WorldWideScience

Sample records for sustained swimming performance

  1. Swimming performance assessment in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Keith B

    2011-05-20

    Swimming performance tests of fish have been integral to studies of muscle energetics, swimming mechanics, gas exchange, cardiac physiology, disease, pollution, hypoxia and temperature. This paper describes a flexible protocol to assess fish swimming performance using equipment in which water velocity can be controlled. The protocol involves one to several stepped increases in flow speed that are intended to cause fish to fatigue. Step speeds and their duration can be set to capture swimming abilities of different physiological and ecological relevance. Most frequently step size is set to determine critical swimming velocity (U(crit;)), which is intended to capture maximum sustained swimming ability. Traditionally this test has consisted of approximately ten steps each of 20 min duration. However, steps of shorter duration (e.g. 1 min) are increasingly being utilized to capture acceleration ability or burst swimming performance. Regardless of step size, swimming tests can be repeated over time to gauge individual variation and recovery ability. Endpoints related to swimming such as measures of metabolic rate, fin use, ventilation rate, and of behavior, such as the distance between schooling fish, are often included before, during and after swimming tests. Given the diversity of fish species, the number of unexplored research questions, and the importance of many species to global ecology and economic health, studies of fish swimming performance will remain popular and invaluable for the foreseeable future.

  2. The influence of temperature on muscle velocity and sustained performance in swimming carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, L C; Funke, R P; Alexander, R M

    1990-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how fish locomote at different muscle temperatures. Sarcomere length excursion and muscle shortening velocity, V, were determined from high-speed motion pictures of carp, Cyprinus carpio (11-14 cm), swimming steadily at various sustained speeds at 10, 15 and 20 degrees C. In the middle and posterior regions of the carp, sarcomeres of the lateral red muscle underwent cyclical excursions of 0.31 microns, centered around the resting length of 2.06 microns (i.e. from 1.91 to 2.22 microns). The amplitudes of the sarcomere length excursions were essentially independent of swimming speed and temperature. As tail-beat frequency increased linearly with swimming speed regardless of temperature, the sarcomeres underwent the same length changes in a shorter time. Thus, V increased in a linear and temperature-independent manner with swimming speed. Neither temperature nor swimming speed had an influence on tail-beat amplitude or tail height. Our findings indicate that muscle fibres are used only over a narrow, temperature-independent range of V/Vmax (0.17-0.36) where power and efficiency are maximal. Carp start to recruit their white muscles at swimming speeds where the red muscle V/Vmax becomes too high (and thus power output declines). When the V/Vmax of the active muscle falls too low during steady swimming, carp switch to 'burst-and-coast' swimming, apparently to keep V/Vmax high. Because Vmax (maximum velocity of shortening) of carp red muscle has a Q10 of 1.63, the transition speeds between swimming styles are lower at lower temperatures. Thus, carp recruit their white anaerobic muscle at a lower swimming speed at lower temperatures (verified by electromyography), resulting in a lower maximum sustainable swimming speed. The present findings also indicate that, to generate the same total force and power to swim at a given speed, carp at 10 degrees C must recruit about 50% greater fibre cross-sectional area than they do at 20 degrees C.

  3. Swimming Performance Assessment in Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Tierney, Keith B.

    2011-01-01

    Swimming performance tests of fish have been integral to studies of muscle energetics, swimming mechanics, gas exchange, cardiac physiology, disease, pollution, hypoxia and temperature. This paper describes a flexible protocol to assess fish swimming performance using equipment in which water velocity can be controlled. The protocol involves one to several stepped increases in flow speed that are intended to cause fish to fatigue. Step speeds and their duration can be set to capture swimming ...

  4. Sustained impairment of respiratory function and swim performance following acute oil exposure in a coastal marine fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, J L; Esbaugh, A J

    2017-06-01

    Acute exposure to crude oil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) can severely impair cardiorespiratory function and swim performance of larval fish; however, the effects of acute oil exposure on later life stages and the capacity for subsequent recovery is less clear. Red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) is an economically important apex predator native to the Gulf of Mexico, which was directly exposed to the 2010 Deep Water Horizon (DWH) oil spill. Here we examine impact and recovery of young adult red drum from exposure to concentrations of 0, 4.1, and 12.1μgL(-1) ΣPAH50 naturally weathered oil-water accommodated fractions (geometric mean), which are well within the range of concentrations measured during the DWH incident. We focused on aerobic scope (ASc), burst- and critical swimming speeds (Uburst and Ucrit), cost of transport (COT), as well as the capacity to repay oxygen debt following exhaustive exercise (EPOC), which are critical parameters for success of all life stages of fishes. A 24h acute exposure to 4.1μgL(-1) ΣPAH caused a significant 9.7 and 12.6% reduction of Uburst and Ucrit respectively, but no change in ASc, COT or EPOC, highlighting a decoupled effect on the respiratory and swimming systems. A higher exposure concentration, 12.1μgL(-1) ΣPAH, caused an 8.6 and 8.4% impairment of Uburst and Ucrit, as well as an 18.4% reduction in ASc. These impairments persisted six weeks post-exposure, suggesting that recorded impacts are entrenched. Large predatory fishes are critically dependent on the cardiorespiratory and swimming systems for ecological fitness, and long-term impairment of performance due to acute oil exposure suggests that even acute exposure events may have long lasting impacts on the ecological fitness of affected populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Factors affecting swimming performance of fasted rainbow trout with implications of exhaustive exercise on overwinter mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, D.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Del Rio, C.M.; Rule, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of body size, water temperature, and sustained swimming activity on swimming performance and the effects of exhaustive exercise on mortality of fasted juvenile rainbow trout. Fasting caused swimming performance to decline more rapidly for small fish than large fish, and warmer water temperatures and sustained swimming activity further decreased swimming performance. Exhaustive exercise increased mortality among fasted fish. Our observations suggest that juvenile rainbow trout with little or no food intake during winter can swim for long periods of time with little effect on mortality, but swimming to exhaustion can enhance mortality, especially among the smallest juveniles.

  6. [Swimming performance in the aged].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letzelter, M; Jungermann, C; Freitag, W

    1986-01-01

    The deterioration of performance caused by aging was examined in 3,469 swimmers divided into 9 age groups and 4 styles of swimming. Comparisons using cross and longitudinal sections show that older swimmers become progressively slower, and the reduction of speed in all styles of swimming follows a quadratic trend. The losses of efficiency increase with age group, being by far the most in back-stroke and the least in crawl swimming. The combined longitudinal and cross sectional comparisons confirm this result, but not without any exception, for very often no statistically significant differences could be recognized between adjacent age groups. The interindividual comparison shows that it is also possible to maintain or even improve the efficiency over 10 to 12 years, even in the fifth or sixth decade of age, if the intensity and volume of training can be increased. The curve comprising reductions in the later stages of life may additionally be caused by the smaller number of persons per group and the deficient homogeneity within these groups. In addition to this, the tendency towards higher losses in older age groups is not significant, if only the best competitors of each age group are compared.

  7. Modelling swimming hydrodynamics to enhance performance

    OpenAIRE

    D.A. Marinho; Rouboa, A.; Barbosa, Tiago M.; Silva, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Swimming assessment is one of the most complex but outstanding and fascinating topics in biomechanics. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology is one of the different methods that have been applied in swimming research to observe and understand water movements around the human body and its application to improve swimming performance. CFD has been applied attempting to understand deeply the biomechanical basis of swimming. Several studies have been conducted willing to analy...

  8. Pre-task music improves swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirmaul, B P; Dos Santos, R V; Da Silva Neto, L V

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pre-task music on swimming performance and other psychological variables. A randomized counterbalanced within-subjects (experimental and control condition) design was employed. Eighteen regional level male swimmers performed two 200-m freestyle swimming time trials. Participants were exposed to either 5 minutes of self-selected music (pre-task music condition) or 5 minutes of silence (control condition) and, after 1 minute, performed the swimming task. Swimming time was significantly shorter (-1.44%) in the pre-task music condition. Listening to pre-task music increased motivation to perform the swimming task, while arousal remained unchanged. While fatigue increased after the swimming task in both conditions, vigor, ratings of perceived exertion and affective valence were unaltered. It is concluded, for the first time, that pre-task music improves swimming performance.

  9. Swimming and other activities: applied aspects of fish swimming performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Farrell, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities such as hydropower development, water withdrawals, and commercial fisheries often put fish species at risk. Engineered solutions designed to protect species or their life stages are frequently based on assumptions about swimming performance and behaviors. In many cases, however, the appropriate data to support these designs are either unavailable or misapplied. This article provides an overview of the state of knowledge of fish swimming performance – where the data come from and how they are applied – identifying both gaps in knowledge and common errors in application, with guidance on how to avoid repeating mistakes, as well as suggestions for further study.

  10. Real-time monitoring of swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Gonzalo, R; Lemkaddem, A; Renevey, Ph; Calvo, E Muntane; Lemay, M; Cox, K; Ashby, D; Willardson, J; Bertschi, M

    2016-08-01

    This article presents the performance results of a novel algorithm for swimming analysis in real-time within a low-power wrist-worn device. The estimated parameters are: lap count, stroke count, time in lap, total swimming time, pace/speed per lap, total swam distance, and swimming efficiency (SWOLF). In addition, several swimming styles are automatically detected. Results were obtained using a database composed of 13 different swimmers spanning 646 laps and 858.78 min of total swam time. The final precision achieved in lap detection ranges between 99.7% and 100%, and the classification of the different swimming styles reached a sensitivity and specificity above 98%. We demonstrate that a swimmers performance can be fully analyzed with the smart bracelet containing the novel algorithm. The presented algorithm has been licensed to ICON Health & Fitness Inc. for their line of wearables under the brand iFit.

  11. Swimming Performance of Toy Robotic Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelina, Nina; Mendelson, Leah; Techet, Alexandra

    2015-11-01

    HEXBUG AquaBotsTM are a commercially available small robot fish that come in a variety of ``species''. These models have varying caudal fin shapes and randomly-varied modes of swimming including forward locomotion, diving, and turning. In this study, we assess the repeatability and performance of the HEXBUG swimming behaviors and discuss the use of these toys to develop experimental techniques and analysis methods to study live fish swimming. In order to determine whether these simple, affordable model fish can be a valid representation for live fish movement, two models, an angelfish and a shark, were studied using 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and 3D Synthetic Aperture PIV. In a series of experiments, the robotic fish were either allowed to swim freely or towed in one direction at a constant speed. The resultant measurements of the caudal fin wake are compared to data from previous studies of a real fish and simplified flapping propulsors.

  12. Swimming performance in surf: the influence of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, M; Reilly, T; Rees, A; Spray, G; Golden, F

    2008-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis (H1) that surf swimming involves a quantifiable experience component. Sixty-five beach lifeguards with (n = 35) and without surf experience (n = 30) completed: a best effort 200-m swim in a 25-m pool, a calm and a surf sea; an anthropometric survey; maximum effort 30-s swim bench test; 50-m pool swim (25 m underwater). In both groups, time to swim 200 m was slower in calm seas than in the pool and slower in surf than in either calm seas or the pool (p surf conditions (p surf experience as a predictor of surf swim time (R(2) = 0.32, p surf swimming. This limits the usefulness of pool swim times and other land-based tests as predictors of surf swimming performance. The hypothesis (H1) is accepted.

  13. Swimming Performance and Metabolism of Golden Shiners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The swimming ability and metabolism of golden shiners, Notemigonus crysoleucas, was examined using swim tunnel respirometery. The oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies at various swimming speeds, an estimation of the standard metabolic rate, and the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) was determ...

  14. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palstra, Arjan P; Mes, Daan; Kusters, Kasper; Roques, Jonathan A C; Flik, Gert; Kloet, Kees; Blonk, Robbert J W

    2014-01-01

    Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (U opt in m s(-1) or body lengths s(-1), BL s(-1)) were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and sustained swimming at U opt on growth performance of juvenile yellowtail kingfish. U opt was quantified in Blazka-type swim-tunnels for 145, 206, and 311 mm juveniles resulting in values of: (1) 0.70 m s(-1) or 4.83 BL s(-1), (2) 0.82 m s(-1) or 3.25 BL s(-1), and (3) 0.85 m s(-1) or 2.73 BL s(-1). Combined with literature data from larger fish, a relation of U opt (BL s(-1)) = 234.07(BL)(-0.779) (R (2) = 0.9909) was established for this species. Yellowtail kingfish, either forced to perform sustained swimming exercise at an optimal speed of 2.46 BL s(-1) ("swimmers") or allowed to perform spontaneous activity at low water flow ("resters") in a newly designed 3600 L oval flume (with flow created by an impeller driven by an electric motor), were then compared. At the start of the experiment, ten fish were sampled representing the initial condition. After 18 days, swimmers (n = 23) showed a 92% greater increase in BL and 46% greater increase in BW as compared to resters (n = 23). As both groups were fed equal rations, feed conversion ratio (FCR) for swimmers was 1.21 vs. 1.74 for resters. Doppler ultrasound imaging showed a statistically significant higher blood flow (31%) in the ventral aorta of swimmers vs. resters (44 ± 3 vs. 34 ± 3 mL min(-1), respectively, under anesthesia). Thus, growth performance can be rapidly improved by optimal swimming, without larger feed investments.

  15. Disease resistance is related to inherent swimming performance in Atlantic salmon.

    OpenAIRE

    Castro Vicente; Grisdale-Helland Barbara; Jørgensen Sven M; Helgerud Jan; Claireaux Guy; Farrell Anthony P; Krasnov Aleksei; Helland Ståle J; Takle Harald

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Like humans, fish can be classified according to their athletic performance. Sustained exercise training of fish can improve growth and physical capacity, and recent results have documented improved disease resistance in exercised Atlantic salmon. In this study we investigated the effects of inherent swimming performance and exercise training on disease resistance in Atlantic salmon. Atlantic salmon were first classified as either poor or good according to their swimming p...

  16. Creatine supplementation and swim performance: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Melissa J; Graham, Kenneth; Rooney, Kieron B

    2006-03-01

    Nutritional supplements are popular among athletes participating in a wide variety of sports. Creatine is one of the most commonly used dietary supplements, as it has been shown to be beneficial in improving performance during repeated bouts of high-intensity anaerobic activity. This review examines the specific effects of creatine supplementation on swimming performance, and considers the effects of creatine supplementation on various measures of power development in this population. Research performed on the effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance indicates that whilst creatine supplementation is ineffective in improving performance during a single sprint swim, dietary creatine supplementation may benefit repeated interval swim set performance. Considering the relationship between sprint swimming performance and measurements of power, the effect of creatine supplementation on power development in swimmers has also been examined. When measured on a swim bench ergometer, power development does show some improvement following a creatine supplementation regime. How this improvement in power output transfers to performance in the pool is uncertain. Although some evidence exists to suggest a gender effect on the performance improvements seen in swimmers following creatine supplementation, the majority of research indicates that male and female swimmers respond equally to supplementation. A major limitation to previous research is the lack of consideration given to the possible stroke dependant effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance. The majority of the research conducted to date has involved examination of the freestyle swimming stroke only. The potential for performance improvements in the breaststroke and butterfly swimming strokes is discussed, with regards to the biomechanical differences and differences in efficiency between these strokes and freestyle. Key PointsCreatine supplementation does not improve single sprint

  17. Analysis of swimming performance: perceptions and practices of US-based swimming coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Robert; Corley, Gavin; Godfrey, Alan; Osborough, Conor; Newell, John; Quinlan, Leo Richard; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2016-01-01

    In elite swimming, a broad range of methods are used to assess performance, inform coaching practices and monitor athletic progression. The aim of this paper was to examine the performance analysis practices of swimming coaches and to explore the reasons behind the decisions that coaches take when analysing performance. Survey data were analysed from 298 Level 3 competitive swimming coaches (245 male, 53 female) based in the United States. Results were compiled to provide a generalised picture of practices and perceptions and to examine key emerging themes. It was found that a disparity exists between the importance swim coaches place on biomechanical analysis of swimming performance and the types of analyses that are actually conducted. Video-based methods are most frequently employed, with over 70% of coaches using these methods at least monthly, with analyses being mainly qualitative in nature rather than quantitative. Barriers to the more widespread use of quantitative biomechanical analysis in elite swimming environments were explored. Constraints include time, cost and availability of resources, but other factors such as sources of information on swimming performance and analysis and control over service provision are also discussed, with particular emphasis on video-based methods and emerging sensor-based technologies.

  18. Combined inhalation of beta2 -agonists improves swim ergometer sprint performance but not high-intensity swim performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsen, Anders; Hostrup, Morten; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-01-01

    ), in permitted doses within the World Anti-Doping Agency 2013 prohibited list, in elite swimmers with (AHR, n = 13) or without (non-AHR, n = 17) AHR. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction of m. quadriceps (MVC), sprint performance on a swim ergometer and performance in an exhaustive swim test at 110% of VO2max...... were determined. Venous plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were measured post-exercise. No improvement was observed in the exhaustive swim test, but swim ergometer sprint time was improved (P ...

  19. Swimming Performance of Adult Asian Carp: Field Assessment Using a Mobile Swim Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    left side, outflow is located on the right side. The collimator grid can be seen at right . The mobile tunnel was newly designed and constructed by...chute with the river (Varble et al. 2007). The Silver Carp contained in the chute were abundant, large, and sexually mature. Methods. The swim...robustness were < 12% (Table 4). Swimming performance is influenced by a complex suite of factors. These may be intrinsic, such as fish size, reproductive

  20. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan P. Palstra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (Uopt in m s-1 or body lengths s-1, BL s-1 were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and sustained swimming at Uopt on growth performance of juvenile yellowtail kingfish. Uopt was quantified in Blazka-type swim-tunnels for 145 mm, 206 mm and 311 mm juveniles resulting in values of: 1 0.70 m s-1 or 4.83 BL s-1, 2 0.82 m s-1 or 3.25 BL s-1 and 3 0.85 m s-1 or 2.73 BL s-1. Combined with literature data from larger fish, a relation of Uopt (BL s-1 = 234.07(BL-0.779 (R2= 0.9909 was established for this species. Yellowtail kingfish, either forced to perform sustained swimming exercise at an optimal speed of 2.46 BL s-1 (‘swimmers’ or allowed to perform spontaneous activity at low water flow (‘resters’ in a newly designed 3,600 L oval flume (with flow created by an impeller driven by an electric motor, were then compared. At the start of the experiment, ten fish were sampled representing the initial condition. After 18 days, swimmers (n= 23 showed a 92% greater increase in BL and 46% greater increase in BW as compared to resters (n= 23. As both groups were fed equal rations, feed conversion ratio (FCR for swimmers was 1.21 vs. 1.74 for resters. Doppler ultrasound imaging showed a statistically significant higher blood flow (31% in the ventral aorta of swimmers vs. resters (44 ± 3 mL min-1 vs. 34 ± 3 mL min-1, respectively, under anesthesia. Thus growth performance can be rapidly improved by optimal swimming, without larger feed investments.

  1. Efficacy of a modified tapering protocol on swimming performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total time and split times for each length, stroke rate, distance per stroke, and stroke index in a performance swim were determined as well as heart rate (HR), profile of mood state (POMS), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and muscle pain during each taper. Results. Mean swim times for the modified and conventional ...

  2. CREATINE SUPPLEMENTATION AND SWIM PERFORMANCE: A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J. Hopwood

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional supplements are popular among athletes participating in a wide variety of sports. Creatine is one of the most commonly used dietary supplements, as it has been shown to be beneficial in improving performance during repeated bouts of high-intensity anaerobic activity. This review examines the specific effects of creatine supplementation on swimming performance, and considers the effects of creatine supplementation on various measures of power development in this population. Research performed on the effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance indicates that whilst creatine supplementation is ineffective in improving performance during a single sprint swim, dietary creatine supplementation may benefit repeated interval swim set performance. Considering the relationship between sprint swimming performance and measurements of power, the effect of creatine supplementation on power development in swimmers has also been examined. When measured on a swim bench ergometer, power development does show some improvement following a creatine supplementation regime. How this improvement in power output transfers to performance in the pool is uncertain. Although some evidence exists to suggest a gender effect on the performance improvements seen in swimmers following creatine supplementation, the majority of research indicates that male and female swimmers respond equally to supplementation. A major limitation to previous research is the lack of consideration given to the possible stroke dependant effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance. The majority of the research conducted to date has involved examination of the freestyle swimming stroke only. The potential for performance improvements in the breaststroke and butterfly swimming strokes is discussed, with regards to the biomechanical differences and differences in efficiency between these strokes and freestyle

  3. Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... But you might run into some jellyfish or Portuguese man-of-wars. These umbrella-shaped, nearly clear ... Here are some other good water safety tips: Learn to swim. Ask your parents to contact your ...

  4. Swimming performance of the small characin Bryconamericus stramineus (Characiformes: Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam A. de Castro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Very little research has been conducted on the swimming capacity of Neotropical fish. The few studies available have focused on large migratory species. The present study used fixed and increasing velocity tests to determine prolonged and sustained speeds of the "pequira", Bryconamericus stramineus Eigenmann, 1908, a small, abundant species found in fish passages implemented at the Paraná basin, Brazil. The results of increasing velocity tests showed significant relationships between critical speeds, total and standard lengths, and body weight. When compared with other Neotropical fish, the "pequira" is able to swim faster than individuals of other species of similar length. The point of change from sustained to prolonged swimming was found to occur at an approximate speed of 8.7 lengths per second. These data provide guidance and criteria for design and proper maintenance of structures such as fishways, fish screens and other systems that aim to facilitate or avoid upstream passages as part of management strategies.

  5. Controlled-frequency breath swimming improves swimming performance and running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, K M; Guenette, J A; Smoliga, J M; Zavorsky, G S

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue can negatively impact athletic performance, but swimming has beneficial effects on the respiratory system and may reduce susceptibility to fatigue. Limiting breath frequency during swimming further stresses the respiratory system through hypercapnia and mechanical loading and may lead to appreciable improvements in respiratory muscle strength. This study assessed the effects of controlled-frequency breath (CFB) swimming on pulmonary function. Eighteen subjects (10 men), average (standard deviation) age 25 (6) years, body mass index 24.4 (3.7) kg/m(2), underwent baseline testing to assess pulmonary function, running economy, aerobic capacity, and swimming performance. Subjects were then randomized to either CFB or stroke-matched (SM) condition. Subjects completed 12 training sessions, in which CFB subjects took two breaths per length and SM subjects took seven. Post-training, maximum expiratory pressure improved by 11% (15) for all 18 subjects (P swimming may improve muscular oxygen utilization during terrestrial exercise in novice swimmers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Do resonating bells increase jellyfish swimming performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Alexander; Miller, Laura

    2013-11-01

    A current question in swimming and flight is whether or not driving flexible appendages at their resonant frequency results in faster or more efficient locomotion. It has been suggested that jellyfish swim faster and/or more efficiently when the bell is driven at its resonant frequency. Previous work has modeled the jellyfish bell as a damped harmonic oscillator, and this simplified model suggests that work done by the bell is maximized when force is applied at the resonant frequency of the bell. We extend the idea of resonance phenomena of the jellyfish bell to a fluid structure interaction framework using the immersed boundary method. We first examine the effects of the bending stiffness of the bell on its resonant frequency. We then further our model with the inclusion of a ``muscular'' spring that connects the two sides of a 2D bell and drives it near its resonant frequency. We use this muscular spring to force the bell at varying frequencies and examine the work done by these springs and the resulting swimming speed. We finally augment our model with a flexible, passive bell margin to examine its role in propulsive efficiency.

  7. Coronary ligation reduces maximum sustained swimming speed in Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, A P; Steffensen, J F

    1987-01-01

    a statistically significant 35.5% reduction in maximum swimming speed. We conclude that the coronary circulation is important for maximum aerobic swimming and implicit in this conclusion is that maximum cardiac performance is probably necessary for maximum aerobic swimming performance.......The maximum aerobic swimming speed of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) was measured before and after ligation of the coronary artery. Coronary artery ligation prevented blood flow to the compact layer of the ventricular myocardium, which represents 30% of the ventricular mass, and produced...

  8. BDKRB2 GENE -9/+9 POLYMORPHISM AND SWIMMING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grenda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between swimming performance and the -9/+9 (rs5810761 polymorphism within the BDKRB2 gene in successful competitive swimmers.Best individual swimming results expressed in FINA points achieved at short, middle and long distance events of 157 well-trained Polish swimmers were incorporated into an analysis. Athletes’ genotype and allele distributions were analysed in comparison to 230 unrelated sedentary subjects who served as controls with the χ2 test. All samples were genotyped for the BDKRB2 -9/+9 polymorphism using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The effects of genotype on swimming performance were analysed with two-way (3 x 2; genotype x gender analysis of variance with metrical age as a covariate for each distance specialization. No statistical differences in the genotype and allele frequencies were found in long distance swimmers when compared with the total group of swimmers or controls. The BDKRB2 +9/-9 genotype had no significant effect on swimming performance at short, middle or long distance, regardless of gender. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that the BDKRB2 -9/+9 polymorphism is associated with swimming performance in Polish swimmers.

  9. Effects of bone-conducted music on swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Angela R; Gennings, Chris; Hoffman, Regina A; Strittmatter, Andrew P; Retchin, Sheldon M

    2012-04-01

    Music has been shown to be a useful adjunct for many forms of exercise and has been observed to improve athletic performance in some settings. Nonetheless, because of the limited availability of practical applications of sound conduction in water, there are few studies of the effects of music on swimming athletes. The SwiMP3 is a novel device that uses bone conduction as a method to circumvent the obstacles to transmitting high fidelity sound in an aquatic environment. Thus, we studied the influence of music on swimming performance and enjoyment using the SwiMP3. Twenty-four competitive swimmers participated in a randomized crossover design study in which they completed timed swimming trials with and without the use of music delivered via bone conduction with the SwiMP3. Each participant swam four 50-m trials and one 800-m trial and then completed a physical enjoyment survey. Statistically significant improvements in swimming performance times were found in both the 50-m (0.32 seconds; p = 0.013) and 800-m (6.5 seconds; p = 0.031) trials with music using the SwiMP3. There was no significant improvement in physical enjoyment with the device as measured by a validated assessment tool. Bone-conducted music appears to have a salutary influence on swimming performance in a practice environment among competitive adult swimmers.

  10. Respiratory muscle specific warm-up and elite swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emma E; McKeever, Tricia M; Lobb, Claire; Sherriff, Tom; Gupta, Luke; Hearson, Glenn; Martin, Neil; Lindley, Martin R; Shaw, Dominick E

    2014-05-01

    Inspiratory muscle training has been shown to improve performance in elite swimmers, when used as part of routine training, but its use as a respiratory warm-up has yet to be investigated. To determine the influence of inspiratory muscle exercise (IME) as a respiratory muscle warm-up in a randomised controlled cross-over trial. A total of 15 elite swimmers were assigned to four different warm-up protocols and the effects of IME on 100 m freestyle swimming times were assessed.Each swimmer completed four different IME warm-up protocols across four separate study visits: swimming-only warm-up; swimming warm-up plus IME warm-up (2 sets of 30 breaths with a 40% maximum inspiratory mouth pressure load using the Powerbreathe inspiratory muscle trainer); swimming warm-up plus sham IME warm-up (2 sets of 30 breaths with a 15% maximum inspiratory mouth pressure load using the Powerbreathe inspiratory muscle trainer); and IME-only warm-up. Swimmers performed a series of physiological tests and scales of perception (rate of perceived exertion and dyspnoea) at three time points (pre warm-up, post warm-up and post time trial). The combined standard swimming warm-up and IME warm-up were the fastest of the four protocols with a 100 m time of 57.05 s. This was significantly faster than the IME-only warm-up (mean difference=1.18 s, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.92, pswim-only warm-up (mean difference=0.62 s, 95% CI 0.001 to 1.23, p=0.05). Using IME combined with a standard swimming warm-up significantly improves 100 m freestyle swimming performance in elite swimmers.

  11. Declines in swimming performance with age: a longitudinal study of Masters swimming champions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin RT

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Robert T Rubin,1,2 Sonia Lin,3 Amy Curtis,4 Daniel Auerbach,5 Charlene Win6 1Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2UCLA Bruin Masters Swim Club, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA; 4Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 5University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; 6Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA, USA Introduction: Because of its many participants and thorough records, competitive Masters swimming offers a rich data source for determining the rate of physical decline associated with aging in physically fit individuals. The decline in performance among national champion swimmers, both men and women and in short and long swims, is linear, at about 0.6% per year up to age 70–75, after which it accelerates in quadratic fashion. These conclusions are based primarily on cross-sectional studies, and little is known about individual performance declines with aging. Herein we present performance profiles of 19 male and 26 female national and international champion Masters swimmers, ages 25 to 96 years, participating in competitions for an average of 23 years. Methods and results: Swimmers’ longitudinal data were compared with the fastest times of world record holders across ages 35–100 years by two regression methods. Neither method proved to accurately model this data set: compared with the rates of decline estimated from the world record data, which represent the best recorded times at given ages, there was bias toward shallower rates of performance decline in the longitudinal data, likely owing to a practice effect in some swimmers as they began their Masters programs. In swimmers’ later years, once maximum performance had been achieved, individual profiles followed the decline represented in the world records, and a few swimmers became the world record holders. In some instances

  12. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, A.P.; Mes, D.; Kusters, K.; Roques, J.A.C.; Flik, G.; Kloet, K.; Blonk, R.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (U-opt in m s(-1) or body lengths s(-1), BL s(-1)) were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and

  13. THE USE OF NEURAL NETWORK TECHNOLOGY TO MODEL SWIMMING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António José Silva

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were: to identify the factors which are able to explain the performance in the 200 meters individual medley and 400 meters front crawl events in young swimmers, to model the performance in those events using non-linear mathematic methods through artificial neural networks (multi-layer perceptrons and to assess the neural network models precision to predict the performance. A sample of 138 young swimmers (65 males and 73 females of national level was submitted to a test battery comprising four different domains: kinanthropometric evaluation, dry land functional evaluation (strength and flexibility, swimming functional evaluation (hydrodynamics, hydrostatic and bioenergetics characteristics and swimming technique evaluation. To establish a profile of the young swimmer non-linear combinations between preponderant variables for each gender and swim performance in the 200 meters medley and 400 meters font crawl events were developed. For this purpose a feed forward neural network was used (Multilayer Perceptron with three neurons in a single hidden layer. The prognosis precision of the model (error lower than 0.8% between true and estimated performances is supported by recent evidence. Therefore, we consider that the neural network tool can be a good approach in the resolution of complex problems such as performance modeling and the talent identification in swimming and, possibly, in a wide variety of sports

  14. Strategic sustainability performance plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    In October 2009, President Obama signed Executive Order (EO) 13514 that sets sustainability : goals for Federal agencies and focuses on making improvements in environmental, energy and : economic performance. The Executive Order requires Federal agen...

  15. Effect of Poly Phenols on Swimming Performance in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Tamatam

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Increased physical activities elevate reactive oxygen species (ROS leading to dysfunction and integrity of cells thus inducing oxidative stress which intern may affect overall physical performance. Polyphenols are well known for their excellent antioxidant potency. In this study, the effect of selected polyphenols with established health benefits viz., catachin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid and quercetin was investigated with respect to swimming performance in rats. Methods: The animals were force fed with aqueous mixture of polyphenols at 25 mg/rat/day and subjected to swimming exercise until exhaustion. Results: Rats fed with poly phenols showed a significant increase in swimming time, and the activities of Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH and creatine pyruvic kinase (CPK were lowered. Polyphenols increased the concentration of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP, glycogen in muscle lowered the activities of and. Polyphenols increased the concentration of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP and glycogen in muscle and reduced MDA levels in the liver, muscle and blood but increased DNA and RNA concentration in muscle. Conclusion: The results clearly demonstrated combination of polyphenols used enhanced the swimming performance of the rats.

  16. Declines in swimming performance with age: a longitudinal study of Masters swimming champions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Robert T; Lin, Sonia; Curtis, Amy; Auerbach, Daniel; Win, Charlene

    2013-01-01

    Because of its many participants and thorough records, competitive Masters swimming offers a rich data source for determining the rate of physical decline associated with aging in physically fit individuals. The decline in performance among national champion swimmers, both men and women and in short and long swims, is linear, at about 0.6% per year up to age 70-75, after which it accelerates in quadratic fashion. These conclusions are based primarily on cross-sectional studies, and little is known about individual performance declines with aging. Herein we present performance profiles of 19 male and 26 female national and international champion Masters swimmers, ages 25 to 96 years, participating in competitions for an average of 23 years. Swimmers' longitudinal data were compared with the fastest times of world record holders across ages 35-100 years by two regression methods. Neither method proved to accurately model this data set: compared with the rates of decline estimated from the world record data, which represent the best recorded times at given ages, there was bias toward shallower rates of performance decline in the longitudinal data, likely owing to a practice effect in some swimmers as they began their Masters programs. In swimmers' later years, once maximum performance had been achieved, individual profiles followed the decline represented in the world records, and a few swimmers became the world record holders. In some instances, the individual profiles indicated performance better than the world record data; these swimmers achieved their times after the world record data were collected in 2005-2006. Declining physiological functional capacity occurs with advancing age, and this is reflected in the performance decrements of aging Masters swimmers. Individual swimmers show different performance trajectories with aging, declines being mitigated by practice, which improves both physiological capacity and swimming technique, particularly in the early

  17. Exposure to cerium dioxide nanoparticles differently affect swimming performance and survival in two daphnid species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Artells, Ester; Issartel, Julien; Auffan, Mélanie; Borschneck, Daniel; Thill, Antoine; Tella, Marie; Brousset, Lenka; Rose, Jérôme; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Thiéry, Alain

    2013-01-01

    .... Acute toxicity bioassays were performed to determine EC₅₀ of exposed daphnids. Video-recorded swimming behavior of both daphnids was used to measure swimming speeds after various exposures to aggregated CeO₂ NPs...

  18. Swimming performance and metabolism of cultured golden shiners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The swimming ability and metabolism of golden shiners, Notemigonus crysoleucas, was examined using swim tunnel respirometery. The oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies at various swimming speeds, an estimation of the standard metabolic rate, and the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) was determ...

  19. The effect of input perturbations on swimming performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Andrea M.; Thornycroft, Patrick J. M.; Lauder, George V.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2014-11-01

    The influence of flexibility and fluid characteristics on the hydrodynamics of swimming has been investigated for a range of experimental systems. One investigative method is to use reduced-order physical models--pitching and heaving hydrofoils. Typically, a smooth, periodic, input signal is used to control foil motion in experiments that explore fundamental factors (aspect ratio, shape, etc.) in swimming performance. However, the significance of non-smooth input signals in undulating swimmers is non-trivial. Instead of varying external properties, we study the impact of perturbed input motions on swimming performance. A smooth sinusoid is overlaid with high frequency, low amplitude perturbations as the input signal for a heaving panel in a closed loop flow tank. Specifically, 1 cm heave amplitude base sinusoids are added to 0.1 cm heave perturbations with frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 13 Hz. Two thin foils with different stiffness are flapped with the combined input signals in addition to the individual high heave and low heave signals that were added to create the combined inputs. Results demonstrate that perturbations can increase thrust and that adding the perturbed signal to a base frequency alters wake structure.

  20. Anaerobic Contribution Determined in Swimming Distances: Relation with Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Z. Campos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Total anaerobic contribution (TAn can be assessed by accumulated oxygen deficit, and through sum of glycolytic and phosphagen contribution which enable the evaluation of TAn without influences on mechanical parameters. However, little is known about the difference of TAn within swimming distances. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were to determine and compare the TAn in different performances using the backward extrapolation technique and amount of lactate accumulated during exercise, and relate it with swimming performance. Fourteen competitive swimmers performed five maximal front crawl swims of 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 m. The total phosphagen (AnAl and glycolytic (AnLa contributions were assumed as the fast component of post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOCFAST and amount of blood lactate accumulated during exercise, respectively. TAn was the sum of AnAl and AnLa. Significantly lower values of AnLa were observed in the 800 m (p < 0.01 than other distances. For AnAl, the 50 m performance presented the lowest values, followed by 100 and 800 m (p < 0.01. The highest values of AnAl were observed in the 200 and 400 m (p > 0.13. The TAn was significantly higher in the 200 and 400 m performances than observed at 50 and 800 m (p < 0.01. Anaerobic contributions were correlated with 50, 100, 200, and 400 m performances (p < 0.01. The AnAl contribution was not correlated with 400 m performance. Anaerobic parameters were not correlated with 800 m performance. In conclusion, the highest values of anaerobic contribution were observed in the 200 and 400 m distances. Moreover, TAn is important to performances below 400 m, and may be used in training routines.

  1. Creating sustainable performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreitzer, Gretchen; Porath, Christine

    2012-01-01

    What makes for sustainable individual and organizational performance? Employees who are thriving-not just satisfied and productive but also engaged in creating the future. The authors found that people who fit this description demonstrated 16% better overall performance, 125% less burnout, 32% more commitment to the organization, and 46% more job satisfaction than their peers. Thriving has two components: vitality, or the sense of being alive and excited, and learning, or the growth that comes from gaining knowledge and skills. Some people naturally build vitality and learning into their jobs, but most employees are influenced by their environment. Four mechanisms, none of which requires heroic effort or major resources, create the conditions for thriving: providing decision-making discretion, sharing information about the organization and its strategy, minimizing incivility, and offering performance feedback. Organizations such as Alaska Airlines, Zingerman's, Quicken Loans, and Caiman Consulting have found that helping people grow and remain energized at work is valiant on its own merits-but it can also boost performance in a sustainable way.

  2. Swimming intensity during triathlon: a review of current research and strategies to enhance race performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeling, Peter; Landers, Grant

    2009-08-01

    The swim section of Sprint- and Olympic-distance triathlon race formats is integral to the success of subsequent cycle and running disciplines, and to overall race performance. The current body of swimming-based triathlon research suggests that the energy used, and the positioning gained among competitors during the swim, is important in determining the success of an athlete's race, especially professional athletes in draft-legal settings. Furthermore, by swimming at a reduced intensity, it has been shown that the performance of the subsequent disciplines may be enhanced. However, reductions in energy output can be obtained without compromising swimming speed. This review highlights the importance of swimming intensity during a triathlon and how it impacts on the ensuing cycle and run. Furthermore, consideration is given to current methods used to manipulate swimming performance.

  3. Sex-related differences and age of peak performance in breaststroke versus freestyle swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrum, Mathias; Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2013-12-19

    Sex-related differences in performance and in age of peak performance have been reported for freestyle swimming. However, little is known about the sex-related differences in other swimming styles. The aim of the present study was to compare performance and age of peak performance for elite men and women swimmers in breaststroke versus freestyle. Race results were analyzed for swimmers at national ranked in the Swiss high score list (during 2006 through 2010) and for international swimmers who qualified for the finals of the FINA World Swimming Championships (during 2003 through 2011). The sex-related difference in swimming speed was significantly greater for freestyle than for breaststroke over 50 m, 100 m, and 200 m race distances for Swiss swimmers, but not for FINA finalists. The sex-related difference for both freestyle and breaststroke swimming speeds decreased significantly with increasing swimming distance for both groups. Race distance did not affect the age of peak performance by women in breaststroke, but age of peak performance was four years older for FINA women than for Swiss women. Men achieved peak swimming performance in breaststroke at younger ages for longer race distances, and the age of peak swimming performance was six years older for FINA men than for Swiss men. In freestyle swimming, race distance did not affect the age of peak swimming performance for Swiss women, but the age of peak swimming performance decreased with increasing race distance for Swiss men and for both sexes at the FINA World Championships. Results of the present study indicate that (i) sex-related differences in swimming speed were greater for freestyle than for breaststroke for swimmers at national level, but not for swimmers at international level, and (ii) both female and male swimmers achieved peak swimming speeds at younger ages in breaststroke than in freestyle. Further studies are required to better understand differences between trends at national and

  4. The effects of chronic cadmium exposure on repeat swimming performance and anaerobic metabolism in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Jessie L.; McGeer, James C., E-mail: jmcgeer@wlu.ca

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Exposure to 18 nM waterborne Cd induced plasma Ca loss that recovered by day 30 for lake whitefish but not brown trout. • Ucrit measured after an initial swim to 85% of Ucrit and a 30 min rest period was reduced in 18 nM Cd exposed fish compared to controls. • Swimming to 85% of Ucrit resulted in decreased muscle glycogen and increased lactate that was not recovered in the 30 min recovery period. • Second swim impairment is not related to metabolic processes in white muscle. - Abstract: This study investigates the effect of chronic Cd exposure on the ability to perform repeat swim challenges in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis). Fish were exposed to waterborne Cd (18 nM) in moderately hard water (120 mg L{sup −1} CaCO{sub 3}) for 30 days. This level of exposure has been shown to cause sublethal physiological disruption and acclimation responses but no impairment of sustained swimming capacity (U{sub crit}) in single swim challenges. Swim trials were done over the course of the exposure and each one consisted of an initial swim to 85% of the U{sub crit} of control fish, a 30 min recovery period and finally a second swim challenge to determine U{sub crit}. Plasma and tissue samples were collected before and after each of the swim periods. As expected from previous studies, Cd exposure resulted in significant accumulation of Cd in gills, liver and kidney but not in white muscle. Exposure also induced a loss of plasma Ca followed by subsequent recovery (in lake whitefish but not brown trout) with few mortalities (100% survival for lake whitefish and 93% for brown trout). Both control and exposed fish swam to 85% of the single swim U{sub crit} and no differences in performance were seen. The Ucrit of unexposed controls in the second swim challenges were not different from the single swim Ucrit. However, second swim performance was significantly reduced in Cd exposed fish, particularly after a week of exposure

  5. MONITORING SWIMMING SPRINT PERFORMANCE DURING A TRAINING CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Marinho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The preparation for a major competition is an important concern of coaches and athletes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the evolution in sprint performance during a training macro cycle in age-group swimmers of both genders. The sample comprised twenty four age-group swimmers (12.0 ± 0.72 years old, 41.43 ± 6.88 kg, 1.51 ± 0.09 m. The evaluations occurred during nine weeks of swimming training in the first macro cycle. During this period the subjects performed 54 training units (6 units per week. In all weeks, the performance in two trials of a 25 m front crawl all out test, with 15 min of rest, was recorded. Only the bestperformance was used to assess the effects of training. Comparisons between the first week and the following weeks were conducted using pair-sample t-test. The significance level was set at 5%. The sprint performance did not change during the first 6 weeks of preparation. In the last three weeks the performance in the 25 m front crawl test was improved when compared with the first week, although the major changes occurred at the last week of preparation.It seems that in age-group swimmers seven weeks of specific swimming training enables improving swimmer’s sprint performance, although some differences exists between male and female swimmers. Thesedata could be used by coaches to program the training season and the evolution of the load components.

  6. THE IMPACT OF TECHNICAL ABILITY TO SWIMMING PERFORMANCE OF THE MIXED SWIMMING AT 100m IN COLLEGE FASTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Beganović

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the impact of technical ability to swim (the starting point, the techniques and turns, within each of these techniques of swimming (freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke and butterfly marked as input or predictor variables, the performance of mixed swimming in the 100m, marked as output or criterion variable. The study was conducted on a sample of 31 students, females, aged from 20-24 years, with the help of the testing (assessment, technical skills of swimming (start, the techniques and turns: OCJKSTR, OCJKTEH, OCJKOKR, OCJLSTR, OCJLTEH, OCJLOKR, OCJPSTR, OCJPTEH, OCJPOKR, OCJDSTR, OCJDTEH, OCJDOKR and mixed swimming in the 100m (OCJPM100, the following order: butterfly, back, breaststroke, freestyle. Analyzing the presented results of regression analysis can be stated that after testing (assessment of all predictor system statistically the most significant impact on the criterion variable had the following variables: assessment techniques freestyle (OCJKTEH, evaluation of starting breast stroke (OCJPSTR and assessment of breast stroke turns (OCJPOKR.

  7. Optimization of sustaining swimming speed of matrinxã Brycon amazonicus: performance and adaptive aspects Otimização da velocidade de nado sustentado em matrinxã Brycon amazonicus: rendimento e aspectos adaptativos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Arbeláez-Rojas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious changes in metabolism, growth performance and body composition may be observed if fish are constrained to swimming continuously or intermittently at over-speeds. This study evaluates effects of four water speeds on growth, body composition and hematologic profile of juvenile matrinxã, Brycon amazonicus. Fish (33.3 ± 0.9 g and 13.44 ± 0.1 cm were held for 90 days in five water speeds (0.0 - control, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 body lengths per second - BLAt swimming speeds ranging on 1.0 and 1.5 BL s–1, in fish growth was 20% higher. Hemoglobin and red blood cells at 1.5 BL s–1 increased 24% and 18% respectively; hematocrit was 17% higher in all exercised fish; protein content of white muscle at 1.0 BL s–1 was 2% higher; lipid deposition in red muscle at 1.0 BL s–1 was 22% higher and water retention 3% lower. Crude energy levels enhanced 10% in all exercised fish; liver water retention was 6% lower at 1.0 BL s–1; liver lipid composition was 29% higher than control and 34% higher than 1.5 BL s–1; liver crude energy increased at 1.0 BL s–1 as compared with control and 2.5 BL s–1. Lipid deposition in ventral muscle was 9% higher at 2.0 BL s–1. Although high lipid deposition of matrinxã has been achieved in moderate swimming speeds, lipids may be the main fuel source to maintain the metabolic demands of exercised matrinxã. The best water flow speed for optimized growth of matrinxã ranged on 1.0 and 1.5 BL s–1.Modificações deletérias no metabolismo, rendimento de crescimento e composição corporal podem ser observadas em peixes forçados à natação contínua ou intermitente sob velocidades excessivas. Neste trabalho, os efeitos de quatro velocidades de água no crescimento, composição corporal e perfil hematológico foram avaliados em matrinxãs juvenis, Brycon amazonicus. Os peixes (33,3 ± 0,9 g e 13,44 ± 0,1 cm foram mantidos durante 90 dias em cinco velocidades de água (0,0 – controle; 1,0; 1,5; 2,0 e 2

  8. Lung volumes in swimmers performing different styles of swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavachandran, C; Nair, H R; Shashidhar, S

    2001-12-01

    The alteration of lung volumes in swimmers performing different strokes was the theme of the present study. The study was carried out due to lack of knowledge regarding the lung volumes of different strokers. As the energy expenditure, O2 consumption rate, body movements, viz. arm and leg movements differ with each stroke, the lung function status and mechanics of breathing in swimmers has to cope up with the stroke techniques. Lung volumes, viz. VC, FVC, FEV1 and RVind decrease from resting condition to after swimming performance in freestyle swimmers and butterfly stroke swimmers. The primary reason for the decline in lung volumes after exercise bout, found out from several reports is that it may be due to the fatigue of respiratory muscle. When lung volumes of different swimming strokers were compared with age and height matched controls a higher lung volume were observed in swimmers performing different strokes. Higher breath holding ability of swimmers may facilitate the increase in the strength of respiratory musculature. This may have lead to higher lung volumes in swimmers. From the results of different strokers of swimmers, it is clear that lung volumes differ with respect to the stroke technique employed by the swimmer. Here the age and height, training duration of the swimmers performing different strokes were almost matched, so it is more or less clear that lung volumes are influenced by different swarming strokes. The results of the study can be utilised for the selection trials of swimmers. The study outlines the need for research work in swimmers to be more specific with regard to strokes than generalizing swimmers of different strokes as a category together.

  9. Changes in breaststroke swimming performances in national and international athletes competing between 1994 and 2011 -a comparison with freestyle swimming performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrum, Mathias; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald; Knechtle, Beat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse potential changes in performance of elite breaststroke swimmers competing at national and international level and to compare to elite freestyle swimming performance. Temporal trends in performance of elite breaststroke swimmers were analysed from records of the Swiss Swimming Federation and the FINA (Fédération Internationale de Natation) World Swimming Championships during the 1994-2011 period. Swimming speeds of elite female and male breaststroke swimmers competing in 50 m, 100 m, and 200 m were examined using linear regression, non-linear regression and analysis of variance. Results of breaststroke swimmers were compared to results of freestyle swimmers. Swimming speed in both strokes improved significantly (p < 0.0001-0.025) over time for both sexes, with the exception of 50 m breaststroke for FINA men. Sex differences in swimming speed increased significantly over time for Swiss freestyle swimmers (p < 0.0001), but not for FINA swimmers for freestyle, while the sex difference remained stable for Swiss and FINA breaststroke swimmers. The sex differences in swimming speed decreased significantly (p < 0.0001) with increasing race distance. The present study showed that elite male and female swimmers competing during the 1994-2011 period at national and international level improved their swimming speed in both breaststroke and freestyle. The sex difference in freestyle swimming speed consistently increased in athletes competing at national level, whereas it remained unchanged in athletes competing at international level. Future studies should investigate temporal trends for recent time in other strokes, to determine whether this improvement is a generalized phenomenon.

  10. Changes in breaststroke swimming performances in national and international athletes competing between 1994 and 2011 –a comparison with freestyle swimming performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to analyse potential changes in performance of elite breaststroke swimmers competing at national and international level and to compare to elite freestyle swimming performance. Methods Temporal trends in performance of elite breaststroke swimmers were analysed from records of the Swiss Swimming Federation and the FINA (Fédération Internationale de Natation) World Swimming Championships during the 1994–2011 period. Swimming speeds of elite female and male breaststroke swimmers competing in 50 m, 100 m, and 200 m were examined using linear regression, non-linear regression and analysis of variance. Results of breaststroke swimmers were compared to results of freestyle swimmers. Results Swimming speed in both strokes improved significantly (p < 0.0001-0.025) over time for both sexes, with the exception of 50 m breaststroke for FINA men. Sex differences in swimming speed increased significantly over time for Swiss freestyle swimmers (p < 0.0001), but not for FINA swimmers for freestyle, while the sex difference remained stable for Swiss and FINA breaststroke swimmers. The sex differences in swimming speed decreased significantly (p < 0.0001) with increasing race distance. Conclusions The present study showed that elite male and female swimmers competing during the 1994–2011 period at national and international level improved their swimming speed in both breaststroke and freestyle. The sex difference in freestyle swimming speed consistently increased in athletes competing at national level, whereas it remained unchanged in athletes competing at international level. Future studies should investigate temporal trends for recent time in other strokes, to determine whether this improvement is a generalized phenomenon. PMID:24826211

  11. Intraspecific variation in aerobic and anaerobic locomotion: gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) do not exhibit a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed and minimum cost of transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Jon C; Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Cordero, Gerardo A; Steffensen, John F

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and trade-off in aerobic and anaerobic traits remain poorly understood in aquatic locomotion. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), both axial swimmers, this study tested four hypotheses: (1) gait transition from steady to unsteady (i.e., burst-assisted) swimming is associated with anaerobic metabolism evidenced as excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC); (2) variation in swimming performance (critical swimming speed; U crit) correlates with metabolic scope (MS) or anaerobic capacity (i.e., maximum EPOC); (3) there is a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed (U sus) and minimum cost of transport (COTmin); and (4) variation in U sus correlates positively with optimum swimming speed (U opt; i.e., the speed that minimizes energy expenditure per unit of distance traveled). Data collection involved swimming respirometry and video analysis. Results showed that anaerobic swimming costs (i.e., EPOC) increase linearly with the number of bursts in S. aurata, with each burst corresponding to 0.53 mg O2 kg(-1). Data are consistent with a previous study on striped surfperch (Embiotoca lateralis), a labriform swimmer, suggesting that the metabolic cost of burst swimming is similar across various types of locomotion. There was no correlation between U crit and MS or anaerobic capacity in S. aurata indicating that other factors, including morphological or biomechanical traits, influenced U crit. We found no evidence of a trade-off between U sus and COTmin. In fact, data revealed significant negative correlations between U sus and COTmin, suggesting that individuals with high U sus also exhibit low COTmin. Finally, there were positive correlations between U sus and U opt. Our study demonstrates the energetic importance of anaerobic metabolism during unsteady swimming, and provides intraspecific evidence that superior maximum sustained swimming speed is associated with superior swimming

  12. Intraspecific variation in aerobic and anaerobic locomotion: gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) do not exhibit a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed and minimum cost of transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Jon C.; Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Cordero, Gerardo A.; Steffensen, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and trade-off in aerobic and anaerobic traits remain poorly understood in aquatic locomotion. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), both axial swimmers, this study tested four hypotheses: (1) gait transition from steady to unsteady (i.e., burst-assisted) swimming is associated with anaerobic metabolism evidenced as excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC); (2) variation in swimming performance (critical swimming speed; Ucrit) correlates with metabolic scope (MS) or anaerobic capacity (i.e., maximum EPOC); (3) there is a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed (Usus) and minimum cost of transport (COTmin); and (4) variation in Usus correlates positively with optimum swimming speed (Uopt; i.e., the speed that minimizes energy expenditure per unit of distance traveled). Data collection involved swimming respirometry and video analysis. Results showed that anaerobic swimming costs (i.e., EPOC) increase linearly with the number of bursts in S. aurata, with each burst corresponding to 0.53 mg O2 kg−1. Data are consistent with a previous study on striped surfperch (Embiotoca lateralis), a labriform swimmer, suggesting that the metabolic cost of burst swimming is similar across various types of locomotion. There was no correlation between Ucrit and MS or anaerobic capacity in S. aurata indicating that other factors, including morphological or biomechanical traits, influenced Ucrit. We found no evidence of a trade-off between Usus and COTmin. In fact, data revealed significant negative correlations between Usus and COTmin, suggesting that individuals with high Usus also exhibit low COTmin. Finally, there were positive correlations between Usus and Uopt. Our study demonstrates the energetic importance of anaerobic metabolism during unsteady swimming, and provides intraspecific evidence that superior maximum sustained swimming speed is associated with superior swimming economy and

  13. Intraspecific variation in aerobic and anaerobic locomotion: gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata do not exhibit a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed and minimum cost of transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Christian Svendsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Intraspecific variation and trade-off in aerobic and anaerobic traits remain poorly understood in aquatic locomotion. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata, both axial swimmers, this study tested four hypotheses: 1 gait transition from steady to unsteady (i.e. burst-assisted swimming is associated with anaerobic metabolism evidenced as excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC; 2 variation in swimming performance (critical swimming speed; Ucrit correlates with metabolic scope (MS or anaerobic capacity (i.e. maximum EPOC; 3 there is a trade-off between maximum sustained swimming speed (Usus and minimum cost of transport (COTmin; and 4 variation in Usus correlates positively with optimum swimming speed (Uopt; i.e. the speed that minimizes energy expenditure per unit of distance travelled. Data collection involved swimming respirometry and video analysis. Results showed that anaerobic swimming costs (i.e. EPOC increase linearly with the number of bursts in S. aurata, with each burst corresponding to 0.53 mg O2 kg-1. Data are consistent with a previous study on striped surfperch (Embiotoca lateralis, a labriform swimmer, suggesting that the metabolic cost of burst swimming is similar across various types of locomotion. There was no correlation between Ucrit and MS or anaerobic capacity in S. aurata indicating that other factors, including morphological or biomechanical traits, influenced Ucrit. We found no evidence of a trade-off between Usus and COTmin. In fact, data revealed significant negative correlations between Usus and COTmin, suggesting that individuals with high Usus also exhibit low COTmin. Finally, there were positive correlations between Usus and Uopt. Our study demonstrates the energetic importance of anaerobic metabolism during unsteady swimming, and provides intraspecific evidence that superior maximum sustained swimming speed is associated with superior swimming economy and optimum

  14. The association of muscle strength, aerobic capacity and swim time performance in young, competitive swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Peter; Knudsen, Hans Kromann; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    ). The association between these factors and swim time performance may plausibly identify some of the determinants for performance enhancement in swimming (Smith et al., 2002). In order to detail the individual training programme, reference values are needed. The aims of this study were firstly to determine...... Jump (VJ) and an intermittent running test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake, the Andersen Test (AT). Swim time performance, expressed as 100m FT, was obtained from a national database for Danish swimmers. A multiple linear regression model was used to determine the association between GS, VJ...... in the current study. Also, increasing aerobic capacity was found to improve swim time performance. These simple and low-cost tests including data on reference values for each test may be considered in order to improve dry-land training prescription, thereby supporting the enhancing swimming performance in young...

  15. Effect of the starting and turning performances on the subsequent swimming parameters of elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Santiago; Roig, Andreu

    2017-03-01

    In the present research, we examined the effect of the starting and turning performances on the subsequent swimming parameters by (1) comparing the starting and turning velocities with the swimming parameters on the emersion and mid-pool segments and (2) by relating the individual behaviour of swimmers during the start and turns with subsequent behaviour on each swimming lap. One hundred and twelve 100 m performances on the FINA 2013 World Swimming Championships were analysed by an image-processing system (InThePool 2.0®). At the point of the start emersion, the swimming parameters of the 100-m elite swimmers were substantially greater than the mid-pool parameters, except on the breaststroke races. On the other hand, no diminution in the swimming parameters was observed between the turn emersion and the mid-pool swimming, except on the butterfly and backstroke male races. Changes on the surface swimming kinematics were not generally related to the starting or turning parameters, although male swimmers who develop faster starts seem to achieve faster velocities at emersion. Race analysts should be aware of a transfer of momentum when swimmers emerge from underwater with implications on the subsequent swimming kinematics, especially for male swimmers who employ underwater undulatory techniques.

  16. Effects of intraspecific variation in reproductive traits, pectoral fin use and burst swimming on metabolic rates and swimming performance in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jon Christian; Banet, Amanda I.; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen

    2013-01-01

    of reproductive traits, pectoral fin use and burse-assisted swimming on swimming metabolic rate, standard metabolic rate (MO2std) and prolonged swimming performance (Ucrit). Reproductive traits included reproductive allocation and pregnancy stage, the former defined as the mass of the reproductive tissues divided......There is considerable intraspecific variation in metabolic rates and locomotor performance in aquatic ectothermic vertebrates; however, the mechanistic basis remains poorly understood. Using pregnant Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata), a livebearing teleost, we examined the effects...... by the total body mass. Results showed that the metabolic rate increased curvilinearly with swimming speed. The slope of the relationship was used as an index of swimming cost. There was no evidence that reproductive traits correlated with swimming cost, MO2std or Ucrit. In contrast, data revealed strong...

