WorldWideScience

Sample records for sustained human presence

  1. Sustainable Human Presence on the Moon using In Situ Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, Carol A.; Fikes, John C.; McCarley, Kevin S.; Darby, Charles A.; Curreri, Peter A.; Kennedy, James P.; Good, James E.; Gilley, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    New capabilities, technologies and infrastructure must be developed to enable a sustained human presence on the moon and beyond. The key to having this permanent presence is the utilization of in situ resources. To this end, NASA is investigating how in situ resources can be utilized to improve mission success by reducing up-mass, improving safety, reducing risk, and bringing down costs for the overall mission. To ensure that this capability is available when needed, technology development is required now. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is supporting this endeavor, along with other NASA centers, by exploring how lunar regolith can be mined for uses such as construction, life support, propulsion, power, and fabrication. Efforts at MSFC include development of lunar regolith simulant for hardware testing and development, extraction of oxygen and other materials from the lunar regolith, production of parts and tools on the moon from local materials or from provisioned feedstocks, and capabilities to show that produced parts are "ready for use". This paper discusses the lunar regolith, how the regolith is being replicated in the development of simulants and possible uses of the regolith.

  2. Frontier In-Situ Resource Utilization for Enabling Sustained Human Presence on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Robert W.; Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    The currently known resources on Mars are massive, including extensive quantities of water and carbon dioxide and therefore carbon, hydrogen and oxygen for life support, fuels and plastics and much else. The regolith is replete with all manner of minerals. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applicable frontier technologies include robotics, machine intelligence, nanotechnology, synthetic biology, 3-D printing/additive manufacturing and autonomy. These technologies combined with the vast natural resources should enable serious, pre- and post-human arrival ISRU to greatly increase reliability and safety and reduce cost for human colonization of Mars. Various system-level transportation concepts employing Mars produced fuel would enable Mars resources to evolve into a primary center of trade for the inner solar system for eventually nearly everything required for space faring and colonization. Mars resources and their exploitation via extensive ISRU are the key to a viable, safe and affordable, human presence beyond Earth. The purpose of this paper is four-fold: 1) to highlight the latest discoveries of water, minerals, and other materials on Mars that reshape our thinking about the value and capabilities of Mars ISRU; 2) to summarize the previous literature on Mars ISRU processes, equipment, and approaches; 3) to point to frontier ISRU technologies and approaches that can lead to safe and affordable human missions to Mars; and 4) to suggest an implementation strategy whereby the ISRU elements are phased into the mission campaign over time to enable a sustainable and increasing human presence on Mars.

  3. Sustained Presence of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Urban Manaus, the Largest Human Settlement in the Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benício, Ednelza; Cordeiro, Mayara; Monteiro, Hannah; Saboia Moura, Marco Antônio; Oliveira, Cintia; Nunes Gadelha, Ellen Pricilla; Chrusciak-Talhari, Anette; Talhari, Carolina; de Lima Ferreira, Luiz Carlos; Mira, Marcelo Távora; Lima Machado, Paulo Roberto; Talhari, Sinésio; Schriefer, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The Amazon is responsible for approximately 40% of the American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) in Brazil. Herein the sustained presence of ATL in Manaus, the largest settlement in the Amazon, was investigated. Records of notification of historic cases, and data from cases prospectively enrolled in the Tropical Medicine Foundation of the Amazonas State were used. Geographic coordinates of prospective patients' living sites were used to detect inner-city clusters of ATL. Infecting Leishmania species was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Among prospectively enrolled subjects, 94.8% were infected with Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis, 76.7% were male, 30.2% were 0-20 years old, and 69.8% had an urban residence. Historic cases showed a profile similar to that of prospectively enrolled subjects. Several clusters of ATL, widely distributed within the city of Manaus, could be detected. In conclusion, there was a high frequency of disease in young age groups and cases clustered in urban neighborhoods. It cannot be determined from these data whether transmission of these cases occurred within or outside the city of Manaus. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  4. Human Capital and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of sustainability needs to consider the role of all forms of capital—natural, biological, social, technological, financial, cultural—and the complex ways in which they interact. All forms of capital derive their value, utility and application from human mental awareness, creativity and social innovation. This makes human capital, including social capital, the central determinant of resource productivity and sustainability. Humanity has entered the Anthropocene Epoch in which human changes have become the predominant factor in evolution. Humanity is itself evolving from animal physicality to social vitality to mental individuality. This transition has profound bearing on human productive capabilities, adaptability, creativity and values, the organization of economy, public policy, social awareness and life styles that determine sustainability. This article examines the linkages between population, economic development, employment, education, health, social equity, cultural values, energy intensity and sustainability in the context of evolving human consciousness. It concludes that development of human capital is the critical determinant of long-term sustainability and that efforts to accelerate the evolution of human consciousness and emergence of mentally self-conscious individuals will be the most effective approach for ensuring a sustainable future. Education is the primary lever. Human choice matters.

  5. Humanity and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available So far our open access publishing company MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute has published mainly science, medicine and technology journals. To become a multidisciplinary publisher, we launched the journal Sustainability [1]. More recently, we started to run several social science journals, including Societies [2], Religions [3], Administrative Sciences [4] and Behavioral Sciences [5]. Today we published the first paper [6] of the inaugural issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787. This will be an international open access journal, publishing scholarly papers of high quality across all humanities disciplines. As a publisher, I would like to publish journals surrounding the topics of sustainability and I believe the humanities as a discipline of academic studies are very important. As a scientist, I believed science and technology will only benefit human beings. I was raised in a small village, living a very primitive life in a peasant family: no electricity, no machines, of course no TV and no refrigerator. Now, the life of my children is completely different. Even my own life has completely changed. I have witnessed very rapid changes: more and more machines are used to consume mineral resources and energy and to pollute the environment, in order to produce more and more powerful machines (we are also launching a journal titled Machines, in which the relationship between Man and machine should be an interesting topic.. Machines are more and more like human individuals consuming resources themselves (we are launching a journal titled Resources. [...

  6. Rendering Humanities Sustainable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Launching a journal intended to cover the entire humanities is certainly an audacious project, for two reasons at least. Firstly, this journal will be expected to cover much academic diversity, particularly by including the “social sciences.” However, in this time of rampant overspecialization, perhaps it is precisely such wholeness and breadth of vision that could become a journal’s strength. Secondly, since the viability of the humanities has been questioned from a number of perspectives it seems essential to meet these challenges by reinventing the discipline in response to issues raised—also a major task. It involves justifying the continuation of humanistic traditions. For this, humanists need to consider the nature of these challenges, understand and analyze them, and respond to them. It is therefore inevitable that a forward-looking, new journal in this discipline will deem it relevant to review these matters. [...

  7. New Humanism and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han d'Orville

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The call for a new humanism in the 21st century roots in the conviction that the moral, intellectual and political foundations of globalization and international cooperation have to be rethought. Whilst the historic humanism was set out to resolve tensions between tradition and modernity and to reconcile individual rights with newly emerging duties of citizenship, the new humanism approach goes beyond the level of the nation state in seeking to unite the process of globalization with its complex and sometimes contradictory manifestations. The new humanism therefore advocates the social inclusion of every human being at all levels of society and underlines the transformative power of education, sciences, culture and communications. Therefore, humanism today needs to be perceived as a collective effort that holds governments, civil society, the private sector and human individuals equally responsible to realize its values and to design creatively and implement a humanist approach to a sustainable society, based on economic, social and environmental development. New humanism describes the only way forward for a world that accounts for the diversity of identities and the heterogeneity of interests and which is based on inclusive, democratic, and, indeed, humanist values. Humanism did evolve into the grand movement of human spiritual and creative liberation, which enabled an unparalleled acceleration of prosperity and transformation of civilizations. In line with humanist ethics, the material growth was understood as a collective good, which was to serve all participants of a community and meant to enable the socio-economic progress of society. The exact definition of humanism has historically fluctuated in accordance with successive and diverse strands of intellectual thought. The underlying concept rests on the universal ideas of human emancipation, independence and social justice. Humanism can hence be understood as a moral inspiration for

  8. Reflections on human presence in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, J

    2001-01-01

    Humankind's exploration of Space has until now been understood as analogous to that of planet Earth: sending out crews to far-off, unknown lands in the hope of finding supplies of food, water or energy along with shelter and living-space. But Space is turning out to be much less hospitable than our earthly milieu in terms of resources as well as energy costs. It seems appropriate to ask what level of adaptation is needed for humans to travel and live in the cosmos, and to assess if the next logical step should necessarily be a programme of conquest analogous to that of the Moon--for example, towards Mars. Should we not rather be making more use of Earth's immediate neighbourhood, namely the sphere of a million of kilometres we call "Greater Earth"? In the same way, it is appropriate to ask questions about the conception of human beings which will from now on sustain the conquest of Space. The astronaut of the last forty years is the direct heir of the explorers of Ancient and Modern times; now, through the influence of science and technology, humanity has been put "into motion" not only geographically, but also in its most essential foundations: culture, psychology, philosophy. If the development of telepresence technology now gives us the ability to talk about a "Greater Human Being", it is chiefly through freedom of choice for oneself, for humanity and even for Earth. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Historical aspects of human presence in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsch, V.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: This paper presents the development of human presence in Space from its beginnings. Study hypotheses were based on historical findings on scientific, medical, cultural, and political aspects of manned Space flight due to the different attitudes of Space minded nations and organizations. Impacts of aerospace medicine on the advances of biomedical sciences will be touched upon, as well as the historical development of aviation and Space medical achievements which are described briefly and visions for future developments are given. Methods: An overview was gained by literature-study, archives research and oral history taking. Results: Aviation Medicine evolved parallel to Man's ability to fly. War-triggered advancements in aviation brought mankind to the edge of space-equivalent conditions within a few decades of the first motor-flight, which took place in the USA in 1903 [V. Harsch, Aerospace medicine in Germany: from the very beginnings, Aviation and Space Environment Medicine 71 (2000) 447-450 [1

  10. Cyclic Variations in Sustained Human Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aue, William R.; Arruda, James E.; Kass, Steven J.; Stanny, Claudia J.

    2009-01-01

    Biological rhythms play a prominent role in the modulation of human physiology and behavior. [Smith, K., Valentino, D., & Arruda, J. (2003). "Rhythmic oscillations in the performance of a sustained attention task." "Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology," 25, 561-570] suggested that sustained human performance may systematically…

  11. Sustainable intensification of agriculture for human prosperity and global sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockström, Johan; Williams, John; Daily, Gretchen; Noble, Andrew; Matthews, Nathanial; Gordon, Line; Wetterstrand, Hanna; DeClerck, Fabrice; Shah, Mihir; Steduto, Pasquale; de Fraiture, Charlotte; Hatibu, Nuhu; Unver, Olcay; Bird, Jeremy; Sibanda, Lindiwe; Smith, Jimmy

    2017-02-01

    There is an ongoing debate on what constitutes sustainable intensification of agriculture (SIA). In this paper, we propose that a paradigm for sustainable intensification can be defined and translated into an operational framework for agricultural development. We argue that this paradigm must now be defined-at all scales-in the context of rapidly rising global environmental changes in the Anthropocene, while focusing on eradicating poverty and hunger and contributing to human wellbeing. The criteria and approach we propose, for a paradigm shift towards sustainable intensification of agriculture, integrates the dual and interdependent goals of using sustainable practices to meet rising human needs while contributing to resilience and sustainability of landscapes, the biosphere, and the Earth system. Both of these, in turn, are required to sustain the future viability of agriculture. This paradigm shift aims at repositioning world agriculture from its current role as the world's single largest driver of global environmental change, to becoming a key contributor of a global transition to a sustainable world within a safe operating space on Earth.

  12. Livable human communities: A sustainability narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotner Douglas M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will explore the subject of “Livable Human Communities” as the product of “Sustainable Development”, which is rooted in the “Science of Sustainability”. Public policy to facilitate Livable Human Communities will also be examined, with recommendations proffered, which are science based, within the context of a sustainable development paradigm, which is reliant upon the “Ecological Footprint” and “A Unified Field Theory of Adapted Space”, for policy formation purposes.

  13. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VĂDUVA MARIA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The phrase "human settlements system" is a concern for researchers in various fields as geography, economics, regional planning and for those responsible for formulating and implementing spatial development policies. The research covers various aspects of human settlements and is a meeting place of many disciplines and humanities. It is natural, as human settlements, either as isolated or in territorial systems they belong, are where manifests are transformed and develop human communities and societies as a whole. Problems national system of settlements in Romania are varied and complex. The evolution and consolidation of a stable and balanced is a continuous and dynamic process that goes through a series of steps, some characterized by profound transformations that can be called critical. One such step is the present one, where the influence of the changes in the economy and social and political life, the very development of settlements, be they urban or rural, knows a turning point, a certain vulnerability when the progressive or regressive of evolution is may change at any time. Industry restructuring on the one hand and reîmproprietărirea owners, are factors that can create shock effects unchecked urban and rural areas. On the other hand the development of trade, multiplying special services, urban (banks, insurers, etc. and can foster diversity of choices population compared to a net urban areas where living conditions and financial incentives for farmers are still far to be attractive

  14. Human factors for a sustainable future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Andrew; Yeow, Paul H P

    2016-11-01

    Current human activities are seriously eroding the ability of natural and social systems to cope. Clearly we cannot continue along our current path without seriously damaging our own ability to survive as a species. This problem is usually framed as one of sustainability. As concerned professionals, citizens, and humans there is a strong collective will to address what we see as a failure to protect the natural and social environments that supports us. While acknowledging that we cannot do this alone, human factors and ergonomics needs to apply its relevant skills and knowledge to assist where it can in addressing the commonly identified problem areas. These problems include pollution, climate change, renewable energy, land transformation, and social unrest amongst numerous other emerging global problems. The issue of sustainability raises two fundamental questions for human factors and ergonomics: which system requires sustaining and what length of time is considered sustainable? In this paper we apply Wilson (2014) parent-sibling-child model to understanding what is required of an HFE sustainability response. This model is used to frame the papers that appear in this Special Issue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Human development and sustainability of energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This seminar on human development and sustainability was jointly organized by the French agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe) and Enerdata company. This document summarises the content of the different presentations and of the minutes of the discussions that took place at the end of each topic. The different themes discussed were: 1 - Political and methodological issues related to sustainability (sustainability concept in government policy, sustainability and back-casting: lessons from EST); 2 - towards a socially viable world: thematic discussions (demography and peoples' migration; time budget and life style change - equal sex access to instruction and labour - geopolitical regional and inter-regional universal cultural acceptability; welfare, poverty and social link and economics); 3 - building up an environmentally sustainable energy world, keeping resources for future generations and preventing geopolitical ruptures (CO{sub 2} emissions; nuclear issues; land-use, noise, and other industrial risks). The memorandum on sustainability issues in view of very long term energy studies is reprinted in the appendix. The transparencies of seven presentations are attached to this document. (J.S.)

  16. INTERDEPENDENCE BETWEEN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina MOCUTA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development in Romania can be achieved only through consensus orchestrated prioritizing people's attitudes and values. In order to achieve a maximum performance, cultural change must precede structural and functional changes, such an approach leading to a lasting transformation. Cultural change is not about social traditions, history, language, art, etc.., But those on the behavior, mentality, attitude towards work, economy and society. Sustainable development have to mean quality and achieve only limited natural capital, social and anthropogenic own or attracted. A drawing resources must be addressed by cost and their global rarity. Sustainable development for Romania, represents the effective management of resources in the national competitiveness and national foreign goods and services. Human health suppliers, health organizations that offer health services and those who need these services, meet on a market, called health services market, whose mechanism has features different from the other markets, not only from the point of view of the two forces, demand and supply, but also from the third party who pays. In the context of globalization, human development, defined as a process of people’s expanding possibilities to choose, cannot exist without an appropriate health. People often make choices in the economic, social and political fields, situated in the centre of development policies. From the human health perspective, attention is aimed at quality of the economic development, and not quantity, in three critical domains: expectation and quality of life, educational level and access to all the necessary economic resources in order to lead a decent life.

  17. Sustainability of Human Ecological Niche Construction

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    Forest Isbell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Humans influence and depend on natural systems worldwide, creating complex societal-ecological feedbacks that make it difficult to assess the long-term sustainability of contemporary human activities. We use ecological niche theory to consider the short-term (transient and long-term (equilibrium effects of improvements in health, agriculture, or efficiency on the abundances of humans, our plant and animal resources, and our natural enemies. We also consider special cases of our model where humans shift to a completely vegetarian diet, or completely eradicate natural enemies. We find that although combinations of health, agriculture, and efficiency improvements tend to support more people and plant resources, they also result in more natural enemies and fewer animal resources. Considering each of these improvements separately reveals that they lead to different, and sometimes opposing, long-term effects. For example, health improvements can reduce pathogen abundances and make it difficult to sustain livestock production, whereas agricultural improvements tend to counterbalance these effects. Our exploratory analysis of a deliberately simple model elucidates trade-offs and feedbacks that could arise from the cascading effects of human activities.

  18. Presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Renee Boeck

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Healthy therapeutic relationships enhance wholeness and healing; they are the key to effective health promotion. Therapeutic nursing presence demonstrates caring, empathy, and connection, qualities required to build rapport and trust between nurse and patient. This concept analysis’ purpose was to illuminate the various forms of the meanings of presence and the value placed on them. The science of nursing often precedes the art and spirituality of nursing. This is due to focusing primarily on the high acuity of the patients being seen in conjunction with shortage of personnel and resources. Patient dissatisfaction continues to be a growing concern. The nursing shortage crisis continues along with more nurses experiencing moral distress, compassion fatigue, and/or burnout. In nurses’ haste to complete their duties, are we facing the risk of overlooking one of the original gifts of the nursing profession? This would be the gift of genuine presence. This concept analysis aims to identify the attributes that are essential to the concept of presence, and to clarify its nursing usage, by following the strategy suggested by Walker and Avant. It is important to reflect on various ways of providing presence in the clinical setting. By exploring the spiritual, literary, psychological, and nursing literature, there is a diverse yet similar interconnectivity of what presence may represent. Observations and experiences of a range of sensatory and kinesthetic perceptions are revealed to ascertain the attributes discerning commonalities and themes of presence. Nursing presence is considered to be an essential state of holistic nursing as well as a core competency in contemporary nursing. Clarifying the significance of presence in nursing invites the prospect of additional evidence-based research that may place the intrinsic value of presence as a continuing theoretical foundation.

  19. Presence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runia, E.H.

    For more than thirty years now, thinking about the way we, humans, account for our past has taken place under the aegis of representationalism. In its first two decades, representationalism, inaugurated by Hayden White's Metahistory of 1973, has been remarkably successful, but by now it has lost

  20. Human Capital Development as a Strategy for Sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    This paper critically examined how human capital development could be a strategy or a catalyst for sustainable development in the Nigerian education system. The presentation by necessary implication involved an examination of the concepts of human capital development, sustainable development, quality education and ...

  1. Human Values and the Quest for Sustainable Ideology in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper draws attention to the correlation between human values and sustainable ideology. The aim here is to highlight the indispensability and centrality of human values to any meaningful search for an enduring ideology in African states. To this end, the paper argues that the quest for sustainable ideology in Africa can ...

  2. Sustainable human development: an educational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar AZNAR MÍNGUET

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable Human Development (hereafter SHD is taking shape as a proposal for progress in the face of a crisis in civilization so complex and far-reaching that it is considered quite difficult to solve. The aim of this article is to offer a reasoned justification of the evolution of the concept of development and of the need for an educational commitment to be able to make progress towards it. Although it is still polemical and the object of criticism, SHD has become consolidated as a strongly ethical proposal to lead the change in the course of development, transversally affecting its multiple dimensions and advocating interdisciplinary and intercultural cooperation and dialogue. The article analyses the challenges posed by SHD to today’s global society, as well as some ways to respond to them from the field of educational action and research. It concludes with a reasoned structuring of the contents of the monograph and an analytical description of the contents of the different contributions.

  3. Teneurin-2 presence in rat and human odontoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, C. A.; Guiati, I. Z.; Ervolino, E.; Gonçalves, A.; Beneti, I. M.; Lovejoy, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Teneurins are transmembrane proteins consisting of four paralogues (Ten-1-4), notably expressed in the central nervous system during development. All teneurins contain a bioactive peptide in their carboxyl terminal named teneurin C-terminal associated peptide (TCAP). The present study analyzed the detailed distribution of teneurin-2-like immunoreactive (Ten-2-LI) cells in developing and mature rat molar teeth, as well as in mature human dental pulps. Ten-2 and TCAP-2 genic expressions were also evaluated in rat and human dental pulps. Finally, Ten-2-LI cells were analyzed during the repair process after dentin-pulp complex injury in rat lower molar teeth. For this, histological sections of rat molar teeth and human dental pulps were submitted to immunohistochemical techniques, while total RNA from developing rat teeth and mature human dental pulps were submitted to conventional RT-PCR. Ten-2-LI cells were evident in the initial bell stage of rat molar teeth development, especially in ectomesenchymal cells of the dental papilla. Ten-2-LI odontoblasts showed strong immunoreactivity in rat and human mature teeth. Ten-2 and TCAP-2 genic expressions were confirmed in rat and human dental pulps. Dentin-pulp complex injury resulted in a decrease of Ten-2-LI odontoblasts after traumatic injury. Interestingly, Ten-2-LI cells were also evident in the pulp cell-rich zone in all postoperative days. In conclusion, Ten-2-LI presence in rat and human odontoblasts was demonstrated for the first time and Ten-2/TCAP-2 genic expressions were confirmed in rat and human dental pulps. Furthermore, it was revealed that Ten-2-LI rat odontoblasts can be modulated during the regenerative process. PMID:28926618

  4. Towards human and social sustainability indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilderink HBM; LOK

    2004-01-01

    Ever since the Brundtland Commission presented its report on sustainable development in 1987, various institutions have either adopted or tried to refine the approach used in the report. Currently, there is a broad collection of concepts that are often highly related to sustainable development.

  5. Human-environment sustainable development of rural areas in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhu, Hongbing; Hu, Shanfeng

    2017-05-01

    Human-environment sustainable development has become the important issue of rural transformation development in China. This paper analyses the development status of rural sustainability in China, and also presents the challenges facing the sustainability from the economic, social and environmental levels, including land and energy efficiency, solid waste, water and other types of environmental pollution. At last, the paper proposes the measures to establish the sustainable and liveable rural areas in China, like raising rural community awareness of sustainable development thinking; improving resource efficiency and new energy; and creating rural green industries and green products.

  6. Astrobiological aspects of Mars and human presence: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G

    2008-08-01

    After the realization of the International Space Station, human exploratory missions to Moon or Mars, i.e. beyond low Earth orbit, are widely considered as the next logical step of peaceful cooperation in space on a global scale. Besides the human desire to extend the window of habitability, human exploratory missions are driven by several aspects of science, technology, culture and economy. Mars is currently considered as a major target in the search for life beyond the Earth. Understanding the history of water on Mars appears to be one of the clues to the puzzle on the probability of life on Mars. On Earth microorganisms have flourished for more than 3.5 Ga and have developed strategies to cope with so-called extreme conditions (e.g., hot vents, permafrost, subsurface regions, rocks or salt crystals). Therefore, in search for life on Mars, microorganisms are the most likely candidates for a putative biota on Mars and the search for morphological or chemical signatures of life or its relics is one of the primary and most exciting goals of Mars exploration. The presence of humans on the surface of Mars will substantially increase this research potential, e.g., by supporting deep subsurface drilling and by allowing intellectual collection and sophisticated in situ analysis of samples of astrobiological interest. On the other hand, such long-duration missions beyond LEO will add a new dimension to human space flight, concerning the distance of travel, the radiation environment, the gravity levels, the duration of the mission, and the level of confinement and isolation the crew will be exposed to. This will raise the significance of several health issues, above all radiation protection, gravity related effects as well as psychological issues. Furthermore, the import of internal and external microorganisms inevitably accompanying any human mission to Mars, or brought purposely to Mars as part of a bioregenerative life support system needs careful consideration with

  7. Factors Influencing the Presence of Sustainability Initiatives in the Strategic Planning of Spanish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrán Jorge, Manuel; Herrera Madueño, Jesús; Javier Andrades Peña, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability issues in higher educational institutions have attracted increasing levels of attention from both the public and policy-makers in recent decades. Many studies have called for a more integration of sustainability into mainstream university operations and curricula. Nevertheless, the interest in sustainability issues has been more…

  8. [Fusarium graminearum presence in wheat samples for human consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Mauro; Castañares, Eliana; Dinolfo, María I; Pacheco, Walter G; Moreno, María V; Stenglein, Sebastián A

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important diseases in cereal crops is Fusarium head blight, being Fusarium graminearum the main etiological agent. This fungus has the ability to produce a wide spectrum and quantity of toxins, especially deoxynivalenol (DON). During the last crop season (2012-2013) the climatic conditions favored Fusarium colonization. The objective of this work was to determine the presence of this fungus as well as the DON content in 50 wheat grain samples. Our results showed that 80% of the samples were contaminated with Fusarium graminearum. Twenty four percent (24%) of the samples contained ≥ 1μg/g DON, 26% ranged from 0,5 and 0,99μg/g, and the remaining 50% had values lower than 0,5μg/g. Correlation was found between the presence of Fusarium graminearum and DON. It is necessary to establish DON limit values in wheat grains for human consumption. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Diversity and inclusion as indicators of sustainable human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions and recommendations for Hotel X and other companies in the hospitality industry include: implementing a sustainable HRM strategy including D&I policies, and setting up a monitoring mechanism ... Keywords: case study, innovation, metrics, monitoring mechanisms, sustainable human resources management ...

  10. The human right to sustainable development in solidarity with Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya Teresa Parrilla Díaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the issue of human development as a universal right subjected to the welfare of Nature. Nature is presented as supporter of life and supplier of the essential resources needed to achieve a complete human development. In light of the global ecological crisis, the author proposes sustainable development as the central framework for a new human development that can be fairer to Nature and to mankind. The challenge of sustainable human development consists in viewing Nature from an ethical perspective of human rights and solidarity.

  11. Altered Human Memory Modification in the Presence of Normal Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censor, Nitzan; Buch, Ethan R; Nader, Karim; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2016-09-01

    Following initial learning, the memory is stabilized by consolidation mechanisms, and subsequent modification of memory strength occurs via reconsolidation. Yet, it is not clear whether consolidation and memory modification are the same or different systems-level processes. Here, we report disrupted memory modification in the presence of normal consolidation of human motor memories, which relate to differences in lesioned brain structure after stroke. Furthermore, this behavioral dissociation was associated with macrostructural network architecture revealed by a graph-theoretical approach, and with white-matter microstructural integrity measured by diffusion-weighted MRI. Altered macrostructural network architecture and microstructural integrity of white-matter underlying critical nodes of the related network predicted disrupted memory modification. To the best of our knowledge, this provides the first evidence of mechanistic differences between consolidation, and subsequent memory modification through reconsolidation, in human procedural learning. These findings enable better understanding of these memory processes, which may guide interventional strategies to enhance brain function and resulting behavior. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Human resource management for sustainable microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microfinancing in Nigeria has developed from the traditional informal groups through direct government intervention to domination by private sector owned and managed institutions. Despite its long history, the sector has not witnessed the existence of sustainable institutions. This prompted the Obasanjo regime to adopt a ...

  13. Human resource management in the construction industry – Sustainability competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renard Yung Jhien Siew

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available While environmental sustainability has been the subject of much debate in the last decade, it was not until recently that attention started to shift towards human resource management as an enabler for sustainability.  Yet, this is still a relatively under researched area.  Much is still unknown about the role of an individual worker in contributing towards sustainable development.  This paper addresses the gap by proposing a framework to measure sustainability competencies of employees within the construction industry sector.  As part of the framework, four proficiency levels together with relevant descriptions are defined for a total of eight sustainability competencies.  Suggested proficiency levels are then mapped to main construction related jobs based on the framework.  An example is also given to illustrate the manner in which competencies should be assessed.  This framework is original and of practical use to construction managers and human resource practitioners.

  14. Relevant Education for Sustainable Human Development in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In human development, conscious efforts are made to enlarge people's choices to enable them live a healthy and prolonged life, acquire knowledge, and have access to resources needed to earn a decent living. Obviously, sustained improvement in African human development still falls short of those experienced in other ...

  15. Education for Sustainability: The Need for a New Human Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Anthony

    Disturbing global trends show that human activity continues to threaten our ability to meet current human needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Sustainability will become more inaccessible without a dramatic change in our current mindset and behavior. As the primary centers of teaching, research, and…

  16. human resource management for sustainable microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ada

    2005) to explain in simple terms the human resource ... institutions themselves and ineffective supervision and control of operators by the regulatory authorities. It is therefore ... aspect of the problems of microfinancing in. Nigeria. Specifically, the ...

  17. Training together: how another human's presence affects behavior during virtual human-based team training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Robb

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite research showing that team training can lead to strong improvements in team performance, logistical difficulties can prevent team training programs from being adopted on a large scale. A proposed solution to these difficulties is the use of virtual humans to replace missing teammates. Existing research evaluating the use of virtual humans for team training has been conducted in settings involving a single human trainee. However, in the real world multiple human trainees would most likely train together. In this paper, we explore how the presence of a second human trainee can alter behavior during a medical team training program. Ninety-two nurses and surgical technicians participated in a medical training exercise, where they worked with a virtual surgeon and virtual anesthesiologist to prepare a simulated patient for surgery. The agency of the nurse and the surgical technician were varied between three conditions: human nurses and surgical technicians working together; human nurses working with a virtual surgical technician; and human surgical technicians working with a virtual nurse. Variations in agency did not produce statistically significant differences in the training outcomes, but several notable differences were observed in other aspects of the team's behavior. Specifically, when working with a virtual nurse, human surgical technicians were more likely to assist with speaking up about patient safety issues that were outside of their normal responsibilities; human trainees spent less time searching for a missing item when working with a virtual partner, likely because the virtual partner was physically unable to move throughout the room and assist with the searching process; and more breaks in presence were observed when two human teammates were present. These results show that some behaviors may be influenced by the presence of multiple human trainees, though these behaviors may not impinge on core training goals. When

  18. Neglecting legumes has compromised human health and sustainable food production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Lam, Hon-Ming; Nguyen, Henry T; Siddique, Kadambot H M; Varshney, Rajeev K; Colmer, Timothy D; Cowling, Wallace; Bramley, Helen; Mori, Trevor A; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Cooper, James W; Miller, Anthony J; Kunert, Karl; Vorster, Juan; Cullis, Christopher; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Liang, Yan; Shou, Huixia; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan; Fodor, Nandor; Kaiser, Brent N; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Valliyodan, Babu; Considine, Michael J

    2016-08-02

    The United Nations declared 2016 as the International Year of Pulses (grain legumes) under the banner 'nutritious seeds for a sustainable future'. A second green revolution is required to ensure food and nutritional security in the face of global climate change. Grain legumes provide an unparalleled solution to this problem because of their inherent capacity for symbiotic atmospheric nitrogen fixation, which provides economically sustainable advantages for farming. In addition, a legume-rich diet has health benefits for humans and livestock alike. However, grain legumes form only a minor part of most current human diets, and legume crops are greatly under-used. Food security and soil fertility could be significantly improved by greater grain legume usage and increased improvement of a range of grain legumes. The current lack of coordinated focus on grain legumes has compromised human health, nutritional security and sustainable food production.

  19. Kenya's Experience Towards Sustainable Human Settlements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allthese have acted in concert to manifest dynamism in the human settlement development. ... impérieux que des actions bien articulées et proactivesen matière de planification soient officiellement décrétées pour faciliter leur validité postérieure et leur harmonieenvironnementale au sein des agglomérations humaines.

  20. Human rights and sustainable spatial development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallemaerts, M.

    2009-01-01

    What is the relationship between spatial planning and human rights? Though this question may seem highly theoretical at first glance, closer analysis will reveal that there are in fact a number of ways in which public policies in the area of territorial planning and development and the imperative of

  1. Human resource management for sustainable microfinance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper analyzes some of the provisions of the Microfinance Policy, Regulatory and Supervisory Framework for Nigeria (2005) to explain in simple terms the human resource implications of some of the roles stipulated for key stakeholders of the microfinance institutions. The paper discovers that some of the factors that ...

  2. Housing / Human Settlements Atlas series: continued support towards more sustainable human settlements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goss, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available of current policy as it relates to the establishment of sustainable human settlements and specifically settlement locality. The objective of the Housing / Human Settlements Atlas series is to guide housing / settlement investment decisions by various...

  3. A sustainable future for humanity? How can psychology help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskamp, S

    2000-05-01

    The sustainability of human life on Earth in the future is in danger. Human actions are producing many harmful and possibly irreversible changes to the environmental conditions that support life on Earth. This article summarizes major threats to Earth's environment, including global warming, ozone layer destruction, exhaustion of fisheries and agricultural land, and widespread exposure to toxic chemicals. Unless they are overcome, these changes will make human life increasingly miserable and eventually may make Earth nearly uninhabitable for future generations. These threats are caused by patterns of human behavior, particularly over-population and over-consumption. Urgent changes to human lifestyles and cultural practices are required for the world to escape ecological disaster, and psychologists should lead the way in helping people adopt sustainable patterns of living. Specific steps toward that goal are proposed in this and the following four articles.

  4. Human Value, Dignity, and the Presence of Others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jill Graper

    2015-09-01

    In the health care professions, the meaning of--and implications for--'dignity' and 'value' are progressively more important, as scholars and practitioners increasingly have to make value judgments when making care decisions. This paper looks at the various arguments for competing sources of human value that medical professionals can consider--human rights, autonomy, and a higher-order moral value--and settles upon a foundational model that is related to (though distinct from) the Kantian model that is popular within the medical community: human value is foundational; human dignity, autonomy, and rights derive from the relational quality of human dignity. Moral dignity is expressed though the relationships we cultivate, the communal ends we pursue, and the rights we enjoy. Correlatively, human dignity is inseparable from its ground (i.e., morality), and the relationship between these two is best represented for Kant in the humanities formulation. The foundational model of dignity ensures that human value is non-circularly derived, but is ultimately tied to expressions of individual human dignity that comes from the dignity of morality. Linking Kant's dignity of humanity to the dignity of morality affords a unique and efficacious response to the discussion of human value. In one sense, dignity is amplificatory, since its worth is inextricable with that of autonomy and the rights afforded to the autonomous. But that isn't to say that the worth of dignity is merely amplificatory. Rather, human dignity indicates the absolute inner value (MM 6:435) found in each individual in virtue of being human (MM 6:435, 462). That inner worth engenders certain universal rights--derivable from the dignity and fundamental rational appeal of morality--just as it provides for the possibility for a community of beings to seek to live the moral life.

  5. Understanding Human Biparental Care: Does Partner Presence Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Nora; Dubas, Judith Semon; Karreman, Annemiek; van Tuijl, Cathy; Dekovic, Maja; van Aken, Marcel A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Most research on parenting has focused on dyadic parent-child interactions to the neglect of triadic interactions between mother, father and child. Drawing from an evolutionary perspective, the present study examined how parental warmth and investment change as a function of the other parent's presence. Our sample consisted of 87 two-parent Dutch…

  6. Diversity and inclusion as indicators of sustainable human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study the themes of diversity and inclusion as elements in sustainable human resource management are explored in the context of the international hospitality industry. A theoretical background is provided to diversity and inclusion, and the themes are brought to life by an international hotel company case study.

  7. Diversity and inclusion as indicators of sustainable human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [CC BY 4.0] (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0). Introduction. In this study the themes of diversity and inclusion as elements in sustainable human resource management are explored in the context of the international hospitality industry. A theoretical background is provided to diversity and inclusion, and the themes ...

  8. Human Influence and Threat to Biodiversity and Sustainable Living

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrative Vice Dean Office

    organisms from all sources, including interalias, terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes of which they are part”. The values, deriving forces and human influences, as well as the measures for conservation and sustainable use of the biodiversity vary greatly with in and between different ...

  9. 123 Relevant Education for Sustainable Human Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nollywood's Advocacy of Relevant Education for Sustainable. Human Development in Nigeria: Reading Selected Films. The Illiterate Series. The captivating movie ..... Books, 2002. 3 – 26. Print. Onyemerekeya, C.C. “Meaning and Objectives of Education.” Teacher Education in Nigeria. Owerri: Department of. Curriculum ...

  10. Peace, Human Security and Sustainable Development in Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Peace, Human Security and Sustainable Development in Africa. Partnership Africa Canada (PAC) undertakes research and policy dialogue on priority issues affecting Africa, in collaboration with partner organizations in Africa and internationally. PAC has actively participated in the Kimberly Process to establish a global ...

  11. Factors Sustaining Human Trafficking In The Contemporary Society ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors sustaining human trafficking in the contemporary society were investigated. One hundred and forty participants were used in generating the items that formed the questionnaire. While four hundred participants were used for the main study, seven leading factors were endorsed by majority of the participants as ...

  12. Sustainability Commitment, New Competitors’ Presence, and Hotel Performance: The Hotel Industry in Barcelona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pedro Aznar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The hospitality industry is facing major challenges, among them the new competition from novel forms of supply in the sharing economy. Airbnb, Homeaway, and Niumba, among other websites offering accommodations, are having an important impact in the sector, changing existing conditions and the market for the traditional hospitality industry. In this context, a strategy based in differentiation can help to prevent drops in revenues and profitability. The main objective of this paper is analyse if commitment towards sustainability has a positive impact on financial performance and can be considered a positive strategy in this new environment. The empirical data refer to a sample of hotels in Barcelona, one of the most important tourist cities in Europe. Our results suggest that there is no clear relationship between sustainability and better financial performance; however, sustainability commitment is associated with a minimum size, which can also have positive effects in terms of economies of scale and finally affect profitability. Hotels more committed to environmental issues are located in areas with a lower density of Airbnb apartments, and this geographical distribution can be more positive than a situation of massive tourist concentration in specific areas with negative externalities for neighbours.

  13. Understanding the human dimensions of a sustainable energy transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steg, Linda; Perlaviciute, Goda; van der Werff, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change threatens the health, economic prospects, and basic food and water sources of people. A wide range of changes in household energy behavior is needed to realize a sustainable energy transition. We propose a general framework to understand and encourage sustainable energy behaviors, comprising four key issues. First, we need to identify which behaviors need to be changed. A sustainable energy transition involves changes in a wide range of energy behaviors, including the adoption of sustainable energy sources and energy-efficient technology, investments in energy efficiency measures in buildings, and changes in direct and indirect energy use behavior. Second, we need to understand which factors underlie these different types of sustainable energy behaviors. We discuss three main factors that influence sustainable energy behaviors: knowledge, motivations, and contextual factors. Third, we need to test the effects of interventions aimed to promote sustainable energy behaviors. Interventions can be aimed at changing the actual costs and benefits of behavior, or at changing people’s perceptions and evaluations of different costs and benefits of behavioral options. Fourth, it is important to understand which factors affect the acceptability of energy policies and energy systems changes. We discuss important findings from psychological studies on these four topics, and propose a research agenda to further explore these topics. We emphasize the need of an integrated approach in studying the human dimensions of a sustainable energy transition that increases our understanding of which general factors affect a wide range of energy behaviors as well as the acceptability of different energy policies and energy system changes. PMID:26136705

  14. With eloquence and humanity? Human factors/ergonomics in sustainable human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dave; Barnard, Tim

    2012-12-01

    This article is based on a keynote presentation given at the 18th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association in Recife, Brazil, February 2012. It considers new, and not so new, approaches and practical roles for the emerging field of human factors/ergonomics (HFE) in sustainable development (SD).The material for this article was largely drawn from the literature in the fields of human development, sustainability, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and social/environmental impact assessment. Identifying the role of HFE in SD is not a simple one and from the outset is complicated by the widely differing ideas in the sustainability literature about what exactly it is we are hoping to sustain. Is it individual companies, business models, cultures, or the carrying capacity of our planet? Or combinations of these? For the purposes of this article, certain assumptions are made, and various emerging opportunities and responsibilities associated with our changing world of work are introduced. First, there are new versions of traditional tasks for us, such as working with the people and companies in the renewable energy sectors. Beyond this, however, it is suggested that there are emerging roles for HFE professionals in transdisciplinary work where we might play our part, for example, in tackling the twinned issues of climate change and human development in areas of significant poverty. In particular we have the tools and capabilities to help define and measure what groups have reason to value, and wish to sustain. It is suggested, that to do this effectively, however, will require a philosophical shift, or perhaps just a philosophical restatement at a collective level, regarding who and what we ultimately serve.

  15. From The Human-Environment Theme Towards Sustainability – Danish Geography and Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2013-01-01

    Research on geography in relation to education for sustainable development (ESD), has only recently climbed the research agenda. The geopolitics of intended learning outcomes in the ESD debate, carries policy that produce dilemmas and challenges confronted with disciplinary traditions. In this ar......Research on geography in relation to education for sustainable development (ESD), has only recently climbed the research agenda. The geopolitics of intended learning outcomes in the ESD debate, carries policy that produce dilemmas and challenges confronted with disciplinary traditions...... and climate change and how geographers articulate their role and function as knowledge on human-environment interactions changes. The analysis of the geographical education reveal that geographers’ find their discipline contribute considerably to ESD, and thus the human environment theme seems...

  16. Medical considerations for extending human presence in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, C. S.; Dietlein, L. F.; Pool, S. L.; Nicogossian, A. E.

    The prospects for extending the length of time that humans can safely remain in space depend partly on resolution of a number of medical issues. Physiologic effects of weightlessness that may affect health during flight include loss of body fluid, functional alterations in the cardiovascular system, loss of red blood cells and bone mineral, compromised immune system function, and neurosensory disturbances. Some of the physiologic adaptations to weightlessness contribute to difficulties with readaptation to Earth's gravity. These include cardiovascular deconditioning and loss of body fluids and electrolytes; red blood cell mass; muscle mass, strength, and endurance; and bone mineral. Potentially harmful factors in space flight that are not related to weightlessness include radiation, altered circadian rhythms and rest/work cycles, and the closed, isolated environment of the spacecraft. There is no evidence that space flight has long-term effects on humans, except that bone mass lost during flight may not be replaced, and radiation damage is cumulative. However, the number of people who have spent several months or longer in space is still small. Only carefully-planned experiments in space preceded by thorough ground-based studies can provide the information needed to increase the amount of time humans can safely spend in space.

  17. Can biodiversity, human wellbeing and sustainable development indicators be linked?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Mainka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A mission to reduce the rate of loss of biodiversity as a contribution to poverty reduction was agreed as part of the Strategic Plan for the Convention on Biological Diversity, adopted by the Conference of the Parties in 2002. As 2010 draws to a close it is clear that this target will not be met. To continue and build on momentum generated by the 2010 target, the conservation community has been discussing a potential post-2010 framework that again includes explicit reference to the link between human wellbeing and conservation, and also considers the links with human wellbeing and sustainable development. Given this agreement, we reviewed several human wellbeing and sustainable development indicators compared to existing biodiversity status and trends indicators to determine if clear correlations can be found that could be used to track progress in a new framework. We undertook this review at both the global and continental levels. The indicators for protected area and forest cover showed significant positive correlation across all continents. We found a significant negative correlation between changes in protected area (PA cover and tonnage of greenhouse gas emissions released (GHGe between 1990 and 2005 for all the continents. At the global level we found no other correlation across the indicators reviewed. However, we found that correlations between the biodiversity and human wellbeing and sustainable development indicators varied across continents. As the only indicators for which global level correlations exist, we suggest that either protected area coverage or forest cover may be relevant biodiversity indicators for global analyses of biodiversity-human wellbeing or sustainable development relationships, and that the relationship between protected area cover and greenhouse gases could be one indicator for links between biodiversity and sustainable development. More research is needed to better understand factors involved in the

  18. Sustained disruption of narwhal habitat use and behavior in the presence of Arctic killer whales

    OpenAIRE

    Breed, Greg A.; Matthews, Cory J. D.; Marcoux, Marianne; Higdon, Jeff W.; LeBlanc, Bernard; Petersen, Stephen D.; Orr, Jack; Reinhart, Natalie R.; Ferguson, Steven H.

    2017-01-01

    Predators are widely understood to impact the structure and stability of ecosystems. In the Arctic, summer sea ice is rapidly declining, degrading habitat for Arctic species, such as polar bears and ringed seals, but also providing more access to important predators, such as killer whales. Using data from concurrently tracked predator (killer whales) and prey (narwhal), we show that the presence of killer whales significantly changes the behavior and distribution of narwhal. Because killer wh...

  19. Sense of presence and anxiety during virtual social interactions between a human and virtual humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nexhmedin Morina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET has been shown to be effective in treatment of anxiety disorders. Yet, there is lack of research on the extent to which interaction between the individual and virtual humans can be successfully implanted to increase levels of anxiety for therapeutic purposes. This proof-of-concept pilot study aimed at examining levels of the sense of presence and anxiety during exposure to virtual environments involving social interaction with virtual humans and using different virtual reality displays. A non-clinical sample of 38 participants was randomly assigned to either a head-mounted display (HMD with motion tracker and sterescopic view condition or a one-screen projection-based virtual reality display condition. Participants in both conditions engaged in free speech dialogues with virtual humans controlled by research assistants. It was hypothesized that exposure to virtual social interactions will elicit moderate levels of sense of presence and anxiety in both groups. Further it was expected that participants in the HMD condition will report higher scores of sense of presence and anxiety than participants in the one-screen projection-based display condition. Results revealed that in both conditions virtual social interactions were associated with moderate levels of sense of presence and anxiety. Additionally, participants in the HMD condition reported significantly higher levels of presence than those in the one-screen projection-based display condition (p = .001. However, contrary to the expectations neither the average level of anxiety nor the highest level of anxiety during exposure to social virtual environments differed between the groups (p = .97 and p = .75, respectively. The findings suggest that virtual social interactions can be successfully applied in VRET to enhance sense of presence and anxiety. Furthermore, our results indicate that one-screen projection-based displays can successfully activate levels

  20. Review. Ochratoxin A: presence in human plasma and intake estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel, M B; Sanchis, V; Ramos, A J; Marin, S

    2010-02-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a fungal toxic secondary metabolite that can be found in several foodstuffs and thereby ingested by humans. One way to assess exposure of humans to OTA is the determination of the levels of this mycotoxin in blood plasma from a certain population. Such studies have been done in many countries, both in healthy people and nephropathy patients. Relationships with individual characteristics were investigated in several cases. Thus, most studies found no correlation with age, either with gender. However, the few studies that found correlation between OTA plasma levels and gender showed that men presented the highest values. When sampling was done over more than one season, the highest OTA plasma levels were found mostly in summer. Differences within regions of a country were related to dietary habits of each area. OTA levels of group populations showed variations from year to year, whereas intraindividual repetitions showed no specific trend. Daily intake of the toxin can be estimated from OTA plasma concentrations by the Klaassen equation. OTA toxicokinetics are considered in this review. Calculated daily intake of OTA by different studies did not overpass the proposed tolerable daily intakes of OTA.

  1. Potential presence of trihalomethanes in water intended for human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lasagna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s it is well known that, though water for human consumption must generally be disinfected before being distributed along the network, the use of chemicals results in the formation of many different Disinfeection By-Products (DBPs. In the case of chlorine-based disinfectants, trihalomethanes (THMs are the most widely studied: the present work first compares some national and international regulations on this subject, then, in the experimental part, compares the results of a test carried out by disinfecting water of different origin collected in three different Italian regions with different amounts of chlorine. Samples were stored at ambient temperature for seven days, then the determination of THMs was carrried out by Purge and Trap extraction coupled with gas cromatography with Electron Capture Detection (ECD. The result obtained are finally compared and discussed.

