and degradation of p53 and that unlike the other E3 ligases for p53, all of which possess an intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity, JFK destabilizes p53 through the assem...

  6. Identification of Semaphorin3B as a Direct Target of p53

    OpenAIRE

    Kensuke Ochi; Toshiki Mori; Yoshiaki Toyama; Yusuke Nakamura; Hirofumi Arakawa

    2002-01-01

    A cDNA microarray analysis indicated that Semaphorin3B. (20Sema3B), a gene whose product is involved in axon guidance and axonal repulsion, is inducible by p53. Introduction of exogenous p53 into a glioblastoma cell line lacking wild-type p53. (20U373MG) dramatically induced expression of Sema3B mRNA. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a reporter assay confirmed that a potential p53 binding site present in the promoter region had p53-dependent transcriptional activity. Expression of ...

  7. Cyclin K as a Direct Transcriptional Target of the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Toshiki Mori; Yoshio Anazawa; Kuniko Matsui; Seisuke Fukuda; Yusuke Nakamura; Hirofumi Arakawa

    2002-01-01

    Cyclin K, a newly recognized member of the “transcription” cyclin family, may play a dual role by regulating CDK and transcription. Using cDNA microarray technology, we found that cyclin K mRNA was dramatically increased in U373MG, a glioblastoma cell line deficient in wild-type p53, in the presence of exogenous p53. An electrophoretic mobility-shift assay showed that a potential p53-binding site (p53BS) in intron 1 of the cyclin K gene could indeed bind to p53 protein. Moreover, a heterologo...

  8. The p53 gene with emphasis on its paralogues in mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tien-Huang; Wu, Yi-Jun; Hou, Jiun-Nan; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Wei-June

    2017-12-01

    The p53 gene is highly important in human cancers, as it serves as a tumor-suppressor gene. Subsequently, two p53 homologues, i.e., p73 and p63, with high identity of amino acids were identified, leading to construction of the p53 family. The p53 gene is highly important in human cancer because it usually transcribes genes that function by causing apoptosis in mammalian cells. In contrast, p63 and p73 tend to be more important in modulating development than inducing cell death, even though they share similar protein structures. Relatively recently, p53 was also identified in mosquitoes and many other insect species. Uniquely, its structure lacks the sterile alpha motif domain which is a putative protein-protein interaction domain and exclusively exists at the C-terminal region in p73 and p63 in mammals. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the p53 gene derived from mosquitoes is composed of two paralogues, p53-1 and p53-2. Of these, only p53-2 is responsively upregulated by dengue 2 virus (DENV2) in C6/36 cells which usually survive the infection. This indicates that the p53 gene is closely related to DENV infection in mosquito cells. The specific significance of p53-2's involvement in cell survival from virus-induced stress is described and briefly discussed in this report. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. [Constructing a p53-fused dual luciferase reporter and verifying its function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jing; Jiang, Xianzhen; He, Leye; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Tang, Yuxin; Yao, Kun; Chen, Binghai; Xue, Juan

    2013-11-01

    To construct a p53-fused dual luciferase reporter and to test whether this reporter can mimic wild-type p53 activities in a high-throughput screen. A restriction endonuclease site was added to each terminus and the stop codon of the wild-type full-length p53 open reading frame (ORF) was removed by PCR. A restriction endonuclease site was added to each terminus and the start codon of the firefly luciferase ORF was removed by PCR. The two modified ORFs were inserted upstream of the IRES-induced renilla luciferase ORF in a CMV-derived vector. The p53 fusion protein was expressed in cells to test its MDM2-mediated degradation, subcellular localization, and induction of p53-responsive promoter. The p53-fused dual luciferase reporter was successfully constructed. After transfection into the host cells, the reporter expressing the p53 fusion protein that was degraded by oncoprotein MDM2, was mainly located inside the nucleus, and induced the p53-responsive promoter, respectively. The p53-fused dual luciferase reporter (p53FL/IRES/RL) can identify modulators of P