  17. Computer assisted video analysis of swimming performance in a forced swim test: simultaneous assessment of duration of immobility and swimming style in mice selected for high and low swim-stress induced analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Lisowski, Paweł; Sliwa, Adam T; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2008-10-20

    In behavioral pharmacology, two problems are encountered when quantifying animal behavior: 1) reproducibility of the results across laboratories, especially in the case of manual scoring of animal behavior; 2) presence of different behavioral idiosyncrasies, common in genetically different animals, that mask or mimic the effects of the experimental treatments. This study aimed to develop an automated method enabling simultaneous assessment of the duration of immobility in mice and the depth of body submersion during swimming by means of computer assisted video analysis system (EthoVision from Noldus). We tested and compared parameters of immobility based either on the speed of an object (animal) movement or based on the percentage change in the object's area between the consecutive video frames. We also examined the effects of an erosion-dilation filtering procedure on the results obtained with both parameters of immobility. Finally, we proposed an automated method enabling assessment of depth of body submersion that reflects swimming performance. It was found that both parameters of immobility were sensitive to the effect of an antidepressant, desipramine, and that they yielded similar results when applied to mice that are good swimmers. The speed parameter was, however, more sensitive and more reliable because it depended less on random noise of the video image. Also, it was established that applying the erosion-dilation filtering procedure increased the reliability of both parameters of immobility. In case of mice that were poor swimmers, the assessed duration of immobility differed depending on a chosen parameter, thus resulting in the presence or lack of differences between two lines of mice that differed in swimming performance. These results substantiate the need for assessing swimming performance when the duration of immobility in the FST is compared in lines that differ in their swimming "styles". Testing swimming performance can also be important in the

  18. Pop up satellite tags impair swimming performance and energetics of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Methling

    Full Text Available Pop-up satellite archival tags (PSATs have recently been applied in attempts to follow the oceanic spawning migration of the European eel. PSATs are quite large, and in all likelihood their hydraulic drag constitutes an additional cost during swimming, which remains to be quantified, as does the potential implication for successful migration. Silver eels (L(T = 598.6±29 mm SD, N = 9 were subjected to swimming trials in a Steffensen-type swim tunnel at increasing speeds of 0.3-0.9 body lengths s(-1, first without and subsequently with, a scaled down PSAT dummy attached. The tag significantly increased oxygen consumption (MO(2 during swimming and elevated minimum cost of transport (COT(min by 26%. Standard (SMR and active metabolic rate (AMR as well as metabolic scope remained unaffected, suggesting that the observed effects were caused by increased drag. Optimal swimming speed (U(opt was unchanged, whereas critical swimming speed (U(crit decreased significantly. Swimming with a PSAT altered swimming kinematics as verified by significant changes to tail beat frequency (f, body wave speed (v and Strouhal number (St. The results demonstrate that energy expenditure, swimming performance and efficiency all are significantly affected in migrating eels with external tags.

  19. Pop up satellite tags impair swimming performance and energetics of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methling, Caroline; Tudorache, Christian; Skov, Peter V; Steffensen, John F

    2011-01-01

    Pop-up satellite archival tags (PSATs) have recently been applied in attempts to follow the oceanic spawning migration of the European eel. PSATs are quite large, and in all likelihood their hydraulic drag constitutes an additional cost during swimming, which remains to be quantified, as does the potential implication for successful migration. Silver eels (L(T) = 598.6±29 mm SD, N = 9) were subjected to swimming trials in a Steffensen-type swim tunnel at increasing speeds of 0.3-0.9 body lengths s(-1), first without and subsequently with, a scaled down PSAT dummy attached. The tag significantly increased oxygen consumption (MO(2)) during swimming and elevated minimum cost of transport (COT(min)) by 26%. Standard (SMR) and active metabolic rate (AMR) as well as metabolic scope remained unaffected, suggesting that the observed effects were caused by increased drag. Optimal swimming speed (U(opt)) was unchanged, whereas critical swimming speed (U(crit)) decreased significantly. Swimming with a PSAT altered swimming kinematics as verified by significant changes to tail beat frequency (f), body wave speed (v) and Strouhal number (St). The results demonstrate that energy expenditure, swimming performance and efficiency all are significantly affected in migrating eels with external tags.

  20. Critical force during tethered swimming for the evaluation of aerobic capacity and prediction of performances in freestyle swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Papoti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the relationship of critical force (Fcrit with lactate threshold (LLNA and the intensity corresponding to VO2max (iVO2max in tethered swimming (TS, and their correlation with maximal performance in 400-m (V400 and 30-min (VT30 freestyle swimming (FS. Seven swimmers were submitted to a TS incremental test for the determination of LLNA and iVO2max. For the determination of Fcrit, the swimmers performed four exercises to exhaustion at intensities (F corresponding to 87%, 104%, 118% and 134% of iVO2max for the calculation of time limits (Tlim. Fcrit corresponded to the linear coefficient of the ratio between F and 1/tlim. The maximal performance in FS corresponded to the mean velocity obtained during maximal exercise of 400-m and 30-min crawl swimming. Fcrit (51.97 ± 4.02 N was significantly lower than iVO2max (60.21 ± 8.73 N but not than LLNA (45.89 ± 8.73. Fcrit was significantly correlated with iVO2max (0.97, LLNA (0.88, V400 (0.85, and VT30 (0.86. These data suggest that Fcrit can be used for the determination of aerobic capacity, prescription of a TS training program, and prediction of performance in FS.

  1. Simulated front crawl swimming performance related to critical speed and critical power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toussaint, H.M.; Wakayoshi, K.; Hollander, A.P.; Ogita, F.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Competitive pool swimming events range in distance from 50 to 1500 m. Given the difference in performance times (±23-1000 s), the contribution of the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems changes considerably with race distance. In training practice the regression line between swimming

  2. Beyond the "High-Tech" Suits: Predicting 2012 Olympic Swim Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, Chris L.; Stager, Joel M.; Tanner, Dave A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the authors in this study was to predict the mean swim time of the top eight swimmers in swim events at the 2012 Olympic Games based upon prior Olympic performances from 1972 through 2008. Using the mean top eight time across all years, a best fit power curve [time = a x year[superscript b

  3. Effect of ectoparasite infestation density and life history stages on the swimming performance of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Bui

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To overcome sustainability obstacles and improve operations, the Atlantic salmon farming industry is testing novel approaches to production. Redistributing farm sites to offshore locations is one such solution; however, tolerance to high-current velocity sites must be considered, particularly if fish health status is compromised by parasites. We tested the effect of parasite density and life-history stage on the swimming performance of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar using a swim flume. Salmon with 3 different salmon lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis densities (0, 0.02 � 0.01 and 0.11 � 0.01 lice cm-2 [mean � SE] were tested across the 4 major life-history stages of lice (copepodid, chalimus, pre-adult and adult for critical swimming performance (Ucrit. Salmon Ucrit declined slightly by a mean of 0.04 to 0.10 body lengths s-1 with high parasite densities compared to uninfested and low densities, across the lice stages, while progression through the parasite life-history stages had little effect on swimming performance. Our results suggest that increasing infestation density of salmon lice incurs negative fitness consequences for farmed Atlantic salmon held in high-current velocity sites, with little difference in costs associated with attachment by different life-history stages of the lice.

  4. Performance Metrics for Sustainability Value

    OpenAIRE

    Sundfors, David

    2016-01-01

    The trend that started with Green Building has moved on into Sustainable Building. But how do we know that something is really sustainable? This project started out with the intention to find a small set of performance indicators for commercial buildings, which could be continuously measured and monitored over time, which would give a good indication of the level of sustainability of the building and as such, and be presented as an additional part in a valuation. Since it has been shown sever...

  5. Firm Sustainability Performance Index Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Wan Jasimah Bt Wan Mohamed Radzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to bring a model for firm sustainability performance index by applying both classical and Bayesian structural equation modeling (parametric and semi-parametric modeling. Both techniques are considered to the research data collected based on a survey directed to the China, Taiwan, and Malaysia food manufacturing industry. For estimating firm sustainability performance index we consider three main indicators include knowledge management, organizational learning, and business strategy. Based on the both Bayesian and classical methodology, we confirmed that knowledge management and business strategy have significant impact on firm sustainability performance index.

  6. Morphology, swimming performance and propulsive mode of six co-occurring hydromedusae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Sean P; Costello, John H

    2002-02-01

    Jet propulsion, based on examples from the Hydrozoa, has served as a valuable model for swimming by medusae. However, cnidarian medusae span several taxonomic classes (collectively known as the Medusazoa) and represent a diverse array of morphologies and swimming styles. Does one mode of propulsion appropriately describe swimming by all medusae? This study examined a group of co-occurring hydromedusae collected from the waters of Friday Harbor, WA, USA, to investigate relationships between swimming performance and underlying mechanisms of thrust production. The six species examined encompassed a wide range of bell morphologies and swimming habits. Swimming performance (measured as swimming acceleration and velocity) varied widely among the species and was positively correlated with bell streamlining (measured as bell fineness ratio) and velar structure development (measured as velar aperture ratio). Calculated thrust production due to jet propulsion adequately explained acceleration patterns of prolate medusae (Aglantha digitale, Sarsia sp. and Proboscidactyla flavicirrata) possessing well-developed velums. However, acceleration patterns of oblate medusae (Aequorea victoria, Mitrocoma cellularia and Phialidium gregarium) that have less developed velums were poorly described by jet thrust production. An examination of the wakes behind swimming medusae indicated that, in contrast to the clearly defined jet structures produced by prolate species, oblate medusae did not produce defined jets but instead produced prominent vortices at the bell margins. These vortices are consistent with a predominantly drag-based, rowing mode of propulsion by the oblate species. These patterns of propulsive mechanics and swimming performance relate to the role played by swimming in the foraging ecology of each medusa. These patterns appear to extend beyond hydromedusae and thus have important implications for other members of the Medusazoa.

  7. Sustainable Workspace Performance for Steelcase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Adrian; Bey, Niki

    the workspace and sustainability (in economic, social and environmental terms). State-of-the-art research and knowledge of workspace and sustainability issues were identified and structured. A “works like” concept model has been developed and is presented in this report. The objective of the project......This report documents the work done in the project “Sustainable Workspace Performance” for Steelcase in the period of October 2006 - December 2007. Today organizations around the world are encouraging and promoting standards for environmentally efficient buildings. Interest in these “green...... was to allow companies to assess their own performance of their workspace in each of the sustainability dimensions relative to their own business context. This is expected to engage and empower companies to take action and make informed sustainable decisions in the design of their workspace....

  8. The Relationship of Flexibility with Swimming Performance -The case of college male swimmers-

    OpenAIRE

    田井村, 明博

    1981-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the relationship of flexibility with swimming performance. For this purpose, 14 flexibility tests and eight swimming performance tests were administrated to 153 skilled college male swimmers. The major findings of which are shown below : 1) In the flexibility of ankle extension, back crawl and butterfly swimmers were more flexible than the other swimmers. 2) Water polo swimmers were less flexible than the other swimmers in all flexibility areas. 3) Trunk r...

  9. Swim performance and thermoregulatory effects of wearing clothing in a simulated cold-water survival situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, Heather; Eglin, Clare M; Tipton, Michael J; Barwood, Martin J

    2016-04-01

    Accidental cold-water immersion (CWI) impairs swim performance, increases drowning risk and often occurs whilst clothed. The impact of clothing on thermoregulation and swim performance during CWI was explored with the view of making recommendations on whether swimming is viable for self-rescue; contrary to the traditional recommendations. Ten unhabituated males (age 24 (4) years; height 1.80 (0.08) m; mass 78.50 (10.93) kg; body composition 14.8 (3.4) fat %) completed four separate CWIs in 12 °C water. They either rested clothed or naked (i.e. wearing a bathing costume) or swum self-paced clothed or naked for up to 1 h. Swim speed, distance covered, oxygen consumption and thermal responses (rectal temperature (T re), mean skin temperature (T msk) and mean body temperature T b) were measured. When clothed, participants swum at a slower pace and for a significantly shorter distance (815 (482) m, 39 (19) min) compared to when naked (1264 (564) m, 52 (18) min), but had a similar oxygen consumption indicating clothing made them less efficient. Swimming accelerated the rate of T msk and T b cooling and wearing clothing partially attenuated this drop. The impairment to swimming performance caused by clothing was greater than the thermal benefit it provided; participants withdrew due to exhaustion before hypothermia developed. Swimming is a viable self-rescue method in 12 °C water, however, clothing impairs swimming capability. Self-rescue swimming could be considered before clinical hypothermia sets in for the majority of individuals. These suggestions must be tested for the wider population.

  10. Effect of Gender, Energetics, and Biomechanics on Swimming Masters Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria I; Barbosa, Tiago M; Neiva, Henrique P; Marta, Carlos C; Costa, Mário J; Marinho, Daniel A

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of gender and energetics on biomechanics and performance of masters swimmers over 1 season. Twenty-five masters swimmers (14 male and 11 female) were assessed 3 times (TP1, TP2, and TP3) during a season (male personal record in 200-m freestyle event: 173.00 ± 31.41 seconds: female personal record in 200-m freestyle event: 200.73 ± 25.02 seconds). An incremental 5 × 200-m step test was selected to evaluate velocity at 4 mmol·l⁻¹ of blood lactate concentration (v4), maximal blood lactate concentration after exercise (La(peak)), maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max), stroke frequency, stroke length (SL), stroke index (SI), and propelling efficiency of the arm stroke (η(p)). The 200-m freestyle performance and average swimming velocity (v200) were also monitored. Significant differences were observed between males and females for the 200-m freestyle performance, SL, SI, and La(peak). Performance (205.18 ± 24.47 seconds; 197.45 ± 20.97 seconds; 193.45 ± 18.12 seconds), SL (1.69 ± 0.17 m; 1.79 ± 0.13 m; 1.78 ± 0.15 m), SI (1.68 ± 0.31 m²·c⁻¹·s⁻¹; 1.83 ± 0.27 m²·c⁻¹·s⁻¹; 1.85 ± 0.27 m²·c⁻¹·s⁻¹), η(p) (0.32 ± 0.04; 0.33 ± 0.03; 0.33 ± 0.04), and V̇O2max (38.71 ± 3.44 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹; 43.43 ± 3.71 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹; 43.95 ± 7.02 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) have changed significantly throughout the season (TP1, TP2, and TP3, respectively) in female swimmers. In male, significant changes were found in η(p) (0.33 ± 0.07; 0.36 ± 0.05; 0.36 ± 0.06) and V̇O2max (41.65 ± 7.30 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹; 45.19 ± 6.55 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹; 50.19 ± 9.65 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) over the season (TP1, TP2, and TP3, respectively). Gender presented a significant effect on SL (TP2: η(p)² = 0.29; TP3: η(p)² = 0.37), SI (TP2: η(p)² = 0.25), and La(peak) (TP3: η(p)² = 0.42). v4 (TP1: η(p)² = 0.23), SL (TP1: η(p)² = 0.46), SI (TP1: η(p)² = 0.78; TP2: η(p)² = 0.37; TP3:

  11. Effect of plyometric training on swimming block start performance in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Daniel C; Smith, Russell J; Smith, Mark F; Rigby, Hannah E

    2009-10-01

    This study aimed to identify the effect of plyometric training (PT), when added to habitual training (HT) regimes, on swim start performance. After the completion of a baseline competitive swim start, 22 adolescent swimmers were randomly assigned to either a PT (n = 11, age: 13.1 +/- 1.4 yr, mass: 50.6 +/- 12.3 kg, stature: 162.9 +/- 11.9 cm) or an HT group (n = 11, age: 12.6 +/- 1.9 yr, mass: 43.3 +/- 11.6 kg, stature: 157.6 +/- 11.9 cm). Over an 8-week preseason period, the HT group continued with their normal training program, whereas the PT group added 2 additional 1-hour plyometric-specific sessions, incorporating prescribed exercises relating to the swimming block start (SBS). After completion of the training intervention, post-training swim start performance was reassessed. For both baseline and post-trials, swim performance was recorded using videography (50 Hz Canon MVX460) in the sagital plane of motion. Through the use of Silicon Coach Pro analysis package, data revealed significantly greater change between baseline and post-trials for PT when compared with the HT group for swim performance time to 5.5 m (-0.59 s vs. -0.21 s; p importance of a successful swim start to overall performance outcome, the current study has found that inclusion of suitable and safely implemented PT to adolescent performers, in addition to HT routines, can have a positive impact on swim start performance.

  12. The determination of the swimming performance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under the effect of detergent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esenbuǧa, Hülya; Alak, Gonca; Atamanalp, Muhammed

    2017-04-01

    Detergent residues can lead to continuous damage in the cell membranes and make them become sensitive to the harmful effects of other toxic substances and infection factors. In this study, the behavioral responses of rainbow trout have been studied at the end of 21 days, where they have been exposed to different concentrations of Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS). In the fish which have been exposed to two different doses of SDS material, the swimming performance has been examined for behavior analysis with emphasis on critical swimming speed. The effect of SDS on critical swimming speed has been found to be significant (p <0.05).

  13. Sustainable Transport and Performance Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    in forecasting and tracking the performance of transport systems increasingly guide sustainable transport policy making. This review explores the implications of the sustainable transport” concept and how it can be made operational with indicators. A number of indicator systems are reviewed, and some strengths......Sustainable transport has become a major policy concern in recent years. The term suggests a need to consider transport in a comprehensive perspective including the well-being of both present and future generations, and taking environmental, social and economic issues into account. Indicators...

  14. Sustainable Transport and Performance Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, H.

    2004-01-01

    ustainable transport has become a major policy concern in recent years. The term suggests a need to consider transport in a comprehensive perspective including the well-being of both present and future generations, and taking environmental, social and economic issues into account. Indicators...... in forecasting and tracking the performance of transport systems increasingly guide sustainable transport policy making. This review explores the implications of the "sustainable transport" concept and how it can be made operational with indicators. A number of indicator systems are reviewed, and some strengths...... and weaknesses are highlighted with regard to the support they provide for sustainable transport development....

  15. Growth-promoting effects of sustained swimming in fingerlings of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Josefina; Moya, A; Millán-Cubillo, A; Vélez, E J; Capilla, E; Pérez-Sánchez, J; Gutiérrez, J; Fernández-Borrás, J

    2015-12-01

    Fish growth is strongly influenced by environmental and nutritional factors and changing culture conditions can help optimize it. The importance of early-life experience on the muscle phenotype later in life is well known. Here, we study the effects of 5 weeks of moderate and sustained swimming activity (5 BL s(-1)) in gilthead sea bream during early development. We analysed growth and body indexes, plasma IGF-I and GH levels, feed conversion, composition [proximate and isotopic ((15)N/(13)C)] and metabolic key enzymes (COX, CS, LDH, HOAD, HK, ALAT, ASAT) of white muscle. Moderate and continuous exercise in fingerlings of gilthead sea bream increased plasma IGF-I, whereas it reduced plasma GH. Under these conditions, growth rate improved without any modification to feed intake through an increase in muscle mass and a reduction in mesenteric fat deposits. There were no changes in the content and turnover of muscle proteins and lipid reserves. Glycogen stores were maintained, but glycogen turnover was higher in white muscle of exercised fish. A lower LDH/CS ratio demonstrated an improvement in the aerobic capacity of white muscle, while a reduction in the COX/CS ratio possibly indicated a functional adaptation of mitochondria to adjust to the tissue-specific energy demand and metabolic fuel availability in exercised fish. We discuss the synergistic effects of dietary nutrients and sustained exercise on the different mitochondrial responses.

  16. Assessment of Body Composition and Sport Performance of Brazilian Paralympic Swim Team Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Radamés M V; Alves, Eduardo S; Lemos, Valdir A; Schwingel, Paulo A; da Silva, Andressa; Vital, Roberto; Vieira, Alexandre S; Barreto, Murilo M; Rocha, Edilson A; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco T

    2016-12-01

    Body-composition assessments of high-performance athletes are very important for identifying physical performance potential. Although the relationship between the kinanthropometric characteristics and performance abilities of Olympic swimmers is extremely important, this subject is not completely understood for Paralympic swimmers. To investigate the relationship between body composition and sport performance in Brazilian Paralympic swimmers 6 mo after training. Experimental pre/posttest design. Research laboratory and field evaluations of swimming were conducted to verify the 50-m freestyle time of each athlete. 17 Brazilian Paralympic swim team athletes (12 men, 5 women). Body-composition assessments were performed using a BOD POD, and swimming performance was assessed using the 50-m freestyle, which was performed twice: before and after 6 mo of training. Increased lean mass and significantly reduced relative fat mass and swimming time (P .05). After a 6-mo training period, Paralympic swimmers presented reduced fat mass and increased lean body mass associated with performance, as measured by 50-m freestyle time. These data suggest that reduced fat-mass percentage was significantly correlated with improved swimming performance in Paralympic athletes.

  17. Board diversity and sustainability performance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kirstam

    quantitative comparative analysis, and a longitudinal design in the form of a trend analysis to compare the differences in board composition between a sample of sustainability performing companies and a sample of other companies listed on the FTSE/JSE All Share Index between 2004 and 2010. Inclusion on the Social ...

  18. Performance sustaining intracortical neural prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyujukian, Paul; Kao, Jonathan C.; Fan, Joline M.; Stavisky, Sergey D.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Neural prostheses, or brain-machine interfaces, aim to restore efficient communication and movement ability to those suffering from paralysis. A major challenge these systems face is robust performance, particularly with aging signal sources. The aim in this study was to develop a neural prosthesis that could sustain high performance in spite of signal instability while still minimizing retraining time. Approach. We trained two rhesus macaques implanted with intracortical microelectrode arrays 1-4 years prior to this study to acquire targets with a neurally-controlled cursor. We measured their performance via achieved bitrate (bits per second, bps). This task was repeated over contiguous days to evaluate the sustained performance across time. Main results. We found that in the monkey with a younger (i.e., two year old) implant and better signal quality, a fixed decoder could sustain performance for a month at a rate of 4 bps, the highest achieved communication rate reported to date. This fixed decoder was evaluated across 22 months and experienced a performance decline at a rate of 0.24 bps yr-1. In the monkey with the older (i.e., 3.5 year old) implant and poorer signal quality, a fixed decoder could not sustain performance for more than a few days. Nevertheless, performance in this monkey was maintained for two weeks without requiring additional online retraining time by utilizing prior days’ experimental data. Upon analysis of the changes in channel tuning, we found that this stability appeared partially attributable to the cancelling-out of neural tuning fluctuations when projected to two-dimensional cursor movements. Significance. The findings in this study (1) document the highest-performing communication neural prosthesis in monkeys, (2) confirm and extend prior reports of the stability of fixed decoders, and (3) demonstrate a protocol for system stability under conditions where fixed decoders would otherwise fail. These improvements to decoder

  19. Effects of loss of visual feedback on performance of two swimming strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciarella, C F

    1982-12-01

    20 subjects, aged 11 to 21 yr., skilled in competitive swimming in both the crawl and the breaststroke, performed a total of 8 timed swimming trials of 25 yd. in both strokes both with and without blindfolds to test the hypothesis that the loss in performance which would occur with loss of visual feedback is related to the complexity of the motor skill being performed. After correction for differences in the speed of each stroke, the loss in speed (performance decrement) in the more complex stroke (crawl) was significantly greater than the decrement in the less complex (breast) stroke.

  20. Swimming physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmér, I

    1992-05-01

    Swimming takes place in a medium, that presents different gravitational and resistive forces, respiratory conditions and thermal stress compared to air. The energy cost of propulsion in swimming is high, but a considerable reduction occurs at a given velocity as result of regular swim training. In medley swimmers the energy cost is lowest for front crawl, followed by backstroke, butterfly and breast-stroke. Cardiac output is probably not limiting for performance since swimmers easily achieve higher values during running. Maximal heart rate, however, is lowered by approx. 10 beats/min during swimming compared to running. Most likely active muscle mass is smaller and rate of power production lesser in swimming. Local factors, such as peripheral circulation, capillary density, perfusion pressure and metabolic capacity of active muscles, are important determinants of the power production capacity and emphasize the role of swim specific training movements. Improved swimming technique and efficiency are likely to explain much of the continuous progress in performance. Rational principles based on improved understanding of the biomechanics and physiology of swimming should be guidelines for swimmers and coaches in their efforts to explore the limits of human performance.

  1. Relationship Between Vertical Jump Height and Swimming Start Performance Before and After an Altitude Training Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Padial, Paulino; de la Fuente, Blanca; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan; Feriche, Belén

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed (a) to analyze the development in the squat jump height and swimming start performance after an altitude training camp, (b) to correlate the jump height and swimming start performance before and after the altitude training period, and (c) to correlate the percent change in the squat jump height with the percent change in swimming start performance. Fifteen elite male swimmers from the Spanish Junior National Team (17.1 ± 0.8 years) were tested before and after a 17-day training camp at moderate altitude. The height reached in the squat jump exercise with additional loads of 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% of swimmers' pretest body weight and swimming start performance (time to 5, 10, and 15 m) were the dependent variables analyzed. Significant increases in the jump height (p ≤ 0.05; effect size [ES]: 0.35-0.48) and swimming start performance (p jump height before training (r = -0.56 to -0.77) and after training (r = -0.50 to -0.71). The change in the squat jump height was inversely correlated with the change in the start time at 5 m (r = -0.47), 10 m (r = -0.73), and 15 m (r = -0.62). These results suggest that altitude training can be suitable to enhance explosive performance. The correlations obtained between the squat jump height and start time in the raw and change scores confirm the relevance of having high levels of lower-body muscular power to optimize swimming start performance.

  2. The effect of substratum type on aspects of swimming performance and behaviour in shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, L E; Kieffer, J D

    2017-01-01

    The swimming performance and associated swimming behaviour (i.e. substratum-skimming, station-holding and free swimming) were assessed in shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum during critical swimming and endurance swimming tests over a rough and a smooth substratum. It was hypothesized that the addition of a rough substratum in the swimming flume may provide a surface for the A. brevirostrum to grip and offer an energetic advantage. Substratum type did not affect the critical swimming performance, but A. brevirostrum consistently performed more bottom behaviours (i.e. substratum-skimming and station-holding) while on a smooth substratum. Acipenser brevirostrum had little contact with the rough substratum until the velocity was >1 body length s(-1) . Endurance swimming time was significantly lower for A. brevirostrum over the rough bottom at the highest velocity (30 cm s(-1) ) which may be attributed to the observed increase in free swimming and decrease in bottom behaviours. During endurance swimming, the rough substratum was mainly used at intermediate velocities, suggesting that there may be a stability cost associated with being in contact with the rough substratum at certain velocities. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  3. Effects of In-Water Passive Recovery on Sprint Swimming Performance and Heart Rate in Adolescent Swimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Casuso, Rafael A.; Emilio Martínez-López, Fidel Hita-Contreras, Irene Ruiz-Cazalilla, David Cruz-Díaz, Antonio Martínez-Amat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to test the hypothesis that sprint swimming performance is enhanced by in-water passive recovery (IN) after sprint swimming bouts in well-trained adolescent swimmers. Using a randomized crossover study design, twelve well-trained adolescent swimmers performed two tests at the swimming pool after preliminary testing. They performed 5 bouts of 100m all-out swimming separated by 5 minutes of passive rest. Their individual in- or out-of-water passive recovery condi...

  4. The ontogenetic scaling of hydrodynamics and swimming performance in jellyfish (Aurelia aurita).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Matthew J; Jed, Jason

    2003-11-01

    It is not well understood how ontogenetic changes in the motion and morphology of aquatic animals influence the performance of swimming. The goals of the present study were to understand how changes in size, shape and behavior affect the hydrodynamics of jet propulsion in the jellyfish Aurelia aurita and to explore how such changes affect the ontogenetic scaling of swimming speed and cost of transport. We measured the kinematics of jellyfish swimming from video recordings and simulated the hydrodynamics of swimming with two computational models that calculated thrust generation by paddle and jet mechanisms. Our results suggest that thrust is generated primarily by jetting and that there is negligible thrust generation by paddling. We examined how fluid forces scaled with body mass using the jet model. Despite an ontogenetic increase in the range of motion by the bell diameter and a decrease in the height-to-diameter ratio, we found that thrust and acceleration reaction scaled with body mass as predicted by kinematic similarity. However, jellyfish decreased their pulse frequency with growth, and speed consequently scaled at a lower exponential rate than predicted by kinematic similarity. Model simulations suggest that the allometric growth in Aurelia results in swimming that is slower, but more energetically economical, than isometric growth with a prolate bell shape. The decrease in pulse frequency over ontogeny allows large Aurelia medusae to avoid a high cost of transport but generates slower swimming than if they maintained a high pulse frequency. Our findings suggest that ontogenetic change in the height-to-diameter ratio and pulse frequency of Aurelia results in swimming that is relatively moderate in speed but is energetically economical.

  5. The association of muscle strength, aerobic capacity and swim time performance in young, competitive swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, P; Knudsen, H K; Juul-Kristensen, B

    for performance enhancement in swimming (Smith et al., 2002). In order to detail the individual training programme, reference values are needed. The aims of this study were firstly to determine the association between muscle strength and power, aerobic capacity and 100 m freestyle time (FT) in young, competitive...... swimmers, and secondly to determine reference values for these physiological factors. Methods In total, 119 competitive swimmers aged 11-15 years were assessed with Grip Strength (GS), Vertical Jump (VJ) and an intermittent running test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake, the Andersen Test (AT). Swim time......, including data on reference values for each test, may be considered in order to improve dry-land training prescription, thereby supporting the enhancing swimming performance in young, competitive swimmers...

  6. Application of regression and neural models to predict competitive swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maszczyk, Adam; Roczniok, Robert; Waśkiewicz, Zbigniew; Czuba, Miłosz; Mikołajec, Kazimierz; Zajac, Adam; Stanula, Arkadiusz

    2012-04-01

    This research problem was indirectly but closely connected with the optimization of an athlete-selection process, based on predictions viewed as determinants of future successes. The research project involved a group of 249 competitive swimmers (age 12 yr., SD = 0.5) who trained and competed for four years. Measures involving fitness (e.g., lung capacity), strength (e.g., standing long jump), swimming technique (turn, glide, distance per stroke cycle), anthropometric variables (e.g., hand and foot size), as well as specific swimming measures (speeds in particular distances), were used. The participants (n = 189) trained from May 2008 to May 2009, which involved five days of swimming workouts per week, and three additional 45-min. sessions devoted to measurements necessary for this study. In June 2009, data from two groups of 30 swimmers each (n = 60) were used to identify predictor variables. Models were then constructed from these variables to predict final swimming performance in the 50 meter and 800 meter crawl events. Nonlinear regression models and neural models were built for the dependent variable of sport results (performance at 50m and 800m). In May 2010, the swimmers' actual race times for these events were compared to the predictions created a year prior to the beginning of the experiment. Results for the nonlinear regression models and perceptron networks structured as 8-4-1 and 4-3-1 indicated that the neural models overall more accurately predicted final swimming performance from initial training, strength, fitness, and body measurements. Differences in the sum of absolute error values were 4:11.96 (n = 30 for 800m) and 20.39 (n = 30 for 50m), for models structured as 8-4-1 and 4-3-1, respectively, with the neural models being more accurate. It seems possible that such models can be used to predict future performance, as well as in the process of recruiting athletes for specific styles and distances in swimming.

  7. Influence of short-term inertial training on swimming performance in young swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naczk, Mariusz; Lopacinski, Artur; Brzenczek-Owczarzak, Wioletta; Arlet, Jarosław; Naczk, Alicja; Adach, Zdzisław

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of dry-land inertial training (IT) on muscle force, muscle power, and swimming performance. Fourteen young, national-level, competitive swimmers were randomly divided into IT and control (C) groups. The experiment lasted four weeks, during which time both groups underwent their regular swimming training. In addition, the IT group underwent IT using the Inertial Training Measurement System (ITMS) three times per week. The muscle groups involved during the upsweep phase of the arm stroke in front crawl and butterfly stroke were trained. Before and after training, muscle force and power were measured under IT conditions. Simultaneously with the biomechanical measurements on the ITMS, the electrical activity of the triceps brachii was registered. After four weeks of training, a 12.8% increase in the muscle force and 14.2% increase in the muscle power (p swimming velocity in the 100 m butterfly and 50 m freestyle improved significantly following the four weeks of dry-land IT (-1.86% and -0.76%, respectively). Changes in the C group were trivial. Moreover, values of force and power registered during the ITMS test correlated negatively with the 100 m butterfly and 50 m freestyle swimming times (r value ranged from -.80 to -.91). These results suggest that IT can be useful in swimming practice.

  8. Inertial Sensor Technology for Elite Swimming Performance Analysis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Robert; Corley, Gavin; Godfrey, Alan; Quinlan, Leo R; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2015-01-01

    Technical evaluation of swimming performance is an essential factor of elite athletic preparation. Novel methods of analysis, incorporating body worn inertial sensors (i.e., Microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS, accelerometers and gyroscopes), have received much attention recently from both research and commercial communities as an alternative to video-based approaches. This technology may allow for improved analysis of stroke mechanics, race performance and energy expenditure, as well as real-time feedback to the coach, potentially enabling more efficient, competitive and quantitative coaching. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the literature related to the use of inertial sensors for the technical analysis of swimming performance. This paper focuses on providing an evaluation of the accuracy of different feature detection algorithms described in the literature for the analysis of different phases of swimming, specifically starts, turns and free-swimming. The consequences associated with different sensor attachment locations are also considered for both single and multiple sensor configurations. Additional information such as this should help practitioners to select the most appropriate systems and methods for extracting the key performance related parameters that are important to them for analysing their swimmers’ performance and may serve to inform both applied and research practices. PMID:26712760

  9. Physiological, biomechanical and anthropometrical predictors of sprint swimming performance in adolescent swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lätt, Evelin; Jürimäe, Jaak; Mäestu, Jarek; Purge, Priit; Rämson, Raul; Haljaste, Kaja; Keskinen, Kari L; Rodriguez, Ferran A; Jürimäe, Toivo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between 100-m front crawl swimming performance and relevant biomechanical, anthropometrical and physiological parameters in male adolescent swimmers. Twenty five male swimmers (mean ± SD: age 15. 2 ± 1.9 years; height 1.76 ± 0.09 m; body mass 63.3 ± 10.9 kg) performed an all-out 100-m front crawl swimming test in a 25-m pool. A respiratory snorkel and valve system with low hydrodynamic resistance was used to collect expired air. Oxygen uptake was measured breath-by-breath by a portable metabolic cart. Swimming velocity, stroke rate (SR), stroke length and stroke index (SI) were assessed during the test by time video analysis. Blood samples for lactate measurement were taken from the fingertip pre exercise and at the third and fifth minute of recovery to estimate net blood lactate accumulation (ΔLa). The energy cost of swimming was estimated from oxygen uptake and blood lactate energy equivalent values. Basic anthropometry included body height, body mass and arm span. Body composition parameters were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results indicate that biomechanical factors (90.3%) explained most of 100-m front crawl swimming performance variability in these adolescent male swimmers, followed by anthropometrical (45.8%) and physiological (45.2%) parameters. SI was the best single predictor of performance, while arm span and ∆La were the best anthropometrical and physiological indicators, respectively. SI and SR alone explained 92.6% of the variance in competitive performance. These results confirm the importance of considering specific stroke technical parameters when predicting success in young swimmers. Key pointsThis study investigated the influence of different anthropometrical, physiological and biomechanical parameters on 100-m swimming performance in adolescent boys.Biomechanical factors contributed most to sprint swimming performance in these young male swimmers (90

  10. Accomplishments and Compromises in Prediction Research for World Records and Best Performances in Track and Field and Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanlong; Paul, Stanley; Fu, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    The conductors of this study reviewed prediction research and studied the accomplishments and compromises in predicting world records and best performances in track and field and swimming. The results of the study showed that prediction research only promises to describe the historical trends in track and field and swimming performances, to study…

  11. Effects of cadmium on skeletal muscles and swimming performance of Danio rerio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Agnisola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the physiological and cytological effects of an environmentally realistic concentration of cadmium on muscles organization and swimming performance of Danio rerio. Results indicate that the ion reduces the Ucrit and that this effects is probably related to the  resorbtion of myofibrils observed in red and white muscles.

  12. Warm water and cool nests are best. How global warming might influence hatchling green turtle swimming performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T Booth

    Full Text Available For sea turtles nesting on beaches surrounded by coral reefs, the most important element of hatchling recruitment is escaping predation by fish as they swim across the fringing reef, and as a consequence hatchlings that minimize their exposure to fish predation by minimizing the time spent crossing the fringing reef have a greater chance of surviving the reef crossing. One way to decrease the time required to cross the fringing reef is to maximize swimming speed. We found that both water temperature and nest temperature influence swimming performance of hatchling green turtles, but in opposite directions. Warm water increases swimming ability, with hatchling turtles swimming in warm water having a faster stroke rate, while an increase in nest temperature decreases swimming ability with hatchlings from warm nests producing less thrust per stroke.

  13. PHYSIOLOGICAL, BIOMECHANICAL AND ANTHROPOMETRICAL PREDICTORS OF SPRINT SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN ADOLESCENT SWIMMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelin Lätt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between 100-m front crawl swimming performance and relevant biomechanical, anthropometrical and physiological parameters in male adolescent swimmers. Twenty five male swimmers (mean ± SD: age 15. 2 ± 1.9 years; height 1.76 ± 0.09 m; body mass 63.3 ± 10.9 kg performed an all-out 100-m front crawl swimming test in a 25-m pool. A respiratory snorkel and valve system with low hydrodynamic resistance was used to collect expired air. Oxygen uptake was measured breath-by-breath by a portable metabolic cart. Swimming velocity, stroke rate (SR, stroke length and stroke index (SI were assessed during the test by time video analysis. Blood samples for lactate measurement were taken from the fingertip pre exercise and at the third and fifth minute of recovery to estimate net blood lactate accumulation (?La. The energy cost of swimming was estimated from oxygen uptake and blood lactate energy equivalent values. Basic anthropometry included body height, body mass and arm span. Body composition parameters were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA. Results indicate that biomechanical factors (90.3% explained most of 100-m front crawl swimming performance variability in these adolescent male swimmers, followed by anthropometrical (45.8% and physiological (45.2% parameters. SI was the best single predictor of performance, while arm span and ∆La were the best anthropometrical and physiological indicators, respectively. SI and SR alone explained 92.6% of the variance in competitive performance. These results confirm the importance of considering specific stroke technical parameters when predicting success in young swimmers.

  14. Evidencing the association between swimming capacities and performance indicators in water polo: a multiple regression study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontic, Dean; Zenic, Natasa; Uljevic, Ognjen; Sekulic, Damir; Lesnik, Blaz

    2017-06-01

    Swimming capacities are hypothesized to be important determinants of water polo performance but there is an evident lack of studies examining different swimming capacities in relation to specific offensive and defensive performance variables in this sport. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between five swimming capacities and six performance determinants in water polo. The sample comprised 79 high-level youth water polo players (all males, 17-18 years of age). The variables included six performance-related variables (agility in offence and defense, efficacy in offence and defense, polyvalence in offence and defense), and five swimming-capacity tests (water polo sprint test [15 m], swimming sprint test [25 m], short-distance [100 m], aerobic endurance [400 m] and an anaerobic lactate endurance test [4× 50 m]). First, multiple regressions were calculated for one-half of the sample of subjects which were then validated with the remaining half of the sample. The 25-m swim was not included in the regression analyses due to the multicollinearity with other predictors. The originally calculated regression models were validated for defensive agility (R=0.67 and R=0.55 for the original regression calculation and validation subsample, respectively) offensive agility (R=0.59 and R=0.61), and offensive efficacy (R=0.64 and R=0.58). Anaerobic lactate endurance is a significant predictor of offensive and defensive agility, while 15 m sprint significantly contributes to offensive efficacy. Swimming capacities are not found to be related to the polyvalence of the players. The most superior offensive performance can be expected from those players with a high level of anaerobic lactate endurance and advanced sprinting capacity, while anaerobic lactate endurance is recognized as most important quality in defensive duties. Future studies should observe players' polyvalence in relation to (theoretical) knowledge of technical and tactical tasks. Results reinforce

  15. The Effect of an Adapted Swimming Program on the Performance of an Individual with Kyphosis-Scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrios, Voutsas; Dimitrios, Kokaridas

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to examine the effect of an adapted swimming program in terms of improving the performance and behaviour of an individual with kyphosis-scoliosis, with the use of an individualised education approach. The sample consisted of an adult woman with kyphosis-scoliosis. The pre-swimming phase included a…

  16. Proactive sustainability strategy and corporate sustainability performance: The mediating effect of sustainability control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijethilake, Chaminda

    2017-07-01

    This study examines to what extent corporations use sustainability control systems (SCS) to translate proactive sustainability strategy into corporate sustainability performance. The study investigates the mediating effect of SCS on the relationship between proactive sustainability strategy and corporate sustainability performance. Survey data were collected from top managers in 175 multinational and local corporations operating in Sri Lanka and analyzed using Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM). SCS were observed to only partially mediate the relationship between proactive sustainability strategy and corporate sustainability performance. The mediating effect of SCS is further examined under three sustainability strategies; environmental and social strategies reveal a partial mediation, while the economic strategy exhibits no mediation. The study also finds that (i) a proactive sustainability strategy is positively associated with SCS and corporate sustainability performance and (ii) SCS are positively associated with corporate sustainability performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of pacing manipulation on performance of juniors in simulated 400-m swim competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorski, Sabrina; Faude, Oliver; Abbiss, Chris R; Caviezel, Seraina; Wengert, Nina; Meyer, Tim

    2014-09-01

    To date, there has been limited research examining the influence of pacing pattern (PP) on middle-distance swimming performance. As such, the purpose of the current study was to examine the influence of PP manipulation on 400-m freestyle swimming performance. 15 front-crawl swimmers (5 female, 10 male; age 18 ± 2 y) performed 3 simulated 400-m swimming events. The initial trial was self-selected pacing (PPSS). The following 2 trials were performed in a counterbalanced order and required participants to complete the first 100 m more slowly (PPSLOW: 4.5% ± 2.2%) or quickly (PPFAST: 2.4% ± 1.6%) than the PPSS trial. 50-m split times were recorded during each trial. Overall performance time was faster in PPSS (275.0 ± 15.9 s) than in PPFAST (278.5 ± 16.4 s, P = .05) but not significantly different from PPSLOW (277.5 ± 16.2 s, P = .22). However, analysis for practical relevance revealed that pacing manipulation resulted in a "likely" (>88.2%) decrease in performance compared with PPSS. Moderate manipulation of the starting speed during simulated 400-m freestyle races seems to affect overall performance. The observed results indicate that PPSS is optimal in most individuals, yet it seems to fail in some swimmers. Future research should focus on the identification of athletes possibly profiting from manipulations.

  18. Oxygen Consumption and Swimming Performance in Hypoxia-Acclimated Rainbow Trout Salmo Gairdneri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    BUSHNELL, PG; STEFFENSEN, JF; JOHANSEN, K

    1984-01-01

    1. Swimming performance and oxygen consumption of normoxic (control) and hypoxia-acclimated (P002=40 mmHg) rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri Richardson, were monitored at >145, 60 and 40mmHg. 2. Maximum swimming velocity at 40mmHg was reduced from >54.8cm s-1 to 41.4cm s1 in controls and to 40.6 cm s......Hg did not significantly change oxygen consumption in control animals, although no fish (control or hypoxia acclimated) completed swimming trials at 54.8cm s-1 in 40mmHg. 5. Oxygen consumption of hypoxia-acclimated fish at 5.5cm s-1 and 40 mmHg was significantly higher than oxygen uptake in normoxia...... at the same speed. This relative increase was not maintained, however, as oxygen consumption at higher swimming speeds was similar to that in normoxia. 6. Blood studies showed that hypoxia-acclimated fish had lower ATP concentrations and P50 values. While these factors may increase the blood oxygen loading...

  19. The kinematic determinants of anuran swimming performance: an inverse and forward dynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Christopher T

    2008-10-01

    The aims of this study were to explore the hydrodynamic mechanism of Xenopus laevis swimming and to describe how hind limb kinematics shift to control swimming performance. Kinematics of the joints, feet and body were obtained from high speed video of X. laevis frogs (N=4) during swimming over a range of speeds. A blade element approach was used to estimate thrust produced by both translational and rotational components of foot velocity. Peak thrust from the feet ranged from 0.09 to 0.69 N across speeds ranging from 0.28 to 1.2 m s(-1). Among 23 swimming strokes, net thrust impulse from rotational foot motion was significantly higher than net translational thrust impulse, ranging from 6.1 to 29.3 N ms, compared with a range of -7.0 to 4.1 N ms from foot translation. Additionally, X. laevis kinematics were used as a basis for a forward dynamic anuran swimming model. Input joint kinematics were modulated to independently vary the magnitudes of foot translational and rotational velocity. Simulations predicted that maximum swimming velocity (among all of the kinematics patterns tested) requires that maximal translational and maximal rotational foot velocity act in phase. However, consistent with experimental kinematics, translational and rotational motion contributed unequally to total thrust. The simulation powered purely by foot translation reached a lower peak stroke velocity than the pure rotational case (0.38 vs 0.54 m s(-1)). In all simulations, thrust from the foot was positive for the first half of the power stroke, but negative for the second half. Pure translational foot motion caused greater negative thrust (70% of peak positive thrust) compared with pure rotational simulation (35% peak positive thrust) suggesting that translational motion is propulsive only in the early stages of joint extension. Later in the power stroke, thrust produced by foot rotation overcomes negative thrust (due to translation). Hydrodynamic analysis from X. laevis as well as forward

  20. Effect of morphological fin curl on the swimming performance and station-holding ability of juvenile shovelnose sturgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, David; Johnston, Ryan; Chipps, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the effect of fin-curl on the swimming and station-holding ability of juvenile shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus (mean fork length = 17 cm; mean weight = 16 g; n = 21) using a critical swimming speed test performed in a small swim chamber (90 L) at 20°C. We quantified fin-curl severity using the pectoral fin index. Results showed a positive relationship between pectoral fin index and critical swimming speed indicative of reduced swimming performance displayed by fish afflicted with a pectoral fin index curl severity, however, did not affect the station-holding ability of individual fish. Rather, fish affected with severe fin-curl were likely unable to use their pectoral fins to position their body adequately in the water column, which led to the early onset of fatigue. Results generated from this study should serve as an important consideration for future stocking practices.

  1. Comparison of modes of feedback on glide performance in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Jacqueline L; Naemi, Roozbeh; Sanders, Ross H

    2012-01-01

    The software product "GlideCoach" was recently developed to give quantitative and qualitative feedback on the glide performance of a swimmer (Naemi & Sanders, 2008 ). This study compared the effect of feedback on glide performance from GlideCoach with video and verbal feedback. Nineteen elite swimmers were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Group 1 and 2 included six swimmers and Group 3 included seven swimmers. All participants performed ten dives in each of five sessions. Each group received one of three forms of feedback (video, video and verbal, and GlideCoach and verbal) for four sessions. In the fifth, retest session, performed 4 weeks after the fourth session, all groups received GlideCoach and verbal feedback only. This enabled the analysis of GlideCoach and verbal feedback on performance of the groups that had not yet received this feedback and assessment of the retention ability for the group that had. Feedback resulted in all groups recording an improvement, as indicated by effect sizes, for average velocity, glide factor (related to resistive drag), and initial velocity (P feedback was greater than that of the two other feedback methods for all variables of interest (P feedback methods. We conclude that GlideCoach feedback is effective in improving glide performance.

  2. Function of the medial red muscle during sustained swimming in common thresher sharks: contrast and convergence with thunniform swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Diego; Donley, Jeanine M; McGillivray, David G; Aalbers, Scott A; Syme, Douglas A; Sepulveda, Chugey

    2010-04-01

    Through convergent evolution tunas and lamnid sharks share thunniform swimming and a medial position of the red, aerobic swimming musculature. During continuous cruise swimming these muscles move uniformly out of phase with local body curvature and the surrounding white muscle tissue. This design results in thrust production primarily from the caudal fin rather than causing whole-body undulations. The common thresher shark (Family Alopiidae) is the only other fish known to share the same medial red muscle anatomy as the thunniform swimmers. However, the overall body shape and extremely heterocercal caudal fin of the common thresher is not shared with the thunniform swimmers, which have both fusiform bodies and high aspect-ratio, lunate caudal fins. Our study used sonomicrometry to measure the dynamics of red and white muscle movement in common thresher sharks swimming in the ocean to test whether the medial position of red muscle is associated with uncoupling of muscle shortening and local body bending as characteristic of thunniform swimmers. Common threshers ( approximately 60-100kg) instrumented with sonomicrometric and electromyographic (EMG) leads swam alongside of the vessel with a tail-beat frequency of approximately 0.5Hz. EMG signals confirmed that only the red muscle was active during sustained swimming. Despite the more medial position of the red muscle relative to the white muscle, its strain was approximately 1.5-times greater than that of the overlying white muscle, and there was a notable phase shift between strain trajectories in the red muscle and adjacent white muscle. These results suggest an uncoupling (shearing) of the red muscle from the adjacent white muscle. Although the magnitude of the phase shift between red and white muscle strain was relatively constant within individuals, it varied among sharks, ranging from near zero (red and white in phase) to almost 180 degrees out of phase. This extent in variability has not been documented

  3. Influence of massage, active and passive recovery on swimming performance and blood lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Rasooli, S; Koushkie Jahromi, M; Asadmanesh, A; Salesi, M

    2012-04-01

    Recovery is an important part of athletic training. The aim of this study was to evaluate influences of three methods of recovery including massage, active and passive recovery on blood lactate concentration and subsequent swimming performance of elite swimmers. Seventeen professional male swimmers (age:21± 2.4 years, height: 175.35±9.1 cm, weight: 67.66± 11.88 kg) voluntarily participated in this study. Two Swimming trials performed in every session which involved 200 m of front crawl swimming with maximal effort separated by ten minutes interval (recovery) period. Statistical method of repeated measures was used for analysis of data. There was significant difference in blood lactate after three types of recovery (Pmassage (P=0.031) and active and massage (P=0.001). Blood lactate decreased after active, massage and passive recovery (blood lactate mean ± SD: 5.72±1.44, 7.10±1.27, 10.94±2.05 mmol/L, respectively). A significant difference was observed between performance time after three type of delivery (P=0.001, F=2.238). Significant differences was observed between passive and active recovery (P=0.003), passive and massage (P=0.001), but no significant difference was observed between performance time after active and massage recovery (P=1.00). the results indicated that active recovery was more effective than massage and massage was more effective compared to passive recovery in removing blood lactate. Active and massage recovery were more effective in improving swimming performance than passive recovery.

  4. The Relationship Between the Lower-Body Muscular Profile and Swimming Start Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Ramos Amador

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the correlation of different dry land strength and power tests with swimming start performance. Twenty international level female swimmers (age 15.3 ± 1.6 years, FINA point score 709.6 ± 71.1 performed the track freestyle start. Additionally, dry land tests were conducted: a squat (SJ and countermovement jumps (CMJ, b squat jumps with additional resistance equivalent to 25, 50, 75 and 100% of swimmers’ body weight [BW], and c leg extension and leg flexion maximal voluntary isometric contractions. Correlations between dry land tests and start times at 5, 10 and 15 m were quantified through Pearson’s linear correlation coefficients (r. The peak bar velocity reached during the jumps with additional resistance was the variable most correlated to swimming start performance (r = -0.57 to -0.66 at 25%BW; r = -0.57 to -0.72 at 50%BW; r = -0.59 to -0.68 at 75%BW; r = -0.50 to - 0.64 at 100%BW. A few significant correlations between the parameters of the SJ and the CMJ with times of 5 and 10 m were found, and none with the isometric variables. The peak velocity reached during jumps with external loads relative to BW was found a good indicator of swimming start performance.

  5. Performance enhancement in swimming: the effect of mental training with biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Eli, M; Blumenstein, B

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the relationship between mental training with biofeedback and swimmers' performance was investigated. The Wingate five-step approach was used as a mental preparation technique for enhancing the performance among 16-18 year-old pre-elite swimmers. Participants (n = 40) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: (a) experimental--regular training plus the Wingate 5-step mental training program (adapted for swimming), and (b) control--regular training plus relaxing activities. After a baseline measurement, participants were tested on running and swimming five times during a 10-week period. Results indicated that the experimental group improved its performance over time on both running and swimming, with improvement being most substantial during transformation and realisation (steps 4 and 5). In contrast, the control group remained relatively stable on both dependent measures. Results are discussed in reference to previous work on the 5-step approach, including several methodological and theoretical aspects that are particularly relevant to the use of such interventions with other athletic tasks and populations.

  6. 2014 Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-30

    activities through centrally-directed policies and procedures to reduce business travel and increase workplace flexibility through telework , alternative...schedule and telework opportunities. Goal 2: Sustainable Buildings Integration USACE views Sustainable Buildings as an inherently integrated goal...down. USACE plans to execute a Commuter Survey in FY2014. Increase number of employees eligible for telework and/or the total number of days

  7. Winter temperatures decrease swimming performance and limit distributions of tropical damselfishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Jacob L; Steffensen, John F; Jones, Geoffrey P

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs within 10° of the equator generally experience ≤3°C seasonal variation in water temperature. Ectotherms that have evolved in these conditions are therefore expected to exhibit narrow thermal optima and be very sensitive to the greater thermal variability (>6°C) experienced at higher latitudes (≥10°N/S). The impact of increased thermal variability on the fitness and distribution of thermally sensitive reef ectotherms is currently unknown. Here, we examine site-attached planktivorous coral reef damselfishes that rely on their physiological capacity to swim and forage in the water column year round. We focus on 10 species spanning four evolutionarily distinct genera from a region of the Great Barrier Reef that experiences ≥6°C difference between seasons. Four ecologically important indicators showed reduced performance during the winter low (23°C) compared with the summer peak (29°C), with effect sizes varying among species and genera, as follows: (i) the energy available for activity (aerobic scope) was reduced by 35-45% in five species and three genera; (ii) the energetically most efficient swimming speed was reduced by 17% across all species; and (iii) the maximal critical swimming speed and (iv) the gait transition speed (the swimming mode predominantly used for foraging) were reduced by 16-42% in six species spanning all four genera. Comparisons with field surveys within and across latitudes showed that species-specific distributions were strongly correlated with these performance indicators. Species occupy habitats where they can swim faster than prevailing habitat currents year round, and >95% of individuals were observed only in habitats where the gait transition speed can be maintained at or above habitat currents. Thermal fluctuation at higher latitudes appears to reduce performance as well as the possible distribution of species and genera within and among coral reef habitats. Ultimately, thermal variability across latitudes may

  8. Impacts of Deepwater Horizon crude oil exposure on adult mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) swim performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, John D; Mager, Edward M; Hoenig, Ronald H; Benetti, Daniel D; Grosell, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The temporal and geographic attributes of the Deepwater Horizon incident in 2010 likely exposed pelagic game fish species, such as mahi-mahi, to crude oil. Although much of the research assessing the effects of the spill has focused on early life stages of fish, studies examining whole-animal physiological responses of adult marine fish species are lacking. Using swim chamber respirometry, the present study demonstrates that acute exposure to a sublethal concentration of the water accommodated fraction of Deepwater Horizon crude oil results in significant swim performance impacts on young adult mahi-mahi, representing the first report of acute sublethal toxicity on adult pelagic fish in the Gulf of Mexico following the spill. At an exposure concentration of 8.4 ± 0.6 µg L(-1) sum of 50 selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; mean of geometric means ± standard error of the mean), significant decreases in the critical and optimal swimming speeds of 14% and 10%, respectively (p crude oil exposure concentrations and a commercially and ecologically valuable Gulf of Mexico fish species, the present results provide insight into the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on adult pelagic fish. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2613-2622. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  9. PREDICTION VERSUS REALITY: THE USE OF MATHEMATICAL MODELS TO PREDICT ELITE PERFORMANCE IN SWIMMING AND ATHLETICS AT THE OLYMPIC GAMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Heazlewood

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have attempted to predict future Olympic performances in athletics and swimming based on trends displayed in previous Olympic Games. Some have utilised linear models to plot and predict change, whereas others have utilised multiple curve estimation methods based on inverse, sigmoidal, quadratic, cubic, compound, logistic, growth and exponential functions. The non linear models displayed closer fits to the actual data and were used to predict performance changes 10's, 100's and 1000's of years into the future. Some models predicted that in some events male and female times and distances would crossover and females would eventually display superior performance to males. Predictions using mathematical models based on pre-1996 athletics and pre-1998 swimming performances were evaluated based on how closely they predicted sprints and jumps, and freestyle swimming performances for both male and females at the 2000 and 2004 Olympic Games. The analyses revealed predictions were closer for the shorter swimming events where men's 50m and women's 50m and 100m actual times were almost identical to predicted times. For both men and women, as the swim distances increased the accuracy of the predictive model decreased, where predicted times were 4.5-7% faster than actual times achieved. The real trends in some events currently displaying performance declines were not foreseen by the mathematical models, which predicted consistent improvements across all athletic and swimming events selected for in this study

  10. Cyclic Variations in Sustained Human Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aue, William R.; Arruda, James E.; Kass, Steven J.; Stanny, Claudia J.

    2009-01-01

    Biological rhythms play a prominent role in the modulation of human physiology and behavior. [Smith, K., Valentino, D., & Arruda, J. (2003). "Rhythmic oscillations in the performance of a sustained attention task." "Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology," 25, 561-570] suggested that sustained human performance may systematically…

  11. EFFECTS OF SODIUM BICARBONATE INGESTION ON SWIM PERFORMANCE IN YOUTH ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Langfort

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral administration of sodium bicarbonate (300 mg·kg-1 b.w. on swim performance in competitive, (training experience of 6.6 ± 0.6 years youth, (15.1 ± 0.6 years male swimmers. The subjects completed a test trial, in a double blind fashion, on separate days, consisting of 4 x 50m front crawl swims with a 1st minute passive rest interval twice, on two occasions: after ingestion of bicarbonate or placebo, 72 hours apart, at the same time of the day. Blood samples were drawn from the finger tip three times during each trial; upon arrival to the laboratory, 60 min after ingestion of placebo or the sodium bicarbonate solution and after the 4 x 50m test, during the 1st min of recovery. Plasma lactate concentration, blood pH, standard bicarbonate and base excess were evaluated. The total time of the 4 x 50 m test trial improved from 1.54.28 to 1.52.85s, while statistically significant changes in swimming speed were recorded only during the first 50m sprint (1.92 vs. 1.97 m·s-1, p < 0.05. Resting blood concentration of HCO-3 increased following the ingestion of sodium bicarbonate from 25.13 to 28.49 mM (p < 0.05. Sodium bicarbonate intake had a statistically significant effect on resting blood pH (7.33 vs. 7.41, p < .05 as well as on post exercise plasma lactate concentration (11.27 vs. 13.06 mM, p < 0.05. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the ingestion of sodium bicarbonate in youth athletes is an effective buffer during high intensity interval swimming and suggest that such a procedure can be used in youth athletes to increase training intensity as well as swimming performance in competition at distances from 50 to 200 m

  12. Traditional formwork system sustainability performance: experts’ opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher Al-ashwal, Mohammed; Abdullah, Redzuan; Zakaria, Rozana

    2017-11-01

    The traditional formwork system is one of the commonly used systems in concrete construction. It is considered as one of the least observed activities in term of sustainability performance. In this paper, the sustainability performance of the traditional formwork has been assessed by using a multi-criteria assessment tool to facilitate the decision on the sustainability performance measurement. A quantitative five Likert scale survey study using judgemental sampling is employed in this study. A sample of 93 of engineering construction experts, with different fields including contractors, developers, and consultants in the Malaysian context has made the body of the collected primary data. The results show variety in the distribution of the respondents’ working experience. The sustainability performance is considered moderately sustainable by the experts with only given 40.24 % of the overall total score for the three sustainable categories namely environmental, social and economic. Despite the finding that shows that the economic pillar was rated as the most sustainable aspect in comparison to the environmental and social pillars the traditional formwork system sustainability still needs enhancement. Further incorporation of the social and environmental pillars into the concrete construction the sustainability performance of traditional formwork system could be improved.