  2. Human Sustainable Development in the Context of Europa 2020 Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina-Mihaela Ion

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human development is a constant concern at European level. Thus, various programs have been proposed with the main objective of developing skills of citizens and informing them about training courses as part of lifelong learning and of employment in the labour market. The article highlights the evolution of European Union through the investments in human capital. The objective of this paper is represented by the analysis of the impact of sustainable human development through trans-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary education in the context of the European Union strategy proposed for the following period up to 2020. Europe 2020 represents a strategic plan for European Union development until 2020, having as main objective raising the standard of living and the quality of life for European citizens. Europe 2020 strategy promotes a new vision for the economy of European Union. For the following period until 2020 there is a major concern for creating favourable conditions for development of a sustainable intelligent economy that promotes inclusion. Some of the main activities with a major impact on creating such conditions are investments in education, research and innovation. The article analyses the current and recent past years’ situation in terms of sustainable development from educational and economic perspectives at European Union level. The analysis was done based on Eurostat data, using specific statistical methods.

  3. Sustained Manned Mars Presence Enabled by E-sail Technology and Asteroid Water Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janhunen, Pekka; Merikallio, Sini; Toivanen, Petri; Envall, M. Jouni

    The Electric Solar Wind Sail (E-sail) can produce 0.5-1 N of inexhaustible and controllable propellantless thrust [1]. The E-sail is based on electrostatic Coulomb interaction between charged thin tethers and solar wind ions. It was invented in 2006, was developed to TRL 4-5 in 2011-2013 with ESAIL FP7 project (http://www.electric-sailing.fi/fp7) and a CubeSat small-scale flight test is in course (ESTCube-1). The E-sail provides a flexible and efficient way of moving 0-2 tonne sized cargo payloads in the solar system without consuming propellant. Given the E-sail, one could use it to make manned exploration of the solar system more affordable by combining it with asteroid water mining. One first sends a miner spacecraft to an asteroid or asteroids, either by E-sail or traditional means. Many asteroids are known to contain water and liberating it only requires heating the material one piece at a time in a leak tight container. About 2 tonne miner can produce 50 tonnes of water per year which is sufficient to sustain continuous manned traffic between Earth and Mars. If the ice-bearing asteroid resides roughly at Mars distance, it takes 3 years for a 0.7 N E-sailer to transport a 10 tonne water/ice payload to Mars orbit or Earth C3 orbit. Thus one needs a fleet of 15 E-sail transport spacecraft plus replacements to ferry 50 tonnes of water yearly to Earth C3 (1/3) and Mars orbit (2/3). The mass of one transporter is 300 kg [2]. One needs to launch max 1.5 tonne mass of new E-sail transporters per year and in practice much less since it is simple to reuse them. This infrastructure is enough to supply 17 tonnes of water yearly at Earth C3 and 33 tonnes in Mars orbit. Orbital water can be used by manned exploration in three ways: (1) for potable water and for making oxygen, (2) for radiation shielding, (3) for LH2/LOX propellant. Up to 75 % of the wet mass of the manned module could be water (50 % propellant and 25 % radiation shield water). On top of this the total mass

  4. Exploring the challenges of habitation design for extended human presence beyond low-earth orbit: Are new requirements and processes needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, D.K.R.; Sterenborg, Glenn; Häuplik, Sandra; Aguzzi, Manuela

    2008-01-01

    With the renewed interest in a sustained human presence beyond low-earth orbit, habitation in space, on planets and on moons is an area that requires re-evaluation in terms of mission and habitat design—there is a need for a paradigmatic move from a design focus on short-term LEO missions to that of

  5. The human component of sustainability: a study for assessing "human performances" of energy efficient construction blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaianese, Erminia; Duca, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an applied research aimed at understanding the relevance and the applicability of human related criteria in sustainability assessment of construction materials. Under a theoretical perspective, human factors consideration is strongly encouraged by building sustainability assessment methods, but the practice demonstrates that current models for building sustainability assessment neglect ergonomic issues, especially those ones concerning the construction phase. The study starts from the observation that new construction techniques for high energy efficient external walls are characterized by elements generally heavier and bigger than traditional materials. In this case, high sustainability performances connected with energy saving could be reached only consuming high, and then not very much sustainable, human efforts during setting-up operations. The paper illustrates a practical approach for encompassing human factors in sustainability assessment of four block types for energy efficient external walls. Research steps, from block selections to bricklaying task analysis, human factors indicators and metrics formulation, data gathering and final assessment are going to be presented. Finally, open issues and further possible generalizations from the particular case study will be discussed.

  6. Sustained disruption of narwhal habitat use and behavior in the presence of Arctic killer whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Greg A; Matthews, Cory J D; Marcoux, Marianne; Higdon, Jeff W; LeBlanc, Bernard; Petersen, Stephen D; Orr, Jack; Reinhart, Natalie R; Ferguson, Steven H

    2017-03-07

    Although predators influence behavior of prey, analyses of electronic tracking data in marine environments rarely consider how predators affect the behavior of tracked animals. We collected an unprecedented dataset by synchronously tracking predator (killer whales, [Formula: see text] = 1; representing a family group) and prey (narwhal, [Formula: see text] = 7) via satellite telemetry in Admiralty Inlet, a large fjord in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. Analyzing the movement data with a switching-state space model and a series of mixed effects models, we show that the presence of killer whales strongly alters the behavior and distribution of narwhal. When killer whales were present (within about 100 km), narwhal moved closer to shore, where they were presumably less vulnerable. Under predation threat, narwhal movement patterns were more likely to be transiting, whereas in the absence of threat, more likely resident. Effects extended beyond discrete predatory events and persisted steadily for 10 d, the duration that killer whales remained in Admiralty Inlet. Our findings have two key consequences. First, given current reductions in sea ice and increases in Arctic killer whale sightings, killer whales have the potential to reshape Arctic marine mammal distributions and behavior. Second and of more general importance, predators have the potential to strongly affect movement behavior of tracked marine animals. Understanding predator effects may be as or more important than relating movement behavior to resource distribution or bottom-up drivers traditionally included in analyses of marine animal tracking data.

  7. Nanomaterials Nexus in Environmental, Human Health, and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseashta, A.

    Three interconnected and underpinning aspects of nanotechnology viz.: environment, human health, and sustainability are discussed. Sustainable development using nanomaterials by employing responsible manufacturing, principles of “green chemistry” by drastically reducing waste discharge and emission by-products; generation and storage of energy; development of lightweight yet mechanically strong components; development of bio-degradable goods — for medicine, waste disposal, containers, etc. and to monitor, detect, and remediate the environmental pollution are discussed. A brief discussion of fate and transport of nanomaterials in air, water, and soil; life-cycle analysis, and methodologies to conduct risk-assessment in the context of source reduction and conservation is introduced. It is expected that such emerging and potentially transformative studies will make a major contribution to improving the quality of the life of citizens worldwide, in particular in sectors such as environment and health care.

  8. The centricity of presence in scenario-based high fidelity human patient simulation: a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnington, Renee M

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing immersive presence has been shown to have influence on learning outcomes in virtual types of simulation. Scenario-based human patient simulation, a mixed reality form, may pose unique challenges for inducing the centricity of presence among participants in simulation. A model for enhancing the centricity of presence in scenario-based human patient simulation is presented here. The model represents a theoretical linkage among the interaction of pedagogical, individual, and group factors that influence the centricity of presence among participants in simulation. Presence may have an important influence on the learning experiences and learning outcomes in scenario-based high fidelity human patient simulation. This report is a follow-up to an article published in 2014 by the author where connections were made to the theoretical basis of presence as articulated by nurse scholars. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Social education, human rights and sustainability in community development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio CARIDE GÓMEZ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article places its contributions in a reflection of a pedagogical and social nature about the links that are established between social education, human rights and sustainability in community development. In this regard, in a historical and prospective key, it places emphasis on the need to promote educational actions that, being consistent with the principles of equity and justice, make it possible to build a more democratic, inclusive and cohesive local-global society.A future expectation that must be confined to educational theories and practices where local communities assume the role they play in their own development processes, with an alternative vision to the ways of educating people and themselves on a daily basis, respectful of human and ecological rights. A line of action that coincides with the commitments made at the Global Action Programme on Education for Sustainable Development, adopted by UNESCO, and Resolution A/70/1 adopted by the General Assembly in 2015, Transform our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, guaranteeing lifelong learning for all.In this objective beats a decisive, although not explicit, of a pedagogical-social vocation: to train citizens that, individually and collectively being aware of their role in socio-environmental changes, assume the responsibilities inherent to the values that sustain life in all its diversity. Social education and community development that, by projecting initiatives in different times and social spaces, allows formative opportunities to be expanded beyond the school system and its curricular practices. The Environmental Education and the Local Agenda 21 continue being two references main for the reflection-action educational and community.

  10. Sustainable oceans in a 'civilized' world requires a sustainable human civilization. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, K.; Ricke, K.; Maclaren, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    The sustainability of the ocean ecosystems is, in many areas, threatened by local and regional activities, including the discharge of pollutants, loss of wetlands, and overfishing. However, some threats to ocean ecosystems, notably ocean acidification and climate change, are a consequence decisions that cannot be substantively addressed only through action that is proximal to the affected ecosystem. The only practical way to reduce risks to the ocean posed by ocean acidification and climate change is to transform our energy system into one that does not use the atmosphere and the ocean as waste dumps for unwanted byproducts of modern civilization. The required revolution in our systems of energy production and consumption is a key component of the transition to a sustainable human civilization. It would be much easier to maintain a sustainable ocean if doing so did not require creating a sustainable human civilization; but unfortunately the ocean does not get to choose the problems it faces. Damage to the ocean is additive, or perhaps multiplicative. Thus, the response of an ecosystem exposed to coastal pollutants, loss of wetlands, overfishing, ocean acidification, and climate change will likely be more dramatic than the response of an ecosystem exposed to ocean acidification and climate change alone. Thus, there is merit in reducing coastal pollution, preserving and restoring wetlands, and reducing excess fishing, even if the ocean acidification and climate problems are not solved. Furthermore, damage from ocean acidification and climate change is not a yes or no question. Each CO2 emission causes a little more acidification and a little more climate change and thus a little more damage to existing ocean ecosystems. Hence, each CO2 emission that can be avoided helps avoid a little bit of damage to ocean ecosystems the world over. While the overall problem of sustainability of the ocean is very difficult to solve, there is no shortage of things to do that would be

  11. Do we need sustainability as a new approach in human factors and ergonomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Klaus J; Fischer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The International Ergonomics Association Technical Committee 'Human Factors and Sustainable Development' was established to contribute to a broad discourse about opportunities and risks resulting from current societal 'mega-trends' and their impacts on the interactions among humans and other elements of a system, e.g. in work systems. This paper focuses on the underlying key issues: how do the sustainability paradigm and human factors/ergonomics interplay and interact, and is sustainability necessary as a new approach for our discipline? Based on a discussion of the sustainability concept, some general principles for designing new and enhancing existent approaches of human factors and ergonomics regarding their orientation towards sustainability are proposed. The increasing profile of sustainability on the international stage presents new opportunities for human factors/ergonomics. Positioning of the sustainability paradigm within human factors/ergonomics is discussed. Approaches to incorporating sustainability in the design of work systems are considered.

  12. Converging and Integrating Our Knowledge to Sustain Humanity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyori, Ryoji

    2018-01-04

    "Science must ever progress and expand, but the scientific community must not allow unbridled splintering into narrow categories. Our community will lose its trust if we cannot discard outdated perceptions, and if we allow ourselves to fossilize into a rigid academic system of small, narrow-minded specialist groups." Read more thoughts on the role of science and technology in order to sustain human civilization in the Editorial by Ryoji Noyori, who steps down from his position as board chairman of the journal. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Sustainable human development: a concept for the transformation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Alberto Rendón Acevedo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mistakes and misunderstanding on the development of adjectives have filled a concept that to be true to human beings in harmony with the planet and future generations. That is, one can not understand the development if this is not human, if not better be referred to humanity in society. It is impossible to talk about development without having a connotation with the present responsibility of the ecological balance of the planet. However, the evolution of thought and the concept has forced the intent or understanding of their integrity, sustainable human development (SHD is a just claim to the manipulation that has made economics, the dominant theory, and its implications for humanity. For this it is necessary to show that even before the redundant adjectives, there is the historical necessity of the use of the DHS concept. Then this article is intended to clarify the concept of the DHS as the result of a comprehensive understanding of development. For this work three parts: In the first, theoretically contextualize the currents of thought that development as an academic and political exercise in the second half of the twentieth century were raised. Chains that led to the conceptual inaccuracies of development after World War II are set in the second. Finally, a summary is made to emphasize the importance of the concept in the current historical moment.

  14. Assessing sustainable biophysical human-nature connectedness at regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorninger, Christian; Abson, David J.; Fischer, Joern; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2017-05-01

    Humans are biophysically connected to the biosphere through the flows of materials and energy appropriated from ecosystems. While this connection is fundamental for human well-being, many modern societies have—for better or worse—disconnected themselves from the natural productivity of their immediate regional environment. In this paper, we conceptualize the biophysical human-nature connectedness of land use systems at regional scales. We distinguish two mechanisms by which primordial connectedness of people to regional ecosystems has been circumvented via the use of external inputs. First, ‘biospheric disconnection’ refers to people drawing on non-renewable minerals from outside the biosphere (e.g. fossils, metals and other minerals). Second, ‘spatial disconnection’ arises from the imports and exports of biomass products and imported mineral resources used to extract and process ecological goods. Both mechanisms allow for greater regional resource use than would be possible otherwise, but both pose challenges for sustainability, for example, through waste generation, depletion of non-renewable resources and environmental burden shifting to distant regions. In contrast, biophysically reconnected land use systems may provide renewed opportunities for inhabitants to develop an awareness of their impacts and fundamental reliance on ecosystems. To better understand the causes, consequences, and possible remedies related to biophysical disconnectedness, new quantitative methods to assess the extent of regional biophysical human-nature connectedness are needed. To this end, we propose a new methodological framework that can be applied to assess biophysical human-nature connectedness in any region of the world.

  15. Concept of environment, sustainable development and respect for human rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urjana ÇURI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The insistence on the definition of environmental protection is an aspiration which has served as prerequisites to the implementation of human rights in a global economic crises. European Regional System has traditionally been focused on the protection of civil and political rights. In the wake of environmental risks that imply the violation of human rights, the emphasis has been placed more on the social, economic and cultural. Collective mechanisms to appeal to the United Nations and the European Court of Human Rights, gave a number of decisions on matters implicating environmental laws and policies. What is to be noted, is the evolution of the guarantees provided under the European Convention on Human Rights, which refers to a substantial understanding of environmental protection, and also including procedural aspects related to the protection of the right to life, privacy, property, information and effective means of appeal. This evolution has been launched by the growing need for states to take preventive measures and policies to the requirements for a balanced sustainable economic development, avoiding environmental risks that imply the violation of human rights. Proportionality in the protection of the interests in this respect creates a context for a fair trial, but also promotes an open and constructive dialogue between judges and lawmakers to protect the public interest.

  16. Human behavior research and the design of sustainable transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, James J.

    2011-09-01

    Transport currently represents approximately 19% of the global energy demand and accounts for about 23% of the global carbon dioxide emissions (IEA 2009). As the demand for mobility is expected to continue to increase in the coming decades, the stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels will require the evolution of transport, along with power generation, building design and manufacturing. The continued development of these sectors will need to include changes in energy sources, energy delivery, materials, infrastructure and human behavior. Pathways to reducing carbon from the transport sector have unique challenges and opportunities that are inherent to the human choices and behavioral patterns that mold the transportation systems and the associated energy needs. Technology, government investment, and regulatory policies have a significant impact on the formulation of transportation infrastructure; however, the role of human behavior and public acceptance on the efficiency and effectiveness of transport systems should not be underestimated. Although developed, rapidly developing, and underdeveloped nations face different challenges in the establishment of transport infrastructure that can meet transport needs while achieving sustainable carbon dioxide emissions, the constraints that establish the domain of possibilities are closely related for all nations. These constraints include capital investment, fuel supplies, power systems, and human behavior. Throughout the world, there are considerable efforts directed at advancing and optimizing the financing of sustainable infrastructures, the production of low carbon fuels, and the production of advanced power systems, but the foundational work on methods to understand human preferences and behavior within the context of transport and the valuation of reductions in carbon dioxide emissions is greatly lagging behind. These methods and the associated understanding of human behavior and the willingness to pay for

  17. Identifying a Human Right to Access Sustainable Energy Services in International Human Rights Law (SDG 7)? (LRN Law and Sustainability Conference)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselman, Marlies

    2017-01-01

    This paper assessed whether a right to sustainable energy services access can be found in international human rights law, possibly in support of achieving UN Sustainable Development Goal 7. According to SDG 7.1, States are expected to strive for the implementation of "universal access to modern,

  18. Social Media Research, Human Behavior, and Sustainable Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A bibliometric analysis was conducted to review social media research from different perspectives during the period of 2008–2014 based on the Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index database. Using a collection of 10,042 articles related to social media, the bibliometric analysis revealed some interesting patterns and trend of the scientific outputs, major journals, subject categories, spatial distribution, international collaboration, and temporal evolution in keywords usage in social media studies. The research on social media has been characterized by rapid growth and dynamic collaboration, with a rising number of publications and citation. Communication, Sociology, Public, Environment & Occupational Health, Business, and Multidisciplinary Psychology were the five most common categories. Computers in Human Behavior was the journal with the most social media publications, and Computers & Education ranked first according to the average citations. The two most productive countries were the U.S. and UK, delivering about half of the publications. The proportion of China’s internationally collaborative publications was the highest. The University of Wisconsin, the University of Michigan, and Harvard University were three most productive institutions. Several keywords, such as “Facebook”, “Twitter”, “communication”, “Social Networking Sites”, “China”, “climate change”, “big data” and “social support” increasingly gained the popularity during the study period, indicating the research trends on human behavior and sustainability.

  19. Detection of volatile organic compounds indicative of human presence in the air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jae; Geier, Brian A; Fan, Maomian; Gogate, Sanjay A; Rinehardt, Sage A; Watts, Brandy S; Grigsby, Claude C; Ott, Darrin K

    2015-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds were collected and analyzed from a variety of indoor and outdoor air samples to test whether human-derived compounds can be readily detected in the air and if they can be associated with human occupancy or presence. Compounds were captured with thermal desorption tubes and then analyzed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Isoprene, a major volatile organic compound in exhaled breath, was shown to be the best indicator of human presence. Acetone, another major breath-borne compound, was higher in unoccupied or minimally occupied areas than in human-occupied areas, indicating that its majority may be derived from exogenous sources. The association of endogenous skin-derived compounds with human occupancy was not significant. In contrast, numerous compounds that are found in foods and consumer products were detected at elevated levels in the occupied areas. Our results revealed that isoprene and many exogenous volatile organic compounds consumed by humans are emitted at levels sufficient for detection in the air, which may be indicative of human presence. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Mass of weaned elephant seal pups in areas of low and high human presence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, GH; van den Hoff, J; Broekman, M; Baarspul, ANJ; Field, [No Value; Burton, HR; Reijnders, PJH

    On sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island, we examined pup weaning mass of southern elephant seals in relation to human presence. Pup weaning mass was previously found to be positively associated with 1st-year survivorship. Weaned pups were weighed in a remote area, Middle Beach, and in an area of

  1. Mass of weaned elephant seal pups in areas of low and high human presence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, G.H.; Hoff, van den J.; Broekman, M.; Baarspul, A.N.J.; Field, I.; Burton, H.R.; Reijnders, P.J.H.

    2001-01-01

    On sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island, we examined pup weaning mass of southern elephant seals in relation to human presence. Pup weaning mass was previously found to be positively associated with 1st-year survivorship. Weaned pups were weighed in a remote area, Middle Beach, and in an area of

  2. Nursing's leadership in positioning human health at the core of urban sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre Schneider, Barbara; Menzel, Nancy; Clark, Michele; York, Nancy; Candela, Lori; Xu, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The United Nations predicts that by 2050 nearly three fourths of the world's population will live in urban areas, including cities. People are attracted to cities because these urban areas offer diverse opportunities, including the availability of goods and services and a higher quality of life. Cities, however, may not be sustainable with this population boom. To address sustainability, urban developers and engineers are building green structures, and businesses are creating products that are safe for the environment. Additionally, efforts are needed to place human health at the core of urban sustainability. Without human health, cities will not survive for future generations. Nursing is the discipline that can place human health in this position. Nursing's initiatives throughout history are efforts of sustainability-improving human health within the physical, economic, and social environments. Therefore, nursing must take a leadership role to ensure that human health is at the core of urban sustainability.

  3. Understanding the human dimensions of a sustainable energy transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steg, Linda; Perlaviciute, Goda; van der Werff, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change threatens the health, economic prospects, and basic food and water sources of people. A wide range of changes in household energy behavior is needed to realize a sustainable energy transition. We propose a general framework to understand and encourage sustainable energy

  4. Sense of presence and anxiety during virtual social interactions between a human and virtual humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morina, N.; Brinkman, W.P.; Hartanto, D.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has been shown to be effective in treatment of anxiety disorders. Yet, there is lack of research on the extent to which interaction between the individual and virtual humans can be successfully implanted to increase levels of anxiety for therapeutic purposes.

  5. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in human spermatozoa and seminal fluid: Presence of an active PDE10A in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maréchal, Loïze; Guillemette, Christine; Goupil, Serge; Blondin, Patrick; Leclerc, Pierre; Richard, François J

    2017-02-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) plays a crucial role as a signaling molecule for sperm functions such as capacitation, motility and acrosome reaction. It is well known that cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzyme has a major impact on sperm functions. The present study was undertaken to characterize cAMP-PDE activity in human semen. cAMP-PDE activity was measured in human sperm and seminal plasma using family specific PDE inhibitors. Three sperm fractionation methods were applied to assess cAMP-PDE activity in spermatozoa. Western blots were used to validate the presence of specific family in sperm and seminal plasma. Using three sperm fractionation methods, we demonstrated that in human sperm, the major cAMP-PDE activity is papaverine-sensitive and thus ascribed to PDE10. In seminal plasma, total cAMP-PDE activity was 1.14±0.39fmol of cAMP hydrolyzed per minute per μg of protein. Using specific inhibitors, we showed that the major cAMP-PDE activity found in human seminal plasma is ascribed to PDE4 and PDE11. Western blot analysis, immunoprecipitation with a specific monoclonal antibody, and mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of PDE10 in human spermatozoa. This study provides the first demonstration of the presence of functional PDE10 in human spermatozoa and functional PDE4 and PDE11 in human seminal plasma. Since the contribution of cyclic nucleotides in several sperm functions is well known, the finding that PDE10 is an active enzyme in human spermatozoa is novel and may lead to new insight into fertility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) birth patterns and human presence in zoological settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtycz, Laura M B; Ross, Stephen R

    2015-11-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that zoo visitors may have a disruptive impact on zoo-housed animals, especially primates. While some consider western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) to be particularly reactive to large crowds, the evidence of these effects is mixed, and is likely highly influenced by exhibit design, and group composition. While the majority of studies have focused on behavioral responses to human presence, there is the potential for physiological effects as well, including the possibility of affecting the timing of parturition. Such effects have been demonstrated in laboratory-housed callitrichids and chimpanzees, but unlike laboratory settings where human presence is lowest during the weekends, human presence might peak during weekends in public zoo settings. However, in a study of zoo-housed chimpanzees, there were no significant differences between the number of chimpanzee births that occurred on weekdays compared to weekends [Wagner and Ross, 2008], and we sought to test these questions with gorillas. We analyzed the timing of 336 live gorilla births and 48 stillbirths at 53 accredited North American zoos from 1985-2014, and similarly to chimpanzees, found no weekend or weekday effect on number of births (live births: G = 0.000, p = 1; stillbirths: G = 0.166, p < 0.684). These data add to our understanding of the potential influence of human presence on primate behavior and physiology, and add to evidence suggesting that the effects of zoo visitors on exhibited species may be less profound than previously assumed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The contributions of human factors and ergonomics to a sustainable minerals industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horberry, Tim; Burgess-Limerick, Robin; Fuller, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This article describes examples of the application of human factors research and development work to a sustainable minerals industry. It begins by outlining human-related aspects of the minerals industry and the key human factors work previously undertaken in this domain. The focus then switches to sustainability in the minerals industry. Sustainability principles are introduced and illustrations provided of how human factors research and development work fits within such a framework. Three case studies of human factors in the minerals industry research are presented and the sustainability implications in each case study are highlighted. Finally, future trends related to human factors work in a sustainable minerals industry are addressed, in particular the opportunities and possible adverse consequences that increasing deployment of mining automation might bring. Minerals industries are a major global activity with significant sustainability implications. Aspects of sustainability in mining are examined using three case studies. These illustrate the contribution of human factors/ergonomics in reducing risks; developing emergency response management systems; and the value of participatory ergonomics in improving the design of mining equipment.

  8. Presence of adenovirus species C in infiltrating lymphocytes of human sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kosulin

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses are known to persist in T-lymphocytes of tonsils, adenoids and intestinal tract. The oncogenic potential of different adenovirus types has been widely studied in rodents, in which adenovirus inoculation can induce multiple tumors such as undifferentiated sarcomas, adenocarcinomas and neuroectodermal tumors. However, the oncogenic potential of this virus has never been proven in human subjects. Using a highly sensitive broad-spectrum qRT-PCR, we have screened a set of different human sarcomas including leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma and gastro intestinal stroma tumors. Primers binding the viral oncogene E1A and the capsid-coding gene Hexon were used to detect the presence of adenovirus DNA in tumor samples. We found that 18% of the tested leiomyosarcomas and 35% of the liposarcomas were positive for the presence of adenovirus DNA, being species C types the most frequently detected adenoviruses. However, only in one sample of the gastro intestinal stroma tumors the virus DNA could be detected. The occurrence of adenovirus in the tumor sections was confirmed by subsequent fluorescence in-situ-hybridization analysis and co-staining with the transcription factor Bcl11b gives evidence for the presence of the virus in infiltrating T-lymphocytes within the tumors. Together these data underline, for the first time, the persistence of adenovirus in T-lymphocytes infiltrated in muscular and fatty tissue tumor samples. If an impaired immune system leads to the viral persistence and reactivation of the virus is involved in additional diseases needs further investigation.

  9. Geographic patterns and environmental factors associated with human yellow fever presence in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrick, Patricia Najera; Aldighieri, Sylvain; Machado, Gustavo; Leonel, Deise Galan; Vilca, Luz Maria; Uriona, Sonia; Schneider, Maria Cristina

    2017-09-01

    In the Americas, yellow fever virus transmission is a latent threat due to the proximity between urban and wild environments. Although yellow fever has nearly vanished from North and Central America, there are still 13 countries in the Americas considered endemic by the World Health Organization. Human cases usually occur as a result of the exposure to sylvatic yellow fever in tropical forested environments; but urban outbreaks reported during the last decade demonstrate that the risk in this environment still exists. The objective of this study was to identify spatial patterns and the relationship between key geographic and environmental factors with the distribution of yellow fever human cases in the Americas. An ecological study was carried out to analyze yellow fever human cases reported to the Pan American Health Organization from 2000 to 2014, aggregated by second administrative level subdivisions (counties). Presence of yellow fever by county was used as the outcome variable and eight geo-environmental factors were used as independent variables. Spatial analysis was performed to identify and examine natural settings per county. Subsequently, a multivariable logistic regression model was built. During the study period, 1,164 cases were reported in eight out of the 13 endemic countries. Nearly 83.8% of these cases were concentrated in three countries: Peru (37.4%), Brazil (28.1%) and Colombia (18.4%); and distributed in 57 states/provinces, specifically in 286 counties (3.4% of total counties). Yellow fever presence was significantly associated with altitude, rain, diversity of non-human primate hosts and temperature. A positive spatial autocorrelation revealed a clustered geographic pattern in 138/286 yellow fever positive counties (48.3%). A clustered geographic pattern of yellow fever was identified mostly along the Andes eastern foothills. This risk map could support health policies in endemic countries. Geo-environmental factors associated with presence

  10. Human-Animal Relations beyond the Zoo: The Quest for a More Inclusive Sustainability Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Hanna; Gyberg, Per; Henriksson, Malin

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates human-animal relations in sustainability education. To understand what educational relationships and boundaries are challenged and/or strengthened in education promoting future sustainable societies, we argue that educational theory and practice must move beyond the anthropocentric framework's sole focus on relationships…

  11. Modelling vertical human walking forces using self-sustained oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prakash; Kumar, Anil; Racic, Vitomir; Erlicher, Silvano

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a model of a self-sustained oscillator which can generate reliably the vertical contact force between the feet of a healthy pedestrian and the supporting flat rigid surface. The model is motivated by the self-sustained nature of the walking process, i.e. a pedestrian generates the required inner energy to sustain its repetitive body motion. The derived model is a fusion of the well-known Rayleigh, Van der Pol and Duffing oscillators. Some additional nonlinear terms are added to produce both the odd and even harmonics observed in the experimentally measured force data. The model parameters were derived from force records due to twelve pedestrians walking on an instrumented treadmill at ten speeds using a linear least square technique. The stability analysis was performed using the energy balance method and perturbation method. The results obtained from the model show a good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Human Aspect as a Critical Factor for Organization Sustainability in the Tourism Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ulus

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organizations adopt diverse strategies to govern the technical and managerial aspects of sustainability implementation processes. The need for better leading and managing people-related issues emerges as companies aim for more effective change towards sustainability. The human aspect of the sustainability implementation process is mostly not paid enough attention, but it can significantly affect the success of a change management program by creating hurdles or easing the process. This study considers three human-related factors: resistance to change, internal communication, and employee engagement in sustainability activities of organizations. The aim of the study is to explore how these human factors are managed by tourism companies for organizational sustainability. For this purpose four companies from different sectors of tourism are chosen as case studies and the results are examined using qualitative data analysis techniques. The results indicate that the companies which are in a more advanced stage of sustainability implementation manage human factors using a greater number of channels and employ varied strategies. The results can provide insights into how organizations tackle the challenges of managing human aspect and display the practices that contribute to successful change management programs for achieving organizational sustainability through people.

  13. The Role of Social and Intergenerational Equity in Making Changes in Human Well-Being Sustainable

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sustainable world is one in which human needs are met equitably and without sacrificing the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Human well-being is described by four primary elements—basic human needs, economic needs, environmental needs, and subjective well-bein...

  14. Human Constraints to Sustainable Agriculture in the Arid Regions of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvel, G. H.; Botha, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with 79 South African farmers in arid regions showed that their conservation practices were influenced by such human factors as needs, perceptions, and knowledge. Direct influence on adoption behaviors was recommended to encourage sustainable agriculture practices. (SK)

  15. The sustainability of current account in the presence of endogenous multiple structural breaks: Evidence from developed and developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dülger Fikret

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to test for the sustainability of current account in 18 developed and 10 developing countries. The stability of the relationship between export (inflows and import (outflows is assessed using the tests proposed by Mohitosh Kejriwal and Pierre Perron (2010. In particular, the nature of the long-run relationship, when multiple regime shifts are identified endogenously, is analyzed using the residual-based test of the null hypothesis of cointegration with multiple breaks proposed by Kejriwal (2008. The results clearly indicate that, for all countries, (i the stability tests reject the null of coefficient stability of the long-run relationship between exports and imports; (ii the cointegration tests that correspond to the number of breaks selected reject the null of cointegration (weak form of sustainability; and (iii the strong form of sustainability hypothesis is not supported by the data for all countries in most regimes but not for 20 of 28 countries especially in the last regime (the post-2000 era. For eight countries (Canada, New Zealand, Spain, Brazil, Mexico, South Africa, Thailand, and Turkey, the findings may be perceived as a warning to creditors and policymakers unless there are policy distortions or permanent productivity shocks to the domestic economies.

  16. Tourism, sustainable development and human rights: The program “Travel More Golden Age”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Freire de Carvalho e Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to discuss the relationship between tourism and sustainable development. For this, start with a presentation on the history of the development concept, which gradually abandons a economistic perspective to incorporate, from theoretical elaborations produced in the UN plan, the issues of sustainability and human rights. We discuss the prospects for development of Amartya Sen and Ignacy Sachs. Then the article focuses on the issue of sustainable tourism, discussing the relations between tourism and sustainability from the theoretical and methodological approach proposed by Sachs and Sen. Finally, discuss the theme of social tourism, focusing attention on Brazilian social tourism program “Travel More Golden Age”.

  17. Sustainability analysis of human settelements in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, C

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available indicators...............................................................................13 2.5.3 Sustainable urban structure and form .................................................................14 2.5.4 Sus tainable c ities... and degradation....................................................................................53 5.3.3 Protec tion of the envir onment .............................................................................54 5.4 Urban form and structure...

  18. Use of human waste in sustainable crop production in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plant nutrient in both urine and excreta come from arable fields and thus should be recycled as fertilizers to support sustainability and retain fertility of the soil. Urine acts very fast and is very rich in nitrogen. Policy on the use of the technology must be promoted and awareness created to the farmers to enable them utilize ...

  19. Oceans and Human Health: Linking Ocean, Organism, and Human Health for Sustainable Management of Coastal Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandifer, P. A.; Trtanj, J.; Collier, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and policy-makers are increasingly recognizing that sustainable coastal communities depend on healthy and resilient economies, ecosystems, and people, and that the condition or "health" of the coastal ocean and humans are intimately and inextricably connected. A wealth of ecosystem services provided by ocean and coastal environments are crucial for human survival and well being. Nonetheless, the health of coastal communities, their economies, connected ecosystems and ecosystem services, and people are under increasing threats from health risks associated with environmental degradation, climate change, and unwise land use practices, all of which contribute to growing burdens of naturally-occurring and introduced pathogens, noxious algae, and chemical contaminants. The occurrence, frequency, intensity, geographic range, and number and kinds of ocean health threats are increasing, with concomitant health and economic effects and eroding public confidence in the safety and wholesomeness of coastal environments and resources. Concerns in the research and public health communities, many summarized in the seminal 1999 NRC Report, From Monsoons to Microbes and the 2004 final report of the US Commission on Ocean Policy, resulted in establishment of a new "meta-discipline" known as Oceans and Human Health (OHH). OHH brings together practitioners in oceanography, marine biology, ecology, biomedical science, medicine, economics and other social sciences, epidemiology, environmental management, and public health to focus on water- and food-borne causes of human and animal illnesses associated with ocean and coastal systems and on health benefits of seafood and other marine products. It integrates information across multiple disciplines to increase knowledge of ocean health risks and benefits and communicate such information to enhance public safety. Recognizing the need for a comprehensive approach to ocean health threats and benefits, Congress passed the Oceans and

  20. Presence of gastrointestinal parasites in swine and human of four swine production farms in Cundinamarca- Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F Mendoza-Gómez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Determine the presence and the type of endoparasites with zoonotic potential in swine and human of two technified and two semi-technified farms in the department of Cundinamarca, Colombia. Materials and methods. Three serial samplings of feces were taken in a pen row within intervals of 15 days, in two technified and two semi-technified farms in different age groups distributed as follows: pregnant-sows, nursing-females, boars, weaners, suckling-piglets, and growing-pig. By means of informed consent thirty-three people agreed to enter the study. Thirty-three samples from men and women of different ages were received. The pool and individual samples of fecal were evaluated by direct analysis, qualitative flotation and sedimentation techniques and modified ZiehlNeelsen stain. Results. For the porcine population, on the average, the results obtained from both technified farms showed that Balantidium coli (42%, Endolimax nana (21.9% and Iodamoeba bütschlii (7.8% were the most common parasites. In semi-technified farms they were: Entamoeba coli (40%, Endolimax nana (35%, Iodamoeba bütschlii (25% and Balantidium coli (5%. By means of the test chi2 it is possible to conclude that there is a significant difference between the parasites species and the type of farm. The results obtained in human showed the presence of parasites as: E. coli (42.2%, Entamoeba hystolitica/dispar (12.1%, E. nana (9.1%, B. coli (9.1%, I. bütschlii (3.0% and Blastocystis hominis (3.0%. Conclusions. The presence of parasites such as Balantidium coli, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba bütschlii and Entamoeba coli in swine and human suggests a possible rotation of parasitic species between hosts.

  1. A broader consideration of human factor to enhance sustainable building design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaianese, Erminia

    2012-01-01

    The link between ergonomic/human factor and sustainability seems to be clearly evidenced mainly in relation to social dimension of sustainability, in order to contribute to assure corporate social responsibility and global value creation. But the will to establish an equilibrated connection among used resources in human activities, supported by the sustainability perspective, evidences that the contribution of ergonomics/human factors can be effectively enlarged to other aspects, especially in relation to building design. In fact a sustainable building is meant to be a building that contributes, through its characteristics and attribute, to a sustainable development by assuring, in the same time, a decrease of resources use and environmental impact and an increase of health, safety and comfort of the occupants. The purpose of this paper is to analyze in a broader sense the contribution of ergonomic/human factor to design of sustainable building, focusing how ergonomics principles, methodology and techniques can improve building design, enhancing its sustainability performance during all phases of building lifecycle.

  2. Roadmap to sustainable sovereignty: limitation of human occupiers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sovereignty is the supreme power of a state. While every nation is recognised as a state, not every state is held to be sovereign. The state being an artificial entity is controlled, administered and headed by human beings. These human beings are not held to be sovereign by themselves, but can be regarded as human ...

  3. Differential Micronuclei Induction in Human Lymphocyte Cultures by Imidacloprid in the Presence of Potassium Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polychronis Stivaktakis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are exposed to pesticides as a consequence of their application in farming or their persistence in a variety of media, including food, water, air, soil, plants, animals, and smoke. The interaction of pesticides with environmental factors may result in the alteration of their physicochemical properties. Square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry (SW-CSV, a technique that simulates electrodynamically the cellular membrane, is used to investigate whether the presence of potassium nitrate (KNO3 in the culture medium interferes with the genotoxic behavior of imidacloprid. The cytokinesis block micronuclei (CBMN method is used to evaluate imidacloprid's genotoxicity in the absence or presence of KNO3 in the culture medium and, as a consequence, its adsorption by lymphocytes. Comparing micronuclei (MN frequencies in control and imidacloprid-treated blood cell cultures, statistically significant differences were not detected. KNO3 did not induce MN frequencies compared to control. Statistically significant differences in MN frequencies were observed when blood cell cultures were treated with imidacloprid in the presence of increasing concentrations of KNO3. SW-CSV revealed that by increasing KNO3 molarity, imidacloprid's concentration in the culture medium decreased in parallel. This finding indicates that imidacloprid is adsorbed by cellular membranes. The present study suggests a novel role of a harmless environmental factor, such as KNO3, on the genotoxic behavior of a pesticide, such as imidacloprid. KNO3 rendered imidacloprid permeable to lymphocytes, resulting in elevated MN frequencies.

  4. Reasserting the primacy of human needs to reclaim the 'lost half' of sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark; Longhurst, James W S

    2018-04-15

    The concept of sustainable development evolved from growing awareness of the interdependence of social and economic progress with the limits of the supporting natural environment, becoming progressively integrated into global agreements and transposition into local regulatory and implementation frameworks. We argue that transposition of the concept into regulation and supporting tools reduced the focus to minimal environmental and social standards, perceived as imposing constraints rather than opportunities for innovation to meet human needs. The aspirational 'half' of the concept of sustainable development specifically addressing human needs was thus lost in transposing high ideals into regulatory instruments. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) restore focus on interlinked human needs, stimulating innovation of products and processes to satisfy them. Through three case studies - PVC water pipes, river quality management in England, and UK local air quality management - we explore the current operationalisation of the concept in diverse settings, using the SDG framework to highlight the broader societal purposes central to sustainable development. Partnerships involving civil society support evolution of regulatory instruments and their implementation, optimising social and ecological benefits thereby serving more human needs. Restoring the visionary 'lost half' of sustainable development - meeting human needs in sustainable ways - creates incentives for innovation and partnership; an innovation framework rather than a perceived constraint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Geographic patterns and environmental factors associated with human yellow fever presence in the Americas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Najera Hamrick

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Americas, yellow fever virus transmission is a latent threat due to the proximity between urban and wild environments. Although yellow fever has nearly vanished from North and Central America, there are still 13 countries in the Americas considered endemic by the World Health Organization. Human cases usually occur as a result of the exposure to sylvatic yellow fever in tropical forested environments; but urban outbreaks reported during the last decade demonstrate that the risk in this environment still exists. The objective of this study was to identify spatial patterns and the relationship between key geographic and environmental factors with the distribution of yellow fever human cases in the Americas.An ecological study was carried out to analyze yellow fever human cases reported to the Pan American Health Organization from 2000 to 2014, aggregated by second administrative level subdivisions (counties. Presence of yellow fever by county was used as the outcome variable and eight geo-environmental factors were used as independent variables. Spatial analysis was performed to identify and examine natural settings per county. Subsequently, a multivariable logistic regression model was built. During the study period, 1,164 cases were reported in eight out of the 13 endemic countries. Nearly 83.8% of these cases were concentrated in three countries: Peru (37.4%, Brazil (28.1% and Colombia (18.4%; and distributed in 57 states/provinces, specifically in 286 counties (3.4% of total counties. Yellow fever presence was significantly associated with altitude, rain, diversity of non-human primate hosts and temperature. A positive spatial autocorrelation revealed a clustered geographic pattern in 138/286 yellow fever positive counties (48.3%.A clustered geographic pattern of yellow fever was identified mostly along the Andes eastern foothills. This risk map could support health policies in endemic countries. Geo-environmental factors associated

  6. On the presence and role of human gene-body DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jjingo, Daudi; Conley, Andrew B.; Yi, Soojin V.; Lunyak, Victoria V.; Jordan, I. King

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation of promoter sequences is a repressive epigenetic mark that down-regulates gene expression. However, DNA methylation is more prevalent within gene-bodies than seen for promoters, and gene-body methylation has been observed to be positively correlated with gene expression levels. This paradox remains unexplained, and accordingly the role of DNA methylation in gene-bodies is poorly understood. We addressed the presence and role of human gene-body DNA methylation using a meta-analysis of human genome-wide methylation, expression and chromatin data sets. Methylation is associated with transcribed regions as genic sequences have higher levels of methylation than intergenic or promoter sequences. We also find that the relationship between gene-body DNA methylation and expression levels is non-monotonic and bell-shaped. Mid-level expressed genes have the highest levels of gene-body methylation, whereas the most lowly and highly expressed sets of genes both have low levels of methylation. While gene-body methylation can be seen to efficiently repress the initiation of intragenic transcription, the vast majority of methylated sites within genes are not associated with intragenic promoters. In fact, highly expressed genes initiate the most intragenic transcription, which is inconsistent with the previously held notion that gene-body methylation serves to repress spurious intragenic transcription to allow for efficient transcriptional elongation. These observations lead us to propose a model to explain the presence of human gene-body methylation. This model holds that the repression of intragenic transcription by gene-body methylation is largely epiphenomenal, and suggests that gene-body methylation levels are predominantly shaped via the accessibility of the DNA to methylating enzyme complexes. PMID:22577155

  7. The sustainable utilization of human resources in global product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Hansen, Mette Sanne

    2010-01-01

    This empirical paper investigates the challenges global product development faces in regard to a sustainable utilization of resources through case studies and interviews in six Danish multinational corporations. Findings revealed 3 key challenges, which relates to increased rework in product...... development and production, overlapping work and a lack of utilization of knowledge and information at the supplier or subsidiary. The authors suggest the use of strategic simulation in order to gain greater transparency in the global network and thus utilize resources better. Strategic simulation...

  8. Presence of human papillomavirus in semen in relation to semen quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttmer, Roosmarijn; Dijkstra, Maaike G; Snijders, Peter J F; Hompes, Peter G A; Pronk, Divera T M; Hubeek, Isabelle; Berkhof, Johannes; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Meijer, Chris J L M

    2016-02-01

    Is the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in semen associated with impairment of semen quality? In a large cohort of males seeking fertility evaluation, no associations were observed between seminal HPV presence and semen parameters. HPV is commonly detected in semen samples. Whether the presence of HPV is related to impairment of semen quality, remains unclear. This cross-sectional study included a cohort of 430 males. Male partners in couples seeking fertility evaluation provided one semen sample per person. Semen samples were tested for HPV-DNA using GP5+/6+-PCR. Sperm concentration was counted and motility was assessed in a Makler counting chamber at a magnification of ×200. The presence of antisperm antibodies was assessed by a mixed agglutination reaction (MAR)-test. Overall HPV was detected in 14.9% (64/430) of semen samples, including 2.1% (9/430) that contained both high-risk (hr) HPV and low-risk (lr) HPV types, 8.8% (38/430) with exclusively hrHPV types and 4.0% (17/430) with exclusively lrHPV types. The presence of HPV in semen was not associated with the age of the participants, seminal pH, semen volume, total sperm count, sperm concentration, progressive motility or the presence of antisperm antibodies. This study did not observe an association between HPV presence in semen and impairment of semen quality. However, we cannot exclude an effect of seminal HPV on early embryo development and clinical reproductive outcomes. As HPV is frequently present in semen, screening of donor semen for HPV should be considered to prevent iatrogenic cervical HPV infections in the recipient. However our findings do not support standardized HPV testing of semen in the diagnostic work-up of subfertile couples. This study was sponsored by an unrestricted grant of Stichting Researchfonds Pathology Amsterdam, the Netherlands. P.J.F.S. has been on the speakers bureau of Roche, Gen-Probe, Abbott, Qiagen and Seegene and has been a consultant for Crucell B.V. J.B. has been

  9. Human presence impacts fungal diversity of inflated lunar/Mars analog habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachowicz, A; Mayer, T; Bashir, M; Pieber, T R; De León, P; Venkateswaran, K

    2017-07-11

    An inflatable lunar/Mars analog habitat (ILMAH), simulated closed system isolated by HEPA filtration, mimics International Space Station (ISS) conditions and future human habitation on other planets except for the exchange of air between outdoor and indoor environments. The ILMAH was primarily commissioned to measure physiological, psychological, and immunological characteristics of human inhabiting in isolation, but it was also available for other studies such as examining its microbiological aspects. Characterizing and understanding possible changes and succession of fungal species is of high importance since fungi are not only hazardous to inhabitants but also deteriorate the habitats. Observing the mycobiome changes in the presence of human will enable developing appropriate countermeasures with reference to crew health in a future closed habitat. Succession of fungi was characterized utilizing both traditional and state-of-the-art molecular techniques during the 30-day human occupation of the ILMAH. Surface samples were collected at various time points and locations to observe both the total and viable fungal populations of common environmental and opportunistic pathogenic species. To estimate the cultivable fungal population, potato dextrose agar plate counts method was utilized. The internal transcribed spacer region-based iTag Illumina sequencing was employed to measure the community structure and fluctuation of the mycobiome over time in various locations. Treatment of samples with propidium monoazide (PMA; a DNA intercalating dye for selective detection of viable microbial populations) had a significant effect on the microbial diversity compared to non-PMA-treated samples. Statistical analysis confirmed that viable fungal community structure changed (increase in diversity and decrease in fungal burden) over the occupation time. Samples collected at day 20 showed distinct fungal profiles from samples collected at any other time point (before or after

  10. Decision making in a human population living sustainably.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, John S; Burgman, Mark A; Marewski, Julian N; Fidler, Fiona; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2012-10-01

    The Tiwi people of northern Australia have managed natural resources continuously for 6000-8000 years. Tiwi management objectives and outcomes may reflect how they gather information about the environment. We qualitatively analyzed Tiwi documents and management techniques to examine the relation between the social and physical environment of decision makers and their decision-making strategies. We hypothesized that principles of bounded rationality, namely, the use of efficient rules to navigate complex decision problems, explain how Tiwi managers use simple decision strategies (i.e., heuristics) to make robust decisions. Tiwi natural resource managers reduced complexity in decision making through a process that gathers incomplete and uncertain information to quickly guide decisions toward effective outcomes. They used management feedback to validate decisions through an information loop that resulted in long-term sustainability of environmental use. We examined the Tiwi decision-making processes relative to management of barramundi (Lates calcarifer) fisheries and contrasted their management with the state government's management of barramundi. Decisions that enhanced the status of individual people and their attainment of aspiration levels resulted in reliable resource availability for Tiwi consumers. Different decision processes adopted by the state for management of barramundi may not secure similarly sustainable outcomes. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Managing Human Resource Capabilities for Sustainable Competitive Advantage: An Empirical Analysis from Indian Global Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandekar, Aradhana; Sharma, Anuradha

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to examine the role of human resource capability (HRC) in organisational performance and sustainable competitive advantage (SCA) in Indian global organisations. Design/Methodology/Approach: To carry out the present study, an empirical research on a random sample of 300 line or human resource managers from…

  12. The presence of human papillomavirus in semen does not affect the integrity of sperm DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, E I; Dávila-Rodríguez, M I; Fernández, J L; de la O-Pérez, L O; Garza-Flores, M E; Eguren-Garza, R; Gosálvez, J

    2017-03-06

    It remains unknown whether human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in semen affect sperm DNA integrity. We investigated whether the presence of these viruses in semen was associated with an elevated sperm DNA fragmentation index. Semen samples of 22 normozoospermic patients undergoing infertility treatment, nine fertile donors and seven fertile men with a risk of HPV infection (genital warts or condylomas) were included in the study. The samples were examined by an INNO-LiPA test PCR-based reverse hybridisation array that identifies 28 types of HPVs as simple or multiple infections. Sperm DNA integrity was determined by sperm chromatin dispersion assay (SCD). Our preliminary findings demonstrate an increase in HPV infection in infertile men with respect to fertile men. However, the sperm DNA fragmentation index was not increased in semen containing these viruses. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Presence of human milk bank is associated with elevated rate of exclusive breastfeeding in VLBW infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslanoglu, Sertac; Moro, Guido E; Bellù, Roberto; Turoli, Daniela; De Nisi, Giuseppe; Tonetto, Paola; Bertino, Enrico

    2013-03-01

    Human milk confers health benefits of vital importance for the sick and preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Mother's own milk is the first choice in preterm infant feeding, and every effort should be made to promote lactation. When mother's milk is not available or is insufficient, donor human milk (DHM) is recommended. Yet, occasionally, the concern that the use of DHM might decrease breastfeeding is being raised. The present data collection planned by the Italian Association of Human Milk Banks (AIBLUD) in collaboration with the Italian Neonatal Network (INN) attempted to address this concern. A total of 4277 very low birth weight (VLBW) infants from 83 Italian NICUs were evaluated for this comparative analysis. The 83 Italian NICUs were divided into two groups: centers with a human milk bank (HMB) and centers without a HMB; the available parameters in the network--"any and exclusive breastfeeding rates" and "exclusive formula rate" at discharge--were compared. Exclusive breastfeeding rate at discharge was significantly higher in NICUs with a HMB than in NICUs without (29.6% vs. 16.0%, respectively). Any breastfeeding rate at discharge tended to be higher in the NICUs with HMB (60.4% vs. 52.8%, P = 0.09), and exclusive formula rate was lower in the NICUs with HMB (26.5% vs. 31.3%), but this difference was not significant. This report shows that the presence of a HMB and the use of DHM in NICU are associated with increased breastfeeding rate at discharge from the hospital for VLBW infants.