  13. Analysis of swimming performance in FINA World Cup long-distance open water races.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, Matthias Alexander; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald; Knechtle, Beat

    2014-01-02

    Age and peak performance in ultra-endurance athletes have been mainly investigated in long-distance runners and triathletes, but not for long-distance swimmers. The present study investigated the age and swimming performance of elite ultra-distance swimmers competing in the 5-, 10- and 25-km Fédération Internationale de Natation (FINA) World Cup swimming events. The associations of age and swimming speed in elite male and female swimmers competing in World Cup events of 5-, 10- and 25-km events from 2000 to 2012 were analysed using single and multi-level regression analyses. During the studied period, the swimming speed of the annual top ten women decreased significantly from 4.94 ± 0.20 to 4.77 ± 0.09 km/h in 5 km and from 4.60 ± 0.04 to 4.44 ± 0.08 km/h in 25 km, while it significantly increased from 4.57 ± 0.01 to 5.75 ± 0.01 km/h in 10 km. For the annual top ten men, peak swimming speed decreased significantly from 5.42 ± 0.04 to 5.39 ± 0.02 km/h in 5 km, while it remained unchanged at 5.03 ± 0.32 km/h in 10 km and at 4.94 ± 0.35 km/h in 25 km. The age of peak swimming speed for the annual top ten women remained stable at 22.5 ± 1.2 years in 5 km, at 23.4 ± 0.9 years in 10 km and at 23.8 ± 0.9 years in 25 km. For the annual top ten men, the age of peak swimming speed increased from 23.7 ± 2.8 to 28.0 ± 5.1 years in 10 km but remained stable at 24.8 ± 1.0 years in 5 km and at 27.2 ± 1.1 years in 25 km. Female long-distance swimmers competing in FINA World Cup races between 2000 and 2012 improved in 10 km but impaired in 5 and 25 km, whereas men only impaired in 5 km. The age of peak performance was younger in women (approximately 23 years) compared to men (about 25-27 years).

  14. Effects of In-Water Passive Recovery on Sprint Swimming Performance and Heart Rate in Adolescent Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Casuso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to test the hypothesis that sprint swimming performance is enhanced by in-water passive recovery (IN after sprint swimming bouts in well-trained adolescent swimmers. Using a randomized crossover study design, twelve well-trained adolescent swimmers performed two tests at the swimming pool after preliminary testing. They performed 5 bouts of 100m all-out swimming separated by 5 minutes of passive rest. Their individual in- or out-of-water passive recovery condition was randomized on the first day. In their second visit to the swimming pool the opposite recovery condition was indicated. More than 60% of the subjects which rested in-water were faster in the 5th bout when compared to the OUT group. However, no significant differences were found in blood lactate when IN and OUT were compared. After the first bout peak heart rate (HR peak was lower in subsequent bouts for IN recovery when compared with OUT (p < 0.001. Thus, coaches and researchers should take into account that IN passive recovery may decrease loss of performance and diminish HR peak during sprint swimming bouts. This is particularly important given the use that many coaches give to HR as a tool in daily training.

  15. HEALTHY AND SAFETY SWIMMING

    OpenAIRE

    Suleyman CEYLAN

    2005-01-01

    Swimming is a sport which has own rules, styles, and fields, however, is one of the most performed avocation as amateur and a joke especially at summer months. Although one of the most beneficial sports, swimming can cause a number of several health problems such as infectious diseases, allergic events, or traumas, if it is not done at adequate conditions and eligible style. In this paper, the factors such as preparing to swimming, health and safety features of swimming areas, important healt...

  16. Relationships among traits of aerobic and anaerobic swimming performance in individual European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Marras

    Full Text Available Teleost fishes exhibit wide and temporally stable inter-individual variation in a suite of aerobic and anaerobic locomotor traits. One mechanism that could allow such variation to persist within populations is the presence of tradeoffs between aerobic and anaerobic performance, such that individuals with a high capacity for one type of performance have a reduced capacity for the other. We investigated this possibility in European seabass Dicentrarchuslabrax, each measured for a battery of indicators of maximum locomotor performance. Aerobic traits comprised active metabolic rate, aerobic scope for activity, maximum aerobic swimming speed, and stride length, using a constant acceleration test. Anaerobic traits comprised maximum speed during an escape response, maximum sprint speed, and maximum anaerobic burst speed during constant acceleration. The data provided evidence of significant variation in performance among individuals, but there was no evidence of any trade-offs among any traits of aerobic versus anaerobic swimming performance. Furthermore, the anaerobic traits were not correlated significantly among each other, despite relying on the same muscular structures. Thus, the variation observed may reflect trade-offs with other morphological, physiological or behavioural traits.

  17. Evaluation of swimming performance for fish passage of longnose dace Rhinichthys cataractae using an experimental flume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, D R; McMahon, T E; Kappenman, K M; Blank, M

    2017-03-01

    The swimming performance of longnose dace Rhinichthys cataractae, the most widely distributed minnow (Cyprinidae) in North America, was assessed in relation to potential passage barriers. The study estimated passage success, maximum ascent distances and maximum sprint speed in an open-channel flume over a range of water velocities and temperatures (10·7, 15·3 and 19·3° C). Rhinichthys cataractae had high passage success (95%) in a 9·2 m flume section at mean test velocities of 39 and 64 cm s(-1) , but success rate dropped to 66% at 78 cm s(-1) . Only 20% of fish were able to ascend a 2·7 m section with a mean velocity of 122 cm s(-1) . Rhinichthys cataractae actively selected low-velocity pathways located along the bottom and corners of the flume at all test velocities and adopted position-holding behaviour at higher water velocities. Mean volitional sprint speed was 174 cm s(-1) when fish volitionally sprinted in areas of high water velocities. Swimming performance generally increased with water temperature and fish length. Based on these results, fishways with mean velocities 100 cm s(-1) within structures should be limited to short distance (swimming performance metrics in an open-channel flume, which can simulate the hydraulic features of fishways and allow for behavioural observations that can facilitate the design of effective passage structures. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  18. How Confident Can We Be in Modelling Female Swimming Performance in Adolescence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilo J. Dormehl

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to determine the expected progression of adolescent female swimming performances using a longitudinal approach. The performances of 514 female swimmers (12–19 year olds who participated in one or more FINA-regulated annual international schools’ swimming championships over an eight-year period were analysed. Quadratic functions for each of the seven individual events (50, 100, 200 m freestyle, 100 m backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly, 200 m individual medley were determined using mixed linear models. The predicted threshold of peak performance ranged from 16.8 ± 0.2 (200 m individual medley to 20.6 ± 0.1 (100 m butterfly years of age, preceded by gradual rates of improvement (mean rate of 1.6% per year. However, following cross validation, only three events (100 m backstroke, 200 m individual medley and 200 m freestyle produced reliable models. Identifying the factors that contribute to the progression of female performance in this transitory period of life remains challenging, not least since the onset of puberty is likely to have occurred prior to reaching 12 years of age, the minimum competition age for this championship.

  19. Swimming performance, venous oxygen tension and cardiac performance of coronary-ligated rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, exposed to progressive hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, J F; Farrell, A P

    1998-01-01

    We performed in vivo studies to examine the idea that cardiac work is impaired in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) below a certain venous PO2 threshold. We hypothesized that coronary-ligated fish, swimming continuously at a reasonably high water velocity (1.5 body lengths x s(-1)) and exposed...... to progressive hypoxia, would fatigue at higher venous PO2 and ambient water PO2 compared with sham-operated fish. However, we found that both the lowest venous PO2 that supported hypoxic swimming (9.9 torr for coronary-ligated fish and 11.1 torr for sham-operated fish) and the venous PO2 at fatigue (7.8 torr...... and 8.6 torr, respectively) were the same for coronary-ligated and sham-operated fish. Also, both groups quit swimming at the same water PO2 heart rate and hematocrit. Nevertheless, significant differences in cardiac performance did exist between the two groups. Whereas ventral aortic blood pressure...

  20. THE EFFECT OF 8-WEEK CORE TRAINING ON 100 M BACKSTROKE SWIMMING PERFORMANCE ON 13-15 AGE MALE SWIMMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Gönener

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, It was aimed to investigate the effect of 8-week core training on backstroke swimming style 100 m performance in male swimming group of 13-15 age group. 24 athletes from the Gebze Gençlerbirliği Swimming Club participated in this study. The groups are divided into experiment group and control group randomly as 12 persons per group. During the study, the experimental group participated in core training in addition to swimming for 3 days a week. Control group just participated in swimming training during the survey. The exercises were designed as strength training for core muscles for 8 weeks. 100 m swimming test was used as a test measurement tool. The obtained data from pre and post test comparison was analyzed with Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test in SPSS 21.0 statistical package program. When the pretest and posttest results were compared as intragroup, a statistically significant difference was found in the experimental group (p.05. As a result, it was seen that the core area trained by 8-week core training on 13-15 age male swimmers have a positive effect on 100 m backstroke style performance.

  1. Divergence in physiological factors affecting swimming performance between anadromous and resident populations of brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespel, A; Dupont-Prinet, A; Bernatchez, L; Claireaux, G; Tremblay, R; Audet, C

    2017-05-01

    In this study, an anadromous strain (L) and a freshwater-resident (R) strain of brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis as well as their reciprocal hybrids, were reared in a common environment and submitted to swimming tests combined with salinity challenges. The critical swimming speeds (Ucrit ) of the different crosses were measured in both fresh (FW) and salt water (SW) and the variations in several physiological traits (osmotic, energetic and metabolic capacities) that are predicted to influence swimming performance were documented. Anadromous and resident fish reached the same Ucrit in both FW and SW, with Ucrit being 14% lower in SW compared with FW. The strains, however, seemed to use different underlying strategies: the anadromous strain relied on its streamlined body shape and higher osmoregulatory capacity, while the resident strain had greater citrate synthase (FW) and lactate dehydrogenase (FW, SW) capacity and either greater initial stores or more efficient use of liver (FW, SW) and muscle (FW) glycogen during exercise. Compared with R♀ L♂ hybrids, L♀ R♂ hybrids had a 20% lower swimming speed, which was associated with a 24% smaller cardio-somatic index and higher physiological costs. Thus swimming performance depends on cross direction (i.e. which parental line was used as dam or sire). The study thus suggests that divergent physiological factors between anadromous and resident S. fontinalis may result in similar swimming capacities that are adapted to their respective lifestyles. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. The effects of fasting on swimming performance in juvenile qingbo (Spinibarbus sinensis) at two temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xu; Yuan, Xing-Zhong; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2014-05-01

    We measured the following variables to investigate the effects of fasting and temperature on swimming performance in juvenile qingbo (Spinibarbus sinensis): the critical swimming speed (Ucrit), resting metabolic rate (ṀO2rest) and active metabolic rate (ṀO2active) of fish fasting for 0 (control), 1, 2 and 4 weeks at low and high acclimation temperatures (15 and 25°C). Both fasting treatment and temperature acclimation had significant effects on all parameters measured (PFasting at the higher temperature had a negative effect on all measured parameters after 1 week (Pfasting had a negative effect on Ucrit until week 2 and on (ṀO2rest), (ṀO2active) and metabolic scope (MS, (ṀO2active)-(ṀO2rest)) until week 4 (Pfasting period groups except for (ṀO2rest) of the fish that fasted for 2 weeks. The relationship between fasting time (T) and Ucrit was described as Ucrit(15)=-0.302T(2)-0.800T+35.877 (r=0.781, n=32, Pfasting but more decrease in the later stage at the low temperature compared to the high temperature, which might be related to thermal acclimation time, resting metabolism, respiratory capacity, energy stores, enzyme activity in muscle tissue and energy substrate utilization changes with fasting between low and high temperatures. The divergent response of the swimming performance to fasting in qingbo at different temperatures might be an adaptive strategy to seasonal temperature and food resource variation in their habitat. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Photic effects on sustained performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J.; Whitmore, J.; Hannon, P. J.; Brainard, G.; Schiflett, S.

    1992-01-01

    Research is described which evaluates manipulating environmental light intensity as a means to attenuate fatigue. A counter balanced, within-subjects design was used to compare nine male subjects exposed to dim (100 lux) and bright (3000 lux) light conditions. Oral temperature values were greater for the bright light group over the dim light condition. Melatonin levels were suppressed by bright light treatment. Also, the frequency of eye blink rate was less for subjects during bright over dim light exposure. Light exposure was without effect on subjective fatigue. However, irrespective of light condition, significant effects on confusion, fatigue, and vigor mood dimensions were found as a result of 30 hour sleep deprivation. The findings suggest that bright lights may be used to help sustain nocturnal activity otherwise susceptible to fatigue. Such findings may have implications for the lighting arrangements on space flights during the subjective night for astronauts.

  4. Evaluation of the Finis Swimsense® and the Garmin Swim™ activity monitors for swimming performance and stroke kinematics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Mooney

    Full Text Available The study aims were to evaluate the validity of two commercially available swimming activity monitors for quantifying temporal and kinematic swimming variables.Ten national level swimmers (5 male, 5 female; 15.3±1.3years; 164.8±12.9cm; 62.4±11.1kg; 425±66 FINA points completed a set protocol comprising 1,500m of swimming involving all four competitive swimming strokes. Swimmers wore the Finis Swimsense and the Garmin Swim activity monitors throughout. The devices automatically identified stroke type, swim distance, lap time, stroke count, stroke rate, stroke length and average speed. Video recordings were also obtained and used as a criterion measure to evaluate performance.A significant positive correlation was found between the monitors and video for the identification of each of the four swim strokes (Garmin: X2 (3 = 31.292, p<0.05; Finis:X2 (3 = 33.004, p<0.05. No significant differences were found for swim distance measurements. Swimming laps performed in the middle of a swimming interval showed no significant difference from the criterion (Garmin: bias -0.065, 95% confidence intervals -3.828-6.920; Finis bias -0.02, 95% confidence intervals -3.095-3.142. However laps performed at the beginning and end of an interval were not as accurately timed. Additionally, a statistical difference was found for stroke count measurements in all but two occasions (p<0.05. These differences affect the accuracy of stroke rate, stroke length and average speed scores reported by the monitors, as all of these are derived from lap times and stroke counts.Both monitors were found to operate with a relatively similar performance level and appear suited for recreational use. However, issues with feature detection accuracy may be related to individual variances in stroke technique. It is reasonable to expect that this level of error would increase when the devices are used by recreational swimmers rather than elite swimmers. Further development to improve

  5. Biomechanics, energetics and coordination during extreme swimming intensity: effect of performance level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, João; Figueiredo, Pedro; Morais, Sara; Alves, Francisco; Toussaint, Huub; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge

    2017-08-01

    The present study aimed to examine how high- and low-speed swimmers organise biomechanical, energetic and coordinative factors throughout extreme intensity swim. Sixteen swimmers (eight high- and eight low-speed) performed, in free condition, 100-m front crawl at maximal intensity and 25, 50 and 75-m bouts (at same pace as the previous 100-m), and 100-m maximal front crawl on the measuring active drag system (MAD-system). A 3D dual-media optoelectronic system was used to assess speed, stroke frequency, stroke length, propelling efficiency and index of coordination (IdC), with power assessed by MAD-system and energy cost by quantifying oxygen consumption plus blood lactate. Both groups presented a similar profile in speed, power output, stroke frequency, stroke length, propelling efficiency and energy cost along the effort, while a distinct coordination profile was observed (F (3, 42)  = 3.59, P = 0.04). Speed, power, stroke frequency and propelling efficiency (not significant, only a tendency) were higher in high-speed swimmers, while stroke length and energy cost were similar between groups. Performing at extreme intensity led better level swimmers to achieve superior speed due to higher power and propelling efficiency, with consequent ability to swim at higher stroke frequencies. This imposes specific constraints, resulting in a distinct IdC magnitude and profile between groups.

  6. The Association between Anthropometric Variables, Functional Movement Screen Scores and 100 m Freestyle Swimming Performance in Youth Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Bond

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the association between anthropometric variables, Functional Movement Screen (FMS scores and 100 m freestyle swimming performance in early adolescent swimmers. Fifty competitive, national level, youth swimmers (21 males, 29 females, mean age ± SD = 13.5 ± 1.5 years, age range 11–16 years performed an “all-out” 100 m freestyle (front crawl swim as fast as they could in a 50 m pool. A median divide for 100 m timed swim was also used to divide the sample into faster or slower groups. Height, body mass, skinfolds and limb lengths were also assessed. Maturation was calculated by proxy using anthropometric measures and participants also undertook the FMS as a measure of functional performance. Backwards linear regression indicated a significant model (p = 0.0001, Adjusted R2 = 0.638 explaining 63.8% of the variance in swim performance with total sum of skinfolds, upper leg length, lower leg length, hand length and total height significantly contributing to the model. Swimmers who were classed as fast had lower total sum of skinfolds (p = 0.005 and higher total FMS score (p = 0.005 compared to their slower peers. In summary, this study indicates that anthropometric variables significantly explained the variance in 100 m freestyle swimming performance in youth swimmers.

  7. Evaluation of the Finis Swimsense® and the Garmin SwimTM activity monitors for swimming performance and stroke kinematics analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mooney, Robert; Quinlan, Leo; Corley, Gavin; Godfrey, Alan; Osborough, Conor; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2017-01-01

    .... Swimmers wore the Finis Swimsense and the Garmin Swim activity monitors throughout. The devices automatically identified stroke type, swim distance, lap time, stroke count, stroke rate, stroke length and average speed...

  8. Evaluation of the Finis Swimsense® and the Garmin Swim™ activity monitors for swimming performance and stroke kinematics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Robert; Quinlan, Leo R; Corley, Gavin; Godfrey, Alan; Osborough, Conor; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2017-01-01

    The study aims were to evaluate the validity of two commercially available swimming activity monitors for quantifying temporal and kinematic swimming variables. Ten national level swimmers (5 male, 5 female; 15.3±1.3years; 164.8±12.9cm; 62.4±11.1kg; 425±66 FINA points) completed a set protocol comprising 1,500m of swimming involving all four competitive swimming strokes. Swimmers wore the Finis Swimsense and the Garmin Swim activity monitors throughout. The devices automatically identified stroke type, swim distance, lap time, stroke count, stroke rate, stroke length and average speed. Video recordings were also obtained and used as a criterion measure to evaluate performance. A significant positive correlation was found between the monitors and video for the identification of each of the four swim strokes (Garmin: X2 (3) = 31.292, pGarmin: bias -0.065, 95% confidence intervals -3.828-6.920; Finis bias -0.02, 95% confidence intervals -3.095-3.142). However laps performed at the beginning and end of an interval were not as accurately timed. Additionally, a statistical difference was found for stroke count measurements in all but two occasions (p<0.05). These differences affect the accuracy of stroke rate, stroke length and average speed scores reported by the monitors, as all of these are derived from lap times and stroke counts. Both monitors were found to operate with a relatively similar performance level and appear suited for recreational use. However, issues with feature detection accuracy may be related to individual variances in stroke technique. It is reasonable to expect that this level of error would increase when the devices are used by recreational swimmers rather than elite swimmers. Further development to improve accuracy of feature detection algorithms, specifically for lap time and stroke count, would also increase their suitability within competitive settings.

  9. Relationship of aerobic and anaerobic parameters with 400 m front crawl swimming performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CA Kalva-Filho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to investigate the relationship of aerobic and anaerobic parameters with 400 m performance, and establish which variable better explains long distance performance in swimming. Twenty-two swimmers (19.1±1.5 years, height 173.9±10.0 cm, body mass 7l.2±10.2 kg; 76.6±5.3% of 400 m world record underwent a lactate minimum test to determine lactate minimum speed (LMS (i.e., aerobic capacity index. Moreover, the swimmers performed a 400 m maximal effort to determine mean speed (S400m, peak oxygen uptake (VO2PEAK and total anaerobic contribution (CAM. The CAM was assumed as the sum of alactic and lactic contributions. Physiological parameters of 400 m were determined using the backward extrapolation technique (VO2PEAK,performance variance. When backward multiple regression analysis was performed, CANA lost significance. Thus, the results demonstrated that both aerobic parameters (capacity and power can be used to predict 400 m swimming performance.

  10. Relationship Between Sprint Performance of Front Crawl Swimming and Muscle Fascicle Length in Young Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Nasirzade

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between 25-m sprint front crawl swimming performance and muscle fascicle length in young male swimmers. 23 swimmers were selected and divided into two groups according to their best records of 25-m sprint performance: 14.6-15.7 sec (S1, n = 11 and 15.8-17 sec (S2, n = 12. Muscle thickness and pennation angle of Biceps Brachii (BB; only muscle thickness, Triceps Brachii (TB, Vastus Lateralis (VL, Gastrocnemius Medialis (GM and Lateralis (GL muscles were measured by B-mode ultrasonography, and fascicle length was estimated. Although, there was no significant differences between groups in anthropometrical parameter as standing height, body mass, arm length, thigh length and leg length (p < 0.001, however, S1 significantly had a greater muscle thickness in VL, GL, and TB muscles (p < 0.05. Pennation angle only in TB was significantly smaller in S1 (p < 0.05. S1 in VL, GL, and TB muscles significantly had greater absolute fascicle length and in VL and TB muscles had relatively (relative to limb length greater fascicle length (p < 0.05. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between sprint swimming time and absolute and relative fascicle length in VL (absolute: r = -0.49 and relative: r = -0.43, both p < 0.05 and GL (absolute: r = -0.47 and relative: r = -0.42, both p < 0.05. Potentially, it seems that fascicle geometry developed in muscles of faster young swimmers to help them to perform their high speed movement.

  11. The effect of temperature on repeat swimming performance in juvenile qingbo (Spinibarbus sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xu; Yuan, Xing-Zhong; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Zhang, Yao-Guang; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effect of temperature on the repeat constant acceleration swimming performance and on the metabolic recovery capacity in juvenile qingbo (Spinibarbus sinensis), their constant acceleration test speed (U(CAT)) and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) recovery process were measured twice with 1-h intervals at different acclimation temperatures (10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 °C). Temperature significantly affected U(CAT), the pre-exercise metabolic rate (MO(2)), metabolic peak values (MO(2peak)), the metabolic scope (MS, MO(2peak)--pre-exercise MO(2)) and the magnitude of the EPOC (P EPOC magnitude) or did not change (MO(2peak) and MS) when the temperature increased from 25 to 30 °C in the first test (P EPOC magnitude) in the first test were as follows: U(CAT) = 62.14/{1 + [(T - 25.1)/21.1](2)} (r = 0.847, P EPOC = 195.42/{1 + [(T - 25.6)/8.7](2)} (r = 0.752, P EPOC magnitude in juvenile qingbo were 25.1, 29.2, 27.1 and 28.6 °C, respectively. Repeat exercise had different effect on U(CAT) and EPOC magnitude at different temperature (interaction effect, P EPOC magnitude between the first and second tests at low temperatures (10-20 °C). However, both U(CAT) and EPOC magnitude decreased significantly during the second test compared with the first test at high temperatures (25 and 30 °C) (P < 0.05). The present study showed that the recovery of the constant acceleration swimming performance was poorer at higher temperatures than at low temperatures in juvenile qingbo. These differences may be related to larger anaerobic metabolism, a lower pH value in the blood, larger ionic fluids and/or higher levels of hormones present at high temperatures.

  12. Swimming performance and physiological responses to exhaustive exercise in radio-tagged and untagged Pacific lampreys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, M.G.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    Populations of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have declined in the Columbia River basin. One factor that may have contributed to this reduction in population size is an excessive use of energy by adult lampreys as they negotiate fishways at dams during spawning migrations. To gain an understanding of the performance capacity of Pacific lampreys, we estimated the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) and documented physiological responses of radio-tagged and untagged adult lampreys exercised to exhaustion. The mean (??SD) Ucrit of untagged lampreys was 86.2 ?? 7.5 cm/s at 15??C, whereas the Ucrit for radio-tagged lampreys was 81.5 ?? 7.0 cm/s, a speed that was significantly lower than that of untagged fish. The physiological responses of tagged and untagged lampreys subjected to exhaustive exercise included decreases in blood pH of 0.3-0.5 units, a 40% decrease in muscle glycogen levels, a 22% increase in hematocrit for untagged fish only, and a 4- to 5-fold increase in muscle and a 40- to 100-fold increase in plasma lactate concentrations. These physiological changes were significant compared with resting control fish and usually returned to resting levels by 1-4 h after fatigue. Our estimates of Ucrit for Pacific lampreys are the first quantitative measures of their swimming performance and suggest that these fish may have difficulty negotiating fishways at dams on the Columbia River, which can have water velocities approaching 2 m/s. Our physiological results indicate that tagged and untagged Pacific lampreys show similar metabolic dysfunction after exhaustive exercise but recover quickly from a single exposure to such a stressor.

  13. The effect of external dummy transmitters on oxygen consumption and performance of swimming Atlantic cod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinhausen, M.F.; Andersen, Niels Gerner; Steffensen, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Decreased critical swimming speed and increased oxygen consumption (Mo-2) was found for externally tagged Atlantic cod Gadus morhua swimming at a high speed of 0 center dot 9 body length (total length, L-Gamma) s(-1). No difference was found in the standard metabolic rate, indicating...

  14. Effects of 8-Week Training on Aerobic Capacity and Swimming Performance of Boys Aged 12 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzeczny, Ryszard; Kuberski, Mariusz; Deska, Agnieszka; Zarzeczna, Dorota; Rydz, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Anna; Balchanowski, Tomasz; Bosiacki, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess the effects of 8-week endurance training in swimming on work capacity of boys aged 12 years. Material and methods: The following groups of schoolboys aged 12 years were studied: untrained control (UC; n = 14) and those training swimming for two years. The latter ones were subjected to 8-week training in classical style (CS; n…

  15. The Age-Related Performance Decline in Ironman Triathlon Starts Earlier in Swimming Than in Cycling and Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käch, Ilja W; Rüst, Christoph A; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat

    2018-02-01

    Käch, I, Rüst, CA, Nikolaidis, PT, Rosemann, T, and Knechtle, B. The age-related performance decline in Ironman triathlon starts earlier in swimming than in cycling and running. J Strength Cond Res 32(2): 379-395, 2018-In Ironman triathlon, the number of overall male and female finishers increased in the past 30 years, while an improvement in performance has been reported. Studies concluding these numbers only analyzed the top 10 athletes per age group instead of all finishers; therefore, a selection bias might have occurred. The aim of this study was to investigate participation, performance, and the age-related performance decline of all pro- and age-group triathletes ranked in all Ironman triathlons held worldwide between 2002 and 2015. Split and overall race times of 329,066 (80%) male and 81,815 (20%) female athletes competing in 253 different Ironman triathlon races were analyzed. The number of finishers increased in all age groups with the exception of women in age group 75-79 years. In pro athletes, performance improved in all disciplines. In age-group athletes, performance improved in younger age groups for running (from 18-24 to 40-44 years) and older age groups for swimming (from 50-54 to 65-69 years) and cycling (from 35-39 to 55-59 years), whereas it impaired in younger age groups for swimming (from 18-24 to 45-49 years) and cycling (from 18-24 to 30-34 years), and older age groups in running (from 45-49 to 70-74 years). The age-related performance decline started in women in age group 25-29 years in swimming and in age group 30-34 years in cycling, running, and overall race time, whereas it started in men in age group 25-29 years in swimming and in age group 35-39 years in cycling, running, and overall race time. For athletes and coaches, performance improved in younger age groups for running and older age groups for swimming and cycling, and the age-related decline in performance started earlier in swimming than in cycling and running. In summary

  16. COMPARISON OF TEMPORAL PARAMETERS OF SWIMMING RESCUE ELEMENTS WHEN PERFORMED USING DOLPHIN AND FLUTTER KICK WITH FINS - DIDACTICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rejman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was an analysis of the time required to swim to a victim and tow them back to shore, while perfoming the flutter-kick and the dolphin-kick using fins. It has been hypothesized that using fins while using the dolphin-kick when swimming leads to reduced rescue time. Sixteen lifeguards took part in the study. The main tasks performed by them, were to approach and tow (double armpit a dummy a distance of 50m while applying either the flutter-kick, or the dolphin-kick with fins. The analysis of the temporal parameters of both techniques of kicking demonstrates that, during the approach to the victim, neither the dolphin (tmean = 32.9s or the flutter kick (tmean = 33.0s were significantly faster than the other. However, when used for towing a victim the flutter kick (tmean = 47.1s was significantly faster when compared to the dolphin-kick (tmean = 52.8s. An assessment of the level of technical skills in competitive swimming, and in approaching and towing the victim, were also conducted. Towing time was significantly correlated with the parameter that linked the temporal and technical dimensions of towing and swimming (difference between flutter kick towing time and dolphin-kick towing time, 100m medley time and the four swimming strokes evaluation. No similar interdependency has been discovered in flutter kick towing time. These findings suggest that the dolphin-kick is a more difficult skill to perform when towing the victim than the flutter-kick. Since the hypothesis stated was not confirmed, postulates were formulated on how to improve dolphin-kick technique with fins, in order to reduce swimming rescue time

  17. Relationship of aerobic and anaerobic parameters with 400 m front crawl swimming performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalva-Filho, CA; Campos, EZ; Andrade, VL; Silva, ASR; Zagatto, AM; Lima, MCS

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the relationship of aerobic and anaerobic parameters with 400 m performance, and establish which variable better explains long distance performance in swimming. Twenty-two swimmers (19.1±1.5 years, height 173.9±10.0 cm, body mass 71.2±10.2 kg; 76.6±5.3% of 400 m world record) underwent a lactate minimum test to determine lactate minimum speed (LMS) (i.e., aerobic capacity index). Moreover, the swimmers performed a 400 m maximal effort to determine mean speed (S400m), peak oxygen uptake (V.O2PEAK) and total anaerobic contribution (CANA). The CANA was assumed as the sum of alactic and lactic contributions. Physiological parameters of 400 m were determined using the backward extrapolation technique (V.O2PEAK and alactic contributions of CANA) and blood lactate concentration analysis (lactic anaerobic contributions of CANA). The Pearson correlation test and backward multiple regression analysis were used to verify the possible correlations between the physiological indices (predictor factors) and S400m (independent variable) (p < 0.05). Values are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Significant correlations were observed between S400m (1.4±0.1 m·s-1) and LMS (1.3±0.1 m·s-1; r = 0.80), V.O2PEAK (4.5±3.9 L·min-1; r = 0.72) and CANA (4.7±1.5 L·O2; r= 0.44). The best model constructed using multiple regression analysis demonstrated that LMS and V.O2PEAK explained 85% of the 400 m performance variance. When backward multiple regression analysis was performed, CANA lost significance. Thus, the results demonstrated that both aerobic parameters (capacity and power) can be used to predict 400 m swimming performance. PMID:28479663

  18. Board diversity and sustainability performance | Oosthuizen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose to this study was to describe and explore the difference in the board composition and characteristics of sustainability performing companies compared with other companies in terms of gender, ethnicity, affiliation and, uniquely, the inclusion of directors from a non-business background. This exploratory study ...

  19. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein in the blood-brain barrier alters avermectin neurotoxicity and swimming performance in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher J; Tierney, Keith B; Mittelstadt, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The importance of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and the contribution to its function by the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in teleosts were examined using the P-gp substrates and central nervous system neurotoxins ivermectin (22,23-dihydroavermectin B1a+22,23-dihydroavermectin B1b) [IVM]) and emamectin benzoate (4″-deoxy-49″epimethylaminoavermectin B1 benzoate [EB]). Trout were injected intraperitoneally with 0.01-1.0 and 1-50mg/kg of IVM or EB, respectively either alone or in combination with cyclosporin A (CsA: a P-gp substrate) at 1mg/kg. IVM affected the swimming performance (critical swimming speed, burst swimming distance, and schooling) at significantly lower concentrations than EB. When fish were exposed to IVM or EB in the presence of CsA, alterations to swimming were increased, suggesting that competition for P-gp in the BBB by CsA increased IVM and EB penetration into the CNS and decreased swimming capabilities. The effect of co-administration of CsA on swimming-related toxicity was different between IVM and EB-treated fish; EB toxicity was increased to a greater extent than IVM toxicity. The greater chemosensitization effect of EB vs. IVM was examined using a P-gp competitive inhibition assay in isolated trout hepatocytes with rhodamine 123 as a substrate. At the cellular level, IVM was a more potent inhibitor of P-gp than EB, which allowed for a greater accumulation of R123 in hepatocytes. These results provide evidence for a role of P-gp in the BBB of fish, and suggest that this protein protects fish from environmental neurotoxins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Validity and reliability of critical speed, critical stroke rate, and anaerobic capacity in relation to front crawl swimming performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekerle, J; Sidney, M; Hespel, J M; Pelayo, P

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the concepts of critical swimming speed, critical stroke rate and anaerobic swimming capacity could be used by coaches as a reliable index in order to monitor endurance performances in competitive swimmers. The results of this study conducted with well-trained swimmers showed that the 30-min test velocity (V30) is not different from the critical swimming speed determined from 200- and 400-m tests but is overestimated by 3.2 %. Furthermore, a regression analysis of the number of stroke cycles on time calculated for each swimmer showed a linear relationship (r(2) greater than 0.99 and p less than 0.01). The 30-min stroke rate test (SR30) was not different from the critical stroke rate determined from 200- and 400-m tests after a correction of minus 3.9 %. These data suggest that the slope of this regression line represents the critical stroke rate defined as the maximal stroke rate value, which can theoretically be maintained continuously without exhaustion. Coaches could easily use critical swimming speed combined with critical stroke rate in order not only to set aerobic training loads but also to control the swimming technique during training. Besides, anaerobic swimming capacity (ASC) values defined as the y-intercept of the regression line between distance and time were not correlated (p > 0.05) with the determined distance over which a significant drop in the maximal speed could be noticed on a 25-m test. Thus, ASC does not provide a reliable estimation of the anaerobic capacity.

  1. Effects of taper on swimming force and swimmer performance after an experimental ten-week training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoti, Marcelo; Martins, Luis E B; Cunha, Sergio A; Zagatto, Alessandro M; Gobatto, Claudio A

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine how an 11-day taper after an 8.5-week experimental training cycle affected lactate levels during maximal exercise, mean force, and performance in training swimmers, independent of shaving, psychological changes, and postcompetition effects. Fourteen competition swimmers with shaved legs and torsos were recruited from the São Paulo Aquatic Federation. The training cycle consisted of a basic training period (endurance and quality phases) of 8.5 weeks, with 5,800 m.d(-1) mean training volume and 6 d.wk(-1) frequency; and a taper period (TP) of 1.5 weeks' duration that incorporated a 48% reduction in weekly volume without altering intensity. Attained swimming force (SF) and maximal performance over 200-m maximal swim (Pmax) before and after taper were measured. After taper, SF and Pmax improved 3.6 and 1.6%, respectively (p < 0.05). There were positive correlations (p < 0.05) between SF and Pmax before (r = 0.86) and after (r = 0.83) the taper phase. Peak lactate concentrations after SF were unaltered before (6.79 +/- 1.2 mM) and after (7.15 +/- 1.8 mM) TP. Results showed that TP improved mean swimming velocity, but not in the same proportion as force after taper, suggesting that there are other factors influencing performance in faster swimming.

  2. Individual variation in thermal performance curves: swimming burst speed and jumping endurance in wild-caught tropical clawed frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careau, Vincent; Biro, Peter A; Bonneaud, Camille; Fokam, Eric B; Herrel, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    The importance of studying individual variation in locomotor performance has long been recognized as it may determine the ability of an organism to escape from predators, catch prey or disperse. In ectotherms, locomotor performance is highly influenced by ambient temperature (Ta), yet several studies have showed that individual differences are usually retained across a Ta gradient. Less is known, however, about individual differences in thermal sensitivity of performance, despite the fact that it could represent adaptive sources of phenotypic variation and/or additional substrate for selection to act upon. We quantified swimming and jumping performance in 18 wild-caught tropical clawed frogs (Xenopus tropicalis) across a Ta gradient. Maximum swimming velocity and acceleration were not repeatable and individuals did not differ in how their swimming performance varied across Ta. By contrast, time and distance jumped until exhaustion were repeatable across the Ta gradient, indicating that individuals that perform best at a given Ta also perform best at another Ta. Moreover, thermal sensitivity of jumping endurance significantly differed among individuals, with individuals of high performance at low Ta displaying the highest sensitivity to Ta. Individual differences in terrestrial performance increased with decreasing Ta, which is opposite to results obtained in lizards at the inter-specific and among-individual levels. To verify the generality of these patterns, we need more studies on individual variation in thermal reaction norms for locomotor performance in lizards and frogs.

  3. Pop up satellite tags impair swimming performance and energetics of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Methling, Caroline; Tudorache, Christian; Skov, Peter Vilhelm

    2011-01-01

    increased oxygen consumption (MO(2)) during swimming and elevated minimum cost of transport (COT(min)) by 26 Standard (SMR) and active metabolic rate (AMR) as well as metabolic scope remained unaffected, suggesting that the observed effects were caused by increased drag. Optimal swimming speed (U......Pop-up satellite archival tags (PSATs) have recently been applied in attempts to follow the oceanic spawning migration of the European eel. PSATs are quite large, and in all likelihood their hydraulic drag constitutes an additional cost during swimming, which remains to be quantified, as does...... and efficiency all are significantly affected in migrating eels with external tags....

  4. Effect of weight and frontal area of external telemetry packages on the kinematics, activity levels and swimming performance of small-bodied sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyoucos, I A; Suski, C D; Mandelman, J W; Brooks, E J

    2017-05-01

    This study sought to observe the effects of submerged weight and frontal cross-sectional area of external telemetry packages on the kinematics, activity levels and swimming performance of small-bodied juvenile sharks, using lemon sharks Negaprion brevirostris (60-80 cm total length, LT ) as a model species. Juveniles were observed free-swimming in a mesocosm untagged and with small and large external accelerometer packages that increased frontal cross-sectional area of the animals and their submerged weight. Despite adhering to widely used standards for tag mass, the presence of an external telemetry package altered swimming kinematics, activity levels and swimming performance of juvenile N. brevirostris relative to untagged individuals, suggesting that tag mass is not a suitable standalone metric of device suitability. Changes in swimming performance could not be detected from tail-beat frequency, which suggests that tail-beat frequency is an unsuitable standalone metric of swimming performance for small N. brevirostris. Lastly, sharks experienced treatment-specific changes in activity level and swimming kinematics from morning to afternoon observation. Therefore, the presence of external telemetry packages altered the kinematics, activity levels and swimming performance of small young-of-the-year N. brevirostris and these data may therefore be relevant to other similar-sized juveniles of other shark species. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. [Effects of starvation on the consumption of energy sources and swimming performance in juvenile Gambusia affinis and Tanichthys albonubes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-tao; Lin, Xiao-tao; Zhou, Chen-hui; Zeng, Peng; Xu, Zhong-neng; Sun, Jun

    2016-01-01

    To explore the consumption of energy sources and swimming performance of juvenile Gambusia affinis and Tanichthys albonubes after starvation, contents of glycogen, lipid and protein, burst swimming speeds (Uburst), and critical swimming speeds (Ucrit) at different starvation times (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 days) were evaluated. The results showed that, at 0 day, contents of glycogen and lipid were significantly lower in G. affinis than those in T. albonubes, whereas no significant difference in content of protein between two experimental fish was found. Swimming speeds in G. affinis were significantly lower than those in T. albonubes for all swimming performances. After different starvation scenarios, content of glycogen both in G. affinis and T. albonubes decreased significantly in power function trend with starvation time and were close to zero after starvation for 10 days, whereas the contents of lipid and protein were linearly significantly decreased. The slope of line regression equation between content of lipid and starvation time in G. affinis was significantly lower than that in T. albonubes, whereas there was a significantly higher slope of line equation between content of protein and starvation time in G. affinis. 40 days later, the consumption rate of glycogen both in G. affinis and T. albonubes were significantly higher than that of lipid, while the consumption rate of protein was the least. Consumption amounts of glycogen in all experimental fish were the least, G. affinis consumed more protein than lipid, and T. albonubes consumed more lipid than protein. Uburst and Ucrit decreased significantly linearly with starvation time for all experimental fish. Slope of linear equation between Uburst and starvation time was not significantly different between G. affinis and T. albonubes. However, the straight slope between Ucrit and starvation time was significantly lower in G. affinis than that in T. albonubes. These findings indicated that there was close

  6. HEALTHY AND SAFETY SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman CEYLAN

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Swimming is a sport which has own rules, styles, and fields, however, is one of the most performed avocation as amateur and a joke especially at summer months. Although one of the most beneficial sports, swimming can cause a number of several health problems such as infectious diseases, allergic events, or traumas, if it is not done at adequate conditions and eligible style. In this paper, the factors such as preparing to swimming, health and safety features of swimming areas, important health behavior, wearing, feeding etc. that effected healthy swimming will be reviewed and evaluated. At the last part of the paper, it will be made some proposals to readers on healthy and safety swimming. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(4.000: 209-221

  7. Larval green and white sturgeon swimming performance in relation to water-diversion flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhille, Christine E.; Poletto, Jamilynn B.; Cocherell, Dennis E.; DeCourten, Bethany; Baird, Sarah; Cech, Joseph J.; Fangue, Nann A.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known of the swimming capacities of larval sturgeons, despite global population declines in many species due in part to fragmentation of their spawning and rearing habitats by man-made water-diversion structures. Larval green (Acipenser medirostris) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) inhabit the highly altered Sacramento–San Joaquin watershed, making them logical species to examine vulnerability to entrainment by altered water flows. The risk of larval sturgeon entrainment is influenced by the ontogeny of swimming capacity and dispersal timing and their interactions with water-diversion structure operations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe and compare the ontogeny and allometry of larval green and white sturgeon swimming capacities until completion of metamorphosis into juveniles. Despite the faster growth rates and eventual larger size of larval white sturgeon, green sturgeon critical swimming velocities remained consistently, though modestly, greater than those of white sturgeon throughout the larval life stage. Although behavioural interactions with water-diversion structures are also important considerations, regarding swimming capacity, Sacramento–San Joaquin sturgeons are most vulnerable to entrainment in February–May, when white sturgeon early larvae are in the middle Sacramento River, and April–May, when green sturgeon early larvae are in the upper river. Green sturgeon migrating downstream to the estuary and bays in October–November are also susceptible to entrainment due to their movements combined with seasonal declines in their swimming capacity. An additional inter-species comparison of the allometric relationship between critical swimming velocities and total length with several sturgeon species found throughout the world suggests a similar ontogeny of swimming capacity with growth. Therefore, although dispersal and behaviour differ among river systems and sturgeon species, similar recommendations are

  8. The Influence of Anthropometric, Kinematic and Energetic Variables and Gender on Swimming Performance in Youth Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Jorge E; Garrido, Nuno D; Marques, Mário C; Silva, António J; Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the: (i) gender; (ii) performance and; (iii) gender versus performance interactions in young swimmers’ anthropometric, kinematic and energetic variables. One hundred and thirty six young swimmers (62 boys: 12.76 ± 0.72 years old at Tanner stages 1–2 by self-evaluation; and 64 girls: 11.89 ± 0.93 years old at Tanner stages 1–2 by self-evaluation) were evaluated. Performance, anthropometrics, kinematics and energetic variables were selected. There was a non-significant gender effect on performance, body mass, height, arm span, trunk transverse surface area, stroke length, speed fluctuation, swimming velocity, propulsive efficiency, stroke index and critical velocity. A significant gender effect was found for foot surface area, hand surface area and stroke frequency. A significant sports level effect was verified for all variables, except for stroke frequency, speed fluctuation and propulsive efficiency. Overall, swimmers in quartile 1 (the ones with highest sports level) had higher anthropometric dimensions, better stroke mechanics and energetics. These traits decrease consistently throughout following quartiles up to the fourth one (i.e. swimmers with the lowest sports level). There was a non-significant interaction between gender and sports level for all variables. Our main conclusions were as follows: (i) there are non-significant differences in performance, anthropometrics, kinematics and energetics between boys and girls; (ii) swimmers with best performance are taller, have higher surface areas and better stroke mechanics; (iii) there are non-significant interactions between sports level and gender for anthropometrics, kinematics and energetics. PMID:24511356

  9. Kinematics and energetics of swimming performance during acute warming in brown trout Salmo trutta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, J M D; Keen, A N; Nudds, R L; Shiels, H A

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how acute warming of water temperature affects the mechanical efficiency of swimming and aerobic capabilities of the brown trout Salmo trutta. Swimming efficiency was assessed using the relationship between swimming kinematics and forward speed (U), which is thought to converge upon an optimum range of a dimensionless parameter, the Strouhal number (St ). Swim-tunnel intermittent stopped-flow respirometry was used to record kinematics and measure oxygen consumption (ṀO2) of S. trutta during warming and swimming challenges. Salmo trutta maintained St between 0·2 and 0·3 at any given U over a range of temperatures, irrespective of body size. The maintenance of St within the range for maximum efficiency for oscillatory propulsion was achieved through an increase in tail-beat frequency (ftail) and a decrease in tail-beat amplitude (A) as temperature increased. Maintenance of efficient steady-state swimming was fuelled by aerobic metabolism, which increased as temperature increased up to 18° C but declined above this temperature, decreasing the apparent metabolic scope. As St was maintained over the full range of temperatures whilst metabolic scope was not, the results may suggest energetic trade-offs at any given U at temperatures above thermal optima. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  10. Engineering performant, innovative and sustainable health systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wouters, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Background: In a time of growing health expenditures and inefficiencies, ageing populations, rise of chronic diseases, co-morbity and technical evolutions, there is a worldwide quest for performant, innovative and sustainable health systems that are, a.o. effective and cost-efficient, patient-centric and co-creative and able to deal with the growing society dynamics.Problem statement: Effectively implementing strategic initiatives that tackle these challenges appears a frightening task since ...

  11. Comparison of Temporal Parameters of Swimming Rescue Elements When Performed Using Dolphin and Flutter Kick with Fins - Didactical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejman, Marek; Wiesner, Wojciech; Silakiewicz, Piotr; Klarowicz, Andrzej; Abraldes, J. Arturo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was an analysis of the time required to swim to a victim and tow them back to shore, while perfoming the flutter-kick and the dolphin-kick using fins. It has been hypothesized that using fins while using the dolphin-kick when swimming leads to reduced rescue time. Sixteen lifeguards took part in the study. The main tasks performed by them, were to approach and tow (double armpit) a dummy a distance of 50m while applying either the flutter-kick, or the dolphin-kick with fins. The analysis of the temporal parameters of both techniques of kicking demonstrates that, during the approach to the victim, neither the dolphin (tmean = 32.9s) or the flutter kick (tmean = 33.0s) were significantly faster than the other. However, when used for towing a victim the flutter kick (tmean = 47.1s) was significantly faster when compared to the dolphin-kick (tmean = 52.8s). An assessment of the level of technical skills in competitive swimming, and in approaching and towing the victim, were also conducted. Towing time was significantly correlated with the parameter that linked the temporal and technical dimensions of towing and swimming (difference between flutter kick towing time and dolphin-kick towing time, 100m medley time and the four swimming strokes evaluation). No similar interdependency has been discovered in flutter kick towing time. These findings suggest that the dolphin-kick is a more difficult skill to perform when towing the victim than the flutter-kick. Since the hypothesis stated was not confirmed, postulates were formulated on how to improve dolphin-kick technique with fins, in order to reduce swimming rescue time. Key points The source of reduction of swimming rescue time was researched. Time required to approach and to tow the victim while doing the flutter kick and the dolphin-kick with fins was analyzed. The propulsion generated by dolphin-kick did not make the approach and tow faster than the flutter kick. More difficult skill to realize of

  12. Critical evaluation of oxygen-uptake assessment in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana; Figueiredo, Pedro; Pendergast, David; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Vilas-Boas, João P; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2014-03-01

    Swimming has become an important area of sport science research since the 1970s, with the bioenergetic factors assuming a fundamental performance-influencing role. The purpose of this study was to conduct a critical evaluation of the literature concerning oxygen-uptake (VO2) assessment in swimming, by describing the equipment and methods used and emphasizing the recent works conducted in ecological conditions. Particularly in swimming, due to the inherent technical constraints imposed by swimming in a water environment, assessment of VO2max was not accomplished until the 1960s. Later, the development of automated portable measurement devices allowed VO2max to be assessed more easily, even in ecological swimming conditions, but few studies have been conducted in swimming-pool conditions with portable breath-by-breath telemetric systems. An inverse relationship exists between the velocity corresponding to VO2max and the time a swimmer can sustain it at this velocity. The energy cost of swimming varies according to its association with velocity variability. As, in the end, the supply of oxygen (whose limitation may be due to central-O2 delivery and transportation to the working muscles-or peripheral factors-O2 diffusion and utilization in the muscles) is one of the critical factors that determine swimming performance, VO2 kinetics and its maximal values are critical in understanding swimmers' behavior in competition and to develop efficient training programs.

  13. Thermal acclimation in rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, leads to faster myotomal muscle contractile properties and improved swimming performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Woytanowski

    2013-01-01

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax display an impressive ability to acclimate to very cold water temperatures. These fish express both anti-freeze proteins and glycerol in their plasma, liver, muscle and other tissues to avoid freezing at sub-zero temperatures. Maintenance of glycerol levels requires active feeding in very cold water. To understand how these fish can maintain activity at cold temperatures, we explored thermal acclimation by the myotomal muscle of smelt exposed to cold water. We hypothesized that cold-acclimated fish would show enhanced swimming ability due to shifts in muscle contractile properties. We also predicted that shifts in swimming performance would be associated with changes in the expression patterns of muscle proteins such as parvalbumin (PV and myosin heavy chain (MyHC. Swimming studies show significantly faster swimming by smelt acclimated to 5°C compared to fish acclimated to 20°C when tested at a common test temperature of 10°C. The cold-acclimated fish also had faster muscle contractile properties, such as a maximum shortening velocity (Vmax almost double that of warm-acclimated fish at the same test temperature. Cold-acclimation is associated with a modest increase in PV levels in the swimming muscle. Fluorescence microscopy using anti-MyHC antibodies suggests that MyHC expression in the myotomal muscle may shift in response to exposure to cold water. The complex set of physiological responses that comprise cold-acclimation in smelt includes modifications in muscle function to permit active locomotion in cold water.

  14. Thermal acclimation in rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, leads to faster myotomal muscle contractile properties and improved swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woytanowski, John R; Coughlin, David J

    2013-03-15

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) display an impressive ability to acclimate to very cold water temperatures. These fish express both anti-freeze proteins and glycerol in their plasma, liver, muscle and other tissues to avoid freezing at sub-zero temperatures. Maintenance of glycerol levels requires active feeding in very cold water. To understand how these fish can maintain activity at cold temperatures, we explored thermal acclimation by the myotomal muscle of smelt exposed to cold water. We hypothesized that cold-acclimated fish would show enhanced swimming ability due to shifts in muscle contractile properties. We also predicted that shifts in swimming performance would be associated with changes in the expression patterns of muscle proteins such as parvalbumin (PV) and myosin heavy chain (MyHC). Swimming studies show significantly faster swimming by smelt acclimated to 5°C compared to fish acclimated to 20°C when tested at a common test temperature of 10°C. The cold-acclimated fish also had faster muscle contractile properties, such as a maximum shortening velocity (Vmax) almost double that of warm-acclimated fish at the same test temperature. Cold-acclimation is associated with a modest increase in PV levels in the swimming muscle. Fluorescence microscopy using anti-MyHC antibodies suggests that MyHC expression in the myotomal muscle may shift in response to exposure to cold water. The complex set of physiological responses that comprise cold-acclimation in smelt includes modifications in muscle function to permit active locomotion in cold water.

  15. An analysis of the energetic cost of the branchial and cardiac pumps during sustained swimming in trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    FARRELL, AP; STEFFENSEN, JF

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data are available for the oxygen cost of the branchial and cardiac pumps in fish. These data were used to theoretically analyze the relative oxygen cost of these pumps during rest and swimming in rainbow troutSalmo gairdneri. Efficiency of the heart increases with activity and so...

  16. Evaluating Warm-Up Strategies for Elite Sprint Breaststroke Swimming Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Courtney J; Pyne, David B; Thompson, Kevin G; Rattray, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Targeted passive heating and completion of dryland-based activation exercises within the warm-up can enhance sprint freestyle performance. The authors investigated if these interventions would also elicit improvements in sprint breaststroke swimming performance. Ten national and internationally competitive swimmers (~805 FINA (Fédération internationale de natation) 2014 scoring points; 6 men, mean ± SD 20 ± 1 y; 4 women, 21 ± 3 y) completed a standardized pool warm-up (1550 m) followed by a 30-min transition phase and a 100-m breaststroke time trial. In the transition phase, swimmers wore a conventional tracksuit and remained seated (control) or wore tracksuit pants with integrated heating elements and performed a 5-min dryland-based exercise routine (combo) in a crossover design. Performance in the 100-m time trial (control: 68.6 ± 4.0 s, combo: 68.4 ± 3.9 s, P = .55) and start times to 15 m (control: 7.3 ± 0.6 s; combo: 7.3 ± 0.6 s; P = .81) were not different between conditions. It was unclear (P = .36) whether combo (-0.12°C ± 0.19°C [mean ± 90% confidence limits]) elicited an improvement in core temperature maintenance in the transition phase compared with control (-0.31°C ± 0.19°C). Skin temperature immediately before commencement of the time trial was higher (by ~1°C, P = .01) within combo (30.13°C ± 0.88°C [mean ± SD]) compared with control (29.11°C ± 1.20°C). Lower-body power output was not different between conditions before the time trial. Targeted passive heating and completion of dryland-based activation exercises in the transition phase does not enhance sprint breaststroke performance despite eliciting elevated skin temperature immediately before time trial commencement.

  17. Is it the athlete or the equipment? An analysis of the top swim performances from 1990 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'connor, Lanty M; Vozenilek, John A

    2011-12-01

    O'Connor, LM and Vozenilek, JA. Is it the athlete or the equipment? An analysis of the top swim performances from 1990 to 2010. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3239-3241, 2011-Forty-three world record swims were recorded at the 2009 Fédération Internationale de Natation (FINA) World Championship meet in Rome. Of the 20 FINA recognized long-course (50-m pool) swimming events, men set new world records in 15 of those events, whereas women did the same in 17 events. Each of the men's world records and 14 of the 17 women's records still stand. These performances were unprecedented; never before had these many world records been broken in such a short period of time. There was much speculation that full-body, polyurethane, technical swimsuits were the reason for the conspicuous improvement in world records. Further analysis led the FINA to institute new rules on January 1, 2010, that limited the types of technical swimsuits that could be worn by athletes. No long-course world record has been broken since then. We sought to understand this phenomenon by analyzing publicly available race data and exploring other possible causes including improvements in other sports, improvements in training science, changes in rules and regulations, gender differences, anaerobic vs. aerobic events, unique talent, and membership data.

  18. A wake-based correlate of swimming performance in seven jellyfish species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, John; Colin, Sean; Katija, Kakani; Costello, John

    2009-11-01

    Animal-fluid interactions have been hypothesized as a principal selective pressure on the evolution of aquatic and aerial animals. However, attempts to discover the fluid dynamic mechanisms that dictate the fitness of an animal---or even to quantify `fitness'---have been limited by an inability to measure the fluid interactions of freely moving animals (i.e., in the absence of tethers or artificial water/wind currents) in comparative studies of multiple species with similar evolutionary histories. We used digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) measurements to calculate wake kinetic energy, drag, and swimming speed of the seven co-occurring species of free-swimming jellyfish. Using this new data, we demonstrate that the swimming and foraging behavior are related to a robust fluid dynamic threshold between two distinct configurations of the wake vortices. The transition between the two wake vortex configurations is known as optimal vortex formation, because it maximizes the fluid dynamic thrust generated for a given energy input (Krueger and Gharib, Phys. Fluids 2003). By comparing the observed wake structures created by each jellyfish species with the optimal vortex configuration, we are able to predict their relative swimming efficiencies and proficiencies and to deduce their corresponding ecological niches.

  19. Pop up satellite tags impair swimming performance and energetics of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Methling, Caroline; Tudorache, Christian; Skov, Peter Vilhelm

    2011-01-01

    Pop-up satellite archival tags (PSATs) have recently been applied in attempts to follow the oceanic spawning migration of the European eel. PSATs are quite large, and in all likelihood their hydraulic drag constitutes an additional cost during swimming, which remains to be quantified, as does the...... and efficiency all are significantly affected in migrating eels with external tags....

  20. Mathematical modelling and simulation of the thermal performance of a solar heated indoor swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mančić Marko V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings with indoor swimming pools have a large energy footprint. The source of major energy loss is the swimming pool hall where air humidity is increased by evaporation from the pool water surface. This increases energy consumption for heating and ventilation of the pool hall, fresh water supply loss and heat demand for pool water heating. In this paper, a mathematical model of the swimming pool was made to assess energy demands of an indoor swimming pool building. The mathematical model of the swimming pool is used with the created multi-zone building model in TRNSYS software to determine pool hall energy demand and pool losses. Energy loss for pool water and pool hall heating and ventilation are analyzed for different target pool water and air temperatures. The simulation showed that pool water heating accounts for around 22%, whereas heating and ventilation of the pool hall for around 60% of the total pool hall heat demand. With a change of preset controller air and water temperatures in simulations, evaporation loss was in the range 46-54% of the total pool losses. A solar thermal sanitary hot water system was modelled and simulated to analyze it's potential for energy savings of the presented demand side model. The simulation showed that up to 87% of water heating demands could be met by the solar thermal system, while avoiding stagnation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 42006: Research and development of energy and environmentally highly effective polygeneration systems based on using renewable energy sources

  1. Laryngoscopy during swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsted, Emil S; Swanton, Laura L; van van Someren, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) is a key differential diagnosis for respiratory symptoms in athletes and is particularly prevalent in aquatic athletes. A definitive diagnosis of EILO is dependent on laryngoscopy, performed continuously, while an athlete engages in the sport...... that precipitates their symptoms. This report provides the first description of the feasibility of performing continuous laryngoscopy during exercise in a swimming environment. The report describes the methodology and safety of the use of continuous laryngoscopy while swimming. Laryngoscope, 2017....

  2. Mechanical models of sandfish locomotion reveal principles of high performance subsurface sand-swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maladen, Ryan D.; Ding, Yang; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2011-01-01

    We integrate biological experiment, empirical theory, numerical simulation and a physical model to reveal principles of undulatory locomotion in granular media. High-speed X-ray imaging of the sandfish lizard, Scincus scincus, in 3 mm glass particles shows that it swims within the medium without using its limbs by propagating a single-period travelling sinusoidal wave down its body, resulting in a wave efficiency, η, the ratio of its average forward speed to the wave speed, of approximately 0.5. A resistive force theory (RFT) that balances granular thrust and drag forces along the body predicts η close to the observed value. We test this prediction against two other more detailed modelling approaches: a numerical model of the sandfish coupled to a discrete particle simulation of the granular medium, and an undulatory robot that swims within granular media. Using these models and analytical solutions of the RFT, we vary the ratio of undulation amplitude to wavelength (A/λ) and demonstrate an optimal condition for sand-swimming, which for a given A results from the competition between η and λ. The RFT, in agreement with the simulated and physical models, predicts that for a single-period sinusoidal wave, maximal speed occurs for A/λ ≈ 0.2, the same kinematics used by the sandfish. PMID:21378020

  3. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN SUSTAINABLE PERFORMANCE MEASURES AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BRAZILIAN CONTEXT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    RODRIGO GOYANNES GUSMÃO CAIADO; OSVALDO LUIZ GONÇALVES QUELHAS

    2016-01-01

    ... sustainable performance measures have stronger positive correlation to achieve organizational sustainability in order to help employees in making decisions that reduce the consumption of resources and that create value throughout its chain...