  14. Presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Shoji, Itaru; Shibasaki, Akiko; Kato, Ichiro; Hiraishi, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Hajime; Kaneko, Kiriko; Murakami, Osamu; Morimoto, Ryo; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Totsune, Kazuhito

    2010-05-01

    Kisspeptins are neuropeptides which activate the hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal axis and are considered to play important physiological roles in the reproduction. Kisspeptins have also been reported to stimulate the aldosterone secretion from the adrenal cortex. However, the expression of kisspeptins in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors has not been clarified yet. We, therefore, studied the presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity (LI) in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors (adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas) by radioimmunoassay and immunocytochemistry. Kisspeptin-LI was detected in all the tissues examined; normal portions of adrenal glands (3.0 +/- 2.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 21, mean +/- SD), aldosterone-producing adenomas (4.6 +/- 3.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 10), cortisol-producing adenomas (2.7 +/- 1.4 pmol/g wet weight, n = 14), adrenocortical carcinomas (1.7 +/- 0.2 pmol/g wet weight, n = 4), and pheochromocytomas (1.8 +/- 0.8 pmol/g wet weight, n = 6). There was no significant difference in kisspeptin-LI levels among them. Immunocytochemistry showed positive kisspeptin-immunostaining in normal adrenal glands, with stronger immunostaining found in the medulla. Furthermore, positive kisspeptin-immunostaining was found in all types of adrenal tumors examined; adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas. The intensity of kisspeptin-immunostaining in these adrenal tumors was, however, not so strong as that in normal adrenal medulla. The present study has shown for the first time the presence of kisspeptin-LI in adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

  15. Presence of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene segments in human intestinal lymph follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, M; Kono, M; Hoshina, S; Komatsu, M; Kitagawa, Y; Iizuka, M; Watanabe, S

    2000-08-01

    There is currently no information regarding microbial agents inside the intestinal lymph follicles. Biopsy or resected specimens, mostly from macroscopically normal areas, were sectioned with a cryostat. DNA was extracted from microdissected samples, exclusively from the lymph follicle. Amplification of DNA was performed using universal primers designed from conserved regions of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Several clones with inserts of around 400 base pairs were subjected to DNA sequence analysis followed by a database homology search. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene segments were detected in the lymph follicle in 2 of 14 (14%) non-inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) cases, 4 of 14 (28%) Crohn disease cases, and in 2 of 5 (40%) ulcerative colitis cases. Nineteen 16S rRNA gene segments were recognized in the eight positive cases. Five segments showed 100% identity to known bacterial 16S rRNAs, namely staphylococcus species, Streptococcus sanguis, and Paracoccus marcusii. However, the other 14 segments showed below 100% identity, indicating either the presence of unknown bacteria or of bacteria without known DNA data. No single identified or unidentified bacterium, characteristic of IBD, including Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes, was detected. The present study confirms the presence of bacterial 16S rRNA gene segments in human intestinal lymph follicles and paves the way for new investigations into the microbiology of the lymph follicle. Whether or not bacteria inside the lymph follicle is a primary stimulus in IBD has yet to be clarified.

  16. Presence of human mycoplasma DNA in gastric tissue samples from Korean chronic gastritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Joon; Kang, Jeong-Ok; Cho, Sun-Hee; Kang, Hee-Bum; Kang, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Kang, Yoon-Suk; Song, Byung-Cheol; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Shim, Mi-Ja; Kim, Hee-Sun; Kim, Young-Bae; Hahm, Ki-Baeg; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kook, Myeong-Cherl; Chung, Myung-Hee; Hyun, Jin-Won

    2004-04-01

    We aimed to determine whether mycoplasmas are present in Korean chronic gastritis, and to understand their roles in gastric cancer tumorigenesis, because mycoplasmas resemble Helicobacter pylori in terms of ammonia production and induction of inflammatory cytokines in immune and non-immune cells. The presence and identity of mycoplasmas were assessed by semi-nested PCR and sequencing, and the results were compared with pathologic data. Fifty-six samples collected from Korean chronic gastritis patients were used for this study. Twenty-three (41.1%) were positive for mycoplasmas. Eighteen sequenced samples contained a single human mycoplasma or two mycoplasmas, which were identified as Mycoplasma faucium (13/18), M. fermentans (3/18), M. orale (1/18), M. salivarium (2/18), and M. spermatophilum (1/18). Mycoplasma-infected chronic gastritis samples showed significantly more severe neutrophil infiltration than non-infected samples (P = 0.0135). Mycoplasma profiles in the oral cavity (M. salivarium is major) and stomach were different, and the presence of significant proinflammatory responses in mycoplasma-positive patients suggests that the mycoplasmas are not simply contaminants. Further studies are required to understand whether mycoplasmas play a role in gastric tumorigenesis.

  17. Presence of human papilloma virus in a series of breast carcinoma from Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Pereira Suarez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology and the molecular mechanisms related to breast carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. Some recent reports have examined the role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in this disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in breast cancer. METHODS: Sixty one fresh frozen breast cancers samples were analyzed. Samples were tested for HPV by PCR, and products were automatically sequenced. Findings were correlated with clinical and pathological characteristics. RESULTS: The HPV DNA prevalence in the breast cancer samples was 26% (16/61. Clinical parameters were not statistically associated with HPV presence (p>0.05 χ(2 test. Sequence analysis in a subgroup of cases indicates the prevalence of low risk HPV11, followed by high risk HPV16. We found no HPV transcriptional activity. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated for the first time in Argentina the presence of HPV in a proportion of the malignant breast tissues. This finding suggests that HPV may have a biological significance in breast carcinogenesis.

  18. [Presence of high risk human papilomaviruses (HPV) in the low grade cervical lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iljazović, Ermina; Mustadenagić-Mujanović, Jasminka; Karasalihović, Zinaida; Cickusić, E; Avdić, S

    2006-01-01

    Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LGSIL) and atypical squamous cells undetermined significance (ASCUS) are the most frequent verified cellular abnormalities. Their management are still highly controversial mostly caused by uncertainty about their histology and nature of originate. Detection of HPV DNA in the absence of cytological abnormalities can also indicate presence of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The aim of this study was to show the association of the benign cellular changes, ASCUS and LGSIL with oncogenic types of HPV and to prove the necessity of more intensive screening of this group of patients. Cytology and pathomorphology analyses were performed first. Identification of the presence of human papiloma virus was carried out by the Digene Hybride Capture II test for all patients. Identification of different HPV types for the particular number of patients was carried out by RFLP (Rsetriction Fragments Length of Polymorphism). Out of the 101 patients in the first group 92 (91,08%) were HPV positive, and 41, 58% had no cellular abnormalities, ASCUS or LGSIL. Out of 509 patients of the second group 26.92% were positive for HRHPV, and 78,97% of them had no cellular abnormalities, ASCUS or LGSIL. HPV 16 was detected in 27.36% (ASCUS/LGSIL) of low risk cervical lesion of the first examined period. The combination of smears with the detection of high risk HPV types increases the triage sensitivity especially at patients with mild.

  19. Sustainable development goals and the human resources crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Achieving universal health coverage by 2030 requires that lessons from the Millennium Development Goals must be heeded. The most important lesson is that the workforce underpins every function of the health system, and is the rate-limiting step. The three dimensions that continue to limit the success of the development agenda are availability, distribution and performance of health workers - and the Sustainable Development Goals cannot be achieved without addressing all three. Hence, the traditional response of scaling up supply is inadequate: a paradigm shift is required in the design of systems that can properly identify, train, allocate and retain health workers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Phasic and sustained fear in humans elicits distinct patterns of brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Ruben P; Chen, Gang; Bodurka, Jerzy; Kaplan, Raphael; Grillon, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Aversive events are typically more debilitating when they occur unpredictably than predictably. Studies in humans and animals indicate that predictable and unpredictable aversive events can induce phasic and sustained fear, respectively. Research in rodents suggests that anatomically related but distinct neural circuits may mediate phasic and sustained fear. We explored this issue in humans by examining threat predictability in three virtual reality contexts, one in which electric shocks were predictably signaled by a cue, a second in which shocks occurred unpredictably but never paired with a cue, and a third in which no shocks were delivered. Evidence of threat-induced phasic and sustained fear was presented using fear ratings and skin conductance. Utilizing recent advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we were able to conduct whole-brain fMRI at relatively high spatial resolution and still have enough sensitivity to detect transient and sustained signal changes in the basal forebrain. We found that both predictable and unpredictable threat evoked transient activity in the dorsal amygdala, but that only unpredictable threat produced sustained activity in a forebrain region corresponding to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis complex. Consistent with animal models hypothesizing a role for the cortex in generating sustained fear, sustained signal increases to unpredictable threat were also found in anterior insula and a frontoparietal cortical network associated with hypervigilance. In addition, unpredictable threat led to transient activity in the ventral amygdala-hippocampal area and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, as well as transient activation and subsequent deactivation of subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, limbic structures that have been implicated in the regulation of emotional behavior and stress responses. In line with basic findings in rodents, these results provide evidence that phasic and sustained fear in humans may

  1. Human head lice and pubic lice reveal the presence of several Acinetobacter species in Algiers, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mana, Nassima; Louni, Meriem; Parola, Philippe; Bitam, Idir

    2017-08-01

    There are two majorspecies of medically important lice that parasitize humans: Phthirus pubis, found in pubic hair, and Pediculus humanus. Pediculus humanus consists of two eco types that live in specific niches on the human host: body lice (Pediculus humanus humanus), found on the human body and clothing, and head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis), found on the scalp. To date, only body lice are known to be vectors of human disease; however, it has recently been reported that the DNA of several bacterial agents has been detected in head lice, raising questions about their role in the transmission of pathogens. This issue caught our attention, in addition to the fact that the pathogenic bacteria associated with P. pubis and P. humanus capitis have never been investigated in Algeria. To investigate this,molecular techniques (real-time PCR) were used to screen for the presence of Acinetobacter spp., Bartonella spp., Borrelia spp. and Rickettsia prowazekii DNA from P. humanus capitis (64 lice) collected from schoolchildren,and P. pubis (4 lice),collected from one adultman living in Algiers. Positive samples for Acinetobacter spp.were identified by sequencing therpoBgene. Conventional PCR targeting the partial Cytb gene was used to determine the phylogenetic clade of the collected lice. Of the 64 samples collected, Acinetobacter spp. DNA was detected in 17/64 (27%) of head lice, identified as: A. baumannii (14%), A. johnsonii (11%) and A. variabilis (2%). Of the four P. pubissamples, 2(50%) were positive for A. johnsonii. The phylogenetic tree based on the Cytb gene revealed that P. humanus capitis were grouped into clades A and B. In this study, we report andidentify for the first time Acinetobacter spp.in Algerian P. pubis and P. humanus capitis. The detection of the genus Acinetobacter in lice should not be underestimated, especially in P. humanus capitis, which is distributed worldwide. However, additional epidemiological data are required to determine if human lice

  2. When Should We Care About Sustainability? Applying Human Security as the Decisive Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander K. Lautensach

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available It seems intuitively clear that not all human endeavours warrant equal concern over the extent of their sustainability. This raises the question about what criteria might best serve for their prioritisation. We refute, on empirical and theoretical grounds, the counterclaim that sustainability should be of no concern regardless of the circumstances. Human security can serve as a source of criteria that are both widely shared and can be assessed in a reasonably objective manner. Using established classifications, we explore how four forms of sustainability (environmental, economic, social, and cultural relate to the four pillars of human security (environmental, economic, sociopolitical, and health-related. Our findings, based on probable correlations, suggest that the criteria of human security allow for a reliable discrimination between relatively trivial incidences of unsustainable behavior and those that warrant widely shared serious concern. They also confirm that certain sources of human insecurity, such as poverty or violent conflict, tend to perpetuate unsustainable behavior, a useful consideration for the design of development initiatives. Considering that human security enjoys wide and increasing political support among the international community, it is to be hoped that by publicizing the close correlation between human security and sustainability greater attention will be paid to the latter and to its careful definition.

  3. The presence and prognostic significance of human papillomavirus in squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkul, Evren; Yilmaz, Ismail; Narli, Gizem; Babayigit, Mustafa Alparslan; Gungor, Atila; Demirel, Dilaver

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of HPV in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and correlate it with patients' clinicopathological data. In total, 78 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients enrolled in this study. The presence of genotype-specific HPV DNA was evaluated using Genotyping Assay in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue which was diagnosed between 2005 and 2015. All samples were also evaluated for p16 immunohistochemical staining. HPV DNA and p16 status were assessed in terms of location, smoking, alcohol consumption, lymph node status, tumor stage, overall survival, disease-free survival, perineural invasion, and vascular invasion retrospectively. Five test samples were excluded from the study due to inadequate deoxyribonucleic acid purity. HPV DNA was detected in 19 of 73 (26.02%) in patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Human papilloma virus genotyping revealed double human papilloma virus in one case (types 16 and 59) and HPV 16 in the remaining cases. Although HPV-positive cases showed slightly better 3 years survival than HPV-negative ones, this finding was not statistically significant (overall survival p = 0.417, HPV positive: 92.3%, HPV negative: 81.4%, and disease-free survival p = 0.526, HPV positive: 93.8%, HPV negative: 80.9%). The presence of HPV DNA was not significantly associated with any clinicopathological features (p > 0.05). Among 73 patients, only 4 had an immunohistochemical staining of p16 and these patients were also HPV DNA 16 positive. Although our study results revealed a slightly better survival in patients with HPV DNA positivity for HPV 16 compared to the negative ones, the difference was not statistically significant. However, an increasing rate in especially high-risk-type HPV-16 prevalence in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma by RT-PCR method was observed compared to our previous study. Although the presence of HPV in laryngeal SCCs seems to be associated with slightly better

  4. Presence of melanopsin in human crystalline lens epithelial cells and its role in melatonin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkozi, Hanan Awad; Wang, Xiaoyu; Perez de Lara, Maria J; Pintor, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Melanopsin is a non-image forming photoreceptor known to be present in the retina and it is considered to have light regulated tasks among other functions. In the present work, melanopsin presence in human lens epithelial cells as well as in human lens tissue is described for the first time. Moreover, studying the concentration of melatonin and its synthesising enzyme AANAT proved a clear link between melanopsin activation and the suppression of melatonin synthesis. Melanopsin sensitivity to specific wavelength (465-480 nm, blue) was confirmed after making temporal studies incubating lens epithelial cells under light, red, green, blue and total darkness for 2, 4, 8, 12 h and analysing the concentration of both melatonin and its synthesising enzyme AANAT, discovering that melatonin levels after submitting cells to total darkness are significantly higher to ones submitted to white or specifically blue light (***p melatonin was also determined by using a specific inhibitor AA92593 and by inhibiting melanopsin-induced phospholipase C activation. Under this situation neither AANAT nor melatonin levels changed under light conditions (n = 4, ***p melatonin synthesis with the corresponding implication as an antioxidant substance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Affordable Exploration of Mars: Recommendations from a Community Workshop on Sustainable Initial Human Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thronson, Harley; Carberry, Chris; Cassady, R. J.; Cooke, Doug; Hopkins, Joshua; Perino, Maria A.; Kirkpatrick, Jim; Raftery, Michael; Westenberg, Artemis; Zucker, Richard

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing consensus that within two decades initial human missions to Mars are affordable under plausible budget assumptions and with sustained international participation. In response to this idea, a distinguished group of experts from the Mars exploration stakeholder communities attended the "Affording Mars" workshop at George Washington University in December, 2013. Participants reviewed and discussed scenarios for affordable and sustainable human and robotic exploration of Mars, the role of the International Space Station over the coming decade as the essential early step toward humans to Mars, possible "bridge" missions in the 2020s, key capabilities required for affordable initial missions, international partnerships, and a usable definition of affordability and sustainability. We report here the findings, observations, and recommendations that were agreed to at that workshop.

  6. Human Influence and Threat to Biodiversity and Sustainable Living ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than half the habitable surface of the planet has already been significantly altered by human activity. Scientists suggested that this planets species are on the verge of mass extinction while our knowledge of diversity and variability of plants, animals, microorganisms and the ecosystem in which they occurs incomplete.

  7. Human Exploration Missions - Maturing Technologies to Sustain Crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Chiaki; Koch, Bernhard; Reese, Terrence G.

    2012-01-01

    Human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit will be long duration with abort scenarios of days to months. Providing crews with the essentials of life such as clean air and potable water means recycling human metabolic wastes back to useful products. Individual technologies are under development for such things as CO2 scrubbing, recovery of O2 from CO2, turning waste water into potable water, and so on. But in order to fully evaluate and mature technologies fully they must be tested in a relevant, high-functionality environment; a systems environment where technologies are challenged with real human metabolic wastes. It is for this purpose that an integrated systems ground testing capability at the Johnson Space Center is being readied for testing. The relevant environment will include deep space habitat human accommodations, sealed atmosphere of 8 psi total pressure and 32% oxygen concentration, life support systems (food, air, water), communications, crew accommodations, medical, EVA, tools, etc. Testing periods will approximate those of the expected missions (such as a near Earth asteroid, Earth ]Moon L2 or L1, the moon, and Mars). This type of integrated testing is needed not only for research and technology development but later during the mission design, development, test, and evaluation phases of preparing for the mission.

  8. Late Holocene records of fire and human presence in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiriadis, Elena; Vecchiato, Marco; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Battistel, Dario; McWethy, Dave B.; Whitlock, Cathy L.; Kehrwald, Natalie M.; Barbante, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    New Zealand, and the South Island in particular, can be considered an excellent test site for the study of the early impact of humans on the environment for two main reasons: the Polynesian settlement occurred only about 700-800 y BP and resulted in abrupt and huge landscape modifications. Burning forest for land clearance impacted dramatically on an ecosystem that was not adapted to fire, changing the composition of the vegetation as documented by sedimentary charcoal and pollen records [1]. Although charcoal data give incontrovertible evidence of some unprecedented fire events right after the arrival of the Māori, its significance as a tracer for local and anthropogenic fire events has been questioned, stressing the need for new markers to confirm and complete the information about human presence and its effective impact [2]. In the present work, faecal sterols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were individuated as suitable molecular markers and analyzed by GC-MS in a sediment core from Lake Kirkpatrick, located in the Lake Wakatipu catchment at 570 m a.s.l. in the South Island of New Zealand. Coprostanol accounts for about 60% of total sterol content in human faeces, being much less relevant in animal dejections [3]. Together with its degradation product epi-coprostanol, it is well conserved in sedimentary archives and can be highly useful in paleoenvironmental reconstructions of human settlements. PAHs are produced in relevant amounts by combustion in conditions of oxygen depletion, and diagnostic ratios (DR) between specific molecules can be used for inferring fuel and sources [4]. The charcoal record for Lake Kirkpatrick shows major fire episodes around AD 1350, confirmed by corresponding high levels of PAHs ascribable to biomass burning (as further evidenced by DR) at c. AD 1350. Moreover, the same trend is observed also in the fluxes of coprostanol and epi-coprostanol, whose sum results in two peaks at c. AD 1346 and 1351. This finding confirms

  9. Self-sustained circadian rhythm in cultured human mononuclear cells isolated from peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisawa, Takashi; Numazawa, Kahori; Shimada, Hiroko; Izutsu, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Kato, Nobumasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Mori, Akio; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2010-02-01

    Disturbed circadian rhythmicity is associated with human diseases such as sleep and mood disorders. However, study of human endogenous circadian rhythm is laborious and time-consuming, which hampers the elucidation of diseases. It has been reported that peripheral tissues exhibit circadian rhythmicity as the suprachiasmatic nucleus-the center of the biological clock. We tried to study human circadian rhythm using cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from a single collection of venous blood. Activated human PBMCs showed self-sustained circadian rhythm of clock gene expression, which indicates that they are useful for investigating human endogenous circadian rhythm.

  10. Integrated Network Architecture for Sustained Human and Robotic Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Gary; Cesarone, Robert; Deutsch, Leslie; Edwards, Charles; Soloff, Jason; Ely, Todd; Cook, Brian; Morabito, David; Hemmati, Hamid; Piazolla, Sabino; hide

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Enterprise is planning a series of human and robotic missions to the Earth's moon and to Mars. These missions will require communication and navigation services. This paper1 sets forth presumed requirements for such services and concepts for lunar and Mars telecommunications network architectures to satisfy the presumed requirements. The paper suggests that an inexpensive ground network would suffice for missions to the near-side of the moon. A constellation of three Lunar Telecommunications Orbiters connected to an inexpensive ground network could provide continuous redundant links to a polar lunar base and its vicinity. For human and robotic missions to Mars, a pair of areostationary satellites could provide continuous redundant links between Earth and a mid-latitude Mars base in conjunction with the Deep Space Network augmented by large arrays of 12-m antennas on Earth.

  11. The protective effect of geniposide on human neuroblastoma cells in the presence of formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Formaldehyde can induce misfolding and aggregation of Tau protein and β amyloid protein, which are characteristic pathological features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). An increase in endogenous formaldehyde concentration in the brain is closely related to dementia in aging people. Therefore, the discovery of effective drugs to counteract the adverse impact of formaldehyde on neuronal cells is beneficial for the development of appropriate treatments for age-associated cognitive decline. Methods In this study, we assessed the neuroprotective properties of TongLuoJiuNao (TLJN), a traditional Chinese medicine preparation, against formaldehyde stress in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line). The effect of TLJN and its main ingredients (geniposide and ginsenoside Rg1) on cell viability, apoptosis, intracellular antioxidant activity and the expression of apoptotic-related genes in the presence of formaldehyde were monitored. Results Cell counting studies showed that in the presence of TLJN, the viability of formaldehyde-treated SH-SY5Y cells significantly recovered. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that the morphology of formaldehyde-injured cells was rescued by TLJN and geniposide, an effective ingredient of TLJN. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of geniposide on formaldehyde-induced apoptosis was dose-dependent. The activity of intracellular antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) increased, as did mRNA and protein levels of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl-2 after the addition of geniposide. In contrast, the expression of the apoptotic-related gene - P53, apoptotic executer - caspase 3 and apoptotic initiator - caspase 9 were downregulated after geniposide treatment. Conclusions Our results indicate that geniposide can protect SH-SY5Y cells against formaldehyde stress through modulating the expression of Bcl-2, P53, caspase 3 and caspase 9, and by increasing the activity of intracellular superoxide dismutase and glutathione

  12. Information and entropy theory for the sustainability of coupled human and natural systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey L. Mayer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For coupled human and natural systems (CHANS, sustainability can be defined operationally as a feasible, desirable set of flows (material, currency, information, energy, individuals, etc. that can be maintained despite internal changes and changes in the environment. Sustainable development can be defined as the process by which CHANS can be moved toward sustainability. Specific indicators that give insight into the structure and behavior of feedbacks in CHANS are of particular interest because they would aid in the sustainable management of these systems through an understanding of the structures that govern system behavior. However, the use of specific feedbacks as monitoring tools is rare, possibly because of uncertainties regarding the nature of their dynamics and the diversity of types of feedbacks encountered in these systems. An information theory perspective may help to rectify this situation, as evidenced by recent research in sustainability science that supports the use of unit-free measures such as Shannon entropy and Fisher information to aggregate disparate indicators. These measures have been used for spatial and temporal datasets to monitor progress toward sustainability targets. Here, we provide a review of information theory and a theoretical framework for studying the dynamics of feedbacks in CHANS. We propose a combination of information-based indices that might productively inform our sustainability goals, particularly when related to key feedbacks in CHANS.

  13. Evaluation of a microwave and infrared human-presence sensing system for agricultural equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutske, J M; Gilbert, W; Chaplin, J

    2001-11-01

    The potential use of electronic safety sensors to protect operators from agricultural equipment with rotating hazards has been identified and discussed as a possible means to prevent traumatic entanglement injury. A multi-sensor human-presence sensing system to protect persons approaching a rotating PTO shaft powering a stationary implement was developed using commercially available, passive infrared and microwave sensors. A control and data acquisition system was designed and constructed to evaluate sensor performance and response. The sensor system performed well during 822 warm weather test passes in which a person approached the potentially hazardous area near the drawbar and PTO/IID located between an IH 986 test tractor and a self-unloading forage wagon. During the 822 test passes, there were no false alarms and no misses. Operators approached the hazard space walking from 92 to 227 cm/second. During tests, the sensing system yielded warning times generally between 0.5 and 1.0 seconds, providing an estimate of the time available to accomplish machine shutdown or operator warnings. Additional cold weather tests caused the control and data acquisition hardware to function erratically. This work suggests that multi-sensor human detection systems have the potential to reduce false alarms through redundancy when more than one sensor is required to detect a person before the system signals a "detect" condition. However, the use of multiple, redundant sensors also increases the potential for a "miss." Further work is needed to determine whether these types of sensor can yield timely enough information to prevent injury via mechanical shutdown or operator warnings.

  14. Biomimicry: a Necessary Eco-Ethical Dimension for a Future Human Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Collado-Ruano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on the concept of “global citizenship” from a transdisciplinary methodology and a biomimetic approach. A sustainable human image appears with this epistemological symbiosis, that constitutes the DNA of a genuine tool of civilizational transformation. On the one hand, the transdisciplinary methodology is opened to the multi-referential conception of the three pillars proposed by Basarab Nicolescu (2008: levels of reality, logic of the included middle, and complexity. On the other hand, the concept of biomimicry approached by Janine M. Benyus (2012 identifies nine operating principles of life in order to mimic nature in the reformulation of new sustainable human production systems with the biosphere. The aim of this study is to identify international agreements on environmental and sustainable development, to elaborate some contribution in the post-2015 eco-political-educational strategic framework led by the United Nations with the Sustainable Development Goals. With the purpose of strengthening ties between education and sustainability through symbiotic bridges between nature and culture, the work identifies the vital axises that constitute the interdependence of ecosystems to make a biomimetic application in the social, political, and educational structures of human systems. Then, this paper is an innovational research that seeks to integrate the eco-ethics as a practice in the “Global Citizenship Education” proposed for UNESCO for next decade 2015-2025.

  15. Presence of Staphylococcus spp. and Candida spp. in the human oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Clélia Aparecida de Paiva

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of yeasts and staphylococci in the oral cavity is important because they can act as supplementary microbiota and in certain situations can cause oral or systemic diseases. The aim of this work was to study the prevalence of Candida spp. and Staphylococcus spp. in the human oral cavity. Oral rinses were collected from sixty-eight individuals according to the technique described by Samaranayake and MacFarlane and then cultured on Sabouraud medium supplemented with chloramphenicol and Baird-Parker agar. After the incubation period, the microorganisms were isolated and identified through biochemical tests. The data obtained were statistically analysed by ANOVA. Candida spp. were isolated from 61.76% of the examined individuals and C. albicans was the more frequently isolated specie. Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from 95.60% of the individuals and 41 strains were coagulase negative (63%. Among the coagulase positive strains, nine were S. aureus, 11 S. hyicus and 4 S. schleiferi subspecie coagulans. No correlation was observed between the counts (cfu of the isolated Candida spp. and Staphylococcus spp.

  16. The Human Telomere Sequence, (TTAGGG4, in the Absence and Presence of Cosolutes: A Spectroscopic Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal R. Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, biophysical studies of nucleic acids have been carried out under near ideal conditions, i.e., low buffer concentration (e.g., 10 mM phosphate, pH 7, low ionic strength (e.g., 100 mM and, for optical studies, low concentrations of DNA (e.g., 1 × 10−6 M. Although valuable structural and thermodynamic data have come out of these studies, the conditions, for the most, part, are inadequate to simulate realistic cellular conditions. The increasing interest in studying biomolecules under more cellular-like conditions prompted us to investigate the effect of osmotic stress on the structural and thermodynamic properties of DNA oligomers containing the human telomere sequence (TTAGGG. Here, we report the characterization of (TTAGGG4 in potassium phosphate buffer with increasing percent PEG (polyethylene glycol or acetonitrile. In general, the presence of these cosolutes induces a conformational change from a unimolecular hybrid structure to a multimolecular parallel stranded structure. Hence, the structural change is accompanied with a change in the molecularity of quadruplex formation.

  17. Oral mucosal lesions: association with the presence of antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, S L; Engel, D; Truelove, E; DeRouen, T; Morton, T; Schubert, M; Dunphy, C; Wood, R W

    1989-07-01

    To assess the relationship between oral lesions and antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus, oral examinations of 803 homosexual males were conducted at the time of serologic testing. Nineteen percent were HIV seropositive. Thirty percent of antibody-positive subjects had one or more oral lesion(s), as compared with 7% of antibody-negative subjects (p less than 0.001). The presence of oral lesions was significantly associated with HIV seropositivity: a subject was 5.7 times as likely to have serum antibodies if he had one or more oral lesions (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 9.1; p less than 0.001). This significant association with HIV seropositivity was only partially explained by cigarette smoking (adjusted odds ratio 3.1; 1.4-6.8; less than 0.006). Specific conditions that were significantly associated with seropositivity included candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, periodontal disease, and Kaposi's sarcoma. Other diseases identified included acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, mucocutaneous ulcerations, and oral warts. Oral findings may occur earlier in the natural history of infection than previously reported.

  18. Building the Leviathan – Voluntary centralisation of punishment power sustains cooperation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jörg; Méder, Zsombor Z.; Okamoto-Barth, Sanae; Riedl, Arno

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cooperation among humans is puzzling because cooperators can be exploited by free riders. Peer punishment has been suggested as a solution to this puzzle, but cumulating evidence questions its robustness in sustaining cooperation. Amongst others, punishment fails when it is not powerful enough, or when it elicits counter-punishment. Existing research, however, has ignored that the distribution of punishment power can be the result of social interactions. We introduce a novel experiment in which individuals can transfer punishment power to others. We find that while decentralised peer punishment fails to overcome free riding, the voluntary transfer of punishment power enables groups to sustain cooperation. This is achieved by non-punishing cooperators empowering those who are willing to punish in the interest of the group. Our results show how voluntary power centralisation can efficiently sustain cooperation, which could explain why hierarchical power structures are widespread among animals and humans. PMID:26888519

  19. Accounting for Natural Resources and Environmental Sustainability: Linking Ecosystem Services to Human Well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of society's greatest challenges is to sustain natural resources while promoting economic growth and quality of life. In the face of this challenge. society must measure the effectiveness of programs established to protect human health and safeguard the environment. The impet...

  20. Assessing impacts of payments for watershed services on sustainability in coupled human and natural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidi Asbjornsen; Alex S. Mayer; Kelly W. Jones; Theresa Selfa; Leonardo Saenz; Randall K. Kolka; Kathleen E. Halvorsen

    2015-01-01

    Payments for watershed services (PWS) as a policy tool for enhancing water quality and supply have gained momentum in recent years, but their ability to lead to sustainable watershed outcomes is uncertain. Consequently, the demand for effective monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of PWS impacts on coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) and their implications for...

  1. Human behavior and environmental sustainability : Problems, driving forces, and research topics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlek, Charles; Steg, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Social and behavioral research is crucial for securing environmental sustainability and improving human living environments. To put the following articles into broader perspective, we first give an overview of worldwide developments in environmental quality and trends in resource use. Second, five

  2. Lithium fluxes indicate presence of Na-Cl cotransport (NCC) in human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauf, Peter K; Chimote, Ameet A; Adragna, Norma C

    2008-01-01

    During regulatory volume decrease (RVD) of human lens epithelial cells (hLECs) by clotrimazole (CTZ)-sensitive K fluxes, Na-K-2Cl cotransport (NKCC) remains active and K-Cl cotransport (KCC) inactive. To determine whether such an abnormal behavior was caused by RVD-induced cell shrinkage, NKCC was measured in the presence of either CTZ or in high K media to prevent RVD. NKCC transports RbCl + NaCl, and LiCl + KCl; thus ouabain-insensitive, bumetanide-sensitive (BS) or Cl-dependent (ClD) Rb and Li fluxes were determined in hyposmotic high NaCl media with CTZ, or in high KCl media alone, or with sulfamate (Sf) or nitrate as Cl replacement at varying Rb, Li or Cl mol fractions (MF). Unexpectedly, NKCC was inhibited by 80% with CTZ (IC(50) = 31 microM). In isosmotic (300 mOsM) K, Li influx was approximately 1/3 of Rb influx in Na, 50% lower in Sf, and bumetanide-insensitive (BI). In hypotonic (200 mOsM) K, only the ClD but not BS Li fluxes were detected. At Li MFs from 0.1-1, Li fluxes fitted a bell-shaped curve maxing at approximately 0.6 Li MF, with the BS fluxes equaling approximately 1/4 of the ClD-Li influx. The difference, i.e. the BI/ClD Li influx, saturated with increasing Li and Cl MFs, with K(ms) for Li of 11 with, and 7 mM without K, and of approximately 46 mM for Cl. Inhibition of this K-independent Li influx by thiazides was weak whilst furosemide (<100 microM) was ineffective. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blots verified presence of both NKCC1 and Na-Cl cotransport (NCC). In conclusion, in hyposmotic high K media, which prevents CTZ-sensitive K flux-mediated RVD in hLECs, NKCC1, though molecularly expressed, was functionally silent. However, a K-independent and moderately thiazide-sensitive ClD-Li flux, i.e. LiCC, likely occurring through NCC was detected operationally and molecularly. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Injecting learning experience into geoethics for human and natural sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookall, David

    2016-04-01

    Our early life experience has a strong influence on our actions in later life. Humans today are just starting to re-learn, collectively, how to treat Earth with the respect that it deserves and that is needed for our offspring to inherit a decent home. However, we still have a long way to go to instill in people at large the ethics, knowledge and skills necessary to ensure a healthy journey for humanity on spaceship. The experience of early upbringing, of schooling and of everyday life is probably the only path strong enough to develop in people a strong desire for ethical behaviour towards their environment. The problem is that the measures taken today to ensure the development of ethical behaviours in the population at large are woefully inadequate. At best, western school programmes contain a few lessons devoted to the environment, and even then they usually just pay lip service to the basics of the environment; they rarely aim to instill skills and knowledge in order to understand and care deeply for the environment. My presentation will suggest some practical ways to help communities build ethical frameworks and strategies to guide and generate tools, methods and activities that guide young people (pupils, students, scholars, researchers) to toward more ethical behaviours regarding their environment and their communities. Examples might include: - Developing geoethical dimensions of internships, in all areas; - Designing, testing and running simulation/games+debriefing providing a rich affective-cognitive context for grappling with geoethical problems- eg, FISH BANKS, KEEP COOL. - Pressuring governments to make geoethics, environmental care and climate change understanding central components of (almost) all educational programmes (in, eg, history, language, business, law, medicine, etc). - Subsidizing environmental-care summer schools for families and teachers at all levels. - Etc. One of my actions is founding a academic journal in the area, maybe with the

  4. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT – HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONNECTIONS IN THE POST-TRUTH ERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREEA CONSTANTINESCU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Following the distancing of current policy from economic rigors and ethical demands aimed at redistribution of wealth, modern societies are parasitized by post-truth of actual facts. It distorts the shape and content of general interest data, for example political distortion of scientific evidence proving anthropogenic climate change. Under these circumstances, the question "to what extent economist’s truth stating what you cannot measure you cannot manage is sustained?" becomes absolutely legitimate. Regarding sustainable development management, monitoring the degree of achievement of Sustainable Development Goals is no longer sufficient to track progress in this area. Therefore, experts propose to introduce as much as possible qualitative data which, combined with quantitative data, will enhance their relevance and make them harder to be diverted for political purposes. This paper follows this direction, trying to prove that protection of data’s real meaning can be achieved by systemic analysis of all data originating from monitoring certain processes, which can be aggregated, with applicability in sustainable development. Thus, analyzing together data on sustainable development and those that indicates the state of human development emphasizes on one hand, the intrinsic link between these concepts and, on the other, maintain the sense of sustainability even in the post-truth era.

  5. Investigation into the presence of human papillomavirus in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Brett J; Chitale, Dhananjay; Chen, Kang Mei; Worsham, Maria J; Yaremchuk, Kathleen

    2017-05-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is known to infect the tissues of the oropharynx as demonstrated in HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). HPV has also been shown to induce benign lymphoid hypertrophy. We sought to investigate an association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the presence of HPV in palatine and lingual tonsillar oropharyngeal tissue. Case series with chart review. This retrospective laboratory-based study of oropharyngeal tissue from patients with OSA included patients >18 years old who underwent surgical treatment for OSA at a single institution between January 2012 and May 2014. Surgical specimens of adequate size were analyzed for HPV6, 11, and 16 using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction from DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks. Student t test, Pearson χ2 test, and linear logistic regression were used to assess comparisons of body mass index (BMI), apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), age, and gender between HPV-positive and HPV-negative groups. Of 99 cases included in the study, six were positive for HPV: two with HPV16 and four with HPV6. BMI, AHI, age, and gender showed no significant differences between the HPV-positive and HPV-negative groups. Logistic regression to predict HPV positivity accounting for each variable and multivariate analysis were not statistically significant. Our study did not show HPV to have a statistically significant association with OSA. None of the covariates analyzed (BMI, AHI, gender, age) predicted HPV positivity in surgically resected oropharyngeal tissue from OSA patients. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1231-1234, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Gas6-Axl signaling in presence of Sunitinib is enhanced, diversified and sustained in renal tumor cells, resulting in tumor-progressive advantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Anna; Fritz, Helena K M; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2017-06-01

    Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (CCRCC) is a lethal cancer with bad prognosis due to development of chemoresistance and recurrence of more aggressive tumors. Investigation of Gas6-mediated Axl signaling in CCRCC and endothelial cells reveals a Sunitinib resistant Gas6-Axl signaling that is sustained and enhanced and specifically triggers downstream AKT and PRAS40 activation in an intensified manner. Gas6-induced Axl signaling in presence of Sunitinib is also diversified displaying onset of Axl-dependent EGFR and METR activation and activation of classical MAPK pathways. Gas6+Sunitinib-adapted CCRCC cells present increased viability and decreased apoptosis and enhanced production of the multi-tumorigenic Osteopontin (OPN) and of one of its activator matrix metalloproteinase-7. Axl activity is necessary for CCRCC cell sphere formation and the ability of the cells to attach after non-adhesive growth. In addition, Gas6+Sunitinib-adapted CCRCC cells displayed enhanced migration and sphere formation, both mechanisms being Axl and OPN dependent. Altogether, this suggests that Sunitinib while targeting endothelial cells and tumor angiogenesis, simultaneously provides protumorigenic effects due to a constitutively, intensified and divergent Gas6-Axl system. Gas6-mediated Axl signaling, which is enhanced and diversified in the presence of Sunitinib possibly contributes to acquired chemoresistance, recurrence of aggressive disease and metastasis of CCRCC tumors. Therefore, combinatorial Axl-targeted therapy might be beneficial for CCRCC patients intended for Sunitinib treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Early variability in the conceptualisation of "sustainable development and human factors".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The sub-discipline of "sustainable development and human factors" is relatively new, first being used in 2006 with a Technical Committee of the IEA being established only in 2009 and a similar special interest group on "green ergonomics" at the Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors being established in 2010. In general though, the definitions and practice of "sustainable development" is highly contentious and ambiguous across a range of disciplines. This paper examines the diversity of definitions and approaches to sustainable development and human factors in the early papers in this sub-discipline. An examination of 45 chapters and papers (from 2008 to 2011) reveals a surprising consistency in the definitions used for sustainable development but also a large proportion of the papers where no definitions are given at all. The majority of papers were, however, biased towards an economic capital and social capital emphasis, which is to be expected of work traditionally in the ergonomics paradigm. Further, most papers were theoretical in nature demonstrating a great opportunity for empirical work. The variability in definitions is discussed in relation to the future challenges facing the growth of this emergent sub-discipline and opportunities for further theoretical and empirical work.

  8. HUMAN CAPITAL AND EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN A GLOBAL WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin Chiriac

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The world continues to face various critical challenges such as: human-induced climate change, the rapid depletion of natural resources, the loss of biodiversity, increased poverty, the dependency of our economic systems on continuous growth in consumerism and so forth. Sustainable economic development focuses on the development of the economic infrastructure, in which the efficient management of our natural and human resources is crucially important. This paper presents on one hand the main steps made for creating, defining and applying the principles of sustainable development and on the other hand, it tries to highlight the role of education seen here as a powerful factor in modeling our most important resource: human capital.

  9. Inhibition of Apoptosis Stages of Human Blood Lymphocytes after Exposure to Carbon Monoxide in the Presence of Recombinant Interleukin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukhov, V G; Tyunina, O I

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effect of carbon monoxide (60-, 75-, and 90-min exposure) on the expression of antiapoptotic proteins (survivin and Bcl-2) in human blood lymphocytes in the presence of recombinant IL-2 in an apoptosis-inducing dose (0.1 ng/ml). Incubation of cells in atmosphere with carbon monoxide in the presence of recombinant IL-2 was accompanied by accumulation of Bcl-2 protein with simultaneous decrease of survivin content. It was concluded that carbon monoxide plays a role in the dysregulation of apoptosis of human blood lymphocytes Bcl-2 (i.e. CO inhibits the proapoptotic effect of recombinant IL-2).

  10. Categorizing biomarkers of the human exposome and developing metrics for assessing environmental sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D

    2012-01-01

    The concept of maintaining environmental sustainability broadly encompasses all human activities that impact the global environment, including the production of energy, use and management of finite resources such as petrochemicals, metals, food production (farmland, fresh and ocean waters), and potable water sources (rivers, lakes, aquifers), as well as preserving the diversity of the surrounding ecosystems. The ultimate concern is how one can manage Spaceship Earth in the long term to sustain the life, health, and welfare of the human species and the planet's flora and fauna. On a more intimate scale, one needs to consider the human interaction with the environment as expressed in the form of the exposome, which is defined as all exogenous and endogenous exposures from conception onward, including exposures from diet, lifestyle, and internal biology, as a quantity of critical interest to disease etiology. Current status and subsequent changes in the measurable components of the exposome, the human biomarkers, could thus conceivably be used to assess the sustainability of the environmental conditions with respect to human health. The basic theory is that a shift away from sustainability will be reflected in outlier measurements of human biomarkers. In this review, the philosophy of long-term environmental sustainability is explored in the context of human biomarker measurements and how empirical data can be collected and interpreted to assess if solutions to existing environmental problems might have unintended consequences. The first part discusses four conventions in the literature for categorizing environmental biomarkers and how different types of biomarker measurements might fit into the various grouping schemes. The second part lays out a sequence of data management strategies to establish statistics and patterns within the exposome that reflect human homeostasis and how changes or perturbations might be interpreted in light of external environmental

  11. Human-related factors regulate the presence of domestic dogs in protected areas

    OpenAIRE

    Soto Navarro, Carolina; Palomares, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Copyright © Fauna & Flora International 2014. The presence of domestic species such as dogs Canis familiaris in protected areas can cause problems for native species as a result of competition, predation and disease transmission. To improve our ability to design effective control policies we investigated the factors affecting detection of dog tracks in a Mediterranean national park. We investigated the presence of dogs across 69 2 × 2 km grid squares in Doñana National Park in south-west Spai...

  12. Biodiversity and human well-being: an essential link for sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Shahid; Chazdon, Robin; Duffy, J Emmett; Prager, Case; Worm, Boris

    2016-12-14

    As society strives to transition towards more sustainable development pathways, it is important to properly conceptualize the link between biodiversity (i.e. genes, traits, species and other dimensions) and human well-being (HWB; i.e. health, wealth, security and other dimensions). Here, we explore how published conceptual frameworks consider the extent to which the biodiversity-HWB links are being integrated into public discourse and scientific research and the implications of our findings for sustainable development. We find that our understanding has gradually evolved from seeing the value of biodiversity as an external commodity that may influence HWB to biodiversity as fundamental to HWB. Analysis of the literature trends indicates increasing engagement with the terms biodiversity, HWB and sustainable development in the public, science and policy spheres, but largely as independent rather than linked terms. We suggest that a consensus framework for sustainable development should include biodiversity explicitly as a suite of internal variables that both influence and are influenced by HWB. Doing so will enhance clarity and help shape coherent research and policy priorities. We further suggest that the absence of this link in development can inadvertently lead to a ratcheting down of biodiversity by otherwise well-meaning policies. Such biotic impoverishment could lock HWB at minimum levels or lead to its decline and halt or reverse progress in achieving sustainable development. © 2016 The Authors.

  13. Sustainable Wearables: Wearable Technology for Enhancing the Quality of Human Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoon Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to elicit insights about sustainable wearables by investigating recent advancements in wearable technology and their applications. Wearable technology has advanced considerably from a technical perspective, but it has stagnated due to barriers without penetrating wider society despite early positive expectations. This situation is the motivation behind the focus on studies by many research groups in recent years into wearable applications that can provide the best value from a human-oriented perspective. The expectation is that a new means to resolve the issue can be found from a viewpoint of sustainability; this is the main point of this paper. This paper first focuses on the trend of wearable technology like bodily status monitoring, multi-wearable device control, and smart networking between wearable sensors. Second, the development intention of such technology is investigated. Finally, this paper discusses about the applications of current wearable technology from the sustainable perspective, rather than detailed description of the component technologies employed in wearables. In this paper, the definition of sustainable wearables is discussed in the context of improving the quality of individual life, social impact, and social public interest; those wearable applications include the areas of wellness, healthcare, assistance for the visually impaired, disaster relief, and public safety. In the future, wearables will not be simple data trackers or fun accessories but will gain extended objectives and meanings that play a valuable role for individuals and societies. Successful and sustainable wearables will lead to positive changes for both individuals and societies overall.

  14. Intergenerational Efforts to Develop a Healthy Environment for Everyone: Sustainability as a Human Rights Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Tina M; Savage, Caroline E; Newsham, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    As climate change proceeds at an unprecedented rate, concern for the natural environment has increased. The world's population aging also continues to rise at an unprecedented rate, giving greater attention to the implications of an older population. The two trends are linked through the fact that changes to the environment affect older adults, and older adults affect the environment. Sustainability is, therefore, an intergenerational phenomenon, and protecting resources today leaves a positive legacy and enhances quality of life for future generations. Older adults have much to share with younger generations about behaviors that promote sustainable living, yet few sustainability efforts are intergenerational in nature. As large numbers of people currently subsist without secure access to basic needs, ensuring equitable resource consumption for all generations is urgent and aligns with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Through exploring linkages between aging and sustainability, we identify intergenerational strategies to protect the environment and promote human rights and quality of life for older adults. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Analysis of clonal expansions through the normal and premalignant human breast epithelium reveals the presence of luminal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cereser, B. (Biancastella); M. Jansen (Marnix); Austin, E. (Emily); Elia, G. (George); Mcfarlane, T. (Taneisha); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); M.G. Daidone (Maria Grazia); Tadrous, P.J. (Paul J); Wright, N.A. (Nicholas A); L. Jones (Louise); Mcdonald, S.A. (Stuart Ac)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIt is widely accepted that the cell of origin of breast cancer is the adult mammary epithelial stem cell; however, demonstrating the presence and location of tissue stem cells in the human breast has proved difficult. Furthermore, we do not know the clonal architecture of the normal and

  16. Presence of highly oncogenic human papillomavirus in the oral mucosa of asymptomatic men

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Ana Paula; Gatto de Almeida, Flávia; Bonin, Camila Mareti; Martins Prata, Thiago Theodoro; Sobrinho Ávilla, Leandro; Junqueira Padovani, Cacilda Tezelli; Teixeira Ferreira, Alda Maria; dos Santos Fernandes, Carlos Eurico; Tozetti,Inês Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify highly oncogenic forms of human papillomavirus in the oral mucosa of asymptomatic men. METHODS: In this study, we analyzed samples of exfoliated cells from the oral cavity of 559 asymptomatic men. DNA-human papillomavirus was detected using the consensus primers PGMY09/11; viral genotyping was performed using type-specific PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism. RESULTS: DNA-human papillomavirus was detected in 1.3% of the s...

  17. A decision model for the sustainable protection of human rights in Italian Prison System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Maturo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The work starts from an analysis of the critical problems of the prison system in Italy. It aims to develop a decision-making model to address the issue of sustainable protection of human rights in prisons. It shows how, using the Saaty AHP procedure, it is possible to have an analytical reasoning guideline for the understanding of the validity of the various alternative choices, in order to facilitate the situation of the prisoners and their reintegration into society.

  18. Human B cells produce chemokine CXCL10 in the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Soren T; Salman, Ahmed M; Ruhwald, Morten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment. A candid......BACKGROUND: The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment....... A candidate for such regulation could be the chemokine CXCL10. CXCL10 is mainly produced by human monocytes, but a few reports have also found CXCL10 production by human B cells. The objective of this study was to investigate CXCL10 production by human B cells in response to in vitro stimulation with Mtb...

  19. Robustness of intrinsic connectivity networks in the human brain to the presence of acoustic scanner noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langers, Dave R. M.; van Dijk, Pim

    2011-01-01

    Evoked responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are affected by the presence of acoustic scanner noise (ASN). Particularly, stimulus-related activation of the auditory system and deactivation of the default mode network have repeatedly been shown to diminish. In contrast, little is

  20. Human B cells produce chemokine CXCL10 in the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Soren T; Salman, Ahmed M; Ruhwald, Morten; Ravn, Pernille; Brock, Inger; Elsheikh, Nabila; Andersen, Peter; Agger, Else Marie

    2015-01-01

    The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment. A candidate for such regulation could be the chemokine CXCL10. CXCL10 is mainly produced by human monocytes, but a few reports have also found CXCL10 production by human B cells. The objective of this study was to investigate CXCL10 production by human B cells in response to in vitro stimulation with Mtb antigens. We analyzed human blood samples from 30 volunteer donors using multiparameter flow cytometry, and identified a subgroup of B cells producing CXCL10 in response to in vitro stimulation with antigens. T cells did not produce CXCL10, but CXCL10 production by B cells appeared to be mediated via IFN-γ and dependent on contact with antigen-specific T cells recognizing the antigen. Human B cells are able to produce CXCL10 in an IFN-γ and T cell contact-dependent manner. The present findings suggest a possible mechanism through which B cells in part may influence granuloma formation in human tuberculosis (TB) and participate in infection control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Human Rights Lens on Full Employment and Decent Work in the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane F. Frey

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available On September 25, 2015, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs as the blueprint for a global partnership for peace, development, and human rights for the period 2016 to 2030. The 2030 agenda follows on the heels of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs, adopted in 2001, which set the international development agenda for the period 2001 to 2015. This article uses a human rights lens to demonstrate that the MDGs and the SDGs have not addressed full employment and decent work in a manner that is consistent with the Decent Work Agenda of the International Labour Organization and international human rights legal obligations of the UN member countries. It concludes that the new 2030 development agenda sadly aligns with market-based economic growth strategies rather than the realization of the human rights to full employment and decent work for all.

  2. Presence of human friends and pet dogs as moderators of autonomic responses to stress in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, K M; Blascovich, J; Tomaka, J; Kelsey, R M

    1991-10-01

    Autonomic responses were measured while 45 adult women performed a standard experimental stress task in the laboratory with only the experimenter present and 2 weeks later at home in the presence of a female friend, pet dog, or neither. Results demonstrated that autonomic reactivity was moderated by the presence of a companion, the nature of whom was critical to the size and direction of the effect. Ss in the friend condition exhibited higher physiological reactivity and poorer performance than subjects in the control and pet conditions. Ss in the pet condition showed less physiological reactivity during stressful tasks than Ss in the other conditions. The results are interpreted in terms of the degree to which friends and pets are perceived as evaluative during stressful task performance. Physiological reactivity was consistent across the laboratory and field settings.

  3. New Archaeological Evidence for an Early Human Presence at Monte Verde, Chile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom D Dillehay

    Full Text Available Questions surrounding the chronology, place, and character of the initial human colonization of the Americas are a long-standing focus of debate. Interdisciplinary debate continues over the timing of entry, the rapidity and direction of dispersion, the variety of human responses to diverse habitats, the criteria for evaluating the validity of early sites, and the differences and similarities between colonization in North and South America. Despite recent advances in our understanding of these issues, archaeology still faces challenges in defining interdisciplinary research problems, assessing the reliability of the data, and applying new interpretative models. As the debates and challenges continue, new studies take place and previous research reexamined. Here we discuss recent exploratory excavation at and interdisciplinary data from the Monte Verde area in Chile to further our understanding of the first peopling of the Americas. New evidence of stone artifacts, faunal remains, and burned areas suggests discrete horizons of ephemeral human activity in a sandur plain setting radiocarbon and luminescence dated between at least ~18,500 and 14,500 cal BP. Based on multiple lines of evidence, including sedimentary proxies and artifact analysis, we present the probable anthropogenic origins and wider implications of this evidence. In a non-glacial cold climate environment of the south-central Andes, which is challenging for human occupation and for the preservation of hunter-gatherer sites, these horizons provide insight into an earlier context of late Pleistocene human behavior in northern Patagonia.

  4. New Archaeological Evidence for an Early Human Presence at Monte Verde, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillehay, Tom D.; Ocampo, Carlos; Saavedra, José; Sawakuchi, Andre Oliveira; Vega, Rodrigo M.; Pino, Mario; Collins, Michael B.; Scott Cummings, Linda; Arregui, Iván; Villagran, Ximena S.; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Mella, Mauricio; González, Andrea; Dix, George

    2015-01-01

    Questions surrounding the chronology, place, and character of the initial human colonization of the Americas are a long-standing focus of debate. Interdisciplinary debate continues over the timing of entry, the rapidity and direction of dispersion, the variety of human responses to diverse habitats, the criteria for evaluating the validity of early sites, and the differences and similarities between colonization in North and South America. Despite recent advances in our understanding of these issues, archaeology still faces challenges in defining interdisciplinary research problems, assessing the reliability of the data, and applying new interpretative models. As the debates and challenges continue, new studies take place and previous research reexamined. Here we discuss recent exploratory excavation at and interdisciplinary data from the Monte Verde area in Chile to further our understanding of the first peopling of the Americas. New evidence of stone artifacts, faunal remains, and burned areas suggests discrete horizons of ephemeral human activity in a sandur plain setting radiocarbon and luminescence dated between at least ~18,500 and 14,500 cal BP. Based on multiple lines of evidence, including sedimentary proxies and artifact analysis, we present the probable anthropogenic origins and wider implications of this evidence. In a non-glacial cold climate environment of the south-central Andes, which is challenging for human occupation and for the preservation of hunter-gatherer sites, these horizons provide insight into an earlier context of late Pleistocene human behavior in northern Patagonia. PMID:26580202

  5. Towards a sustainable human right to water : Supporting vulnerable people and protecting water resources with Suriname as a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misiedjan, D.J.E.

    2017-01-01

    This study answers a key question: how can the concept of sustainable development contribute to the sustainable realization of the human right to water for vulnerable people, by taking the following approaches. This was answered in the following ways. Firstly, by widening the scope of vulnerability

  6. Modeling Sustainability: Population, Inequality, Consumption, and Bidirectional Coupling of the Earth and Human Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motesharrei, Safa; Rivas, Jorge; Kalnay, Eugenia; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Busalacchi, Antonio J.; Cahalan, Robert F.; Cane, Mark A.; Colwell, Rita R.; Feng, Kuishuang; Franklin, Rachel S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two centuries, the impact of the Human System has grown dramatically, becoming strongly dominant within the Earth System in many different ways. Consumption, inequality, and population have increased extremely fast, especially since about 1950, threatening to overwhelm the many critical functions and ecosystems of the Earth System. Changes in the Earth System, in turn, have important feedback effects on the Human System, with costly and potentially serious consequences. However, current models do not incorporate these critical feedbacks. We argue that in order to understand the dynamics of either system, Earth System Models must be coupled with Human System Models through bidirectional couplings representing the positive, negative, and delayed feedbacks that exist in the real systems. In particular, key Human System variables, such as demographics, inequality, economic growth, and migration, are not coupled with the Earth System but are instead driven by exogenous estimates, such as UN population projections. This makes current models likely to miss important feedbacks in the real Earth-Human system, especially those that may result in unexpected or counterintuitive outcomes, and thus requiring different policy interventions from current models. The importance and imminence of sustainability challenges, the dominant role of the Human System in the Earth System, and the essential roles the Earth System plays for the Human System, all call for collaboration of natural scientists, social scientists, and engineers in multidisciplinary research and modeling to develop coupled Earth-Human system models for devising effective science-based policies and measures to benefit current and future generations.

  7. Modeling Sustainability: Population, Inequality, Consumption, and Bidirectional Coupling of the Earth and Human Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motesharrei, Safa; Rivas, Jorge; Kalnay, Eugenia; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Busalacchi, Antonio J.; Cahalan, Robert F.; Cane, Mark A.; Colwell, Rita R.; Feng, Kuishuang; Franklin, Rachel S.; Hubacek, Klaus; Miralles-Wilhelm, Fernando; Miyoshi, Takemasa; Ruth, Matthias; Sagdeev, Roald; Shirmohammadi, Adel; Shukla, Jagadish; Srebric, Jelena; Yakovenko, Victor M.; Zeng, Ning

    2016-12-11

    Over the last two centuries, the impact of the Human System has grown dramatically, becoming strongly dominant within the Earth System in many different ways. Consumption, inequality, and population have increased extremely fast, especially since about 1950, threatening to overwhelm the many critical functions and ecosystems of the Earth System. Changes in the Earth System, in turn, have important feedback effects on the Human System, with costly and potentially serious consequences. However, current models do not incorporate these critical feedbacks. We argue that in order to understand the dynamics of either system, Earth System Models must be coupled with Human System Models through bidirectional couplings representing the positive, negative, and delayed feedbacks that exist in the real systems. In particular, key Human System variables, such as demographics, inequality, economic growth, and migration, are not coupled with the Earth System but are instead driven by exogenous estimates, such as United Nations population projections. This makes current models likely to miss important feedbacks in the real Earth–Human system, especially those that may result in unexpected or counterintuitive outcomes, and thus requiring different policy interventions from current models. The importance and imminence of sustainability challenges, the dominant role of the Human System in the Earth System, and the essential roles the Earth System plays for the Human System, all call for collaboration of natural scientists, social scientists, and engineers in multidisciplinary research and modeling to develop coupled Earth–Human system models for devising effective science-based policies and measures to benefit current and future generations.

  8. Presence of a pet dog and human cardiovascular responses to mild mental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingwell, B A; Lomdahl, A; Anderson, W P

    2001-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying the possible cardiovascular benefits of pet ownership have not been established. Using a randomized design, the effect of a friendly dog on cardiovascular and autonomic responses to acute, mild mental stress was investigated. Seventy-two subjects (aged 40 +/- 14 y; mean +/- SD) participated. Rest was alternated with mental stress during four 10-minute periods. An unknown dog was randomly selected to be present during the first or the second half of the study. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were monitored continuously and cardiac autonomic function assessed using spectral analysis of heart period. Heart period variability data were expressed as the ratio of 0.1 Hz to respiratory or high frequency variation (LF/HF). Whereas mental stress significantly increased BP and HR in the absence of the dog (from 125/71 +/- 3/2 to 133/75 +/- 3/2 mm Hg; p <0.001), the presence of the dog had no effect on these variables. Heart period LF/HF ratio was lowest in dog owners in the presence of the dog (dog present 2.8 +/- 0.3 versus dog absent 3.4 +/- 0.4; p <0.001) and in non-dog owners in the absence of the dog (dog present 3.4 +/- 0.4 versus dog absent 2.8 +/- 0.3; p <0.001). In conclusion, a friendly but unfamiliar dog does not influence BP or HR either at rest or during mild mental stress. Cardiac autonomic profile was most favorable in the presence of the dog for dog owners and in the absence of the dog for non-owners.

  9. Recovery of partial 16S rDNA sequences suggests the presence of Crenarchaeota in the human digestive ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieu-Lesme, Françoise; Delbès, Céline; Sollelis, Lauriane

    2005-11-01

    Human feces collected from 10 healthy teenagers was analyzed for the presence of Crenarchaeota. After a first polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with Archaea-specific primers, a nested real-time PCR was performed using Crenarchaeota-specific primers. Real-time Crenarchaeotal PCR products detected from four subjects were cloned and the sequencing revealed that most of the partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were highly similar (> or = 97% homology) to sequences affiliated to the Sulfolobus group of the Crenarchaeota phylum. Our findings suggest for the first time that Crenarchaeota might be present in the microbiota of the human digestive ecosystem in which this phylum has never been found yet.

  10. Humans and Tits in the City: Quantifying the Effects of Human Presence on Great Tit and Blue Tit Reproductive Trait Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Corsini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Environmental conditions are key drivers of life-history evolution, and the urban environment is an extreme form of land-use readily inhabited by avian wildlife, whose life-history variation in such altered environment is still poorly understood. Recently, the study of environmental variables associated with urban living—which include shifts in temperature, light, noise or food availability—has attracted increased attention. Another environmental axis that sets the urban space at odds relative to natural habitats is high human abundance, yet very little is known about its effect on avian fitness. We developed a protocol to quantify human presence by performing repeated counts of humans on the ground within a 15 m radius of nestboxes monitored in two centrally-located study areas of a European capital city. In parallel, a GIS-based approach was used to infer nestbox distance to the nearest path and road. Multiple counts of human presence around each nestbox yielded moderate to high repeatabilities (0.6 ≤ r ≤ 0.8 while requiring considerable resources time- and people- wise. In contrast, GIS-based estimates of nestbox distance to paths and roads were time efficient and generated highly repeatable results. The effects of (i human presence around each nestbox, (ii nestbox distance to the nearest path and (iii nestbox distance to the nearest road were tested on reproductive traits of blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus and great tits Parus major breeding in two urban sites. Human presence did not influence blue tit or great tit life-history traits and reproductive success, suggesting reproductive habituation to humans in an urban landscape. In contrast, nestbox distance to roads shortened incubation time in great tits while nestbox distance to paths increased incubation time in blue tits. Moreover, blue tit offspring 2 weeks after hatching were lighter closer to roads. Our study confirms the reliability of a field protocol capturing human presence

  11. The presence and molecular forms of cardiodilatin immunoreactivity in the human and rat right atrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meleagros, L.; Ghatei, M.A.; Anderson, J.V.; Wharton, J.; Taylor, K.M.; Meijler, F.L.; Polak, J.M.; Bloom, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay has been developed for cardiodilatin; the N-terminal peptide sequence of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) prohormone. Cardiodilatin-immunoreactivity (-IR) concentrations in the human right atrial appendage were found to correlate with ANP-IR

  12. Is human society in denial regarding the tough questions about sustainability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cairns, Jr.

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The news media report daily on unsustainable practices and events that impede progress toward sustainable use of the planet - production of greenhouse gases, biotic impoverishment, depletion of fossil waters (aquifers, human population growth, production of persistent toxic substances, loss of agricultural topsoil and land, rapid loss of old growth forests, and so on. Exponential economic growth both depletes natural capital more rapidly than it is regenerated and also gives an illusion of sustainable prosperity. Failure to act more expeditiously is almost certainly due to a number of factors; however, denial that a problem exists is, arguably, one of the most likely reasons. Just as an alcoholic or drug addict must first acknowledge that a problem exists before successful treatment is possible, so must those addicted to exponential growth on a finite planet.

  13. An early modern human presence in Sumatra 73,000-63,000 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaway, K. E.; Louys, J.; Awe, R. Due; Morwood, M. J.; Price, G. J.; Zhao, J.-X.; Aubert, M.; Joannes-Boyau, R.; Smith, T. M.; Skinner, M. M.; Compton, T.; Bailey, R. M.; van den Bergh, G. D.; de Vos, J.; Pike, A. W. G.; Stringer, C.; Saptomo, E. W.; Rizal, Y.; Zaim, J.; Santoso, W. D.; Trihascaryo, A.; Kinsley, L.; Sulistyanto, B.

    2017-08-01

    Genetic evidence for anatomically modern humans (AMH) out of Africa before 75 thousand years ago (ka) and in island southeast Asia (ISEA) before 60 ka (93-61 ka) predates accepted archaeological records of occupation in the region. Claims that AMH arrived in ISEA before 60 ka (ref. 4) have been supported only by equivocal or non-skeletal evidence. AMH evidence from this period is rare and lacks robust chronologies owing to a lack of direct dating applications, poor preservation and/or excavation strategies and questionable taxonomic identifications. Lida Ajer is a Sumatran Pleistocene cave with a rich rainforest fauna associated with fossil human teeth. The importance of the site is unclear owing to unsupported taxonomic identification of these fossils and uncertainties regarding the age of the deposit, therefore it is rarely considered in models of human dispersal. Here we reinvestigate Lida Ajer to identify the teeth confidently and establish a robust chronology using an integrated dating approach. Using enamel-dentine junction morphology, enamel thickness and comparative morphology, we show that the teeth are unequivocally AMH. Luminescence and uranium-series techniques applied to bone-bearing sediments and speleothems, and coupled uranium-series and electron spin resonance dating of mammalian teeth, place modern humans in Sumatra between 73 and 63 ka. This age is consistent with biostratigraphic estimations, palaeoclimate and sea-level reconstructions, and genetic evidence for a pre-60 ka arrival of AMH into ISEA. Lida Ajer represents, to our knowledge, the earliest evidence of rainforest occupation by AMH, and underscores the importance of reassessing the timing and environmental context of the dispersal of modern humans out of Africa.

  14. Infodemiology: a New Presence Concept in Human Information Interaction Based on Eysenbach’s View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh SeyyedHosseini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the presence contexts of infodemiology and the introduction and expansion of its framework. Based on Eysenbach’s View, infodemiology can be defined as the science of distribution and determinants of information in an electronic medium, specifically the Internet, or in a population, with the ultimate aim to inform public health and public policy. In this review article, library method has been used to define and describe the term “infodemiology” and its dimensions. In this study after an introduction investigating the present setting, and defining the concept of infodemiology, the framework of this science and its measurements has been studied and finally the relationship between infodemiology and public health has been described. According to the results, digital media technologies resulted in paradigm shift in choosing the ways in which people search their health information. The researches in this domain have been resulted in credible and significant measurements to track health information supply and demand. Also, infodemiological researches cause specialists design and develop health information databanks based on given measurements. The studies show that there is the possibility of applying some measurements as alarm systems for proliferating infection diseases or presence of new diseases. These measurements are called “infodemiology measurements” which reflect supply-based infodemiology and demand-based infodemiology. According to these, data collecting in this field and using its measurements could be useful in policy-making.

  15. Defining, Measuring, and Incentivizing Sustainable Land Use to Meet Human Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, K. A.; Brady, M. V.; Olin, S.; Ekroos, J.; Hall, M.; Seaquist, J. W.; Lehsten, V.; Smith, H.

    2016-12-01

    Land is a natural capital that supports the flow of an enormous amount of ecosystem services critical to human welfare. Sustainable land use, which we define as land use that meets both current and future human needs for ecosystem services, is essential to meet global goals for climate mitigation and sustainable development, while maintaining natural capital. However, it is not clear what governance is needed to achieve sustainable land use under multiple goals (as defined by the values of relevant decision-makers and land managers), particularly under climate change. Here we develop a conceptual model for examining the interactions and tradeoffs among multiple goals, as well as their spatial interactions (teleconnections), in research developed using Design Thinking principles. We have selected five metrics for provisioning (food production, and fiber production for wood and energy), regulating and maintenance (climate mitigation and biodiversity conservation), and cultural (heritage) ecosystem services. Using the case of Sweden, we estimate indicators for these metrics using a combination of existing data synthesis and process-based simulation modeling. We also develop and analyze new indicators (e.g., combining data on land use, bird conservation status, and habitat specificity to make a predictive model of bird diversity changes on agricultural or forested land). Our results highlight both expected tradeoffs (e.g., between food production and biodiversity conservation) as well as unexpected opportunities for synergies under different land management scenarios and strategies. Our model also provides a practical way to make decision-maker values explicit by comparing both quantity and preferences for bundles of ecosystem services under various scenarios. We hope our model will help in considering competing interests and shaping economic incentives and governance structures to meet national targets in support of global goals for sustainable management of land

  16. From Environmental Connectedness to Sustainable Futures: Topophilia and Human Affiliation with Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Beery

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human affiliation with nonhuman nature is an important dimension of environmental concern and support for pro-environmental attitudes. A significant theory of human connectedness with nature, the Biophilia Hypothesis, suggests that there exists a genetically based inclination for human affiliation with the biological world. Both support and challenge to the Biophilia Hypothesis are abundant in the literature of environmental psychology. One response that both challenges and builds upon the Biophilia Hypothesis is the Topophilia Hypothesis. The Topophilia Hypothesis has extended the ideas of biophilia to incorporate a broader conception of nonhuman nature and a co-evolutionary theory of genetic response and cultural learning. While the Topophilia Hypothesis is a new idea, it is built upon long-standing scholarship from humanistic geography and theories in human evolution. The Topophilia Hypothesis expands previous theory and provides a multidisciplinary consideration of how biological selection and cultural learning may have interacted during human evolution to promote adaptive mechanisms for human affiliation with nonhuman nature via specific place attachment. Support for this possible co-evolutionary foundation for place-based human affiliation with nonhuman nature is explored from multiple vantage points. We raise the question of whether this affiliation may have implications for multifunctional landscape management. Ultimately, we propose that nurturing potential topophilic tendencies may be a useful method to promote sustainable efforts at the local level with implications for the global.

  17. The impact of corruption on the sustainable development of human capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absalyamova, Svetlana; Absalyamov, Timur; Khusnullova, Asiya; Mukhametgalieva, Chulpan

    2016-08-01

    The article explains the use of the human capital sustainable development index (HCSDI) to assess the quality of the reproduction of human capital. The paper provides the algorithm for calculating HCSDI and its components. Authors estimated cross-country differences of HCSDI and developed econometric model of the impact of corruption on HCSDI. The use of this model has allowed to reveal the mechanism and assess the impact of corruption on HCSDI and its components. The results of econometric analysis revealed a negative multiplier effect: an increase in the corruption of the socio-economic system of the state by 1% caused HCSDI reduce by more than 1%. The results and conclusions may be proxy-assessments of the socio-economic consequences of violations of the stability of reproduction of human capital in the conditions of the growth of corruption in the country

  18. Towards a sustainable world through human factors and ergonomics: it is all about values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange-Morales, Karen; Thatcher, Andrew; García-Acosta, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse two approaches that attempt to address how a human factors and ergonomics (HFE) perspective can contribute to the sustainability of the human race. We outline the principles, purposes and fields of application of ergoecology and green ergonomics, and thereafter deal with their context of emergence, and the overlaps in purpose, and principles. Shared values are deduced and related to socio-technical principles for systems' design. Social responsibility and environmental/ecospheric responsibility are the leading threads of ergoecology and green ergonomics, giving rise to the values of: respect for human rights, respect for the Earth, respect for ethical decision-making, appreciation of complexity, respect for transparency and openness, and respect for diversity. We discuss the consequences of considering these values in HFE theory and practice.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory Human and Intellectual Capital for Sustaining Nuclear Deterrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAlpine, Bradley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current human and intellectual capital at Los Alamos National Laboratory, through specific research into the statistics and demographics as well as numerous personal interviews at all levels of personnel. Based on this information, a series of recommendations are provided to assist Los Alamos National Laboratory in ensuring the future of the human and intellectual capital for the nuclear deterrence mission. While the current human and intellectual capital is strong it stands on the precipice and action must be taken to ensure Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains leadership in developing and sustaining national nuclear capabilities. These recommendations may be applicable to other areas of the nuclear enterprise, including the Air Force, after further research and study.

  20. Glucose Uptake by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Actinomyces viscosus in the Presence of Human Saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Germaine, Greg, R.; Tellefson, Lois M.

    1982-01-01

    Glucose uptake was examined by using whole-cell suspensions of Streptococcus mutans (strains BHT, Ingbritt, and GS-5), Streptococcus mitis (strains 9811 and 72×41), and Actinomyces viscosus (strains T6 and WVU626) incubated for up to 90 min in 0 to 82% (vol/vol) human whole salivary supernatant. Glucose uptake by the S. mutans strains was completely inhibited at all saliva concentrations. Dithiothreitol (DTT), present during saliva incubation, prevented saliva inhibition. Glucose uptake was a...

  1. Experimental and modeling study of human tympanic membrane motion in the presence of middle ear liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangming; Guan, Xiying; Nakmali, Don; Palan, Vikrant; Pineda, Mario; Gan, Rong Z

    2014-12-01

    Vibration of the tympanic membrane (TM) has been measured at the umbo using laser Doppler vibrometry and analyzed with finite element (FE) models of the human ear. Recently, full-field TM surface motion has been reported using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry, holographic interferometry, and optical coherence tomography. Technologies for imaging human TM motion have the potential to lead to using a dedicated clinical diagnosis tool for identification of middle ear diseases. However, the effect of middle ear fluid (liquid) on TM surface motion is still not clear. In this study, a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer was used to measure the full-field surface motion of the TM from four human temporal bones. TM displacements were measured under normal and disease-mimicking conditions with different middle ear liquid levels over frequencies ranging from 0.2 to 8 kHz. An FE model of the human ear, including the ear canal, middle ear, and spiral cochlea was used to simulate the motion of the TM in normal and disease-mimicking conditions. The results from both experiments and FE model show that a simple deflection shape with one or two major displacement peak regions of the TM in normal ear was observed at low frequencies (1 kHz and below) while complicated ring-like pattern of the deflection shapes appeared at higher frequencies (4 kHz and above). The liquid in middle ear mainly affected TM deflection shapes at the frequencies higher than 1 kHz.

  2. Human health alters the sustainability of fishing practices in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorella, Kathryn J; Milner, Erin M; Salmen, Charles R; Hickey, Matthew D; Omollo, Dan O; Odhiambo, Abdi; Mattah, Brian; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Fernald, Lia C H; Brashares, Justin S

    2017-04-18

    Understanding feedbacks between human and environmental health is critical for the millions who cope with recurrent illness and rely directly on natural resources for sustenance. Although studies have examined how environmental degradation exacerbates infectious disease, the effects of human health on our use of the environment remains unexplored. Human illness is often tacitly assumed to reduce human impacts on the environment. By this logic, ill people reduce the time and effort that they put into extractive livelihoods and, thereby, their impact on natural resources. We followed 303 households living on Lake Victoria, Kenya over four time points to examine how illness influenced fishing. Using fixed effect conditional logit models to control for individual-level and time-invariant factors, we analyzed the effect of illness on fishing effort and methods. Illness among individuals who listed fishing as their primary occupation affected their participation in fishing. However, among active fishers, we found limited evidence that illness reduced fishing effort. Instead, ill fishers shifted their fishing methods. When ill, fishers were more likely to use methods that were illegal, destructive, and concentrated in inshore areas but required less travel and energy. Ill fishers were also less likely to fish using legal methods that are physically demanding, require travel to deep waters, and are considered more sustainable. By altering the physical capacity and outlook of fishers, human illness shifted their effort, their engagement with natural resources, and the sustainability of their actions. These findings show a previously unexplored pathway through which poor human health may negatively impact the environment.

  3. Investing in human and natural capital. An alternative paradigm for sustainable development in Awassa, Ethiopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Travis W. [Evans School of Public Affairs, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 98195 (United States); Farley, Joshua [Gund Institute for Ecological Economics and Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, 05405 (United States); Huber, Candice [UVM Agricultural Extension Service, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, 05405 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Ethiopia remains underdeveloped due to limitations in natural, human, social and built capital. A 2006 scientific atelier conducted in the city of Awassa, Ethiopia investigated investments in human and natural capital as a sustainable development strategy. Local stakeholders identified firewood shortages, degradation of croplands, rising lake levels encroaching on croplands and poor water quality as major impediments to development. They further identified ecological degradation as a key component of these problems, and they acknowledged multiple vicious cycles compounding the environmental and economic threats to the Awassa community. Proposed solutions included investment in natural capital in the form of reforestation activities, investment in human capital in the form of promoting more efficient wood stoves along with increasing public awareness of environmental threats, and investments in social capital in the form of inter-institutional coordination to address environmental problems. All recommended investments rely primarily on national resources, in distinct contrast to the extensive imports required for most built capital investments. Unfortunately, Awassa lacks the surplus necessary for major capital investments of any kind. The atelier therefore helped local participants identify potential funders and write grant proposals for various projects, though none have been funded so far. Reversing the ecological degradation on the scale necessary for sustained economic development in Ethiopia however will require a steady flow of substantial investments, and cannot rely solely on the short term generosity of funders. International payments for carbon sequestration and other ecosystem services could help provide the necessary resources. (author)

  4. Presence of Human Pathogens in Produce from Retail Markets in Northern Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Gregor; Kabisch, Jan; Böhnlein, Christina; Huch, Melanie; Becker, Biserka; Cho, Gyu-Sung; Franz, Charles M A P

    2017-09-01

    Two hundred fresh produce samples (cucumber, carrots, herbs, leaf lettuce, and ready-to-eat mixed salad leaves) were obtained from retail in northern Germany in 2015. These were investigated for microbial contamination and the presence of foodborne pathogens, including Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella serovars, presumptive Bacillus (B.) cereus, and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli using culture-dependent (enrichment, plating on selective media) and -independent (real-time polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) techniques. Overall, our results showed that the fresh produce samples generally showed high mean aerobic mesophilic bacterial counts of between 7 and 8 log10 cfu/g. However, there was also a considerable variation in total aerobic bacterial counts between different product samples. Although real-time PCR signals for pathogenic E. coli were detected in 14.0% of total samples analyzed, only one (0.5%) Shiga toxin-producing E. coli isolate of serotype O26:H11 was recovered from mixed salad leaves and contained stx1, stx2, and eae genes. Two L. monocytogenes isolates (1% of total samples) were recovered from packaged mixed salad leaves and belonged to PCR serogroups IIb and IVb, respectively. One Salmonella isolate (0.5%) was recovered after selective enrichment also from mixed salad leaves and it was identified as Salmonella Szentes serotype 16:k:1,2. Overall the incidence of foodborne pathogens on the northern German retail market in 2015 was very low.

  5. Presence and dynamics of leptin, GLP-1, and PYY in human breast milk at early postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueler, Jessica; Alexander, Brenda; Hart, Ann Marie; Austin, Kathleen; Larson-Meyer, D Enette

    2013-07-01

    The presence of appetite hormones, namely glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), and leptin in breast milk may be important in infant feeding regulation and infant growth. This study evaluated whether concentrations of GLP-1, PYY, and leptin change across a single feeding (from fore- to hindmilk), and are associated with maternal and infant anthropometrics. Thirteen postpartum women (mean ± SD: 25.6 ± 4.5 years, 72.0 ± 11.9 kg) provided fore- and hindmilk samples 4-5 weeks after delivery and underwent measurements of body weight and composition by Dual X-ray Absorptiometry. GLP-1, PYY, and leptin concentrations were measured using radioimmunoassay, and milk fat content was determined by creamatocrit. Concentration of GLP-1 and content of milk fat was higher in hindmilk than foremilk (P ≤ 0.05). PYY and leptin concentrations did not change between fore- and hindmilk. Both leptin concentration and milk fat content were correlated with indices of maternal adiposity, including body mass index (r = 0.65-0.85, P hormones in breast milk may be important in infant appetite and growth regulation. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  6. Bacteriolytic Activity Of Human Interleukin-2, Chicken Egg Lysozyme In The Presence Of Potential Effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, P. A.; Matolygina, D. A.; Ovchinnikova, E. D.; Atroshenko, D. L.; Savin, S. S.; Belogurova, N. G.; Smirnov, S. A.; Tishkov, V. I.; Levashov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and chicken egg lysozyme in the presence of various substances has been studied. Glycine and lysine do not affect the activity of interleukin-2 but increase that of lysozyme, showing a bell-shape concentration dependence peaking at 1.5 mM glycine and 18 mM lysine. Arginine and glutamate activate both interleukin-2 and lysozyme with a concentration dependence of the saturation type. Aromatic amino acids have almost no effect on the activity of both interleukin-2 and lysozyme. Aromatic amines, tryptamine, and tyramine activate interleukin-2 but inhibit lysozyme. Peptide antibiotics affect interleukin and lysozyme similarly and exhibit maximum activity in the micromolar range of antibiotics. Taurine has no effect on the activity of interleukin-2 and lysozyme. Mildronate showed no influence on lysozyme, but it activated interleukin-2 with the activity maximum at 3 mM. EDTA activates both interleukin-2 and lysozyme at concentrations above 0.15 mM. PMID:28740730

  7. Using different ELECTRE methods in strategic planning in the presence of human behavioral resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Milani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the multicriteria strategic planning of an organization, management should often be aware of employees' resistance to change before making new decisions; otherwise, a chosen strategy, though technologically acceptable, may not be efficient in the long term. This paper, using a sample case study within an organization, shows how different versions of ELECTRE methods can be used in choosing efficient strategies that account for both human behavioral resistance and technical elements. The effect of resistance from each subsystem of the organization is studied to ensure the reliability of the chosen strategy. The comparison of results from a select number of compensatory and noncompensatory models (ELECTRE I, III, IV, IS; TOPSIS; SAW; MaxMin suggests that when employee resistance is a decision factor in the multicriteria strategic planning problem, the models can yield low-resistance strategies; however, ELECTRE seems to show more reasonable sensitivity.

  8. Utilizing of Square Wave Voltammetry to Detect Flavonoids in the Presence of Human Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available About biological affecting of flavonoids on animal organisms is known less,thus we selected flavonoids, flavanones and flavones, and their glycosides, which wereexamined as potential inducers of cytochrome(s P450 when administrated by gavages intoexperimental male rats. The study was focused on induction of CYP1A1, the majorcytochrome P450 involved in carcinogen activation. The data obtained demonstrate thenecessity of taking into account not only ability of flavonoids to bind to Ah receptor(induction factor but also to concentrate on their distribution and metabolism (includingcolon microflora in the body. After that we examined certain flavonoids as potential inducers of cytochrome P450, we wanted to suggest and optimize suitable electrochemical technique for determination of selected flavonoids (quercetin, quercitrin, rutin, chrysin and diosmin in body liquids. For these purposes, we selected square wave voltannetry using carbon paste electrode. Primarily we aimed on investigation of their basic electrochemical behaviour. After that we have optimized frequency, step potential and supporting electrolyte. Based on the results obtained, we selected the most suitable conditions for determination of the flavonoids as follows: frequency 180 Hz, step potential 1.95 mV/s and phosphate buffer of pH 7 as supporting electrolyte. Detection limits (3 S/N of the flavonoids were from units to tens of nM except diosmin, where the limit were higher than μM. In addition, we attempted to suggest a sensor for analysis of flavonoids in urine. It clearly follows from the results obtained that flavonoids can be analysed in the presence of animal urine, because urine did not influence much the signals of flavonoids (recoveries of the signals were about 90 %.

  9. Serological study on WNV presence in horses in Vojvodina after the human outbreak in Serbia in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović T.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To establish the presence of West Nile virus (WNV infection in the animal population in Serbia after the human WNV outbreak, the presence of anti-WNV IgG antibodies was examined by commercial ELISA of blood sera samples of 130 horses collected in 2012 from 6 stables and 1 settlement in Vojvodina Province, northern Serbia. During the blood sampling, hibernating mosquitoes in the vicinity of the sampled horses were collected (31 pools from 4 locations and tested for WNV presence by real-time RT-PCR. The presence of anti-WNV antibodies was observed in 49.23% (64/130 horses. Per stable, the percent of seropositive animals ranged from 35% to 64%. All 31 analyzed pools of hibernating mosquitoes tested negative for WNV RNA. The WNV-antibody prevalence of 49.23% obtained in horses during 2012 was much higher than the prevalence (12% found in horses during 2009/2010. These results, including the confirmed seroconversion in eight horses that tested negative in 2010, indicated an intensive WNV circulation during 2012 in Serbia, and the necessity of implementing surveillance programs. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31084 and III43007

  10. Sustained fecal-oral human-to-human transmission following a zoonotic event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T. de Graaf (Marieke); Beck, R. (Relja); S. Caccio (Simone); B. Duim; P.L.A. Fraaij (Pieter); Le Guyader, F.S. (Françoise S.); Lecuit, M. (Marc); Le Pendu, J. (Jacques); E. de Wit (Emmie); C. Schultsz (Constance)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBacterial, viral and parasitic zoonotic pathogens that transmit via the fecal-oral route have a major impact on global health. However, the mechanisms underlying the emergence of such pathogens from the animal reservoir and their persistence in the human population are poorly understood.

  11. Sustained fecal-oral human-to-human transmission following a zoonotic event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, Miranda; Beck, Relja; Caccio, Simone M; Duim, Birgitta|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/143855352; Fraaij, Pieter LA; Le Guyader, Françoise S; Lecuit, Marc; Le Pendu, Jacques; de Wit, Emmie; Schultsz, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial, viral and parasitic zoonotic pathogens that transmit via the fecal-oral route have a major impact on global health. However, the mechanisms underlying the emergence of such pathogens from the animal reservoir and their persistence in the human population are poorly understood. Here, we

  12. The Urban Crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Threat to Human Security and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mediel Hove

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Urban centres have existed and have been evolving for many centuries across the world. However, the accelerated growth of urbanisation is a relatively recent phenomenon. The enormous size of urban populations and more significantly, the rapidity with which urban areas have been and are growing in many developing countries have severe social, economic and physical repercussions. This paper argues that the accelerated growth of urbanisation has amplified the demand for key services. However, the provision of shelter and basic services such as water and sanitation, education, public health, employment and transport has not kept pace with this increasing demand. Furthermore, accelerated and poorly managed urbanisation has resulted in various types of atmospheric, land and water pollution thereby jeopardising human security. This paper offers the conclusion that the increased environmental, social and economic problems associated with rapid urbanisation pose a threat to sustainable development, human security and, crucially, peace.

  13. Towards a new view of sustainable development: human well-being and environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Thomas; Jorgenson, Andrew K.

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the relationship between human well-being and the stress economic activity places on the environment is a central challenge of sustainability research. Lamb et al (2014 Environ. Res. Lett. 9 014011) provide two important results that will influence future analyses. First, they show that the drivers of consumption that induce anthropogenic carbon emissions are similar to but not the same as the drivers of place-based (i.e., production driven) carbon emissions. Second, they show that a diverse set of countries are able to achieve high levels of human well-being while placing relatively little stress on the environment. Since the desire of low emission countries to increase emissions in pursuit of development is a major blockage point in international climate negotiations, the finding that emissions are decoupled from increased well-being is not only of scientific interest, it could also inform policy discussions.

  14. Functional metagenomics of spacecraft assembly cleanrooms: Presence of virulence factors associated with human pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Bashir

    2016-09-01

    , Escherichia coli and Legionella pneumophila, and their corresponding virulence factors were present in all cleanroom samples. This is the first functional metagenomics study describing presence of pathogens and their corresponding virulence factors in cleanroom environments. The results of this study should be considered for microbial monitoring of enclosed environments such as schools, homes, hospitals and more isolated habitation such the International Space Station and future manned missions to Mars.

  15. Sustainable access to safe drinking water: fundamental human right in the international and national scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Maran de Oliveira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Access to potable water is absolutely essential to the maintenance of life, as well as to provide regular exercise of other human rights. The lack of access to water in sufficient quantity or access to non-potable water may cause serious and irreparable damage to people. This paper investigates the evolution of international and national recognition of this fundamental human right, whether implicit or explicit. This was accomplished by the study of international human rights treaties, bibliographic information on water resources and their corresponding legal systems, national and international. The results suggest that sustainable access to drinking water is a fundamental human right in the context of international relations and the State. Further, even without explicitly stating this right in the Constitution of 1988, Brazil has incorporated the main international provisions on the subject, but this right must be acknowledged according to the principles of non-typical fundamental rights and the dignity of the human person. This right should be universally guaranteed by the Government in sufficient quantity and quality, regardless of the economic resources of individuals.

  16. A survey of Australian oysters for the presence of human noroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Felicity; Ross, Tom; Holds, Geoffrey; Kiermeier, Andreas; McLeod, Catherine

    2014-12-01

    Impending international policies for norovirus in oysters and the lack of Australian data suggested there was a need to undertake a national survey of norovirus in oysters. Two geographically distinct oyster-growing areas from each of three Australian states were sampled on 4 occasions during 2010 and 2011. The sites selected were considered by state shellfish authorities to be the most compromised with respect to the potential for human faecal contamination as identified by shoreline surveys. The oysters were tested for norovirus GI, GII and Escherichia coli. Norovirus GII was detected in two of 120 (1.7%) samples and norovirus GI was not detected. One of the norovirus positive samples was cloned and sequenced as GII.3. Five of 120 (4.2%) samples were found to have more than the guidance concentration of 230 E. coli per 100 g of shellfish but these samples did not contain detectable concentrations of norovirus. The apparently low prevalence of norovirus in oysters from Australian growing areas supports epidemiological data that suggests norovirus contamination of Australian oysters is rare. The results from this study emphasise the need for future norovirus control measures for shellfish to be commensurate with the risk associated with the growing area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and bacterial vaginosis presence in cervical samples from Paraguayan indigenous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongelos, Pamela; Mendoza, Laura Patricia; Rodriguez-Riveros, Isabel; Castro, Amalia; Gimenez, Graciela; Araujo, Patricia; Paez, Malvina; Castro, Wilberto; Basiletti, Jorge; González, Joaquín; Echagüe, Gloria; Diaz, Valentina; Laspina, Florentina; Ever, Santiago; Marecos, Ramón; Deluca, Gerardo; Picconi, María Alejandra

    2015-10-01

    To determine the frequency of human papillomavirus (HPV) types and to assess bacterial vaginosis (BV) possible associations with cervical infections in indigenous Paraguayan women of the Department of Presidente Hayes. This study included 181 sexually active women without cervical lesions. HPV typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction with primers PGMY 09/11 followed by reverse line hybridization. BV was diagnosed by the Nugent criteria using the results from a Gram stain smear. Sixteen percent of women were positive for at least one high risk HPV type (HR-HPV). The most frequent genotypes were HPV 16 (4.4%), followed by HPV 58 (3.3%), HPV 45 (3.3%), HPV 53 (2.8%) and HPV 11 (2.8%). A significant association between HR-HPV and BV was observed (p=0.01). In addition, women with BV had a higher frequency of Chlamydia trachomatis (p=0.0007), Trichomonas vaginalis (p=0.00009), Mycoplasma hominis (p=0.001). A large variety of HPV genotypes was detected and showed a slightly different pattern from previous studies on urban women in Paraguay, with the predominance of HR-HPV. Furthermore, the information of co-infections involved in BV could be useful for the improvement of national prevention programs, as well as for laboratory surveillance of these genital infections. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. The presence and near-shore transport of human fecal pollution in Lake Michigan beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, S.L.; Liu, L.B.; Phanikumar, M.S.; Jenkins, T.M.; Wong, M.V.; Rose, J.B.; Whitman, R.L.; Shively, D.A.; Nevers, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    The Great Lakes are a source of water for municipal, agricultural and industrial use, and support significant recreation, commercial and sport fishing industries. Every year millions of people visit the 500 plus recreational beaches in the Great Lakes. An increasing public health risk has been suggested with increased evidence of fecal contamination at the shoreline. To investigate the transport and fate of fecal pollution at Great Lakes beaches and the health risk associated with swimming at these beaches, the near-shore waters of Mt Baldy Beach, Lake Michigan and Trail Creek, a tributary discharging into the lake were examined for fecal pollution indicators. A model of surf zone hydrodynamics coupled with a transport model with first-order inactivation of pollutant was used to understand the relative importance of different processes operating in the surf zone (e.g. physical versus biological processes). The Enterococcus human fecal pollution marker, which targets a putative virulence factor, the enterococcal surface protein (esp) in Enterococcus faecium, was detected in 2/28 samples (7%) from the tributaries draining into Lake Michigan and in 6/30 samples (20%) from Lake Michigan beaches. Preliminary analysis suggests that the majority of fecal indicator bactateria variation and water quality changes at the beaches can be explained by inputs from the influential stream and hydrometeorological conditions. Using modeling methods to predict impaired water quality may help reduce potential health threats to recreational visitors.