  4. Sustainability performance of soybean and beef chains in Latin America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pashaei Kamali, F.

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability Performance of Soybean and Beef Chains in Latin America The objective of this thesis, was to analyze the sustainability performance of soybean and beef production chains in Latin America (LA). First identifying a set of sustainability issues of soybean and beef

  5. Creating and validating a test for measuring motor performance of the crawl swimming style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Carvalho Villis

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to create and validate a test to measure the motor performance of the crawlswimming style, in order to sort subjects out learning levels. To the achievement of the reliability criterion, 23 adults (12 men and 11 women averaging 24.7 years old and engaged in the Sports Swimming School Association of the UFSM were sampled. To test the objectivity, the application was carried out by three evaluators. Throughout the two analyses, a linear intra-class correlation coefficient was used. For the description and visualization of its elements, the test was divided in six items: body posture; leg movement; propelling and non-propelling arm stage; breathing; leg, arm and breathing synchronization. To determine the validity of the test content, it was evaluated by four Physical Education professionals. The results come out of the statistical analysis allowed both the test reliability (0.90 through 0.95 and the test objectivity (0.95 through 0.98 to be classified as excellent. An exception is made for the former, regarding the propelling arm stage item, which was deemed to be good. From the analysis performed by the four Physical Education professionals, it came out that the test put forward is valid. Thus, the “Motor Performance of the Crawl Swimming Style Test” can be applied to sort subjects out learning levels. Pellegrini (2000 suggests three assortment levels: beginner, intermediate and expert. Accordingly, scores ranging from 0 to 9 belonged in the beginners group; from 10 to 19, in the intermediate one; and from 20 to 30, in the experts. RESUMO O objetivo deste estudo foi criar e validar um teste para medir o desempenho do nado crawl, a fim de classificar os indivíduos em estágios de aprendizagem. Participaram da validação do teste, para estabelecimento do critério de fidedignidade, 23 adultos, (12 homens e 11 mulheres com idade média de 24,7, participantes da Escolinha de Natação da Associação Desportiva da UFSM

  6. Greenroads : a sustainability performance metric for roadway design and construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Greenroads is a performance metric for quantifying sustainable practices associated with roadway design and construction. Sustainability is defined as having seven key components: ecology, equity, economy, extent, expectations, experience and exposur...

  7. Fasting goldfish, Carassius auratus, and common carp, Cyprinus carpio, use different metabolic strategies when swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Hon Jung; Sinha, Amit Kumar; Mauro, Nathalie; Diricx, Marjan; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2012-11-01

    Fish need to balance their energy use between digestion and other activities, and different metabolic compromises can be pursued. We examined the effects of fasting (7 days) on metabolic strategies in goldfish and common carp at different swimming levels. Fasting had no significant effect on swimming performance (U(crit)) of either species. Feeding and swimming profoundly elevated total ammonia (T(amm)) excretion in both species. In fed goldfish, this resulted in increased ammonia quotients (AQ), and additionally plasma and tissue ammonia levels increased with swimming reflecting the importance of protein contribution for aerobic metabolism. In carp, AQ did not change since oxygen consumption (MO(2)) and T(amm) excretion followed the same trend. Plasma ammonia did not increase with swimming suggesting a balance between production and excretion rate except for fasted carp at U(crit). While both species relied on anaerobic metabolism during exhaustive swimming, carp also showed increased lactate levels during routine swimming. Fasting almost completely depleted glycogen stores in carp, but not in goldfish. Both species used liver protein for basal metabolism during fasting and muscle lipid during swimming. In goldfish, feeding metabolism was sacrificed to support swimming metabolism with similar MO(2) and U(crit) between fasted and fed fish, whereas in common carp feeding increased MO(2) at U(crit) to sustain feeding and swimming independently. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Short-term exposure to municipal wastewater influences energy, growth, and swimming performance in juvenile Empire Gudgeons (Hypseleotris compressa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Effectively treating domestic wastewater is paramount for preserving the health of aquatic ecosystems. Various technologies exist for wastewater treatment, ranging from simple pond-based systems to advanced filtration, and it is important to evaluate the potential for these different options to produce water that is acceptable for discharge. Sub-lethal responses were therefore assessed in juvenile Empire Gudgeons (Hypseleotris compressa) exposed for a period of two weeks to control, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100% wastewater treated through a multi-stage constructed wetland (CW) treatment system. Effects on basic energy reserves (i.e., lipids and protein), growth and condition, and swimming performance were quantified following exposure. A significant increase in weight and condition was observed in fish exposed to 50 and 100% wastewater dilutions, whereas whole-body lipid content was significantly reduced in these treatments. Maximum swimming velocity increased in a dose-dependent manner amongst treatment groups (although not significantly), whereas angular velocity was significantly reduced in the 50 and 100% dilutions. Results demonstrate that treated domestic wastewater can influence the growth and swimming performance of fish, and that such effects may be related to alterations to primary energy stores. However, studies assessing complex wastewaters present difficulties when it comes to interpreting responses, as many possible factors can contribute towards the observed effects. Future research should address these uncertainties by exploring interaction between nutrients, basic water quality characteristics and relevant contaminant mixtures, for influencing the energetics, growth, and functional performance of aquatic animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of the Finis Swimsense® and the Garmin Swim™ activity monitors for swimming performance and stroke kinematics analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert Mooney; Leo R Quinlan; Gavin Corley; Alan Godfrey; Conor Osborough; Gearóid ÓLaighin

    2017-01-01

    .... Swimmers wore the Finis Swimsense and the Garmin Swim activity monitors throughout. The devices automatically identified stroke type, swim distance, lap time, stroke count, stroke rate, stroke length and average speed...

  10. Improving Sustainability Performance for Public-Private-Partnership (PPP Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyin Shen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Improving sustainability performance in developing infrastructure projects is an important strategy for pursuing the mission of sustainable development. In recent years, the business model of public-private-partnership (PPP is promoted as an effective approach in developing infrastructure projects. It is considered that the distribution of the contribution on project investment between private and public sectors is one of the key variables affecting sustainability performance of PPP-type projects. This paper examines the impacts of the contribution distribution between public and private sectors on project sustainability performance. A model named the sustainability performance-based evaluation model (SPbEM is developed for assisting the assessment of the level of sustainability performance of PPP projects. The study examines the possibility of achieving better sustainability through proper arrangement of the investment distribution between the two primary sectors in developing PPP-type infrastructure projects.

  11. Swimming behaviour of juvenile Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauble, Dennis D.; Moursund, Russell A.; Bleich, Matthew D.

    2006-02-01

    Actively migrating juvenile Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata Richardson, 1836) were collected from hydroelectric bypass facilities in the Columbia River and transferred to the laboratory to study their diel movement patterns and swimming ability. Volitional movement of lamprey was restricted mainly to night, with 94% of all swimming activity occurring during the 12-hr dark period. Burst speed of juvenile lamprey ranged from 56 to 94 cm/s with a mean of 71 ±5 cm/s or an average speed of 5.2 body lengths (BL)/s. Sustained swim speed for 5-min test intervals ranged from 0 to 46 cm/s with a median of 23 cm/s. Critical swimming speed was 36.0±10.0 cm/s and 2.4±0.6 BL/s. There was no significant relationship between fish length and critical swimming speed. Overall swimming performance of juvenile Pacific lamprey is low compared to that of most anadromous teleosts. Their poor swimming ability provides a challenge during the freshwater migration interval to the Pacific Ocean.

  12. Substrate roughening improves swimming performance in two small-bodied riverine fishes: implications for culvert remediation and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Essie M.; Heaslip, Breeana M.; Cramp, Rebecca L.; Riches, Marcus; Gordos, Matthew A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Worldwide declines in riverine fish abundance and diversity have been linked to the fragmentation of aquatic habitats through the installation of instream structures (e.g. culverts, dams, weirs and barrages). Restoring riverine connectivity can be achieved by remediating structures impeding fish movements by, for example, replacing smooth substrates of pipe culverts with naturalistic substrates (i.e. river stones; culvert roughening). However, empirical evaluations of the efficacy of such remediation efforts are often lacking despite the high economic cost. We assessed the effectiveness of substrate roughening in improving fish swimming performance and linked this to estimates of upstream passage success. Critical swimming speeds (Ucrit) of two small-bodied fish, purple-spotted gudgeon (Mogurnda adspersa; 7.7–11.6 cm total length, BL) and crimson-spotted rainbowfish (Melanotaenia duboulayi; 4.2–8.7 cm BL) were examined. Swimming trials were conducted in a hydraulic flume fitted with either a smooth acrylic substrate (control) or a rough substrate with fixed river stones. Swimming performance was improved on the rough compared to the smooth substrate, with Mo. adspersa (Ucrit-smooth = 0.28 ± 0.0 m s−1, 2.89 ± 0.1 BL s−1, Ucrit-rough = 0.36 ± 0.02 m s−1, 3.66 ± 0.22 BL s−1, mean ± s.e) and Me. duboulayi (Ucrit-smooth = 0.46 ± 0.01 m s−1, 7.79 ± 0.33 BL s−1; Ucrit-rough = = 0.55 ± 0.03 m s−1, 9.83 ± 0.67 BL s−1, mean ± s.e.) both experiencing a 26% increase in relative Ucrit. Traversable water velocity models predicted maximum water speeds allowing successful upstream passage of both species to substantially increase following roughening remediation. Together these findings suggest culvert roughening may be a solution which allows hydraulic efficiency goals to be met, without compromising fish passage. PMID:28567285

  13. Sustainable Transportation - Indicators, Frameworks, and Performance Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Hall, Ralph P.; Marsden, Greg

    This textbook provides an introduction to the concept of sustainability in the context of transportation planning, management, and decision-making. The book is divided into two parts. In the first part, indicators and frameworks for measuring sustainable development in the transportation sector...... are developed. In the second, the authors analyze actual planning and decision-making in transportation agencies in a variety of governance settings. This analysis of real-world case studies demonstrates the benefits and limitations of current approaches to sustainable development in transportation. The book...

  14. Using Performance Indicators to Promote Sustainable Transport in Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Fukuda, Daisuke; Cornet, Yannick

    The challenges associated with using performance measurement to steer transport policy towards sustainability include general aspects of measuring sustainability of transport systems with indicators as well as specific national and institutional conditions for adopting and responding...... to the information produced by such sustainability indicator systems. Japan is interesting in these regards, since the country has adopted strategies for achieving a more sustainable transport situation, as well as frameworks of policy performance measurement and management. The paper will describe a general...... framework for reviewing sustainable transport policy performance measurement and will apply it to Japanese transport policy, with a focus on two specific cases. The framework is based in current scholarly literature on performance indicators to support sustainable transport policy and more general...

  15. Swimming Dynamics and Propulsive Efficiency of Squids throughout Ontogeny

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ian K. Bartol; Paul S. Krueger; Joseph T. Thompson; William J. Stewart

    2008-01-01

    .... These morphological changes and varying flow conditions affect swimming performance in squids. To determine how swimming dynamics and propulsive efficiency change throughout ontogeny, digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV...

  16. Changes in Respiratory Parameters and Fin-Swimming Performance Following a 16-Week Training Period with Intermittent Breath Holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, Vasileios; Toubekis, Argyris G; Karetsi, Eleni

    2015-12-22

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of training with intermittent breath holding (IBH) on respiratory parameters, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and performance. Twenty-eight fin-swimming athletes were randomly divided into two groups and followed the same training for 16 weeks. About 40% of the distance of each session was performed with self-selected breathing frequency (SBF group) or IBH (IBH group). Performance time of 50 and 400 m at maximum intensity was recorded and forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF) and SpO2 were measured before and after the 50 m test at baseline and post-training. Post-training, the respiratory parameters were increased in the IBH but remained unchanged in the SBF group (FEV1: 17 ±15% vs. -1 ±11%; FVC: 22 ±13% vs. 1 ±10%; PEF: 9 ±14% vs. -4 ±15%; p<0.05). Pre compared to post-training SpO2 was unchanged at baseline and decreased post-training following the 50 m test in both groups (p<0.05). The reduction was higher in the IBH compared to the SBF group (p<0.05). Performance in the 50 and 400 m tests improved in both groups, however, the improvement was greater in the IBH compared to the SBF group in both 50 and 400 m tests (p<0.05). The use of IBH is likely to enhance the load on the respiratory muscles, thus, contributing to improvement of the respiratory parameters. Decreased SpO2 after IBH is likely due to adaptation to hypoventilation. IBH favours performance improvement at 50 and 400 m fin-swimming.

  17. Changes in Respiratory Parameters and Fin-Swimming Performance Following a 16-Week Training Period with Intermittent Breath Holding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavrou Vasileios

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of training with intermittent breath holding (IBH on respiratory parameters, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2 and performance. Twenty-eight fin-swimming athletes were randomly divided into two groups and followed the same training for 16 weeks. About 40% of the distance of each session was performed with self-selected breathing frequency (SBF group or IBH (IBH group. Performance time of 50 and 400 m at maximum intensity was recorded and forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, peak expiratory flow (PEF and SpO2 were measured before and after the 50 m test at baseline and post-training. Posttraining, the respiratory parameters were increased in the IBH but remained unchanged in the SBF group (FEV1: 17 ±15% vs. -1 ±11%; FVC: 22 ±13% vs. 1 ±10%; PEF: 9 ±14% vs. -4 ±15%; p<0.05. Pre compared to post-training SpO2 was unchanged at baseline and decreased post-training following the 50 m test in both groups (p<0.05. The reduction was higher in the IBH compared to the SBF group (p<0.05. Performance in the 50 and 400 m tests improved in both groups, however, the improvement was greater in the IBH compared to the SBF group in both 50 and 400 m tests (p<0.05. The use of IBH is likely to enhance the load on the respiratory muscles, thus, contributing to improvement of the respiratory parameters. Decreased SpO2 after IBH is likely due to adaptation to hypoventilation. IBH favours performance improvement at 50 and 400 m fin-swimming.

  18. Campus Sustainability Initiatives and Performance: Do They Correlate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that there are correlations between campus sustainability initiatives and environmental performance, as measured by resource consumption and waste generation performance metrics. Institutions of higher education would like to imply that their campus sustainability initiatives are good…

  19. Sustainable Performance in Energy Harvesting - Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fafoutis, Xenofon; Di Mauro, Alessio; Dragoni, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    In this practical demo we illustrate the concept of "sustainable performance" in Energy-Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks (EH-WSNs). In particular, for different classes of applications and under several energy harvesting scenarios, we show how it is possible to have sustainable performance when...

  20. The effects of feeding on the swimming performance and metabolic response of juvenile southern catfish, Silurus meridionalis, acclimated at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xu; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Peng, Jiang-Lan; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2010-02-01

    To test whether the effects of feeding on swimming performance vary with acclimation temperature in juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis), we investigated the specific dynamic action (SDA) and swimming performance of fasting and feeding fish at acclimation temperatures of 15, 21, 27, and 33 degrees C. Feeding had no effect on the critical swimming speeding (U(crit)) of fish acclimated at 15 degrees C (p=0.66), whereas it elicited a 12.04, 18.70, and 20.98% decrease in U(crit) for fish acclimated at 21, 27 and 33 degrees C, respectively (pcatfish's central cardio-respiratory, peripheral digestive and locomotory capacities. The different metabolic strategies of juvenile southern catfish at different temperatures may relate to changes in oxygen demand, imbalances in ion fluxes and dissolved oxygen levels with changes in temperature. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Customers' values, beliefs on sustainable corporate performance, and buying behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Christy M.; Steg, Linda

    Sustainable corporate performance (SCP) requires balancing a corporation's economic, social, and environmental performance. This research explores values, beliefs about the importance of SCP, and buying behaviors of supermarket customers from within a stakeholder framework. Beliefs about the

  2. Reproductive performance and larval quality of blue swimming crab (Portunus pelagicus broodstock, fed with different feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vutthichai Oniam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fecundity, hatching rate and crab larvae quality of blue swimming crab, Portunus pelagicus, broodstock reared inearthen ponds, fed with different feeds, were studied for about 150 days. Results showed that average fecundity ofP. pelagicus broodstock fed with trash fish (569,842±243,173 eggs, shrimp feed (464,098±188,884 eggs, mixed feeds(544,875.3±169,357.3 eggs and hatching rate (50.78±25.19%, 62.33±26.79% and 50.86±20.76% were not significantly different(P>0.05. Zoea produced by female broodstock fed with mixed feeds had a significantly higher survival rate (89.47±5.03%,P<0.05 compared to those produced by female broodstock fed with trash fish (73.40±14.61% and shrimp feeds (67.33±12.80%, but the survival rate of megalopa and first crab stages was not affected. This study recommends that the mixed feedwas suitable feed for rearing of P. pelagicus broodstock in an earthen pond as evidenced by the quality of zoea I or 1 dayafter hatching and growth of female broodstock.

  3. Swimming Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Corinna C.; Krüger, Carsten; Herminghaus, Stephan; Bahr, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Swimming droplets are artificial microswimmers based on liquid droplets that show self-propelled motion when immersed in a second liquid. These systems are of tremendous interest as experimental models for the study of collective dynamics far from thermal equilibrium. For biological systems, such as bacterial colonies, plankton, or fish swarms, swimming droplets can provide a vital link between simulations and real life. We review the experimental systems and discuss the mechanisms of self-propulsion. Most systems are based on surfactant-stabilized droplets, the surfactant layer of which is modified in a way that leads to a steady Marangoni stress resulting in an autonomous motion of the droplet. The modification of the surfactant layer is caused either by the advection of a chemical reactant or by a solubilization process. Some types of swimming droplets possess a very simple design and long active periods, rendering them promising model systems for future studies of collective behavior.

  4. Sustainable construction building performance simulation and asset and maintenance management

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a collection of recent research works that highlight best practice solutions, case studies and practical advice on the implementation of sustainable construction techniques. It includes a set of new developments in the field of building performance simulation, building sustainability assessment, sustainable management, asset and maintenance management and service-life prediction. Accordingly, the book will appeal to a broad readership of professionals, scientists, students, practitioners, lecturers and other interested parties.

  5. Sustainable Supplier Performance Evaluation and Selection with Neofuzzy TOPSIS Method

    OpenAIRE

    Chaharsooghi, S. K.; Ashrafi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Supplier selection plays an important role in the supply chain management and traditional criteria such as price, quality, and flexibility are considered for supplier performance evaluation in researches. In recent years sustainability has received more attention in the supply chain management literature with triple bottom line (TBL) describing the sustainability in supply chain management with social, environmental, and economic initiatives. This paper explores sustainability in supply chain...

  6. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND PERFORMANCE IN THE CONTEXT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela-Oana PINTEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The characteristic elements of the new economy require economic entities new performance standards that go beyond economics. These standards should be integrated into corporate strategy development to ensure sustainability of activities. Globalization affects corporate governance reforms currently characterized by what we call corporate responsibility and transparency. Companies are pressed to provide in addition to financial information the non-financial information, which focus on social and environmental impact of their activities and the way sustainability related constraints are integrated into their strategy for achieving organizational success. This paper highlights the changes imposed by sustainable development on corporate governance regarding the increased information that stakeholders need and the way performance is seen, as a holistic concept. Today, corporations are challenged to meet through performance the values, interests and expectations of society. The main objective of a corporate governance system is to assure a sustainable growth of the company taking into consideration the new standards imposed by the requirements of sustainable development.

  7. Sustainable Supply Chain Capabilities: Accumulation, Strategic Types and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Seung Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the cumulative sustainable supply chain (SC capabilities and their effects on supply chain performance, including economic, environmental, and social performance. Using empirical analyses with data from 198 small- and medium-sized suppliers in Korea, this paper provides evidence about the cumulative sustainable SC capabilities, indicating that economic, social, and environmental capabilities in the supply chain mutually reinforce each other rather than traded off. This study also presents the positive effect of cumulative sustainable SC capabilities on supply chain sustainability performance. This paper identifies four distinctive groups of cumulative capabilities: the laggard, environmental-focused, social-cautious, and all-round. This study provides a better understanding about sustainable capabilities and important guidelines for managers of suppliers and buyers who wish to build strong social/environmental management capabilities without compromising economic capability throughout the entire supply chain.

  8. Sustainable Supplier Performance Evaluation and Selection with Neofuzzy TOPSIS Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaharsooghi, S K; Ashrafi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Supplier selection plays an important role in the supply chain management and traditional criteria such as price, quality, and flexibility are considered for supplier performance evaluation in researches. In recent years sustainability has received more attention in the supply chain management literature with triple bottom line (TBL) describing the sustainability in supply chain management with social, environmental, and economic initiatives. This paper explores sustainability in supply chain management and examines the problem of identifying a new model for supplier selection based on extended model of TBL approach in supply chain by presenting fuzzy multicriteria method. Linguistic values of experts' subjective preferences are expressed with fuzzy numbers and Neofuzzy TOPSIS is proposed for finding the best solution of supplier selection problem. Numerical results show that the proposed model is efficient for integrating sustainability in supplier selection problem. The importance of using complimentary aspects of sustainability and Neofuzzy TOPSIS concept in sustainable supplier selection process is shown with sensitivity analysis.

  9. Sustainable Supplier Performance Evaluation and Selection with Neofuzzy TOPSIS Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaharsooghi, S. K.; Ashrafi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Supplier selection plays an important role in the supply chain management and traditional criteria such as price, quality, and flexibility are considered for supplier performance evaluation in researches. In recent years sustainability has received more attention in the supply chain management literature with triple bottom line (TBL) describing the sustainability in supply chain management with social, environmental, and economic initiatives. This paper explores sustainability in supply chain management and examines the problem of identifying a new model for supplier selection based on extended model of TBL approach in supply chain by presenting fuzzy multicriteria method. Linguistic values of experts' subjective preferences are expressed with fuzzy numbers and Neofuzzy TOPSIS is proposed for finding the best solution of supplier selection problem. Numerical results show that the proposed model is efficient for integrating sustainability in supplier selection problem. The importance of using complimentary aspects of sustainability and Neofuzzy TOPSIS concept in sustainable supplier selection process is shown with sensitivity analysis. PMID:27379267

  10. Sustainability Matter and Financial Performance of Companies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carlos Lassala; Andreea Apetrei; Juan Sapena

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between social and environmental performance and financial performance in companies has been a subject widely debated in the literature but the results obtained to date are not conclusive...

  11. Swimming level classification of young school age children and their success in a long distance swimming test

    OpenAIRE

    Nováková, Martina

    2010-01-01

    Title: Swimming level classification of young school age children and their success in a long distance swimming test Work objectives: The outcome of our work is comparison and evaluation of the initial and final swimming lenght in a test of long distance swimming. This test is taken during one swimming course. Methodology: Data which were obtained by testing a certain group of people and were statistically processed, showed the swimming level and performance of the young school age children. ...

  12. A model for the training effects in swimming demonstrates a strong relationship between parasympathetic activity, performance and index of fatigue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Chalencon

    Full Text Available Competitive swimming as a physical activity results in changes to the activity level of the autonomic nervous system (ANS. However, the precise relationship between ANS activity, fatigue and sports performance remains contentious. To address this problem and build a model to support a consistent relationship, data were gathered from national and regional swimmers during two 30 consecutive-week training periods. Nocturnal ANS activity was measured weekly and quantified through wavelet transform analysis of the recorded heart rate variability. Performance was then measured through a subsequent morning 400 meters freestyle time-trial. A model was proposed where indices of fatigue were computed using Banister's two antagonistic component model of fatigue and adaptation applied to both the ANS activity and the performance. This demonstrated that a logarithmic relationship existed between performance and ANS activity for each subject. There was a high degree of model fit between the measured and calculated performance (R(2=0.84±0.14,p<0.01 and the measured and calculated High Frequency (HF power of the ANS activity (R(2=0.79±0.07, p<0.01. During the taper periods, improvements in measured performance and measured HF were strongly related. In the model, variations in performance were related to significant reductions in the level of 'Negative Influences' rather than increases in 'Positive Influences'. Furthermore, the delay needed to return to the initial performance level was highly correlated to the delay required to return to the initial HF power level (p<0.01. The delay required to reach peak performance was highly correlated to the delay required to reach the maximal level of HF power (p=0.02. Building the ANS/performance identity of a subject, including the time to peak HF, may help predict the maximal performance that could be obtained at a given time.

  13. Sustainable Innovation, Management Accounting and Control Systems, and International Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Lopez-Valeiras

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes how Management Accounting and Control Systems (MACS facilitate the appropriation of the benefits of sustainable innovations in organizations. In particular, this paper examines the moderating role of different types of MACS in the relationships between sustainable innovation and international performance at an organizational level. We collected survey data from 123 Spanish and Portuguese organizations. Partial Least Square was used to analyze the data. Results show that the effect of sustainable innovations on international performance is enhanced by contemporary rather than traditional types of MACS. Overall our findings show that MACS can help managers to develop and monitor organizational activities (e.g., costumer services and distribution activities, which support the appropriation of the potential benefits from sustainable innovation. This paper responds to recent calls for in-depth studies about the organizational mechanism that may enhance the success of sustainable innovation.

  14. Geneva 24 Hours Swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  15. Geneva 24 hours swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  16. Effects of a Novel Acoustic Transmitter on Swimming Performance and Predator Avoidance of Juvenile Chinook Salmon: Determination of a Size Threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Ricardo W.; Ashton, Neil K.; Brown, Richard S.; Liss, Stephanie A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Do Vale Beirao, Bernardo; Townsend, Richard L.; Deng, Zhiqun; Eppard, M. B.

    2016-01-04

    Abstract Telemetry studies are used worldwide to investigate the behavior and migration of fishes. The miniaturization of acoustic transmitters enables researchers to tag smaller fish, such as the juvenile life stages of salmon, thus representing a greater proportion of the population of interest. The development of an injectable acoustic transmitter has led to research determining the least invasive and quickest method of tag implantation. Swimming performance and predator avoidance were examined. To quantify critical swimming speed (Ucrit; an index of prolonged swimming performance) and predator avoidance for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), fish were split into three groups: (1) fish implanted with a dummy injectable acoustic transmitter (IAT treatment), (2) fish implanted with a dummy injectable acoustic transmitter and passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag (IAT+PIT treatment), and (3) an untagged control group. The Ucrits and predator avoidance capability of tagged fish were compared with untagged fish to determine if carrying an IAT adversely affected swimming performance or predator avoidance. Fish implanted with only an IAT had lower Ucrit values than untagged fish and a size threshold at 79 mm fork length was found. Conversely, Ucrit values for fish implanted with an IAT+PIT were not significantly different from untagged controls and no size threshold was found. Predator avoidance testing showed no significant difference for fish implanted with an IAT compared to untagged individuals, nor was there a significant difference for IAT+PIT fish compared to untagged fish.

  17. Building performance modelling for sustainable building design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufolahan Oduyemi

    2016-12-01

    The output revealed that BPM delivers information needed for enhanced design and building performance. Recommendations such as the establishment of proper mechanisms to monitor the performance of BPM related construction are suggested to allow for its continuous implementation. This research consolidates collective movements towards wider implementation of BPM and forms a base for developing a sound BIM strategy and guidance.

  18. Effects of 4 Weeks of β-Alanine Supplementation on Swim-Performance Parameters in Water Polo Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisola, Gabriel Motta Pinheiro; Milioni, Fabio; Papoti, Marcelo; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2017-08-01

    In water polo, several high-intensity efforts are performed, leading to the fatigue process due to accumulation of hydrogen ions, and thus β-alanine supplementation could be an efficient strategy to increase the intramuscular acid buffer. Purpose To investigate whether 4 wk of β-alanine supplementation enhances parameters related to water polo performance. Methods Twenty-two highly trained male water polo players of national level were randomly assigned to receive 28 d of either β-alanine or a placebo (4.8 g/d of the supplement in the first 10 d and 6.4 g/d in the final 18 d). The participants performed 30-s maximal tethered swimming (30TS), 200-m swimming (P200m), and 30-s crossbar jumps (30CJ) before and after the supplementation period. Results The β-alanine group presented significant increases in 30TS for mean force (P = .04; Δ = 30.5% ± 40.4%) and integral of force (P = .05; Δ = 28.0% ± 38.0%), as well as P200m (P = .05; Δ = -2.2% ± 2.6%), while the placebo group did not significantly differ for mean force (P = .13; Δ = 24.1% ± 33.7%), integral of force (P = .12; Δ = 24.3% ± 35.1%), or P200m (P = .10; Δ = -1.6% ± 3.8%). However, there was no significant group effect for any variable, and the magnitude-based-inference analysis showed unclear outcomes between groups (Cohen d ± 95%CL mean force = 0.16 ± 0.83, integral of force = 0.12 ± 0.84, and P200m = 0.05 ± 0.30). For 30CJ the results were similar, with improvements in both groups (placebo, Δ = 14.9% ± 14.1%; β-alanine, Δ = 16.9% ± 18.5%) but with no significant interaction effect between groups and an unclear effect (0.14 ± 0.75). Conclusion Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation does not substantially improve performance of 30TS, P200m, or 30CJ in highly trained water polo athletes compared with a control group.

  19. Assessing the Sustainability Performance of Organic Farms in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien M. de Olde

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth of organic agriculture in Denmark raises the interest of both producers and consumers in the sustainability performance of organic production. The aim of this study was to examine the sustainability performance of farms in four agricultural sectors (vegetable, dairy, pig and poultry using the sustainability assessment tool RISE 2.0. Thirty seven organic farms were assessed on 10 themes, including 51 subthemes. For one theme (water use and 17 subthemes, a difference between sectors was found. Using the thresholds of RISE, the vegetable, dairy and pig sector performed positively for seven themes and the poultry sector for eight themes. The performance on the nutrient flows and energy and climate themes, however, was critical for all sectors. Moreover, the performance on the economic viability theme was critical for vegetable, dairy and pig farms. The development of a tool, including decisions, such as the selection of themes and indicators, reference values, weights and aggregation methods, influences the assessment results. This emphasizes the need for transparency and reflection on decisions made in sustainability assessment tools. The results of RISE present a starting point to discuss sustainability at the farm-level and contribute to an increase in awareness and learning about sustainability.

  20. The effects of swimming exercise and dissolved oxygen on growth performance, fin condition and precocious maturation of early-rearing Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Thomas; Summerfelt, Steven T.; Mazik, Patricia M.; Good, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Swimming exercise, typically measured in body-lengths per second (BL/s), and dissolved oxygen (DO), are important environmental variables in fish culture. While there is an obvious physiological association between these two parameters, their interaction has not been adequately studied in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. Because exercise and DO are variables that can be easily manipulated in modern aquaculture systems, we sought to assess the impact of these parameters, alone and in combination, on the performance, health and welfare of juvenile Atlantic salmon. In our study, Atlantic salmon fry were stocked into 12 circular 0.5 m3 tanks in a flow-through system and exposed to either high (1.5–2 BL/s) or low (<0.5 BL/s) swimming speeding and high (100% saturation) or low (70% saturation) DO while being raised from 10 g to approximately 350 g in weight. Throughout the study period, we assessed the impacts of exercise and DO concentration on growth, feed conversion, survival and fin condition. By study's end, both increased swimming speed and higher DO were independently associated with a statistically significant increase in growth performance (p < .05); however, no significant differences were noted in survival and feed conversion. Caudal fin damage was associated with low DO, while right pectoral fin damage was associated with higher swimming speed. Finally, precocious male sexual maturation was associated with low swimming speed. These results suggest that providing exercise and dissolved oxygen at saturation during Atlantic salmon early rearing can result in improved growth performance and a lower incidence of precocious parr.

  1. Micro- and nanorobots swimming in heterogeneous liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bradley J; Peyer, Kathrin E

    2014-09-23

    Essentially all experimental investigations of swimming micro- and nanorobots have focused on swimming in homogeneous Newtonian liquids. In this issue of ACS Nano, Schamel et al. investigate the actuation of "nanopropellers" in a viscoelastic biological gel that illustrates the importance of the size of the nanostructure relative to the gel mesh size. In this Perspective, we shed further light on the swimming performance of larger microrobots swimming in heterogeneous liquids. One of the interesting results of our work is that earlier findings on the swimming performance of motile bacteria in heterogeneous liquids agree, in principle, with our results. We also discuss future research directions that should be pursued in this fascinating interdisciplinary field.

  2. the sustainability and outreach performance of ethiopian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eyerusalem

    of outreach matters when performance is compared against local benchmarks. It further indicates the presence of commercial and social oriented MFI clusters. Comparison with international benchmarks shows mixed evidence across scale of outreach, but the whole industry is weak in terms of depth of outreach. The trend.

  3. Energy sustainability performance of the regional economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Danilov

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of the study of the dynamics of energy intensity of gross regional product of the Sverdlovsk region for the period 1996 - 2003 years. and projections for the period up to 2015. The principal possibility of growth performance of the regional economy, without a significant increase in the consumption of primary fuel.

  4. Key Sustainability Performance Indicator Analysis for Czech Breweries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Kasem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability performance can be said to be an ability of an organization to remain productive over time and hold on to its potential for maintaining long-term profitability. Since the brewery sector is one of the most important and leading markets in the foodstuff industry of the Czech Republic, this study depicts the Czech breweries’ formal entry into sustainability reporting and performance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an efficiency level evaluation which would represent the level of corporate performance of Czech breweries. For this reason, Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA is introduced. In order to apply it, we utilize a set of key performance indicators (KPIs based on two international standard frameworks: the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI and its GRI 4 guidelines, and the guideline KPIs for ESG 3.0, which was published by the DVFA Society. Four sustainability dimensions (economic, environmental, social and governance are covered, making it thus possible to adequately evaluate sustainability performance in Czech breweries. The main output is not only the efficiency score of the company but also the input weights. These weights are used to determine the contribution of particular criteria to the breweries’ achieved score. According to the achieved efficiency results for Czech breweries, the percentage of women supervising the company does not affect the sustainability performance.

  5. The Effects of Different Warm-up Volumes on the 100-m Swimming Performance: A Randomized Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Henrique P; Marques, Mário C; Barbosa, Tiago M; Izquierdo, Mikel; Viana, João L; Teixeira, Ana M; Marinho, Daniel A

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of 3 different warm-up (WU) volumes on 100-m swimming performance. Eleven male swimmers at the national level completed 3 time trials of 100-m freestyle on separate days and after a standard WU, a short WU (SWU), or a long WU (LWU) in a randomized sequence. All of them replicated some usual sets and drills, and the WU totaled 1,200 m, the SWU totaled 600 m, and the LWU totaled 1,800 m. The swimmers were faster after the WU (59.29 seconds; confidence interval [CI] 95%, 57.98-60.61) and after the SWU (59.38 seconds; CI 95%, 57.92-60.84) compared with the LWU (60.18 seconds; CI 95%, 58.53-61.83). The second 50-m lap after the WU was performed with a higher stroke length (effect size [ES] = 0.77), stroke index (ES = 1.26), and propelling efficiency (ES = 0.78) than that after the SWU. Both WU and SWU resulted in higher pretrial values of blood lactate concentrations [La] compared with LWU (ES = 1.58 and 0.74, respectively), and the testosterone:cortisol levels were increased in WU compared with LWU (ES = 0.86). In addition, the trial after WU caused higher [La] (ES ≥ 0.68) and testosterone:cortisol values compared with the LWU (ES = 0.93). These results suggest that an LWU could impair 100-m freestyle performance. The swimmers showed higher efficiency during the race after a 1200-m WU, suggesting a favorable situation. It highlighted the importance of the [La] and hormonal responses to each particular WU, possibly influencing performance and biomechanical responses during a 100-m race.

  6. Short-term feed and light deprivation reduces voluntary activity but improves swimming performance in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, J R; Lazado, C C; Methling, C; Skov, P V

    2018-02-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (~ 180 g, 16 °C and rainbow trout that were swimming freely in large circular respirometers at 16 °C. These showed decreasing consumption oxygen rates and reductions in the amount of oxygen consumed above standard metabolic rate (a proxy for spontaneous activity) over 12 days, though this happened significantly faster when they were kept in total darkness when compared to a 12:12-h light-dark (LD) photoperiod. Weight loss during this period was also significantly reduced in total darkness (3.33% compared to 4.98% total body weight over 12 days). Immunological assays did not reveal any consistent up- or downregulation of antipathogenic and antioxidant enzymes in the serum or skin mucus of rainbow trout between 1 and 12 days of feed and light deprivation. Overall, short periods of deprivation do not appear to significantly affect the performance of rainbow trout which appear to employ a behavioural energy-sparing strategy, albeit more so in darkness than under a 12:12-h LD regime.

  7. The Relation between Sustainable Innovation Strategy and Financial Performance Mediated By Environmental Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariyati Hariyati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the relationship of sustainable innovation strategy and financial performance through the mediation environmental performance. The hypothesis in this study is sustainable innovation strategy affect the financial performance which is mediated by environmental performance. This study is quantitative research in the explanatory level. The population of this study is all the manufacturer companies in East Java. The data is collected through questionnaire. The unit of analysis is a business unit. The respondent of this study is the manager of a business unit manufacturing company in East Java. The results showed that the environmental performance mediates partially the relation between sustainable innovation strategy and financial performance.

  8. 24th & 25th Joint Workshop on Sustained Simulation Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Bez, Wolfgang; Focht, Erich; Gienger, Michael; Kobayashi, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the state of the art in High Performance Computing on modern supercomputer architectures. It addresses trends in hardware and software development in general, as well as the future of High Performance Computing systems and heterogeneous architectures. The contributions cover a broad range of topics, from improved system management to Computational Fluid Dynamics, High Performance Data Analytics, and novel mathematical approaches for large-scale systems. In addition, they explore innovative fields like coupled multi-physics and multi-scale simulations. All contributions are based on selected papers presented at the 24th Workshop on Sustained Simulation Performance, held at the University of Stuttgart’s High Performance Computing Center in Stuttgart, Germany in December 2016 and the subsequent Workshop on Sustained Simulation Performance, held at the Cyberscience Center, Tohoku University, Japan in March 2017.

  9. Swimming Eigenworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bussel, Frank; Khan, Zeina; Rahman, Mizanur; Vanapalli, Siva; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2014-03-01

    The nematode C. Elegans is a much studied organism, with a fully mapped genome, cell structure, and nervous system; however, aspects of its behavior have yet to be elucidated, particularly with respect to motility under various conditions. Recently the ``Eigenworm'' technique has emerged as a promising avenue of exploration: via principle component analysis it has been shown that the state space of a healthy crawling worm is low dimensional, in that its shape can be well described by a linear combination of just four eigenmodes. So far, use of this methodology with swimming worms has been somewhat tentative, though medical research such as drug screening is commonly done with nematodes in fluid environments e.g. well plates. Here we give initial results for healthy worms swimming in liquids of varying viscosity. The main result is that at the low viscosities (M9 buffer solution) the state space is even lower dimensional than that for the crawling worm, with only two significant eigenmodes; and that as viscosity increases so does the number of modes needed for an adequate shape description. As well, the shapes of the eigenmodes undergo significant transitions across the range of viscosities looked at.

  10. Effects of fasting and feeding on the fast-start swimming performance of southern catfish Silurus meridionalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, G J; He, X K; Cao, Z D; Fu, S J

    2015-01-21

    This study investigated the effects of fasting and feeding on the fast-start escape swimming performance of juvenile southern catfish Silurus meridionalis, a sit-and-wait forager that encounters extreme fasting and famine frequently during its lifespan. Ten to 30 days of fasting resulted in no significant change in most of the variables measured in the fast-start response except a 20-30% decrease in the escape distance during the first 120 ms (D120ms ) relative to the control group (48 h after feeding). The ratio of the single-bend (SB) response (lower energetic expenditure) to the double-bend (DB) response increased significantly from 0% in the control group to 75 and 82·5% in the 20 and 30 day fasting groups, respectively. Satiated feeding (25% of body mass) resulted in a significantly lower (36·6%) maximum linear velocity (Vmax ) and a significantly lower (43·3%) D120ms than in non-fed fish (control group, 48 h after feeding). Half-satiated feeding (12·5% of body mass), however, showed no significant effects on any of the measured variables of the fast-start response relative to control fish. It is suggested that the increase in the ratio of SB:DB responses with fasting in S. meridionalis may reflect a trade-off between energy conservation and maintaining high Vmax , while variables of fast-start performance were more sensitive to feeding than fasting might be an adaptive strategy to their foraging mode and food availability in their habitat. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  11. An accelerometer-based system for elite athlete swimming performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Neil P.; Anderson, Megan E.; James, Daniel A.

    2005-02-01

    The measurement of sport specific performance characteristics is an important part of an athletes training and preparation for competition. Thus automated measurement, extraction and analysis of performance measures is desired and addressed in this paper. A tri-axial accelerometer based system was located on the lower back or swimmers to record acceleration profiles. The accelerometer system contained two ADXL202 bi-axial accelerometers positioned perpendicular to one another, and can store over 6 hours of data at 150Hz per channel using internal flash memory. The simultaneous collection of video and electronics touch pad timing was used to validate the algorithm results. Using the tri-axial accelerometer data, algorithms have been developed to derive lap times and stroke count. Comparison against electronic touch pad timing against accelerometer lap times has produced results with a typical error of better than +/-0.5 seconds. Video comparison of the stroke count algorithm for freestyle also produced results with an average error of +/-1 stroke. The developed algorithms have a higher level of reliability compared to hand timed and counted date that is commonly used during training.

  12. Mechanics of Mammalian Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Timothy; Legac, Paul; Fish, Frank; Williams, Terrie; Mark, Russell; Hutchison, Sean

    2008-03-01

    Propulsion of large mammals (i.e. dolphins and humans) has been of great interest for both technological and athletic reasons. The foundational question is how fast can a mammal swim? Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) has been modified to be safely used on swimmers and dolphins. Experiments of dolphins performing various swimming behaviors were performed at the Long Marine Laboratory, University of California, Santa Cruz. Vortices generated by the dolphins' tail motions were used to estimate thrust production. Also, a two-dimensional dynamic force balance was constructed to study and improve the mechanics of elite swimmers. Paired with an underwater video camera, the forces seen could be directly related to the motion of the swimmer. These force measurements could be correlated to time resolved DPIV measurements of flow around the swimmers. Measurements made with swimmers, Megan Jendrick (2000 Olympic gold medalist) and Ariana Kukors (4x US National Champion), as well as data from trials with two dolphins will be presented.

  13. Energy Performance of Buildings - The European Approach to Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the European approach to improve sustainability in the building sector, which has a very high potential for considerable reduction of energy consumption in the coming years. By approving the Energy Performance in Buildings Directive the European Union has taken a strong...

  14. The performance frontier: innovating for a sustainable strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Robert G; Serafeim, George

    2013-05-01

    A mishmash of sustainability tactics does not add up to a sustainable strategy. Too often, companies launch sustainability programs with the hope that they'll be financially rewarded for doing good, even when those programs aren't relevant to their strategy and operations. They fail to understand the trade-offs between financial performance and performance on environmental, social, and governance (ESG) issues. Improving one typically comes at a cost to the other. But it doesn't have to be this way. It's possible to simultaneously boost both financial and ESG performance-if you focus strategically on issues that are the most "material" to shareholder value, and you develop major innovations in products, processes, and business models that prioritize those concerns. Maps being developed by the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board, which rank the materiality of 43 issues for 88 industries, can provide valuable guidance. And broad initiatives undertaken by three companies-Natura, Dow Chemical, and CLP Group-demonstrate the kind of innovations that will push performance into new territory. Communicating the benefits to stakeholders is also critical, which is why integrated reports, which combine financial and ESG reporting, are now gaining in popularity.

  15. New Key Performance Indicators for a Smart Sustainable City

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Minako Hara; Tomomi Nagao; Shinsuke Hannoe; Jiro Nakamura

    2016-01-01

      We propose key performance indicators (KPIs) based on the Gross Social Feel-Good Index to evaluate a smart sustainable city and report the results of a field trial in a city located almost at the center of the Tokyo Metropolitan Area...

  16. Effect on swimming start performance of two types of activation protocols: lunge and YoYo squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca-Fernández, Francisco; López-Contreras, Gracia; Arellano, Raúl

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 2 protocols of postactivation potentiation (PAP) on swimming start perfomance (SS). Fourteen trained swimmers (10 men and 4 women) volunteered for this study. An intragroup design of randomized repetitive measurements was applied. A previous SS trial, performed after a standard warm-up (SWU), served as a reference. Two methods of PAP, performed after 1 hour of rest, were randomly added to the SWU: (a) 3 lunges at 85% of 1 repetition maximum (LWU) and (b) 4 repetitions on the flywheel device YoYo squat (YWU). Swimmers were tested in an SS 8 minutes after the PAP warm-ups. Kinematic variables were collected using 3 underwater digital video cameras fixed poolside and operating at 25 Hz, and 1 high-speed camera focused on the block and operating at 300 Hz. Data obtained from the video analysis were processed using a repeated measures analysis of the variance. The mean horizontal velocity of the swimmer's flight improved after both PAP methods, with the greatest improvement after YWU (F2,12 = 47.042, p < 0.001; SWU = 3.63 ± 0.11; LWU = 4.15 ± 0.122; YWU = 4.89 ± 0.12 m·s). After YWU, it took the subjects less time to cover a distance of 5 m (F2,12 = 24.453, p < 0.001) and 15 m (F2,12 = 4.262, p < 0.04). Subjects also achieved a higher mean angular velocity of the knee extension (F2,12 = 23.286, p < 0.001) and a reduction of the time on the block (F2,12 = 6.595, p ≤ 0.05). These results demonstrate that muscle performance in the execution of an SS is enhanced after a warm-up with specific PAP protocols. YWU leads to the greatest improvement in the performance of the swimmer's start and, therefore, may be especially beneficial in short events.

  17. 20th Joint Workshop on Sustained Simulation Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Bez, Wolfgang; Focht, Erich; Patel, Nisarg; Kobayashi, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    The book presents the state of the art in high-performance computing and simulation on modern supercomputer architectures. It explores general trends in hardware and software development, and then focuses specifically on the future of high-performance systems and heterogeneous architectures. It also covers applications such as computational fluid dynamics, material science, medical applications and climate research and discusses innovative fields like coupled multi-physics or multi-scale simulations. The papers included were selected from the presentations given at the 20th Workshop on Sustained Simulation Performance at the HLRS, University of Stuttgart, Germany in December 2015, and the subsequent Workshop on Sustained Simulation Performance at Tohoku University in February 2016.

  18. Sustainable Entrepreneurship in SMEs: A Business Performance Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Soto-Acosta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that sustainable entrepreneurship leads to business performance, the present paper intends to investigate the standpoints of SMEs (small and medium-sized enterprises entrepreneurs on different facets. The emphasis is laid on the entrepreneurs’ approaches towards people, planet and profit and on their prioritization within business dynamics. The aforementioned dimensions are deemed important factors engendering business performance in terms of turnover, customer attraction and retention and market share. With a view to testing the advanced hypotheses, we employed a quantitative perspective relying on a questionnaire-based survey. As the results posited, the proposed model accounts for almost 50 percent of variance in business performance, whereas sustainable entrepreneurship approaches towards the people and profit dimensions have a significant positive influence on business performance.

  19. New Key Performance Indicators for a Smart Sustainable City

    OpenAIRE

    Minako Hara; Tomomi Nagao; Shinsuke Hannoe; Jiro Nakamura

    2016-01-01

    We propose key performance indicators (KPIs) based on the Gross Social Feel-Good Index to evaluate a smart sustainable city and report the results of a field trial in a city located almost at the center of the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We developed KPIs based on the following concepts: (1). The triple bottom line is the basic evaluation criteria; (2). The same unit is used for every evaluation criterion; (3). The KPIs can be used to assess a diverse range of smart sustainable cities with diffe...

  20. Conceptualizing Learning Organization towards Sustaining Learning Organization’s Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Faizal Iylia Mohd Ghazali; Norliya Ahmad Kassim; Lokman Hakim Khalib; Muhammad Nurjufri Jaafar; Muhammad Ariff Idris

    2015-01-01

    A learning organization is a place where people in the organization are powerfully learning collectively and by their own to expand their knowledge and skills so that they can enhance and optimize their organizational performance at the maximum. This paper reviews the literature that leads to developing a conceptual framework of a study on the factors of learning organization towards sustaining an organization’s performance. Based on the literature review, three main independent variables are...

  1. Holistic Performance Measurement to Achieve Sustainable Competitive Advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Keni Keni

    2013-01-01

    In the past, companies used balanced scorecard to measure its performance. Now, balanced scorecard as a performance measurement tool is no longer sufficient because business has been affected by changes to the natural environment and developing social expectations. In order to achieve sustainable competitive advantage, companies are beginning to address the risks and opportunities associated with these changes in their longer-term business planning. To turn risks into opportunities, companies...

  2. Value networks in manufacturing sustainability and performance excellence

    CERN Document Server

    Uusitalo, Teuvo

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights innovative solutions together with various techniques and methods that can help support the manufacturing sector to excel in economic, social, and environmental terms in networked business environments. The book also furthers understanding of sustainable manufacturing from the perspective of value creation in manufacturing networks, by capitalizing on the outcomes of the European ‘Sustainable Value Creation in Manufacturing Networks’ project. New dynamics and uncertainties in modern markets call for innovative solutions in the global manufacturing sector. While the manufacturing sector is traditionally driven by technology, it also requires other managerial and organizational solutions in terms of network governance, business models, sustainable solution development for products and services, performance management portals, etc., which can provide major competitive advantages for companies. At the same time, the manufacturing industry is subject to a change process, where business net...

  3. PROPERTIES OF SWIMMING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun KIR

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Swimming waters may be hazardous on human health. So, The physicians who work in the facilities, which include swimming areas, are responsible to prevent risks. To ensure hygiene of swimming water, European Swimming Water Directive offers microbiological, physical, and chemical criteria. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2004; 3(5.000: 103-104

  4. The need for performance governance to reach sustainable transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik

    , ‘Performance governance’ is what they call the most advanced form of public performance management. In simple models a government collects only sporadic information on performance to satisfy internal reporting. In the performance governance model, performance management is systematic, continuous...... are then designed to fulfill those targets in the best way, rather than being necessarily focused on building new infrastructure projects. New links are only built if they are better in terms of the politically defined indicators for economic, social and environmental performance indicators than other solutions......, such as improving the use of existing systems, or measures to manage demand and mobility. A key element in performance governance is thus the use of indicators to track progress, and to give feedback on the achievement of performance goals. Sustainable transport is a typical area where there is a strong need...

  5. The Physiology and Mechanics of Undulatory Swimming: A Student Laboratory Exercise Using Medicinal Leeches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The medicinal leech is a useful animal model for investigating undulatory swimming in the classroom. Unlike many swimming organisms, its swimming performance can be quantified without specialized equipment. A large blood meal alters swimming behavior in a way that can be used to generate a discussion of the hydrodynamics of swimming, muscle…

  6. Ecological differences influence the thermal sensitivity of swimming performance in two co-occurring mysid shrimp species with climate change implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Gordon T; Thornber, Carol; Grear, Jason; Kolbe, Jason J

    2017-02-01

    Temperature strongly affects performance in ectotherms. As ocean warming continues, performance of marine species will be impacted. Many studies have focused on how warming will impact physiology, life history, and behavior, but few studies have investigated how ecological and behavioral traits of organisms will affect their response to changing thermal environments. Here, we assessed the thermal tolerances and thermal sensitivity of swimming performance of two sympatric mysid shrimp species of the Northwest Atlantic. Neomysis americana and Heteromysis formosa overlap in habitat and many aspects of their ecological niche, but only N. americana exhibits vertical migration. In temperate coastal ecosystems, temperature stratification of the water column exposes vertical migrators to a wider range of temperatures on a daily basis. We found that N. americana had a significantly lower critical thermal minimum (CTmin) and critical thermal maximum (CTmax). However, both mysid species had a buffer of at least 4°C between their CTmax and the 100-year projection for mean summer water temperatures of 28°C. Swimming performance of the vertically migrating species was more sensitive to temperature variation, and this species exhibited faster burst swimming speeds. The generalist performance curve of H. formosa and specialist curve of N. americana are consistent with predictions based on the exposure of each species to temperature variation such that higher within-generation variability promotes specialization. However, these species violate the assumption of the specialist-generalist tradeoff in that the area under their performance curves is not constant. Our results highlight the importance of incorporating species-specific responses to temperature based on the ecology and behavior of organisms into climate change prediction models. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Beta-Alanine Supplementation Improves Throwing Velocities in Repeated Sprint Ability and 200-m Swimming Performance in Young Water Polo Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Gabriel Machado; Redkva, Paulo Eduardo; Brisola, Gabriel Mota Pinheiro; Malta, Elvis Sousa; de Araujo Bonetti de Poli, Rodrigo; Miyagi, Willian Eiji; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of beta-alanine supplementation on specific tests for water polo. Fifteen young water polo players (16 ± 2 years) underwent a 200-m swimming performance, repeated-sprint ability test (RSA) with free throw (shooting), and 30-s maximal tethered eggbeater kicks. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups (placebo × beta-alanine) and supplemented with 6.4g∙day(-1)of beta-alanine or a placebo for six weeks. The mean and total RSA times, the magnitude based inference analysis showed a likely beneficial effect for beta-alanine supplementation (both). The ball velocity measured in the throwing performance after each sprint in the RSA presented a very like beneficial inference in the beta-alanine group for mean (96.4%) and percentage decrement of ball velocity (92.5%, likely beneficial). Furthermore, the percentage change for mean ball velocity was different between groups (beta-alanine=+2.5% and placebo=-3.5%; p = .034). In the 30-s maximal tethered eggbeater kicks the placebo group presented decreased peak force, mean force, and fatigue index, while the beta-alanine group maintained performance in mean force (44.1%, possibly beneficial), only presenting decreases in peak force. The 200-m swimming performance showed a possibly beneficial effect (68.7%). Six weeks of beta-alanine supplementation was effective for improving ball velocity shooting in the RSA, maintaining performance in the 30-s test, and providing possibly beneficial effects in the 200-m swimming performance.

  8. Sustainability performance measurement with Analytic Network Process and balanced scorecard: Cuban practical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Medel-González

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The recent years has arisen a global discussion in relation with how to incorporate sustainability at a business level. Corporate sustainability is a multidimensional concept, is the translation of Sustainable Development concept at a business level. Sustainability in organizations must be managed and assessed by decision makers, for that reason a multi-criteria sustainability performance measurement is necessary. The aim of this paper is combine different important tools that helps to make operative corporate sustainability and sustainability performance measurement in Cuban organizations. The combination of Sustainability Balanced Scorecard, multi-criteria decisions models like: Analytic Network Process, and Matrix of Sustainable Strategic Alignment, can help managers in sustainability performance measurement and assessment. The result of this paper focus in a Corporate Sustainability Measurement Network design as a first approach for further sustainability performance measurement systems development emphasizing in multi-criteria analysis.

  9. New Key Performance Indicators for a Smart Sustainable City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minako Hara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose key performance indicators (KPIs based on the Gross Social Feel-Good Index to evaluate a smart sustainable city and report the results of a field trial in a city located almost at the center of the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We developed KPIs based on the following concepts: (1. The triple bottom line is the basic evaluation criteria; (2. The same unit is used for every evaluation criterion; (3. The KPIs can be used to assess a diverse range of smart sustainable cities with different goals. With the proposed KPIs of smart sustainable cities, indicators are divided into four layers for simplicity: the triple bottom line and “satisfaction” lie in the first layer. Since the notion of “society” is broad, it is further split into “safety”, “health”, and “comfort”, which are positioned in the second layer. The third layer includes indicators such as “information security” and “ubiquitous society” from the perspective of information communication technology (ICT. We conducted a trial evaluation by applying the proposed KPIs to individual ICT solutions of “Internet Protocol announcements”, “Wi-Fi around the station” and “information transmission and control” which have already been installed in a smart sustainable city.

  10. Estimating energy expenditure during front crawl swimming using accelerometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Espinosa, Hugo G.; Van Thiel, David H

    2014-01-01

    The determination of energy expenditure is of major interest in training load and performance assessment. Small, wireless accelerometer units have the potential to characterise energy expenditure during swimming. The correlation between absorbed oxygen versus flume swimming speed and absorbed oxy...

  11. Tagging Juvenile Pacific Lamprey with Passive Integrated Transponders: Methodology, Short-Term Mortality, and Influence on Swimming Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Bleich, Matthew D.

    2006-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine the feasibility (i.e., efficiency and onintrusiveness) of tagging juvenile Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and to determine any associated impacts on survivorship and swimming ability. Juvenile Pacific lampreys were obtained from the John Day Dam fish collection facility and tests were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in 2001 and 2002. A new PIT-tagging procedure was used to inject 12-mm tags 5 mm posterior to the gill openings. ampreys were allowed to recover for 3–4 d following surgery before postmortality and swimming tests were conducted. The PIT tagging procedure during 2001 did not include a suture, and 2.6% of the tags were shed after 40 d. During 2002 a single suture was used to close the opening after inserting a tag, and no tag shedding was observed. Overall short-term mortality rates for lampreys 120–155 mm (total length) held for 40 d at 88C was 2.2% for tagged and 2.7% for untagged fish. Mortality increased significantly when tagged and untagged groups were held in warmer (19–238C) river water: 50% for tagged and 60% for untagged animals. Lengths did not significantly affect survival for either the tagged or untagged group held in warm water. A fungal infection was observed to be the cause of death when water temperature increased. Swimming tests to determine any adverse effects due to tag insertion showed no significant difference (P ¼ 0.12) between tagged and untagged lampreys for mean burst speed; however, maximum burst speeds were significantly lower for the PIT-tagged group.

  12. Requisite leader behavioural competencies for sustainable organisational performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schalk W. Grobler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Organisations constantly strive to understand the impact of leader behaviour on continued superior organisational performance.Research purpose: The purpose of the study was to establish a framework of requisite leader behavioural competencies for sustainable (repeated organisational performance and to determine the interrelationship between leader behaviour and sustainable organisational performance.Rationale/ motivation: Many studies have been conducted investigating the impact of leadership on organisational performance, but a gap exists in studying the interplay between leader behavioural competencies, organisational performance and organisational context.Research design, approach and method: A case study research design was used employing a qualitative approach with a constructivist grounded theory research philosophy. Data collection comprised archival document review and semi-structured, in-depth interviews with senior executives in a high performing multinational listed South African organisation as case. Data analysis was conducted with the aid of qualitative data analysis computer software, as well as through iterative open and axial coding to discover patterns and themes.Main findings: The study resulted in a leader behavioural competency framework purporting a model founded strongly in context and simplicity.Practical/ Managerial implications: Requisite leader behavioural competencies were identified as: 1 simple focus and providing direction; 2 a sincere regard for people, or employee well-being; 3 creating an environment of absolute trust and empowerment; 4 enforcing innovation and entrepreneurship; 5 full leader support and backup; and 6 affording profound reward and recognition for achievements.Contribution: Organisations can benefit from an insight into understanding how the identified requisite leader behavioural competencies possibly can impact organisational performance in their respective environments.