  19. Using Social Science to Ensure Sustainable Development Centered on Human Well-being in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C. A.; Durham, W. H.; Gaffikin, L.

    2012-12-01

    When then president José Figueres Ferrer invited the world to use Costa Rica as a "laboratory for sustainable development" in 1997, the country's fame as a biodiversity mecca was firmly established. Yet despite vast investment, conservation-related interventions in the cantons of Osa and Golfito along the country's southern Pacific coast have been seen as overly conservation-oriented and carried out "with its back to the communities." By ignoring human well-being, these interventions have been unable to overcome the region's vast disparities in access to resources and general state of underdevelopment despite investments of many millions of dollars in recent decades. With the country's third international airport and Central America's largest hydroelectric project proposed for the region, as well as other infrastructure-driven development currently underway, the region is poised to undergo rapid change. This presentation first describes the Osa-Golfito Initiative (INOGO), an interdisciplinary effort facilitated by the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment to development a long term strategic action plan that ensures a development trajectory focused on human and environmental well-being. Whereas a concurrent presentation will focus on biophysical components of INOGO, the focus here is on the often-overlooked contributions of social science for ensuring the region's future sustainability. An anthropological approach is taken to assess the assets and resources of the region's residents, and the obstacles and challenges as they perceive them. This groundwork provides a crucial link between individual and local realities, and the regional and national political economy, and thus provides greater probability of sustainable development occurring with its "face to the communities.";

  20. Human-Nature for Climate Action: Nature-Based Solutions for Urban Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Santiago Fink

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The global climate change agenda proceeds at an incremental pace while the Earth is approaching critical tipping points in its development trajectory. Climate action at this pinnacle juncture needs to be greatly accelerated and rooted in the fundamentals of the problem—human beings’ disconnection from nature. This paper underscores the valuable role nature and nature-based solutions can play in addressing climate change at the city scale and its implications for broader sustainability. Urban ecosystems (nature in cities are seen as an integral part of a proposed local climate action rubric wherein policy measures and integrated planning guide lowcarbon/impact development to create more resilient and sustainable urban environments. The use of green infrastructure is highlighted as a cost-effective means to contribute to mitigation and adaptation needs as well as to promote human wellbeing. The paper takes an exploratory view of the influence of ecosystem services, particularly cultural services, and its economics in relation to the individual and society to understand how biophilia can be nurtured to promote environmental stewardship and climate action.

  1. U-series constraints on the Holocene human presence in the Cuatro Cienegas basin, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. R.; Felstead, N.; Gonzalez, S.; Leng, M. J.; Metcalfe, S. E.; Patchett, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    U-series tufa ages dating a human trackway have been obtained, part of a larger Late Pleistocene - Recent palaeoclimate and human occupation study of the Cuatro Cienegas basin, NE Mexico. Our analytical approach, including tracer calibration, couples aspects of what we consider best practice in the U-series community with our U-Pb experiences which includes the EarthTime U-Pb tracer calibration exercise. The recently discovered trackway is near a small hydrothermal pool within the basin [1], an ecologically highly significant oasis in the Chihuahuan desert. The oasis comprises >200 freshwater hydrothermal pools and a river system, and the related ecosystem hosts >70 endemic species[2]. Pools are fed by waters that circulate a deep karstic system and that originate in the surrounding upper Jurassic-lower Cretaceous Sierra Madre Oriental mountains (>3000m) [3]. The area hosted nomadic hunter-gatherers during the Holocene, and possibly as early as Late Pleistocene (~12 ka BP). Despite the basin's ecological significance, only three palaeoenvironmental studies have been published to date, and limited geochronological constraints are available. A pollen study of drill core through peats and tufas proximal to the pools suggested a long period of climatic stability and biogeographic isolation[4], a notion supported by the large number of endemic species, but other palynological and plant macrofossil data suggest that large climatic changes occurred post Late Pleistocene [5]. The 10 m long in situ trackway is preserved in tufa and five samples from the uppermost surfaces were analysed to date the footprints. The tufas comprise clean carbonate with no petrographic evidence of replacement and little contaminant detrital material (on some exposed upper surfaces). Powdered tufa was processed following [6-8], and analysed by TIMS (Triton, U) and MC-ICP-MS (Th, Nu HR), although our future analyses will primarily be obtained on a Neptune. Samples were spiked with a 229Th/236U

  2. Identification of a novel picornavirus in healthy piglets and seroepidemiological evidence of its presence in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-mei Yu

    Full Text Available In this study, we describe a novel porcine parechovirus-like virus (tentatively named PLV-CHN from healthy piglets in China using 454 high-throughput sequencing. The complete genome of the virus comprises 6832 bp, encoding a predicted polyprotein of 2132 amino acids that is most similar to Ljungan virus (32% identity. A similar virus that belongs to a novel Picornaviridae genus, named swine pasivirus 1 (SPaV-1, was reported during the preparation of this paper. Sequence analysis revealed that PLV-CHN and SPaV1 shared 82% nucleotide identity and 89% amino acid identity. Further genomic and phylogenetic analyses suggested that both SPaV1 and PLV-CHN shared similar genomic characteristics and belong to the same novel Picornaviridae genus. A total of 36 (20.0% fecal samples from 180 healthy piglets were positive for PLV-CHN by RT-PCR, while no fecal samples from 100 healthy children and 100 children with diarrhea, and no cerebrospinal fluid samples from 196 children with suspected viral encephalitis, was positive for the virus. However, Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using recombinant PLV-CHN VP1 polypeptide as an antigen showed a high seroprevalence of 63.5% in the healthy population. When grouped by age, the antibody-positivity rates showed that the majority of children under 12 years of age have been infected by the virus. It was suggested that PLV-CHN, SPaV1, or an as-yet-uncharacterized virus can infect humans early in life. Thus, investigation of the role of this novel virus is vital.

  3. Clinical Features, Presence of Human Herpesvirus-8 and Treatment Results in Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Su

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Classic Kaposi sarcoma (KS occurs predominantly among the elderly, with Jews, Italians and Greeks. Classic KS has been seen relatively frequently in Turkey. Our aim was to evaluate the demographic, clinical features of Kaposi sarcoma and etiopathological role of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8. Treatment results of 18 classic Kaposi’s sarcoma were also concluded.Material and Method: Eighteen cases of classic Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed as clinically and histopathologically between January 2001 and August 2008 in our dermatology department were taken to this study. Demographic, clinical features and treatment results were reviewed retrospectively in all patients. HHV-8 was investigated in the lesional skin of 7 patients.Results: A male/female ratio of 2/1 was found. Mean age at diagnosis was 67.2 (37-94 years. Bilaterally lower extremities were involved in 15 patients (83.3%, the trunk was involved in 3 patients (16.6%. Plaques and nodules were the common type of lesions (66.6% and 55.5%. Nine patients had no symptoms (50%. Edema was the most common symptom (38.8%. A second primary malignancy was found in 2 patients (11.1%. HHV-8 was detected in 6 of the 7 patients(85.7%. Majority of the patients were treated with interferon alfa (subcutaneously and cryotherapy as a monotherapy or a combination therapy. Imiquimod was the second agent in combined treatment (27.7%. Conclusion: We suggest that interferon alfa and imiquimod can be used as first line therapy agents with their antiviral and immunmodulatuar features in the treatment of KKS. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 122-6

  4. Show us you are real: the effect of human-versus-organizational presence on online relationship building through social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyojung; Lee, Hyunmin

    2013-04-01

    This study examined how creating a human presence in organizational online communication affects organization-public relationships and publics' favorable behavioral intentions to engage in word-of-mouth (WOM) and dialogic communications. Four hypotheses were tested in the context of Twitter through a 2×2 (presence: human vs. organizational×organization type: nonprofit vs. for-profit) within-subjects design. The results revealed that conversational human voice was perceived to be higher for Twitter pages of organizations with a human presence than for those with an organizational presence. Providing a human presence on social media through the use of social media managers' avatars and names appeared to promote favorable organization-public relationships and positive WOM communication. However, dialogic communication intentions did not significantly differ between organizations incorporating a human presence versus an organizational presence into their Twitter pages. The proposed dynamic role of human presence versus organizational presence adds a new perspective as to how organizations can take better advantage of interpersonal aspects of social media.

  5. Teratoma Formation by Human Embryonic Stem Cells is site-dependent and enhanced by the presence of Matrigel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokhorova, Tatyana A; Harkness, Linda M; Frandsen, Ulrik

    2008-01-01

    When implanted into immunodeficient mice, human embryonic stem cells (hESC) give rise to teratoma, tumour-like formations containing tissues belonging to all three germ layers. The ability to form teratoma is a sine qua non characteristic of pluripotent stem cells. However, limited data...... of differentiated to un-differentiated tissues was significantly decreased suggesting defective pluripotency of the cells. In conclusion, subcutaneous implantation of hESC in presence of Matrigel appears to be the most efficient, reproducible and the easiest approach for teratoma formation by hESC. Also, teratoma...

  6. Glucose Uptake by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Actinomyces viscosus in the Presence of Human Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaine, Greg, R.; Tellefson, Lois M.

    1982-01-01

    Glucose uptake was examined by using whole-cell suspensions of Streptococcus mutans (strains BHT, Ingbritt, and GS-5), Streptococcus mitis (strains 9811 and 72×41), and Actinomyces viscosus (strains T6 and WVU626) incubated for up to 90 min in 0 to 82% (vol/vol) human whole salivary supernatant. Glucose uptake by the S. mutans strains was completely inhibited at all saliva concentrations. Dithiothreitol (DTT), present during saliva incubation, prevented saliva inhibition. Glucose uptake was also restored when saliva-inhibited cells were subsequently exposed to DTT. The inclusion of catalase in the saliva incubation mixtures resulted in protection equal to that obtained with DTT. The S. mitis strains were also inhibited by saliva but to a far lesser extent that S. mutans. DTT and catalase also protected S. mitis from saliva inhibition. Both A. viscosus strains were completely refractory to saliva inhibition of glucose uptake. Based on (i) the sensitivity of the catalase-negative streptococci and the resistance of catalase-positive actinomyces to saliva inhibition and (ii) the equal and complete protection to saliva inhibition afforded by DTT and catalase, we conclude that the lactoperoxidase-SCN−-H2O2 system in saliva was the only antibacterial system expressed under our experimental conditions. The relative resistance of S. mitis 9811 (compared with S. mutans BHT) to saliva inhibition was shown not to result from poor H2O2 production in either glucose-supplemented buffer or saliva solutions. S. mitis produced inhibitory quantities of H2O2 that equaled or exceeded S. mutans H2O2 accumulation. It is suggested that S. mitis might possess a greater ability to repair lactoperoxidase-mediated damage than does S. mutans. Every organism studied exhibited a saliva concentration-dependent, cell growth-independent stimulation of glucose uptake after 60 to 90 min of incubation. The A. viscosus and S. mitis strains showed saliva stimulation (or stabilization) of glucose

  7. The presence of lysyl oxidase-like enzymes in human control and keratoconic corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudakova, Lubica; Sasaki, Takako; Liskova, Petra; Palos, Michalis; Jirsova, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases, a family comprising lysyl oxidase (LOX) and four LOX-like enzymes (LOXL1-4), catalyse the cross-linking of elastin and collagen fibrils. Keratoconus (KC) is characterized by progressive thinning leading to irregular astigmatism, resulting in significant visual impairment. Although the pathogenesis of KC remains unclear, one of the current hypotheses is based on alterations in the organization and structure of collagen fibrils. To extend existing general knowledge about cross-linking enzymes in the human cornea, in the present study we have focused on the detection of LOXL enzymes. The localization and distribution of LOXL1-4 were assessed in cryosections of 7 control donors (three males and three females; 25-68 years; mean age 46±17.6 years) and 8 KC corneas (5 males and 3 females; 25-46 years; mean age 31.3±7.5 years) using indirect fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC). The specimens were examined using an Olympus BX51 microscope (Olympus Co., Tokyo, Japan) at a magnification of 200-1000x. Western blot analysis of 4 control and 4 KC corneas was performed for all tested enzymes. All four LOX-like enzymes were present in all layers of control corneas as well as in the limbus and conjunctiva. Almost no differences between control and pathological specimens were found for LOXL1. A lower staining intensity of LOXL2 was found using IHC and Western blot analysis in KC specimens. Decreases of the signal and small irregularities in the staining were found in the epithelium, keratocytes and extracellular matrix, where a gradual anterior-posterior weakening of the signal was observed. LOXL3 IHC staining was lower in the corneal stromal extracellular matrix and keratocytes of KC samples. No prominent differences were detected using IHC for LOXL4, but a slight decrease was observed in KC corneas using Western blot analysis. We presume that the decrease of LOXL2 in KC corneas is more likely a consequence of the associated pathological processes (activation

  8. Validation of a screening questionnaire for a human milk bank to determine the presence of illegal drugs, nicotine, and caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuder-Vieco, Diana; Garcia-Algar, Óscar; Pichini, Simona; Pacifici, Roberta; García-Lara, Nadia Raquel; Pallás-Alonso, Carmen Rosa

    2014-04-01

    To validate the health and lifestyle questionnaire answered by donors to a human milk bank with respect to the presence of illegal drugs, nicotine, and caffeine levels in donor milk. A total of 400 human milk samples from 63 donors were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the presence of 14 illegal drugs, nicotine, and caffeine. Demographics and clinical and lifestyle data (illegal drugs, tobacco, and caffeinated beverage use) were collected from the required screening questionnaire of a human milk bank. The relationship between the 2 evaluation techniques was determined. Illegal drugs were not found in donor milk. Nicotine (46.1 ng/mL) and cotinine (138.6 ng/mL) were quantified in one milk sample from a donor who did not report tobacco use in the questionnaire (1.6% false negative). Caffeine was detected in 45.3% (181/400) of the total milk samples, with a mean concentration of 496 ± 778 ng/mL. The sensitivity and specificity of the questionnaire to detect caffeine in donor milk was 46% and 77%, respectively. The lifestyle questionnaire is reliable for the assessment of illicit drug use by donors to a human milk bank, but there are certain limitations regarding the identification of second-hand smoke exposure and the disclosure of consumption of caffeinated beverages. Data such as smoking habits of partners, type and volume of beverage or food containing caffeine, method of preparation, and time of day of consumption should be collected by the questionnaire. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. NGS-based approach to determine the presence of HPV and their sites of integration in human cancer genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrani, P; Kulkarni, V; Iyer, P; Upadhyay, P; Chaubal, R; Das, P; Mulherkar, R; Singh, R; Dutt, A

    2015-06-09

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) accounts for the most common cause of all virus-associated human cancers. Here, we describe the first graphic user interface (GUI)-based automated tool 'HPVDetector', for non-computational biologists, exclusively for detection and annotation of the HPV genome based on next-generation sequencing data sets. We developed a custom-made reference genome that comprises of human chromosomes along with annotated genome of 143 HPV types as pseudochromosomes. The tool runs on a dual mode as defined by the user: a 'quick mode' to identify presence of HPV types and an 'integration mode' to determine genomic location for the site of integration. The input data can be a paired-end whole-exome, whole-genome or whole-transcriptome data set. The HPVDetector is available in public domain for download: http://www.actrec.gov.in/pi-webpages/AmitDutt/HPVdetector/HPVDetector.html. On the basis of our evaluation of 116 whole-exome, 23 whole-transcriptome and 2 whole-genome data, we were able to identify presence of HPV in 20 exomes and 4 transcriptomes of cervical and head and neck cancer tumour samples. Using the inbuilt annotation module of HPVDetector, we found predominant integration of viral gene E7, a known oncogene, at known 17q21, 3q27, 7q35, Xq28 and novel sites of integration in the human genome. Furthermore, co-infection with high-risk HPVs such as 16 and 31 were found to be mutually exclusive compared with low-risk HPV71. HPVDetector is a simple yet precise and robust tool for detecting HPV from tumour samples using variety of next-generation sequencing platforms including whole genome, whole exome and transcriptome. Two different modes (quick detection and integration mode) along with a GUI widen the usability of HPVDetector for biologists and clinicians with minimal computational knowledge.

  10. Embodied niche construction in the hominin lineage: semiotic structure and sustained attention in human embodied cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Aaron J

    2014-01-01

    Human evolution unfolded through a rather distinctive, dynamically constructed ecological niche. The human niche is not only generally terrestrial in habitat, while being flexibly and extensively heterotrophic in food-web connections. It is also defined by semiotically structured and structuring embodied cognitive interfaces, connecting the individual organism with the wider environment. The embodied dimensions of niche-population co-evolution have long involved semiotic system construction, which I hypothesize to be an evolutionarily primitive aspect of learning and higher-level cognitive integration and attention in the great apes and humans alike. A clearly pre-linguistic form of semiotic cognitive structuration is suggested to involve recursively learned and constructed object icons. Higher-level cognitive iconic representation of visually, auditorily, or haptically perceived extrasomatic objects would be learned and evoked through indexical connections to proprioceptive and affective somatic states. Thus, private cognitive signs would be defined, not only by their learned and perceived extrasomatic referents, but also by their associations to iconically represented somatic states. This evolutionary modification of animal associative learning is suggested to be adaptive in ecological niches occupied by long-lived, large-bodied ape species, facilitating memory construction and recall in highly varied foraging and social contexts, while sustaining selective attention during goal-directed behavioral sequences. The embodied niche construction (ENC) hypothesis of human evolution posits that in the early hominin lineage, natural selection further modified the ancestral ape semiotic adaptations, favoring the recursive structuration of concise iconic narratives of embodied interaction with the environment.

  11. Cytokeratin (CK5, CK8, CK14) expression and presence of progenitor stem cells in human fetal thymuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Gupta, Tulika; Kaur, Harjeet; Sehgal, Shobha; Aggarwal, Anjali; Kapoor, Kanchan; Sharma, Anshu; Sahni, Daisy; Singla, Suhalika

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to observe the expression of cytokeratins in human fetal thymuses. Specific cytokeratin markers in adult humans and mice have been well described but there has been little similar work on human fetuses. We also aimed to see whether progenitor stem cells that could be harvested to treat various immunodeficiency disorders are present in fetal thymic tissue. Thymuses obtained from 30 aborted human fetuses (12 to 31 weeks) were examined immunohistochemically to investigate changes in cytokeratin expression in the epithelial cells (TEC) at various gestational ages. Before 16 weeks of gestation, cortical (cTEC) and medullary (mTEC) TEC exhibited homogenous staining for cytokeratins CK8 and CK5. After 16 weeks there was differential staining, with cTEC positive for CK8 and mTEC for CK5 and CK14. Interestingly, both CK5 + CK8+ progenitor stem cells were present in the fetal thymic cortex at all gestational ages, with a relatively high number from 12 to 16 weeks. Cytokeratin expression in fetal thymuses was quite different from that in the adult thymus owing to the presence of undifferentiated progenitor stem cells in fetal thymic stroma along with differentiated TEC. The best time to harvest these progenitor stem cells from fetal thymic stroma in order to treat various immune deficiency disorders appears to be 12-16 weeks. Clin. Anat. 29:711-717, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The cellulose-degrading microbial community of the human gut varies according to the presence or absence of methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassard, Christophe; Delmas, Eve; Robert, Céline; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick

    2010-10-01

    Cellulose-degrading microorganisms involved in the breakdown of plant cell wall material in the human gut remain rather unexplored despite their role in intestinal fermentation. Microcrystalline cellulose-degrading bacteria were previously identified in faeces of methane-excreting individuals, whereas these microorganisms were undetectable in faecal samples from non-methane excretors. This suggested that the structure and activity of the cellulose-degrading community differ in methane- and non-methane-excreting individuals. The purpose of this study was to characterize in depth this cellulose-degrading community in individuals of both CH(4) statuses using both culture-dependent and molecular methods. A new real-time PCR analysis was developed to enumerate microcrystalline cellulose-degrading ruminococci and used to confirm the predominance of these hydrolytic ruminococci in methane excretors. Culture-dependent methods using cell wall spinach (CWS) residue revealed the presence of CWS-degrading microorganisms in all individuals. Characterization of CWS-degrading isolates further showed that the main cellulose-degrading bacteria belong essentially to Bacteroidetes in non-methane-excreting subjects, while they are predominantly represented by Firmicutes in methane-excreting individuals. This taxonomic diversity was associated with functional diversity: the ability to degrade different types of cellulose and to produce H(2) from fermentation differed depending on the species. The structure of the cellulolytic community was shown to vary depending on the presence of methanogens in the human gut. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Photodynamically-induced Apoptosis Due to Ultraviolet A in the Presence of Lomefloxacin in Human Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Shouko; Imaizumi, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takahiro; Iwase, Yumiko; Nishi, Koji; Okudaira, Kazuho; Yumita, Nagahiko

    2017-11-01

    Lomefloxacin (LFX) is a widely used fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent that plays an important role in the treatment of human and animal infections; however, it has been reported to cause phototoxicity. In this study, we investigated the induction of apoptosis due to ultraviolet A (UVA) light in the presence and absence of LFX in HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells. HL-60 cells were exposed to UVA at an intensity of 1.1 mW/cm2 for 20 min in the presence and absence of LFX, and the induction of apoptosis was examined by analyzing cell morphology, DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3 activity. Cells treated with 100 μM LFX and UVA clearly showed membrane blebbing and cell shrinkage. The proportion of apoptotic cells was significantly higher in cells treated with both UVA and LFX than in those treated with UVA or LFX alone. In addition, DNA ladder formation and caspase-3 activation were observed in cells treated with both UVA and LFX. A significant reduction in the number of UVA-induced apoptotic cells and caspase-3 activation was observed when histidine was present, which suggested that photodynamically-generated singlet oxygen is an important mediator of apoptosis. These results indicate that the combination of UVA and LFX induces apoptosis in HL-60 cells. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Production and supply of high-quality food protein for human consumption: sustainability, challenges, and innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoyao; Fanzo, Jessica; Miller, Dennis D; Pingali, Prabhu; Post, Mark; Steiner, Jean L; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna E

    2014-08-01

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that 843 million people worldwide are hungry and a greater number suffer from nutrient deficiencies. Approximately one billion people have inadequate protein intake. The challenge of preventing hunger and malnutrition will become even greater as the global population grows from the current 7.2 billion people to 9.6 billion by 2050. With increases in income, population, and demand for more nutrient-dense foods, global meat production is projected to increase by 206 million tons per year during the next 35 years. These changes in population and dietary practices have led to a tremendous rise in the demand for food protein, especially animal-source protein. Consuming the required amounts of protein is fundamental to human growth and health. Protein needs can be met through intakes of animal and plant-source foods. Increased consumption of food proteins is associated with increased greenhouse gas emissions and overutilization of water. Consequently, concerns exist regarding impacts of agricultural production, processing and distribution of food protein on the environment, ecosystem, and sustainability. To address these challenging issues, the New York Academy of Sciences organized the conference "Frontiers in Agricultural Sustainability: Studying the Protein Supply Chain to Improve Dietary Quality" to explore sustainable innovations in food science and programming aimed at producing the required quality and quantity of protein through improved supply chains worldwide. This report provides an extensive discussion of these issues and summaries of the presentations from the conference. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda: A Commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Jane

    2013-01-01

    In her commentary of McPhail's 2013 article "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It: Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda," Jane Andrew begins by highlighting a number of McPhail's primary arguments. She points out that McPhail sets out to achieve two things…

  16. Conformational control of human transferrin covalently anchored to carbon-coated iron nanoparticles in presence of a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Agata; Matysiak-Brynda, Edyta; Bystrzejewski, Michal; Sutherland, Duncan S; Stojek, Zbigniew; Nowicka, Anna M

    2016-11-01

    The control of the interactions of proteins with the support matrix plays a key role in medicine, drug delivery systems and diagnostics. Herein, we report that covalent anchoring of human transferrin to carbon-coated iron magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with carboxylic groups (Fe@C-COOH Nps) in the presence of magnetic field results in its conformational integrity and electroactivity. We have found that, the direct contact of human transferrin with Fe@C-COOH Nps does not lead to release of iron and in consequence to the irreversible conformational changes of the protein. Moreover, the examination of the direct electron transfer between Tf molecules from the conjugate and the electrode surface was possible. The quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D)- and thermogravimetric data (TGA) showed that under such conditions, in addition to a monolayer, an adlayer of the protein can be formed on Fe@C-COOH Nps at constant pH. To our best knowledge this is the first paper that reports on covalent anchoring of human transferrin (Tf) to carbon-coated iron magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with carboxylic groups (Fe@C-COOH Nps) in the presence of magnetic field, which results in its conformational integrity and electroactivity. We showed that it is possible to attach, without changing pH, more than one single layer of transferrin to the Fe@C-COOH Nps. This is a very rare phenomenon in the case of proteins. We proved, using various experimental techniques, that the proposed methodology does not lead to release of iron from Tf molecules, what was the major problem so far. We believe that this finding opens new possibilities in targeting drug delivery systems and medical diagnostics. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sunlight-induced inactivation of human Wa and porcine OSU rotaviruses in the presence of exogenous photosensitizers

    KAUST Repository

    Romero-Maraccini, Ofelia C.

    2013-10-01

    Human rotavirus Wa and porcine rotavirus OSU solutions were irradiated with simulated solar UV and visible light in the presence of different photosensitizers dissolved in buffered solutions. For human rotavirus, the exogenous effects were greater than the endogenous effects under irradiation with full spectrum and UVA and visible light at 25 C. For porcine rotavirus, the exogenous effects with UVA and visible light irradiation were only observed at high temperatures, >40 C. The results from dark experiments conducted at different temperatures suggest that porcine rotavirus has higher thermostability than human rotavirus. Concentrations of 3′-MAP excited triplet states of 1.8 fM and above resulted in significant human rotavirus inactivation. The measured excited triplet state concentrations of ≤0.45 fM produced by UVA and visible light irradiation of natural dissolved organic matter solutions were likely not directly responsible for rotavirus inactivation. Instead, the linear correlation for human rotavirus inactivation rate constant (kobs) with the phenol degradation rate constant (kexp) found in both 1 mM NaHCO3 and 1 mM phosphate-buffered solutions suggested that OH radical was a major reactive species for the exogenous inactivation of rotaviruses. Linear correlations between rotavirus kobs and specific UV254 nm absorbance of two river-dissolved organic matter and two effluent organic matter isolates indicated that organic matter aromaticity may help predict formation of radicals responsible for rotavirus inactivation. The results from this study also suggested that the differences in rotavirus strains should be considered when predicting solar inactivation of rotavirus in sunlit surface waters. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. National Sustainability Outreach Assessment Based on Human and Social Capital: The Case of Environmental Sciences in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Frischknecht

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a sustainability outreach study based on an assessment of human and social capital. The aim was to capture the national sustainability outreach of twenty years of Environmental Sciences education, centered at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH in Zurich. The study contained two lines of research, one being a human capital assessment with a survey among graduates from the years 1992 to 2005 (n = 542 and the other being a social capital analysis based on interviews with institutions that represent the Swiss social systems of economy, politics/public administration and civil society (20 institutions. Our analyses reveal several functional forms of both human capital (specialists, pioneers, leaders and social capital (qualification profile, internalization, networks, standardization, professionalization that trigger and channel sustainability outreach.

  19. Developing and sustaining human resources in the health supply chain in Ethiopia: barriers and enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia; Traulsen, Janine M; Damene Kabtimer, Woynabeba; Mekasha Habtegiorgis, Bitsatab; Teshome Gebregeorgise, Dawit; Essah, Nana Am; Khan, Sara A; Brown, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    The health supply chain is often the weakest link in achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals and universal health coverage, requiring trained professionals who are often unavailable. In Ethiopia there have been recent developments in the area of health supply chain management. The aim of this study was to explore the current status of the development of human resources in health supply chain management in Ethiopia and to identify important factors affecting this development. A series of face-to-face interviews with key stakeholders was carried out in 2014. The interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. The interview guide comprised 51 questions. A qualitative analysis of transcripts was made. A total of 25 interviews were conducted. Three themes were identified: General changes: recognition, commitment and resources, Education and training, and Barriers and enablers. Results confirm the development of human resources in health supply chain management in many areas. However, several problems were identified including lack of coordination, partly due to the large number of stakeholders; reported high staff mobility; and a lack of overall strategy regarding the job/career structures necessary for maintaining human resources. Rural areas have a particular set of problems, including in transportation of goods and personnel, attracting and keeping personnel, and in communication and access to information. Ethiopia is on the way to developing a nationwide viable system for health supply chain management. However, there are still challenges. Short-term challenges include the importance of highlighting strategies and programs for human resources in health supply chain management. In the long term, commitments to financial support must be obtained. A strategy is needed for the further development and sustainability of human resources in the health supply chain in Ethiopia.

  20. Presence of anti-Toxoplasma antibodies in humans and their cats in the urban zone of Guadalajara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galván Ramírez María de la Luz

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cats are the definitive hosts of Toxoplasma gondii. Infected cats excrete oocysts in their feces, infecting humans and other animals. The objective of the present study was to determine the presence of anti-Toxoplasma antibodies in cat owners and their pets, and determine if there was a relationship between Toxoplasma infection and humans who live with infected cats. IgG anti-Toxoplasma antibodies in sera of 59 cat owners were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, in 24 sera from their cats, IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies were found using Burney's ELISA. Thirty-eight (64% of 59 cat owners were positive to IgG anti-Toxoplasma. Seropositivity for cats was 70.8% IgG, 8.3% IgM, and 62.5% IgA. Cohabitation with cats infected by T. gondii, feeding with leftovers or raw viscera, and lack of control over how their feces were handled are risk factors conducive for humans to become infected by T. gondii.

  1. Ivermectin residue depletion in food producing species and its presence in animal foodstuffs with a view to human safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, M; San Andrés, M I; de Lucas, J J; González-Canga, A

    2012-05-01

    From a human safety perspective, the administration of ivermectin to food producing animal species entails potential risks related to the presence of drug residues in edible tissues, milk, and other derived products. The European Medicines Agency has established the maximum residue limits for ivermectin in the European Union, with values of 100 μg·kg(-1) in fat and liver and 30 μg·kg(-1) in kidney for all mammalian food producing species, in order to ensure that the amount of ivermectin that can be found in animal foodstuff is below dangerous levels for the consumers. According to these values, withdrawal periods after subcutaneous injection were recently established in the European Union (2009), in 49 days for products containing ivermectin as a single active substance or in combination with closantel, and in 66 days when combined with clorsulon. The marker residue for ivermectin was found to be H(2)B(1a), which is the major component of the parent compound. The tissue distribution of residues and the overall ratios of marker to total residues were generally similar in most species, and the highest concentrations of ivermectin residues were found in fat and liver with high levels also detected in injection site muscles. Ivermectin is not licensed for use in animals from which milk is produced for human consumption, however its extra-label use should be considered regarding human safety, due to its long persistence in milk and milk-derived products.

  2. The chrondoprotective actions of a natural product are associated with the activation of IGF-1 production by human chondrocytes despite the presence of IL-1β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrowski Paul

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage loss is a hallmark of arthritis and follows activation of catabolic processes concomitant with a disruption of anabolic pathways like insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1. We hypothesized that two natural products of South American origin, would limit cartilage degradation by respectively suppressing catabolism and activating local IGF-1 anabolic pathways. One extract, derived from cat's claw (Uncaria guianensis, vincaria®, is a well-described inhibitor of NF-κB. The other extract, derived from the vegetable Lepidium meyenii (RNI 249, possessed an uncertain mechanism of action but with defined ethnomedical applications for fertility and vitality. Methods Human cartilage samples were procured from surgical specimens with consent, and were evaluated either as explants or as primary chondrocytes prepared after enzymatic digestion of cartilage matrix. Assessments included IGF-1 gene expression, IGF-1 production (ELISA, cartilage matrix degradation and nitric oxide (NO production, under basal conditions and in the presence of IL-1β. Results RNI 249 enhanced basal IGF-1 mRNA levels in human chondrocytes by 2.7 fold, an effect that was further enhanced to 3.8 fold by co-administration with vincaria. Enhanced basal IGF-1 production by RNI 249 alone and together with vincaria, was confirmed in both explants and in primary chondrocytes (P Conclusion The identification of agents that activate the autocrine production of IGF-1 in cartilage, even in the face of suppressive pro-inflammatory, catabolic cytokines like IL-1β, represents a novel therapeutic approach to cartilage biology. Chondroprotection associated with prevention of the catabolic events and the potential for sustained anabolic activity with this natural product suggests that it holds significant promise in the treatment of debilitating joint diseases.

  3. Leveraging Human-environment Systems in Residential Buildings for Aggregate Energy Efficiency and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoqi

    Reducing the energy consumed in the built environment is a key objective in many sustainability initiatives. Existing energy saving methods have consisted of physical interventions to buildings and/or behavioral modifications of occupants. However, such methods may not only suffer from their own disadvantages, e.g. high cost and transient effect, but also lose aggregate energy saving potential due to the oftentimes-associated single-building-focused view and an isolated examination of occupant behaviors. This dissertation attempts to overcome the limitations of traditional energy saving research and practical approaches, and enhance residential building energy efficiency and sustainability by proposing innovative energy strategies from a holistic perspective of the aggregate human-environment systems. This holistic perspective features: (1) viewing buildings as mutual influences in the built environment, (2) leveraging both the individual and contextualized social aspects of occupant behaviors, and (3) incorporating interactions between the built environment and human behaviors. First, I integrate three interlinked components: buildings, residents, and the surrounding neighborhood, and quantify the potential energy savings to be gained from renovating buildings at the inter-building level and leveraging neighborhood-contextualized occupant social networks. Following the confirmation of both the inter-building effect among buildings and occupants' interpersonal influence on energy conservation, I extend the research further by examining the synergy that may exist at the intersection between these "engineered" building networks and "social" peer networks, focusing specifically on the additional energy saving potential that could result from interactions between the two components. Finally, I seek to reach an alignment of the human and building environment subsystems by matching the thermostat preferences of each household with the thermal conditions within their

  4. Collective Hunger in the Vision of Amartya Sen as One of the Impeditive Factors of Sustainable Human Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Torres Roberti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at collective hunger in the vision of Amartya Sen as one of the impeding factors of Sustainable Human Development. In the economist's view, collective hunger goes beyond chronic hunger, involves a sudden outbreak of deprivation for a portion of the population. To eliminate hunger in the modern world, it is crucial to understand the cause of collective hunger in a broad way, and not just because of some mechanical imbalance between food and population. By illustrating the deprivation of liberty, child labor is included as one of the impediments to sustainable human development.

  5. Integrating Sustainability Science with the Sciences of Human Well-being to Inform Design and Planning in an Urbanizing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, M.; Graumlich, L. J.; Frumkin, H.; Friedman, D.

    2012-12-01

    A sustainable human future requires both healthy ecosystems and communities in which people thrive, with opportunities for health, well-being, happiness, economic prosperity, and equity. To make progress towards this goal, two largely disparate communities of scholars and practitioners must come together: sustainability science needs to be integrated with the sciences of human health and well-being. The opportunity for such integration is particularly ripe for urbanizing regions which not only dominate energy and resource use but also increasingly represent the human habitat. We present a conceptual framework that integrates sustainability science with the sciences of human health and well-being to explicitly articulate testable hypotheses on the relationships between humans and their habitat. We are interested in human behaviors and metrics of health and well-being in relationship to the characteristics of the built environment at various scales from buildings to metro regions. Focusing on the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW) as a testbed, we are building on our current empirical studies on urban sprawl and ecosystem function including biodiversity, air quality, hydrological, biogeochemical, and human health to develop formal hypotheses on how alternative urban design and development patterns may influence health outcomes and well-being. The PNW is an ideal setting for this work because of the connected metropolitan areas within a region characterized by a spectacular diversity of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and deeply held cultural and political aspirations towards sustainability. The framework also highlights opportunities for translation of knowledge to practice in the design and planning of built environments. For example, understanding these associations is critical to assessing tradeoffs in design and planning strategies and exploring potential synergies that optimize both sustainability and human well-being. In complex systems such as cities, managers

  6. The presence and absence of lymphatic vessels in the adult human intervertebral disc: relation to disc pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliskey, Karolina; Williams, Kelly; Yu, J.; Urban, Jill; Athanasou, Nick [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); Jackson, David [Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Human Immunology Unit, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    Although the normal adult human intervertebral disc is considered to be avascular, vascularised cellular fibrous tissue can be found in pathological conditions involving the disc such as disc herniation. Whether lymphatics vessels form a component of this reparative tissue is not known as the presence or absence of lymphatics in herniated and normal disc tissue is not known. We examined spinal tissues and discectomy specimens for the presence of lymphatics. The examination used immunohistochemistry to identify the specific lymphatic endothelial cell markers, podoplanin and LYVE1. Lymphatic vessels were not found in the nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosus of intact, non-herniated lumbar and thoracic discs but were present in the surrounding ligaments. Ingrowth of fibrous tissue was seen in 73% of herniated disc specimens of which 36% contained LYVE1+/podoplanin + lymphatic vessels. Lymphatic vessels were not seen in the sacrum and coccyx or biopsies of four sacrococcygeal chordomas, but they were noted in surrounding extra-osseous fat and fibrous tissue at the edge of the infiltrating tumour. Our findings indicate that lymphatic vessels are not present in the normal adult intervertebral disc but that, when there is extrusion of disc material into surrounding soft tissue, there is ingrowth of reparative fibrous tissue containing lymphatic vessels. Our findings also indicate that chordoma, a tumour of notochordal origin, spreads to regional lymph nodes via lymphatics in para-spinal soft tissues. (orig.)

  7. Presence of Enniatins and Beauvericin in Romanian Wheat Samples: From Raw Material to Products for Direct Human Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, Oana; Juan, Cristina; Miere, Doina; Loghin, Felicia; Mañes, Jordi

    2017-06-12

    In this study, a total of 244 wheat and wheat-based products collected from Romania were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in order to evaluate the presence of four enniatins (ENs; i.e., ENA, ENA1, ENB, and ENB1) and beauvericin (BEA). For the wheat samples, the influence of agricultural practices was assessed, whereas the results for the wheat-based products were used to calculate the estimated daily intake of emerging mycotoxins through wheat consumption for the Romanian population. ENB presented the highest incidence (41% in wheat and 32% in wheat-based products), with its maximum levels of 815 μg kg-1 and 170 μg kg-1 in wheat and wheat-based products, respectively. The correlation between the concentrations of ENB and ENB1 in wheat grain samples and farm practices (organic or conventional) was confirmed statistically (p < 0.05). This is the first study that provides comprehensive information about the influence of agricultural practice on emerging Fusarium mycotoxin presence in Romanian wheat samples and the estimated daily intake of ENs and BEA present in wheat-based products for human consumption commercialized in Romania.

  8. Evaluation of immunohistochemical expression of p16 and presence of human papillomavirus in oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarutti, Ana Luíza Laguardia; Fernandes, Lais Papini; Saldanha, Marina Vaz de Lima Fullin; Marques, Ana Elizia Mascarenhas; Vianna, Leonora Maciel de Souza; de Melo, Nilce Santos; Guerra, Eliete Neves da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Carcinogenesis concerns several changes that eventually result in the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and activation of protooncogenes, leading to loss of cell cycle control. Inactivation of p16 seems to be an early event in this process and occurs in approximately 80% of squamous cell carcinoma cases. The aims of this study were to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of p16 protein in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cases, with both the tumoral area itself and its surgical margin being analyzed (dysplastic areas and histologically normal epithelium adjacent to carcinoma), and to verify the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and its relation to p16 expression. Paraffin-embedded biopsy tissues from 26 patients, 13 with oral squamous cell carcinoma and 13 with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, comprised the analyzed samples. To detect HPV, a nested polymerase chain reaction test using PGMY 09/11 and GP5*/GP6* primers and visualization of the product on a 2% agarose gel was performed. Demographic data were obtained from medical records. The results showed low expression of p16 in the tumor area (38.46%), compared with surgical margins in the histologically normal epithelium (84.6%) and dysplastic areas (57.7%). These findings indicate the inactivation of p16 in the process of malignant transformation. The association described in the literature between expression of p16 and presence of HPV could not be verified in this study, because none of the cases was HPV positive.

  9. Assessing the universal health coverage target in the Sustainable Development Goals from a human rights perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Audrey R

    2016-12-15

    The UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), adopted in September 2015, include a comprehensive health goal, "to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being at all ages." The health goal (SDG 3) has nine substantive targets and four additional targets which are identified as a means of implementation. One of these commitments, to achieve universal health coverage (UHC), has been acknowledged as central to the achievement of all of the other health targets. As defined in the SDGs, UHC includes financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services, and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all. This article evaluates the extent to which the UHC target in the SDGs conforms with the requirements of the right to health enumerated in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and other international human rights instruments and interpreted by international human rights bodies. It does so as a means to identify strengths and weaknesses in the framing of the UHC target that are likely to affect its implementation. While UHC as defined in the SDGs overlaps with human rights standards, there are important human rights omissions that will likely weaken the implementation and reduce the potential benefits of the UHC target. The most important of these is the failure to confer priority to providing access to health services to poor and disadvantaged communities in the process of expanding health coverage and in determining which health services to provide. Unless the furthest behind are given priority and strategies adopted to secure their participation in the development of national health plans, the SDGs, like the MDGs, are likely to leave the most disadvantaged and vulnerable communities behind.

  10. Embodied Niche Construction in the Hominin Lineage: Semiotic Structure and Sustained Attention in Human Embodied Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Jonas Stutz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human evolution unfolded through a rather distinctive, dynamically constructed ecological niche. The human niche is not only generally terrestrial in habitat, while being flexibly and extensively heterotrophic in food-web connections. It is also defined by semiotically structured and structuring embodied cognitive interfaces, connecting the individual organism with the wider environment. The embodied dimensions of niche-population co-evolution have long involved semiotic system construction, which I hypothesize to be an evolutionarily primitive aspect of learning and higher-level cognitive integration and attention in the great apes and humans alike. A clearly pre-linguistic form of semiotic cognitive structuration is suggested to involve recursively learned and constructed object icons. Higher-level cognitive iconic representation of visually, auditorily, or haptically perceived extrasomatic objects would be learned and evoked through indexical connections to proprioceptive and affective somatic states. Thus, private cognitive signs would be defined, not only by their learned and perceived extrasomatic referents, but also by their associations to iconically represented somatic states. This evolutionary modification of animal associative learning is suggested to be adaptive in ecological niches occupied by long-lived, large-bodied ape species, facilitating memory construction and recall in highly varied foraging and social contexts, while sustaining selective attention during goal-directed behavioral sequences. The embodied niche construction (ENC hypothesis of human evolution posits that in the early hominin lineage, natural selection further modified the ancestral ape semiotic adaptations, favoring the recursive structuration of concise iconic narratives of embodied interaction with the environment.

  11. Extensive characterization of human tear fluid collected using different techniques unravels the presence of novel lipid amphiphiles1[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sin Man; Tong, Louis; Duan, Xinrui; Petznick, Andrea; Wenk, Markus R.; Shui, Guanghou

    2014-01-01

    The tear film covers the anterior eye and the precise balance of its various constituting components is critical for maintaining ocular health. The composition of the tear film amphiphilic lipid sublayer, in particular, has largely remained a matter of contention due to the limiting concentrations of these lipid amphiphiles in tears that render their detection and accurate quantitation tedious. Using systematic and sensitive lipidomic approaches, we validated different tear collection techniques and report the most comprehensive human tear lipidome to date; comprising more than 600 lipid species from 17 major lipid classes. Our study confers novel insights to the compositional details of the existent tear film model, in particular the disputable amphiphilic lipid sublayer constituents, by demonstrating the presence of cholesteryl sulfate, O-acyl-ω-hydroxyfatty acids, and various sphingolipids and phospholipids in tears. The discovery and quantitation of the relative abundance of various tear lipid amphiphiles reported herein are expected to have a profound impact on the current understanding of the existent human tear film model. PMID:24287120

  12. The presence of ochratoxin A in cord serum and in human milk and its correspondence with maternal dietary habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasucci, G; Calabrese, G; Di Giuseppe, R; Carrara, G; Colombo, F; Mandelli, B; Maj, M; Bertuzzi, T; Pietri, A; Rossi, F

    2011-04-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin present in food that can be found in human blood and milk. The link between the nutritional habits of pregnant women both of Italian and foreign nationality resident in Italy and the presence of ochratoxin A in cord blood and in maternal milk was investigated. The study involved 130 pregnant women. Food consumption during pregnancy was evaluated by means of the EPIC questionnaire; OTA content was determined in cord serum and maternal milk by HPLC. The mean daily dietary intake of OTA was 1.02 ± 1.20 and 0.87 ± 0.78 ng/kg of bodyweight for Italian and non-Italian women, respectively, but this difference was not statistically significant. The incidence of positive milk samples was 73.0 and 85.0% among the Italian and non-Italian mothers, respectively. Pork meat, soft drinks, sweets and red wine showed a significant relationship with OTA level in serum. As far as milk is concerned, a positive relationship resulted for pork meat, sweets, soft drinks and seed oils. A positive relationship between serum OTA level and the ratio serum/milk OTA was found. The intake of OTA had no effect on the cord blood creatinine level. This study confirms that OTA is widely present in human milk and therefore could pose a risk for the newborn.

  13. Estimation of dose requirements for sustained in vivo activity of a therapeutic human anti-CD20 antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, Wim K.; Munk, Martin E.; Mackus, Wendy J. M.; van den Brakel, Jeroen H. N.; Pluyter, Marielle; Glennie, Martin J.; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    We evaluated the dose requirements for sustained in vivo activity of ofatumumab, a human anti-CD20 antibody under development for the treatment of B cell-mediated diseases. In a mouse xenograft model, a single dose, resulting in an initial plasma antibody concentration of 5 mu g/ml, which was

  14. Can human resources induce sustainability in business?: Modeling, testing and correlating HR index and company's business results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubović Jovan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper the authors analyze the impact of the composite human resource index on sustainable growth in a specific business sector in a transition country. Sustainability of country's economy is growingly relying on the knowledge economy which has been implemented in strategies of sustainable development throughout Europe. The knowledge economy is mostly based on human resources and the way they are organized and managed in the companies actively operating in competitive markets. In order to confirm importance of the human resources (HR index, results were tested by means of modeling, measuring and correlating the HR index with business results at micro level. The tests were conducted on the data from the survey in Serbian meat processing industry. The results were then compared with the results from the survey conducted in a financial industry. Moreover, a model was made that could be applicable in all countries that do not have available official statistic data on the level of investments in human resources. The focus was on determining the correlation direction, and hence creating a research model applicable in all business sectors. It has been found that a significant one-way correlation exists between business performance and increased HR index. In that way it has been confirmed that in Serbian economy that has recorded global decrease during transition, certain business sectors, and especially companies with high levels of investments in improving its HR index record above average and sustainable growth.