  13. ARC Code TI: Swim

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Swim is a software information service for the grid built on top of Pour, which is an information service framework developed at NASA. Swim provides true software...

  14. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to keep my child safe around swimming pools? An adult should actively watch children at ...

  15. 2012 Swimming Season Factsheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  16. Performance of Power Systems under Sustained Random Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Verdejo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies linear systems under sustained additive random perturbations. The stable operating point of an electric power system is replaced by an attracting stationary solution if the system is subjected to (small random additive perturbations. The invariant distribution of this stationary solution gives rise to several performance indices that measure how well the system copes with the randomness. These indices are introduced, showing how they can be used for the optimal tuning of system parameters in the presence of noise. Results on a four-generator two-area system are presented and discussed.

  17. Methodics of obstacle swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Picka, Matěj

    2015-01-01

    Title: Methodics of Obstacle swimming Objective: The objectve of my disertation is to define requirments for Obstacle swimming and present the most effective methods for mastering in this discipline of Military Penthatlon Methods: Methods of pedagogical research Methods or theoretical and empirical research Results: The outcome of this thesis is to create methodics for obstacle swimming, show major mistakes in overcoming obstacles and give examples for ideal training session for swimming itse...

  18. 18th and 19th Workshop on Sustained Simulation Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Bez, Wolfgang; Focht, Erich; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Patel, Nisarg

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the state of the art in high-performance computing and simulation on modern supercomputer architectures. It covers trends in hardware and software development in general and the future of high-performance systems and heterogeneous architectures in particular. The application-related contributions cover computational fluid dynamics, material science, medical applications and climate research; innovative fields such as coupled multi-physics and multi-scale simulations are highlighted. All papers were chosen from presentations given at the 18th Workshop on Sustained Simulation Performance held at the HLRS, University of Stuttgart, Germany in October 2013 and subsequent Workshop of the same name held at Tohoku University in March 2014.  

  19. Business sustainability performance measurement: Eco-ratio analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins C. Ngwakwe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Eco-aware customers and stakeholders are demanding for a measurement that links environmental performance with other business operations. To bridge this seemingly measurement gap, this paper suggests ‘Eco-Ratio Analysis’ and proposes an approach for conducting eco-ratio analysis. It is argued that since accounting ratios function as a tool for evaluating corporate financial viability by management and investors, eco-ratio analysis should be brought to the fore to provide a succinct measurement about the linkage between environmental performance and conventional business performance. It is hoped that this suggestion will usher in a nuance debate and approach in the teaching, research and practice of environmental management and sustainability accounting

  20. A kinematic and dynamic comparison of surface and underwater displacement in high level monofin swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas, Guillaume; Bideau, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Fin-swimming performance can be divided into underwater and surface water races. World records are about 10% faster for underwater swimming vs. surface swimming, but little is known about the advantage of underwater swimming for monofin swimming. Some authors reported that the air-water interface influences the kinematics and leads to a narrow vertical amplitude of the fin. On the one hand, surface swimming is expected to affect drag parameters (cross-sectional area (S) an...

  1. Measuring business performance using indicators of ecologically sustainable organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Charles G., Jr.; Snow, Charles C.

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of ecology-based performance measures as a way of augmenting the Balanced Scorecard approach to organizational performance measurement. The Balanced Scorecard, as proposed by Kaplan and Norton, focuses on four primary dimensions; financial, internal-business-process, customer, and learning and growth perspectives. Recently, many 'green' organizational theorists have developed the concept of "Ecologically Sustainable Organizations" or ESOs, a concept rooted in open systems theory. The ESO is called upon to consider resource use and conservation as a strategy for long-term viability. This paper asserts that in order to achieve ESO status, an organization must not only measure but also reward resource conservation measures. Only by adding a fifth perspective for ecological dimensions will the entity be truly motivated toward ESO status.

  2. Characterisation of the swimming muscles of two Subantarctic notothenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alfredo Fernández

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The histochemical characteristics and distribution of muscle fibre types have been investigated in the swimming muscles of the róbalo, Eleginops maclovinus and the lorcho, Patagonotothen tessellata, Subantarctic notothenioids that inhabit the Beagle Channel. The fibre types were differentiated on the basis of glycogen and lipid contents and succinate dehydrogenase and myofibrillar ATPase (mATPase activities. White, red, intermediate and tonic fibres were present in the axial muscle of both species. The same fibre types were identified in the pectoral fin adductor muscles, although the intermediate type was absent. The mATPase technique performed at room temperature (21ºC allowed a good differentiation of fibre types, overcoming the problems found by previous researchers when applying this technique to Antarctic notothenioids. Four different zones (peripheral, mosaic, main and adjacent to the bone were found in the adductor profundis muscle. The proportion of the zones varied along the length of the adductor muscle. For both species, the percentage of red fibres found in the axial muscles was less than 5%, indicating that sustained swimming ability is not dependent on these muscles. The pectoral muscle mass/carcase mass ratio was significantly greater in E. maclovinus than in P. tessellata, reflecting a greater capacity for sustained swimming using pectoral fins.

  3. Sustained load performance of adhesive anchor systems in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Todd Marshall

    Stemming from a tragic failure of an adhesive anchor system, this research project investigated the sustained load performance of adhesive anchors in concrete under different installation and in-service conditions. The literature review investigated the current state of art of adhesive anchors. Extensive discussion was devoted to the behavior of adhesive anchors in concrete as well as the many factors that can affect their short-term and sustained load strength. Existing standards and specifications for the testing, design, construction, and inspection of adhesive anchors were covered. Based on the results of the literature review and the experience of the research group, a triage was conducted on many parameters identified as possibly affecting the sustained load performance of adhesive anchors and the highest priority parameters were investigated in this project. A stress versus time-to-failure approach was used to evaluate sensitivity of three ICC-ES AC 308 approved adhesive anchor systems. Of the various parameters investigated, only elevated in-service temperature and manufacturer's cure time was shown to exhibit adverse effects on sustained loads more than that predicted by short-term tests of fully cured adhesive over a reasonable structure lifetime of 75 years. In a related study, various tests were conducted on the adhesive alone (time-temperature superposition, time-stress superposition, and dogbone tensile tests). The results of that study were used to investigate the existence of a correlation with long-term anchor pullout testing in concrete. No consistent correlations were detected for the adhesives in the study. Tests were also conducted on the effect of early-age concrete on adhesive anchor bond strength. On the basis of confined test bond-strength alone, adhesive A (vinyl ester) did not show any significant increase after 14 days (102% of 28 day strength at 14 days), and adhesive B and C (epoxies) did not show any significant increase after 7 days

  4. A wake-based correlate of swimming performance and foraging behavior in seven co-occurring jellyfish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, J O; Colin, S P; Katija, K; Costello, J H

    2010-04-01

    It is generally accepted that animal-fluid interactions have shaped the evolution of animals that swim and fly. However, the functional ecological advantages associated with those adaptations are currently difficult to predict on the basis of measurements of the animal-fluid interactions. We report the identification of a robust, fluid dynamic correlate of distinct ecological functions in seven jellyfish species that represent a broad range of morphologies and foraging modes. Since the comparative study is based on properties of the vortex wake--specifically, a fluid dynamical concept called optimal vortex formation--and not on details of animal morphology or phylogeny, we propose that higher organisms can also be understood in terms of these fluid dynamic organizing principles. This enables a quantitative, physically based understanding of how alterations in the fluid dynamics of aquatic and aerial animals throughout their evolution can result in distinct ecological functions.

  5. Short-term feed and light deprivation reduces voluntary activity but improves swimming performance in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Javed Rafiq; Lazado, Carlo Cabacang; Methling, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    in large circular respirometers at 16 °C. These showed decreasing consumption oxygen rates and reductions in the amount of oxygen consumed above standard metabolic rate (a proxy for spontaneous activity) over 12 days, though this happened significantly faster when they were kept in total darkness when...... rate (MMR). They also showed a significant decrease in the estimated metabolic rate at 0 BL s−1 over 12 days which leads to a higher factorial aerobic metabolic scope at day 12 (9.38) compared to day 1 (6.54). Routine metabolic rates were also measured in ~ 90 g rainbow trout that were swimming freely......Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (~ 180 g, 16 °C and metabolic...

  6. No evidence for a bioenergetic advantage from forced swimming in rainbow trout under a restrictive feeding regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Lund, Ivar; Margarido Pargana, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Sustained swimming at moderate speeds is considered beneficial in terms of the productive performance of salmonids, but the causative mechanisms have yet to be unequivocally established. In the present study, the effects of moderate exercise on the bioenergetics of rainbow trout were assessed...

  7. The effects of diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation on the hypoxia tolerance, swimming capacity and growth performance of southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the effects of diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation on the hypoxia tolerance, swimming and growth performance of juvenile southern catfish, we initially measured the critical oxygen tension (P(crit)), oxygen thresholds of aquatic surface respiration (ASR) and loss of equilibrium (LOE) of diel-cycling hypoxia-acclimated (15 d, 7:00-21:00, dissolved oxygen level (DO) = 7.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1); 21:00-7:00, DO = 3.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1)) and non-acclimated (15 d, DO = 7.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1)) southern catfish at 25 °C. We then measured the critical swimming speed (U(crit)) and metabolic rate (MR) of hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated fish (under both hypoxic and normoxic conditions). The feeding rate (FR), feeding efficiency (FE) and specific growth rate (SGR) of fish in hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated groups were also measured. The P(crit), ASR and LOE of hypoxia-acclimated fish were significantly lower than those of non-acclimated fish. Hypoxia acclimation resulted in a significantly higher U(crit) when the individuals swam in hypoxia. The U(crit), maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and metabolic scope (MS) of both the hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated fish all decreased with the decrease of DO. However, the U(crit), MMR and MS decreased by 31, 43 and 54%, respectively, in non-acclimated fish, whereas these values decreased by 15, 28 and 29%, respectively, in hypoxia-acclimated fish, which suggests that hypoxia-acclimated fish were less sensitive to the DO decrease. The FR, FE and SGR all decreased by 21, 20 and 45%, respectively, in the hypoxia-acclimated group compared to the non-acclimated group. This result suggests that diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation improved the hypoxia tolerance and aerobic swimming performance of southern catfish, whereas impaired the growth performance. The high hypoxia tolerance and physiological plasticity to hypoxia-acclimated southern catfish may be related to its lower maintenance energy expenditure, sit-and-wait lifestyle and

  8. Sustainable collaboration : The impact of governance and institutions on sustainable performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesten, Eva; Jolink, Albert; Lopes de Sousa Jabbour, Ana Beatriz; Chappin, Maryse; Lozano, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    Collaboration between firms is important to stimulate the transition to a more sustainable society. This special volume shows that collaboration is indeed one of the preferred forms of governance to manage relations between firms in a sustainability context. Collaboration enhances sustainable

  9. Sports Medicine Meets Synchronized Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Betty J.; And Others

    This collection of articles contains information about synchronized swimming. Topics covered include general physiology and cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility exercises, body composition, strength training, nutrition, coach-athlete relationships, coping with competition stress and performance anxiety, and eye care. Chapters are included on…

  10. Body Fineness Ratio as a Predictor of Maximum Prolonged-Swimming Speed in Coral Reef Fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jeffrey A.; Alfaro, Michael E.; Noble, Mae M.; Fulton, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to sustain high swimming speeds is believed to be an important factor affecting resource acquisition in fishes. While we have gained insights into how fin morphology and motion influences swimming performance in coral reef fishes, the role of other traits, such as body shape, remains poorly understood. We explore the ability of two mechanistic models of the causal relationship between body fineness ratio and endurance swimming-performance to predict maximum prolonged-swimming speed (Umax) among 84 fish species from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. A drag model, based on semi-empirical data on the drag of rigid, submerged bodies of revolution, was applied to species that employ pectoral-fin propulsion with a rigid body at Umax. An alternative model, based on the results of computer simulations of optimal shape in self-propelled undulating bodies, was applied to the species that swim by body-caudal-fin propulsion at Umax. For pectoral-fin swimmers, Umax increased with fineness, and the rate of increase decreased with fineness, as predicted by the drag model. While the mechanistic and statistical models of the relationship between fineness and Umax were very similar, the mechanistic (and statistical) model explained only a small fraction of the variance in Umax. For body-caudal-fin swimmers, we found a non-linear relationship between fineness and Umax, which was largely negative over most of the range of fineness. This pattern fails to support either predictions from the computational models or standard functional interpretations of body shape variation in fishes. Our results suggest that the widespread hypothesis that a more optimal fineness increases endurance-swimming performance via reduced drag should be limited to fishes that swim with rigid bodies. PMID:24204575

  11. Swimming without a spine: Computational modeling and analysis of the swimming hydrodynamics of the Spanish Dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuoyu; Mittal, Rajat

    2017-10-16

    Incompressible flow simulations are used to study the swimming of a Spanish Dancer (Hexabranchus sanguineus), a soft-bodied invertebrate marine gastropod that swims by combining body pitching with undulations of its large mantle. A simple model based on a field video is employed as the basis for the model and coupling of the flow with the body acceleration enables us to examine the free swimming of this animal. Simulations indicate propulsive efficiencies of up to about 57% and terminal swimming speeds of 1.33 body lengths per cycle. Examination of the effect of body planform on the swimming hydrodynamics suggests that the planform of this animal is likely adapted to enhance its swimming performance. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Development of sustainable ultra-high performance concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jisong; Zhao, Yinghua

    2017-04-01

    To design Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) in a sustainable way, this paper investigates the properties of UHPC containing supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as fly ash (FA) and silica fume (SF). The flexural strength, compressive strength, and microstructure of the UHPC are examined. Results indicate that it is possible to design UHPC with very low cement amount. On the basis of 30% FA replacement, the incorporation of 10% and 20% SF shows equivalent or higher mechanical properties compared to the reference samples. The microstructure and pore volume of developed UHPC indicated a high correlation with its compressive strength. Efficiency factor (k-value) is calculated as an indicator to predict the flexural and compressive strength of UHPC with SCMs in terms of their synergistic effects.

  13. Sustaining Health and Performance in the Desert: Environmental Medicine Guidance for Operations in Southwest Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    poisonous jellyfish and sea urchins. Minimizing the Problem 1. Both diarrheal and insect-borne diseases are prevented through a strategy which breaks the...showering and recreational swimming should not be allowed except in U.S. Military inspected and approved facilities. Any unapproved water source should... behavioral signs of environmental and operational stress, and implement corrective actions. Understanding the Problem 1. Military Performance in the Heat

  14. Contrasting effects of nitrogenous pollution on fitness and swimming performance of Iberian waterfrog, Pelophylax perezi (Seoane, 1885), larvae in mesocosms and field enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea-Serrano, A; Tejedo, M

    2014-01-01

    Amphibians are declining worldwide and pollutants have been implicated as a major contributor to these declines. To understand these declines, many studies have assessed the impact of pollutants on amphibian behaviour. However, information regarding their effect on locomotor abilities, as well as the intra-specific variation of the tolerance to pollutants, is extremely rare. Further, the majority of studies examining the impact of pollutants on amphibians have been conducted in simplified laboratory settings. Given the complexity of natural systems, determining whether amphibian responses in laboratory studies can be generalized to more realistic natural scenarios is critical. Towards this goal, this study assessed the impact of nitrogenous pollution on survival and fitness-related larval traits (growth, mass and swimming performance) for three populations of the frog Pelophylax perezi, exposed to different degrees of eutrophication in two different and complementary experiments: (1) pond mesocosms, with NH4Cl isolated or combined with NaNO2 and NaNO3, and (2) field enclosures placed in natural streams differing in their degree of pollution. For both mesocosm and field enclosure experiments, larval mortality was unaffected by nitrogenous pollution. However, in the mesocosm experiment, exposure to nitrogenous compounds reduced final larvae mass and growth. In contrast, in the enclosure experiment, polluted locations facilitated final mass and growth of surviving tadpoles. Population-level variation in the effect of pollution was observed for final larval mass in the mesocosm but not in the field enclosure experiment. In addition, although nitrogenous compounds in both mesocosm and natural conditions had no direct effect on absolute larval swimming performance, they may impact the viability of larvae by affecting the relationships between growth and the swimming abilities. The differential pattern found in the impacts of nitrogenous compounds on larvae of P. perezi

  15. The commonest mistakes in the basic swimming techniques after a 20-hour swimming course in the first cycle of the primary school

    OpenAIRE

    Jerina, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The main object of the study in this thesis is identifying the commonest mistakes in the basic swimming techniques after a 20-hour swimming course in the first cycle of the primary school. In our swimming learning system we document the number of swimmers and non-swimmers and titles acquired to eight-scale ranking (Slovenian scale for assessing swimming skills), but we do not document the correctness of performed swimming technique. Consequently we do not have information about the common...

  16. Performance and sustainability of two alternative rabbit breeding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Theau.Clément

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate 2 alternative breeding systems that differ from the current system in terms of reproduction rhythm, age of females at first insemination and the age of kits at weaning and at slaughter. We measured the performance of 332 females and their offspring over 4 consecutive cycles, as well as the sustainability of the systems. We compared an intensive (group I: reproduction rhythm [RR]=35 d; first insemination [AI1]=20.6 wk of age; weaning age [WA]=32 d; slaughter age [WS]=63 d an extensive (group E: RR=49 d; AI1=16.6 wk; WA=30 d; WS=70 d and a semi-intensive system (group S: RR=42 d; AI1=19.6 wk; WA=35 d; WS=70 d considered as the control system. Sustainability was evaluated using a multicriteria assessment method that takes 14 economic, environmental and social criteria into account, for which 3 to 5 indicators were expressed as the relative score [–1; –0.5; 0; +0.5; +1] for alternative systems compared to the control system. The productivity measured at 28 d (3.5, 4.2 and 4.6 kg/AI, for groups I, S and E, respectively, at 63 d post-partum (30, 38 and 42 kg/female for 4 cycles, respectively, and the total body energy measured 3 d after the 1st and at the 4th insemination (45.4, 46.8 and 49.5 MJ, respectively, were significantly increased when the reproductive rhythm decreased (P<0.001. Before and after weaning, kit mortality decreased when the reproduction rhythm decreased (11.4, 7.3, and 1.9% and 18.3, 15.3 and 10.6% for groups I, S and E, respectively, P<0.05. Carcass quality (weight and dressing percentage was lower in I than in the S and E groups (P<0.001. On this basis, the yearly productivity per doe at weaning could be estimated at 79, 83, and 78 kg for groups I, S and E, respectively. Consequently, the productivity per reproductive cycle increases with the extensification of the breeding system. Nevertheless, compared with the current French system (S, simultaneous changes in several breeding

  17. Swimming and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Jason M; Khanna, Neel; Chesler, Roseann; Salciccioli, Louis

    2013-09-20

    Exercise training is accepted to be beneficial in lowering morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiac disease. Swimming is a popular recreational activity, gaining recognition as an effective option in maintaining and improving cardiovascular fitness. Swimming is a unique form of exercise, differing from land-based exercises such as running in many aspects including medium, position, breathing pattern, and the muscle groups used. Water immersion places compressive forces on the body with resulting physiologic effects. We reviewed the physiologic effects and cardiovascular responses to swimming, the cardiac adaptations to swim training, swimming as a cardiac disease risk factor modifier, and the effects of swimming in those with cardiac disease conditions such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and the long-QT syndrome. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. The Evaluation of t he Nutritional Habits of Athletes Between the Ages of 17 - 18 Who Perform t he Swimming Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine TURGUT

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this research is to determine dietary habits of sporters actively involved in swimming and between ages 17 - 18. 98 sporters (60 male and 38 female who swam in the “Anatolian Cup” swimming competition organized in Malatya province in the East Anatolian Region, constitute popu lation of the study. Sporters have participated in a survey that consisted of two parts. First part of the survey is about personal information, and second part inclu des questions about nutrition. When the results of the survey were evaluated, it was est ablished that most of the sporters made exercise between 3 and 5 hours in one week, and they are doing this sports for about 4 years. It was determined that sporters generally acquired their knowledge about nutrition from their coaches or sports friends. They indicated that they usually eat their last meal 3 - 4 hours before the competition, they pay attention this meal to consist from light food, they prefer food like honey and butter in order to increase their energy before the competition, and the energy they need is between 4000 - 5000 kcal. It is observed that they received protein for contribution to recovery period after the competition and training. It is also revealed that most of the sporters skip breakfast and eat only 2 meals in a day, and they a re not taking any snacks. They explained the reason as they don‟t have enough time and they wake up late. Sporters in the research group think that doping is harmful even though it improves the performance; however most of them state that they can take d oping for a prize or money. It will be beneficial to organize trainings, seminars for sporters and coaches on the subject of foods to be eaten by the sporters and their importance on the performance of the sporters.

  19. Regeneration in Swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Lehocký, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Topic: Regeneration in the swimming Aim: Using a questionnaire to find out information and views on the need of regeneration and its use. Process the results and evaluate the survey data into synoptic tables and graphs. Giving a comprehensive overview of the field of regeneration in the swimming sport. Method: The research group of our work happened 30 swimmers - participants Championship Czech Republic 2005 in short swimming pool at the age of 15-33 years. Results: It was confirmed that most...

  20. A mechanism for efficient swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Saadat, Mehdi; Brandes, Aaron; Saraiya, Vishaal; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental measurements of hydrodynamic performance as well as wake visualization for a freely swimming 3D foil with pure pitching motion. The foil is constrained to move in its axial direction. It is shown that the iso-lines for speed and input power (or economy) coincide in the dimensional frequency versus amplitude plane, up to a critical amplitude. The critical amplitude is independent from swimming speed. It is shown that all swimming gaits (combination of frequency and amplitude) share a single value for Strouhal number (for amplitudes below the critical amplitude), when plotted in non-dimensional frequency vs. amplitude plane. Additionally, it is shown that the swimming gaits with amplitudes equal to the critical amplitude are energetically superior to others. This finding provides a fundamental mechanism for an important observation made by Bainbridge (1958) namely, most fish (such as trout, dace, goldfish, cod and dolphins) maintain constant tail-beat amplitude during cruise, and their speed is correlated linearly with their tail-beat frequency. The results also support prior findings of Saadat and Haj-Hariri (2013). Supported by ONR MURI Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  1. Sustainability Management in Agribusiness: Challenges, Concepts, Responsibilities and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Friedrich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea of sustainable management has recently gained growing attention in the agribusiness sector. This is mainly due to a widespread discontent with the industrialization of agricultural production and food processing and growing public pressure on agribusiness firms to implement more sustainable management practices. In this paper we present the results of an explorative empirical study of sustainability management in German agribusiness firms. The study shows that agribusiness firms have developed a broad understanding of sustainability management and perceive a multi-facetted spectrum of societal demands they have to meet. The most important arguments for implementing more sustainable management practices are that companies have to make sure that they are trusted by society in the long run and that the perception of a company by external stakeholders has become more and more important. The companies surveyed know quite a number of sustainability programmes and standards, but the number of companies that actually participate in these initiatives is much smaller. Nonetheless, the majority of the respondents feels that their company is more successful with regard to sustainability management than industry average.

  2. Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. Discovering Sustainable Solutions to Power and Secure America’s Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-09-01

    Sustainability is fundamental to the Department of Energy’s research mission and operations as reflected in the Department’s Strategic Plan. Our overarching mission is to discover the solutions to power and secure America’s future.

  3. Performance versus values in sustainability transformation of food systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrøe, Hugo F.; Sautier, Marion; Legun, Katharine

    2017-01-01

    -based approaches that aim at communicating and mediating sustainability values to enable coordinated and cooperative action to transform the food system. We identify their respective strengths and weaknesses based on a cross-case analysis of four cases, and propose that the two approaches, likeWeber's two types......Questions have been raised on what role the knowledge provided by sustainability science actually plays in the transition to sustainability and what role it may play in the future. In this paper we investigate different approaches to sustainability transformation of food systems by analyzing...... the rationale behind transformative acts-the ground that the direct agents of change act upon-and how the type of rationale is connected to the role of research and how the agents of change are involved. To do this we employ MaxWeber's distinction between instrumental rationality and value-rationality in social...

  4. Process-related key performance indicators for measuring sustainability performance of ecodesign implementation into product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Vinicius Picanco; Pigosso, Daniela Cristina Antelmi; McAloone, Tim C.

    2016-01-01

    Developing products with improved environmental performance is regarded as a crucial component of companies' commitment towards sustainable development. The potential benefits derived from ecodesign are constantly highlighted in the literature, and go beyond the pure environmental dimension....... However, the primary focus has been positioned on evaluating those benefits in terms of product-related environmental performance, which leaves an open potential for capturing performance from a broader managerial perspective. Consequently, the major challenges tackled by this paper relate to the limited...... focus on process-oriented perspectives that cover all dimensions of the triple bottom line and offer a systematized view on ecodesign performance measurement. Therefore, this paper presents a comprehensive set of process-related key performance indicators for product development, based on a three...

  5. A Global Perspective on the Sustainable Performance of Urbanization

    OpenAIRE

    Liyin Shen; Chenyang Shuai; Liudan Jiao; Yongtao Tan; Xiangnan Song

    2016-01-01

    Urbanization, particularly in developing countries, is a major strategy for development. However, major concerns accompany it, such as air pollution, habitat destruction, and loss of arable land. In responding to these challenges, governments throughout the world have been implementing various policy mechanisms to guide the practice of urbanization towards sustainable development. It appears that there is little research investigating the outcomes of those efforts in implementing sustainable ...

  6. Analytic network process model for sustainable lean and green manufacturing performance indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminuddin, Adam Shariff Adli; Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd; Mohamed, Nik Mohd Zuki Nik

    2014-09-01

    Sustainable manufacturing is regarded as the most complex manufacturing paradigm to date as it holds the widest scope of requirements. In addition, its three major pillars of economic, environment and society though distinct, have some overlapping among each of its elements. Even though the concept of sustainability is not new, the development of the performance indicator still needs a lot of improvement due to its multifaceted nature, which requires integrated approach to solve the problem. This paper proposed the best combination of criteria en route a robust sustainable manufacturing performance indicator formation via Analytic Network Process (ANP). The integrated lean, green and sustainable ANP model can be used to comprehend the complex decision system of the sustainability assessment. The finding shows that green manufacturing is more sustainable than lean manufacturing. It also illustrates that procurement practice is the most important criteria in the sustainable manufacturing performance indicator.

  7. Framework for Sustainability Performance Assessment for Manufacturing Processes- A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K.; Sultan, I.

    2017-07-01

    Manufacturing industries are facing tough competition due to increasing raw material cost and depleting natural resources. There is great pressure on the industry to produce environmental friendly products using environmental friendly processes. To address these issues modern manufacturing industries are focusing on sustainable manufacturing. To develop more sustainable societies, industries need to better understand how to respond to environmental, economic and social challenges. This paper proposed some framework and tools that accelerate the transition towards a sustainable system. The developed framework will be beneficial for sustainability assessment comparing different plans alongside material properties, ultimately helping the manufacturing industries to reduce the carbon emissions and material waste, besides improving energy efficiency. It is expected that this would be highly beneficial for determination of environmental impact of a process at early design stages. Therefore, it would greatly help the manufacturing industries for selection of process plan based on sustainable indices. Overall objective of this paper would have good impact on reducing air emissions and protecting environment. We expect this work to contribute to the development of a standard reference methodology to help further sustainability in the manufacturing sector.

  8. Site Sustainability Plan with FY2015 Performance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Teresa A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lapsa, Melissa Voss [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hudey, Bryce D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is both the largest science and energy laboratory in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and one of the oldest national laboratories still operating at its original site. ORNL implemented an aggressive modernization program in 2000, providing modern, energy-efficient facilities that help to support the growth of important national scientific missions while faced with the unique and challenging opportunity to integrate sustainability into legacy assets. ORNL is committed to leveraging the outcomes of DOE-sponsored research programs to maximize the efficient use of energy and natural resources across a diverse campus. ORNL leadership in conjunction with the Sustainable Campus Initiative (SCI) maintains a commitment to the integration of technical innovations into new and existing facilities, systems, and processes with a comprehensive approach to achieving DOE directives and the new Executive Order 13693. Energy efficiency, greenhouse gas reductions, climate change resiliency, and other pursuits toward integrated sustainability factor in all we do. ORNL continues to pursue and deploy innovative solutions and initiatives to advance regional, national, and worldwide sustainability and continues to transform its culture and engage employees in supporting sustainability at work, at home, and in the community.

  9. Cetacean Swimming with Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank

    2016-11-01

    During entanglement in fishing gear, dolphins can suffer abrasions and amputations of flukes and fins. As a result, if the dolphin survives the ordeal, swimming performance is altered. Current rehabilitation technques is the use of prosthesis to regain swimming ability. In this work, analyses are focused on two dolphins with locomotive impairment; Winter (currently living in Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Florida) and Fuji (lived in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan). Fuji lost about 75% of its fluke surface to necrosis (death of cells) and Winter lost its tail due to amputation. Both dolphins are aided by prosthetic tails that mimic the shape of a real dolphin tail. Using 3D surface reconstruction techniques and a high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solver, we were able to elucidate the kinematics and hydrodynamics and fluke deformation of these swimmers to clarify the effectiveness of prostheses in helping the dolphins regain their swimming ability. Associated with the performance, we identified distinct features in the wake structures that can explain this gap in the performance compared to a healthy dolphin. This work was supported by ONR MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  10. Optimal Strouhal number for swimming animals

    CERN Document Server

    Eloy, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the swimming performances of aquatic animals, an important dimensionless quantity is the Strouhal number, St = fA/U, with f the tail-beat frequency, A the peak-to-peak tail amplitude, and U the swimming velocity. Experiments with flapping foils have exhibited maximum propulsive efficiency in the interval 0.25 < St < 0.35 and it has been argued that animals likely evolved to swim in the same narrow interval. Using Lighthill's elongated-body theory to address undulatory propulsion, it is demonstrated here that the optimal Strouhal number increases from 0.15 to 0.8 for animals spanning from the largest cetaceans to the smallest tadpoles. To assess the validity of this model, the swimming kinematics of 53 different species of aquatic animals have been compiled from the literature and it shows that their Strouhal numbers are consistently near the predicted optimum.

  11. The Fluid Dynamics of Competitive Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Timothy; Mark, Russell; Hutchison, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Nowhere in sport is performance so dependent on the interaction of the athlete with the surrounding medium than in competitive swimming. As a result, understanding (at least implicitly) and controlling (explicitly) the fluid dynamics of swimming are essential to earning a spot on the medal stand. This is an extremely complex, highly multidisciplinary problem with a broad spectrum of research approaches. This review attempts to provide a historical framework for the fluid dynamics-related aspects of human swimming research, principally conducted roughly over the past five decades, with an emphasis on the past 25 years. The literature is organized below to show a continuous integration of computational and experimental technologies into the sport. Illustrations from the authors' collaborations over a 10-year period, coupling the knowledge and experience of an elite-level coach, a lead biomechanician at USA Swimming, and an experimental fluid dynamicist, are intended to bring relevance and immediacy to the review.

  12. Safe, High-Performance, Sustainable Precast School Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsen, Peter I.

    2011-01-01

    School design utilizing integrated architectural and structural precast and prestressed concrete components has gained greater acceptance recently for numerous reasons, including increasingly sophisticated owners and improved learning environments based on material benefits such as: sustainability, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, storm…

  13. Framework for measuring the sustainability performance of ecodesign implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Vinicius Picanco; Pigosso, Daniela Cristina Antelmi; McAloone, Tim C.

    Companies and academic studies are consistently reporting several potential business benefits gained fromecodesign implementation, such as increased innovation potential, development of new markets and business models, reduction in environmental liability, risks and costs, improvement of organiza......, in alignment with corporate sustainability strategy and main drivers....

  14. Energetics of swimming of a sea turtle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, H D

    1976-02-01

    Young (mean mass 735 g) green turtles (Chelonia mydas) were able to swim in a water channel at sustained speeds between 0-14 and 0-35 m.s-1. Oxygen consumption at rest was was 0-07 l.kg-1.h-1; at maximum swimming speed oxygen consumption was 3-4 times greater than at rest for a given individual. In comparison with other animals of the same body mass the cost of transport for the green turtle (0.186lO2.kg-1.km-1) is less than that for flying birds but greater than that for fish. From drag measurements it was calculated that the aerobic efficiency of swimming was between 1 and 10%; the higher efficiencies were found at the higher swimming speeds. Based upon the drag calculations for young turtles, it is estimated that adult turtles making the round-trip breeding migration between Brazil and Ascension Island (4800 km) would require the equivalent of about 21% of their body mass in fat stores to account for the energetic cost of swimming.

  15. Nutritional recommendations for synchronized swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sherry; Benardot, Dan; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    The sport of synchronized swimming is unique, because it combines speed, power, and endurance with precise synchronized movements and high-risk acrobatic maneuvers. Athletes must train and compete while spending a great amount of time underwater, upside down, and without the luxury of easily available oxygen. This review assesses the scientific evidence with respect to the physiological demands, energy expenditure, and body composition in these athletes. The role of appropriate energy requirements and guidelines for carbohydrate, protein, fat, and micronutrients for elite synchronized swimmers are reviewed. Because of the aesthetic nature of the sport, which prioritizes leanness, the risks of energy and macronutrient deficiencies are of significant concern. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport and disordered eating/eating disorders are also of concern for these female athletes. An approach to the healthy management of body composition in synchronized swimming is outlined. Synchronized swimmers should be encouraged to consume a well-balanced diet with sufficient energy to meet demands and to time the intake of carbohydrate, protein, and fat to optimize performance and body composition. Micronutrients of concern for this female athlete population include iron, calcium, and vitamin D. This article reviews the physiological demands of synchronized swimming and makes nutritional recommendations for recovery, training, and competition to help optimize athletic performance and to reduce risks for weight-related medical issues that are of particular concern for elite synchronized swimmers.

  16. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquarium granuloma; Fish tank granuloma; Mycobacterium marinum infection ... A swimming pool granuloma occurs when water containing Mycobacterium marinum bacteria enter a break in the skin. Signs of a skin infection appear ...

  17. Diarrhea and Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Externa) "Swimmer's Ear" (Otitis Externa) Prevention Head Lice MRSA Pinworm & Swimming Other Recreational Water-related Issues Pools & ... Professionals Aquatics Staff Travelers En Español Publications, Data, & Statistics Disease & Outbreak Tracking Prevention Commentaries Diarrhea & Vomiting Skin, ...

  18. Swimming fundamentals: turning performance of leopard sharks (Triakis semifasciata) is predicted by body shape and postural reconfiguration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Marianne E; Roque, Cassandra M; Long, John H

    2011-12-01

    Turns are essential maneuvers that sharks employ when foraging, feeding, and migrating. How well any individual performs in turning is determined, in part, by the static form and postural reconfiguration of its body. Since the importance of postural reconfiguration in determining turning performance is not well understood, our goal was to examine how body form and posture correlate with turning performance in juvenile leopard sharks, Triakis semifasciata. From videos of sharks turning laterally in yaw, performance was measured as turning radius, turning angle, angular speed of the head, and translational speed of the body along its path. Body form variables included the body's length, mass, width, second moment of area, and mass moment of inertia. Postural variables included body-bending coefficient, body flexion at different longitudinal positions, and lag time between body flexion and turning of the center of rotation. Using step-wise linear regression followed by multiple regression, each performance variable was regressed onto three pools of independent variables: (i) all form variables alone, (ii) all postural variables alone, and (iii) a combination of all form and postural variables. From these correlations, it appears that turning performance may be controlled primarily by the magnitude and timing of the flexion of the body. In other words, sharks alter how they turn by changing the pattern in which they bend their bodies; the body acts as a dynamically reconfiguring rudder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of a quantitative parameter to evaluate swimming technique based on the maximal tethered swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soncin, Rafael; Mezêncio, Bruno; Ferreira, Jacielle Carolina; Rodrigues, Sara Andrade; Huebner, Rudolf; Serrão, Julio Cerca; Szmuchrowski, Leszek

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a new force parameter, associated with swimmers' technique and performance. Twelve swimmers performed five repetitions of 25 m sprint crawl and a tethered swimming test with maximal effort. The parameters calculated were: the mean swimming velocity for crawl sprint, the mean propulsive force of the tethered swimming test as well as an oscillation parameter calculated from force fluctuation. The oscillation parameter evaluates the force variation around the mean force during the tethered test as a measure of swimming technique. Two parameters showed significant correlations with swimming velocity: the mean force during the tethered swimming (r = 0.85) and the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation (r = 0.86). However, the intercept coefficient was significantly different from zero only for the mean force, suggesting that although the correlation coefficient of the parameters was similar, part of the mean velocity magnitude that was not associated with the mean force was associated with the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation. Thus, force fluctuation during tethered swimming can be used as a quantitative index of swimmers' technique.

  20. Propulsive efficiency of frog swimming with different feet and swimming patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jizhuang, Fan; Wei, Zhang; Bowen, Yuan; Gangfeng, Liu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aquatic and terrestrial animals have different swimming performances and mechanical efficiencies based on their different swimming methods. To explore propulsion in swimming frogs, this study calculated mechanical efficiencies based on data describing aquatic and terrestrial webbed-foot shapes and swimming patterns. First, a simplified frog model and dynamic equation were established, and hydrodynamic forces on the foot were computed according to computational fluid dynamic calculations. Then, a two-link mechanism was used to stand in for the diverse and complicated hind legs found in different frog species, in order to simplify the input work calculation. Joint torques were derived based on the virtual work principle to compute the efficiency of foot propulsion. Finally, two feet and swimming patterns were combined to compute propulsive efficiency. The aquatic frog demonstrated a propulsive efficiency (43.11%) between those of drag-based and lift-based propulsions, while the terrestrial frog efficiency (29.58%) fell within the range of drag-based propulsion. The results illustrate the main factor of swimming patterns for swimming performance and efficiency. PMID:28302669

  1. Propulsive efficiency of frog swimming with different feet and swimming patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jizhuang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and terrestrial animals have different swimming performances and mechanical efficiencies based on their different swimming methods. To explore propulsion in swimming frogs, this study calculated mechanical efficiencies based on data describing aquatic and terrestrial webbed-foot shapes and swimming patterns. First, a simplified frog model and dynamic equation were established, and hydrodynamic forces on the foot were computed according to computational fluid dynamic calculations. Then, a two-link mechanism was used to stand in for the diverse and complicated hind legs found in different frog species, in order to simplify the input work calculation. Joint torques were derived based on the virtual work principle to compute the efficiency of foot propulsion. Finally, two feet and swimming patterns were combined to compute propulsive efficiency. The aquatic frog demonstrated a propulsive efficiency (43.11% between those of drag-based and lift-based propulsions, while the terrestrial frog efficiency (29.58% fell within the range of drag-based propulsion. The results illustrate the main factor of swimming patterns for swimming performance and efficiency.

  2. Fast growers sprint slower: effects of food deprivation and re-feeding on sprint swimming performance in individual juvenile European sea bass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Shaun S; Marras, Stefano; McKenzie, David J

    2014-03-15

    While many ectothermic species can withstand prolonged fasting without mortality, food deprivation may have sublethal effects of ecological importance, including reductions in locomotor ability. Little is known about how such changes in performance in individual animals are related to either mass loss during food deprivation or growth rate during re-feeding. This study followed changes in the maximum sprint swimming performance of individual European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, throughout 45 days of food deprivation and 30 days of re-feeding. Maximum sprint speed did not show a significant decline until 45 days of food deprivation. Among individuals, the reduction in sprinting speed at this time was not related to mass loss. After 30 days of re-feeding, mean sprinting speed had recovered to match that of control fish. Among individuals, however, maximum sprinting speed was negatively correlated with growth rate after the resumption of feeding. This suggests that the rapid compensatory growth that occurs during re-feeding after a prolonged fast carries a physiological cost in terms of reduced sprinting capacity, the extent of which shows continuous variation among individuals in relation to growth rate. The long-term repeatability of maximum sprint speed was low when fish were fasted or fed a maintenance ration, but was high among control fish fed to satiation. Fish that had been previously food deprived continued to show low repeatability in sprinting ability even after the initiation of ad libitum feeding, probably stemming from variation in compensatory growth among individuals and its associated negative effects on sprinting ability. Together, these results suggest that food limitation can disrupt hierarchies of maximum sprint performance within populations. In the wild, the cumulative effects on locomotor capacity of fasting and re-feeding could lead to variable survival among individuals with different growth trajectories following a period of food

  3. Alterations to Juvenile Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Swim Performance after Acute Embryonic Exposure to Sub-lethal Exposures of Hydraulic Fracturing Flowback and Produced Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkerts, Erik J; Blewett, Tamzin A; He, Yuhe; Goss, Greg G

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water (FPW) is a wastewater produced during fracturing activities in an operating well which is hyper saline and chemically heterogeneous in nature, containing both anthropogenic and petrogenic chemicals. Determination of FPW associated toxicity to embryonic fish is limited, while investigation into how embryonic exposures may affect later life stages is not yet studied. Zebrafish embryos (24hrs post fertilization) were acutely exposed to 2.5% and 5% FPW fractions for either 24 or 48hrs and returned to freshwater. After either 24 or 48h exposures, embryos were examined for expression of 3 hypoxia related genes. Erythropoietin (epoa) but not hypoxia inducible factor (hif1aa) nor hemoglobin -ß chain (hbbe1.1) was up-regulated after either 24 or 48h FPW exposure. Surviving embryos were placed in freshwater and grown to a juvenile stage (60days post fertilization). Previously exposed zebrafish were analyzed for both swim performance (Ucrit and Umax) and aerobic capacity. Fish exposed to both sediment containing (FPW-S) or sediment free (FPW-SF) FPW displayed significantly reduced aerobic scope and Ucrit/Umax values compared to control conditions. Our results collectively suggest that organics present in our FPW sample may be responsible for sub-lethal fitness and metabolic responses. We provide evidence supporting the theory that the cardio-respiratory system is impacted by FPW exposure. This is the first known research associating embryonic FPW exposures to sub-lethal performance related responses in later life fish stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Widespread utilization of passive energy recapture in swimming medusae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Brad J; Colin, Sean P; Costello, John H

    2018-01-11

    Recently, it has been shown that some medusae are capable of swimming very efficiently, i.e. with a low cost of transport, and that this is in part due to passive energy recapture (PER) which occurs during bell relaxation. We compared the swimming kinematics among a diverse array of medusae, varying in taxonomy, morphology and propulsive and foraging modes, in order to evaluate the prevalence of PER in medusae. We found that while PER was common among taxa, the magnitude of the contribution to overall swimming varied greatly. The ability of medusae to utilize PER was not related to morphology and swimming performance but was controlled by their swimming kinematics. Utilizing PER required the medusae to pause after bell expansion and individuals could modulate their PER by changing their pause duration. PER can greatly enhance swimming efficiency but there appear to be trade-offs associated with utilizing PER. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Measuring Longitudinal Student Performance on Student Learning Outcomes in Sustainability Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarchow, Meghann E.; Formisano, Paul; Nordyke, Shane; Sayre, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the student learning outcomes (SLOs) for a sustainability major, evaluate faculty incorporation of the SLOs into the courses in the sustainability major curriculum and measure student performance on the SLOs from entry into the major to the senior capstone course. Design/methodology/approach:…

  6. Relationship between sustainable development initiatives and improved company financial performance: A South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darelle Groenewald

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Companies are under ever-increasing pressure from both internal and external stakeholders to consider the environmental and social impacts of their operations and to mitigate these impacts. This necessitates an investigation into the effect of sustainability initiatives on the financial performance (FP of a company.Research purpose: The study analysed the relationship between sustainability performance and FP in South African listed companies.Motivation for the study: Some South African listed companies acknowledge in their sustainability reports that there is a link between sustainability development and long-term shareholder value. This implies that FP is linked to sustainable development performance. This relationship has not been researched for South African listed companies and therefore needs to be investigated.Research design, approach and method: A similar research method was used as for an international study. Forty-five listed South African companies were selected as the sample. Their sustainable development reports were used for analysis. Data were analysed with the use of content and a canonical correlation analysis.Main findings: The results of the study revealed that an overall positive relationship exists between sustainability performance and FP. Practical implications: South African companies that have a high involvement and focus on specific sustainable development initiatives that are integrated into overall sustainable development strategy can deliver improved FP for the organisation and deliver long-term value to its shareholders.Contribution: Six sustainable development aspects were found to be significantly correlated with improved FP and if incorporated into a company’s sustainable development strategy can lead to increased successes.

  7. Sustaining extended enterprise performance : a value co-creation perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbink, Maria; Hartmann, Andreas; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2016-01-01

    The Extended Enterprise, an advanced form of supply-chain integration, focusses on maximizing overall performance while also optimizing the performance of the stand-alone organizations involved. This necessitates not only inter-organizational collaboration but also inter-organizational performance

  8. Configurational Paths to Social Performance in SMEs: The Interplay of Innovation, Sustainability, Resources and Achievement Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Kraus

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In today’s world of increasing ecological, social and economic issues, the question as to how businesses can become a vehicle towards more sustainable development has become more relevant than ever. Crucial to a more sustainable economy is the successful implementation of sustainable practices through entrepreneurial activities. Although there are attempts to describe how sustainable entrepreneurs differentiate themselves, the question of how some entrepreneurs manage to successfully create a sustainable enterprise, while others do not, remains unanswered. The aim of this research is to find causal patterns that explain the success of sustainable entrepreneurs, using their social performance as a measure. Using a configuration approach-based fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA of 598 Austrian small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs, we could identify four different combinations of the interconnected variables of innovation orientation, environmental sustainability, resource leveraging and achievement motivation, which all lead to social performance depending on the respective networking intensity of the firms. The only variable that is included in all combinations is environmental sustainability, thus indicating it may be either crucial to or a prerequisite for achieving social performance in SMEs.

  9. Approach to swimming knowledge among the students of the Faculty of education

    OpenAIRE

    Grabnar, Marjana

    2016-01-01

    In the theoretical part of this thesis, we presented the importance of swimming knowledge and the environment in which swimming is performed. We tried to capture the education of swimming as a whole. Firstly, we presented the history of swimming in general and swimming in Slovenia. We continued by researching what the education of swimming actually is and what must be accomplished to become an actual swimmer, not just a person that feels well in the water and is not afraid of it. Furthermore,...

  10. How current assessments of Sustainability Performance by Best Practice in the UN Global Compact challenge legitimacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    the Economist (2013) turn to Scandinavia as having the solutions to some of the global sustainability-related challenges, it might also be worth reversing the optics. One approach could be to take a closer look at whether this high level of support for the UNGC translates to a high level of Sustainability...... Performance? And how the current assessment of Sustainability Performance by Best Practice in the UN Global Compact challenge the legitimacy of both the corporation, the UNGC and governments attempting to facilitate sustainability and CSR engagement? Best Practice is a concept frequently used by authorities......The Scandinavian countries have been strong supporters of the UN Global Compact (UNGC) since the official launch in year 2000. This is best evidenced by the level of adoption of the UNGC, which is the most widely adopted broad sustainability-reporting standard in Scandinavia (Kjaergaard, submitted...

  11. Nutrition for swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Gregory; Boyd, Kevin T; Burke, Louise M; Koivisto, Anu

    2014-08-01

    Swimming is a sport that requires considerable training commitment to reach individual performance goals. Nutrition requirements are specific to the macrocycle, microcycle, and individual session. Swimmers should ensure suitable energy availability to support training while maintaining long term health. Carbohydrate intake, both over the day and in relation to a workout, should be manipulated (3-10 g/kg of body mass/day) according to the fuel demands of training and the varying importance of undertaking these sessions with high carbohydrate availability. Swimmers should aim to consume 0.3 g of high-biological-value protein per kilogram of body mass immediately after key sessions and at regular intervals throughout the day to promote tissue adaptation. A mixed diet consisting of a variety of nutrient-dense food choices should be sufficient to meet the micronutrient requirements of most swimmers. Specific dietary supplements may prove beneficial to swimmers in unique situations, but should be tried only with the support of trained professionals. All swimmers, particularly adolescent and youth swimmers, are encouraged to focus on a well-planned diet to maximize training performance, which ensures sufficient energy availability especially during periods of growth and development. Swimmers are encouraged to avoid rapid weight fluctuations; rather, optimal body composition should be achieved over longer periods by modest dietary modifications that improve their food choices. During periods of reduced energy expenditure (taper, injury, off season) swimmers are encouraged to match energy intake to requirement. Swimmers undertaking demanding competition programs should ensure suitable recovery practices are used to maintain adequate glycogen stores over the entirety of the competition period.

  12. The balanced scorecard: sustainable performance assessment for forensic laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Max; Speaker, Paul J; Fleming, Arron Scott; Riley, Richard A

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the concept of the balanced scorecard into the laboratory management environment. The balanced scorecard is a performance measurement matrix designed to capture financial and non-financial metrics that provide insight into the critical success factors for an organization, effectively aligning organization strategy to key performance objectives. The scorecard helps organizational leaders by providing balance from two perspectives. First, it ensures an appropriate mix of performance metrics from across the organization to achieve operational excellence; thereby the balanced scorecard ensures that no single or limited group of metrics dominates the assessment process, possibly leading to long-term inferior performance. Second, the balanced scorecard helps leaders offset short term performance pressures by giving recognition and weight to long-term laboratory needs that, if not properly addressed, might jeopardize future laboratory performance. Copyright © 2012 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Swim Speed Tests as a Method for Differentiating the Profiles of Young Swimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Klara Šiljeg; Joško Sindik; Goran Leko

    2017-01-01

    Swimming tests are used in every training cycle and seasons with purpose of estimating swimming performance and evaluate certain training types. The focus of this study is an attempt to distinguish between the potential short-distance and longer-distance swimmers, as well as the swimmers who could have desirable profiles for particular swimming styles. For this purpose, several aims are given: () to determine the latent dimensions of the performances in swimming tests, conducted on various di...

  14. Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tub/Spa Test Strips Inflatable & Plastic Kiddie Pools Water Play Areas & Interactive Fountains Swim Diapers & Swim Pants Breastfeeding in Pools & Hot Tubs/Spas Recreational Water Illnesses Diarrheal Illness Rashes Ear Infections Respiratory Infections ...

  15. 2008 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  16. 2010 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  17. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  18. 2009 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  19. 2007 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  20. 2006 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  1. Biomechanical Analysis of the Swim-Start: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Vantorre, Didier Chollet, Ludovic Seifert

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This review updates the swim-start state of the art from a biomechanical standpoint. We review the contribution of the swim-start to overall swimming performance, the effects of various swim-start strategies, and skill effects across the range of swim-start strategies identified in the literature. The main objective is to determine the techniques to focus on in swimming training in the contemporary context of the sport. The phases leading to key temporal events of the swim-start, like water entry, require adaptations to the swimmer’s chosen technique over the course of a performance; we thus define the swim-start as the moment when preparation for take-off begins to the moment when the swimming pattern begins. A secondary objective is to determine the role of adaptive variability as it emerges during the swim-start. Variability is contextualized as having a functional role and operating across multiple levels of analysis: inter-subject (expert versus non-expert, inter-trial or intra-subject (through repetitions of the same movement, and inter-preference (preferred versus non-preferred technique. Regarding skill effects, we assume that swim-start expertise is distinct from swim stroke expertise. Highly skilled swim-starts are distinguished in terms of several factors: reaction time from the start signal to the impulse on the block, including the control and regulation of foot force and foot orientation during take-off; appropriate amount of glide time before leg kicking commences; effective transition from leg kicking to break-out of full swimming with arm stroking; overall maximal leg and arm propulsion and minimal water resistance; and minimized energy expenditure through streamlined body position. Swimmers who are less expert at the swim-start spend more time in this phase and would benefit from training designed to reduce: (i the time between reaction to the start signal and impulse on the block, and (ii the time in transition (i

  2. Association between infant swimming and rhinovirus-induced wheezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuez-Havupalo, Linnea; Karppinen, Sinikka; Toivonen, Laura; Kaljonen, Anne; Jartti, Tuomas; Waris, Matti; Peltola, Ville

    2014-11-01

    Infant swimming has been considered as a risk factor for wheezing, but the role that respiratory viruses play is unclear. We explored the effects of infant swimming on the risk of all wheezing illnesses and wheezing associated with rhinoviruses. We followed up a birth cohort of 1827 children until 17 months of age, collecting data on infant swimming, other risk factors and physician-diagnosed bronchiolitis or recurrent wheezing. Viral diagnostics were performed in a subset of children with all respiratory tract infections. Data on infant swimming were obtained for 1038 children, with viral follow-up for 635 children. At least one wheezing illness was documented in 45/469 (9.6%) swimming children versus 39/569 (6.9%) nonswimming children (p = 0.11), and rhinoviruses were associated with wheezing in 11/296 (3.7%) swimming children versus 4/339 (1.2%) nonswimming children (p = 0.04). In adjusted logistic regression analyses, swimming had an odds ratio of 1.71 (p = 0.05) for bronchiolitis and 3.57 (p = 0.06) for rhinovirus-associated wheezing. An association between infant swimming and rhinovirus-associated wheezing was detected for children with atopic eczema (p = 0.006). There may be a link between infant swimming and rhinovirus-induced wheezing illnesses in atopic infants. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Physiological responses to swimming fatigue of juvenile white-leg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Swimming performance is one of the crucial factors determining the lifestyle and survival of Penaeid shrimps. This study examined under controlled laboratory conditions, the physiological responses to swimming fatigue of juvenile white-leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (8.85 ± 0.05 cm TL) exposed to different current ...

  4. Wild-type Zebrafish subjected to swim-training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiaz, Ansa

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide microarray analysis of the effects of swim-training on zebrafish larval development. Zebrafish were subjected to swim-training from 5 days post fertilization (dpf) until 10 dpf. Subsequently, we performed a genome-wide microarray analysis of trained and control fish at 10 dpf. The goal

  5. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance of work resulting from damage sustained... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary to...

  6. Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience (SuPER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagode, Heike [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bosilca, George [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Danalis, Anthony [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dongarra, Jack [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Moore, Shirley [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The University of Tennessee (UTK) and University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) partnership supported the three main thrusts of the SUPER project---performance, energy, and resilience. The UTK-UTEP effort thus helped advance the main goal of SUPER, which was to ensure that DOE's computational scientists can successfully exploit the emerging generation of high performance computing (HPC) systems. This goal is being met by providing application scientists with strategies and tools to productively maximize performance, conserve energy, and attain resilience. The primary vehicle through which UTK provided performance measurement support to SUPER and the larger HPC community is the Performance Application Programming Interface (PAPI). PAPI is an ongoing project that provides a consistent interface and methodology for collecting hardware performance information from various hardware and software components, including most major CPUs, GPUs and accelerators, interconnects, I/O systems, and power interfaces, as well as virtual cloud environments. The PAPI software is widely used for performance modeling of scientific and engineering applications---for example, the HOMME (High Order Methods Modeling Environment) climate code, and the GAMESS and NWChem computational chemistry codes---on DOE supercomputers. PAPI is widely deployed as middleware for use by higher-level profiling, tracing, and sampling tools (e.g., CrayPat, HPCToolkit, Scalasca, Score-P, TAU, Vampir, PerfExpert), making it the de facto standard for hardware counter analysis. PAPI has established itself as fundamental software infrastructure in every application domain (spanning academia, government, and industry), where improving performance can be mission critical. Ultimately, as more application scientists migrate their applications to HPC platforms, they will benefit from the extended capabilities this grant brought to PAPI to analyze and optimize performance in these environments, whether they use PAPI

  7. High performance sport and sustainability: a contradiction of terms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, D.; Barker-Ruchtia, N.; Wals, A.E.J.; Tinning, R.

    2014-01-01

    Success in high performance sport has always been highly valued. Today, lucrative contracts, sponsorship deals and opportunities for celebrity status are balanced against substantial time spent training and high chances of failure. With pressure mounting on athletes to make the most of their

  8. Predictive performance simulations for a sustainable lecture building complex

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conradie, Dirk CU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available during operational hours. The following process was used to model the ventilation performance of this mixed-mode building: 1) An insolation analysis was undertaken to establish the effect of cumulative exposure of the Trombe wall surface to solar...

  9. 20th and 21st Joint Workshop on Sustained Simulation Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Bez, Wolfgang; Focht, Erich; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Qi, Jiaxing; Roller, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The book presents the state of the art in high-performance computing and simulation on modern supercomputer architectures. It covers trends in hardware and software development in general, and the future of high-performance systems and heterogeneous architectures specifically. The application contributions cover computational fluid dynamics, material science, medical applications and climate research. Innovative fields like coupled multi-physics or multi-scale simulations are also discussed. All papers were chosen from presentations given at the 20th Workshop on Sustained Simulation Performance in December 2014 at the HLRS, University of Stuttgart, Germany, and the subsequent Workshop on Sustained Simulation Performance at Tohoku University in February 2015.  .

  10. Determination of Economic Indicators in the Context of Corporate Sustainability Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Pavláková Dočekalová

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on determination of the most significant economic indicators influencing corporate sustainability performance. Corporate sustainability performance is a multidimensional concept based on the original idea of sustainable development, replacing the traditional understanding of corporate performance only as capital appreciation for owners (shareholders. Compared to the original concept of sustainable development which consists of environmental, social and economic performance, the so-called triple-bottom-line, it is broaden to the responsibilities and the impact of Corporate Governance on the corporate performance. The basic set of economic indicators has been constructed from a synthesis of resources developed by international organizations (Global Reporting Initiative, International Federation of Accountants and research among manufacturing companies in the Czech Republic. The basic set of twenty-five key indicators is divided into seven groups: Costs, Investments, Economic Results, Asset & financial resources utilization, Suppliers reliability, Penalties and R&D expenses. Basic set of indicators was presented to 23 top-managers who quantified the potential effect of each indicator to the success and sustainability of their companies. Through the methods of descriptive statistics knowledge of the particularities of each indicator was obtained. Correlation analysis and factor analysis were applied in order to eliminate information duplicity and dimensionality reduction. The result is a reduction in the number of economic indicators, so that the loss of information on the influence of the original indicators on the corporate sustainability is minimized. Corporate sustainability indicators are a tool for measuring and managing progress towards sustainability goals and environmental, social and economic impacts.

  11. Most common swimming technique mistakes by amateur swimmers and their re-education

    OpenAIRE

    Raček, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims at observing the swimming technique of adult amateur swimmers and revealing their most common mistakes. Based on statistical analysis, a training plan was composed in order to eliminate the observed swimming technique errors. Furthermore, it was examined whether better swimming technique results in faster performance by the target group.

  12. The Effect of Rehearsal Learning and Warm-up on the Speed of Different Swimming Strokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, Carlo; Mascardo, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of rehearsal learning and warm-up exercise on the time of performing different swimming strokes. The study was conducted among 202 college freshmen students taking up a course on physical education concentrated in swimming. The design employed is a mixed factorial (2 X 2) where time of swimming is measured before…

  13. The swimming mechanics of Artemia Salina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Angulo, A.; Ramos-Musalem, A. K.; Zenit, R.