  15. Shuttle Shortfalls and Lessons Learned for the Sustainment of Human Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Edgar; Levack, Daniel J. H.; Rhodes, Russell E.; Robinson, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Much debate and national soul searching has taken place over the value of the Space Shuttle which first flew in 1981 and which is currently scheduled to be retired in 2010. Originally developed post-Saturn Apollo to emphasize affordability and safety, the reusable Space Shuttle instead came to be perceived as economically unsustainable and lacking the technology maturity to assure safe, routine access to low earth orbit (LEO). After the loss of two crews, aboard Challenger and Columbia, followed by the decision to retire the system in 2010, it is critical that this three decades worth of human space flight experience be well understood. Understanding of the past is imperative to further those goals for which the Space Shuttle was a stepping-stone in the advancement of knowledge. There was significant reduction in life cycle costs between the Saturn Apollo and the Space Shuttle. However, the advancement in life cycle cost reduction from Saturn Apollo to the Space Shuttle fell far short of its goal. This paper will explore the reasons for this shortfall. Shortfalls and lessons learned can be categorized as related to design factors, at the architecture, element and sub-system levels, as well as to programmatic factors, in terms of goals, requirements, management and organization. Additionally, no review of the Space Shuttle program and attempt to take away key lessons would be complete without a strategic review. That is, how do national space goals drive future space transportation development strategies? The lessons of the Space Shuttle are invaluable in all respects - technical, as in design, program-wise, as in organizational approach and goal setting, and strategically, within the context of the generational march toward an expanded human presence in space. Beyond lessons though (and the innumerable papers, anecdotes and opinions published on this topic) this paper traces tangible, achievable steps, derived from the Space Shuttle program experience, that must be

  16. Agriculture: Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainability creates and maintains the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the food, feed, and fiber needs of our country and the social, economic and other requirements.

  17. A Word of Caution: Human Rights, Disability, and Implementation of the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Brolan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available On 25 September 2015, the United Nations (UN General Assembly unanimously voted for the post-2015 UN resolution on the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goal (SDG agenda. This article argues that although the post-2015 SDG agenda is an advance on its precursor the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs—especially for progressing the human rights of persons with disabilities in development settings, everywhere—it should nonetheless be approached with caution. This article will identify “three steps forward” for persons with disabilities within the broad content of the post-2015 SDGs, while also highlighting four potential “steps back”. It concludes persons with disabilities, disability rights advocates and their supporters must remain vigilant as the post-SDG UN resolution is now operationalised and implemented by UN Member States and their many partners. This is particularly so if the content of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is to be effectively integrated into the post-2015 development policy and planning landscape.

  18. Environmental Assessment for Sustainability and Resiliency for Ecological and Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Clarke, James; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn

    2015-06-01

    Considerable attention has been devoted to environmental assessment and monitoring, primarily by physical and biological scientists, and more recently by social scientists. However, population growth and global change have resulted in an imperative to assess the resiliency of the environment to adapt to large scale changes and to continue to produce goods and services for future generations (sustainability). Changing land use needs or expectations may require the remediation and restoration of degraded or contaminated land. This paper provides an overview of monitoring types, and discusses how indicators for the different monitoring types can be developed to address questions of ecological health, human health, and whether restoration and remediation are effective. We suggest that along with more traditional types of monitoring, agencies should consider recovery indicators or metrics, as well as resiliency metrics. We suggest that one goal of assessment should be to determine if management, remediation, restoration, and mitigation reduce recovery time, thus reducing community vulnerability and enhancing resiliency to environmental stressors and disasters.

  19. Accounting for natural resources and environmental sustainability: linking ecosystem services to human well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Stephen J; Hayes, Sharon E; Yoskowitz, David; Smith, Lisa M; Summers, J Kevin; Russell, Marc; Benson, William H

    2010-03-01

    One of society's greatest challenges is to sustain natural resources while promoting economic growth and quality of life. In the face of this challenge, society must measure the effectiveness of programs established to safeguard the environment. The impetus for demonstrating positive results from government-sponsored research and regulation in the United States comes from Congress (General Accountability Office; GAO) and the Executive Branch (Office of Management and Budget; OMB). The message is: regulatory and research programs must demonstrate outcomes that justify their costs. Although the concept is simple, it is a complex problem to demonstrate that environmental research, policies, and regulations cause measurable changes in environmental quality. Even where changes in environmental quality can be tracked reliably, the connections between government actions and environmental outcomes seldom are direct or straightforward. In this article, we describe emerging efforts (with emphasis on the role of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; EPA) to frame and measure environmental outcomes in terms of ecosystem services and values-societally and ecologically meaningful metrics for gauging how well we manage environmental resources. As examples of accounting for outcomes and values, we present a novel, low-cost method for determining relative values of multiple ecosystem services, and describe emerging research on indicators of human well-being.

  20. Dietary fat induces sustained reward response in the human brain without primary taste cortex discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène eTzieropoulos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To disentangle taste from reward responses in the human gustatory cortex, we combined high density electro-encephalography with a gustometer delivering tastant puffs to the tip of the tongue. Stimuli were pure tastants (salt solutions at two concentrations, caloric emulsions of identical taste (two milk preparations differing in fat content and a mixture of high fat milk with the lowest salt concentration. Early event-related potentials showed a dose-response effect for increased taste intensity, with higher amplitude and shorter latency for high compared to low salt concentration, but not for increased fat content. However, the amplitude and distribution of late potentials were modulated by fat content independently of reported intensity and discrimination. Neural source estimation revealed a sustained activation of reward areas to the two high-fat stimuli. The results suggest calorie detection through specific sensors on the tongue independent of perceived taste. Finally, amplitude variation of the first peak in the event-related potential to the different stimuli correlated with papilla density, suggesting a higher discrimination power for subjects with more fungiform papillae.

  1. Activated Human Valvular Interstitial Cells Sustain Interleukin-17 Production To Recruit Neutrophils in Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Shun, Chia-Tung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Wei; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Yang, Chia-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie valvular inflammation in streptococcus-induced infective endocarditis (IE) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) can activate human heart valvular interstitial cells (VIC) to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine involved in T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activated VIC can enhance neutrophil infiltration through sustained IL-17 production, leading to valvular damage. To monitor cytokine and chemokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and the induction or expansion of CD4+ CD45RA− CD25− CCR6+ Th17 cells, primary human VIC were cultured in vitro and activated by GTFs. Serum cytokine levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and neutrophils and Th17 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in infected valves from patients with IE. The expression of IL-21, IL-23, IL-17, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (Rorc) was upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which may enhance the proliferation of memory Th17 cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. Many chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), were upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which might recruit neutrophils and CD4+ T cells. Moreover, CXCL1 production in VIC was induced in a dose-dependent manner by IL-17 to enhance neutrophil chemotaxis. CXCL1-expressing VIC and infiltrating neutrophils could be detected in infected valves, and serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased in patients with IE compared to healthy donors. Furthermore, elevated serum IL-21 levels have been significantly associated with severe valvular damage, including rupture of chordae tendineae, in IE patients. Our findings suggest that VIC are activated by bacterial modulins to recruit neutrophils and that such activities might be further enhanced by the production of Th17-associated cytokines. Together, these factors can amplify the

  2. Mast cell degranulation and de novo histamine formation contribute to sustained postexercise vasodilation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Steven A; McCord, Jennifer L; Ely, Matthew R; Sieck, Dylan C; Buck, Tahisha M; Luttrell, Meredith J; MacLean, David A; Halliwill, John R

    2017-03-01

    In humans, acute aerobic exercise elicits a sustained postexercise vasodilation within previously active skeletal muscle. This response is dependent on activation of histamine H1 and H2 receptors, but the source of intramuscular histamine remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that interstitial histamine in skeletal muscle would be increased with exercise and would be dependent on de novo formation via the inducible enzyme histidine decarboxylase and/or mast cell degranulation. Subjects performed 1 h of unilateral dynamic knee-extension exercise or sham (seated rest). We measured the interstitial histamine concentration and local blood flow (ethanol washout) via skeletal muscle microdialysis of the vastus lateralis. In some probes, we infused either α-fluoromethylhistidine hydrochloride (α-FMH), a potent inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, or histamine H1/H2-receptor blockers. We also measured interstitial tryptase concentrations, a biomarker of mast cell degranulation. Compared with preexercise, histamine was increased after exercise by a change (Δ) of 4.2 ± 1.8 ng/ml (P histamine in skeletal muscle increases with exercise and results from both de novo formation and mast cell degranulation. This suggests that exercise produces an anaphylactoid signal, which affects recovery, and may influence skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Blood flow to previously active skeletal muscle remains elevated following an acute bout of aerobic exercise and is dependent on activation of histamine H1 and H2 receptors. The intramuscular source of histamine that drives this response to exercise has not been identified. Using intramuscular microdialysis in exercising humans, we show both mast cell degranulation and formation of histamine by histidine decarboxylase contributes to the histamine-mediated vasodilation that occurs following a bout of aerobic exercise. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Nurse Knowledge Exchange Plus: Human-Centered Implementation for Spread and Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mike; Heisler, Scott; Fahey, Linda; McGinnis, Juli; Whiffen, Teri L

    2015-07-01

    Kaiser Permanente implemented a new model of nursing communication at shift change-in the bedside nursing report known as the Nurse Knowledge Exchange (NKE) in 2004-but noted variations in its spread and sustainability across medical centers five years later. The six core elements of NKEplus were as follows: team rounding in the last hour before shift changes, pre-shift patient assignments that limit the number of departing nurses at shift change, unit support for uninterrupted bedside reporting, standardization for report and safety check formats, and collaboration with patients to update in-room care boards. In January 2011 Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC; Pasadena) began implementing NKEplus in 125 nursing units across 14 hospitals, with the use of human-centered design principles: creating shared understanding of the need for change, minimum specifications, and customization by frontline staff. Champion teams on each nursing unit designed and pilot tested unit-specific versions of NKEplus for four to eight weeks. Implementation occurred in waves and proceeded from medical/surgical units to specialty units. Traditional performance improvement strategies of accountability, measurement, and management were also applied. By the end of 2012, 100% of the 64 medical/surgical units and 47 (77.0%) of the 61 specialty units in KPSC medical centers implemented NKEplus-as had all but 1 of the specialty units by May 2013. The mean KPSC score on the NKEplus nursing behavior bundle improved from 65.9% in 2010 to 71.3% in the first quarter of 2014. The mean KPSC Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) score for nurse communication improved from 73.1% in 2010 to 76.4% in the first quarter of 2014 (p Human-centered implementation appeared to help spread a new model of nursing handoffs and change the culture of professional nursing practice related to shift change.

  4. Efficient nanoparticle mediated sustained RNA interference in human primary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukerjee, Anindita; Shankardas, Jwalitha; Ranjan, Amalendu P; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K, E-mail: Jamboor.vishwanatha@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology and Institute for Cancer Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-11-04

    Endothelium forms an important target for drug and/or gene therapy since endothelial cells play critical roles in angiogenesis and vascular functions and are associated with various pathophysiological conditions. RNA mediated gene silencing presents a new therapeutic approach to overcome many such diseases, but the major challenge of such an approach is to ensure minimal toxicity and effective transfection efficiency of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to primary endothelial cells. In the present study, we formulated shAnnexin A2 loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles which produced intracellular small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Annexin A2 and brought about the downregulation of Annexin A2. The per cent encapsulation of the plasmid within the nanoparticle was found to be 57.65%. We compared our nanoparticle based transfections with Lipofectamine mediated transfection, and our studies show that nanoparticle based transfection efficiency is very high ({approx}97%) and is more sustained compared to conventional Lipofectamine mediated transfections in primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells and human cancer cell lines. Our findings also show that the shAnnexin A2 loaded PLGA nanoparticles had minimal toxicity with almost 95% of cells being viable 24 h post-transfection while Lipofectamine based transfections resulted in only 30% viable cells. Therefore, PLGA nanoparticle based transfection may be used for efficient siRNA transfection to human primary endothelial and cancer cells. This may serve as a potential adjuvant treatment option for diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and age related macular degeneration besides various cancers.

  5. Efficient nanoparticle mediated sustained RNA interference in human primary endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukerjee, Anindita; Shankardas, Jwalitha; Ranjan, Amalendu P.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2011-11-01

    Endothelium forms an important target for drug and/or gene therapy since endothelial cells play critical roles in angiogenesis and vascular functions and are associated with various pathophysiological conditions. RNA mediated gene silencing presents a new therapeutic approach to overcome many such diseases, but the major challenge of such an approach is to ensure minimal toxicity and effective transfection efficiency of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to primary endothelial cells. In the present study, we formulated shAnnexin A2 loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles which produced intracellular small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Annexin A2 and brought about the downregulation of Annexin A2. The per cent encapsulation of the plasmid within the nanoparticle was found to be 57.65%. We compared our nanoparticle based transfections with Lipofectamine mediated transfection, and our studies show that nanoparticle based transfection efficiency is very high (~97%) and is more sustained compared to conventional Lipofectamine mediated transfections in primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells and human cancer cell lines. Our findings also show that the shAnnexin A2 loaded PLGA nanoparticles had minimal toxicity with almost 95% of cells being viable 24 h post-transfection while Lipofectamine based transfections resulted in only 30% viable cells. Therefore, PLGA nanoparticle based transfection may be used for efficient siRNA transfection to human primary endothelial and cancer cells. This may serve as a potential adjuvant treatment option for diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and age related macular degeneration besides various cancers.

  6. Both Maturation and Survival of Human Dendritic Cells are Impaired in the Presence of Anergic/Suppressor T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Piccolella

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available T cell suppression is a well established phenomenon, but the mechanisms involved are still a matter of debate. Mouse anergic T cells were shown to suppress responder T cell activation by inhibiting the antigen presenting function of DC. In the present work we studied the effects of co-culturing human anergic CD4+ T cells with autologous dendritic cells (DC at different stages of maturation. Either DC maturation or survival, depending on whether immature or mature DC where used as APC, was impaired in the presence of anergic cells. Indeed, MHC and costimulatory molecule up-regulation was inhibited in immature DC, whereas apoptotic phenomena were favored in mature DC and consequently in responder T cells. Defective ligation of CD40 by CD40L (CD154 was responsible for CD95-mediated and spontaneous apoptosis of DC as well as for a failure of their maturation process. These findings indicate that lack of activation of CD40 on DC by CD40L-defective anergic cells might be the primary event involved in T cell suppression and support the role of CD40 signaling in regulating both activation and survival of DC.

  7. Probing the interaction of human serum albumin with DPPH in the absence and presence of the eight antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangrong; Chen, Dejun; Wang, Gongke; Lu, Yan

    2015-02-25

    Albumin represents a very abundant and important circulating antioxidant in plasma. DPPH radical is also called 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl. It has been widely used for measuring the efficiency of antioxidants. In this paper, the ability of human serum albumin (HSA) to scavenge DPPH radical was investigated using UV-vis absorption spectra. The interaction between HSA and DPPH was investigated in the absence and presence of eight popular antioxidants using fluorescence spectroscopy. These results indicate the antioxidant activity of HSA against DPPH radical is similar to glutathione and the value of IC50 is 5.200×10(-5) mol L(-1). In addition, the fluorescence experiments indicate the quenching mechanism of HSA, by DPPH, is a static process. The quenching process of DPPH with HSA is easily affected by the eight antioxidants, however, they cannot change the quenching mechanism of DPPH with HSA. The binding of DPPH to HSA primarily takes place in subdomain IIA and exists two classes of binding sites with two different interaction behaviors. The decreased binding constants and the number of binding sites of DPPH with HSA by the introduction of the eight antioxidants may result from the competition of the eight antioxidants and DPPH binding to HSA. The binding of DPPH to HSA may induce the micro-environment of the lone Trp-214 from polar to slightly nonpolar. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of cytokines in sustaining long-term human megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briddell, R A; Brandt, J E; Leemhuis, T B; Hoffman, R

    1992-01-15

    An in vitro liquid suspension culture system was used to determine the role of cytokines in sustaining long-term human megakaryocytopoiesis. Bone marrow cells expressing CD34 but not HLA-DR (CD34+DR-) were used as the inoculum of cells to initiate long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC). CD34+DR- cells (5 x 10(3)/mL) initially contained 0.0 +/- 0.0 assayable colony-forming unit-megakaryocytes (CFU-MK), 6.2 +/- 0.4 assayable burst-forming unit-megakaryocytes (BFU-MK), and 0.0 +/- 0.0 megakaryocytes (MK). LTBMCs were recharged every 48 hours with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-3, and/or IL-6, alone or in combination. LTBMCs were demidepopulated weekly or biweekly, the number of cells and MK enumerated, and then assayed for CFU-MK and BFU-MK. LTBMCs receiving no cytokine(s) contained no assayable CFU-MK or BFU-MK and no observable MK. LTBMCs receiving GM-CSF, IL-1 alpha, and/or IL-3 contained assayable CFU-MK and MK but no BFU-MK for 10 weeks of culture. The effects of GM-CSF and IL-3, IL-1 alpha and IL-3, but not GM-CSF and IL-1 alpha were additive with regards to their ability to augment the numbers of assayable CFU-MK during LTBMC. LTBMCs supplemented with IL-6 contained modest numbers of assayable CFU-MK for only 4 weeks; this effect was not additive to that of GM-CSF, IL-1 alpha, or IL-3. The addition of GM-CSF, IL-1 alpha, and IL-3 alone or in combination each led to the appearance of significant numbers of MKs during LTBMC. By contrast, IL-6 supplemented cultures contained relatively few MK. These studies suggest that CD34+DR- cells are capable of initiating long-term megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro and that a hierarchy of cytokines exists capable of sustaining this process.

  9. The role of humans in facilitating and sustaining coat colour variation in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderholm, Anna; Larson, Greger

    2013-01-01

    Though the process of domestication results in a wide variety of novel phenotypic and behavioural traits, coat colour variation is one of the few characteristics that distinguishes all domestic animals from their wild progenitors. A number of recent reviews have discussed and synthesised the hundreds of genes known to underlie specific coat colour patterns in a wide range of domestic animals. This review expands upon those studies by asking how what is known about the causative mutations associated with variable coat colours, can be used to address three specific questions related to the appearance of non wild-type coat colours in domestic animals. Firstly, is it possible that coat colour variation resulted as a by-product of an initial selection for tameness during the early phases of domestication? Secondly, how soon after the process began did domestic animals display coat colour variation? Lastly, what evidence is there that intentional human selection, rather than drift, is primarily responsible for the wide range of modern coat colours? By considering the presence and absence of coat colour genes within the context of the different pathways animals travelled from wild to captive populations, we conclude that coat colour variability was probably not a pleiotropic effect of the selection for tameness, that coat colours most likely appeared very soon after the domestication process began, and that humans have been actively selecting for colour novelty and thus allowing for the proliferation of new mutations in coat colour genes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The use of music with young children to improve sustained attention during a vigilance task in the presence of auditory distractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, David E; Noguchi, Laura K

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of music to sustain attention of young children during conditions of auditory distractions. Kindergarten students (N=76) were randomly assigned to one of four conditions/groups: (a) spoken story with no distraction, (b) spoken story with distraction, (c) musical story with no distraction, musical story with distraction. Participants were asked to listen to the story and to identify specific "actions" and "animals" that were presented (i.e., spoken or sung) within the story. A tally of correct responses (child pointed to correct actions/animals at appropriate times) was recorded during the listening task. Observations of participants' behaviors while listening were also made by the experimenter using narrative recording procedures. A one-way ANOVA was computed to assess the difference in mean scores across the four experimental conditions. Significant results were found. Further analysis employing a Tukey post hoc/multiple comparisons test revealed significant differences between the spoken story with distraction condition and the musical story with distraction condition. These statistical results, along with the observations of listening behaviors, were discussed in terms of providing suggestions for future research and in lending support to the use of music with young children to improve vigilance within educational and clinical settings.

  11. Graham H. Pyke: Sustainability for Humanity: It's Time To Preach Beyond the Converted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Researchers seeking to increase awareness and action regarding sustainability issues have been overly preaching to relatively small congregations of the already converted, rather than delivering their messages more broadly, thus contributing to a growing mismatch between public opinion and sustainability science. I present suggestions for how we can remedy this and seek your increasing involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sustained-release genistein from nanostructured lipid carrier suppresses human lens epithelial cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lu Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To design and investigate the efficacy of a modified nanostructured lipid carrier loaded with genistein (Gen-NLC to inhibit human lens epithelial cells (HLECs proliferation. METHODS: Gen-NLC was made by melt emulsification method. The morphology, particle size (PS, zeta potentials (ZP, encapsulation efficiency (EE and in vitro release were characterized. The inhibition effect of nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC, genistein (Gen and Gen-NLC on HLECs proliferation was evaluated by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8 assay, gene and protein expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 were evaluated with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR and immunofluorescence analyses. RESULTS: The mean PS of Gen-NLC was 80.12±1.55 nm with a mean polydispersity index of 0.11±0.02. The mean ZP was -7.14±0.38 mV and the EE of Gen in the nanoparticles was 92.3%±0.73%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Gen-NLC displayed spherical-shaped particles covered by an outer-layer structure. In vitro release experiments demonstrated a prolonged drug release for 72h. The CCK-8 assay results showed the NLC had no inhibitory effect on HLECs and Gen-NLC displayed a much more prominent inhibitory effect on cellular growth compared to Gen of the same concentration. The mRNA and protein expression of Ki67 in LECs decreased significantly in Gen-NLC group. CONCLUSION: Sustained drug release by Gen-NLCs may impede HLEC growth.

  13. The close linkage between the elasticity modulus measured by real-time mapping shear wave elastography and the presence of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with a sustained virological response to interferon for chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yasuharu; Taira, Jun-Ichi; Okada, Mayumi; Ando, Mayumi; Sano, Takatomo; Miyata, Yuhki; Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Nakamura, Ikuo; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2015-07-01

    Some patients develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after sustained virological response (SVR) to interferon therapy for chronic hepatitis C (CH-C). The aim of this study was to examine the linkage between liver elasticity and the presence/absence of HCC in patients after SVR. We enrolled 42 patients who underwent real-time mapping shear wave elastography (SWE) after SVR to interferon therapy for CH-C. Of the 42 patients, six had HCC and 36 did not. We retrospectively compared the elasticity modulus and other clinical parameters between patients with and without HCC. Elasticity modulus measured by SWE, age, and serum albumin was significantly different between patients with and without HCC. Age, Fibrosis-4 index, serum gamma-globulin, total protein, and albumin levels were significantly correlated with the elasticity modulus. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves of elasticity modulus, gamma-globulin, and age for the presence of HCC were 0.963, 0.888, and 0.778, respectively. In patients with an elasticity modulus ≥6.5 kPa, both sensitivity and specificity for the presence of HCC were 83.3 %. The study demonstrated the close linkage between the elasticity modulus measured by SWE and the presence of HCC in patients after SVR.

  14. Human Rights Courts Interpreting Sustainable Development: Balancing Individual Rights and the Collective Interest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Folkesson (Emelie)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ __Abstract__ This article uses a generally accepted conceptualisation of sustainable development that can be operationalized in a judicial context. It focuses on the individual and collective dimensions of the environmental, economic and social pillars, as well as

  15. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOAL: GENDER EQUALITY FOR WOMEN'S EMPOWERMENT AND HUMAN RIGHTS

    OpenAIRE

    Sudershan Kumar Pathania

    2017-01-01

    Empowerment of women and girls is to be realized through sustainable development. Sustainable development depends on an equitable distribution of resources and it cannot be achieved without gender equality. Gender Equity is the process of allocating resources, programs, and decision making fairly to both males and females without any discrimination on the basis of sex…and addressing any imbalances in the benefits available to males and females. Diane Elson, an adviser to UN Women, argues in h...

  16. Therapeutic concentrations of varenicline in the presence of nicotine increase action potential firing in human adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone, Arik J; Michael McIntosh, J; Rueda-Ruzafa, Lola; Passas, Juan; de Castro-Guerín, Cristina; Blázquez, Jesús; González-Enguita, Carmen; Albillos, Almudena

    2017-01-01

    Varenicline is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist used to treat nicotine addiction, but a live debate persists concerning its mechanism of action in reducing nicotine consumption. Although initially reported as α4β2 selective, varenicline was subsequently shown to activate other nAChR subtypes implicated in nicotine addiction including α3β4. However, it remains unclear whether activation of α3β4 nAChRs by therapeutically relevant concentrations of varenicline is sufficient to affect the behavior of cells that express this subtype. We used patch-clamp electrophysiology to assess the effects of varenicline on native α3β4* nAChRs (asterisk denotes the possible presence of other subunits) expressed in human adrenal chromaffin cells and compared its effects to those of nicotine. Varenicline and nicotine activated α3β4* nAChRs with EC50 values of 1.8 (1.2-2.7) μM and 19.4 (11.1-33.9) μM, respectively. Stimulation of adrenal chromaffin cells with 10 ms pulses of 300 μM acetylcholine (ACh) in current-clamp mode evoked sodium channel-dependent action potentials (APs). Under these conditions, perfusion of 50 or 100 nM varenicline showed very little effect on AP firing compared to control conditions (ACh stimulation alone), but at higher concentrations (250 nM) varenicline increased the number of APs fired up to 436 ± 150%. These results demonstrate that therapeutic concentrations of varenicline are unlikely to alter AP firing in chromaffin cells. In contrast, nicotine showed no effect on AP firing at any of the concentrations tested (50, 100, 250, and 500 nM). However, perfusion of 50 nM nicotine simultaneously with 100 nM varenicline increased AP firing by 290 ± 104% indicating that exposure to varenicline and nicotine concurrently may alter cellular behavior such as excitability and neurotransmitter release. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Red and processed meat consumption and purchasing behaviours and attitudes: impacts for human health, animal welfare and environmental sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clonan, Angie; Wilson, Paul; Swift, Judy A; Leibovici, Didier G; Holdsworth, Michelle

    2015-09-01

    Higher intakes of red and processed meat are associated with poorer health outcomes and negative environmental impacts. Drawing upon a population survey the present paper investigates meat consumption behaviours, exploring perceived impacts for human health, animal welfare and the environment. Structured self-completion postal survey relating to red and processed meat, capturing data on attitudes, sustainable meat purchasing behaviour, red and processed meat intake, plus sociodemographic characteristics of respondents. Urban and rural districts of Nottinghamshire, East Midlands, UK, drawn from the electoral register. UK adults (n 842) aged 18-91 years, 497 females and 345 males, representing a 35·6 % response rate from 2500 randomly selected residents. Women were significantly more likely (P60 years) were more likely to hold positive attitudes towards animal welfare (Pimpact of climate change could be reduced by consuming less meat, dairy products and eggs. Positive attitudes towards animal welfare were associated with consuming less meat and a greater frequency of 'higher welfare' meat purchases. Human health and animal welfare are more common motivations to avoid red and processed meat than environmental sustainability. Policy makers, nutritionists and health professionals need to increase the public's awareness of the environmental impact of eating red and processed meat. A first step could be to ensure that dietary guidelines integrate the nutritional, animal welfare and environmental components of sustainable diets.

  18. Policy recommendations and cost implications for a more sustainable framework for European human biomonitoring surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joas, Anke; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike

    2015-01-01

    the LIFE+ programme of the European Commission. The potential of HBM in supporting and evaluating policy making (including e.g. REACH) and in awareness raising on environmental health, should significantly advance the process towards a fully operational, continuous, sustainable and scientifically based EU...... HBM programme. From a number of stakeholder activities during the past 10 years and the national engagement, a framework for sustainable HBM structure in Europe is recommended involving national institutions within environment, health and food as well as European institutions such as ECHA, EEA...

  19. Cultivating an Academy We Can Live With: The Humanities and Education for Sustainability1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Johnston

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Many facets of the university system in North America are fundamentally unsustainable, developing and perpetuating knowledge practices that not only do not sustain the biospheric conditions in which our species evolved, but actually defray them. This analysis proceeds in three ways: (a highlights the historical entanglement of religion and sustainability discourse and the now global concern over climate disruption; (b it interrogates assumptions regarding whether, when, and to what extent scholars of religions should advance politically significant arguments; (c explores problem-based learning and integrative curricular development, which may be fostered by focusing on complex wicked problems such as climate disruption.

  20. Sustainability-based Study on the Development of Human Settlement in Traditional Villages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yali; Huang, Liping; Lu, Qi

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate and analyze the status quo of the living environment in traditional villages, and to identify current issues and developing strategies based on data analysis. It is proposed that comprehensive sustainable strategies for land use should be designed, defined and used as guidelines for the constructions of traditional villages in the process of rapid urbanization. Such sustainable strategies should be applicable for remediation and development of traditional villages. This will promote the coordinated development in society, economy and environment in traditional villages.

  1. Towards an integrative post-2015 sustainable development goal framework: Focusing on global justice – peace, security and basic human rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George R. Lueddeke

    2015-12-01

    To strengthen the likelihood of realizing the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs, particularly with regard to “planet and population” health and well-being , UN and other decision-makers are urged to consider the adoption of an integrated SDG framework that is based on (i a vision of global justice - underpinned by peace, security and basic human rights; (ii the development of interdependent and interconnected strategies for each of the eleven thematic indicators identified in the UN document The World We Want; and (iii the application of guiding principles to measure the impact of SDG strategies in terms of holism, equity, sustainability, ownership, and global obligation. While current discussions on the SDGs are making progress in a number of areas, the need for integration of these around a common global vision and purpose seems especially crucial to avoid MDG shortcomings.

  2. Data and models for exploring sustainability of human well-being in global environmental change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deffuant, G.; Alvarez, I.; Barreteau, O.; Vries, de B.; Edmonds, B.; Gilbert, N.; Gotts, N.; Jabot, F.; Janssen, S.J.C.; Hilden, M.; Kolditz, O.; Murray-Rust, D.; Rouge, C.; Smits, P.

    2012-01-01

    This position paper proposes a vision for the research activity about sustainability in global environmental change (GEC) taking place in the FuturICT flagship project. This activity will be organised in an "Exploratory", gathering a core network of European scientists from ICT, social simulation,

  3. Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol are absorbed from moderate and sustained doses of virgin olive oil in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Casas, E; Covas, M-I; Fitó, M; Farré-Albadalejo, M; Marrugat, J; de la Torre, R

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the absorption of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol from moderate and sustained doses of virgin olive oil consumption. The study also aimed to investigate whether these phenolic compounds could be used as biomarkers of virgin olive oil intake. Ingestion of a single dose of virgin olive oil (50 ml). Thereafter, for a week, participants followed their usual diet which included 25 ml/day of the same virgin olive oil as the source of raw fat. Unitat de Recerca en Farmacologia. Institut Municipal d'Investigació Mèdica (IMIM). Seven healthy volunteers. An increase in 24 h urine of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol, after both a single-dose ingestion (50 ml) and short-term consumption (one week, 25 ml/day) of virgin olive oil (P<0.05) was observed. Urinary recoveries for tyrosol were similar after a single dose and after sustained doses of virgin olive oil. Mean recovery values for hydroxytyrosol after sustained doses were 1.5-fold those obtained after a single 50 ml dose. Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol are absorbed from realistic doses of virgin olive oil. With regard to the dose-effect relationship, 24 h urinary tyrosol seems to be a better biomarker of sustained and moderate doses of virgin olive oil consumption than hydroxytyrosol.

  4. Transfusion of 35-Day Stored RBCs in the Presence of Endotoxemia Does Not Result in Lung Injury in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Anna L.; van Hezel, Maike E.; Cortjens, Bart; Tuip-de Boer, Anita M.; van Bruggen, Robin; de Korte, Dirk; Jonkers, René E.; Bonta, Peter I.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; Lutter, Rene; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Preclinical studies have shown that aged RBCs can induce transfusion-related acute lung injury in the presence of a "first hit" (e.g., sepsis). Clinical studies, however, show conflicting results on this

  5. Peripheral chemoreceptor control of ventilation following sustained hypoxia in young and older adult humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovk, Andrea; Smith, W Donald F; Paterson, Nicole D; Cunningham, David A; Paterson, Donald H

    2004-11-01

    The rate and duration of peripheral chemoreceptor resensitization following sustained hypoxia was characterized in young and older (74-year-old) adults. In addition, cerebral blood velocity (CBV) was measured in young subjects during and following the relief from sustained hypoxia. Following 20 min of sustained eucapnic hypoxia (50 mmHg), subjects were re-exposed to brief (1.5 min) hypoxic pulses (50 mmHg), and the magnitude of the ventilatory response was used to gauge peripheral chemosensitivity. Five minutes after the relief from sustained hypoxia, ventilation (V(E)) increased to 40.3 +/- 4.5% of the initial hypoxic ventilatory response, and by 36 min V(E) increased to 100%, indicating that peripheral chemosensitivity to hypoxia was restored. The V(E) response magnitude plotted versus time demonstrated that V(E), hence peripheral chemosensitivity, was restored at a rate of 1.9% per minute. Cerebral blood flow (CBF, inferred from CBV) remained constant during sustained hypoxia and increased by the same magnitude during the hypoxic pulses, suggesting that CBF has a small, if any, impact on the decline in V(E) during hypoxia and its subsequent recovery. To address the issue of whether hypoxic pulses affect subsequent challenges, series (continuous hypoxic pulses at various recovery intervals) and parallel (only 1 pulse per trial) methods were used. There were no differences in the ventilatory responses between the series and parallel methods. Older adults demonstrated a similar rate of recovery as in the young, suggesting that ageing in active older adults does not affect the peripheral chemoreceptor response.

  6. Equol Induces Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Gastric Cancer Cells via the Sustained Activation of ERK1/2 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiping; Zhao, Yan; Yao, Yahong; Li, Jun; Wang, Wangshi; Wu, Xiaonan

    2016-10-01

    The cancer chemo-preventive effects of equol have been demonstrated for a wide variety of experimental tumours. In a previous study, we found that equol inhibited proliferation and induced apoptotic death of human gastric cancer MGC-803 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying equol-mediated apoptosis have not been well understood. In the present study, the dual AO (acridine orange)/EB (ethidium bromide) fluorescent assay, the comet assay, MTS, western blotting and flow cytometric assays were performed to further investigate the pro-apoptotic effect of equol and its associated mechanisms in MGC-803 cells. The results demonstrated that equol induced an apoptotic nuclear morphology revealed by AO/EB staining, the presence of a comet tail, the cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP and the depletion of cIAP1, indicating its pro-apoptotic effect. In addition, equol-induced apoptosis involves the mitochondria-dependent cell-death pathway, evidenced by the depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the cleavage of caspase-9 and the depletion of Bcl-xL and full-length Bid. Moreover, treating MGC-803 cells with equol induced the sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and inhibiting ERK by U0126, a MEK/ERK pathway inhibitor, significantly attenuated the equol-induced cell apoptosis. These results suggest that equol induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in human gastric cancer MGC-803 cells via the sustained activation of the ERK1/2 pathway. Therefore, equol may be a novel candidate for the chemoprevention and therapy of gastric cancer.

  7. Urban microbiomes and urban ecology: how do microbes in the built environment affect human sustainability in cities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary M

    2014-09-01

    Humans increasingly occupy cities. Globally, about 50% of the total human population lives in urban environments, and in spite of some trends for deurbanization, the transition from rural to urban life is expected to accelerate in the future, especially in developing nations and regions. The Republic of Korea, for example, has witnessed a dramatic rise in its urban population, which now accounts for nearly 90% of all residents; the increase from about 29% in 1955 has been attributed to multiple factors, but has clearly been driven by extraordinary growth in the gross domestic product accompanying industrialization. While industrialization and urbanization have unarguably led to major improvements in quality of life indices in Korea and elsewhere, numerous serious problems have also been acknowledged, including concerns about resource availability, water quality, amplification of global warming and new threats to health. Questions about sustainability have therefore led Koreans and others to consider deurbanization as a management policy. Whether this offers any realistic prospects for a sustainable future remains to be seen. In the interim, it has become increasingly clear that built environments are no less complex than natural environments, and that they depend on a variety of internal and external connections involving microbes and the processes for which microbes are responsible. I provide here a definition of the urban microbiome, and through examples indicate its centrality to human function and wellbeing in urban systems. I also identify important knowledge gaps and unanswered questions about urban microbiomes that must be addressed to develop a robust, predictive and general understanding of urban biology and ecology that can be used to inform policy-making for sustainable systems.

  8. Sustained human hematopoiesis in sheep transplanted in utero during early gestation with fractionated adult human bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, E F; Zanjani, E D; Brandt, J E; Leemhuis, T; Briddell, R A; Heerema, N A; Hoffman, R

    1992-03-15

    Sheep were transplanted in utero during early gestation with subpopulations of adult human bone marrow (BM) cells enriched for human progenitor and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Chimerism was documented in three of seven transplanted fetuses using monoclonal antibodies against human-specific hematopoietic cell lineages and/or cytogenetic analysis of BM and peripheral blood cells of recipients. Only chimeric sheep BM cells expressing CD45 (6.0% of total BM cells) formed human hematopoietic colonies in response to human recombinant cytokines as determined by cytogenetic analysis. Sorted CD45+ BM cells developed human T-cell colonies containing CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells. DNA from chimeric BM cells obtained 3 months after birth displayed a finger printing pattern identical to that of DNA from the human donor of the HSC graft. These studies indicate that first trimester sheep fetuses are tolerant of adult human HSC grafts, thus permitting the creation of xenogeneic chimera expressing human myeloid and lymphoid lineages. The present findings also suggest that HSC grafts from immunologically competent, HLA-mismatched adult donors may be useful for correcting human genetic diseases in utero during early gestation.

  9. PARTICIPATION OF TLR4 IN ENGULFMENT OF ESCHERICHIA COLI BY HUMAN BLOOD NEUTROPHILS IN PRESENCE OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Zubova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. TLR4 is a key player in signaling system of host cells. Possible role of TLR4 is actively discussed, e.g. its significance for phagocytosis. A capacity of neutrophils to engulf FITC-labeled E. coli bacteria upon activation with LPS of different origin was studied in presence of anti-TLR4 Mab’s (HTA125 clone. It was shown that, in whole blood, TLR4 does not play any essential role in engulfment of bacteria by the neutrophils. Phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood increases increased after their priming with E. coli endotoxins. LPS from Rb. сapsulatus did not affect phagocytosis. In presence of endotoxins, the degree of TLR4 involvement in neutrophil phagocytosis depends on LPS structure.

  10. Efficient Encapsulation and Sustained Release of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor in Nanofilm: Extension of the Feeding Cycle of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Uiyoung; Park, Hee Ho; Kim, Yu Jin; Park, Tai Hyun; Park, Ju Hyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2017-08-02

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has an established pivotal function in biomedical engineering, especially for the human pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, the limitation of bFGF is the ease of denaturation under normal physiological conditions, inducing loss of its activity. In this study, we designed multi-trilayered nanofilm composed of a repeating polycation/polyanion/bFGF structure, which has high loading efficiency and short buildup time. We also investigated that the loading and release of bFGF from the nanofilm with two parameters (counter-polyanion and film architectures). Then, we prepared the optimized nanofilm which maintains a sustained bFGF level in physiological condition to apply the nanofilm to human iPSCs culture. The amount of bFGF release from 12 trilayer nanofilm was 36.4 ng/cm(2), and activity of bFGF encapsulated into the nanofilm was maintained (60%) until 72 h during incubation at 37 °C. As a result, the iPSCs grown in the presence of the nanofilm with tridaily replacement of growth medium maintained undifferentiated morphology and expression levels of pluripotency marker proteins.

  11. Presence of functional, autoreactive human milk-specific IgE in infants with cow's milk allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, K M; Geller, L; Bencharitiwong, R; Sampson, H A

    2012-02-01

    Occasionally, exclusively breastfed infants with cow's milk allergy (CMA) remain symptomatic despite strict maternal milk avoidance. To determine whether or not persistence of symptoms could be due to sensitization against endogenous human milk proteins with a high degree of similarity to bovine allergens. Ten peptides representing known bovine milk IgE-binding epitopes [α-lactalbumin (ALA), β- and κ-casein] and the corresponding, highly homologous human milk peptides were labelled with sera from 15 breastfed infants with CMA, aged 3 weeks to 12 months, and peptide (epitope)-specific IgE antibodies were assessed. Nine of the 15 breastfed infants became asymptomatic during strict maternal avoidance of milk and other major food allergens; six infants remained symptomatic until weaned. Ten older children, aged 5-15 years, with CMA were also assessed. The functional capacity of specific IgE antibodies was assessed by measuring β-hexosaminidase release from rat basophilic leukaemia cells passively sensitized and stimulated with human and bovine ALA. A minimum of one human milk peptide was recognized by IgE antibodies from 9 of 15 (60%) milk-allergic infants, and the majority of older children with CMA. Genuine sensitization to human milk peptides in the absence of IgE to bovine milk was occasionally seen. There was a trend towards specific IgE being detected to more human milk peptides in those infants who did not respond to the maternal milk elimination diet than in those who did (P = 0.099). Functional IgE antibody to human ALA was only detected in infants not responding to the maternal diet. Endogenous human milk epitopes are recognized by specific IgE from the majority of infants and children with CMA. Such autoreactive, human milk-specific IgE antibodies appear to have functional properties in vitro. Their role in provoking allergic symptoms in infants exclusively breastfed by mothers strictly avoiding dietary milk remains unclear. © 2011 Blackwell

  12. Presence of functional, autoreactive human milk-specific IgE in infants with cow’s milk allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, K. M.; Geller, L.; Bencharitiwong, R.; Sampson, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Occasionally, exclusively breastfed infants with cow’s milk allergy (CMA) remain symptomatic despite strict maternal milk avoidance. Objective To determine whether or not persistence of symptoms could be due to sensitization against endogenous human milk proteins with a high degree of similarity to bovine allergens. Methods Ten peptides representing known bovine milk IgE-binding epitopes [α-lactalbumin (ALA), β- and κ-casein] and the corresponding, highly homologous human milk peptides were labelled with sera from 15 breastfed infants with CMA, aged 3 weeks to 12 months, and peptide (epitope)-specific IgE antibodies were assessed. Nine of the 15 breastfed infants became asymptomatic during strict maternal avoidance of milk and other major food allergens; six infants remained symptomatic until weaned. Ten older children, aged 5–15 years, with CMA were also assessed. The functional capacity of specific IgE antibodies was assessed by measuring β-hexosaminidase release from rat basophilic leukaemia cells passively sensitized and stimulated with human and bovine ALA. Results A minimum of one human milk peptide was recognized by IgE antibodies from 9 of 15 (60%) milk-allergic infants, and the majority of older children with CMA. Genuine sensitization to human milk peptides in the absence of IgE to bovine milk was occasionally seen. There was a trend towards specific IgE being detected to more human milk peptides in those infants who did not respond to the maternal milk elimination diet than in those who did (P = 0.099). Functional IgE antibody to human ALA was only detected in infants not responding to the maternal diet. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Endogenous human milk epitopes are recognized by specific IgE from the majority of infants and children with CMA. Such autoreactive, human milk-specific IgE antibodies appear to have functional properties in vitro. Their role in provoking allergic symptoms in infants exclusively breastfed by

  13. SuDS and human behaviour: Co-developing solutions to encourage sustainable behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett Glyn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS are today widely considered to be a more progressive and environmentally sensitive approach to Flood Risk Management (FRM. However, this paper argues that the sustainability of SuDS should not be so simply presumed. Devices will depend upon correct behaviour from those local to them in order to function properly over time, and for Green Infrastructure SuDS to flourish and deliver their promised multiple benefits. This paper looks to the potential value in using Social Practice Theory as a lens for understanding current behaviours around SuDS devices, and for assessing possible strategies for encouraging positive behaviour amongst affected communities. It concludes in arguing that involving local people as much as possible in the co-design of systems and then working to maintain involvement and awareness will be the most cost-effective means by which SuDS might be made to live up to the sustainability they are celebrated for.

  14. Sustained responses for pitch and vowels map to similar sites in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutschalk, Alexander; Uppenkamp, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    Several studies have shown enhancement of auditory evoked sustained responses for periodic over non-periodic sounds and for vowels over non-vowels. Here, we directly compared pitch and vowels using synthesized speech with a "damped" amplitude modulation. These stimuli were parametrically varied to yield four classes of matched stimuli: (1) periodic vowels (2) non-periodic vowels, (3) periodic non-vowels, and (4) non-periodic non-vowels. 12 listeners were studied with combined MEG and EEG. Sustained responses were reliably enhanced for vowels and periodicity. Dipole source analysis revealed that a vowel contrast (vowel-non-vowel) and the periodicity-pitch contrast (periodic-non-periodic) mapped to the same site in antero-lateral Heschl's gyrus. In contrast, the non-periodic, non-vowel condition mapped to a more medial and posterior site. The sustained enhancement for vowels was significantly more prominent when the vowel identity was varied, compared to a condition where only one vowel was repeated, indicating selective adaptation of the response. These results render it unlikely that there are spatially distinct fields for vowel and pitch processing in the auditory cortex. However, the common processing of vowels and pitch raises the possibility that there is an early speech-specific field in Heschl's gyrus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of ultraviolet-visible irradiation in the presence of melanin isolated from human black or red hair upon Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, I.A.; Persad, S.; Ranadive, N.S.; Haberman, H.F.

    1983-07-01

    The present study is an attempt to investigate the possibility that ultraviolet irradiation in the presence of pheomelanin may be more harmful to cells than the irradiation in the presence of eumelanin. The effects of UV-visible irradiation upon Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells in the presence of the melanin isolated from human black hair (eumelanin) or from red hair (pheomelanin) were investigated. Irradiation of these cells was found to produce cell lysis, as observed by leakage of 51Cr from labeled cells and intracellular lactic dehydrogenase from the cells and decrease in cell viability demonstrated by the trypan blue exclusion test. The three parameters were quantitatively parallel to one another under various experimental conditions, namely different periods of irradiation and irradiation in the presence of different concentrations of melanin. The above effects were more pronounced when the irradiation was carried out in the presence of melanin from red hair than in the presence of black-hair melanin. In the absence of either melanin, the irradiation did not produce any significant effect in cell viability or cell lysis. Irradiation of the cells in the presence of red-hair melanin also decreased the transplantability of these cells. These observations clearly show that irradiation of cells in the presence of pheomelanin could produce cytotoxic effects. The present experimental design may have application in the development of in vitro models for the study of UV radiation-induced cutaneous carcinogenesis. The reactions of pheomelanin may be related to the susceptibility of ''Celtic'' skin to UV radiation-induced skin damage and carcinogenesis.

  16. Sustained maximal voluntary contraction produces independent changes in human motor axons and the muscle they innervate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Milder

    Full Text Available The repetitive discharges required to produce a sustained muscle contraction results in activity-dependent hyperpolarization of the motor axons and a reduction in the force-generating capacity of the muscle. We investigated the relationship between these changes in the adductor pollicis muscle and the motor axons of its ulnar nerve supply, and the reproducibility of these changes. Ten subjects performed a 1-min maximal voluntary contraction. Activity-dependent changes in axonal excitability were measured using threshold tracking with electrical stimulation at the wrist; changes in the muscle were assessed as evoked and voluntary electromyography (EMG and isometric force. Separate components of axonal excitability and muscle properties were tested at 5 min intervals after the sustained contraction in 5 separate sessions. The current threshold required to produce the target muscle action potential increased immediately after the contraction by 14.8% (p<0.05, reflecting decreased axonal excitability secondary to hyperpolarization. This was not correlated with the decline in amplitude of muscle force or evoked EMG. A late reversal in threshold current after the initial recovery from hyperpolarization peaked at -5.9% at ∼35 min (p<0.05. This pattern was mirrored by other indices of axonal excitability revealing a previously unreported depolarization of motor axons in the late recovery period. Measures of axonal excitability were relatively stable at rest but less so after sustained activity. The coefficient of variation (CoV for threshold current increase was higher after activity (CoV 0.54, p<0.05 whereas changes in voluntary (CoV 0.12 and evoked twitch (CoV 0.15 force were relatively stable. These results demonstrate that activity-dependent changes in motor axon excitability are unlikely to contribute to concomitant changes in the muscle after sustained activity in healthy people. The variability in axonal excitability after sustained activity

  17. Mastitis Modifies the Biogenic Amines Profile in Human Milk, with Significant Changes in the Presence of Histamine, Putrescine and Spermine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Perez

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines (BAs are low molecular weight nitrogenous organic compounds with different biological activities. Putrescine, spermidine and spermine are essential for the development of the gut and immune system of newborns, and are all found in human milk. Little is known, however, about the role of histamine, tyramine or cadaverine in breast milk. Nor is it known whether mastitis alters the BA composition of milk. The BA profile of human milk, and the influence of mastitis on BA concentrations, were therefore investigated. Putrescine, spermidine and spermine were the main BAs detected. In mastitis-affected milk, the concentrations of putrescine, spermine and histamine were higher.