    2013-11-01

    An experimental study to analyze the swimming strategy of a small crustacean (Artemia Salina) was conducted. This animal has a series of eleven pairs of paddle-like appendices in its thorax. These legs move in metachronal-wave fashion to achieve locomotion. To quantify the swimming performance, both high speed video recordings of the legs motion and time-resolved PIV measurements of the induced propulsive jet were conducted. Experiments were conducted for both tethered and freely swimming specimens. We found that despite their small size, the propulsion is achieved by an inertial mechanism. An analysis of the efficiency of the leg wave-like motion is presented and discussed. A brief discussion on the mixing capability of the induced flow is also presented.

  14. Muscle dynamics in fish during steady swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shadwick, RE; Steffensen, JF; Katz, SL

    1998-01-01

    SYNOPSIS. Recent research in fish locomotion has been dominated by an interest in the dynamic mechanical properties of the swimming musculature. Prior observations have indicated that waves of muscle activation travel along the body of an undulating fish faster than the resulting waves of muscular...... contraction, suggesting that the phase relation between the muscle strain cycle and its activation must vary along the body. Since this phase relation is critical in determining how the muscle performs in cyclic contractions, the possibility has emerged that dynamic muscle function may change with axial...... position in swimming fish. Quantification of muscle contractile properties in cyclic contractions relies on in vitro experiments using strain and activation data collected in vivo. In this paper we discuss the relation between these parameters and body kinematics. Using videoradiographic data from swimming...

  15. Hydrodynamics of undulatory underwater swimming: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaboy, Chris; Coleman, Simon; Sanders, Ross H

    2009-11-01

    Undulatory underwater swimming (UUS) occurs in the starts and turns of three of the four competitive swimming strokes and plays a significant role in overall swimming performance. The majority of research examining UUS is comparative in nature, dominated by studies comparing aquatic animals' undulatory locomotion with the UUS performance of humans. More recently, research directly examining human forms of UUS have been undertaken, providing further insight into the factors which influence swimming velocity and efficiency. This paper reviews studies which have examined the hydromechanical, biomechanical, and coordination aspects of UUS performance in both animals and humans. The present work provides a comprehensive evaluation of the key factors which combine to influence UUS performance examining (1) the role of end-effector frequency and body amplitudes in the production of a propulsive waveform, (2) the effects of morphology on the wavelength of the propulsive waveform and its subsequent impact on the mode of UUS adopted, and (3) the interactions of the undulatory movements to simultaneously optimise propulsive impulse whilst minimising the active drag experienced. In conclusion, the review recommends that further research is required to fully appreciate the complexity of UUS and examine how humans can further optimise performance.

  16. Relationship between Muscle Strength and Front Crawl Swimming Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gola Radosław

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. competitive performance in swimming depends on a number of factors including, among others, the development of relevant muscle groups. The aim of the study was to clarify the relationship between muscle strength and swimming velocity and the role of individual muscle groups in front crawl swimming. Methods. sixteen physical education university students participated in the study. The strength values, defined as torque produced during isometric contractions, of eight upper and lower extremity muscle groups were measured. Data were compared with participants' front crawl swim times in the 25m and 50m distances. Results. correlation analysis demonstrated a relationship between muscle strength and swimming velocity. statistically significant relationships were observed between swimming velocity and the torque values of the elbow flexor and shoulder extensor muscles as well as the sum of upper extremity muscle torque values (p ⋋ 0.05. Conclusions. The results indicate the need for a focus on training those muscle groups identified as having a statistically significant relationship with swimming velocity for a given distance, as the sample showed deficiencies in the strength of those muscle groups responsible for generating propulsive force in the front crawl. Additionally, the collected data can serve as a diagnostic tool in evaluating the development of muscle groups critical for swimming performance.

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Swimming Styles in Competitive Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Loebbecke, Alfred; Mittal, Rajat; Gupta, Varun; Mark, Russell

    2007-11-01

    High-fidelity numerical simulations are being used to conduct a critical evaluation of swimming strokes in competitive swimming. We combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD), laser body scans, animation software, and video footage to develop accurate models of Olympic level swimmers and use these to examine contrasting styles of the dolphin kick as well as the arm strokes in back and front crawl stroke. In the dolphin kick, the focus is on examining the effects of Strouhal number, kick amplitude, frequency, and technique on thrust production. In the back stroke, we examine the performance of the so called ``flat stroke'' versus the ``deep catch,'' The most important aspect that separates the two major types of back stroke is the alignment or angle of attack of the palm during the stroke. In one style of front crawl arm stroke, there is greater elbow joint flexion, shoulder abduction and sculling whereas the other style consists of a straight arm pull dominated by simple shoulder flexion. Underlying the use of these two styles is the larger and more fundamental issue of the role of lift versus drag in thrust production and we use the current simulations to examine this issue in detail.

  18. A Step towards Developing a Sustainability Performance Measure within Industrial Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Shokravi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the plethora of literature in sustainability and supply chain management in the recent years, a quantitative tool that measures the sustainability performance of an industrial supply network, considering the uncertainties of existing data, is hard to find. This conceptual paper is aimed at establishing a quantitative measure for the sustainability performance of industrial supply networks that considers aleatory and epistemic uncertainties in its environmental performance evaluation. The measure is built upon economic, environmental and social performance evaluation models. These models address a number of shortcomings in the literature, such as incomplete and inaccurate calculation of environmental impacts, as well as the disregard for aleatory and epistemic uncertainties in the input data and, more importantly, the scarce number of quantitative social sustainability measures. Dyadic interactions are chosen for the network, while the network members have a revenue-sharing relationship. This relationship promotes sharing of the required information for the use of the proposed model. This measure provides an approach to quantify the environmental, social and economic sustainability performances of a supply network. Moreover, as this measure is not specifically designed for an industrial sector, it can be employed over an evolving and diverse industrial network.

  19. Incorporating sustainability into TxDOT's transportation decision making : summary of work performed, methods used, and results achieved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 and 2010 under TxDOT : Implementation Project 5-5541-01 Regional Workshops on Sustainability Enhancement : Tool. TxDOT Research Project 0-5541, Developing Sustainable Tra...

  20. Beyond Magnet® Designation: Perspectives From Nurse Managers on Factors of Sustainability and High-Performance Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Margaret A; Wolf, Gail A; Zedreck-Gonzalez, Judith F

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify patterns of high-performing behaviors and nurse manager perceptions of the factors of Magnet® sustainability at a multidesignated Magnet organization. The Magnet program recognizes exemplary professional nursing practice and is challenging to achieve and sustain. Only 10% (n = 42) of Magnet hospitals sustained designation for 12 years or longer. This study explored the perspectives of Magnet nurse managers regarding high-performing teams and the sustainability of Magnet designation. A qualitative study of nurse managers was conducted at 1 multidesignated Magnet organization (n = 13). Interview responses were analyzed using pattern recognition of Magnet model domains and characteristics of high-performing teams and then related to factors of Magnet sustainability. Transformational leadership is both an essential factor for sustainability and a potential barrier to sustainability of Magnet designation. Transformational nursing leaders lead high-performing teams and should be in place at all levels as an essential factor in sustaining Magnet redesignation.

  1. The sustainability and performance measurement on supply chain in services industry: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leksono, Eko Budi; Suparno, Vanany, Iwan

    2017-11-01

    The services industry growth has been significant relation with economic growth. A new paradigm is needed for services sector development. The supply chain and performance measurement able to sustain of services industry growth. The supply chain implementation in the services industry called service supply chain (SSC). The globalization and stakeholder pressure makes operation of SSC should more attention to sustainability issue which consists of economic, social and environment simultaneously on SSC. Furthermore, services industry can develop by implementation of the sustainable SSC and its performance measurement. The sustainable SSC implementation can minimize of negative operation effect to environment and social, and maximize of profit. Sustainable service supply chain performance measurements (SSSCPM) are still less explored. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature in the field SSC, SSSC, SSC performance measurement (SSCPM) and SSSCPM for identification of the SSSCPM frameworks and indicators. Beside, the result of review able to look opportunities for develop a new framework for SSSCPM at the operational level, tactical and strategic, multiplayer and close loop, the effectiveness of the integration and development of modeling and simulation for evaluation in the future.

  2. Performance Indicator Framework for Evaluation of Sustainable Tourism in the Taiwan Coastal Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hao Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Surrounded by the ocean, Taiwan has been increasingly developing coastal tourism projects. Concerns that negative impacts might be brought about by prosperous tourism have resulted in a recent focus on sustainable tourism. Sustainable tourism involves policies that acknowledge the interdependences among the environment, the community, and the economy. The goal of sustainable tourism is to enhance and protect the environment while satisfying basic human requirements, as well as those of the contemporary and future tourism industries to improve quality of life. On the other hand, unsustainable coastal tourism might undermine the natural environment and society, resulting in air, water, and soil pollution, wildlife habitat disruption, and changes of local community cultural characteristics. Therefore, performance evaluation of coastal tourism, using an indicator framework to facilitate sustainable development and enhance the effectiveness of coastal resources exploitation, is critical. Through a literature review and expert surveys using the methods of the fuzzy Delphi method (FDM and the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP, this study builds a performance indicator framework and identifies the key factors affecting the sustainable development of coastal tourism in Taiwan. The results can serve as a reference for the public sector to be used for the sustainable planning and development of coastal tourism.

  3. Water droplets also swim!

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Marjolein; Izri, Ziane; Michelin, Sébastien; Dauchot, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Recently there has been a surge of interest in producing artificial swimmers. One possible path is to produce self-propelling droplets in a liquid phase. The self-propulsion often relies on complex mechanisms at the droplet interface, involving chemical reactions and the adsorption-desorption kinetics of the surfactant. Here, we report the spontaneous swimming of droplets in a very simple system: water droplets immersed in an oil-surfactant medium. The swimmers consist of pure water, with no additional chemical species inside: water droplets also swim! The swimming is very robust: the droplets are able to transport cargo such as large colloids, salt crystals, and even cells. In this talk we discuss the origin of the spontaneous motion. Water from the droplet is solubilized by the reverse micellar solution, creating a concentration gradient of swollen reverse micelles around each droplet. By generalizing a recently proposed instability mechanism, we explain how spontaneous motion emerges in this system at sufficiently large Péclet number. Our water droplets in an oil-surfactant medium constitute the first experimental realization of spontaneous motion of isotropic particles driven by this instability mechanism.

  4. Kinematical changes in swimming front Crawl and Breaststroke with the AquaTrainer snorkel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Tiago; Silva, António José; Reis, António Malvas; Costa, Mário; Garrido, Nuno; Policarpo, Fernando; Reis, Victor Machado

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the kinematical changes when swimming maximal bouts in Front Crawl and Breaststroke with the AquaTrainer snorkel. Thirteen male swimmers (7 at Breaststroke and 6 at Front Crawl) of national level performed randomly two maximal bouts of 100-m swims: one bout using the AquaTrainer snorkel (snorkel swim) and another one without the snorkel (free swim). The swims were videotaped in sagittal plane with a pair of cameras providing 2D kinematics evaluation. The following measures were assessed: swimming performance (T100), stroke cycle period (P), stroke rate (SR), stroke length (SL), swimming velocity (v), swimming efficiency as estimated by the stroke index (SI), speed fluctuation (dv) and the mathematical characterisation of dv. T100 was significantly higher when swimming with the snorkel than in free swimming at Breaststroke (Delta = 6.26%) and at Front Crawl (Delta = 4.75%). P, SR and SL, as well as SI and dv did not present significant differences. The main finding of the study was that changes in the swimming velocity imposed by the use of the Aquatrainer do not seem due to changes in general kinematics or swimming efficiency.

  5. Indicators and Performance Measures for Transportation, Environment and Sustainability in North America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, H.

    A study trip to USA and Canada was undertaken in October 2000 with support from the German Marshall Fund. The purpose of the trip was to learn about performance planning and performance indicators in the area of transportation and environment. The report describe findings from the trip in the fol......A study trip to USA and Canada was undertaken in October 2000 with support from the German Marshall Fund. The purpose of the trip was to learn about performance planning and performance indicators in the area of transportation and environment. The report describe findings from the trip...... in the following areas: how performance planning for transportation and environment is conducted in the US and Canada at federal, state and municipal level, to what extent performance planning serve as an instrument to integrate environmental and sustainability goals in transportation policy which specific...... indicators are used to measure the environmental sustainability of transportation systems and policies in the two North American countries....

  6. Laryngoscopy during swimming: A novel diagnostic technique to characterize swimming-induced laryngeal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsted, Emil S; Swanton, Laura L; van van Someren, Ken; Morris, Tessa E; Furber, Matthew; Backer, Vibeke; Hull, James H

    2017-10-01

    Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) is a key differential diagnosis for respiratory symptoms in athletes and is particularly prevalent in aquatic athletes. A definitive diagnosis of EILO is dependent on laryngoscopy, performed continuously, while an athlete engages in the sport that precipitates their symptoms. This report provides the first description of the feasibility of performing continuous laryngoscopy during exercise in a swimming environment. The report describes the methodology and safety of the use of continuous laryngoscopy while swimming. Laryngoscope, 127:2298-2301, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Tethered Swimming for the Evaluation and Prescription of Resistance Training in Young Swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoti, Marcelo; da Silva, Adelino S R; Kalva-Filho, Carlos Augusto; Araujo, Gustavo Gomes; Santiago, Vanessa; Martins, LuizEduardo Barreto; Cunha, Sérgio Augusto; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    The aims of the present study were 1) to evaluate the effects of 11 weeks of a typical free-swimming training program on aerobic and stroke parameters determined in tethered swimming (Study 1; n=13) and 2) to investigate the responses of tethered swimming efforts, in addition to free-swimming sessions, through 7 weeks of training (Study 2; n=21). In both studies, subjects performed a graded exercise test in tethered swimming (GET) to determine anaerobic threshold (AnT), stroke rate at AnT (SRAnT), peak force at GET (PFGET) and peak blood lactate ([La-]GET). Participants also swam 100-, 200- and 400-m lengths to evaluate performance. In Study 2, swimmers were divided into control (i. e., only free-swimming; GC [n=11]) and tethered swimming group (i. e., 50% of the main session; GTS [n=10]). The results of Study 1 demonstrate that AnT, PFGET, [La(-)]GET and 200-m performance were improved with free-swimming training. The SRAnT decreased with training. In Study 2, free-swimming performance and most of the graded exercise test parameters were not altered in either group. However, [La-]GET improved only for GTS. These results demonstrate that aerobic parameters obtained in tethered swimming can be used to evaluate free-swimming training responses, and the addition of tethered efforts during training routine improves the lactate production capacity of swimmers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. The human component of sustainability: a study for assessing "human performances" of energy efficient construction blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaianese, Erminia; Duca, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an applied research aimed at understanding the relevance and the applicability of human related criteria in sustainability assessment of construction materials. Under a theoretical perspective, human factors consideration is strongly encouraged by building sustainability assessment methods, but the practice demonstrates that current models for building sustainability assessment neglect ergonomic issues, especially those ones concerning the construction phase. The study starts from the observation that new construction techniques for high energy efficient external walls are characterized by elements generally heavier and bigger than traditional materials. In this case, high sustainability performances connected with energy saving could be reached only consuming high, and then not very much sustainable, human efforts during setting-up operations. The paper illustrates a practical approach for encompassing human factors in sustainability assessment of four block types for energy efficient external walls. Research steps, from block selections to bricklaying task analysis, human factors indicators and metrics formulation, data gathering and final assessment are going to be presented. Finally, open issues and further possible generalizations from the particular case study will be discussed.

  9. PERFORMANCE OF TRADITIONAL INVESTMENT FUNDS AND ETFs LINKED TO SUSTAINABILITY AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela de Magalhães Soares

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to compare the performance of traditional investment funds and Exchange traded funds (ETFs, which benchmarks are Ibovespa, IBrX and Sustainability Indexes, as well as free funds using daily frequency data covering the period from 20 June 2012 to 31 October 2013. The survey is descriptive with a quantitative approach. Analyses were performed using the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM and the Sharpe Ratio (1966. In order to obtain an index of ETFs linked to sustainability, the nomenclature and prospectus of each ETF were analyzed to see which ones were linked to this sector. Then the average return of these funds was calculated, weighted by its Net Asset Value, generating a series of the same period and frequency of others. The results show that the funds linked to sustainability and corporate governance indices are one of the best investment options, surpassed only by free funds.

  10. Unsteady bio-fluid dynamics in flying and swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Li, Gen

    2017-08-01

    Flying and swimming in nature present sophisticated and exciting ventures in biomimetics, which seeks sustainable solutions and solves practical problems by emulating nature's time-tested patterns, functions, and strategies. Bio-fluids in insect and bird flight, as well as in fish swimming are highly dynamic and unsteady; however, they have been studied mostly with a focus on the phenomena associated with a body or wings moving in a steady flow. Characterized by unsteady wing flapping and body undulation, fluid-structure interactions, flexible wings and bodies, turbulent environments, and complex maneuver, bio-fluid dynamics normally have challenges associated with low Reynolds number regime and high unsteadiness in modeling and analysis of flow physics. In this article, we review and highlight recent advances in unsteady bio-fluid dynamics in terms of leading-edge vortices, passive mechanisms in flexible wings and hinges, flapping flight in unsteady environments, and micro-structured aerodynamics in flapping flight, as well as undulatory swimming, flapping-fin hydrodynamics, body-fin interaction, C-start and maneuvering, swimming in turbulence, collective swimming, and micro-structured hydrodynamics in swimming. We further give a perspective outlook on future challenges and tasks of several key issues of the field.

  11. Sustained attention performance during sleep deprivation associates with instability in behavior and physiologic measures at baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Lee, Ivan Tian-Guang; Tan, Luuan-Chin; Lau, Pauline; Cai, Shiwei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Puvanendran, Kathiravelu; Gooley, Joshua J

    2014-01-01

    To identify baseline behavioral and physiologic markers that associate with individual differences in sustained attention during sleep deprivation. In a retrospective study, ocular, electrocardiogram, and electroencephalogram (EEG) measures were compared in subjects who were characterized as resilient (n = 15) or vulnerable (n = 15) to the effects of total sleep deprivation on sustained attention. Chronobiology and Sleep Laboratory, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore. Healthy volunteers aged 22-32 years from the general population. Subjects were kept awake for at least 26 hours under constant environmental conditions. Every 2 hours, sustained attention was assessed using a 10-minute psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). During baseline sleep and recovery sleep, EEG slow wave activity was similar in resilient versus vulnerable subjects, suggesting that individual differences in vulnerability to sleep loss were not related to differences in homeostatic sleep regulation. Rather, irrespective of time elapsed since wake, subjects who were vulnerable to sleep deprivation exhibited slower and more variable PVT response times, lower and more variable heart rate, and higher and more variable EEG spectral power in the theta frequency band (6.0-7.5 Hz). Performance decrements in sustained attention during sleep deprivation associate with instability in behavioral and physiologic measures at baseline. Small individual differences in sustained attention that are present at baseline are amplified during prolonged wakefulness, thus contributing to large between-subjects differences in performance and sleepiness.

  12. Sustainability and Economic Performance of the Companies in the Renewable Energy Sector in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail Busu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on the sustainability and economic performance of the renewable energy sector of Romania. In our analysis, we have used Total Quality Management (TQM model, which is an economic modern tool used for improving the quality of management for all companies. The aim of this study is to bring into discussion the conceptualized TQM model of Edward Deming underlying different stages of its evolution as it is described in the economic literature. Conceptual model is applied in a case study of the renewable energy sector of Romania. The quantitative research evaluates the impact of the total quality management to achieve the sustainable development, performance objectives and the competitive advantage of the companies in the renewable energy sector. Data was collected through a survey and the questionnaire was addressed to the management and employees in the renewable energy sector. Structural equation modelling (SEM was used and the hypotheses were tested by partial least square (PLS equations. Data was analyzed through the Smart PLS 3 software. The main contribution of this paper is to identify and evaluate the relationship among sustainable development, economic performance of the companies and TQM model indicators. The conclusions of our research are in line with the existing literature and confirm the theoretical assumptions, underlining the fact that the undertaking’s performance and sustainable development is a direct consequence of the combination among a series of factors like decisional power quality, motivated workforce as well as integrity of operational process.

  13. Sustained Attention Performance during Sleep Deprivation Associates with Instability in Behavior and Physiologic Measures at Baseline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Lee, Ivan Tian-Guang; Tan, Luuan-Chin; Lau, Pauline; Cai, Shiwei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Puvanendran, Kathiravelu; Gooley, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify baseline behavioral and physiologic markers that associate with individual differences in sustained attention during sleep deprivation. Design: In a retrospective study, ocular, electrocardiogram, and electroencephalogram (EEG) measures were compared in subjects who were characterized as resilient (n = 15) or vulnerable (n = 15) to the effects of total sleep deprivation on sustained attention. Setting: Chronobiology and Sleep Laboratory, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore. Participants: Healthy volunteers aged 22-32 years from the general population. Interventions: Subjects were kept awake for at least 26 hours under constant environmental conditions. Every 2 hours, sustained attention was assessed using a 10-minute psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). Measurements and Results: During baseline sleep and recovery sleep, EEG slow wave activity was similar in resilient versus vulnerable subjects, suggesting that individual differences in vulnerability to sleep loss were not related to differences in homeostatic sleep regulation. Rather, irrespective of time elapsed since wake, subjects who were vulnerable to sleep deprivation exhibited slower and more variable PVT response times, lower and more variable heart rate, and higher and more variable EEG spectral power in the theta frequency band (6.0-7.5 Hz). Conclusions: Performance decrements in sustained attention during sleep deprivation associate with instability in behavioral and physiologic measures at baseline. Small individual differences in sustained attention that are present at baseline are amplified during prolonged wakefulness, thus contributing to large between-subjects differences in performance and sleepiness. Citation: Chua EC; Yeo SC; Lee IT; Tan LC; Lau P; Cai S; Zhang X; Puvanendran K; Gooley JJ. Sustained attention performance during sleep deprivation associates with instability in behavior and physiologic measures at baseline. SLEEP 2014;37(1):27-39. PMID:24470693

  14. Quality Versus Quantity Debate in Swimming: Perceptions and Training Practices of Expert Swimming Coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Frank J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The debate over low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training, commonly known as Quality versus Quantity, respectively, is a frequent topic of discussion among swimming coaches and academics. The aim of this study was to explore expert coaches’ perceptions of quality and quantity coaching philosophies in competitive swimming and to investigate their current training practices. A purposeful sample of 11 expert swimming coaches was recruited for this study. The study was a mixed methods design and involved each coach participating in 1 semi-structured interview and completing 1 closed-ended questionnaire. The main findings of this study were that coaches felt quality training programmes would lead to short term results for youth swimmers, but were in many cases more appropriate for senior swimmers. The coaches suggested that quantity training programmes built an aerobic base for youth swimmers, promoted technical development through a focus on slower swimming and helped to enhance recovery from training or competition. However, the coaches continuously suggested that quantity training programmes must be performed with good technique and they felt this was a misunderstood element. This study was a critical step towards gaining a richer and broader understanding on the debate over Quality versus Quantity training from an expert swimming coaches’ perspective which was not currently available in the research literature.

  15. Quality versus Quantity Debate in Swimming: Perceptions and Training Practices of Expert Swimming Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Frank J; Comyns, Thomas M; Warrington, Giles D

    2017-06-01

    The debate over low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training, commonly known as Quality versus Quantity, respectively, is a frequent topic of discussion among swimming coaches and academics. The aim of this study was to explore expert coaches' perceptions of quality and quantity coaching philosophies in competitive swimming and to investigate their current training practices. A purposeful sample of 11 expert swimming coaches was recruited for this study. The study was a mixed methods design and involved each coach participating in 1 semi-structured interview and completing 1 closed-ended questionnaire. The main findings of this study were that coaches felt quality training programmes would lead to short term results for youth swimmers, but were in many cases more appropriate for senior swimmers. The coaches suggested that quantity training programmes built an aerobic base for youth swimmers, promoted technical development through a focus on slower swimming and helped to enhance recovery from training or competition. However, the coaches continuously suggested that quantity training programmes must be performed with good technique and they felt this was a misunderstood element. This study was a critical step towards gaining a richer and broader understanding on the debate over Quality versus Quantity training from an expert swimming coaches' perspective which was not currently available in the research literature.

  16. Sustainability Reporting a nd Environmental Performance: A Case S tudy in I stanbul Stock Exchan ge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tanç

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is determining the environmental perf ormances of companies operating in the manufacturing industry in the Istanbul Stock Exchange (ISE in 2013 within the scope of sustainability reports. The amounts of water recycled, energy savings achieved by efficiency studies, emission reduction achievedby efficiency studies, hazardous waste disposed and nonhazardous waste disposed and investments made on environmental protection and expenditures were selected as environmental performance indicators of the sustainability reports of the companies included in the analysis for 2013. The criteria determined are converted into a single score for each company's environmental performance by a multi-criteria decision-making method “Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS”. At the end of the study, it has been determined that AKÇANSA has the highest environmental performance while BRİSA has the lowest environmental performance, respectively.

  17. Wearable inertial sensors in swimming motion analysis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Magalhaes, Fabricio Anicio; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Gatta, Giorgio; Fantozzi, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The use of contemporary technology is widely recognised as a key tool for enhancing competitive performance in swimming. Video analysis is traditionally used by coaches to acquire reliable biomechanical data about swimming performance; however, this approach requires a huge computational effort, thus introducing a delay in providing quantitative information. Inertial and magnetic sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers, have been recently introduced to assess the biomechanics of swimming performance. Research in this field has attracted a great deal of interest in the last decade due to the gradual improvement of the performance of sensors and the decreasing cost of miniaturised wearable devices. With the aim of describing the state of the art of current developments in this area, a systematic review of the existing methods was performed using the following databases: PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, IEEE Xplore, Google Scholar, Scopus and Science Direct. Twenty-seven articles published in indexed journals and conference proceedings, focusing on the biomechanical analysis of swimming by means of inertial sensors were reviewed. The articles were categorised according to sensor's specification, anatomical sites where the sensors were attached, experimental design and applications for the analysis of swimming performance. Results indicate that inertial sensors are reliable tools for swimming biomechanical analyses.

  18. Optimal translational swimming of a sphere at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2015-01-01

    Swimming velocity and rate of dissipation of a sphere with surface distortions are discussed on the basis of the Stokes equations of low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. At first the surface distortions are assumed to cause an irrotational axisymmetric flow pattern. The efficiency of swimming is optimized within this class of flows. Subsequently more general axisymmetric polar flows with vorticity are considered. This leads to a considerably higher maximum efficiency. An additional measure of swimming performance is proposed based on the energy consumption for given amplitude of stroke.

  19. Sustainability of processed foods supply chain: Social, economic and territorial performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beber Caetano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a global market, food companies engaged in sustainable development must now integrate the economic and social component. However the tools to assess it are lacking. Several theoretical frameworks have been developed to define social sustainability and its implementation. The attributional approaches, pathways or capabilities methods have emerged, based on a functional unit of a good or service along the supply chain. This paper proposes a new method to assess social economic and territorial performances of a food chain as a whole on a Territory. It is divided into four components: (i dignity and well-being of workers, (ii contribution to local life, (iii fairness and integrity of business practices, and (iv creation of material and intangible wealth. 50 criteria are used according to international, national or sectoral references. This generic method applicable to any sector of processed food products aims to identify where are the areas of improvement to qualify the sector as socially sustainable. An application to the wine Beaujolais and Burgundy wine was performed from surveys of 35 production and trade operators in 2014. The results show that the sector is particularly effective for the promotion of the territory, local life participation, loyalty and integrity of business practices; some improvement is still possible for the welfare of workers and the creation of material wealth. This method can be coupled with the environmental performance determined by the life cycle analysis in order to assess the sustainability in its entirety.

  20. Paramecia swimming in viscous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Jana, S.; Giarra, M.; Vlachos, P. P.; Jung, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ciliates like Paramecia exhibit fore-aft asymmetry in their body shapes, and preferentially swim in the direction of the slender anterior rather than the wider posterior. However, the physical reasons for this preference are not well understood. In this work, we propose that specific features of the fluid flow around swimming Paramecia confer some energetic advantage to the preferred swimming direction. Therefore, we seek to understand the effects of body asymmetry and swimming direction on the efficiency of swimming and the flux of fluid into the cilia layer (and thus of food into the oral groove), which we assumed to be primary factors in the energy budgets of these organisms. To this end, we combined numerical techniques (the boundary element method) and laboratory experiments (micro particle image velocimetry) to develop a quantitative model of the flow around a Paramecium and investigate the effect of the body shape on the velocity fields, as well as on the swimming and feeding behaviors. Both simulation and experimental results show that velocity fields exhibit fore-aft asymmetry. Moreover, the shape asymmetry revealed an increase of the fluid flux into the cilia layer compared to symmetric body shapes. Under the assumption that cilia fluid intake and feeding efficiency are primary factors in the energy budgets of Paramecia, our model predicts that the anterior swimming direction is energetically favorable to the posterior swimming direction.

  1. Interpersonal early-life trauma alters amygdala connectivity and sustained attention performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortenbaugh, Francesca C; Corbo, Vincent; Poole, Victoria; McGlinchey, Regina; Milberg, William; Salat, David; DeGutis, Joseph; Esterman, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Interpersonal early life trauma (I-ELT) is associated with a myriad of functional impairments in adulthood, increased risk of drug addiction, and neuropsychiatric disorders. While deficits in emotional regulation and amygdala functioning are well characterized, deficits in general cognitive functioning have also been documented. However, the neural underpinnings of cognitive dysfunction in adults with a history of I-ELT and the potential relationship between amygdala-based functional connectivity and behavioral performance are currently poorly understood. This study examined how I-ELT affects the cognitive and neural mechanisms supporting sustained attention. A total of 66 Veterans (18 with and 48 without a history of I-ELT) completed a nonemotional sustained attention task during functional MRI. The individuals with I-ELT showed significant impairments in sustained attention (i.e., higher error rates, greater response variability). This cohort exhibited increased amygdala functional connectivity with the prefrontal cortex and decreased functional connectivity with the parahippocampal gyrus when compared to those without I-ELT. These connections were significantly correlated with individual differences in sustained attention performance. Notably, classification analyses revealed that the pattern of amygdala connectivity across the whole brain was able to classify I-ELT status with 70% accuracy. These results provide evidence of a lasting negative impact for those with a history of I-ELT on sustained attention ability. They also highlight a critical role for amygdala functioning in cognitive control and sustained attention for those with a history of I-ELT, which may underlie the observed attention deficits in clinical assessments and cognitive tests involving both emotional and nonemotional stimuli.

  2. Chronic Rhodiola rosea extract supplementation enforces exhaustive swimming tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Fang-Tsai; Kuo, Tz-Yin; Liou, Shaw-Yih; Chien, Chiang-Ting

    2009-01-01

    We explored the effects and mechanisms of Rhodiola rosea extract supplementation on swimming-induced fatigue in rats. The concentrations of active components in Rhodiola rosea have been determined by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer. The Rhodiola rosea extract supplementation in water for 2-4 weeks was evaluated in male Wistar rats with 90-min unloaded swimming exercise and 5% body weight loaded swimming up to fatigue. We measured the fatigue biomarkers, including blood urea nitrogen (BUN), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), hepatic glycogen content, the activity of fat metabolism enzymes, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), the tissue oxygen content and ratio of red and white skeletal muscle fibers in rats. Rhodiola rosea significantly increased liver glycogen, SREBP-1, FAS, heat shock protein 70 expression, Bcl-2/Bax ratio and oxygen content before swimming. Rhodiola rosea supplementation significantly increased the swimming time in a dose-dependent manner and reduced swimming-enhanced serum BUN, GOT and GPT levels. The ratio of red and white muscle fibers was not altered after chronic Rhodiola rosea extract supplementation. Chronic Rhodiola rosea supplementation significantly improved exhaustive swimming-induced fatigue by the increased glycogen content, energy supply of lipogenic enzyme expressions and protective defense mechanisms.

  3. Spatial organization and Synchronization in collective swimming of Hemigrammus bleheri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Intesaaf; Ha, Thanh-Tung; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Thiria, Benjamin; Halloy, Jose; Collignon, Bertrand; Laboratoire de Physique et Mécanique des Milieux Hétérogènes (PMMH) Team; Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire des Energies de Demain (LIED) Team

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the collective swimming of Hemigrammus bleheri fish using experiments in a shallow swimming channel. We use high-speed video recordings to track the midline kinematics and the spatial organization of fish pairs and triads. Synchronizations are characterized by observance of "out of phase" and "in phase" configurations. We show that the synchronization state is highly correlated to swimming speed. The increase in synchronization led to efficient swimming based on Strouhal number. In case of fish pairs, the collective swimming is 2D and the spatial organization is characterized by two characteristic lengths: the lateral and longitudinal separation distances between fish pairs.For fish triads, different swimming patterns or configurations are observed having three dimensional structures. We performed 3D kinematic analysis by employing 3D reconstruction using the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT). We show that fish still keep their nearest neighbor distance (NND) constant irrespective of swimming speeds and configuration. We also point out characteristic angles between neighbors, hence imposing preferred patterns. At last we will give some perspectives on spatial organization for larger population. Sorbonne Paris City College of Doctoral Schools. European Union Information and Communication Technologies project ASSISIbf, FP7-ICT-FET-601074.

  4. Economic and Environmental Performance of Fashion Supply Chain: The Joint Effect of Power Structure and Sustainable Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiutian Shi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fashion supply chain members now search for trade-offs between sustainable investment and the related incentives, such as savings on environmental taxes and gains in incremental demands. To evaluate the economic and environmental performance of sustainable investment from a power perspective, we develop an analytical model to study a two-echelon sustainable supply chain consisting of one retailer and one manufacturer with three different power structures. We derive the optimal solutions for various cases associated with different supply chain power structures and sustainable investors. Though it is beneficial for both the manufacturer and retailer to make sustainable investment, they often utilize high power to gain economic benefit with less sustainable investment. Interestingly, the follower with less supply chain power has more incentive to make a sustainable effort to achieve a higher profit. The optimal amount of sustainable investment in the apparel manufacturer investment case is greater than that in the retailer investment case in most scenarios.

  5. The Impact of Transformational Leadership on Employee Sustainable Performance: The Mediating Role of Organizational Citizenship Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Jiang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Transformational leadership has drawn extensive attention in management research. In this field, the influence of transformational leadership on employee performance is an important branch. Recent research indicates that organizational citizenship behavior plays a mediating role between transformational leadership and employee performance. However, some of these findings contradict each other. Given the background where greater attention is being paid to transformational leadership in the construction industry, this research aims to find the degree of the influence of transformational leadership on employee sustainable performance, as well as the mediating role of organizational citizenship behavior. A total of 389 questionnaires were collected from contractors and analyzed via structural equation modeling. The findings reveal that employee sustainable performance is positively influenced by transformational leadership. In addition, more than half of that influence is mediated by their organizational citizenship behavior. These findings remind project managers of the need to pay close attention to transformational leadership, to cultivate organizational citizenship behavior, and thereby to eventually improve employee’s sustainable performance.

  6. Combined effects of attention and motivation on visual task performance: transient and sustained motivational effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Jan B; Damaraju, Eswar; Padmala, Srikanth; Pessoa, Luiz

    2009-01-01

    We investigated how the brain integrates motivational and attentional signals by using a neuroimaging paradigm that provided separate estimates for transient cue- and target-related signals, in addition to sustained block-related responses. Participants performed a Posner-type task in which an endogenous cue predicted target location on 70% of trials, while motivation was manipulated by varying magnitude and valence of a cash incentive linked to task performance. Our findings revealed increased detection performance (d') as a function of incentive value. In parallel, brain signals revealed that increases in absolute incentive magnitude led to cue- and target-specific response modulations that were independent of sustained state effects across visual cortex, fronto-parietal regions, and subcortical regions. Interestingly, state-like effects of incentive were observed in several of these brain regions, too, suggesting that both transient and sustained fMRI signals may contribute to task performance. For both cue and block periods, the effects of administering incentives were correlated with individual trait measures of reward sensitivity. Taken together, our findings support the notion that motivation improves behavioral performance in a demanding attention task by enhancing evoked responses across a distributed set of anatomical sites, many of which have been previously implicated in attentional processing. However, the effect of motivation was not simply additive as the impact of absolute incentive was greater during invalid than valid trials in several brain regions, possibly because motivation had a larger effect on reorienting than orienting attentional mechanisms at these sites.

  7. Combined effects of attention and motivation on visual task performance: transient and sustained motivational effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan B Engelmann

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how the brain integrates motivational and attentional signals by using a neuroimaging paradigm that provided separate estimates for transient cue- and target-related signals, in addition to sustained block-related responses. Participants performed a Posner-type task in which an endogenous cue predicted target location on 70% of trials, while motivation was manipulated by varying magnitude and valence of a cash incentive linked to task performance. Our findings revealed increased detection performance (d’ as a function of incentive value. In parallel, brain signals revealed that increases in absolute incentive magnitude led to cue- and target-specific response modulations that were independent of sustained state effects across visual cortex, fronto-parietal regions, and subcortical regions. Interestingly, state-like effects of incentive were observed in several of these brain regions, too, suggesting that both transient and sustained fMRI signals may contribute to task performance. For both cue and block periods, the effects of administering incentives were correlated with individual trait measures of reward sensitivity. Taken together, our findings support the notion that motivation improves behavioral performance in a demanding attention task by enhancing evoked responses across a distributed set of anatomical sites, many of which have been previously implicated in attentional processing. However, the effect of motivation was not simply additive as the impact of absolute incentive was greater during invalid than valid trials in several brain regions, possibly because motivation had a larger effect on reorienting than orienting attentional mechanisms at these sites.

  8. Sustainable Leadership Practices Driving Financial Performance: Empirical Evidence from Thai SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparak Suriyankietkaew

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many managers and researchers alike are asking: What does an enterprise need to do to generate a proper balance between economic, social, and ecological objectives while gaining superior corporate financial performance, resilience, and sustainability? Several leadership concepts for enhancing organizational sustainability have emerged in recent years, but none provides an integrative approach, with the exception of Sustainable Leadership (SL. However, empirical research examining the effects of various SL practices on financial performance and other business outcomes is lacking. This article addresses this gap by empirically investigating the relationships between 23 SL practices and financial performance. Using a cross-sectional survey, data stem from 439 managers in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs in Thailand. Of the 23 SL practices in SL, 16 were significantly associated with corporate financial performance. Four SL practices, in particular—amicable labor relations, valuing employees, social responsibility, plus strong and shared vision—were significant drivers, and positive predictors, of enhanced long-term firm performance. Lastly, implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed.

  9. A Novel Approach for Assessing the Performance of Sustainable Urbanization Based on Structural Equation Modeling: A China Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudan Jiao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The rapid urbanization process has brought problems to China, such as traffic congestion, air pollution, water pollution and resources scarcity. Sustainable urbanization is commonly appreciated as an effective way to promote the sustainable development. The proper understanding of the sustainable urbanization performance is critical to provide governments with support in making urban development strategies and policies for guiding the sustainable development. This paper utilizes the method of Structural equation modeling (SEM to establish an assessment model for measuring sustainable urbanization performance. Four unobserved endogenous variables, economic variable, social variable, environment variable and resource variable, and 21 observed endogenous variables comprise the SEM model. A case study of the 31 provinces in China demonstrates the validity of the SEM model and the analysis results indicated that the assessment model could help make more effective policies and strategies for improving urban sustainability by recognizing the statue of sustainable urbanization.

  10. Enhancing learning, innovation, adaptation, and sustainability in health care organizations: the ELIAS performance management framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, D David

    2014-01-01

    The development of sustainable health care organizations that provide high-quality accessible care is a topic of intense interest. This article provides a practical performance management framework that can be utilized to develop sustainable health care organizations. It is a cyclical 5-step process that is premised on accountability, performance management, and learning practices that are the foundation for a continuous process of measurement, disconfirmation, contextualization, implementation, and routinization This results in the enhancement of learning, innovation, adaptation, and sustainability (ELIAS). Important considerations such as recognizing that health care organizations are complex adaptive systems and the presence of a dynamic learning culture are necessary contextual factors that maximize the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Importantly, the ELIAS framework utilizes data that are already being collected by health care organizations for accountability, improvement, evaluation, and strategic purposes. Therefore, the benefit of the framework, when used as outlined, would be to enhance the chances of health care organizations achieving the goals of ongoing adaptation and sustainability, by design, rather than by chance.

  11. The Impact of Baby Swimming on Introductory and Elementary Swimming Training

    OpenAIRE

    Břízová, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    THESIS ANNOTATION Title: The Impact of Baby Swimming on Introductory and Elementary Swimming Training Aim: To assess the impact of 'baby swimming' on the successfulness in introductory and partly in elementary swimming training, and to find out whether also other circumstances (for example the length of attendance at 'baby swimming') have some influence on introductory swimming training. Methods: We used a questionnaire method for the parents of children who had attended 'baby swimming' and f...

  12. Swimming level of pupils from elementary schools with own swimming pool

    OpenAIRE

    Zálupská, Klára

    2012-01-01

    Title: Swimming level of pupils from primary school with private swimming pool. Work objectives: The aim is to identify assess level of swimming of pupils from first to ninth grade of primary school with a private pool in Chomutov district using continuous swimming test with regular swimming lessons, which is started in the first grade and persists until the ninth grade. The condition was organizing a school swimming lessons once a week for 45 minutes in all grades. Methodology: Swimming leve...

  13. Evidence-Based Background Material Underlying Guidance for Federal Agencies in Implementing Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans - Implementing Sustainability: The Institutional-Behavioral Dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, Elizabeth L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Sanquist, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wolfe, Amy K. [ORNL; Diamond, Rick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Payne, Christopher [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Dion, Jerry [ORNL

    2013-06-01

    This document is part of a larger, programmatic effort to assist federal agencies in taking action and changing their institutions to achieve and maintain federal sustainability goals, while meeting their mission goals. FEMP is developing guidance for federal agency efforts to enable institutional behavior change for sustainability, and for making sustainability “business as usual.” The driving requirement for this change is Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance. FEMP emphasizes strategies for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy utilization as critical components of attaining sustainability, and promotes additional non-energy action pathways contained in EO 13514. This report contributes to the larger goal by laying out the conceptual and evidentiary underpinnings of guidance to federal agencies. Conceptual frameworks focus and organize the development of guidance. We outline a series of progressively refined conceptual frameworks, including a multi-layer approach, key steps in sustainability implementation, a process view of specific approaches to institutional change, the agency Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans (SSPPs), and concepts related to context-specific rules, roles and tools for sustainability. Additionally, we tap pertinent bodies of literature in drawing eight evidence-based principles for behavior change. These principles are important foundations upon which to build in selecting strategies to effect change in organizations. Taken together, this report presents a suite of components that inform the training materials, presentations, web site, and other products that provide guidance to federal agencies.

  14. Estimation of Performance Indices for the Planning of Sustainable Transportation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Paz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of sustainable transportation systems, previous studies have either focused only on the transportation system or have not used a methodology that enables the treatment of incomplete, vague, and qualitative information associated with the available data. This study proposes a system of systems (SOS and a fuzzy logic modeling approach. The SOS includes the Transportation, Activity, and Environment systems. The fuzzy logic modeling approach enables the treatment of the vagueness associated with some of the relevant data. Performance Indices (PIs are computed for each system using a number of performance measures. The PIs illustrate the aggregated performance of each system as well as the interactions among them. The proposed methodology also enables the estimation of a Composite Sustainability Index to summarize the aggregated performance of the overall SOS. Existing data was used to analyze sustainability in the entire United States. The results showed that the Transportation and Activity systems follow a positive trend, with similar periods of growth and contractions; in contrast, the environmental system follows a reverse pattern. The results are intuitive and are associated with a series of historic events, such as depressions in the economy as well as policy changes and regulations.

  15. The study of sustainability report disclosure aspects and their impact on the companies’ performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caesaria Aisyah Farisa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed to invetigate the effect of Sustainability Report Disclosure to the Firm’s market performance. Three material aspects disclosed in the Sustainability report such as economics (EC, environmental (EN, and social aspect (SC are used as the independent variables in this research and, furthermore, the dependent variable is the market performance which is proxied by using Tobin’s Q. This researchs was conducted using mainstream positivistic quantitative methods to test the three formulated hypotheses. The samples taken were 44 observations from all listed companies in the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX that reveal sustainability reports using GRI-G4 guidelines. This guideline is the latest version issued by the Global Reporting Innitiative (GRI, which can be implemented starting from 2013. The results showed that economicss, environmental, and social aspects have positively significant influence to the companies market performance. The practical implication of this research is the value given by society in term of the company image to those companies which disclosure their activities related to economics, social, and environment activities affects their company performance.

  16. Aspectos cinemáticos e neuromusculares relacionados com o desempenho da saída do bloco na natação Kinematical and neuromuscular aspects related to performance during the swimming start

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Detanico

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi relacionar o desempenho (distância e tempo de voo na saída de bloco com variáveis cinemáticas e neuromusculares. Participaram 10 nadadores do sexo masculino (26,4 ± 6,6 anos, 76,4 ± 6,6 kg, 1,81 ± 0,07 m de estatura. Utilizou-se uma câmera filmadora (30 Hz para a aquisição das variáveis cinemáticas, sendo analisadas: distância de voo, tempo de voo, altura máxima do quadril, ângulos de saída de bloco e entrada na água. Para a obtenção da potência muscular foi utilizado o "Squat Jump" realizado sobre uma plataforma de força. Foram obtidas as seguintes variáveis: altura do salto, potência e pico de velocidade. Utilizou-se estatística descritiva e correlação de Pearson para relacionar as variáveis neuromusculares e cinemáticas com o desempenho na saída de bloco, utilizando nível de significância de 5%. Encontrou-se correlação significativa do ângulo de saída com a distância (r = -0,59 e com o tempo de voo (r = 0,88, além da altura máxima com o tempo de voo (r = 0,59. Não foi observada correlação significativa da distância e do tempo de voo com as variáveis neuromusculares (p > 0,05. Com base nos resultados pode-se concluir que o desempenho na saída de bloco da natação foi relacionado com o ângulo de saída de bloco e com a altura máxima do quadril na fase aérea. A potência muscular não interferiu no desempenho nos nadadores investigados.The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the performance of the start off the swimming block with kinematical and neuromuscular parameters (flight distance and flight time. Ten male swimmers (26.4 ± 6.6 years, 76.4 ± 6.6 kg, 1.81 ± 0.07 m participated in the study. A video camera (30 Hz was used to obtain the kinematic variables: flight distance, flight time, maximum height, start angle and entry angle. Muscle power was assessed via the performance of a Squat Jump on a force plate. Jump height, power and peak of

  17. Biomechanics of competitive front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, H M; Beek, P J

    1992-01-01

    Essential performance-determining factors in front crawl swimming can be analysed within a biomechanical framework, in reference to the physiological basis of performance. These factors include: active drag forces, effective propulsive forces, propelling efficiency and power output. The success of a swimmer is determined by the ability to generate propulsive force, while reducing the resistance to forward motion. Although for a given competitive stroke a range of optimal stroking styles may be expected across a sample of swimmers, a common element of technique related to a high performance level is the use of complex sculling motions of the hands to generate especially lift forces. By changing the orientation of the hand the propulsive force acting on the hand is aimed successfully in the direction of motion. Furthermore, the swimming velocity (v) is related to drag (A), power input (Pi, the rate of energy liberation via the aerobic/anaerobic metabolism), the gross efficiency (eg), propelling efficiency (ep), and power output (Po) according to: [formula; see text] Based on the research available at present it is concluded that: (a) drag in groups of elite swimmers homogeneous with respect to swimming technique is determined by anthropometric dimensions; (b) total mechanical power output (Po) is important since improvement in performance is related to increased Po. Furthermore, it shows dramatic changes with training and possibly reflects the size of the 'swimming engine'; (c) propelling efficiency seems to be important since it is much higher in elite swimmers (61%) than in triathletes (44%); and (d) distance per stroke gives a fairly good indication of propelling efficiency and may be used to evaluate individual progress in technical ability.

  18. Performance assessment, social accountability and sustainability governance in Hangzhou: Leveraging the implementation gap?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delman, Jørgen

    This is an explorative case study that examines how ideas and concepts relating to sustainable development are factored into new approaches to urban governance in Hangzhou. The proposition is that traditional performance assessment procedures combined with innovative surveys of the city governmen...... transparency of government and new forms of public accountability. This could pave the way for further progress with regard to development of sustainable city governance due to the strategic green turn pursued by Hangzhou’s leadership for some years now.......’s social accountability and with various forms of social participation have created a new framework for urban governance, both conceptually and as a series of practical measures. More specifically, the study examines a dramatic redesign of the performance assessment system in Hangzhou aimed at developing...

  19. A framework for the integration of Green and Lean Six Sigma for superior sustainability performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherrafi, Anass; Elfezazi, Said; Govindan, Kannan

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that Lean, Six Sigma and Green approaches make a positive contribution to the economic, social and environmental (i.e. sustainability) performance of organisations. However, evidence also suggests that organisations have found their integration and implementation challenging....... The purpose of this research is therefore to present a framework that methodically guides companies through a five stages and sixteen steps process to effectively integrate and implement the Green, Lean and Six Sigma approaches to improve their sustainability performance. To achieve this, a critical review...... of industries. The results showed that the integration of Lean Six Sigma and Green helped the organisations to averagely reduce their resources consumption from 20 to 40% and minimise the cost of energy and mass streams by 7–12%. The application of the framework should be gradual, the companies should assess...

  20. The Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience, University of North Carolina, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Robert [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2018-01-20

    This is the final report for the UNC component of the SciDAD Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience. In this report, we describe activities on the SUPER project at RENCI at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While we focus particularly on UNC, we touch on project-wide activities as well as, on interactions with, and impacts on, other projects.

  1. Narrowing the Energy Performance Gap in Non-Domestic Buildings with Aspirational Sustainability Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    The non-domestic building sector has in recent years witnessed a boom in the number of ostensibly ‘green’ buildings certified under the Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Methodology (BREEAM) and similar rating schemes. Despite the proliferation of aspirationally sustainable building designs, the actual energy performance of certified buildings is generally little better and sometimes worse than the building stock average. The actual energy consumption of non-domestic bu...

  2. Ultra-High Performance Concrete: Mechanical Performance, Durability, Sustainability and Implementation Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S. Abbas; M. L. Nehdi; M. A. Saleem

    2016-01-01

    .... The successful production of ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) depends on its material ingredients and mixture proportioning, which leads to denser and relatively more homogenous particle packing...

  3. A Sustainable Performance Assessment Framework for Plastic Film Supply Chain Management from a Chinese Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuping Xu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Academics’ and practitioners’ interest in sustainable supply chain management has received great concern in recent years. The application of biaxially-oriented polypropylene (BOPP plastic film has had a significant influence on the economic, environmental and social performance of supply chain management. However, research on the integration of these three sustainable dimensions is still rare in this field. In this paper, we identify sustainability criteria based on a triple bottom line approach (economic benefit, environmental protection and social responsibility from the supply chain perspective, develop a hybrid multi-criteria decision making framework to evaluate the criteria and select alternatives and apply the proposed approach to a real case study at a focal BOPP plastic film company in China. In the framework, a fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP is used to determine the performance criteria weights and a fuzzy technique for order performance by similarity to ideal solution (FTOPSIS is applied to rank the alternatives. The case study finds that the economic dimension was the most important aspect with environmental second and social third. The results also verify the effectiveness of the proposed framework. This paper develops an effective and systematic approach for decision makers to conduct evaluations and select optimal alternatives for focal plastic film companies.

  4. Towards systemic sustainable performance of TBI care systems: emergency leadership frontiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Denis H J

    2010-11-10

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) continue as a twenty-first century subterranean and almost invisible scourge internationally. TBI care systems provide a safety net for survival, recovery, and reintegration into social communities from this scourge, particularly in Canada, the European Union, and the USA. This paper examines the underlying issues of systemic performance and sustainability of TBI care systems, in the light of decreasing care resources and increasing demands for services. This paper reviews the extant literature on TBI care systems, systems reengineering, and emergency leadership literature. This paper presents a seven care layer paradigm, which forms the essence of systemic performance in the care of patients with TBIs. It also identifies five key strategic drivers that hold promise for the future systemic sustainability of TBI care systems. Transformational leadership and engagement from the international emergency medical community is the key to generating positive change. The sustainability/performance care framework is relevant and pertinent for consideration internationally and in the context of other emergency medical populations.

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory DOE Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) with FY 2013 Performance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Teresa A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lapsa, Melissa Voss [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is both the largest science and energy laboratory of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and one of the oldest national laboratories still operating at its original site. These characteristics provide the Sustainable Campus Initiative (SCI) both a unique opportunity and a unique challenge to integrate sustainability into facilities and activities. As outlined in this report, SCI is leveraging the outcomes of ORNL’s DOE-sponsored research and development programs to maximize the efficient use of energy and natural resources across ORNL. Wherever possible, ORNL is integrating technical innovations into new and existing facilities, systems, and processes with a widespread approach to achieving Executive Order 13514. ORNL continues to pursue and deploy innovative solutions and initiatives to advance regional, national, and worldwide sustainability and continues to transform its culture and engage employees in supporting sustainability at work, at home, and in the community. Table 1 summarizes ORNL's FY 2013 performance and planned actions to attain future goals. ORNL has achieved numerous successes during FY 2013, which are described in detail throughout this document.

  6. Effects of exercise training and coronary ablation on swimming performance, heart size, and cardiac enzymes in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    FARRELL, AP; JOHANSEN, JA; STEFFENSEN, JF

    1990-01-01

    Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were exercise trained for 28-52 days. Trained fish were 13% larger and swam 12% faster in an aerobic swimming test. Training induced cardiac growth that was isometric with body growth, since ventricle mass relative to body mass was constant. The proportions of ...... if the coronary artery was ligated and an increase in metabolic enzymes associated with ATP generation, namely, citrate synthase, ß-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase, and hexokinase....... of compact and spongy myocardia in the ventricle were also unchanged by training. Trained fish had significantly higher levels of citrate synthase, ß-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase, and hexokinase in both compact and spongy myocardium. Ligation of a 0.5- to 1.0-cm section of the coronary artery produced only...... of citrate synthase, ß-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase, and hexokinase. Exercise-induced increases in the levels of these enzymes in the compact myocardium were prevented by coronary ligation. The decrease of enzymes in the compact myocardium as a result of coronary ligation was compensated for by a 30...

  7. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swimming pools. 1250.89 Section 1250.89 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.89 Swimming pools. (a) Fill and draw swimming pools shall not be installed or used. (b) Swimming pools of the recirculation type shall be...

  8. Lagrangian coherent structures in jetting and paddling jellyfish swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, Doug; Mohseni, Kamran

    2009-11-01

    Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are a relatively new technique for visualizing and analysing structures and transport in complex fluid flows. In this study, we use LCS to examine the flow created by swimming jellyfish. We focus on identifying structures which contribute to feeding and propulsion and find several interesting results. Jellyfish which use different methods of propulsion create very different flow structures during swimming which are complimentary to the type of propulsion used. Additionally, we investigate the relationship between flow structures, pressure and swimming performance for the jetting Jellyfish, Sarsia tubulosa. We have previously detected structures within the bell of Sarsia tubulosa and we now focus on examining how these structures may impact the jellyfish's swimming.

  9. Reliability of tethered swimming evaluation in age group swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Nuno; Marinho, Daniel A; Batalha, Nuno; Marques, Mário C; Morouço, Pedro

    2014-06-28

    The aim of the present study was to examine the reliability of tethered swimming in the evaluation of age group swimmers. The sample was composed of 8 male national level swimmers with at least 4 years of experience in competitive swimming. Each swimmer performed two 30 second maximal intensity tethered swimming tests, on separate days. Individual force-time curves were registered to assess maximum force, mean force and the mean impulse of force. Both consistency and reliability were very strong, with Cronbach's Alpha values ranging from 0.970 to 0.995. All the applied metrics presented a very high agreement between tests, with the mean impulse of force presenting the highest. These results indicate that tethered swimming can be used to evaluate age group swimmers. Furthermore, better comprehension of the swimmers ability to effectively exert force in the water can be obtained using the impulse of force.

  10. Reliability of Tethered Swimming Evaluation in Age Group Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaro Nuno

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the reliability of tethered swimming in the evaluation of age group swimmers. The sample was composed of 8 male national level swimmers with at least 4 years of experience in competitive swimming. Each swimmer performed two 30 second maximal intensity tethered swimming tests, on separate days. Individual force-time curves were registered to assess maximum force, mean force and the mean impulse of force. Both consistency and reliability were very strong, with Cronbach's Alpha values ranging from 0.970 to 0.995. All the applied metrics presented a very high agreement between tests, with the mean impulse of force presenting the highest. These results indicate that tethered swimming can be used to evaluate age group swimmers. Furthermore, better comprehension of the swimmers ability to effectively exert force in the water can be obtained using the impulse of force.

  11. Critical stroke rate as a parameter for evaluation in swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Franken

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the critical stroke rate (CSR compared to the average stroke rate (SR when swimming at the critical speed (CS. Ten competitive swimmers performed five 200 m trials at different velocities relative to their CS (90, 95, 100, 103 and 105% in front crawl. The CSR was significantly higher than the SR at 90% of the CS and lower at 105% of the CS. Stroke length (SL at 103 and 105% of the CS were lower than the SL at 90, 95, and 100% of the CS. The combination of the CS and CSR concepts can be useful for improving both aerobic capacity/power and technique. CS and CSR could be used to reduce the SR and increase the SL, when swimming at the CS pace, or to increase the swimming speed when swimming at the CSR.

  12. Swimming ability and physiological response to swimming fatigue in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The swimming endurance of kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus (11.04 ± 2.43 g) at five swimming speeds (23.0, 26.7, 31.0, 34.6 and 38.6 cm s-1) was determined in a circulating flume at 25.7 ± 0.7°C. The plasma glucose and total protein, hepatopancreas and pleopods muscle glycogen concentrations were ...

  13. Swim Speed Tests as a Method for Differentiating the Profiles of Young Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klara Šiljeg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Swimming tests are used in every training cycle and seasons with purpose of estimating swimming performance and evaluate certain training types. The focus of this study is an attempt to distinguish between the potential short-distance and longer-distance swimmers, as well as the swimmers who could have desirable profiles for particular swimming styles. For this purpose, several aims are given: ( to determine the latent dimensions of the performances in swimming tests, conducted on various distances and performed using different swimming styles; 2 to determine the correlations between speeds on various distances using different swimming styles; 3 to determine the differences in various distance speeds at the same swimmers ; 4 to determine the profiles of swimmers, based on the various distance speeds (4. Male swimmers (N=68, aged 14 to 16 from five Zagreb clubs were tested. Four swimming tests were used to measure speed (25-m freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly, five swimming tests measured speed endurance (50-m freestyle, 100-m freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly, while only one test measured endurance (800-m freestyle. The results revealed two interpretable and highly reliable latent dimensions of swimming tests. Factor analysis of the scores in swimming tests differentiated the variables of swimming tests that describe breaststrokes and other strokes. Most of the scores in the swimming tests are positively correlated (in range 0.25–0.85, while no differences in various distance speeds among the same swimmers are found. The results indicate the importance of using swimming tests, especially in breaststrokes styles, because of their specific motor structure.

  14. In-Water Resisted Swim Training for Age-Group Swimmers: An Evaluation of Training Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kosuke; Brammer, Christopher L; Sossong, Tyler D; Abe, Takashi; Stager, Joel M

    2017-09-22

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of resisted sprint swim training with that of nonresisted sprint swim training on 50-m freestyle competition time (Vmax50) in age-group swimmers. Twenty-four age-group swimmers (age 10.6-14.9 y) were divided into resisted or nonresisted sprint swim training groups and completed a sprint swim training intervention 2 times per week for 10 weeks. Repeated 10-m sprints with progressively increasing resistance were used to determine measures of swim power. Skeletal muscle mass was estimated using B-mode ultrasound. Maturity status was estimated using predicted adult height (%Htadult) and maturity offset. A 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed no group × time interaction for measured variables. Vmax50 was correlated with skeletal muscle mass and swim power variables, but no significant relationship was found between relative changes in these variables. Estimated maturity status (%Htadult) appeared to be associated with initial measures of swim power and performance variables. Ten weeks of resisted sprint swim training was not any more effective than nonresisted sprint swim training at improving sprint swim performance in age-group swimmers.

  15. Effects of swimming activity on the copulatory behavior of sexually active male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allouh, M Z

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity has long been associated with better sexual function. This study investigated the effects of moderate swimming exercise on the copulatory behavior of sexually potent male rats. Two sets of sexually potent male rats -highly active and moderately active- were identified depending on baseline sexual activity. Each of the two sets of rats was further randomly divided into two groups (swimming and sedentary). There were 16 rats in each of the four study groups (highly active swimming, highly active sedentary, moderately active swimming and moderately active sedentary). The copulatory behavior parameters and serum testosterone levels were measured and compared between the rats of the swimming and sedentary groups following a month long training period in which rats were made to swim for 1 h every alternate day. Swimming significantly improved the sexual performance of highly active rats, as indicated by increased intromission frequency and intromission ratio, compared with the sedentary controls. Swimming improved both sexual desire and performance, as indicated by reduced mount latency and increased intromission ratio, respectively, in swimming moderately active rats compared with the sedentary moderately active controls. Therefore, swimming activity improves the copulatory behavior of both highly active and moderately active male rats.

  16. The Association between Organisational Commitment And Corporate Social Responsibility-Environmental Performance Within an Integrated Sustainability Balanced Scorecard Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Rae

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether organisational commitment is associated with organisations‘CSR performance within sustainability aspects of their internal process. A structural equation model (SEM tested two sequential direct associations between: (1 senior management employees‘ affective and continuance organisational commitment and organisations‘ conventional value-creating internal processes; (2 conventional value-creating internal processes and organisations‘ CSR performance within sustainability value-creating internal process. The SEM results show an indirect association between affective commitment and CSR performance within sustainability value-creating internal process, which is mediated by the conventional value-creating internal processes. The findings support an integrated sustainability internal process within a sustainability balanced scorecard (SBSC as depicted in Kaplan and Norton‘s strategy map. Organisations may develop internal processes that promote CSR outcome characteristics when employees possess higher levels of affective organisational commitment. Future research could investigate a broader  range of environmental outcomes within CSR performance.

  17. A Novel Feed-Forward Modeling System Leads to Sustained Improvements in Attention and Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Ashley F; Rose, Maya; Norris, Troy; Gordon, Eric

    2016-01-28

    This study tested a novel feed-forward modeling (FFM) system as a nonpharmacological intervention for the treatment of ADHD children and the training of cognitive skills that improve academic performance. This study implemented a randomized, controlled, parallel design comparing this FFM with a nonpharmacological community care intervention. Improvements were measured on parent- and clinician-rated scales of ADHD symptomatology and on academic performance tests completed by the participant. Participants were followed for 3 months after training. Participants in the FFM training group showed significant improvements in ADHD symptomatology and academic performance, while the control group did not. Improvements from FFM were sustained 3 months later. The FFM appeared to be an effective intervention for the treatment of ADHD and improving academic performance. This FFM training intervention shows promise as a first-line treatment for ADHD while improving academic performance. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Sustainability Initiatives and Organizational Performance: An Analysis of Publications in the WEB of SCIENCE DATABASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Luís Hepper

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is going through a time of reflection about the preservation of natural resources, an issue that is increasingly considered in its agenda. The search for balance between environmental, social and economic aspects has been a challenge for business survival over the years and has led companies to adopt initiatives focused on sustainability. The objective of this article is to analyse how the international scientific production addresses sustainable practices and initiatives and their relationship with organizational performance. Considering this scope, a bibliometric study of the publications located on Web of Science - Social Sciences Citation Index (WoS-SSCI was developed. There were 33 articles identified and selected on the subject. Journals that stand out in quantity of articles and number of citations are the Journal of Cleaner Production and Strategic Management Journal, respectively. Analysing the results, a growing concern about this issue and the increase in publications was noticed after the 2000s. The results found, in general, associate sustainable practices to positive organizational performance, such as increased profit on the product sold, quality improvement, improved reputation, and waste reduction, among others gains identified.

  19. Sustainability Commitment, New Competitors’ Presence, and Hotel Performance: The Hotel Industry in Barcelona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pedro Aznar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The hospitality industry is facing major challenges, among them the new competition from novel forms of supply in the sharing economy. Airbnb, Homeaway, and Niumba, among other websites offering accommodations, are having an important impact in the sector, changing existing conditions and the market for the traditional hospitality industry. In this context, a strategy based in differentiation can help to prevent drops in revenues and profitability. The main objective of this paper is analyse if commitment towards sustainability has a positive impact on financial performance and can be considered a positive strategy in this new environment. The empirical data refer to a sample of hotels in Barcelona, one of the most important tourist cities in Europe. Our results suggest that there is no clear relationship between sustainability and better financial performance; however, sustainability commitment is associated with a minimum size, which can also have positive effects in terms of economies of scale and finally affect profitability. Hotels more committed to environmental issues are located in areas with a lower density of Airbnb apartments, and this geographical distribution can be more positive than a situation of massive tourist concentration in specific areas with negative externalities for neighbours.

  20. System Wide Information Management (SWIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritz, Mike; McGowan, Shirley; Ramos, Cal

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation lists questions regarding the implementation of System Wide Information Management (SWIM). Some of the questions concern policy issues and strategies, technology issues and strategies, or transition issues and strategies.

  1. Public swimming in Roudnice nad Labem

    OpenAIRE

    Trč, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Title: Public swimming in Roudnice nad Labem Target: This thesis aims to explore the public's interest in swimming, chart the course of their visits to the swimming pool and find out personal interest in improving swimming techniques. Assess the importance of the swimming section for the public with regard to the possibility of physical activity for children and youth. Methods: Information from public in Roudnice nad Labem were obtained by using questionnaires. The results of the questionnair...

  2. A practical model for sustainable operational performance; Een praktisch model voor duurzaam bedrijfspresteren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlek, C.A.J.; Steg, E.M.; Feenstra, D.; Gerbens-Leenis, W.; Lindenberg, S.; Moll, H.; Schoot Uiterkamp, A.; Sijtsma, F.; Van Witteloostuijn, A. [Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2002-07-12

    By means of a concrete model for sustainable operational performance enterprises can report uniformly on the sustainability of their contributions to the economy, welfare and the environment. The development and design of a three-dimensional monitoring system is presented and discussed. [Dutch] Ondernemingen zijn belangrijke pijlers voor een duurzame samenleving. Met een concreet model voor duurzaam bedrijfspresteren kunnen ondernemingen op uniforme wijze rapporteren over de duurzaamheid van hun bijdragen aan economie, welzijn en milieu. In dit artikel wordt de opzet van een driedimensionaal meetsysteem gepresenteerd. Vanuit de samenleving klinkt een aanzwellende roep om maatschappelijk verantwoord ondernemen, vaak ook duurzaam ondernemen genoemd'. Daarbij wordt meer aandacht gevraagd voor collectieve langetermijnbelangen van economie, welzijn en milieu. Ook internationaal wordt al jaren gediscussieerd over bedrijfsethiek en maatschappelijke verantwoordelijkheid. Sinds september 2000 wordt aan de Rijksuniversiteit Groningen een begripsmodel ontwikkeld, dat wordt uitgewerkt in een operationeel meetsysteem met diverse praktische functies.

  3. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  4. Impaired spatial performance in rats with retrosplenial lesions: importance of the spatial problem and the rat strain in identifying lesion effects in a swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, K Troy; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2002-02-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological, and anatomical evidence suggests that retrosplenial (RS) cortex (areas RSA and RSG) plays a role in spatial navigation. This conclusion has been questioned in recent work, suggesting that it is damage to the underlying cingulum bundle (CG) (areas CG and IG), and not RS, that disrupts spatial place learning (Aggleton et al., 2000). We revisited this issue by comparing Long-Evans rats, the strain used in studies that report RS deficits, to Dark Agouti rats, the strain in which no RS deficit has been reported. Rat groups with RS, RS + CG, or no lesion were tested on a place task in a swimming pool, a test of nonspatial and spatial learning, and a matching-to-place task, a relatively selective test of spatial learning. Long-Evans rats given RS and RS + CG lesions, either before or after training on the two tasks, were impaired on both tasks, a deficit not attributable to impaired visual acuity. Control Dark Agouti rats and RS Dark Agouti rats, although not different on the place task, were both significantly impaired relative to Long-Evans rats. The RS Dark Agouti group, however, was also impaired on the matching-to-place task. Thus, we show that RS cortex is part of an extended neural circuit involved in spatial behavior in both Long-Evans and Dark Agouti rats, but its role in the place task may be masked by an innate nonspatial deficit in Dark Agouti rats. The results are discussed in relation to the importance of assessing spatial learning with appropriate spatial tests, the problems of interpretation posed by rat strain differences, and the role of retrosplenial cortex in spatial behavior.

  5. Alkali-Activated Mortars for Sustainable Building Solutions: Effect of Binder Composition on Technical Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnese Attanasio

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in the construction sector in the use of sustainable binders as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, the production of which is highly impacting on the environment, due to high carbon dioxide emissions and energy consumption. Alkali-activated binders, especially those resulting from low-cost industrial by-products, such as coal fly ash or metallurgical slag, represent a sustainable option for cement replacement, though their use is more challenging, due to some technological issues related to workability or curing conditions. This paper presents sustainable alkali-activated mortars cured in room conditions and based on metakaolin, fly ash, and furnace slag (both by-products resulting from local sources and relevant blends, aiming at their real scale application in the building sector. The effect of binder composition—gradually adjusted taking into consideration technical and environmental aspects (use of industrial by-products in place of natural materials in the view of resources saving—on the performance (workability, compressive strength of different mortar formulations, is discussed in detail. Some guidelines for the design of cement-free binders are given, taking into consideration the effect of each investigated alumino-silicate component. The technical feasibility to produce the mortars with standard procedures and equipment, the curing in room conditions, the promising results achieved in terms of workability and mechanical performance (from 20.0 MPa up to 52.0 MPa, confirm the potential of such materials for practical applications (masonry mortars of class M20 and Md. The cement-free binders resulting from this study can be used as reference for the development of mortars and concrete formulations for sustainable building materials production.

  6. Quantification of upper limb kinetic asymmetries in front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morouço, Pedro G; Marinho, Daniel A; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Marques, Mário C

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed at quantifying upper limb kinetic asymmetries in maximal front crawl swimming and to examine if these asymmetries would affect the contribution of force exertion to swimming performance. Eighteen high level male swimmers with unilateral breathing patterns and sprint or middle distance specialists, volunteered as participants. A load-cell was used to quantify the forces exerted in water by completing a 30s maximal front crawl tethered swimming test and a maximal 50 m free swimming was considered as a performance criterion. Individual force-time curves were obtained to calculate the mean and maximum forces per cycle, for each upper limb. Following, symmetry index was estimated and breathing laterality identified by questionnaire. Lastly, the pattern of asymmetries along the test was estimated for each upper limb using linear regression of peak forces per cycle. Asymmetrical force exertion was observed in the majority of the swimmers (66.7%), with a total correspondence of breathing laterality opposite to the side of the force asymmetry. Forces exerted by the dominant upper limb presented a higher decrease than from the non-dominant. Very strong associations were found between exerted forces and swimming performance, when controlling the isolated effect of symmetry index. Results point that force asymmetries occur in the majority of the swimmers, and that these asymmetries are most evident in the first cycles of a maximum bout. Symmetry index stood up as an influencing factor on the contribution of tethered forces over swimming performance. Thus, to some extent, a certain degree of asymmetry is not critical for short swimming performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A Balanced Scorecard of Sustainable Management in the Taiwanese Bicycle Industry: Development of Performance Indicators and Importance Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chao Chung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to investigate the development of the performance indicators of sustainable management in the Taiwanese bicycle industry and to perform an importance analysis. Based on the Balanced Scorecard concept, the framework of sustainable management is added. Ten experts evaluated the performance indicators of a sustainable Balanced Scorecard in the Taiwanese bicycle industry using five major categories: (1 Financial, (2 Customer, (3 Internal Business Processes, (4 Learning and Growth, and (5 Sustainable Development, and a total of 21 performance indicators were used. The analytic network process (ANP was used to perform an importance analysis of the various performance indicators. Most of the experts suggested that for the introduction of a sustainable management strategy into the bicycle industry in Taiwan, it is necessary to include the definition of sustainable management and to improve five performance indicators: innovation process, customer satisfaction, operations process, after-sales service, and market share. According to the analysis results, this study proposed relevant management definitions and suggestions to be used as important references for decision-makers to understand the introduction of sustainable management strategies to the current bicycle industry in Taiwan.

  8. Sustainability Performance of Scandinavian Corporations and their Value Chains assessed by UN Global Compact and Global Reporting Initiative standards - a way to identify superior performers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a combination of the two most adopted multi- stakeholder standards for sustainability reporting as an alternate framework for assessing sustainability performance in Scandinavian corporations. This novel approach leverages numeric measures on the criteria...... Strategies & Policies, Management Systems, Monitoring and Evaluation Mechanisms and Key Outcomes on sustainability defined broadly as the Human Rights, Labour, Environment and Anti-Corruption issues by the UN Global Compact. The study firmly concludes that Scandinavian corporations on average...

  9. Analysis of Sustainable Performance in Romania’s Local Public Administrations: An External Stakeholders Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana MIHAIU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Building a sustainable performance system at the level of the local public administrations must have as starting point the local public administration’s (LPA mission and must go down to the level of the individual. This system must follow the external performance that it delivers to the citizens, the outcomes generated, but also the internal performance which suggests how to achieve the external performance. We propose in this regard the simultaneous use of the Balanced Scorecard tool for managing the internal performance and the Public Service Value Model for measuring the external performance measurement which derives from the organization's mission. In the second part of the work we analyzed comparatively the external performance created by the county capitals of Romania in the year 2013 using the Public Service Value Model (PSVM. Based on this analysis, the county capitals of Romania can be divided in the following categories: high performance organizations (value driven, budget conscious organizations, low performance organizations (sleeping giants and quality conscious organizations. This classification is useful both for the external and internal stakeholders because it shows the efficiency of public money spending and the areas in which the LPA is performing well, and also the ones that need to be improved.

  10. Is paramecium swimming autonomic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Toplosky, Norman; Hansen, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We seek to explore if the swimming of paramecium has an underlying autonomic mechanism. Such robotic elements may be useful in capturing the disturbance field in an environment in real time. Experimental evidence is emerging that motion control neurons of other animals may be present in paramecium as well. The limit cycle determined using analog simulation of the coupled nonlinear oscillators of olivo-cerebellar dynamics (ieee joe 33, 563-578, 2008) agrees with the tracks of the cilium of a biological paramecium. A 4-motor apparatus has been built that reproduces the kinematics of the cilium motion. The motion of the biological cilium has been analyzed and compared with the results of the finite element modeling of forces on a cilium. The modeling equates applied torque at the base of the cilium with drag, the cilium stiffness being phase dependent. A low friction pendulum apparatus with a multiplicity of electromagnetic actuators is being built for verifying the maps of the attractor basin computed using the olivo-cerebellar dynamics for different initial conditions. Sponsored by ONR 33.

  11. Swimming with the Shoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ann

    2017-10-01

    This article responds to Yuli Rahmawati and Peter Charles Taylor's piece and explores my role as a science teacher, science teacher educator and researcher in two contexts, Sierra Leone and Bhutan. In the first part of the article I reflect on my 3 years as a science teacher in Sierra Leone and demonstrate resonances with Yuli's accounts of culture shock and with her positioning of herself in a third space. I also reflect on the importance of colleagues in helping me reshape my identity as a science teacher in this new context. The second part of the article reflects on much shorter periods of time in Bhutan and my work as a teacher educator and researcher where, unlike Sierra Leone, it was not possible because of the short periods I worked there, to occupy a third space. I close by discussing how in Bhutan, but also Sierra Leone, collaboration with colleagues allowed me to contribute my own expertise, despite my lack of a deep understanding of the cultural context, in a way that was as valuable as possible. I liken this way of collaborative working in my professional life as `swimming with the shoal'.

  12. High-intensity high-volume swimming induces more robust signaling through PGC-1α and AMPK activation than sprint interval swimming in m. triceps brachii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casuso, Rafael A; Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to test whether high-intensity high-volume training (HIHVT) swimming would induce more robust signaling than sprint interval training (SIT) swimming within the m. triceps brachii due to lower metabolic and oxidation. Nine well-trained swimmers performed the two training procedures...

  13. A new system for analyzing swim fin propulsion based on human kinematic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Guillaume; Bideau, Benoit; Bideau, Nicolas; Colobert, Briac; Le Guerroue, Gaël; Delamarche, Paul

    2010-07-20

    The use of swim fins has become popular in various water sport activities. While numerous models of swim fin with various innovative shapes have been subjectively designed, the exact influence of the fin characteristics on swimming performance is still much debated, and remains difficult to quantify. To date, the most common approach for evaluating swim fin propulsion is based on the study of "swimmer-fins" as a global system, where physiological and/or biomechanical responses are considered. However, reproducible swimming technique is difficult (or even impossible) to obtain on human body and may lead to discrepancies in data acquired between trials. In this study, we present and validate a new automat called HERMES which enables an evaluation of various swim fins during an adjustable, standardized and reproducible motion. This test bench reliably and accurately reproduces human fin-swimming motions, and gives resulting dynamic measurements at the ankle joint. Seven fins with various geometrical and mechanical characteristics were tested. For each swim fin, ankle force and hydromechanical efficiency (useful mechanical power output divided by mechanical power input delivered by the motors) were calculated. Efficiencies reported in our study were high (close to 70% for some swim fins) over a narrow range of Strouhal number (St) and peaks within the interval 0.2swimming animals. Therefore, an interesting prospect in this work would be to accurately study the impact of adjustable fin kinematics and material (design and mechanical properties) on the wake structure and on efficiency. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Swimming of a Tiny Subtropical Sea Butterfly with Coiled Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, David; Karakas, Ferhat; Maas, Amy

    2017-11-01

    Sea butterflies, also known as pteropods, include a variety of small, zooplanktonic marine snails. Thecosomatous pteropods possess a shell and swim at low Reynolds numbers by beating their wing-like parapodia in a manner reminiscent of insect flight. In fact, previous studies of the pteropod Limacina helicina have shown that pteropod swimming hydrodynamics and tiny insect flight aerodynamics are dynamically similar. Studies of L. helicina swimming have been performed in polar (0 degrees C) and temperate conditions (12 degrees C). Here we present measurements of the swimming of Heliconoides inflatus, a smaller yet morphologically similar pteropod that lives in warm Bermuda seawater (21 degrees C) with a viscosity almost half that of the polar seawater. The collected H. inflatus have shell sizes less than 1.5 mm in diameter, beat their wings at frequencies up to 11 Hz, and swim upwards in sawtooth trajectories at speeds up to approximately 25 mm/s. Using three-dimensional wing and body kinematics collected with two orthogonal high speed cameras and time-resolved, 2D flow measurements collected with a micro-PIV system, we compare the effects of smaller body size and lower water viscosity on the flow physics underlying flapping-based swimming by pteropods and flight by tiny insects.

  15. Influence of pre-school swimming on level of swimming abilities of early schol age children

    OpenAIRE

    Velová, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    My thesis paper is focused on children swimming from their birth to early school age. The pivotal part of the paper is the comparison of swimming abilities between primary school children who have passed pre-school swimming training and those who have had no training at all. Theoretical framework of the paper is then focused on general swimming theory, characteristics of children's evolutionary stages within the context of swimming and definition of basic swimming skills.

  16. The Role of Marketing Audit in Evaluation Sustainable Marketing Performance in Romanian Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Serbănică

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In today`s society, marked by profound changes in consumer attitudes towards the environment and social issues, organizations are forced to behave responsibly, to be oriented towards a sustainable marketing. However the efforts of the organization should be evaluated periodically to see the extent to which objectives are achieved and the extent to which resource consumption leads to results. From the marketing perspective, this can be achieved through marketing audit, which is a tool for evaluating and controlling a marketing organization’s performance. This paper aims, through a documentary study in the first part and an exploratory quantitative research, in the second, to highlight the role and place of the audit of marketing in companies in Romania, to assess the effectiveness of marketing activity undertaken the principles of sustainability. The last part of the paper includes research findings and a series of theoretical and managerial recommendations on the use of marketing audit as a tool for assessing the sustainability of marketing companies in the target group, with the possibility of generalizing to all companies operating on the market in Romania.

  17. Mix design and mechanical performance of geopolymer binder for sustainable construction and building material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeli, Manfredi; Novais, Rui M.; Seabra, Maria Paula; Labrincha, João A.

    2017-11-01

    Sustainability in construction is a major concern worldwide, due to the huge volume of materials and energy consumed by this sector. Associated supplementing industries (e.g. Portland cement production) constitute a significant source of CO2 emissions and global warming. Valorisation and reuse of industrial wastes and by-products make geopolymers a solid and sustainable via to be followed as a valid alternative to Portland cement. In this work the mix design of a green fly ash-based geopolymer is evaluated as an environmentally friendly construction material. In the pursuit of sustainability, wastes from a regional kraft pulp industry are exploited for the material processing. Furthermore, a simple, reproducible, and low-cost manufacture is used. The mix design is hence optimised in order to improve the desirable mechanical performance of the material intended for structural applications in construction. Tests indicate that geopolymers may efficiently substitute the ordinary Portland cement as a mortar/concrete binder. Furthermore, valorisation and reuse of wastes in geopolymers is a suboptimal way of gaining financial surplus for the involved industrial players, while contributes for the implementation of a desirable circular economy.

  18. The Building sector commitment to promote the sustainability of construction products: a common European approach for the Environmental Product Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Gargari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The industry of construction products plays an important role in Europe in promoting the sustainability of the built environment in a life cycle perspective. Within the framework of the European initiatives for a sustainable competitiveness, manufacturers are interested in promoting a life cycle approach along the building chain. However both, institutions and building operators, in general still have to go a long way on designing and applying a sustainable and competitive industrial policy. This paper aims to describe the European background, the regulatory framework, identifying gaps and the actions to be undertaken to promote a market for sustainable products and sustainable buildings. In particular this paper deals with the assessment and communication of the environmental performance of construction products between the operators in the building chain, as a prerequisite for the sustainability of the built environment, and outlines the strategies to implement a proper evaluation and communication process.

  19. Performance Evaluation for Sustainability of Strong Smart Grid by Using Stochastic AHP and Fuzzy TOPSIS Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiru Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As an efficient way to deal with the global climate change and energy shortage problems, a strong, self-healing, compatible, economic and integrative smart gird is under construction in China, which is supported by large amounts of investments and advanced technologies. To promote the construction, operation and sustainable development of Strong Smart Grid (SSG, a novel hybrid framework for evaluating the performance of SSG is proposed from the perspective of sustainability. Based on a literature review, experts’ opinions and the technical characteristics of SSG, the evaluation model involves four sustainability criteria defined as economy, society, environment and technology aspects associated with 12 sub-criteria. Considering the ambiguity and vagueness of the subjective judgments on sub-criteria, fuzzy TOPSIS method is employed to evaluate the performance of SSG. In addition, different from previous research, this paper adopts the stochastic Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP method to upgrade the traditional Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS by addressing the fuzzy and stochastic factors within weights calculation. Finally, four regional smart grids in China are ranked by employing the proposed framework. The results show that the sub-criteria affiliated with environment obtain much more attention than that of economy from experts group. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis indicates the ranking list remains stable no matter how sub-criteria weights are changed, which verifies the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed model and evaluation results. This study provides a comprehensive and effective method for performance evaluation of SSG and also innovates the weights calculation for traditional TOPSIS.

  20. Hydrodynamic advantages of swimming by salp chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kelly R; Weihs, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Salps are marine invertebrates comprising multiple jet-propelled swimming units during a colonial life-cycle stage. Using theory, we show that asynchronous swimming with multiple pulsed jets yields substantial hydrodynamic benefit due to the production of steady swimming velocities, which limit drag. Laboratory comparisons of swimming kinematics of aggregate salps (Salpa fusiformis and Weelia cylindrica) using high-speed video supported that asynchronous swimming by aggregates results in a smoother velocity profile and showed that this smoother velocity profile is the result of uncoordinated, asynchronous swimming by individual zooids. In situ flow visualizations of W. cylindrica swimming wakes revealed that another consequence of asynchronous swimming is that fluid interactions between jet wakes are minimized. Although the advantages of multi-jet propulsion have been mentioned elsewhere, this is the first time that the theory has been quantified and the role of asynchronous swimming verified using experimental data from the laboratory and the field. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. A Procedure to Perform Multi-Objective Optimization for Sustainable Design of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Brunelli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available When dealing with sustainable design concepts in new construction or in retrofitting existing buildings, it is useful to define both economic and environmental performance indicators, in order to select the optimal technical solutions. In most of the cases, the definition of the optimal strategy is not trivial because it is necessary to solve a multi-objective problem with a high number of the variables subjected to nonlinear constraints. In this study, a powerful multi-objective optimization genetic algorithm, NSGAII (Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II, is used to derive the Pareto optimal solutions, which can illustrate the whole trade-off relationship between objectives. A method is then proposed, to introduce uncertainty evaluation in the optimization procedure. A new university building is taken as a case study to demonstrate how each step of the optimization process should be performed. The results achieved turn out to be reliable and show the suitableness of this procedure to define both economic and environmental performance indicators. Similar analysis on a set of buildings representatives of a specific region might be used to assist local/national administrations in the definition of appropriate legal limits that will permit a strategic optimized extension of renewable energy production. Finally, the proposed approach could be applied to similar optimization models for the optimal planning of sustainable buildings, in order to define the best solutions among non-optimal ones.

  2. Sustainability and Financial Performance of Companies in the Energy Sector in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Paun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article, we focus on the question of sustainability in the renewable energy sector of Romania. The aim of the current paper is to analyze the financial performance of the companies operating in the field. Our assumption is that the success of the implementation of the energy switch from classic to renewables relies on the businesses operating in this industry. In our article, we have selected the most prominent players in the energy industry, comparing the performance of those that are producing renewable energy to the ones that are producing energy using fossil fuels. Our analysis has shown that, starting with 2013, the companies have encountered financial difficulties, which has led to a halt in investments and the questioning of the sustainability of entering the market. After analyzing the data, we have seen that the investments have been rather opportunistic, based on the commitment of the government to keep the subsidies introduced by the policy, and have not been based on the realistic long-term financial performance of the companies in this area.

  3. Establishing Zebrafish as a Novel Exercise Model: Swimming Economy, Swimming-Enhanced Growth and Muscle Growth Marker Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, Mireia; Brittijn, Sebastiaan A.; Burgerhout, Erik; van den Thillart, Guido E. E. J. M.; Spaink, Herman P.; Planas, Josep V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Zebrafish has been largely accepted as a vertebrate multidisciplinary model but its usefulness as a model for exercise physiology has been hampered by the scarce knowledge on its swimming economy, optimal swimming speeds and cost of transport. Therefore, we have performed individual and group-wise swimming experiments to quantify swimming economy and to demonstrate the exercise effects on growth in adult zebrafish. Methodology/Principal Findings Individual zebrafish (n = 10) were able to swim at a critical swimming speed (Ucrit) of 0.548±0.007 m s−1 or 18.0 standard body lengths (BL) s−1. The optimal swimming speed (Uopt) at which energetic efficiency is highest was 0.396±0.019 m s−1 (13.0 BL s−1) corresponding to 72.26±0.29% of Ucrit. The cost of transport at optimal swimming speed (COTopt) was 25.23±4.03 µmol g−1 m−1. A group-wise experiment was conducted with zebrafish (n = 83) swimming at Uopt for 6 h day−1 for 5 days week−1 for 4 weeks vs. zebrafish (n = 84) that rested during this period. Swimming zebrafish increased their total body length by 5.6% and body weight by 41.1% as compared to resting fish. For the first time, a highly significant exercise-induced growth is demonstrated in adult zebrafish. Expression analysis of a set of muscle growth marker genes revealed clear regulatory roles in relation to swimming-enhanced growth for genes such as growth hormone receptor b (ghrb), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor a (igf1ra), troponin C (stnnc), slow myosin heavy chain 1 (smyhc1), troponin I2 (tnni2), myosin heavy polypeptide 2 (myhz2) and myostatin (mstnb). Conclusions/Significance From the results of our study we can conclude that zebrafish can be used as an exercise model for enhanced growth, with implications in basic, biomedical and applied sciences, such as aquaculture. PMID:21217817

  4. Establishing zebrafish as a novel exercise model: swimming economy, swimming-enhanced growth and muscle growth marker gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan P Palstra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zebrafish has been largely accepted as a vertebrate multidisciplinary model but its usefulness as a model for exercise physiology has been hampered by the scarce knowledge on its swimming economy, optimal swimming speeds and cost of transport. Therefore, we have performed individual and group-wise swimming experiments to quantify swimming economy and to demonstrate the exercise effects on growth in adult zebrafish. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Individual zebrafish (n = 10 were able to swim at a critical swimming speed (U(crit of 0.548±0.007 m s(-1 or 18.0 standard body lengths (BL s(-1. The optimal swimming speed (U(opt at which energetic efficiency is highest was 0.396±0.019 m s(-1 (13.0 BL s(-1 corresponding to 72.26±0.29% of U(crit. The cost of transport at optimal swimming speed (COT(opt was 25.23±4.03 µmol g(-1 m(-1. A group-wise experiment was conducted with zebrafish (n = 83 swimming at U(opt for 6 h day(-1 for 5 days week(-1 for 4 weeks vs. zebrafish (n = 84 that rested during this period. Swimming zebrafish increased their total body length by 5.6% and body weight by 41.1% as compared to resting fish. For the first time, a highly significant exercise-induced growth is demonstrated in adult zebrafish. Expression analysis of a set of muscle growth marker genes revealed clear regulatory roles in relation to swimming-enhanced growth for genes such as growth hormone receptor b (ghrb, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor a (igf1ra, troponin C (stnnc, slow myosin heavy chain 1 (smyhc1, troponin I2 (tnni2, myosin heavy polypeptide 2 (myhz2 and myostatin (mstnb. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: From the results of our study we can conclude that zebrafish can be used as an exercise model for enhanced growth, with implications in basic, biomedical and applied sciences, such as aquaculture.

  5. Analysis of sex differences in open-water ultra-distance swimming performances in the FINA World Cup races in 5 km, 10 km and 25 km from 2000 to 2012.

    OpenAIRE

    Zingg, Matthias,; Rüst, Christoph,; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald; Knechtle, Beat

    2014-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: The present study investigated the changes in swimming speeds and sex differences for elite male and female swimmers competing in 5 km, 10 km and 25 km open-water FINA World Cup races held between 2000 and 2012. METHODS: The changes in swimming speeds and sex differences across years were analysed using linear, non-linear, and multi-level regression analyses for the annual fastest and the annual ten fastest competitors. RESULTS: For the annual fastest, swim...

  6. Sustainable, heat-resistant and flame-retardant cellulose-based composite separator for high-performance lithium ion battery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Jianjun; Yue, Liping; Kong, Qingshan; Liu, Zhihong; Zhou, Xinhong; Zhang, Chuanjian; Xu, Quan; Zhang, Bo; Ding, Guoliang; Qin, Bingsheng; Duan, Yulong; Wang, Qingfu; Yao, Jianhua; Cui, Guanglei; Chen, Liquan

    2014-01-01

    A sustainable, heat-resistant and flame-retardant cellulose-based composite nonwoven has been successfully fabricated and explored its potential application for promising separator of high-performance...

  7. Thermal Performance of Precast Concrete Sandwich Panel (PCSP) Design for Sustainable Built Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Peniel Ang Soon; Ling, Lim Mei; Kasim, Narimah; Hamid, Zuhairi Abd; Masrom, Md Asrul Nasid Bin

    2017-10-01

    Malaysia’s awareness of performance criteria in construction industry towards a sustainable built environment with the use of precast concrete sandwich panel (PCSP) system is applied in the building’s wall to study the structural behaviour. However, very limited studies are conducted on the thermal insulation of exterior and interior panels in PCSP design. In hot countries such as Malaysia, proper designs of panel are important to obtain better thermal insulation for building. This study is based on thermal performance of precast concrete sandwich panel design for sustainable built environment in Malaysia. In this research, three full specimens, which are control specimen (C), foamed concrete (FC) panels and concrete panels with added palm oil fuel ash (FC+ POFA), where FC and FC+POFA sandwiched with gypsum board (G) were produced to investigate their thermal performance. Temperature difference of exterior and interior surface of specimen was used as indicators of thermal-insulating performance of PCSP design. Heat transfer test by halogen lamp was carried out on three specimens where the exterior surface of specimens was exposed to the halogen lamp. The temperature reading of exterior and interior surface for three specimens were recorded with the help of thermocouple. Other factors also studied the workability, compressive strength and axial compressive strength of the specimens. This study has shown that FC + POFA specimen has the strength nearer to normal specimen (C + FC specimen). Meanwhile, the heat transfer results show that the FC+POFA has better thermal insulation performance compared to C and FC specimens with the highest temperature difference, 3.4°C compared to other specimens. The results from this research are useful to be implemented in construction due to its benefits such as reduction of energy consumption in air-conditioning, reduction of construction periods and eco-friendly materials.

  8. The key kinematic determinants of undulatory underwater swimming at maximal velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaboy, Chris; Naemi, Roozbeh; Brown, Susan; Psycharakis, Stelios; McCabe, Carla; Coleman, Simon; Sanders, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The optimisation of undulatory underwater swimming is highly important in competitive swimming performance. Nineteen kinematic variables were identified from previous research undertaken to assess undulatory underwater swimming performance. The purpose of the present study was to determine which kinematic variables were key to the production of maximal undulatory underwater swimming velocity. Kinematic data at maximal undulatory underwater swimming velocity were collected from 17 skilled swimmers. A series of separate backward-elimination analysis of covariance models was produced with cycle frequency and cycle length as dependent variables (DVs) and participant as a fixed factor, as including cycle frequency and cycle length would explain 100% of the maximal swimming velocity variance. The covariates identified in the cycle-frequency and cycle-length models were used to form the saturated model for maximal swimming velocity. The final parsimonious model identified three covariates (maximal knee joint angular velocity, maximal ankle angular velocity and knee range of movement) as determinants of the variance in maximal swimming velocity (adjusted-r2 = 0.929). However, when participant was removed as a fixed factor there was a large reduction in explained variance (adjusted r2 = 0.397) and only maximal knee joint angular velocity continued to contribute significantly, highlighting its importance to the production of maximal swimming velocity. The reduction in explained variance suggests an emphasis on inter-individual differences in undulatory underwater swimming technique and/or anthropometry. Future research should examine the efficacy of other anthropometric, kinematic and coordination variables to better understand the production of maximal swimming velocity and consider the importance of individual undulatory underwater swimming techniques when interpreting the data.

  9. Innovation in user-centered skills and performance improvement for sustainable complex service systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Waldemar; Ahram, Tareq Z

    2012-01-01

    In order to leverage individual and organizational learning and to remain competitive in current turbulent markets it is important for employees, managers, planners and leaders to perform at high levels over time. Employee competence and skills are extremely important matters in view of the general shortage of talent and the mobility of employees with talent. Two factors emerged to have the greatest impact on the competitiveness of complex service systems: improving managerial and employee's knowledge attainment for skills, and improving the training and development of the workforce. This paper introduces the knowledge-based user-centered service design approach for sustainable skill and performance improvement in education, design and modeling of the next generation of complex service systems. The rest of the paper cover topics in human factors and sustainable business process modeling for the service industry, and illustrates the user-centered service system development cycle with the integration of systems engineering concepts in service systems. A roadmap for designing service systems of the future is discussed. The framework introduced in this paper is based on key user-centered design principles and systems engineering applications to support service competitiveness.

  10. A generic systematic to support bibliometric research illustrated for the performance evaluation of sustainable development issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Kurman Merlin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The question that arises in this work is how to select a theoretical structure scientifically justified to a research. Thus, this exploratory and descriptive study aims to present and illustrate a structured process (ProKnow-C for selecting papers on performance evaluation oriented to issues concerning sustainable development. From the proposed process, it was mentioned the following results: identification of seven key words for search, identification of four databases of abstracts and full texts aligned with the research theme, selection of 9123 articles dealing with the theme; structured filtering of the 9123 selected articles from the databases in 13 scientific articles, which resulted in the theoretical underpinning for research on performance appraisal oriented to sustainable development issues. Subsequently, it was identified the bibliometric profile of the bibliography portfolio selected, highlighting the keywords, authors, journal articles and the articles of the portfolio and the portfolio of bibliographic references for the last three. Considering the results, it was argued that the proposed process was robust, since it achieved the goal of identifying and selecting relevant publications for the study, to gather scientific content aligned to the subject that the research sought to address.

  11. Sustaining Soldier Health and Performance in Southwest Asia: Guidance for Small Unit Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-10-01

    clothing is wet. The first signs of developing hypothermia mightinclude confusion, bizarre behavior and withdrawal from group interaction. Victims...good personal hygiene. Wash your hands to protect Yourself and others from infectious disease. Do not bathe, swim or wash clothes in local water such...Pirsian Gulf contain hazardous marine animals including sea snakes, poisonous jellyfish , and sea urchins. Diseases such as Brucellosis, Ŕ" fever, and

  12. Predation, metabolic priming and early life-history rearing environment affect the swimming capabilities of growth hormone transgenic rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossin, Glenn T; Devlin, Robert H

    2017-08-01

    The period of first feeding, when young salmonid fishes emerge from natal stream beds, is one fraught with predation risk. Experiments conducted in semi-natural stream mesocosms have shown that growth hormone transgenic salmonids are at greater risk of predation than their non-transgenic siblings, due partly to the higher metabolic demands associated with transgenesis, which force risky foraging behaviours. This raises questions as to whether there are differences in the swim-performance of transgenic and non-transgenic fishes surviving predation experiments. We tested this hypothesis in wild-origin rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that were reared from first feeding in semi-natural stream mesocosms characterized by complex hydrodynamics, the presence of predators and oligotrophic conditions. Using an open-flume raceway, we swam fish and measured their capacity for burst-swimming against a sustained flow. We found a significant genotype effect on burst-performance, with transgenic fish sustaining performance longer than their wild-type siblings, both in predator and predator-free stream segments. Importantly, this effect occurred before differences in growth were discernable. We also found that mesocosm-reared fish had greater burst-performance than fish reared in the controlled hatchery environment, despite the latter being unexposed to predators and having abundant food. Our results suggest a potential interaction between predation and metabolic priming, which leads to greater burst capacity in transgenic trout. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. A new method to assess the sustainability performance of events: Application to the 2014 World Orienteering Championship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrucca, Flavio; Severi, Claudio [ECOCONGRESS Scientific Department, Via N. Cristofani 4/a, 06135 Perugia (Italy); Galvan, Nicola [WOC (World Orienteering Championship) Organising Committee 2014, Loc. Parco 3, 38056 Levico Terme (Italy); Brunori, Antonio, E-mail: info@pefc.it [PEFC Italy (Programme for Endorsement of Forest Certification schemes), Strada dei Loggi 22, 06135 Perugia (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    Nowadays an increasing attention of public and private agencies to the sustainability performance of events is observed, since it is recognized as a key issue in the context of sustainable development. Assessing the sustainability performance of events involves environmental, social and economic aspects; their impacts are complex and a quantitative assessment is often difficult. This paper presents a new quali-quantitative method developed to measure the sustainability of events, taking into account all its potential impacts. The 2014 World Orienteering Championship, held in Italy, was selected to test the proposed evaluation methodology. The total carbon footprint of the event was 165.34 tCO{sub 2}eq and the avoided emissions were estimated as being 46 tCO{sub 2}eq. The adopted quali-quantitative method resulted to be efficient in assessing the sustainability impacts and can be applied for the evaluation of similar events. - Highlights: • A quali-quantitative method to assess events' sustainability is presented. • All the methodological issues related to the method are explained. • The method is used to evaluate the sustainability of an international sports event. • The method resulted to be valid to assess the event's sustainability level. • The carbon footprint of the event has been calculated.

  14. The Influence of Perceived Corporate Sustainability Practices on Employees and Organizational Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongrok Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most previous studies on corporate sustainability (corporate social responsibility practices tend to focus on external stakeholders and outcomes. However, the influence of CSR practices on employees remains largely unexplored. In this study, we examine the influence of CSR practices on employees’ attitudes and behaviors. We investigate the mediation effect of employees’ attitudes and behaviors on the relationship between CSR practices and organizational performance. The empirical results indicate that employees’ perceptions of CSR practices have a positive impact on their organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behavior. The organizational citizenship behavior partially mediates the relationship between CSR practices and organizational performance, whereas organizational commitment indirectly mediates the relationship only through organizational citizenship behavior. This study also raises some important implications based on the empirical results.

  15. DESIGN, PERFORMANCE, AND SUSTAINABILITY OF ENGINEERED COVERS FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W. Jody

    2004-04-21

    Final remedies at most uranium mill tailings sites include engineered covers designed to contain metals and radionuclides in the subsurface for hundreds of years. Early cover designs rely on compacted soil layers to limit water infiltration and release of radon, but some of these covers inadvertently created habitats for deep-rooted plants. Root intrusion and soil development increased the saturated hydraulic conductivity several orders of magnitude above design targets. These covers may require high levels of maintenance to sustain long-term performance. Relatively low precipitation, high potential evapotranspiration, and thick unsaturated soils favor long-term hydrologic isolation of buried waste at arid and semiarid sites. Later covers were designed to mimic this natural soil-water balance with the goal of sustaining performance with little or no maintenance. For example, the cover for the Monticello, Utah, Superfund site relies on a thick soil-sponge layer overlying a sand-and-gravel capillary barrier to store precipitation while plants are dormant and on native vegetation to dry the soil sponge during the growing season. Measurements of both off-site caisson lysimeters and a large 3-ha lysimeter built into the final cover show that drainage has been well below a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency target of less than 3.0 mm/yr. Our stewardship strategy combines monitoring precursors to failure, probabilistic riskbased modeling, and characterization of natural analogs to project performance of covers for a range of possible future environmental scenarios. Natural analogs are needed to understand how ecological processes will influence cover performance, processes that cannot be predicted with short-term monitoring and existing numerical models.

  16. Human performance under sustained operations and acute sleep deprivation conditions: toward a model of controlled attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, June J; Band, David; Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Muth, Eric R

    2007-05-01

    Although a number of studies have examined the effects of sleep deprivation on performance, the results are not easily explained. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of sustained operations and acute sleep deprivation on tasks that require a wide range of information processing. The current study also provided preliminary data on the use of the controlled attention model to better understand the effects of sleep deprivation. There were 24 college students who were paid to remain awake for one night and complete a variety of cognitive and vigilance tasks. Each task was administered four times during the night, once in each testing session (17:30-21:30, 21:45-01:45, 02:30-06:30, and 06:45-10:45). All tasks were counterbalanced across the testing sessions. The data were converted to z-scores and repeated-measures ANOVAs were completed. Performance did not significantly decrease on the more complex cognitive tasks over the night of sleep deprivation. Performance on the vigilance tasks decreased significantly across the night. Examining the characteristics of the cognitive tasks indicated that although they required different types of processing, they encouraged the participants to remain attentive to and engaged in the task. In contrast, the vigilance tasks were less intrinsically interesting and engaging. Thus, it seems likely that the participants were less capable of maintaining attention on the vigilance tasks than the cognitive tasks. These results indicate that a controlled attention model may be useful in better understanding the effects of sustained operations and sleep deprivation on performance.

  17. Synchronised Swimming of Two Fish

    CERN Document Server

    Novati, Guido; Alexeev, Dmitry; Rossinelli, Diego; van Rees, Wim M; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    We study the fluid dynamics of two fish-like bodies with synchronised swimming patterns. Our studies are based on two-dimensional simulations of viscous incompressible flows. We distinguish between motion patterns that are externally imposed on the swimmers and self-propelled swimmers that learn manoeuvres to achieve certain goals. Simulations of two rigid bodies executing pre-specified motion indicate that flow-mediated interactions can lead to substantial drag reduction and may even generate thrust intermittently. In turn we examine two self-propelled swimmers arranged in a leader-follower configuration, with a-priori specified body-deformations. We find that the swimming of the leader remains largely unaffected, while the follower experiences either an increase or decrease in swimming speed, depending on the initial conditions. Finally, we consider a follower that synchronises its motion so as to minimise its lateral deviations from the leader's path. The leader employs a steady gait while the follower use...

  18. Comparative hindlimb myology of foot-propelled swimming birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Glenna T; Carr, Jennifer A; Biewener, Andrew A

    2017-11-03

    Several groups of birds have convergently evolved the ability to swim using their feet despite facing trade-offs with walking. However, swimming relative to terrestrial performance varies across these groups. Highly specialized divers, such as loons and grebes, excel at swimming underwater but struggle to stand on land, whereas species that primarily swim on the water surface, such as Mallards, retain the ability to move terrestrially. The identification of skeletal features associated with a swimming style and conserved across independent groups suggests that the hindlimb of foot-propelled swimming birds has adapted to suit the physical challenges of producing propulsive forces underwater. But in addition to skeletal features, how do hindlimb muscles reflect swimming ability and mode? This paper presents the first comparative myology analysis associated with foot-based swimming. Our detailed dissections of 35 specimens representing eight species reveal trends in hindlimb muscle size and attachment location across four independent lineages of extant swimming birds. We expand upon our dissections by compiling data from historical texts and provide a key to any outdated muscle nomenclature used in these sources. Our results show that highly diving birds tuck the femur and proximal tibiotarsus next to the ribcage and under the skin covering the abdomen, streamlining the body. Several hindlimb muscles exhibit dramatic anatomical variation in diving birds, including the flexor cruris lateralis (FCL) and iliofibularis (IF), which reduce in size and shift distally along the tibiotarsus. The femorotibialis medius (FTM) extends along an expanded cnemial crest. The resulting increased moment arms of these muscles likely help stabilize the hip and knee while paddling. Additionally, distal ankle plantarflexors, including the gastrocnemius and digital flexors, are exceptionally large in diving birds in order to power foot propulsion. These patterns exist within distantly

  19. Water Evaporation in Swimming Baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgård, Carl-Erik

    This paper is publishing measuring results from models and full-scale baths of the evaporation in swimming baths, both public baths and retraining baths. Moreover, the heat balance of the basin water is measured. In addition the full-scale measurements have given many experiences which are repres......This paper is publishing measuring results from models and full-scale baths of the evaporation in swimming baths, both public baths and retraining baths. Moreover, the heat balance of the basin water is measured. In addition the full-scale measurements have given many experiences which...

  20. Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS) has been designed to meet multi-agency hydrologic database needs for Kansas. The SWIMS project was supported...

  1. Sustainability of the Tourism Industry, Based on Financial Key Performance Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Dutescu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Even if there is a real need of a set of key performance indicators for small and medium sized enterprises, this is not yet considered to be satisfied. Our research is focused on two main aspects, each of them individually important for the users of accounting information: the basic indicators specific for analysing operational performance and for decision making and the trend of the key performance indicators in the context of the economic crisis. The starting point of the study is a questionnaire addressed to small and medium sized enterprises activating in the tourism area, especially in the hotel industry. The respondents answered the questions in perfect anonymity by choosing one of the multiple choices for some of them and offering open answers to the others. Our analysis reveals a fair view of the dynamic of the most used key performance indicators in Romanian hotel industry, the limits of their interpretation and usage and the evolution of the financial and economic performance. The declared purpose of the research is to set the bases of a starting point in order to provide solutions for improving the relevance and the usage of these indicators in this domain, in the context of a sustainable business, taking into account the nowadays status of the economy in general and in particular the hotel industry.

  2. The advent of canine performance science: offering a sustainable future for working dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Mia; Branson, Nick; McGreevy, Paul; Lill, Alan; Bennett, Pauleen

    2015-01-01

    Working and sporting dogs provide an essential contribution to many industries worldwide. The common development, maintenance and disposal of working and sporting dogs can be considered in the same way as other animal production systems. The process of 'production' involves genetic selection, puppy rearing, recruitment and assessment, training, housing and handling, handler education, health and working life end-point management. At present, inefficiencies throughout the production process result in a high failure rate of dogs attaining operational status. This level of wastage would be condemned in other animal production industries for economic reasons and has significant implications for dog welfare, as well as public perceptions of dog-based industries. Standards of acceptable animal use are changing and some historically common uses of animals are no longer publicly acceptable, especially where harm is caused for purposes deemed trivial, or where alternatives exist. Public scrutiny of animal use appears likely to increase and extend to all roles of animals, including working and sporting dogs. Production system processes therefore need to be transparent, traceable and ethically acceptable for animal use to be sustainable into the future. Evidence-based approaches already inform best practice in fields as diverse as agriculture and human athletic performance. This article introduces the nascent discipline of canine performance science, which aims to facilitate optimal product quality and production efficiency, while also assuring evidence-based increments in dog welfare through a process of research and development. Our thesis is that the model of canine performance science offers an objective, transparent and traceable opportunity for industry development in line with community expectations and underpins a sustainable future for working dogs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Canine Behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploring R&D Influences on Financial Performance for Business Sustainability Considering Dual Profitability Objectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao-Yi Shen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of research and development (R&D for business sustainability have gained increasing interests, especially in the high-tech sector. However, the efforts of R&D might cause complex and mixed impacts on the financial results considering the associated expenses. Thus, this study aims to examine how R&D efforts may influence business to improve its financial performance considering the dual objectives: the gross and the net profitability. This research integrates a rough-set-based soft computing technique and multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM methods to explore this complex and yet valuable issue. A group of public listed companies from Taiwan, all in the semiconductor sector, is analyzed as a case study. More than 30 variables are considered, and the adopted soft computing technique retrieves 14 core attributes—for the dual profitability objectives—to form the evaluation model. The importance of R&D for pursuing superior financial prospects is confirmed, and the empirical case demonstrates how to guide an individual company to plan for improvements to achieve its long-term sustainability by this hybrid approach.

  4. Economic Performance and Sustainability of a Novel Intercropping System on the North China Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengdong; Liu, Quanqing; Heerink, Nico; Stomph, TjeerdJan; Li, Baoshen; Liu, Ruili; Zhang, Hongyan; Wang, Chong; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Chaochun; van der Werf, Wopke; Zhang, Fusuo

    2015-01-01

    Double cropping of wheat and maize is common on the North China Plain, but it provides limited income to rural households due to the small farm sizes in the region. Local farmers in Quzhou County have therefore innovated their production system by integration of watermelon as a companion cash crop into the system. We examine the economic performance and sustainability of this novel intercropping system using crop yield data from 2010 to 2012 and farm household survey data collected in 2012. Our results show that the gross margin of the intercropping system exceeded that of the double cropping system by more than 50% in 2012. Labor use in the intercropping system was more than three times that in double cropping. The lower returns per labor hour in intercropping, however, exceeded the average off-farm wage in the region by a significant margin. Nutrient surpluses and irrigation water use are significant larger under the intercropping system. We conclude that the novel wheat-maize/watermelon intercropping system contributes to rural poverty alleviation and household-level food security, by raising farm incomes and generating more employment, but needs further improvement to enhance its sustainability.

  5. Effects of Swimming on the Inflammatory and Redox Response in a Model of Allergic Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, T R; Ávila, L C M; Fortkamp, B; Greiffo, F R; Bobinski, F; Mazzardo-Martins, L; Martins, D F; Duarte, M M M F; Dafre, A; Santos, A R S; Silva, M D; Souza, L F; Vieira, R P; Hizume-Kunzler, D C

    2015-06-01

    In this study we hypothesized that swimming during sensitization phase could result in a preventive effect in mice with allergic asthma. Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: Control and Swimming (non-sensitized), OVA and OVA+Swimming (sensitized). The allergic inflammation was induced by 2 intraperitoneal injections and 4 aerosol challenges using ovalbumin. Swimming sessions were performed at high intensity over 3 weeks. 48 h after the last challenge mice were euthanized. Swimming decreased OVA-increased total IgE, IL-1, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 levels, as well as the number of total cells, lymphocytes and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, (pswimming also increased IL-10 and glutathione levels in the Swimming and OVA+Swimming groups (pSwimming group when compared to all groups (pswimming resulted in an attenuation of pulmonary allergic inflammation followed by an increase of glutathione levels in the OVA group. Swimming only increased the levels of glutathione peroxidase and catalase in non-sensitized mice (pswimming in this model of OVA-induced asthma may be, at least partly, modulated by reduced oxidative stress and increased IL-10 production. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Effect of swim-training on caudal fin development in zebrafish larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiaz, Ansa

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide microarray analysis of the effects of swim-training on caudal fin development in zebrafish larvae. Zebrafish were subjected to swim-training from 5 days post fertilization (dpf) until 10 dpf. Subsequently, we performed a genome-wide microarray analysis on the caudal fins of control and

  7. Sustainability performance for Brazilian electricity power industry: An assessment integrating social, economic and environmental issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartori, S.; Witjes, S.; Campos, L.M.S.

    2017-01-01

    The increased pressure on companies to address sustainability issues has resulted in the development of several voluntary corporate sustainability integration approaches. The array of existing approaches is large and overwhelming, resulting in companies not understanding what corporate

  8. The Impact of Corporate Sustainability Strategies on the Financial Performance of Romanian Companies in the Context of Green Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Siminică

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The current research paper aims at making a comprehensive analysis of the current green marketing initiatives adopted by the top performing Romanian companies, in order to understand the determinant factors that influence their green approach and to evaluate the impact of the sustainability strategies implemented on their financial performance. The research of business sustainability strategies in 31 top performing companies in Romania is conducted by analyzing their green marketing initiatives, the ability to communicate online current and past Corporate Sustainability (CS actions (substantive action and their future commitments towards green marketing (symbolic action. The authors also analyzed the impact of companies’ dimensions on their green performance and commitment, substantiating that the size of a company is a significant influential factor. The analysis of the impact of substantive and symbolic action on the financial performance of the companies shows that there is not a significant correlation between these indicators.

  9. 36 CFR 327.5 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swimming. 327.5 Section 327.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY RULES AND REGULATIONS... Swimming. (a) Swimming, wading, snorkeling or scuba diving at one's own risk is permitted, except at...

  10. 36 CFR 331.10 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swimming. 331.10 Section 331.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY REGULATIONS..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.10 Swimming. Swimming is prohibited unless authorized in writing by the District...

  11. 43 CFR 423.36 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Swimming. 423.36 Section 423.36 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Swimming. (a) You may swim, wade, snorkel, scuba dive, raft, or tube at your own risk in Reclamation waters...

  12. Sustainable Process Performance by Application of Six Sigma Concepts: The Research Study of Two Industrial Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sujova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The current approach to business management focuses on increasing the performance of business processes. To achieve the required processes performance means to ensure the required quality and capability of processes. The partial aim of this paper is to confirm the positive effects of the Six Sigma methodology (SSM on the corporate performance in the Slovak Republic and an investigation of the dependency of SSM implementation on the certified quality management system (QMS as a set-forward condition via a questionnaire survey carried out in Slovak industrial enterprises. The survey results confirmed the above-mentioned assumptions. The SSM using DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control was applied in real conditions of two manufacturing enterprises with a different level of quality management system. The results of the research study proved a possibility to implement SSM and to use the same methods in enterprises aside from a level of QMS. However, more remarkable results were achieved by the enterprise which introduced QMS. The first application of SSM in enterprises within specific conditions of furniture production processes can be considered to be a contribution of the research study, as well. The result of the work is the model including the methodology and the appropriate combination of methods and tools for assuring the sustainable performance of the business processes.

  13. A Model for Sustainable Building Energy Efficiency Retrofit (BEER) Using Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) Mechanism for Hotel Buildings in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengpeng

    Hotel building is one of the high-energy-consuming building types, and retrofitting hotel buildings is an untapped solution to help cut carbon emissions contributing towards sustainable development. Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) has been promulgated as a market mechanism for the delivery of energy efficiency projects. EPC mechanism has been introduced into China relatively recently, and it has not been implemented successfully in building energy efficiency retrofit projects. The aim of this research is to develop a model for achieving the sustainability of Building Energy Efficiency Retrofit (BEER) in hotel buildings under the Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) mechanism. The objectives include: • To identify a set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for measuring the sustainability of BEER in hotel buildings; • To identify Critical Success Factors (CSFs) under EPC mechanism that have a strong correlation with sustainable BEER project; • To develop a model explaining the relationships between the CSFs and the sustainability performance of BEER in hotel building. Literature reviews revealed the essence of sustainable BEER and EPC, which help to develop a conceptual framework for analyzing sustainable BEER under EPC mechanism in hotel buildings. 11 potential KPIs for sustainable BEER and 28 success factors of EPC were selected based on the developed framework. A questionnaire survey was conducted to ascertain the importance of selected performance indicators and success factors. Fuzzy set theory was adopted in identifying the KPIs. Six KPIs were identified from the 11 selected performance indicators. Through a questionnaire survey, out of the 28 success factors, 21 Critical Success Factors (CSFs) were also indentified. Using the factor analysis technique, the 21 identified CSFs in this study were grouped into six clusters to help explain project success of sustainable BEER. Finally, AHP/ANP approach was used in this research to develop a model to

  14. Ambidextrous Leadership and Sustainability-Based Project Performance: The Role of Project Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwei Zheng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most studies in the project management field emphasized the effects of leaders or managers, but these effects have rarely been examined at the project level. To cover this research gap, this study applies organizational ambidexterity theory to examine the effects among ambidextrous leadership, ambidextrous culture and sustainability-based project performance. Using a valid sample of 217 project leaders and members from Chinese construction projects, the method of multiple linear regression was adopted to assess the direct relationship among ambidextrous leadership, ambidextrous culture and project performance. Moreover, the bootstrapping technique through structural equation modeling, has been used to analyze the mediating effect of ambidextrous culture. Additionally, the sample data was divided into different groups according to the median value of the variables to conduct the ANOVA and to assess the within-group differences. The results indicated a positive and direct relationship that ambidextrous leadership has on project performance and ambidextrous culture. In addition, there was also a mediating impact of ambidextrous leadership on project performance via ambidextrous culture. Thus, ambidextrous leadership combined with transformational leadership as well as transactional leadership likely has a stronger positive impact on project performance through fostering the adaptive culture and consistent culture. Our findings contribute to an in-depth understanding of the role of the leader and culture for project outcomes. The project-based organization in construction projects could train project leaders’ ambidextrous leadership behavior to facilitate the formation of an ambidextrous culture and to increase project performance. Moreover, this study enriches the existing literature on leadership and project management by highlighting the important path of ambidextrous leadership and ambidextrous culture on the performance at the project level

  15. The Use of Causal Mapping in the Design of Sustainability Performance Measurement Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parisi, Cristiana

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to illustrate the use of the ad hoc methodology of causal mapping to support the process of quantifying the financial returns related to sustainability investments. The present study uses two methods to build causal maps, that is aggregate and congregate mapping......, deductive research undertaken at the leading international pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk. This chapter presents the results of a longitudinal study developed through an action research approach conducted at the Company over a four-year period. This study illustrates how the described approach...... organisations’ strategic performance measurement systems (SPMSs). This study’s main contribution is the triangulation of multiple qualitative methods to enhance the reliability of causal maps. This innovative approach supports the use of causal mapping to extract managerial tacit knowledge in order to identify...