  18. Mastitis Modifies the Biogenic Amines Profile in Human Milk, with Significant Changes in the Presence of Histamine, Putrescine and Spermine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Marta; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Del Rio, Beatriz; Fernandez, Leonides; Rodriguez, Juan Miguel; Martín, M Cruz; Fernandez, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic amines (BAs) are low molecular weight nitrogenous organic compounds with different biological activities. Putrescine, spermidine and spermine are essential for the development of the gut and immune system of newborns, and are all found in human milk. Little is known, however, about the role of histamine, tyramine or cadaverine in breast milk. Nor is it known whether mastitis alters the BA composition of milk. The BA profile of human milk, and the influence of mastitis on BA concentrations, were therefore investigated. Putrescine, spermidine and spermine were the main BAs detected. In mastitis-affected milk, the concentrations of putrescine, spermine and histamine were higher.

  19. An Experimental Study of Embodied Interaction and Human Perception of Social Presence for Interactive Robots in Public Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Heath, Damith; Vlachos, Evgenios

    2017-01-01

    The human perception of cognitive robots as social depends on many factors, including those that do not necessarily pertain to a robot’s cognitive functioning. Experience Design offers a useful framework for evaluating when participants interact with robots as products or tools and when they regard...... in a museum context. Using an Experience Design framework, we tested the robot in three different conditions to better understand which factors contribute to the perception of robots as social. The experiment also outlines best practices for conducting human-robot interaction research in museum exhibitions...

  20. Statement on the risks for human health related to the presence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in honey, tea, herbal infusions and food supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annette

    day to assess the carcinogenic risks of PAs, and concluded that there is a possible concern for human health related to the exposure to PAs, in particular for frequent and high consumers of tea and herbal infusions. The Panel noted that consumption of food supplements based on PA-producing plants......EFSA was asked by the European Commission to deliver a scientific opinion on the risks for human health related to the presence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) in honey, tea, herbal infusions and food supplements and to identify the PAs of relevance in the aforementioned food commodities...... and in other feed and food. PAs are a large group of toxins produced by different plant species. In 2011, the EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM Panel) assessed the risks related to the presence of PAs in food and feed. Based on occurrence data limited to honey, the CONTAM Panel concluded...

  1. Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It: Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Preamble to the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UNDHR) calls on every organ of society to teach and educate for the promotion of the rights it contains. However, few if any business schools have any systematic or critical human rights content in their accounting and business curricula. This oversight is increasingly problematic as…

  2. Presence of erm gene classes in Gram-positive bacteria of animal and human origin in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Frimodt-Moller, N.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1999-01-01

    and 68 staphylococcal erythromycin resistant isolates of animal and human origin. At least one of these genes was detected in 88% of the isolates. Four isolates contained more than one ei il? gene. ermB dominated among the enterococci (88%) and streptococci (90%) and ermC among staphylococci (75...

  3. Presence of human papillomavirus in semen of healthy men is firmly associated with HPV infections of the penile epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttmer, Roosmarijn; Dijkstra, Maaike G.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.; King, Audrey J.; Pronk, Divera T. M.; Foresta, Carlo; Garolla, Andrea; Hompes, Peter G. A.; Berkhof, Johannes; Bleeker, Maaike C. G.; Doorbar, John; Heideman, Daniëlle A. M.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.

    2015-01-01

    To study the source of human papillomavirus (HPV) in semen. Observational study (CCMO-NL3248800010). Academic hospital-based laboratory. Healthy male volunteers (n = 213). One penile scrape and three semen samples were obtained per participant for HPV-DNA testing by both GP5+/6+ polymerase chain

  4. Functional glycomic analysis of human milk glycans reveals the presence of virus receptors and embryonic stem cell biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Mishra, Shreya; Song, Xuezheng; Lasanajak, Yi; Bradley, Konrad C; Tappert, Mary M; Air, Gillian M; Steinhauer, David A; Halder, Sujata; Cotmore, Susan; Tattersall, Peter; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Cummings, Richard D; Smith, David F

    2012-12-28

    Human milk contains a large diversity of free glycans beyond lactose, but their functions are not well understood. To explore their functional recognition, here we describe a shotgun glycan microarray prepared from isolated human milk glycans (HMGs), and our studies on their recognition by viruses, antibodies, and glycan-binding proteins (GBPs), including lectins. The total neutral and sialylated HMGs were derivatized with a bifunctional fluorescent tag, separated by multidimensional HPLC, and archived in a tagged glycan library, which was then used to print a shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). This SGM was first interrogated with well defined GBPs and antibodies. These data demonstrated both the utility of the array and provided preliminary structural information (metadata) about this complex glycome. Anti-TRA-1 antibodies that recognize human pluripotent stem cells specifically recognized several HMGs that were then further structurally defined as novel epitopes for these antibodies. Human influenza viruses and Parvovirus Minute Viruses of Mice also specifically recognized several HMGs. For glycan sequencing, we used a novel approach termed metadata-assisted glycan sequencing (MAGS), in which we combine information from analyses of glycans by mass spectrometry with glycan interactions with defined GBPs and antibodies before and after exoglycosidase treatments on the microarray. Together, these results provide novel insights into diverse recognition functions of HMGs and show the utility of the SGM approach and MAGS as resources for defining novel glycan recognition by GBPs, antibodies, and pathogens.

  5. Earliest Human Presence in North America Dated to the Last Glacial Maximum: New Radiocarbon Dates from Bluefish Caves, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauriane Bourgeon

    Full Text Available The timing of the first entry of humans into North America is still hotly debated within the scientific community. Excavations conducted at Bluefish Caves (Yukon Territory from 1977 to 1987 yielded a series of radiocarbon dates that led archaeologists to propose that the initial dispersal of human groups into Eastern Beringia (Alaska and the Yukon Territory occurred during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. This hypothesis proved highly controversial in the absence of other sites of similar age and concerns about the stratigraphy and anthropogenic signature of the bone assemblages that yielded the dates. The weight of the available archaeological evidence suggests that the first peopling of North America occurred ca. 14,000 cal BP (calibrated years Before Present, i.e., well after the LGM. Here, we report new AMS radiocarbon dates obtained on cut-marked bone samples identified during a comprehensive taphonomic analysis of the Bluefish Caves fauna. Our results demonstrate that humans occupied the site as early as 24,000 cal BP (19,650 ± 130 14C BP. In addition to proving that Bluefish Caves is the oldest known archaeological site in North America, the results offer archaeological support for the "Beringian standstill hypothesis", which proposes that a genetically isolated human population persisted in Beringia during the LGM and dispersed from there to North and South America during the post-LGM period.

  6. Simultaneous presence of DDT and pyrethroid residues in human breast milk from a malaria endemic area in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouwman, H. [School for Environmental Sciences and Development, North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus), Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa)]. E-mail: drkhb@puk.ac.za; Sereda, B. [Agricultural Research Council, Plant Protection Research Institute, Private Bag X134 Queenswood, Pretoria 0121 (South Africa); Meinhardt, H.M. [South African Bureau of Standards, Testing and Conformity Services (Pty) Ltd, Private Bag X191, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2006-12-15

    DDT and pyrethroids were determined in 152 breast-milk samples from three towns in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, one of which had no need for DDT for malaria control. All compounds were found present in breast milk. Primiparae from one town had the highest mean {sigma}DDT whole milk levels (238.23 {mu}g/l), and multiparae from the same town had the highest means for permethrin (14.51 {mu}g/l), cyfluthrin (41.74 {mu}g/l), cypermethrin (4.24 {mu}g/l), deltamethrin (8.39 {mu}g/l), and {sigma}pyrethroid (31.5 {mu}g/l), most likely derived from agriculture. The ADI for DDT was only exceeded by infants from one town, but the ADI for pyrethroids was not exceeded. Since the ADI for DDT was recently reduced from 20 to 10 {mu}g/kg/bw, we suggest that this aspect be treated with concern. We therefore raise a concern based on toxicant interactions, due to the presence of four different pyrethroids and DDT. Breastfeeding however, remains safe under prevailing conditions. - The simultaneous presence of DDT and pyrethroid residues in breast milk raises the question of infant exposure and safety.

  7. Sustainable Development Goals : an opportunity for the realisation of human rights in and by Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Kercher, Julia; Mahler, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Im September 2015 werden die Staats- und Regierungschefs aller UN-Mitgliedstaaten in New York zusammenkommen, um die Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) zu verabschieden. Die SDGs sollen zu nachhaltigem Fortschritt in wirtschaftlichen, sozialen und in ökologischen Fragen führen. Die SDGs werden - anders als die Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) - für alle Länder gleichermaßen gelten. Damit sind die SDGs nicht nur durch die deutsche Außen- und Entwicklungspolitik, sondern auch vor allem inn...

  8. An analysis of the Human Development Report 2011 : sustainability and equity : a better future for all

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des); A.V. Portocarrero (Ana Victoria); A.L. St.Clair (Asuncion Lera)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The Human Development Report 2007/2008 about climate change and development made bold arguments concerning human rights and justice for the poor and for disadvantaged populations. However, its policy proposals were not as bold, looking very similar to those of the

  9. Theorizing Strategic Human Resource Development: Linking Financial Performance and Sustainable Competitive Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Po

    2007-01-01

    This paper is to explore potential new underlying theory of strategic human resource development based on critiques of current theoretical foundations of HRD. It offers a new definition and model of Strategic HRD based on resource-based view of firm and human resource, with linkage to financial performance and competitiveness. Proposed new model…

  10. Shifting Relations with the More-than-Human: Six Threshold Concepts for Transformative Sustainability Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, M. J.; Harmin, Matthew; Maracle, Bryan; Patterson, Molly; Thomson, Christina; Flowers, Michelle; Bors, Kirk

    2017-01-01

    Using the iterative process of action research, we identify six portals of understanding, called threshold concepts, which can be used as curricular guideposts to disrupt the socially constituted separation, and hierarchy, between humans and the more-than-human. The threshold concepts identified in this study provide focal points for a curriculum…

  11. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and peptide histidine methionine. Presence in human follicular fluid and effects on DNA synthesis and steroid secretion in cultured human granulosa/lutein cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, S; Ovesen, P; Andersen, A N

    1994-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine methionine (PHM) originate from the same precursor molecule, prepro VIP. In the present study we examined the concentrations of VIP and PHM in human follicular fluid and their effects on cultured human granulosa/lutein cells. Follicular...... fluid and cells were obtained from patients undergoing in-vitro fertilization for tubal infertility. The concentrations of VIP and PHM in pre-ovulatory human follicular fluid were measured radioimmunochemically. Granulosa/lutein cells isolated from follicular fluid were cultured under serum....... We conclude that VIP and PHM are present in human preovulatory follicular fluid and that VIP stimulates DNA synthesis and oestradiol secretion in cultured human granulosa/lutein cells. This indicates that VIP and perhaps PHM participate in the local nervous regulation of human ovarian function....

  12. Human Intestinal Dendritic Cells Decrease Cytokine Release against Salmonella Infection in the Presence of Lactobacillus paracasei upon TLR Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Muñoz-Quezada, Sergio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Matencio, Esther; Bernal, María J.; Romero, Fernando; Gil, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have been shown to modulate immune responses and could have therapeutic effects in allergic and inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the signalling pathways that are engaged by probiotics. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells that are involved in immunity and tolerance. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) and murine DCs are different from human gut DCs; therefore, in this study, we used human DCs generated from CD34+ progenitor cells (hematopoietic stem cells) harvested from umbilical cord blood; those DCs exhibited surface antigens of dendritic Langerhans cells, similar to the lamina propria DCs in the gut. We report that both a novel probiotic strain isolated from faeces of exclusively breast-fed newborn infants, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and its cell-free culture supernatant (CFS) decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human intestinal DCs challenged with Salmonella. Interestingly, the supernatant was as effective as the bacteria in reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. In contrast, the bacterium was a potent inducer of TGF-β2 secretion, whereas the supernatant increased the secretion of TGF-β1 in response to Salmonella. We also showed that both the bacteria and its supernatant enhanced innate immunity through the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling. These treatments strongly induced the transcription of the TLR9 gene. In addition, upregulation of the CASP8 and TOLLIP genes was observed. This work demonstrates that L. paracasei CNCM I-4034 enhanced innate immune responses, as evidenced by the activation of TLR signalling and the downregulation of a broad array of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The use of supernatants like the one described in this paper could be an effective and safe alternative to using live bacteria in functional foods. PMID:22905233

  13. Regional variations in certain cellular characteristics in human lumbar intervertebral discs, including the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastreiter, D; Ozuna, R M; Spector, M

    2001-07-01

    An evaluation of the regional variation of certain cellular features in the human intervertebral disc (IVD) could lead to a better understanding of site-specific properties relative to degradation, response to injury, and healing processes. The objective of this study was to determine how cell density, cell morphology, cell grouping, and expression of a specific actin isoform varied with location and degeneration in the human disc. A total of 41 human L4-L5 and L5-S1 discs removed postmortem from 21 individuals were analyzed. The discs were graded for degeneration based on the Thompson scale and processed for evaluation. Microtomed sections from paraffin-embedded specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or a monoclonal antibody to alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), an actin isoform often associated with contraction. A significant regional dependence was found for most of the measured parameters. A fourfold increase in cell density was found in proceeding from the nucleus pulposus (NP) to the outer annulus (OA) of the IVD. Approximately 30% of the cells in the NP were present in groups. Virtually all of the cells in the NP and 40% of those in the OA were round. Moreover, notable percentages (12-15%) of the cells in the NP and inner annulus (IA) contained alpha-SMA. Only pair density was found to be correlated with Thompson grade, with more degenerated specimens having higher values. A greater effect was also observed on the percentage of cells in groups. These findings provide the basis for future work to investigate the importance of cells in groups, the role of alpha-SMA in the disc, and the changes in these cellular characteristics in pathological disc conditions.

  14. Human Security Workers Deployed in Austere Environments: A Brief Guide to Self-Care, Sustainment, and Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F. Ditzler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1990s, the human security movement has sought to expand the concept of security beyond the traditional military defense of national borders to focus on the intra-state security needs of populations at the individual level. Specific initiatives frequently address problems of population health, ethnic conflict, religious extremism, human rights, environmental or natural disasters, and other critical issues. For expatriate human security workers in the field, the environment may present meaningful challenges to their wellbeing and productivity. This can be especially so for those who have relatively more experience in academic, business, or administrative settings, and less in the field. The authors' goal is to illuminate practices that have demonstrated their efficacy in enhancing wellness, sustainment, and productivity for human security and other humanitarian and development workers deployed to austere environments. The content represents a synoptic consensus of best general practices and guidance from a range of resources comprising United Nations agencies and activities, national and international non-governmental organizations (NGO's, private volunteer organ­izations (PVO's, national military services, and international business concerns.

  15. Fecal transplant: A safe and sustainable clinical therapy for restoring intestinal microbial balance in human disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieze, A.; de Groot, P. F.; Kootte, R. S.; Knaapen, M.; van Nood, E.; Nieuwdorp, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested an association between intestinal microbiota composition and human disease, however causality remains to be proven. With hindsight, the application of fecal transplantation (FMT) does indeed suggest a causal relation between interfering with gut microbiota composition

  16. Human Rights Discourse in the Sustainable Development Agenda Avoids Obligations and Entitlements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Carmel; Blaiklock, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Our commentary on Forman et al paper explores their thesis that right to health language can frame global health policy responses. We examined human rights discourse in the outcome documents from three 2015 United Nations (UN) summits and found rights-related terms are used in all three. However, a deeper examination of the discourse finds the documents do not convey the obligations and entitlements of human rights and international human rights law. The documents contain little that can be used to empower the participation of those already left behind and to hold States and the private sector to account for their human rights duties. This is especially worrying in a neoliberal era. PMID:27285518

  17. Human Capital as Source for Sustained Competitive Advantages in SMEs: A Core Competencies Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. F-JARDON

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human capital is a source of competitive advantage, since it helps to build core competencies which position the company above its competitors. Core competencies are dynamic competencies of superior hierarchy, which integrate, build and reconfigure internal and external factors of business to create value. Core competencies are competitive advantages when an organization gets better performance than competitors. Human capital is source of competitive advantage but it possibly does not directly affect to performance. It needs to associate with other elements in core competencies. These associations are not well known. That is the goal of this paper: to determine how human capital affects the organizational performance through core competencies. We argue that human capital needs other intellectual capital-based elements to constitute core competencies which finally improve and yields above average performance.

  18. Impact of human presence on secondary organic aerosols derived from ozone-initiated chemistry in a simulated office environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyi, Moshood O; Weschler, Charles J; Tham, Kwok W; Wu, Wei Y; Sultan, Zuraimi M

    2013-04-16

    Several studies have documented reductions in indoor ozone levels that occur as a consequence of its reactions with the exposed skin, hair and clothing of human occupants. One would anticipate that consumption of ozone via such reactions would impact co-occurring products derived from ozone's reactions with various indoor pollutants. The present study examines this possibility for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) derived from ozone-initiated chemistry with limonene, a commonly occurring indoor terpene. The experiments were conducted at realistic ozone and limonene concentrations in a 240 m(3) chamber configured to simulate a typical open office environment. During an experiment the chamber was either unoccupied or occupied with 18-20 workers. Ozone and particle levels were continuously monitored using a UV photometric ozone analyzer and a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS), respectively. Under otherwise identical conditions, when workers were present in the simulated office the ozone concentrations were approximately two-thirds and the SOA mass concentrations were approximately one-half of those measured when the office was unoccupied. This was observed whether new or used filters were present in the air handling system. These results illustrate the importance of accounting for occupancy when estimating human exposure to pollutants in various indoor settings.

  19. Human echolocation: Blind and sighted persons' ability to detect sounds recorded in the presence of a reflecting object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkman, Bo N; Nilsson, Mats E

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that blind people are superior to sighted in echolocation, but systematic psychoacoustic studies on environmental conditions such as distance to objects, signal duration, and reverberation are lacking. Therefore, two experiments were conducted. Noise bursts of 5, 50, or 500 ms were reproduced by a loudspeaker on an artificial manikin in an ordinary room and in an anechoic chamber. The manikin recorded the sounds binaurally in the presence and absence of a reflecting 1.5-mm thick aluminium disk, 0.5 m in diameter, placed in front, at distances of 0.5 to 5 m. These recordings were later presented to ten visually handicapped and ten sighted people, 30-62 years old, using a 2AFC paradigm with feedback. The task was to detect which of two sounds that contained the reflecting object. The blind performed better than the sighted participants. All performed well with the object at room than in the anechoic chamber. A supplementary experiment on the two best blind persons showed that their superior performance at distances > 2 m was not by chance. Detection thresholds showed that blind participants could detect the object at longer distances in the conference room than in the anechoic chamber, when using the longer-duration sounds and also as compared to the sighted people. Audiometric tests suggest that equal hearing in both ears is important for echolocation. Possible echolocation mechanisms are discussed.

  20. Future of keeping pet reptiles and amphibians: towards integrating animal welfare, human health and environmental sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasmans, Frank; Bogaerts, Serge; Braeckman, Johan; Cunningham, Andrew A; Hellebuyck, Tom; Griffiths, Richard A; Sparreboom, Max; Schmidt, Benedikt R; Martel, An

    2017-10-28

    The keeping of exotic pets is currently under debate and governments of several countries are increasingly exploring the regulation, or even the banning, of exotic pet keeping. Major concerns are issues of public health and safety, animal welfare and biodiversity conservation. The keeping of reptiles and amphibians in captivity encompasses all the potential issues identified with keeping exotic pets, and many of those relating to traditional domestic pets. Within the context of risks posed by pets in general, the authors argue for the responsible and sustainable keeping of reptile and amphibian pets by private persons, based on scientific evidence and on the authors' own expertise (veterinary medicine, captive husbandry, conservation biology). © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Human-Scale Sustainability Assessment of Urban Intersections Based upon Multi-Source Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhuan Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the sustainability of an enormous number of urban intersections, a novel assessment model is proposed, along with an indicator system and corresponding methods to determine the indicators. Considering mainly the demands and feelings of the urban residents, the three aspects of safety, functionality, and image perception are taken into account in the indicator system. Based on technologies such as street view picture crawling, image segmentation, and edge detection, GIS spatial data analysis, a rapid automated assessment method, and a corresponding multi-source database are built up to determine the indicators. The improved information entropy method is applied to obtain the entropy weights of each indicator. A case study shows the efficiency and applicability of the proposed assessment model, indicator system and algorithm.

  2. Human performance under sustained operations and acute sleep deprivation conditions: toward a model of controlled attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, June J; Band, David; Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Muth, Eric R

    2007-05-01

    Although a number of studies have examined the effects of sleep deprivation on performance, the results are not easily explained. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of sustained operations and acute sleep deprivation on tasks that require a wide range of information processing. The current study also provided preliminary data on the use of the controlled attention model to better understand the effects of sleep deprivation. There were 24 college students who were paid to remain awake for one night and complete a variety of cognitive and vigilance tasks. Each task was administered four times during the night, once in each testing session (17:30-21:30, 21:45-01:45, 02:30-06:30, and 06:45-10:45). All tasks were counterbalanced across the testing sessions. The data were converted to z-scores and repeated-measures ANOVAs were completed. Performance did not significantly decrease on the more complex cognitive tasks over the night of sleep deprivation. Performance on the vigilance tasks decreased significantly across the night. Examining the characteristics of the cognitive tasks indicated that although they required different types of processing, they encouraged the participants to remain attentive to and engaged in the task. In contrast, the vigilance tasks were less intrinsically interesting and engaging. Thus, it seems likely that the participants were less capable of maintaining attention on the vigilance tasks than the cognitive tasks. These results indicate that a controlled attention model may be useful in better understanding the effects of sustained operations and sleep deprivation on performance.

  3. Muscle vibration sustains motor unit firing rate during submaximal isometric fatigue in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, L; Garland, S J; Ivanova, T; Gossen, E R

    2001-09-15

    1. In keeping with the 'muscular wisdom hypothesis', many studies have documented that the firing rate of the majority of motor units decreased during fatiguing isometric contractions. The present study investigated whether the application of periodic muscle vibration, which strongly activates muscle spindles, would alter the modulation of motor unit firing rate during submaximal fatiguing isometric contractions. 2. Thirty-three motor units from the lateral head of the triceps brachii muscle were recorded from 10 subjects during a sustained isometric 20 % maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the elbow extensors. Vibration was interposed on the contraction for 2 s every 10 s. Twenty-two motor units were recorded from the beginning of the fatigue task. The discharge rate of the majority of motor units remained constant (12/22) or increased (4/22) with fatigue. Six motor units demonstrated a reduction in discharge rate that later returned toward initial values; these motor units had higher initial discharge rates than the other 16 motor units. 3. In a second series of experiments, four subjects held a sustained isometric 20 % MVC for 2 min and then vibration was applied as above for the remainder of the contraction. In this case, motor units initially demonstrated a decrease in firing rate that increased after the vibration was applied. Thus muscle spindle disfacilitation of the motoneurone pool may be associated with the decline of motor unit discharge rate observed during the first 2 min of the contraction. 4. In a third set of experiments, seven subjects performed the main experiment on one occasion and repeated the fatigue task without vibration on a second occasion. Neither the endurance time of the fatiguing contraction nor the MVC torque following fatigue was affected by the application of vibration. This finding calls into question the applicability of the muscular wisdom hypothesis to submaximal contractions.

  4. Holocene hydrological changes and human presence in NW Arabia: Insights from lipid biomarker analysis of the Tayma palaeolake sediment record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräger, Nadine; Schwab, Valérie F.; Plessen, Birgit; Neugebauer, Ina; Dinies, Michèle; Engel, Max; Brauer, Achim; Gleixner, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    Holocene hydrological changes in NW Arabia and their influence on human migration and settlement are scarcely studied due to the lack of suitable climate archives. In particular, mechanisms and sources of increased moisture availability as well as the onset of oasis cultivation and culture during the early Holocene humid period are still not well understood. Here, we present the first Holocene lipid biomarker record of the Arabian Peninsula from the Tayma palaeolake sediment sequence. We applied a combined approach of aquatic, terrestrial and faecal lipid biomarker and compound specific hydrogen isotope analyses, which allow tracing both hydrological and anthropogenic signals in the sediment deposits. Our investigations focused on the early Holocene annually laminated (varved) sediment section (ca. 8500 to 8000 cal. a BP) presenting a phase of maximum lake levels probably caused by increased moisture availability (Dinies et al., 2015; Engel et al., 2012). During the early Holocene high lake level phase our results show increased concentrations of long-chain n-alkanes and faecal biomarkers suggesting grassland expansion and probably human occupation. The increase in grassland during this time is further supported by results from pollen analysis (Dinies et a., 2015). However, the increase in n-alkanes and faecal biomarkers did not occur simultaneously. While the rise of n-alkane concentrations predates the onset of varved sediments by about one century, the increase in faecal biomarker coincides with the beginning of varve preservation. Moreover, comparisons with sedimentological and geochemical data (i.e. diatom layer thickness, organic carbon content, δ13Ccarbonate) suggest a coincidence of highest concentrations of faecal biomarkers and increased lake productivity. We discuss possible causes for these coincidences including prehistoric human activities as well as climate and environmental changes. This study is a contribution to the research project "CLEAR

  5. Polyurethane acrylates as effective substrates for sustained in vitro culture of human myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriani, Yosephine; Chua, Jason Min-Wen; Chua, Benjamin Yan-Jiang; Phang, In Yee; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Tan, Wui Siew

    2017-07-15

    Muscular disease has debilitating effects with severe damage leading to death. Our knowledge of muscle biology, disease and treatment is largely derived from non-human cell models, even though non-human cells are known to differ from human cells in their biochemical responses. Attempts to develop highly sought after in vitro human cell models have been plagued by early cell delamination and difficulties in achieving human myotube culture in vitro. In this work, we developed polyurethane acrylate (PUA) materials to support long-term in vitro culture of human skeletal muscle tissue. Using a constant base with modulated crosslink density we were able to vary the material modulus while keeping surface chemistry and roughness constant. While previous studies have focused on materials that mimic soft muscle tissue with stiffness ca. 12kPa, we investigated materials with tendon-like surface moduli in the higher 150MPa to 2.4GPa range, which has remained unexplored. We found that PUA of an optimal modulus within this range can support human myoblast proliferation, terminal differentiation and sustenance beyond 35days, without use of any extracellular protein coating. Results show that PUA materials can serve as effective substrates for successful development of human skeletal muscle cell models and are suitable for long-term in vitro studies. We developed polyurethane acrylates (PUA) to modulate the human skeletal muscle cell growth and maturation in vitro by controlling surface chemistry, morphology and tuning material's stiffness. PUA was able to maintain muscle cell viability for over a month without any detectable signs of material degradation. The best performing PUA prevented premature cell detachment from the substrate which often hampered long-term muscle cell studies. It also supported muscle cell maturation up to the late stages of differentiation. The significance of these findings lies in the possibility to advance studies on muscle cell biology, disease and

  6. Who Establishes the Presence of a Mental Disorder in Defendants? Medicolegal Considerations on a European Court of Human Rights Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijmans, Tijs; Meynen, Gerben

    2017-01-01

    Legal insanity is a peculiar element of criminal law, because it brings together two very different disciplines: psychiatry and psychology on the one hand and the law on the other. One of the basic questions regarding evaluations of defendants concerns the question of who should establish “true mental disorder,” the judge or the behavioral expert? This question is complicated, and in this contribution it will be explored based on a Dutch case that was eventually decided by the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). We will argue that the ECtHR provides a valuable legal framework. Based on its merits, the framework could also be of interest to countries outside the Court’s jurisdiction. PMID:29085306

  7. Impact of human presence on secondary organic aerosols derived from ozone-initiated chemistry in a simulated office environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadeyi, Moshood O.; Weschler, Charles J.; Tham, Kwok W.

    2013-01-01

    . Under otherwise identical conditions, when workers were present in the simulated office the ozone concentrations were approximately two-thirds and the SOA mass concentrations were approximately one-half of those measured when the office was unoccupied. This was observed whether new or used filters were......Several studies have documented reductions in indoor ozone levels that occur as a consequence of its reactions with the exposed skin, hair and clothing of human occupants. One would anticipate that consumption of ozone via such reactions would impact co-occurring products derived from ozone......'s reactions with various indoor pollutants. The present study examines this possibility for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) derived from ozone-initiated chemistry with limonene, a commonly occurring indoor terpene. The experiments were conducted at realistic ozone and limonene concentrations in a 240 m3...

  8. Analysis of native human plasma proteins and haemoglobin for the presence of bityrosine by high-performance liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daneshvar, B; Frandsen, H; Dragsted, L O

    1997-01-01

    fluorescent substance, bityrosine. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of acid hydrolyzed serum albumin after oxidation with peroxidase/H2O2 or with Cu++/H2O2 showed that bityrosine had been formed whereas oxidation of this protein with Fe(III)/ascorbate did not result in the formation......Generation of reactive oxygen species in vivo results in oxidative-damage to cellular components, including proteins. Due to the relatively long half-lives of several blood proteins the cumulative formation of oxidatively damaged proteins might serve as a biomarker for reactive oxygen species...... of bityrosine. Bityrosine could not be detected in human plasma proteins or haemoglobin with the detection limit of one pmol per mg protein....

  9. Coronal leakage of four intracanal medications after exposure to human saliva in the presence of a temporary filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verissimo Rebeca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the time required for the recontamination of root canals medicated with four different materials. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 intact, caries-free, human single-rooted teeth with straight roots were selected for this study. After chemo-mechanical preparation they must be changed in the specimens into seven groups: 10 teeth medicated with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH 2 + Camphorated paramonochlorophanol (CPMC (G.1; 10 medicated with 2.5% Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL (G.2; 10 medicated with 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX in gel (G.3; 10 medicated with 2% CHX in gel + Ca(OH 2 (G.4; 10 without intracanal medicament and sealed with a coronal temporary filling (G.5. Five teeth were without intracanal medicament and coronally unsealed, used as the positive control group (PC (G.6 and 5 teeth with intact crowns used as the negative control group (NC (G.7. Glass vials with rubber stoppers were adjusted for use. The medicaments were prepared and injected into the root canals using sterile plastic syringes. An apparatus was used to evaluate for 30 days leakage. The chamber was filled with 3 ml of human saliva and Brain Heart Infusion (BHI broth, incubated at 37°C and checked daily for the appearance of turbidity in the BHI broth. Results: Recontamination was detected after an average time of 2.6 days in group 2, 15.9 days in group 3, 30 days in group 1, 27.6 days in group 4, 2.9 days in group 5, 1 day in the positive control, and there was no contamination in the negative control group. Conclusion : The NaOCl group showed the highest worst average of recontamination; on the other hand, high averages were also shown by Ca(OH 2 + CPMC and Ca(OH 2 + 2% CHX in gel.

  10. Intratumoral chemotherapy with a sustained-release drug delivery system inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J P; Stock, E; Orenberg, E K; Yu, N Y; Kanekal, S; Brown, D M

    1995-12-01

    This study provides the first evidence that treatment of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma is markedly improved by the intratumoral administration of chemotherapeutic agents in a novel drug delivery system. The effect of chemotherapeutic agents delivered in a sustained-release, protein-based, injectable gel was evaluated on the growth of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, BxPC-3. In vitro chemosensitivity of BxPC-3 cells exposed for 24 or 72 h to fluorouracil (0.01-5 mM), cisplatin or doxorubicin (0.1-50 microM) and floxuridine, vinblastine, mitomycin or paclitaxel (1.0-100 microM) was compared with that of untreated cells. In vitro chemosensitivity was also studied with fluorouracil and mitomycin in the poorly differentiated PANC-1, human pancreatic cancer cell line. Survival was determined after 7-10 days. All drugs decreased cell growth in a dose-dependent fashion. The efficacy of fluorouracil, cisplatin and doxorubicin increased with prolonged exposure, rendering these drugs most appropriate for a sustained-release preparation. For in vivo studies, athymic nude mice bearing BxPC-3 xenografts were treated either with fluorouracil, cisplatin or doxorubicin in the therapeutic injectable gel containing epinephrine or with vehicle alone administered intratumorally on days 1 and 4. After 28 days, the mice were sacrificed and tumors dissected and weighed. Tumors in mice treated with the injectable gel decreased in size by 72-79% compared with tumors in untreated controls and tumors treated with vehicle alone. Intratumoral injection of drug solution and intraperitoneal injection of drug in the injectable gel did not change tumor size compared with controls. In a drug-retention study, mice were injected intratumorally with [3H]fluorouracil either in the injectable gel or in solution. Sustained radioactivity was observed in tumors injected with the gel, and, conversely, greater radioactivity was detected in the liver and kidneys in mice receiving the radiolabeled

  11. Couple-focused human immunodeficiency virus prevention for young Latino parents: randomized clinical trial of efficacy and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Lesser, Janna; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Cumberland, William G

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and sustainability of a couple-focused human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention intervention in reducing unprotected sex and increasing intent to use condoms and knowledge about AIDS. Randomized controlled trial. Urban community settings in Southern California. Primarily Latino couples (168 couples; 336 individuals) who were aged 14 to 25 years, English or Spanish speaking, and coparenting a child at least 3 months of age. A 12-hour theory-based, couple-focused HIV prevention program culturally tailored for young Latino parents, with emphasis on family protection, skill building, and issues related to gender and power. The 1½-hour control condition provided basic HIV-AIDS information. Primary outcome measures included self-report of condom use during the past 3 months; secondary, intent to use condoms and knowledge about AIDS. The HIV prevention intervention reduced the proportion of unprotected sex episodes (odds ratio, 0.87 per month from baseline to 6 months; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-0.93) and increased intent to use condoms (slope increase, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.04-0.37) at the 6-month follow-up; however, these effects were not sustained at 12 months. Knowledge about AIDS was increased in both groups from baseline to 6 months (slope estimate, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.47-0.67) and was maintained in the intervention group only through 12 months. Female participants in both groups had higher intent to use condoms and knowledge about AIDS than male participants (P ≤ .01). The couple-focused HIV prevention intervention reduced risky sexual behaviors and improved intent to use condoms among young Latino parents at the 6-month evaluation. A maintenance program is needed to improve the sustainability of effects over time.

  12. Human Behavior and Environmental Sustainability: promoting a pro-environmental behavior by harnessing the social, psychological and physical influences of the built environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusafieh, Shaden; Razem, Maiss

    2017-11-01

    Recently, technological advancements in the sustainable design field have allowed us to reduce the ecological impact of the built environment, to reduce consumption of non-renewable resources, to create healthy environments and in some cases may even rehabilitate the ecosystem. Nevertheless, several studies have been carried out showing that sustainable technology does not automatically lead to environmentally friendly behaviors in its users. Various environmental problems threaten environmental sustainability and many of these problems are rooted in human behavior. Unfortunately, there is a lack in studies which take into consideration the human behavior influences within a sustainable built environment. We believe that the built environment should be used to support human goals and requirements, but at the same time we should consider it as a context in which human values and behaviors are cultivated. This research aimed to help in promoting environmental sustainability by using architectural design in changing relevant human behavior toward an environmentally friendly behavior. In order to achieve this, the research adopted Environment-centered Approach to gain more acute perspective into the relationship between the physical environment and human behavior, focusing on social, psychological and physical influences of the built environment. It appears that environmental psychology's merits have high potential in changing behavior within the built environment. The research provides a systematic approach for selecting, assessing, evaluating the behaviors to be changed and the factors that determine them. Furthermore, this approach helps in choosing the best interventions that could be applied in built environment to encourage such a sustainable behavior. This study tried to construct an agenda for further researches to find particular architectural design elements and strategies that we can harness to develop a pro-environment human behavior.

  13. Why Human Papillomaviruses Activate the DNA Damage Response (DDR) and How Cellular and Viral Replication Persists in the Presence of DDR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, Molly L; Das, Dipon; Morgan, Iain M

    2017-09-21

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) require the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) in order to undergo a successful life cycle. This activation presents a challenge for the virus and the infected cell: how does viral and host replication proceed in the presence of a DDR that ordinarily arrests replication; and how do HPV16 infected cells retain the ability to proliferate in the presence of a DDR that ordinarily arrests the cell cycle? This raises a further question: why do HPV activate the DDR? The answers to these questions are only partially understood; a full understanding could identify novel therapeutic strategies to target HPV cancers. Here, we propose that the rapid replication of an 8 kb double stranded circular genome during infection creates aberrant DNA structures that attract and activate DDR proteins. Therefore, HPV replication in the presence of an active DDR is a necessity for a successful viral life cycle in order to resolve these DNA structures on viral genomes; without an active DDR, successful replication of the viral genome would not proceed. We discuss the essential role of TopBP1 in this process and also how viral and cellular replication proceeds in HPV infected cells in the presence of DDR signals.

  14. Developing and sustaining human resources in the health supply chain in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia; Traulsen, Janine M; Damene Kabtimer, Woynabeba

    2016-01-01

    is on the way to developing a nationwide viable system for health supply chain management. However, there are still challenges. Short-term challenges include the importance of highlighting strategies and programs for human resources in health supply chain management. In the long term, commitments to financial...... management. The aim of this study was to explore the current status of the development of human resources in health supply chain management in Ethiopia and to identify important factors affecting this development. METHODS: A series of face-to-face interviews with key stakeholders was carried out in 2014...... and training, and Barriers and enablers. Results confirm the development of human resources in health supply chain management in many areas. However, several problems were identified including lack of coordination, partly due to the large number of stakeholders; reported high staff mobility; and a lack...

  15. Constraining free riding in public goods games: designated solitary punishers can sustain human cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Rick; Henrich, Joseph; Van Vugt, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Much of human cooperation remains an evolutionary riddle. Unlike other animals, people frequently cooperate with non-relatives in large groups. Evolutionary models of large-scale cooperation require not just incentives for cooperation, but also a credible disincentive for free riding. Various theoretical solutions have been proposed and experimentally explored, including reputation monitoring and diffuse punishment. Here, we empirically examine an alternative theoretical proposal: responsibility for punishment can be borne by one specific individual. This experiment shows that allowing a single individual to punish increases cooperation to the same level as allowing each group member to punish and results in greater group profits. These results suggest a potential key function of leadership in human groups and provides further evidence supporting that humans will readily and knowingly behave altruistically. PMID:18812292

  16. Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and 2 photoinactivated in the presence of methylene blue transform human and mouse cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michútová, M; Mrázová, V; Kúdelová, M; Smolinská, M; Šupoliková, M; Vrbová, M; Golais, F

    Three strains of herpes simplex virus, K17syn- and HSZPsyn+ of type 1 (HSV-1) and USsyn- of type 2 (HSV-2), were photoinactivated in the presence of methylene blue and used to infect 3 cell lines, normal human lung tissue cells (MRC-5), mouse epithelial cells (NIH3T3), and human lung carcinoma cells (A549). The virus titer and phenotype of cells were evaluated to compare the characteristics of normal and carcinoma cells infected with non-syncytial (non-syn) and syncytial (syn) strains of herpes simplex viruses. We found that the cells of both normal cell lines infected with photoinactivated K17syn- and USsyn- but not HSZPsyn+ acquired transformed phenotype accompanied by the presence of virus. Surprisingly, the infection with photoinactivated viruses K17syn- and USsyn- but not HSZPsyn+ resulted in the suppression of the transformed phenotype of A549 cells. Using nested PCR, herpesviral DNA was identified in newly transformed cells and cells that lost the transformed phenotype. The effect of putative herpesvirus-related growth factors (HRGF) produced by cells infected with photoinactivated viruses was quantified and compared. Since methylene blue is currently used in phototherapy of herpetic lesions, these results raise the question of whether such therapy is risky to human health.

  17. Arsenic toxicity in the human nerve cell line SK-N-SH in the presence of chromium and copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    HU, LIGANG; GREER, JUSTIN B.; SOLO-GABRIELE, HELENA; FIEBER, LYNNE A.; CAI, YONG

    2013-01-01

    As, Cr, and Cu represent one potential combination of multiple metals/metalloids exposures since these three elements are simultaneously leached from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood, a common product used for building construction, at levels that can be potentially harmful. This study investigated the neurotoxicity of As associated with CCA-treated wood when accompanied by Cr and Cu. The toxicity was evaluated on basis of a cytotoxicity model using human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH. The cells were cultured with CCA-treated wood leachates or with solutions containing arsenate [As(V)], divalent copper [Cu(II)], trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] alone or in different combinations of the three elements. The toxicity was evaluated using variations in cell replication compared to controls after 96 hrs exposure. Among the three elements present in wood leachates, As played the primary role in the observed toxic effects, which exerted through multiple pathways, including the generation of oxidative stress. DOM affected the absorption of metals/metalloids into the test cells, which however did not obviously appear to impact toxicity. As toxicity was enhanced by Cu(II) and inhibited by Cr(III) at concentrations below U.S. EPA’s allowable maximum contaminant levels in drinking waters. Thus assessing As toxicity in real environments is not sufficient if based solely on the result from As. PMID:23473430

  18. The presence of a dog attenuates cortisol and heart rate in the Trier Social Stress Test compared to human friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polheber, John P; Matchock, Robert L

    2014-10-01

    Limited research has addressed how social support in the form of a pet can affect both sympathetic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal reactivity in response to a psychological challenge. The present study examined the effects of social support on salivary cortisol and heart rate (HR). Forty-eight participants were randomly assigned to three different conditions (human friend, novel dog, or control). All participants completed the Trier Social Stress Test and provided cortisol, HR, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory measures. For participants paired with a dog, overall cortisol levels were attenuated throughout the experimental procedure, and HR was attenuated during the Trier Social Stress Test. For all groups, state anxiety increased after the Trier Social Stress Test, and HR during the Trier Social Stress Test was a predictor of cortisol. These results suggest that short-term exposure to a novel dog in an unfamiliar setting can be beneficial. They also suggest a possible mechanism for the beneficial effect associated with affiliation with pets.

  19. Human heat-shock protein 60 receptor-coated paramagnetic beads show improved capture of Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of other Listeria in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, O K; Aroonnual, A; Bhunia, A K

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the suitability of human Hsp60, a receptor for Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), on paramagnetic beads (PMB) to capture Listeria monocytogenes from food in the presence of other Listeria to facilitate rapid and specific detection of this pathogen. Commercially available streptavidin-coated PMBs were linked with biotinylated Hsp60 (PMB-Hsp60), and the bacterial capture efficiency from pure culture and meat samples was determined. Capture rate was also compared with the monoclonal antibody (MAb)-C11E9-coated beads (PMB-C11E9) and the commercial Dynabeads anti-Listeria. Captured cells were detected and quantified by plating on selective medium, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and a light-scattering sensor. Overall, all ligand-coated beads had similar capture efficiency (varied from 1·8 to 9·2%) for L. monocytogenes under the conditions employed, and the minimum cell number required to achieve such capture was 10³ CFU ml⁻¹. PMB-Hsp60 had significantly greater capture efficiency for pathogenic Listeria (P Listeria. In contrast, PMB-C11E9 and Dynabeads anti-Listeria had similar capture efficiency for both. The efficacy of all PMBs to capture L. monocytogenes in the presence of Listeria innocua from food matrices was compared. Although Dynabeads anti-Listeria had the overall best capture efficiency, PMB-Hsp60 was able to selectively capture L. monocytogenes even in the presence of 10-100-fold more L. innocua cells from enriched meat samples. Data show that the human cell receptor, Hsp60, is suitable for the capture of pathogenic Listeria on PMB in the presence of other Listeria in food. As pathogen interaction with host cells is highly specific, host cell receptors could be used as alternate capture molecules on PMB to aid in specific detection of pathogens. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Artificial sweat composition to grow and sustain a mixed human axillary microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callewaert, Chris; Buysschaert, Benjamin; Vossen, Els; Fievez, Veerle; Van de Wiele, Tom; Boon, Nico

    2014-08-01

    A novel artificial sweat composition, Skin Community Interaction simulation, designed to mimic the human axillary sweat, was compared to other artificial sweat compositions. Axillary microbiota grown in the novel composition closely resembled the original community. Volatile organic compound analysis showed good correlations with in vivo axillary (mal)odor components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 78 FR 26639 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: Financial Sustainability of Human Tissue Biobanking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) Ways to minimize the... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: Financial... invited on one or more of the following points: (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is...

  2. Toward Projects in Humanization: Research on Co-Creating and Sustaining Dialogic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Pedro, Timothy; Kinloch, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we argue that co-constructing knowledge, co-creating relationships, and exchanging stories are central to educational research. Relying on humanizing and Indigenous research methods to locate relational interactions in educational research allows us to engage in transformative praxis and storying, or Projects in Humanization…

  3. Education and language: A human right for sustainable development in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaci-Wilhite, Zehlia; Geo-JaJa, Macleans A.; Lou, Shizhou

    2012-10-01

    Pre-colonial Africa was neither an educationally nor a technologically unsophisticated continent. While education was an integral part of the culture, issues of language identification and standardisation which are subject to contentious debate today were insignificant. Children learned community knowledge and history by asking questions instead of being taught in a hegemonic alien language. This article argues that education and development should take place in a broader context of human rights, and explores the links between three areas often dealt with separately, namely: language, education and development. The authors of this paper demonstrate that changing the face of the multi-dimensionalities of poverty within societies is possible only when education is constructed in a rights perspective over the favoured colonial languages, which are not an integral part of the culture and resources of a community. The authors make a distinction between the right to education and rights in education, the latter of which are found to be more significant for the challenges Africa faces. It is argued here that the elements of Amartya Sen's "threshold" conditions for inclusion in human rights and self-development in education are essential, and that a more promising architecture of education would include what the authors term meta-narrative frameworks, i.e. interrelated policies. The authors contend that the neoliberal commodification of the knowledge sector has only exacerbated human rights and capabilities deprivation - which encompasses both human and income poverty.

  4. Human Security and Energy Security: A Sustainable Energy System as a Public Good

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karlsson-Vinkhuyzen, S.I.S.E.; Jollands, N.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is dedicated to the concept of human security and its link to energy and energy governance, particularly global energy governance. Through this focus emerges the need to look at the links between the concept of public goods and energy. Our starting argument is that conventional notions

  5. Short-term retinoic acid treatment sustains pluripotency and suppresses differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Maria Teresa; Parrotta, Elvira Immacolata; Santamaria, Gianluca; Cuda, Giovanni

    2018-01-05

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) derived from blastocyst and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) generated from somatic cells by ectopic expression of defined transcriptional factors, have both the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into all cell types. Here we explored the two antagonistic effects of retinoic acid (RA) on hiPSCs. Although RA has been widely described as a pharmacological agent with a critical role in initiating differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, we demonstrate that short-term RA exposure not only antagonizes cell differentiation and sustains pluripotency of hiPSCs, but it also boosts and improves their properties and characteristics. To shed light on the mechanistic insights involved in the resistance to differentiation of hiPSCs cultured in RA conditions, as well as their improved pluripotency state, we focused our attention on the Wnt pathway. Our findings show that RA inhibits the Wnt canonical pathway and positively modulates the Akt/mTOR signaling, explaining why such perturbations, under our experimental conditions, do not lead to hiPSCs differentiation. Altogether, these data uncover a novel role for RA in favouring the maintenance of ground-state pluripotency, supporting its bivalent role, dose- and time-dependent, for hiPSCs differentiation and self-renewal processes.