  16. The influence of elements of synchronized swimming on technique of the selected swimming strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Široký, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Title: The influence of elements of synchronized swimming on technique of the selected swimming strokes Objectives: The objective of the thesis is to assess the effect of the elements of synchronized swimming at improving the techniques of swimming. Methods: The results were detected by overt observation with active participation and subsequent scaling on the ordinal scale 1 to 5. Results: The results show that the influence of the elements of synchronized swimming on improving the technique ...

  17. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 1. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming - Lift-based Propulsion. Jaywant H Arakeri. General Article Volume 14 Issue 1 January 2009 pp 32-46. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Shape Optimization of Swimming Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkening, J.; Hosoi, A.E.

    2005-03-01

    The swimming behavior of a flexible sheet which moves by propagating deformation waves along its body was first studied by G. I. Taylor in 1951. In addition to being of theoretical interest, this problem serves as a useful model of the locomotion of gastropods and various micro-organisms. Although the mechanics of swimming via wave propagation has been studied extensively, relatively little work has been done to define or describe optimal swimming by this mechanism.We carry out this objective for a sheet that is separated from a rigid substrate by a thin film of viscous Newtonian fluid. Using a lubrication approximation to model the dynamics, we derive the relevant Euler-Lagrange equations to optimize swimming speed and efficiency. The optimization equations are solved numerically using two different schemes: a limited memory BFGS method that uses cubic splines to represent the wave profile, and a multi-shooting Runge-Kutta approach that uses the Levenberg-Marquardt method to vary the parameters of the equations until the constraints are satisfied. The former approach is less efficient but generalizes nicely to the non-lubrication setting. For each optimization problem we obtain a one parameter family of solutions that becomes singular in a self-similar fashion as the parameter approaches a critical value. We explore the validity of the lubrication approximation near this singular limit by monitoring higher order corrections to the zeroth order theory and by comparing the results with finite element solutions of the full Stokes equations.

  19. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    shark). Redrawn from Review of Fish. Swimming Modes for Aquatic. Locomotion, IEEE Journal of. Oceanic Engineering, Vol.24,. No.2, pp. 237–252, 1999, D M. Lane, M Sfakiotakis and J B C. Davies, Heriot-Watt University. undulatory → oscillatory caudaltail¯n (B C F ) m otions are know n collectively as. B C F sw im m ers.

  20. EEG indices correlate with sustained attention performance in patients affected by diffuse axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelli, Stefania; Barbieri, Riccardo; Reni, Gianluigi; Zucca, Claudio; Bianchi, Anna Maria

    2017-11-09

    The aim of this study is to assess the ability of EEG-based indices in providing relevant information about cognitive engagement level during the execution of a clinical sustained attention (SA) test in healthy volunteers and DAI (diffused axonal injury)-affected patients. We computed three continuous power-based engagement indices (P β /P α , 1/P α , and P β / (P α + P θ )) from EEG recordings in a control group (n = 7) and seven DAI-affected patients executing a 10-min Conners' "not-X" continuous performance test (CPT). A correlation analysis was performed in order to investigate the existence of relations between the EEG metrics and behavioral parameters in both the populations. P β /P α and 1/P α indices were found to be correlated with reaction times in both groups while P β / (P α + P θ ) and P β /P α also correlated with the errors rate for DAI patients. In line with previous studies, time course fluctuations revealed a first strong decrease of attention after 2 min from the beginning of the test and a final fading at the end. Our results provide evidence that EEG-derived indices extraction and evaluation during SA tasks are helpful in the assessment of attention level in healthy subjects and DAI patients, offering motivations for including EEG monitoring in cognitive rehabilitation practice. Graphical abstract Three EEG-derived indices were computed from four electrodes montages in a population of seven healthy volunteers and a group of seven DAI-affected patients. Results show a significant correlation between the time course of the indices and behavioral parameters, thus demonstrating their usefulness in monitoring mental engagement level during a sustained attention task.

  1. The Effect of Swimming Experience on Acquisition and Retention of Swimming-Based Taste Aversion Learning in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2010-01-01

    Swimming endows rats with an aversion to a taste solution consumed before swimming. The present study explored whether the experience of swimming before or after the taste-swimming trials interferes with swimming-based taste aversion learning. Experiment 1 demonstrated that a single preexposure to 20 min of swimming was as effective as four or…

  2. Factors determining swimming efficiency observed in less skilled swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucia-Czyszczoń, Katarzyna; Dybińska, Ewa; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Chwała, Wiesław

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of performance in professional sport requires a systematic improvement of the training process. Such activities should also include optimizing the children and youth training in these disciplines, where an early specialization operates. The main aim of this paper was to search for the relationship between swimmer's segmental kinematics (segmental velocities, stroke rate, stroke length, stroke index); the relationship between swimmer's technical skill level (in four competitive swimming techniques) and training overloads taking into consideration gender and age effect. The study group consisted of 121 swimmers (69 female and 52 male), of the Polish 12-15 age group swim team, volunteered to serve as subjects. Video-based methods and video equipment are being applied to assist qualitative and simple quantitative analysis for immediate feedback and research in swimming. Both technical skill level preparation and segmental kinematics of 12-15 year old swimmers proved to be highly conditioned by implemented training intensity (p trade at a level of significance p intensity of training showed high and very high correlation with the swimming efficiency, presented segmental kinematics and technical skill level, however, there appeared particularly pronounced relationship with the size of kinematic parameters taken into account in four competitive swimming techniques, components of the 100 m individual medley.

  3. Integrating the analytic hierarchy process and importance-performance analysis into ISO 14001 framework for assessing campus sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramono, Susatyo N. W.; Ulkhaq, M. Mujiya; Trianto, Reza; Setiowati, Priska R.; Rasyida, Dyah R.; Setyorini, Nadia A.; Jauhari, Wakhid A.

    2017-11-01

    There has been an international emerging issue in the role of higher education in promoting sustainability due to numerous declarations and commitments related to the need of sustainability in higher education. As a result, there is an increasing number of higher educations that have embarked on projects and initiatives to incorporate sustainability into their systems. Higher educations could implement ISO 14001 framework that is recognized as a guide for an organization which aim to implement an environmental management system to pursue the sustainability. This research tried to attempt an extension of the previous work in assessing campus sustainability using ISO 14001 framework by integrating the analytic hierarchy process and importance-performance analysis (IPA). The inclusion of IPA is because many organizations are constrained by limitations on the resources they have so that it has to be decided how those limited resources are best deployed to attain the goals to be achieved. The self-assessment scores of ISO 14001 would the performance and the AHP result is the importance part of the IPA. A case study is conducted at the Diponegoro University, which is located in Semarang, Indonesia. The result indicates that only two main elements of ISO 14001 are located in the second quadrant of IPA, i.e. high performance and high importance. The result also could be a basis for the university to identify, prioritize, and improve the programs related to sustainability and ensure that valuable resources are allocated in the most effective areas.

  4. Suspension biomechanics of swimming microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takuji

    2009-10-06

    Micro-organisms play a vital role in many biological, medical and engineering phenomena. Some recent research efforts have demonstrated the importance of biomechanics in understanding certain aspects of micro-organism behaviours such as locomotion and collective motions of cells. In particular, spatio-temporal coherent structures found in a bacterial suspension have been the focus of many research studies over the last few years. Recent studies have shown that macroscopic properties of a suspension, such as rheology and diffusion, are strongly affected by meso-scale flow structures generated by swimming microbes. Since the meso-scale flow structures are strongly affected by the interactions between microbes, a bottom-up strategy, i.e. from a cellular level to a continuum suspension level, represents the natural approach to the study of a suspension of swimming microbes. In this paper, we first provide a summary of existing biomechanical research on interactions between a pair of swimming micro-organisms, as a two-body interaction is the simplest many-body interaction. We show that interactions between two nearby swimming micro-organisms are described well by existing mathematical models. Then, collective motions formed by a group of swimming micro-organisms are discussed. We show that some collective motions of micro-organisms, such as coherent structures of bacterial suspensions, are satisfactorily explained by fluid dynamics. Lastly, we discuss how macroscopic suspension properties are changed by the microscopic characteristics of the cell suspension. The fundamental knowledge we present will be useful in obtaining a better understanding of the behaviour of micro-organisms.

  5. Significant problems of swimming in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachurovs'kyy D.O.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The variants of decision of problems of swimming are considered in the article. Are presented prognoses of possible results. Complex approach is offered in the decision of the marked problems. Directions are rotined forming for the citizens of vitally important skill of swimming. The variants of decision of problem of teaching swimming of rural population and increase of amount of gettings busy are offered swimming. Traditions of domestic rest are considered in swimming complexes. The ways of increase of level of physical preparation are set student, worker and servicemen.

  6. Stokesian swimming of a prolate spheroid at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2016-01-01

    The swimming of a spheroid immersed in a viscous fluid and performing surface deformations periodically in time is studied on the basis of Stokes equations of low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. The average over a period of time of the swimming velocity and the rate of dissipation are given by integral expressions of second order in the amplitude of surface deformations. The first order flow velocity and pressure, as functions of spheroidal coordinates, are expressed as sums of basic solutions of Stokes equations. Sets of superposition coefficients of these solutions which optimize the mean swimming speed for given power are derived from an eigenvalue problem. The maximum eigenvalue is a measure of the efficiency of the optimal stroke within the chosen class of motions. The maximum eigenvalue for sets of low order is found to be a strongly increasing function of the aspect ratio of the spheroid.

  7. Theory of swimming filaments in viscoelastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Henry

    2008-03-01

    Microorganisms often encounter and must move through complex media. What aspects of propulsion are altered when swimming in viscoelastic gels and fluids? Motivated by the swimming of sperm through the mucus of the female mammalian reproductive tract, we examine the swimming of filaments in nonlinearly viscoelastic fluids. We obtain the swimming velocity and hydrodynamic force exerted on an infinitely long cylinder with prescribed beating pattern. We apply these results to study the swimming of a simplified sliding-filament model for a sperm flagellum. Viscoelasticity tends to decrease swimming speed. The viscoelastic response of the fluid can change the shapes of beating patterns, and changes in the beating patterns can even lead to reversal of the swimming direction.

  8. To Swim or Not to Swim: Potential Transmission of Balaenophilus manatorum (Copepoda: Harpacticoida in Marine Turtles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Domènech

    Full Text Available Species of Balaenophilus are the only harpacticoid copepods that exhibit a widespread, obligate association with vertebrates, i.e., B. unisetus with whales and B. manatorum with marine turtles and manatees. In the western Mediterranean, juveniles of the loggerhead sea turtle, Caretta caretta are the only available hosts for B. manatorum, which has been found occurring at high prevalence (>80% on them. A key question is how these epibionts are transmitted from host to host. We investigated this issue based on experiments with live specimens of B. manatorum that were cultured with turtle skin. Specimens were obtained from head-started hatchlings of C. caretta from the western Mediterranean. Hatched nauplii crawled only on rough substrates and lacked the ability to swim. Only copepodites IV and V, and adults, were able to perform directional swimming. Legs 2, 3 and 4 played a major role in swimming and were only well-developed in these stages. Nauplii reared in wells with turtle skin readily fed on this item. Late copepodites and adults also fed on turtle skin but did not consume other potential food items such as fish skin, baleen plates or planktonic algae. Evidences suggest that the transmission of B. manatorum should rely on hosts' bodily contacts and/or swimming of late developmental stages between spatially close hosts. The possibility of long-ranged dispersal is unlikely for two reasons. First, all developmental stages seem to depend on turtle skin as a food resource. Second, the average clutch size of ovigerous females was small (< 70 eggs for free-living phases to successfully contact turtles that occur at very low densities (< 0.6 turtles·km-2 in the western Mediterranean. The high prevalence of B. manatorum in loggerhead turtles in this area raises the question whether these turtles have contacts, or tend to closely aggregate, more than is currently believed.

  9. Minimizing data transfer with sustained performance in wireless brain-machine interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorbergsson, Palmi Thor; Garwicz, Martin; Schouenborg, Jens; Johansson, Anders J

    2012-06-01

    algorithms for spike detection and spike sorting in order to examine the generalizability of our results to other algorithms. Our findings indicate that the minimization of recording noise is the primary factor to consider in the design process. In most cases, there are breakpoints for sampling rates and resolution that provide guidelines for BMI designers in terms of minimum amount raw input data that guarantees sustained performance. Such guidelines are essential during system dimensioning. Based on these findings we conclude by presenting a quantitative task-allocation scheme that can be followed to achieve optimal utilization of available resources.

  10. Predicting the Performance and Survival of Islamic Banks in Malaysia to Achieve Growth Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazuin Sapuan Noraina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, the growth of the Islamic financial industry has increased tremendously in line with the Government’s ambition to make Malaysia as an international hub for Islamic finance since 2010. With the increasing number of foreign players in this industry plus with the increasing demand from domestic and foreign customers would further enhance the possibility for Malaysia to achieve this ambition. Currently, according to the Economic Transformation Programme, 2012 Malaysia is the world’s third largest market for Shariah assets that cover Islamic banks, Takaful, and sukuk. Malaysia as one of the main contributors to the global Islamic financial assets with Islamic assets in Malaysia grew by 23.8% in 2011 from RM350.8bil to RM434.6bil. The issues of predicting the performance and the survival of Islamic Banks in Malaysia become amongst crucial issues in academic research. By employing multi – layer perceptron neural network and pooled regression, we found that total assets/ size of the Islamic banks (GROWTH have high weightage and significantly influence in predicting the performance and the survival of Islamic banks in Malaysia. With the increasing number of Islamic banking institutions in Malaysia, this study can give insight on the sustainability of the Islamic banking system in Malaysia for the benefit of the investors, shareholder and depositors.

  11. Effects of Swimming on Functional Recovery after Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca R.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Baltzley, Ryan; Bunger, Michelle; Baldini, Angela; Burke, Darlene A.; Magnuson, David S.K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most promising rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury is weight-supported treadmill training. This strategy seeks to re-train the spinal cord below the level of injury to generate a meaningful pattern of movement. However, the number of step cycles that can be accomplished is limited by the poor weight-bearing capability of the neuromuscular system after injury. We have begun to study swimming as a rehabilitation strategy that allows for high numbers of steps and a high step-cycle frequency in a standard rat model of contusive spinal cord injury. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of swimming as a rehabilitation strategy in rats with contusion injuries at T9. We used a swimming strategy with or without cutaneous feedback based on original work in the chick by Muir and colleagues. Adult female rats (n = 27) received moderately-severe contusion injuries at T9. Walking and swimming performance were evaluated using the Open-Field Locomotor Scale (BBB; Basso et al., 1995) and a novel swimming assessment, the Louisville Swimming Scale (LSS). Rats that underwent swim-training with or without cutaneous feedback showed a significant improvement in hindlimb function during swimming compared to untrained animals. Rats that underwent swim-training without cutaneous feedback showed less improvement than those trained with cutaneous feedback. Rats in the non-swimming group demonstrated little improvement over the course of the study. All three groups showed the expected improvement in over-ground walking and had similar terminal BBB scores. These findings suggest that animals re-acquire the ability to swim only if trained and that cutaneous feedback improves the re-training process. Further, these data suggest that the normal course of recovery of over-ground walking following moderately-severe contusion injuries at T9 is the result of a re-training process. PMID:16774475

  12. Key performance indicators (KPIs) and priority setting in using the multi-attribute approach for assessing sustainable intelligent buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALwaer, H. [The University of Dundee, School of Architecture, Matthew Building, 13 Perth Road, Dundee DD1 4HT (United Kingdom); Clements-Croome, D.J. [School of Construction Management and Engineering, The University of Reading, Whiteknights, PO Box 219, Reading RG6 6AW (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    The main objectives of this paper are to: firstly, identify key issues related to sustainable intelligent buildings (environmental, social, economic and technological factors); develop a conceptual model for the selection of the appropriate KPIs; secondly, test critically stakeholder's perceptions and values of selected KPIs intelligent buildings; and thirdly develop a new model for measuring the level of sustainability for sustainable intelligent buildings. This paper uses a consensus-based model (Sustainable Built Environment Tool- SuBETool), which is analysed using the analytical hierarchical process (AHP) for multi-criteria decision-making. The use of the multi-attribute model for priority setting in the sustainability assessment of intelligent buildings is introduced. The paper commences by reviewing the literature on sustainable intelligent buildings research and presents a pilot-study investigating the problems of complexity and subjectivity. This study is based upon a survey perceptions held by selected stakeholders and the value they attribute to selected KPIs. It is argued that the benefit of the new proposed model (SuBETool) is a 'tool' for 'comparative' rather than an absolute measurement. It has the potential to provide useful lessons from current sustainability assessment methods for strategic future of sustainable intelligent buildings in order to improve a building's performance and to deliver objective outcomes. Findings of this survey enrich the field of intelligent buildings in two ways. Firstly, it gives a detailed insight into the selection of sustainable building indicators, as well as their degree of importance. Secondly, it tesst critically stakeholder's perceptions and values of selected KPIs intelligent buildings. It is concluded that the priority levels for selected criteria is largely dependent on the integrated design team, which includes the client, architects, engineers and facilities managers

  13. Getting in Shape : Swimming with Stokes and Surfing with Brinkman

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bet, B.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370530667

    2018-01-01

    In this dissertation, we investigate the effect of shape on the motion of microscopic particles that perform a swimming motion or ‘surf’, driven by an external flow, through microscopic channels. These motions take place in a fluid, and fluid motion is in general described by the Navier-Stokes

  14. High Performance Education Fails in Sustainability? —A Reflection on Finnish Primary Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili-Ann Wolff

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is internationally often emphasized as an essential aim of higher education, but more as a principle than on the practical level. This is also obvious in the academic education of primary teachers in Finland. Therefore, it is a great challenge for Finnish teachers to include sustainability in their teaching and everyday life in schools. The aim of this article is to critically analyze why the implementation of sustainability in teacher education is so intricate and to discuss possible solutions with Finland—a country highly valued for its education—as an example. The article reports outcomes from educational policy documents and research on educational, philosophical, scientific and social aspects of sustainability, including evaluation of how sustainability has been implemented in schools and at universities, especially among teacher educators. In addition, the article builds on analyses of comprehensive university strategies and primary school teacher education programs. We found these reasons for the ignoring of sustainability in the Finnish teacher education: sustainability is in conflict with overall trends in society and politics, teacher education takes place at universities and is based on separate academic disciplines. Sustainability is also intricate because it is strongly connected to ecological literacy and it is value dependent. Universities need to overcome these obstacles and become forerunners in the sustainability process.

  15. Effect of high wavelengths low intensity light during dark period on physical exercise performance, biochemical and haematological parameters of swimming rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, W; Gobatto, C

    2016-03-01

    Nocturnal rodents should be assessed at an appropriate time of day, which leads to a challenge in identifying an adequate environmental light which allows animal visualisation without perturbing physiological homeostasis. Thus, we analysed the influence of high wavelength and low intensity light during dark period on physical exercise and biochemical and haematological parameters of nocturnal rats. We submitted 80 animals to an exhaustive exercise at individualised intensity under two different illuminations during dark period. Red light (> 600 nm; led to worse haematological and biochemical conditions, demonstrating that EI alone can influence physiological parameters and jeopardise result interpretation. SI promotes normal physiological conditions and greater aerobic tolerance than EI, showing the importance of a correct illumination pattern for all researchers that employ nocturnal rats for health/disease or sports performance experiments.

  16. C-17A Sustainment Performance Metrics Assessment: Repair Source Impact on Sustainment for Future Business Case Analysis Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Maintenance Depots. June 10, 2010. Report No. D-2010-067. Kaplan , Robert S., Norton , David P., Putting the Balances Scorecard to Work. Harvard...metrics. Most applicably, a recognized “best practice”, as advocated by Kaplan (1993), used a balanced scorecard to assess cross-functional areas...strategic model to measure the balanced scorecard as cited in Graham (1996). Both Kaplan and Brown viewed performance metrics as the key success

  17. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    CERN Document Server

    Jana, Saikat; Jung, Sunghwan

    2010-01-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat navigate through a wide array of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with the boundaries is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism as observed under ideal conditions. We study the dynamics of ciliary locomotion in Paramecium multimicronucleatum and observe the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities in the near field of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight line motion as the diameter of the capillary tubes decrease. Theoretically this system is modeled as an undulating cylinder with pressure gradient and compared with experiments; showing that such considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized organisms in the restrictive geometries.

  18. Sustainability, innovative orientation and export performance of manufacturing SMEs: An empirical analysis of the mediating role of corporate image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villena-Manzanares, F.; Souto-Pérez, J.E.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this research is to empirically analyze the role played by corporate image, sustainability, and innovative orientation on export performance. Hypothesis testing was conducted with a sample of 180 manufacturing SMEs in Seville (Spain) and a structural equation system is modeled using the technique Partial Least Squares (PLS). The research model includes the following variables: corporate image, sustainability, and innovative orientation on export performance. The results show the positive effect of sustainability and innovative orientation on export performance, as well as the mediator effect of corporate image on these relationships. The results may be more general if we had used a national sample and cross cultural. The conclusions cannot be directly extrapolated to other countries. This work propose future research doing the same study with other types companies. Corporate image requires special attention, as it acts as a filter of the impacts of sustainability and innovative orientation. The creation of corporate image not only as a result of tangible items, but as a result of the actions and behavior of the company. In this research is showed that there is a high level of complexity in the management of intangibles since the intangibles influence each other, such as the influence of sustainability and innovative orientation on corporate image. Managers should focus on proper design and management of the company image, in order to compete and grow in the international area. (Author)

  19. Sustainability, innovative orientation and export performance of manufacturing SMEs: An empirical analysis of the mediating role of corporate image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Villena-Manzanares

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this research is to empirically analyze the role played by corporate image, sustainability, and innovative orientation on export performance. Design/methodology/approach: hypothesis testing was conducted with a sample of 180 manufacturing SMEs in Seville (Spain and a structural equation system is modeled using the technique Partial Least Squares (PLS. The research model includes the following variables: corporate image, sustainability, and innovative orientation on export performance. Findings: The results show the positive effect of sustainability and innovative orientation on export performance, as well as the mediator effect of corporate image on these relationships. Research limitations/implications: The results may be more general if we had used a national sample and cross cultural. The conclusions cannot be directly extrapolated to other countries. This work propose future research doing the same study with other types companies. Originality/value: Corporate image requires special attention, as it acts as a filter of the impacts of sustainability and innovative orientation. The creation of corporate image not only as a result of tangible items, but as a result of the actions and behavior of the company. In this research is showed that there is a high level of complexity in the management of intangibles since the intangibles influence each other, such as the influence of sustainability and innovative orientation on corporate image. Managers should focus on proper design and management of the company image, in order to compete and grow in the international area.

  20. Performance of primary repair on colon injuries sustained from low-versus high-energy projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazovic, Ranko; Radojevic, Nemanja; Curovic, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Among various reasons, colon injuries may be caused by low- or high-energy firearm bullets, with the latter producing a temporary cavitation phenomenon. The available treatment options include primary repair and two-stage management, but recent studies have shown that primary repair can be widely used with a high success rate. This paper investigates the differences in performance of primary repair on these two types of colon injuries. Two groups of patients who sustained colon injuries due to single gunshot wounds, were retrospectively categorized based on the type of bullet. Primary colon repair was performed in all patients selected based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria (Stone and Fabian's criteria). An almost absolute homogeneity was attained among the groups in terms of age, latent time before surgery, and four trauma indexes. Only one patient from the low-energy firearm projectile group (4%) developed a postsurgical complication versus nine patients (25.8%) from the high-energy group, showing statistically significant difference (p = 0.03). These nine patients experienced the following postsurgical complications: pneumonia, abscess, fistula, suture leakage, and one multiorgan failure with sepsis. Previous studies concluded that one-stage primary repair is the best treatment option for colon injuries. However, terminal ballistics testing determined the projectile's path through the body and revealed that low-energy projectiles caused considerably lesser damage than their high-energy counterparts. Primary colon repair must be performed definitely for low-energy short firearm injuries but very carefully for high-energy injuries. Given these findings, we suggest that the treatment option should be determined based not only on the bullet type alone but also on other clinical findings. PMID:26874437

  1. Determinant kinantropometric factors in swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Vilas-Boas

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to present a bibliographic review, based on the specialized literature, of the kineantropometric characteristics of swimmers and their importance for swimming performance. The main conclusions were: (i swimmers are taller and heavier than the general population; (ii swimmers present an high index of arm span/height (explained by a large biacromial diameter and long the upper arm; (iii high values for the biacromial/bicristal diameter ratio were found, offering a lower drag coeffi cient; (iv high length and surface area arm and leg values were observed (which positively infl uence their propulsion capacity; (v elite male swimmers presents a ectomorph-endomorph somatotype and elite female swimmers are central or balanced mesomorphs (vi swimmers exhibit a higher percentage of body mass than other athletes, which may benefi t positively their floatation. RESUMO O objetivo deste trabalho é apresentar uma revisão bibliográfi ca das principais características cineantropométricas do nadador e a forma como estas infl uenciam a sua prestação na modalidade. As principais conclusões obtidas foram as seguintes: (i os nadadores são mais altos e pesados do que a população em geral; (ii os nadadores apresentam um elevado índice envergadura/ altura, explicitando valores elevados do diâmetro biacromial e do comprimento dos MS; (iii verifi ca-se uma elevada razão entre os diâmetros biacromial e bicristal, traduzindo um fator decisivo na modalidade: a promoção de um coefi ciente de arrasto inferior; (iv foram observados elevados valores de comprimento e superfície dos membros dos nadadores (afetando positivamente a sua capacidade propulsiva; (v os nadadores de elite apresentam um somatótipo médio ecto-mesomorfo e as nadadoras são centrais ou mesomorfas equilibradas; (vi como grupo, os nadadores apresentam um maior percentual de massa gorda do que outros desportistas, fator este que poderá beneficiálos relativamente

  2. Efficient swimming of an assembly of rigid spheres at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2015-01-01

    The swimming of an assembly of rigid spheres immersed in a viscous fluid of infinite extent is studied in low Reynolds number hydrodynamics. The instantaneous swimming velocity and rate of dissipation are expressed in terms of the time-dependent displacements of sphere centers about their collective motion. For small amplitude swimming with periodically oscillating displacements, optimization of the mean swimming speed at given mean power leads to an eigenvalue problem involving a velocity matrix and a power matrix. The corresponding optimal stroke permits generalization to large amplitude motion in a model of spheres with harmonic interactions and corresponding actuating forces. The method allows straightforward calculation of the swimming performance of structures modeled as assemblies of interacting rigid spheres. A model of three collinear spheres with motion along the common axis is studied as an example.

  3. Nutrition considerations for open-water swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Gregory; Koivisto, Anu; Gerrard, David; Burke, Louise M

    2014-08-01

    Open-water swimming (OWS) is a rapidly developing discipline. Events of 5-25 km are featured at FINA World Championships, and the international circuit includes races of 5-88 km. The Olympic OWS event, introduced in 2008, is contested over 10 km. Differing venues present changing environmental conditions, including water and ambient temperatures, humidity, solar radiation, and unpredictable tides. Furthermore, the duration of most OWS events (1-6 hr) creates unique physiological challenges to thermoregulation, hydration status, and muscle fuel stores. Current nutrition recommendations for open-water training and competition are either an extension of recommendations from pool swimming or are extrapolated from other athletic populations with similar physiological requirements. Competition nutrition should focus on optimizing prerace hydration and glycogen stores. Although swimmers should rely on self-supplied fuel and fluid sources for shorter events, for races of 10 km or greater, fluid and fuel replacement can occur from feeding pontoons when tactically appropriate. Over the longer races, feeding pontoons should be used to achieve desirable targets of up to 90 g/ hr of carbohydrates from multitransportable sources. Exposure to variable water and ambient temperatures will play a significant role in determining race nutrition strategies. For example, in extreme environments, thermoregulation may be assisted by manipulating the temperature of the ingested fluids. Swimmers are encouraged to work with nutrition experts to develop effective and efficient strategies that enhance performance through appropriate in-competition nutrition.

  4. High Performance Sustainable School Design: Roy Lee Walker Elementary, McKinney, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHW Group, Inc., Dallas, TX.

    This document describes the sustainable features of the Roy Lee Walker Elementary School (Texas), a prototype "Eco Education" school that blends the physical environment with the student learning process while protecting the site. The document also presents the process of integrating sustainability criteria in all phases of the school's…

  5. The Impact of Organisational Alignment on the Effectiveness of Firms' Sustainability Strategic Performance Measurement Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parisi, Cristiana

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability is becoming a mainstream issue for many organisations. A limited number of studies exist, however, on integrating sustainability into daily practices. Indeed, most of the research to date addresses only the definition and motivation for companies’ interest in environmental and social...

  6. High Performance Education Fails in Sustainability?--A Reflection on Finnish Primary Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Lili-Ann; Sjöblom, Pia; Hofman-Bergholm, Maria; Palmberg, Irmeli

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability is internationally often emphasized as an essential aim of higher education, but more as a principle than on the practical level. This is also obvious in the academic education of primary teachers in Finland. Therefore, it is a great challenge for Finnish teachers to include sustainability in their teaching and everyday life in…

  7. How to Assess Transformative Performance towards Sustainable Development in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights the role of sustainability appraisal for Higher Education Institutions (HEIs). Traditional HEI appraisal systems lack a way to assess the integration of sustainability principles reflecting societal needs with the consequences of research, education and management of HEIs. Two appraisal systems are discussed. The Austrian…

  8. Sustainable Development Drivers, The Role of Leadership on Government, Business and NGO Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoeteman, B.C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable development cannot be prescribed – rather, it results from conscious personal choices in government, business and NGOs. This thought-provoking book explores both the origins and future of the global sustainable development movement, and provides an original overview of the driving forces

  9. Can polish university female students swim?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podstawski Robert

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim of the work: There are only few studies in Polish and foreign literature providing solid information on swimming skills of university students. The aim of the study carried out at the University of Warmia & Mazury in Olsztyn was to determine swimming skills of Polish university female students starting their studies. Material and methods: The study was conducted in 2012 on 298 female students of the 1 st year course, at the age of 19 – 20. Anonymous questionnaire was used in the research. Results: It has been shown that almost 72% of the women could not swim at all, and 26% swam poorly. Within the group of women able to swim, the greatest percentage was set by women using classical style (49% and “their own” one (27% and only 13% of the students used crawl, 9% - back stroke and 2% - butterfly style. Of all the women declaring swimming abilities, the biggest percentage (16% could cover the distance of only 20 – 50 m; fewer students (6% covered the distance of 50 – 100 m; and 5% could swim only 20 m. Only a marginal number of students (2% could cover the distance from 100 to 1000 m; none could swim more than 1000 m. Conclusions: The study showed a very pessimistic picture of swimming skills of Polish university female students in respect of the number of women able to swim, their knowledge of swimming styles, and the length of the covered distance.

  10. Unsteady computational fluid dynamics in front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Mathias; Bernard, Anthony; Monnet, Tony; Lacouture, Patrick; David, Laurent

    2017-05-01

    The development of codes and power calculations currently allows the simulation of increasingly complex flows, especially in the turbulent regime. Swimming research should benefit from these technological advances to try to better understand the dynamic mechanisms involved in swimming. An unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study is conducted in crawl, in order to analyse the propulsive forces generated by the hand and forearm. The k-ω SST turbulence model and an overset grid method have been used. The main objectives are to analyse the evolution of the hand-forearm propulsive forces and to explain this relative to the arm kinematics parameters. In order to validate our simulation model, the calculated forces and pressures were compared with several other experimental and numerical studies. A good agreement is found between our results and those of other studies. The hand is the segment that generates the most propulsive forces during the aquatic stroke. As the pressure component is the main source of force, the orientation of the hand-forearm in the absolute coordinate system is an important kinematic parameter in the swimming performance. The propulsive forces are biggest when the angles of attack are high. CFD appears as a very valuable tool to better analyze the mechanisms of swimming performance and offers some promising developments, especially for optimizing the performance from a parametric study.

  11. Approaching a Conceptual Framework for Research on Sustainability Performance in Corporate Value Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    and corporate engagement with other primary and secondary stakeholders. Conducting research on Supply Chain Management is challenging and adding the ambiguously defined concept of sustainability and a value chain perspective increases the complexity almost exponentially. As a result, researchers tend to focus......The literature on sustainability in supply chains is growing rapidly, leading to the manifestation of conceptualizations like Sustainable Supply Chain Management. More recently the concept of Sustainable Value Chain Management has emerged, extending the view to included suppliers in multiple tiers...... in supply- and value chains to a limited extent. Though, this article proposes that the ongoing work towards new standards for integrated sustainability reporting represents a unique opportunity for increasing the presence of supply- and value chain perspectives in reporting in a way that facilitates a more...

  12. Physiological plasticity to water flow habitat in the damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus: linking phenotype to performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A Binning

    Full Text Available The relationships among animal form, function and performance are complex, and vary across environments. Therefore, it can be difficult to identify morphological and/or physiological traits responsible for enhancing performance in a given habitat. In fishes, differences in swimming performance across water flow gradients are related to morphological variation among and within species. However, physiological traits related to performance have been less well studied. We experimentally reared juvenile damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus, under different water flow regimes to test 1 whether aspects of swimming physiology and morphology show plastic responses to water flow, 2 whether trait divergence correlates with swimming performance and 3 whether flow environment relates to performance differences observed in wild fish. We found that maximum metabolic rate, aerobic scope and blood haematocrit were higher in wave-reared fish compared to fish reared in low water flow. However, pectoral fin shape, which tends to correlate with sustained swimming performance, did not differ between rearing treatments or collection sites. Maximum metabolic rate was the best overall predictor of individual swimming performance; fin shape and fish total length were 3.3 and 3.7 times less likely than maximum metabolic rate to explain differences in critical swimming speed. Performance differences induced in fish reared in different flow environments were less pronounced than in wild fish but similar in direction. Our results suggest that exposure to water motion induces plastic physiological changes which enhance swimming performance in A. polyacanthus. Thus, functional relationships between fish morphology and performance across flow habitats should also consider differences in physiology.

  13. Short-Term Memory Performances during Sustained Wakefulness in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greneche, Jerome; Krieger, Jean; Bertrand, Frederic; Erhardt, Christine; Maumy, Myriam; Tassi, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Both working and immediate memories were assessed every 4 h by specific short-term memory tasks over sustained wakefulness in 12 patients with obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and 10 healthy controls. Results indicated that OSAHS patients exhibited lower working memory performances than controls on both backward digit span and…

  14. Special Issue: Enhancing Sustainable Performance in Organizational and Inter-Institutional Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Winch

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is not just for Christmas… it’s for life. Sustainable solutions, whether sought in terms of business strategies, social policies, or the exploitation of natural resources have to serve organizations and communities in the long term, sometimes very long term, as well as the short term. Static analysis is unlikely to be able to evaluate candidate solutions fully, and is more likely to focus on the short-term future to the detriment of the longer-term. Sustainable solutions are more likely to be developed from studies based on deep analysis using systems approaches, and from system dynamics (SD approaches in particular.

  15. Effects of short-term swimming exercise on bone mineral density, geometry, and microstructural properties in sham and ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foong Kiew Ooi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Little information exists about the effects of swimming exercise on bone health in ovariectomized animals with estrogen deficiency, which resembles the postmenopausal state and age-related bone loss in humans. This study investigated the effects of swimming exercise on tibia and femur bone mineral density (BMD, geometry, and microstructure in sham and ovariectomized rats. Forty 3-month-old female rats were divided into four groups: sham operated-sedentary control (Sham-control, sham operated with swimming exercise group (Sham-Swim, ovariectomy-sedentary control (OVx-control, and ovariectomy and swimming exercise (OVx-Swim groups. Swimming sessions were performed by the rats 90 minutes/day for 5 days/week for a total of 8 weeks. At the end of the study, tibial and femoral proximal volumetric total BMD, midshaft cortical volumetric BMD, cross-sectional area, and cross-sectional moment of inertia (MOI, and bone microstructural properties were measured for comparison. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. The Sham-Swim group exhibited significantly (p < 0.05; one-way ANOVA greater values in bone geometry parameters, that is, tibial midshaft cortical area and MOI compared to the Sham-control group. However, no significant differences were observed in these parameters between the Ovx-Swim and Ovx-control groups. There were no significant differences in femoral BMD between the Sham-Swim and Sham-control groups. Nevertheless, the Ovx-Swim group elicited significantly (p < 0.05; one-way ANOVA higher femoral proximal total BMD and improved bone microstructure compared to the Ovx-Sham group. In conclusion, the positive effects of swimming on bone properties in the ovariectomized rats in the present study may suggest that swimming as a non- or low-weight-bearing exercise may be beneficial for enhancing bone health in the postmenopausal population.

  16. Effect of Beetroot Juice Supplementation on Aerobic Response during Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pinna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of beetroot juice supplementation (BJS have been tested during cycling, walking, and running. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether BJS can also improve performance in swimmers. Fourteen moderately trained male master swimmers were recruited and underwent two incremental swimming tests randomly assigned in a pool during which workload, oxygen uptake (VO2, carbon dioxide production (VCO2, pulmonary ventilation (VE, and aerobic energy cost (AEC of swimming were measured. One was a control swimming test (CSW and the other a swimming test after six days of BJS (0.5l/day organic beetroot juice containing about 5.5 mmol of NO3−. Results show that workload at anaerobic threshold was significantly increased by BJS as compared to the CSW test (6.3 ± 1 and 6.7 ± 1.1 kg during the CSW and the BJS test respectively. Moreover, AEC was significantly reduced during the BJS test (1.9 ± 0.5 during the SW test vs. 1.7 ± 0.3 kcal·kg−1·h−1 during the BJS test. The other variables lacked a statistically significant effect with BJS. The present investigation provides evidence that BJS positively affects performance of swimmers as it reduces the AEC and increases the workload at anaerobic threshold.

  17. STATUS BERKELANJUTAN KOTA TANGERANG SELATAN-BANTEN DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS (Sustainable Status of South Tangerang City-Banten Using Key Performance Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heri Apriyanto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Pembangunan kota yang tidak terkendali akan mengakibatkan tekanan terhadap lingkungan dan beban masyarakat meningkat, sebaliknya degradasi lingkungan akan mengakibatkan pembatasan pengembangan ekonomi dan penurunan kualitas hidup. Guna mencegah terjadinya dampak-dampak negatif, maka diperlukan prinsip-prinsip pembangunan kota yang berkelanjutan. Evaluasi terhadap pelaksanan pembangunan kota yang berkelanjutan perlu dilakukan untuk mengetahui apakah pembangunan suatu kota sudah atau belum/tidak berkelanjutan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menyusun Key Performance Indicators (KPI guna menilai status pembangunan kota berkelanjutan. Perumusan KPI ini dilakukan dengan pendekatan Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. KPI yang dihasilkan terdiri dari 21 indikator dan 9 elemen dari 3 pilar pembangunan berkelanjutan (ekonomi, sosial, dan lingkungan. Implementasi KPI dilakukan untuk pengukuran status keberlanjutan Kota Tangerang Selatan. Hasil pengukuran menunjukkan bahwa kota ini termasuk dalam tahap awal pembangunan berkelanjutan. Secara umum perkembangan ekonomi dan sosial relatif cukup baik, namun tidak demikian dengan kondisi lingkungannya. ABSTRACT Uncontrolled urban development will result in pressure on the environment and the burden of the people. On the contrary, environmental degradation will lead to restricted economic development and decreased quality of life. In order to prevent negative impacts, it is necessary to implement the principles of sustainable city development. Evaluation of the implementation of sustainable city development is needed to determine whether the development of a city is sustainable or not. This study aimed to develop Key Performance Indicators (KPI to assess the status of sustainable city development. The formulation of KPI is done with Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. KPI generated consists of 21 indicators and 9 elements of the 3 pillars of sustainable development (economic, social, and environmental

  18. Current Methodologies in Baby and Infant Swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Boldišová, Šárka

    2009-01-01

    Thesis describes history of infant a baby swimming in Czech republic and worlwide. It brings an overview of current methods and methodologies of infant a baby swimming worlwide and in the Czech republic. Thesis describes in a reasonable detail methodology, developed by BabyClub Plaváček. Second - practical part of the thesis tries to evaluate hypothesis concerning methodologies used in infant and baby swimming. Evaluation is done upon questionaries and their evaluation. This thesis describes ...

  19. Análise dos parâmetros cinemáticos determinantes do desempenho na prova de 200 m nado livre Analysis of the determinant kinematical parameters for performance in the 200-m freestyle swimming event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Ferreira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste estudo foram: i caracterizar o nado submáximo e máximo do ponto de vista cinemático; ii verificar a influência das variáveis cinemáticas na prova máxima de 200 metros crawl. Nove nadadores de elite nacionais realizaram dois testes: um submáximo, descontínuo de intensidade progressiva; outro máximo, que consistiu em uma simulação de uma prova de 200 m crawl. Foram estudados os parâmetros cinemáticos gerais da mecânica da braçada, a duração de cada fase do ciclo gestual, a velocidade do centro de massa e a variação intracíclica da velocidade horizontal. Verificaram-se diferenças cinemáticas significativas da frequência gestual, velocidade de deslocamento do centro de massa, duração total do ciclo gestual, duração da ação subaquática propulsora e da velocidade do centro de massa na fase de recuperação entre os testes. Identificou-se associações significativas entre o teste máximo e algumas variáveis cinemáticas como a velocidade do centro de massa e índice de nado.The main aims of this study were i to perform a kinematic characterization of sub and maximal swimming speed; ii to investigate the associations between the kinematic profiles and the 200 m front crawl style. Nine national level male swimmers performed two speed tests: a submaximal discontinuous speed trial of progressive speed intensity, and a maximal one, simulating a 200 m front crawl style. The stroke general kinematic parameters, the phases duration of the stroke cycle, the velocity of the centre of mass and the intra cyclic variation of the horizontal velocity were herein studied. Significant kinematic differences in relation to stroke rate, horizontal velocity of the centre of mass, total cycle duration, absolute and relative duration of the propulsive sub aquatic action and the velocity of the centre of mass during the arms recovery were compared between the speed tests. Significant correlations between the performance in

  20. KPIs for measuring the sustainability performance of ecodesign implementation into product development and related processes: a systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Vinicius Picanco; Pigosso, Daniela Cristina Antelmi; McAloone, Tim C.

    for strategic-level decision. Besides, the traditional metrics are also pointed out to be historical and hard to correlate, providing little information on the root cause of problems. The literature also highlight the fact that research and development performance is not focused on the performance result......The development of products with improved environmental performance is increasingly part of companies’ engagement towards sustainable development. Ecodesign is an approach for integrating environmental aspects into the product development and related processes (PDRP), such as manufacturing......, marketing, procurement etc. in order to develop products with increased environmental performance.The application of ecodesign potentially presents a set of sustainability benefits, such as innovation potential, development of new products and business models, the ability to meet or exceed customer...

  1. A GIS-based performance measurement system for assessing transportation sustainability and community livability : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-31

    Sustainability and livability in transportation, as the concepts referring to the capability of transportation systems to maintain the well being of our society, have been widely : accepted as the critical principles to improve quality of life and he...

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Sustainability Plan with FY 2016 Performance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Teresa A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lapsa, Melissa Voss [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Campus sustainability is part of an ongoing process of modernization at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Initiated in 2002, it grew to include the Sustainable Campus Initiative (SCI) as of 2008. The SCI embodies a diversity of areas, reflecting the multifaceted nature of sustainability and the resulting need for a holistic approach, by tapping ORNL’s multiplatform science and technology expertise in a pathway critical in catalyzing change and shaping the Laboratory’s future. The past year has shown significant progress for the SCI as well as for sustainable development at large, with the 21st Session of the Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris setting a new pace and direction for worldwide mitigation of climate change in the coming decades.

  3. Developing sustainable transportation performance measures for TXDOT's strategic plan : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    For this research project, sustainable transportation can be viewed as the provision of safe, effective, and : efficient access and mobility into the future while considering economic, social, and environmental needs. : This project developed a perfo...

  4. Configurational Paths to Social Performance in SMEs: The Interplay of Innovation, Sustainability, Resources and Achievement Motivation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sascha Kraus; Janina Burtscher; Thomas Niemand; Norat Roig-Tierno; Pasi Syrjä

    2017-01-01

    In today’s world of increasing ecological, social and economic issues, the question as to how businesses can become a vehicle towards more sustainable development has become more relevant than ever...

  5. Improved Swimming Performance in Hydrodynamically- coupled Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Sina; Shelley, Michael J.; Kanso, Eva

    2017-11-01

    Collective motion is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom from fish schools to bird flocks. Half of the known fish species are thought to exhibit schooling behavior during some phase of their life cycle. Schooling likely occurs to serve multiple purposes, including foraging for resources and protection from predators. Growing experimental and theoretical evidence supports the hypothesis that fish can benefit from the hydrodynamic interactions with their neighbors, but it is unclear whether this requires particular configurations or regulations. Here, we propose a physics-based approach that account for hydrodynamic interactions among swimmers based on the vortex sheet model. The benefit of this model is that it is scalable to a large number of swimmers. We start by examining the case of two swimmers, heaving plates, moving in parallel and in tandem. We find that for the same heaving amplitude and frequency, the coupled-swimmers move faster and more efficiently. This increase in velocity depends strongly on the configuration and separation distance between the swimmers. Our results are consistent with recent experimental findings on heaving airfoils and underline the role of fluid dynamic interactions in the collective behavior of swimmers.

  6. Teaching children the freestyle swimming stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Vajglová, Kateřina

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare two groups of children both practicing the freestyle swimming stroke. One group attended the Juklík swimming club from an early age and the second group attended swimming lessons provided through primary school. An integral part of this study was to compare the teaching methods, preparations and objectives used in the two models. Results of these observations are displayed in the form of graphs based on the results of an identical swimming test. KEYWORDS Sw...

  7. Efficient Management Design for Swimming Exercise Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Kyunghun; Kyung, Taewon; Kim, Wonhyun; Shin, Chungsick; Song, Youngjae; Lee, Moo Yeol; Lee, Hyunwoo; Cho, Yongchan

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-mediated physical treatment has attracted much recent interest. In particular, swimming is a representative exercise treatment method recommended for patients experiencing muscular and cardiovascular diseases...

  8. Central generation of swimming activity in the hydrozoan jellyfish Aequorea aequorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterlie, R A

    1985-01-01

    Swimming in Aequorea is controlled by a network of electrically coupled neurons (swim motorneurons) located in the inner nerve ring. The network is made up of the largest neurons in the ring, up to 22 microns in diameter. Intracellular recordings from swim motorneurons reveal slow membrane potential oscillations and a superimposed barrage of synaptic "noise." The synaptic noise, but not the slow oscillations, is eliminated in seawater containing an elevated Mg++ concentration. The swim motorneurons produce a rapid burst of two to eight action potentials preceding each contraction of the subumbrella. Spontaneous bursting persists in high-Mg++ seawater. Injected ramp currents indicated a "bursty" character of the swim motorneurons as suprathreshold depolarizations produced repetitive bursting with an increasing burst frequency with increased depolarization. Hyperpolarizing currents locally blocked spiking in swim motorneurons. Intercellular coupling was demonstrated with Lucifer Yellow injection and dual electrode recordings. In dye fills, only the large neurons of the inner nerve ring were dye-coupled. Two pieces of evidence suggest that swim motorneurons activate the overlying epithelial cells via chemical synapses. First, direct synaptic connections have been noted in ultrastructural examination of the inner nerve ring region. Second, dual recordings from a swim motorneuron and an epithelial cell reveal a 1:1 correspondence between neuron spikes and epithelial synaptic potentials. The synaptic potentials occur with a latency as short as 3 ms which is constant in any one recording session. The results suggest that the swim motorneuron network of Aequorea not only performs a motorneuron function, but also serves as the pattern generator for swimming activity.

  9. Undulatory swimming in viscoelastic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Xiaoning

    2011-01-01

    The effects of fluid elasticity on the swimming behavior of the nematode \\emph{Caenorhabditis elegans} are experimentally investigated by tracking the nematode's motion and measuring the corresponding velocity fields. We find that fluid elasticity hinders self-propulsion. Compared to Newtonian solutions, fluid elasticity leads to 35% slower propulsion speed. Furthermore, self-propulsion decreases as elastic stresses grow in magnitude in the fluid. This decrease in self-propulsion in viscoelastic fluids is related to the stretching of flexible molecules near hyperbolic points in the flow.

  10. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers.

  11. Numerical study on the hydrodynamics of thunniform bio-inspired swimming under self-propulsion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningyu Li

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations are employed to study the hydrodynamics of self-propelled thunniform swimming. The swimmer is modeled as a tuna-like flexible body undulating with kinematics of thunniform type. The wake evolution follows the vortex structures arranged nearly vertical to the forward direction, vortex dipole formation resulting in the propulsion motion, and finally a reverse Kármán vortex street. We also carry out a systematic parametric study of various aspects of the fluid dynamics behind the freely swimming behavior, including the swimming speed, hydrodynamic forces, power requirement and wake vortices. The present results show that the fin thrust as well as swimming velocity is an increasing function of both tail undulating amplitude Ap and oscillating amplitude of the caudal fin θm. Whereas change on the propulsive performance with Ap is associated with the strength of wake vortices and the area of suction region on the fin, the swimming performance improves with θm due to the favorable tilting of the fin that make the pressure difference force more oriented toward the thrust direction. Moreover, the energy loss in the transverse direction and the power requirement increase with Ap but decrease with θm, and this indicates that for achieving a desired swimming speed increasing θm seems more efficiently than increasing Ap. Furthermore, we have compared the current simulations with the published experimental studies on undulatory swimming. Comparisons show that our work tackles the flow regime of natural thunniform swimmers and follows the principal scaling law of undulatory locomotion reported. Finally, this study enables a detailed quantitative analysis, which is difficult to obtain by experiments, of the force production of the thunniform mode as well as its connection to the self-propelled swimming kinematics and vortex wake structure. The current findings help provide insights into the swimming performance and mechanisms of self

  12. Numerical study on the hydrodynamics of thunniform bio-inspired swimming under self-propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ningyu; Liu, Huanxing; Su, Yumin

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations are employed to study the hydrodynamics of self-propelled thunniform swimming. The swimmer is modeled as a tuna-like flexible body undulating with kinematics of thunniform type. The wake evolution follows the vortex structures arranged nearly vertical to the forward direction, vortex dipole formation resulting in the propulsion motion, and finally a reverse Kármán vortex street. We also carry out a systematic parametric study of various aspects of the fluid dynamics behind the freely swimming behavior, including the swimming speed, hydrodynamic forces, power requirement and wake vortices. The present results show that the fin thrust as well as swimming velocity is an increasing function of both tail undulating amplitude Ap and oscillating amplitude of the caudal fin θm. Whereas change on the propulsive performance with Ap is associated with the strength of wake vortices and the area of suction region on the fin, the swimming performance improves with θm due to the favorable tilting of the fin that make the pressure difference force more oriented toward the thrust direction. Moreover, the energy loss in the transverse direction and the power requirement increase with Ap but decrease with θm, and this indicates that for achieving a desired swimming speed increasing θm seems more efficiently than increasing Ap. Furthermore, we have compared the current simulations with the published experimental studies on undulatory swimming. Comparisons show that our work tackles the flow regime of natural thunniform swimmers and follows the principal scaling law of undulatory locomotion reported. Finally, this study enables a detailed quantitative analysis, which is difficult to obtain by experiments, of the force production of the thunniform mode as well as its connection to the self-propelled swimming kinematics and vortex wake structure. The current findings help provide insights into the swimming performance and mechanisms of self

  13. Targeted delivery of colloids by swimming bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumakis, N.; Lepore, A.; Maggi, C.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of exploiting motile microorganisms as tiny propellers represents a fascinating strategy for the transport of colloidal cargoes. However, delivery on target sites usually requires external control fields to steer propellers and trigger cargo release. The need for a constant feedback mechanism prevents the design of compact devices where biopropellers could perform their tasks autonomously. Here we show that properly designed three-dimensional (3D) microstructures can define accumulation areas where bacteria spontaneously and efficiently store colloidal beads. The process is stochastic in nature and results from the rectifying action of an asymmetric energy landscape over the fluctuating forces arising from collisions with swimming bacteria. As a result, the concentration of colloids over target areas can be strongly increased or depleted according to the topography of the underlying structures. Besides the significance to technological applications, our experiments pose some important questions regarding the structure of stationary probability distributions in non-equilibrium systems. PMID:24100868

  14. Swimming in Ireland: Immersions in therapeutic blue space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Ronan

    2015-09-01

    This paper explores swimming as a healthy body-water engagement in blue space at selected outdoor Irish swimming spots. Associated theoretical underpinnings draw from non-representational theories (NRT). Taking as a starting point the idea of immersion, the paper argues for a deeper application of NRT to blue space settings. In addition, the paper reflects recent therapeutic geographies research on differential experiences of health and wellbeing linked to such immersions. Methodologically, the paper uses observer participation and swimmer's own voices to draw affective and embodied accounts from on and within water. The act of swimming as an emplaced and performed therapeutic encounter is highlighted along with a more critical discussion of contested narratives associated with risk and respect. Theoretical learning suggests the need for greater attention to the production of affect from across the life-course and a fuller articulation of the in-betweenness of theory and empirical testimonies. Swimming emerges from the study as a potentially valuable health and wellbeing resource that can be more fully harnessed to inform wider public health policy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Swimming and spinal deformities: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaina, Fabio; Donzelli, Sabrina; Lusini, Monia; Minnella, Salvatore; Negrini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of spinal deformities and low back pain (LBP) in adolescent competitive swimmers and normal controls. This was a cross-sectional study with convenience sample of 112 adolescent competitive swimmers (62 females) compared with 217 students (106 females) of the same age (12.5 years). We designed a questionnaire to collect data on LBP and measured the angle of trunk rotation with a Bunnell scoliometer to screen for scoliosis, along with the plumbline distances for kyphosis and lordosis. Clinical cutoffs defined in the literature for detection of spinal deformities were applied. Analyses were performed using the t test and χ(2) test, and ORs and 95% CIs were calculated. Swimming was found to increase the risk of trunk asymmetries (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.08-3.20). Swimming also increased the risk of hyperkyphosis (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.35-3.77) and hyperlordosis (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.06-4.73), and increased LBP in females by 2.1-fold (95% CI, 1.08-4.06). Swimming is associated with an increased risk of trunk asymmetries and hyperkyphosis. Although swimming has been considered a complete sport and a treatment option for scoliosis, our data contradict that approach, and also show a higher prevalence of LBP in females. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling and simulation of fish swimming with active muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curatolo, Michele; Teresi, Luciano

    2016-11-21

    Our goal is to reproduce the key features of carangiform swimming by modeling muscle functioning using the notion of active distortions, thus emphasizing the kinematical role of muscle, the generation of movement, rather than the dynamical one, the production of force. This approach, already proposed to model the action of muscles in different contexts, is here tested again for the problem of developing an effective and reliable framework to model and simulate swimming. A proper undulatory movement of a fish-like body is reproduced by defining a pattern of distortions, tuned in both space and time, meant to model the muscles activation which produce the flexural motion of body fish; eventually, interactions with the surrounding water yields the desired thrust. Carangiform swimmers have a relatively inflexible anterior body section and a generally flat, flexible posterior section. Because of this configuration, undulations sent rearward along the body attain a significant amplitude only in the posterior section. We compare the performances of different swimming gaits, and we are able to find some important relations between key parameters such as frequencies, wavelength, tail amplitude, and the achieved swim velocity, or the generated thrust, which summarize the swimming performance. In particular, an interesting relation is found between the Strouhal number and the wavelength of muscles activation. We highlight the muscle function during fish locomotion describing the activation of muscles and the relation between the force production and the shortening-lengthening cycle of muscle. We found a great accordance between results and empirical relations, giving an implicit validation of our models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A fuzzy multi criteria approach for measuring sustainability performance of a supplier based on triple bottom line approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govindan, Kannan; Khodaverdi, R.; Jafarian, A.

    2013-01-01

    . Traditionally, organizations consider criteria such as price, quality, flexibility, etc. when evaluating supplier performance. While the articles on the selection and evaluation of suppliers are abundant, those that consider sustainability issues are rather limited. This paper explores sustainable supply chain...... initiatives and examines the problem of identifying an effective model based on the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) approach (economic, environmental, and social aspects) for supplier selection operations in supply chains by presenting a fuzzy multi criteria approach. We use triangular fuzzy numbers to express...... linguistic values of experts' subjective preferences. Qualitative performance evaluation is performed by using fuzzy numbers for finding criteria weights and then fuzzy TOPSIS (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution) is proposed for finding the ranking of suppliers. The proposed...

  18. Current controversy: analysis of the 2013 FINA World Swimming Championships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, Andrew; Brammer, Christopher; Stager, Joel

    2015-03-01

    Anecdotal reports regarding the 2013 Fédération Internationale de Natation World Swimming Championships held in Barcelona suggested that swimming performances were biased, presumably because of a current. The purpose of this study was to analyze the swimmers' performance data to determine the merit of these rumors. The mean time difference between odd and even 50-m lengths for each lane in the 1500-m freestyle was compared. For each 50-m event, a percent change in performance from the preliminaries to semifinals and semifinals to finals was calculated for all qualifying swimmers. Observations were grouped according to the swimmers' lane assignments. For the 1500-m freestyle, lane assignment significantly affected the time difference between odd and even 50-m lengths (P Natation's primary stated objectives is to provide fairness in competition, new policies are needed to prevent similar biases from occurring in the future.

  19. Propulsive force in front crawl swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; de Groot, G.; Hollander, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the propulsive forces in front crawl arm swimming, derived from a three-dimensional kinematic analysis, these values were compared with mean drag forces. The propulsive forces during front crawl swimming using the arms only were calculated using three-dimensional kinematic analysis

  20. Swimming and muscle structure in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierts, I.L.Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this series of studies the relations between swimming behaviour of fish in general and extreme swimming responses in particular (called fast starts or escape responses) and the structure and ontogeny of the muscle system was investigated. Special attention was paid to relate functional