  6. Hype, harmony and human factors: applying user-centered design to achieve sustainable telehealth program adoption and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossos, P G; St-Cyr, O; Purdy, B; Toenjes, C; Masino, C; Chmelnitsky, D

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of international experience with the use of information and communication technologies in healthcare delivery, widespread telehealth adoption remains limited and progress slow. Escalating health system challenges related to access, cost and quality currently coincide with rapid advancement of affordable and reliable internet based communication technologies creating unprecedented opportunities and incentives for telehealth. In this paper, we will describe how Human Factors Engineering (HFE) and user-centric elements have been incorporated into the establishment of telehealth within a large academic medical center to increase acceptance and sustainability. Through examples and lessons learned we wish to increase awareness of HFE and its importance in the successful implementation, innovation and growth of telehealth programs.

  7. The absence of cruelty is not the presence of humanness: physicians and the death penalty in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivot, Joel B

    2012-12-03

    The death penalty by lethal injection is a legal punishment in the United States. Sodium Thiopental, once used in the death penalty cocktail, is no longer available for use in the United States as a consequence of this association. Anesthesiologists possess knowledge of Sodium Thiopental and possible chemical alternatives. Further, lethal injection has the look and feel of a medical act thereby encouraging physician participation and comment. Concern has been raised that the death penalty by lethal injection, is cruel. Physicians are ethically directed to prevent cruelty within the doctor-patient relationship and ethically prohibited from participation in any component of the death penalty. The US Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty is not cruel per se and is not in conflict with the 8th amendment of the US constitution. If the death penalty is not cruel, it requires no further refinement. If, on the other hand, the death penalty is in fact cruel, physicians have no mandate outside of the doctor patient relationship to reduce cruelty. Any intervention in the name of cruelty reduction, in the setting of lethal injection, does not lead to a more humane form of punishment. If physicians contend that the death penalty can be botched, they wrongly direct that it can be improved. The death penalty cocktail, as a method to reduce suffering during execution, is an unverifiable claim. At best, anesthetics produce an outward appearance of calmness only and do not address suffering as a consequence of the anticipation of death on the part of the condemned.

  8. The absence of cruelty is not the presence of humanness: physicians and the death penalty in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zivot Joel B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The death penalty by lethal injection is a legal punishment in the United States. Sodium Thiopental, once used in the death penalty cocktail, is no longer available for use in the United States as a consequence of this association. Anesthesiologists possess knowledge of Sodium Thiopental and possible chemical alternatives. Further, lethal injection has the look and feel of a medical act thereby encouraging physician participation and comment. Concern has been raised that the death penalty by lethal injection, is cruel. Physicians are ethically directed to prevent cruelty within the doctor-patient relationship and ethically prohibited from participation in any component of the death penalty. The US Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty is not cruel per se and is not in conflict with the 8th amendment of the US constitution. If the death penalty is not cruel, it requires no further refinement. If, on the other hand, the death penalty is in fact cruel, physicians have no mandate outside of the doctor patient relationship to reduce cruelty. Any intervention in the name of cruelty reduction, in the setting of lethal injection, does not lead to a more humane form of punishment. If physicians contend that the death penalty can be botched, they wrongly direct that it can be improved. The death penalty cocktail, as a method to reduce suffering during execution, is an unverifiable claim. At best, anesthetics produce an outward appearance of calmness only and do not address suffering as a consequence of the anticipation of death on the part of the condemned.

  9. Human capacity and institutional development towards a sustainable energy future in Ethiopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulugetta, Yacob [Centre for Environmental Strategy, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    The overwhelming majority of Ethiopians lack access to modern energy fuels such as electricity and liquid petroleum gas, still locked into a biomass-based energy system. As such, women and children in rural areas spend long hours of productive time and labour on woodfuel collection and the urban poor spend a sizeable proportion of their income to meet their daily energy needs. Electricity, which is at the disposal of every household in Western Europe is largely restricted to the urban centres in Ethiopia, hence indicating a strong correlation between lack of access to modern energy and poverty. The paper will analyse the reasons why Ethiopia is lagging behind the rest of the developing world in setting up a sustainable energy pathway. As such, the performance and 'mind-set' of various 'agencies', i.e. higher education system, government, energy authorities, donor agencies, etc. will be reviewed. The paper refers to a range of cases in to illustrate the challenge of building the mechanisms that allow energy technologies to be successfully disseminated, supported and integrated into rural livelihoods. The paper will provide a series of observations and recommendations to ameliorate the current state-of-affairs and ways through which the various actors (community-based organisations, government at various levels and to a lesser degree, donors) can contribute towards that end. (author)

  10. THE INVESTMENT IN HUMAN CAPITAL, AN INTRISIC FACTOR OF THE SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTINA TEODORA BALACEANU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The educational system will need to direct its actions and programs towards the identification of the current and future values of the labour market, starting from the existing and potential labour resources, anticipating first and foremost the adjusting of the economy to fast-developing fields and domains, put forward by the State via the Fast-developing Field Strategies or even via the Fast-developing National Strategy. It will accordingly generate a binder between the demands of the labour market as a response to the developing necessities of the economy, and the training/specialization of the labour force as offered by the national syllabus. By these means the educational system would create a labour force compatible with the labour market, which is both a premiss for the increasing level of employment and for the sustainable economic growth. Our task is therefore to provide a concept of education related to technological progress, based on the model of Nelson and Phelps, and a suggestion for investments and education policies.

  11. Sustained negative BOLD response in human fMRI finger tapping task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Liu

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigated the sustained negative blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD response (sNBR using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a finger tapping task. We observed that the sNBR for this task was more extensive than has previously been reported. The cortical regions involved in sNBR are divided into the following three groups: frontal, somatosensory and occipital. By investigating the spatial structure, area, amplitude, and dynamics of the sNBR in comparison with those of its positive BOLD response (PBR counterpart, we made the following observations. First, among the three groups, the somatosensory group contained the greatest number of activated voxels and the fewest deactivated voxels. In addition, the amplitude of the sNBR in this group was the smallest among the three groups. Second, the onset and peak time of the sNBR are both larger than those of the PBR, whereas the falling edge time of the sNBR is less than that of the PBR. Third, the long distance between most sNBR foci and their corresponding PBR foci makes it unlikely that they share the same blood supply artery. Fourth, the couplings between the sNBR and its PBR counterpart are distinct among different regions and thus should be investigated separately. These findings imply that the origin of most sNBR foci in the finger-tapping task is much more likely to be neuronal activity suppression rather than "blood steal."

  12. Proteomics reveals the effects of sustained weight loss on the human plasma proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Philipp E; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Tyanova, Stefka; Grassl, Niklas; Iepsen, Eva W; Lundgren, Julie; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens J; Torekov, Signe S; Mann, Matthias

    2016-12-22

    Sustained weight loss is a preferred intervention in a wide range of metabolic conditions, but the effects on an individual's health state remain ill-defined. Here, we investigate the plasma proteomes of a cohort of 43 obese individuals that had undergone 8 weeks of 12% body weight loss followed by a year of weight maintenance. Using mass spectrometry-based plasma proteome profiling, we measured 1,294 plasma proteomes. Longitudinal monitoring of the cohort revealed individual-specific protein levels with wide-ranging effects of losing weight on the plasma proteome reflected in 93 significantly affected proteins. The adipocyte-secreted SERPINF1 and apolipoprotein APOF1 were most significantly regulated with fold changes of -16% and +37%, respectively (P plasma proteome, and eight plasma proteins correlated better with insulin resistance than the known marker adiponectin. Nearly all study participants benefited from weight loss regarding a ten-protein inflammation panel defined from the proteomics data. We conclude that plasma proteome profiling broadly evaluates and monitors intervention in metabolic diseases. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  13. Energy efficiency, human behavior, and economic growth: Challenges to cutting energy demand to sustainable levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarius, Tilman

    2015-03-01

    Increasing energy efficiency in households, transportation, industries, and services is an important strategy to reduce energy service demand to levels that allow the steep reduction of greenhouse gases, and a full fledged switch of energy systems to a renewable basis. Yet, technological efficiency improvements may generate so-called rebound effects, which may `eat up' parts of the technical savings potential. This article provides a comprehensive review of existing research on these effects, raises critiques, and points out open questions. It introduces micro-economic rebound effect and suggests extending consumer-side analysis to incorporate potential `psychological rebound effects.' It then discusses meso-economic rebound effects, i.e. producer-side and market-level rebounds, which so far have achieved little attention in the literature. Finally, the article critically reviews evidence for macro-economic rebound effects as energy efficiency-induced economic growth impacts. For all three categories, the article summarizes assessments of their potential quantitative scope, while pointing out remaining methodological weaknesses and open questions. As a rough "rule of thumb", in the long term and on gross average, only half the technical savings potential of across-the-board efficiency improvements may actually be achieved in the real world. Policies that aim at cutting energy service demand to sustainable levels are well advised to take due note of detrimental behavioral and economic growth impacts, and should foster policies and measures that can contain them.

  14. Exploring isoxsuprine hydrochloride binding with human serum albumin in the presence of folic acid and ascorbic acid using multispectroscopic and molecular modeling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Fereshteh; Shahraki, Somaye; Shahriyar, Amin; Majd, Mostafa Heidari

    2017-05-01

    Isoxsuprine hydrochloride (vasodilator drug), folic acid and ascorbic acid are medicines which can be utilized alone or simultaneously by pregnant women. In the present work the competitive binding of isoxsuprine hydrochloride (ISO) with human serum albumin (HSA) in the absence and presence of folic acid (FOL) and ascorbic acid (AS) was investigated using different spectroscopic probes and molecular docking studies. The results of fluorescence suggested that isoxsuprine alone or in the presence of ascorbic acid can bind to HSA and quench the fluorescence of HSA with static mechanism but For HSA-folic acid-isoxsuprine system, dynamic type of quenching mechanisms is involved. The values of binding constants (K HSA-ISO ~1.2×10 3 M -1 , K HSA-AS-ISO ~2.1×10 3 M -1 and K HSA-FOL-ISO ~0.7×10 3 M -1 ) suggested that affinity of HSA to isoxsuprine increased in the presence of ascorbic acid while the presence of folic acid reduced the affinity of protein to isoxsuprine. The results of FT-IR and circular dichroism measurements indicated that the binding of isoxsuprine to HSA in the absence and the presence of folic acid and ascorbic acid may induce conformational and microenvironmental changes of protein. Not only do these types of spectroscopy techniques provide all the information about the systems, molecular docking, also emphasizes the results and is employed for the identification of the active site residues, bioactive conformer of Isoxsuprine and their critical interactions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Achieving And Sustaining Human Exploration of Mars The Fourth Community Workshop (AM IV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thronson, Harley; Beaty, David; Carberry, Chris; Drake, Bret; Hays, Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    About a half decade ago, several professionals working mainly in industry on scenarios for initial human exploration of Mars exploration together recognized that, under generally similar assumptions, there was a fair degree of similarity among these scenarios. Moreover, opportunities should be sought for greater community input into NASAs own scenario-building for the future of human space flight. A series of focused community workshops were considered to be effective to critically assess the increasingly sophisticated scenarios. Explore Mars, Inc. the American Astronautical Society agreed to support them. Four workshops to date each involve about sixty professional scientists, engineers, technologists, and strategists from NASA, academia, aerospace corporations, the National Academies, consulting organizations, and potential international partners. Each workshop produced a series of presentations and reports briefed to NASA leadership and other stakeholders.

  16. Metabolic consequences of the presence or absence of the thermogenic capacity of brown adipose tissue in mice (and probably in humans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, B; Nedergaard, J

    2010-10-01

    Only with the development of the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)-ablated mouse has it become possible to strictly delineate the physiological significance of the thermogenic capacity of brown adipose tissue. Considering the presence of active brown adipose tissue in adult humans, these insights may have direct human implications. In addition to classical nonshivering thermogenesis, all adaptive adrenergic thermogeneses, including diet-induced thermogenesis, is fully dependent on brown adipocyte activity. Any weight-reducing effect of β(3)-adrenergic agonists is fully dependent on UCP1 activity, as is any weight-reducing effect of leptin (in excess of its effect on reduction of food intake). Consequently, in the absence of the thermogenic activity of brown adipose tissue, obesity develops spontaneously. The ability of brown adipose tissue to contribute to glucose disposal is also mainly related to thermogenic activity. However, basal metabolic rate, cold-induced thermogenesis, acute cold tolerance, fevers, nonadaptive adrenergic thermogenesis and processes such as angiogenesis in brown adipose tissue itself are not dependent on UCP1 activity. Whereas it is likely that these conclusions are also qualitatively valid for adult humans, the quantitative significance of brown adipose tissue for human metabolism--and the metabolic consequences for a single individual possessing more or less brown adipose tissue--awaits clarification.

  17. Building a framework to explore water-human interaction for sustainable agro ecosystems in US Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Ding, D.; Rapolu, U.

    2012-12-01

    Human activity is intricately linked to the quality and quantity of water resources. Although many studies have examined water-human interaction, the complexity of such coupled systems is not well understood largely because of gaps in our knowledge of water-cycle processes which are heavily influenced by socio-economic drivers. On this context, this team has investigated connections among agriculture, policy, climate, land use/land cover, and water quality in Iowa over the past couple of years. To help explore these connections the team is developing a variety of cyber infrastructure tools that facilitate the collection, analysis and visualization of data, and the simulation of system dynamics. In an ongoing effort, the prototype system is applied to Clear Creek watershed, an agricultural dominating catchment in Iowa in the US Midwest, to understand water-human processes relevant to management decisions by farmers regarding agro ecosystems. The primary aim of this research is to understand the connections that exist among the agricultural and biofuel economy, land use/land cover change, and water quality. To help explore these connections an agent-based model (ABM) of land use change has been developed that simulates the decisions made by farmers given alternative assumptions about market forces, farmer characteristics, and water quality regulations. The SWAT model was used to simulate the impact of these decisions on the movement of sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus across the landscape. The paper also demonstrate how through the use of this system researchers can, for example, search for scenarios that lead to desirable socio-economic outcomes as well as preserve water quantity and quality.

  18. Human resource development – A key factor for the sustainable development of Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlat Lame

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the current situation of labor resources in Albania and its trends from the viewpoint of their contributions to the overall country progress. A real partnership between business and public institutions, the efforts to formalize the economy, to promote discipline and better application of international standards are considered key issues for the future country developments. The effective management of human resources and coordination could not be reached without profound structural and economic reforms, without free entrepreneurship initiative encouragement, and without mutual confidence between the employers and the employees.

  19. Toward Economies that Sustain Nature and Human Dignity An Ecological Economic Reformulation

    CERN Document Server

    Norgaard, R B

    1998-01-01

    Modern economies have successfully rallied human and community potentials to the production and consumption of material goods but are having increasing difficulty creating meaningful lives, assuring social justice, and protecting the environment for future generations. To redress these imbalances, we invoke economic language and reasoning ever more insistently and incessantly, and move away from solutions rather than toward them. This is because economics evolved with the larger assumptions of modernity that brought us to where we are. Reformulating economics, along with the on-going reformulation of our environmental and social consciousness, will be necessary to build a durable and endurable future.

  20. Expression of Pluripotency and Oocyte-Related Genes in Single Putative Stem Cells from Human Adult Ovarian Surface Epithelium Cultured In Vitro in the Presence of Follicular Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Virant-Klun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to trigger the expression of genes related to oocytes in putative ovarian stem cells scraped from the ovarian surface epithelium of women with premature ovarian failure and cultured in vitro in the presence of follicular fluid, rich in substances for oocyte growth and maturation. Ovarian surface epithelium was scraped and cell cultures were set up by scrapings in five women with nonfunctional ovaries and with no naturally present mature follicles or oocytes. In the presence of donated follicular fluid putative stem cells grew and developed into primitive oocyte-like cells. A detailed single-cell gene expression profiling was performed to elucidate their genetic status in comparison to human embryonic stem cells, oocytes, and somatic fibroblasts. The ovarian cell cultures depleted/converted reproductive hormones from the culture medium. Estradiol alone or together with other substances may be involved in development of these primitive oocyte-like cells. The majority of primitive oocyte-like cells was mononuclear and expressed several genes related to pluripotency and oocytes, including genes related to meiosis, although they did not express some important oocyte-specific genes. Our work reveals the presence of putative stem cells in the ovarian surface epithelium of women with premature ovarian failure.

  1. Probing the Interaction of Human Serum Albumin with Norfloxacin in the Presence of High-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields: Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Circular Dichroism Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshidkhan Chamani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes an investigation by fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism and UV-visible spectroscopy of the interaction between norfloxacin (NRF and human serum albumin (HSA in the presence of electromagnetic fields (EMFs. The results obtained from this study indicated that NRF had a strong ability to quench HSA at λex = 280 nm. In addition, a slight blue shift occurred, which suggested that the microenvironment of the protein became more hydrophobic after addition of NRF. The interaction between the NRF and HSA, whether in the absence or presence of an EMF, was considered to be a static quenching mechanism. Moreover, synchronous fluorescence demonstrated that the microenvironment around Trp became modified. Data of HSA-NRF in the presence of EMFs between 1 Hz–1 MHz confirmed the results of quenching and blue shifts. Corresponding Stern-Volmer plots were also drawn and the resultant Ksv and kq values were compared. Moreover, the binding parameters, including the number of binding sites, the binding constant and the distance, r, between donor and acceptor, were calculated based on Förster’s non-radiative energy transfer theory. According to far and near UV-CD, the formation of the complex caused changes of the secondary and tertiary structures of HSA. The obtained results are significant for patients who are subjected to high-frequency radiation as this was found to reduce the affinity of NRF to HSA.

  2. In vitro investigation of orthopedic titanium-coated and brushite-coated surfaces using human osteoblasts in the presence of gentamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Akif; Schütze, Norbert; Hendrich, Christian; Thull, Roger; Eulert, Jochen; Löhr, Jochen F

    2008-08-01

    Anti-infective coatings have been developed to protect the surfaces of cementless implants from bacterial colonization that is known to be a prerequisite for device-related infection. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of brushite-coated arthroplasty surfaces on human osteoblasts and to evaluate the impact of concomitant exposure to gentamycin. We cultured human osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19) on brushite-coated and uncoated titanium alloy in the presence of gentamycin and analyzed cell function and vitality. Our results show that brushite-coated titanium alloy surfaces supported the function of osteoblasts and the expression of extracellular matrix even in the presence of highly dosed gentamycin. Brushite-coated titanium alloy surfaces supported osteogenic function, indicating that this coating could enhance implant osteointegration in vivo. Concomitant exposure to gentamycin slightly decreased osteoblastic activity in vitro, suggesting that there might also be negative effects in vivo. However, in vivo studies are necessary to validate these in vitro findings.

  3. Injectable and Biodegradable pH-Responsive Hydrogels for Localized and Sustained Treatment of Human Fibrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liubing; Gu, Jun; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Zonggang; Lu, Yufeng; Shen, Liqin; Dong, Qirong; Wang, Yangyun

    2015-04-22

    Injectable hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials, and they have been widely used for controlled drug release. This study evaluated an injectable hydrogel formed in situ system by the reaction of a polyethylene glycol derivative with α,β-polyaspartylhydrazide for local cancer chemotherapy. This pH-responsive hydrogel was used to realize a sol-gel phase transition, where the gel remained a free-flowing fluid before injection but spontaneously changed into a semisolid hydrogel just after administration. As indicated by scanning electron microscopy images, the hydrogel exhibited a porous three-dimensional microstructure. The prepared hydrogel was biocompatible and biodegradable and could be utilized as a pH-responsive vector for drug delivery. The therapeutic effect of the hydrogel loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) after intratumoral administration in mice with human fibrosarcoma was evaluated. The inhibition of tumor growth was more obvious in the group treated by the DOX-loaded hydrogel, compared to that treated with the free DOX solution. Hence, this hydrogel with good syringeability and high biodegradability, which focuses on local chemotherapy, may enhance the therapeutic effect on human fibrosarcoma.

  4. Understanding the Structural, Human Resource, Political, and Symbolic Dimensions of Implementing and Sustaining Interprofessional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Tracy J; Peterson, Teri; Neill, Karen; Neill, Mark; Seikel, John A; Lawson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of deans and faculty members of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) concerning the degree to which their institutions implement and integrate the structural, human resource, political, and symbolic frames or dimensions of interprofessional education (IPE). The study identified correlations among these frames/dimensions, including their relationship with overall IPE program progress and success. This study utilized a nonexperimental comparative descriptive and correlational survey design. The instrument was developed by the researchers and administered online using a readily accessible data collection process. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Content validity and reliability were established prior to full implementation of the survey. Results revealed high levels of interest but lower levels of progress and success in implementing the various frames/dimensions of IPE. Strong correlations existed between the structural, human resource, political, and symbolic dimensions of IPE, and these dimensions individually and collectively predicted overall IPE program progress and success. The differences between interest and performance raised important questions and led to conclusions about leadership effectiveness, organizational clarity, and the process of implementing the organizational change needed for effective IPE at ASAHP institutions.

  5. Studies on immunoproteasome in human liver. Part I: Absence in fetuses, presence in normal subjects, and increased levels in chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasuri, Francesco; Capizzi, Elisa [Pathology Unit of the ' F. Addarii' Institute of Oncology, S.Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Bellavista, Elena [Department of Experimental Pathology, Bologna University (Italy); Interdepartmental Center for Studies on Biophysics, Bioinformatics and Biocomplexity ' L. Galvani' (CIG), Bologna University (Italy); Mishto, Michele [Department of Experimental Pathology, Bologna University (Italy); Interdepartmental Center for Studies on Biophysics, Bioinformatics and Biocomplexity ' L. Galvani' (CIG), Bologna University (Italy); Institute of Biochemistry, Medical Faculty Charite, Berlin (Germany); Santoro, Aurelia [Department of Experimental Pathology, Bologna University (Italy); Interdepartmental Center for Studies on Biophysics, Bioinformatics and Biocomplexity ' L. Galvani' (CIG), Bologna University (Italy); Fiorentino, Michelangelo [Pathology Unit of the ' F. Addarii' Institute of Oncology, S.Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Capri, Miriam [Department of Experimental Pathology, Bologna University (Italy); Interdepartmental Center for Studies on Biophysics, Bioinformatics and Biocomplexity ' L. Galvani' (CIG), Bologna University (Italy); Cescon, Matteo; Grazi, Gian Luca [Unit of General and Transplantation Surgery, S.Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Grigioni, Walter Franco; D' Errico-Grigioni, Antonia [Pathology Unit of the ' F. Addarii' Institute of Oncology, S.Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Franceschi, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.franceschi@unibo.it [Department of Experimental Pathology, Bologna University (Italy); Interdepartmental Center for Studies on Biophysics, Bioinformatics and Biocomplexity ' L. Galvani' (CIG), Bologna University (Italy)

    2010-06-25

    Despite the central role of proteasomes in relevant physiological pathways and pathological processes, this topic is unexpectedly largely unexplored in human liver. Here we present data on the presence of proteasome and immunoproteasome in human livers from normal adults, fetuses and patients affected by major hepatic diseases such as cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis. Immunohistochemistry for constitutive ({alpha}4 and {beta}1) and inducible (LMP2 and LMP7) proteasome subunits, and for the PA28{alpha}{beta} regulator, was performed in liver samples from 38 normal subjects, 6 fetuses, 2 pediatric cases, and 19 pathological cases (10 chronic active hepatitis and 9 cirrhosis). The immunohistochemical data have been validated and quantified by Western blotting analysis. The most striking result we found was the concomitant presence in hepatocyte cytoplasm of all healthy subjects, including the pediatric cases, of constitutive proteasome and immunoproteasome subunits, as well as PA28{alpha}{beta}. At variance, immunoproteasome was not present in hepatocytes from fetuses, while a strong cytoplasmic and nuclear positivity for LMP2 and LMP7 was found in pathological samples, directly correlated to the histopathological grade of inflammation. At variance from other organs such as the brain, immunoproteasome is present in livers from normal adult and pediatric cases, in apparent absence of pathological processes, suggesting the presence of a peculiar regulation of the proteasome/immunoproteasome system, likely related to the physiological stimuli derived from the gut microbiota after birth. Other inflammatory stimuli contribute in inducing high levels of immunoproteasome in pathological conditions, where its role deserve further attention.

  6. Human development assessment through the human-scale development approach: integrating different perspectives in the contribution to a sustainable human development theory.

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz Barreiro, Ivonne Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Since the first Human Development Report (HDRs) was published in 1990, the Human Development (HD) paradigm has become a relevant conceptual framework as well as an intrinsic instrument to measure human progress. Yet, critics on the Reports for oversimplifying development have been pointed out as they do not take into account the myriad complex social, cultural, political and historical aspects of a country or a particular society. The United Nations Human Development Programme (UNDP) has howe...

  7. Curcumin conjugated with PLGA potentiates sustainability, anti-proliferative activity and apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargav N Waghela

    Full Text Available Curcumin, an ingredient of turmeric, exhibits a variety of biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-proliferative, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-metastatic. It is a highly pleiotropic molecule that inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Despite its imperative biological activities, chemical instability, photo-instability and poor bioavailability limits its utilization as an effective therapeutic agent. Therefore, enhancing the bioavailability of curcumin may improve its therapeutic index for clinical setting. In the present study, we have conjugated curcumin with a biodegradable polymer Poly (D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid and evaluated its apoptotic potential in human colon carcinoma cells (HCT 116. The results show that curcumin-PLGA conjugate efficiently inhibits cell proliferation and cell survival in human colon carcinoma cells as compared to native curcumin. Additionally, curcumin conjugated with PLGA shows improved cellular uptake and exhibits controlled release at physiological pH as compared to native curcumin. The curcumin-PLGA conjugate efficiently activates the cascade of caspases and promotes intrinsic apoptotic signaling. Thus, the results suggest that conjugation potentiates the sustainability, anti-proliferative and apoptotic activity of curcumin. This approach could be a promising strategy to improve the therapeutic index of cancer therapy.

  8. Technological innovation, human capital and social change for sustainability. Lessons learnt from the industrial technologies theme of the EU's Research Framework Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabadie, Jesús Alquézar

    2014-05-15

    Europe is facing a twofold challenge. It must maintain or even increase its competitiveness, a basic requirement in a globalised economy and under the current demographic threat. It needs also to tackle the so-called "grand challenges", especially environmental issues, through a sustainable model of production and consumption. Such challenges should lead to new business and industrial models, based on more sustainable production and consumption chains, from design to end of life. This implies a need for new industrial materials and processes, new skills and, indeed, new values and life-styles. Sustainability and innovation are key elements of EU's Research and Innovation Framework Programmes, particularly in the field of industrial technologies (nanotechnologies, materials and industrial technologies), which objective is to "improve the competitiveness of the European industry and generate knowledge to ensure its transformation from a resource intensive to a knowledge intensive industry". Sustainability and innovation are interrelated challenges for R&D. Research can develop technical solutions to tackle environmental or societal challenges, but such technologies need to be successfully commercialised to have a real environmental impact. Several socio-economic studies carried-out by the European Commission show not only the emerging technological and industrial trends, but they also emphasise the need for linking sustainable technologies with social change. Human capital and new social behaviours are critical factors to combine economic competitiveness and sustainability: technology alone is no longer able to solve global challenges. But what kind of human capital (skills, behaviours, and values) are we referring to? How to encourage the shift towards a greener society through human capital? Which reforms are needed in education systems to move towards a sustainable economy? Are there examples of social innovation to be extrapolated and/or generalised? © 2013

  9. Health human resource planning in Barbados and the eastern Caribbean states: a matter of sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, B J; Kissoon, N; Syed, N; Fraser, H S

    2008-12-01

    Health and Human Resources (HHR) are very important issues to be considered in healthcare services. While various factors may be of greater significance in one area depending on resources, priorities and stage of economic development, a robust HHR plan is important in all cases. There are many factors such as demographic shifts, changing delivery models, consumer expectations, global shortages and financial restraints that must be considered in proper HHR planning. This manuscript summarizes some of the factors that should be considered and some of the short comings of current HHR planning approaches. Based on our review and experience, we developed a framework for HHR planning and apply the framework to Barbados to try to identify the existing challenges and issues and potential areas for staff and training investments.

  10. The Market and Institutional Value Attachments to Sustainable Return of Human Capital to Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar BOZIC

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the main characteristics of potentials and challenges of the brain grain process in a post conflict and transitional situation, by reflecting the various views and perspectives of the relevant stakeholders in the field o migration from Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH. The focus is on highly skilled tertiary graduates’ returnees from BiH and the assessment of their skills and knowledge recognition within the labour market and public administration. The study concludes that even though it has been widely estimated that advanced countries can significantly benefit regarding country's productivity from temporary movements of tertiary migrants, societies that challenge serious human capital flow can negatively value the potential benefits of the highly skilled returnees, while their advanced skills and knowledge most likely remains unrecognized.

  11. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and peptide histidine methionine. Presence in human follicular fluid and effects on DNA synthesis and steroid secretion in cultured human granulosa/lutein cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, S; Ovesen, P; Andersen, A N

    1994-01-01

    fluid and cells were obtained from patients undergoing in-vitro fertilization for tubal infertility. The concentrations of VIP and PHM in pre-ovulatory human follicular fluid were measured radioimmunochemically. Granulosa/lutein cells isolated from follicular fluid were cultured under serum....../l, respectively. VIP at a concentration of 10 nmol/l caused a significant increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation, and at 1000 nmol/l a significant increase in oestradiol secretion was observed. VIP had no effect on progesterone secretion. PHM at the concentrations tested did not influence any of the activities...

  12. Human presence increases parasitic load in endangered lion-tailed macaques (Macaca silenus in its fragmented rainforest habitats in Southern India.

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    Shaik Hussain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding changes in the host-parasite relationship due to habitat fragmentation is necessary for better management and conservation of endangered species in fragmented landscapes. Pathogens and parasites can pose severe threat to species in restricted environments such as forest fragments where there is increased contact of wildlife with human and livestock populations. Environmental stress and reduced nutritional level in forest fragments can influence parasite infection and intensity on the native species. In this study, we examine the impact of habitat fragmentation on the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in lion-tailed macaques in a fragmented rainforest in Western Ghats. METHODS: The prevalence of different gastrointestinal parasites was estimated from 91 fecal samples collected from 9 lion-tailed macaque groups in nine forest fragments. The parasites were identified up to genus level on the basis of the morphology and coloration of the egg, larva and cyst. The covariates included forest fragment area, group size and the presence/absence of human settlements and livestock in proximity. We used a linear regression model to identify the covariates that significantly influenced the prevalence of different parasite taxa. RESULTS: Nine gastrointestinal parasite taxa were detected in lion-tailed macaque groups. The groups near human settlements had greater prevalence and number of taxa, and these variables also had significant positive correlations with group size. We found that these parameters were also greater in groups near human settlements after controlling for group size. Livestock were present in all five fragments that had human settlements in proximity. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that high prevalence and species richness of gastrointestinal parasites in lion-tailed macaque groups are directly related to habitat fragmentation, high anthropogenic activities and high host density. The parasite load

  13. Human presence increases parasitic load in endangered lion-tailed macaques (Macaca silenus) in its fragmented rainforest habitats in Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shaik; Ram, Muthuvarmadam Subramanian; Kumar, Ajith; Shivaji, Sisinthy; Umapathy, Govindhaswamy

    2013-01-01

    Understanding changes in the host-parasite relationship due to habitat fragmentation is necessary for better management and conservation of endangered species in fragmented landscapes. Pathogens and parasites can pose severe threat to species in restricted environments such as forest fragments where there is increased contact of wildlife with human and livestock populations. Environmental stress and reduced nutritional level in forest fragments can influence parasite infection and intensity on the native species. In this study, we examine the impact of habitat fragmentation on the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in lion-tailed macaques in a fragmented rainforest in Western Ghats. The prevalence of different gastrointestinal parasites was estimated from 91 fecal samples collected from 9 lion-tailed macaque groups in nine forest fragments. The parasites were identified up to genus level on the basis of the morphology and coloration of the egg, larva and cyst. The covariates included forest fragment area, group size and the presence/absence of human settlements and livestock in proximity. We used a linear regression model to identify the covariates that significantly influenced the prevalence of different parasite taxa. Nine gastrointestinal parasite taxa were detected in lion-tailed macaque groups. The groups near human settlements had greater prevalence and number of taxa, and these variables also had significant positive correlations with group size. We found that these parameters were also greater in groups near human settlements after controlling for group size. Livestock were present in all five fragments that had human settlements in proximity. The present study suggests that high prevalence and species richness of gastrointestinal parasites in lion-tailed macaque groups are directly related to habitat fragmentation, high anthropogenic activities and high host density. The parasite load partially explains the reason for the decline in immature survival

  14. Stretching the Boundaries of Transformative Sustainability Learning: On the Importance of Decolonizing Ways of Knowing and Relations with the More-than-Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmin, Matthew; Barrett, M. J.; Hoessler, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    This paper chronicles students' experiences of transformative sustainability learning through "epistemological stretching"--a pedagogical orientation which focuses on expanding the ways of knowing that someone respects, understands, and/or engages with. With a particular emphasis on decolonizing relations between humans and the…

  15. Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Community Sustainability Study Focuses on Tying the Science of Ecosystem Services and Human Health Directly to Community Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Community-based Sustainability Research Program in EPA’s Office of Research and Development is studying how the availability of ecosystem goods and services (EGS) is impacted by community decision making and how this relationship alters human wellbeing. We also seek ‘common g...

  16. Can Facebook Aid Sustainability? An Investigation of Empathy Expression within the Humans of New York Blog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Wheeler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study offers a novel exploration of the links between social media, virtual intergroup contact, and empathy by examining how empathy is expressed through interactions on a popular social media blog. Global leaders are encouraging individuals to engage in behaviors and support policies that provide basic social foundations. It is difficult to motivate people to undertake such actions. However, research shows that empathy intensifies motivation to help others. It can cause individuals to see the world from the perspective of stigmatized group members and increase positive feelings. Social media offers a new pathway for virtual intergroup contact, providing opportunities to increase conversation about disadvantaged others and empathy. We examined expressions of empathy within a popular blog, Humans of New York (HONY, and engaged in purposeful case selection by focusing on (1 events where specific prosocial action was taken corresponding to interactions on the HONY blog and (2 presentation of people in countries other than the United States. Nine overarching themes; (1 perspective taking, (2 fantasy, (3 empathic concern, (4 personal distress, (5 relatability, (6 prosocial action, (7 community appreciation, (8 anti-empathy, and (9 rejection of anti-empathy, exemplify how the HONY community expresses and shares empathic thoughts and feelings.

  17. Alternative Ultrasound Gel for a Sustainable Ultrasound Program: Application of Human Centered Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Salmon

    Full Text Available This paper describes design of a low cost, ultrasound gel from local products applying aspects of Human Centered Design methodology. A multidisciplinary team worked with clinicians who use ultrasound where commercial gel is cost prohibitive and scarce. The team followed the format outlined in the Ideo Took Kit. Research began by defining the challenge "how to create locally available alternative ultrasound gel for a low-resourced environment? The "End-Users," were identified as clinicians who use ultrasound in Democratic Republic of the Congo and Ethiopia. An expert group was identified and queried for possible alternatives to commercial gel. Responses included shampoo, oils, water and cornstarch. Cornstarch, while a reasonable solution, was either not available or too expensive. We then sought deeper knowledge of locally sources materials from local experts, market vendors, to develop a similar product. Suggested solutions gleaned from these interviews were collected and used to create ultrasound gel accounting for cost, image quality, manufacturing capability. Initial prototypes used cassava root flour from Great Lakes Region (DRC, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania and West Africa, and bula from Ethiopia. Prototypes were tested in the field and resulting images evaluated by our user group. A final prototype was then selected. Cassava and bula at a 32 part water, 8 part flour and 4 part salt, heated, mixed then cooled was the product design of choice.

  18. Alternative Ultrasound Gel for a Sustainable Ultrasound Program: Application of Human Centered Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Margaret; Salmon, Christian; Bissinger, Alexa; Muller, Mundenga Mutendi; Gebreyesus, Alegnta; Geremew, Haimanot; Wendel, Sarah K; Wendell, Sarah; Azaza, Aklilu; Salumu, Maurice; Benfield, Nerys

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes design of a low cost, ultrasound gel from local products applying aspects of Human Centered Design methodology. A multidisciplinary team worked with clinicians who use ultrasound where commercial gel is cost prohibitive and scarce. The team followed the format outlined in the Ideo Took Kit. Research began by defining the challenge "how to create locally available alternative ultrasound gel for a low-resourced environment? The "End-Users," were identified as clinicians who use ultrasound in Democratic Republic of the Congo and Ethiopia. An expert group was identified and queried for possible alternatives to commercial gel. Responses included shampoo, oils, water and cornstarch. Cornstarch, while a reasonable solution, was either not available or too expensive. We then sought deeper knowledge of locally sources materials from local experts, market vendors, to develop a similar product. Suggested solutions gleaned from these interviews were collected and used to create ultrasound gel accounting for cost, image quality, manufacturing capability. Initial prototypes used cassava root flour from Great Lakes Region (DRC, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania) and West Africa, and bula from Ethiopia. Prototypes were tested in the field and resulting images evaluated by our user group. A final prototype was then selected. Cassava and bula at a 32 part water, 8 part flour and 4 part salt, heated, mixed then cooled was the product design of choice.

  19. Linking human capital and enterprise sustainability in Indonesian medium-sized food manufacturing enterprises: the role of informal knowledge sharing practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunardi, O.

    2017-12-01

    Medium-sized food manufacturing enterprises in Indonesia are significant in a number of contexts, in terms of their part to the national production (GDP) and their establishment to the employment. In term of their role to national production, manufacturing sector contributes the highest GDP by 85%. In this sector, food manufacturing subsector contributes the highest GDP. Nevertheless, they faced the same common problems: quality of human capital and sustainability issues. Previous government supplementary programs have been established to expand the human capital capability amongst medium enterprises. Adequate amount of fund has been apportioned to develop human capital, though, the medium enterprises sustainability is still in question. This study proposes and examines the human capital role from informal knowledge sharing perspective. By conducting qualitative approach through interviews to four informants in Indonesian medium-sized food manufacturing enterprises, a set of hypotheses is derived from this study for future quantitative study. This study indicates that human capital traits (diverse education background, employee skills, and employee experience) could leverage the practice of informal knowledge sharing. Constructs such as mutual trust and reciprocal intention could play as mediating variables, and cultural interpretation perspective could act as moderating factor to informal knowledge sharing effectiveness. In final, informal knowledge sharing is indicated to play as moderating variable for human capital policy and practice to support enterprise sustainability.

  20. The human ankyrin 1 promoter insulator sustains gene expression in a β-globin lentiviral vector in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Wherley, Jennifer; Kaufman, Michael L; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Cooper, Aaron R; Hoban, Megan D; Baldwin, Kismet M; Lumaquin, Dianne; Wang, Xiaoyan; Senadheera, Shantha; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors designed for the treatment of the hemoglobinopathies require the inclusion of regulatory and strong enhancer elements to achieve sufficient expression of the β-globin transgene. Despite the inclusion of these elements, the efficacy of these vectors may be limited by transgene silencing due to the genomic environment surrounding the integration site. Barrier insulators can be used to give more consistent expression and resist silencing even with lower vector copies. Here, the barrier activity of an insulator element from the human ankyrin-1 gene was analyzed in a lentiviral vector carrying an antisickling human β-globin gene. Inclusion of a single copy of the Ankyrin insulator did not affect viral titer, and improved the consistency of expression from the vector in murine erythroleukemia cells. The presence of the Ankyrin insulator element did not change transgene expression in human hematopoietic cells in short-term erythroid culture or in vivo in primary murine transplants. However, analysis in secondary recipients showed that the lentiviral vector with the Ankyrin element preserved transgene expression, whereas expression from the vector lacking the Ankyrin insulator decreased in secondary recipients. These studies demonstrate that the Ankyrin insulator may improve long-term β-globin expression in hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemoglobinopathies.

  1. The human ankyrin 1 promoter insulator sustains gene expression in a β-globin lentiviral vector in hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Wherley, Jennifer; Kaufman, Michael L; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Cooper, Aaron R; Hoban, Megan D; Baldwin, Kismet M; Lumaquin, Dianne; Wang, Xiaoyan; Senadheera, Shantha; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors designed for the treatment of the hemoglobinopathies require the inclusion of regulatory and strong enhancer elements to achieve sufficient expression of the β-globin transgene. Despite the inclusion of these elements, the efficacy of these vectors may be limited by transgene silencing due to the genomic environment surrounding the integration site. Barrier insulators can be used to give more consistent expression and resist silencing even with lower vector copies. Here, the barrier activity of an insulator element from the human ankyrin-1 gene was analyzed in a lentiviral vector carrying an antisickling human β-globin gene. Inclusion of a single copy of the Ankyrin insulator did not affect viral titer, and improved the consistency of expression from the vector in murine erythroleukemia cells. The presence of the Ankyrin insulator element did not change transgene expression in human hematopoietic cells in short-term erythroid culture or in vivo in primary murine transplants. However, analysis in secondary recipients showed that the lentiviral vector with the Ankyrin element preserved transgene expression, whereas expression from the vector lacking the Ankyrin insulator decreased in secondary recipients. These studies demonstrate that the Ankyrin insulator may improve long-term β-globin expression in hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26029723

  2. Alterations in human ECG due to the MagnetoHydroDynamic effect: a method for accurate R peak detection in the presence of high MHD artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Abdallah, Dima; Robin, Vincent; Drochon, Agnès; Fokapu, Odette

    2007-01-01

    Blood flow in high static magnetic fields induces elevated voltages that contaminate the ECG signal which is recorded simultaneously during MRI scans for synchronization purposes. This is known as the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effect, it increases the amplitude of the T wave, thus hindering correct R peak detection. In this paper, we inspect the MHD induced alterations of human ECG signals recorded in a 1.5 Tesla steady magnetic field and establish a primary characterization of the induced changes using time and frequency domain analysis. We also reexamine our previously developed real time algorithm for MRI cardiac gating and determine that, with a minor modification, this algorithm is capable of achieving perfect detection even in the presence of strong MHD artifacts.

  3. Studies on the interaction between promethazine and human serum albumin in the presence of flavonoids by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ling-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wang, Yong-Xia; Liu, Xian-Ping; Yang, Yan-Jie; Gao, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence, absorption, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques as well as molecular modeling methods were used to study the binding characterization of promethazine (PMT) to human serum albumin (HSA) and the influence of flavonoids, rutin and baicalin, on their affinity. The results indicated that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of HSA by PMT is a static quenching due to the formation of complex. The reaction was spontaneous and mainly mediated by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The binding distance between the tryptophan residue of HSA and PMT is less than 8nm, which indicated that the energy transfer from the tryptophan residue of HSA to PMT occurred. The binding site of PMT on HSA was located in sites I and the presence of PMT can cause the conformational changes of HSA. There was the competitive binding to HSA between PMT and flavonoids because of the overlap of binding sites in HSA. The flavonoids could decrease the association constant and increase the binding distance. In addition, their synergistic effect can further change the conformation of HSA. The decrease in the affinities of PMT binding to HSA in the presence of flavonoids may lead to the increase of free drug in blood, which would affect the transportation or disposition of drug and evoke an adverse or toxic effect. Hence, rationalising dosage and diet regimens should be taken into account in clinical application of PMT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [What is sustainability science?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Guo; Guo, Xiao-Chuan; Yang, Jie; Qian, Gui-Xia; Niu, Jian-Ming; Liang, Cun-Zhu; Zhang, Qing; Li, Ang

    2014-01-01

    Sustainability is the theme of our time and also the grandest challenge to humanity. Since the 1970s, the term, sustainable development, has frequently appeared in the scientific literature, governmental documents, media promotions for public goods, and commercial advertisements. However, the science that provides the theoretical foundation and practical guidance for sustainable development--sustainability science--only began to emerge in the beginning of the 21st century. Nevertheless, the field has rapidly developed in depth and expanded in scope during the past decade, with its core concepts and research methods coalescing. China, as the most populous country in the world and home to the philosophical root of sustainability science-the unity of man and nature, is obligated to take upon the challenge of our time, to facilitate global sustainability while pursuing the Chinese Dream, and to play a leading role in the development of sustainability science. Toward this grandiose goal, this paper presents the first Chinese introduction to sustainability science, which discusses its basic concepts, research questions, and future directions. Sustainability science is the study of the dynamic relationship between humans and the environment, particularly focusing on the vulnerability, robustness, resilience, and stability of the coupled human-environment system. It is a transdisciplinary science that integrates natural sciences with humanities and social sciences. It hinges on the environment-economy-society nexus, and merges basic and applied research. The key components of sustainability often change with time, place, and culture, and thus sustainability science needs to emphasize multi-scale studies in space and time, with emphasis on landscapes and regions over a horizon of 50 to 100 years. It needs to focus on the relationship between ecosystem services and human well-being, as influenced by biodiversity and ecosystem processes as well as climate change, land use

  5. Efficacy and safety of sustained-release recombinant human growth hormone in Korean adults with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsook; Hong, Jae Won; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Sung-Woon; Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Jin Hwa; Kim, Byung-Joon; Lee, Eun Jig

    2014-07-01

    The administration of recombinant human growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency has been known to improve metabolic impairment and quality of life. Patients, however, have to tolerate daily injections of growth hormone. The efficacy, safety, and compliance of weekly administered sustained-release recombinant human growth hormone (SR-rhGH, Declage™) supplement in patients with growth hormone deficiency were evaluated. This trial is 12-week prospective, single-arm, open-label trial. Men and women aged ≥20 years with diagnosed growth hormone deficiency (caused by pituitary tumor, trauma and other pituitary diseases) were eligible for this study. Each subject was given 2 mg (6 IU) of SR-rhGH once a week, subcutaneously for 12 weeks. Efficacy and safety at baseline and within 30 days after the 12th injection were assessed and compared. Score of Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA score) for quality of life and serum IGF-1 level. The IGF-1 level of 108.67±74.03 ng/mL was increased to 129.01±68.37 ng/mL (p=0.0111) and the AGHDA QoL score was decreased from 9.80±6.51 to 7.55±5.76 (p<0.0001) at week 12 compared with those at baseline. Adverse events included pain, swelling, erythema, and warmth sensation at the administration site, but many adverse events gradually disappeared during the investigation. Weekly administered SR-rhGH for 12 weeks effectively increased IGF-1 level and improved the quality of life in patients with GH deficiency without serious adverse events.

  6. Re-imaging the Eastern Cape Province: Sustainable Human Development from the Perspectives of the State, Civic Society, and the University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayshree Thakrar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Eastern Cape Planning Commission identifies human development as the central concern that the Provincial Development Plan should be premised on (Eastern Cape Planning Commission, 2012. This article proposes to critically examine the emerging (albeit implicit philosophicalfoundation for sustainable human development, which we read as a combination of consciousness, capability, and rational organisation, and discusses these three interrelating aspects against selected stakeholders of sustainable human development: the State, civic society and the university. We determine that a re-imagination of the Eastern Cape Province would require serious consideration for the reshaping of the State, a rethinking of the roles and relationships with, and between, civic society, and a review of the third mission of the university.

  7. Human error in medical practice: an unavoidable presence El error en la práctica médica: una presencia ineludible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladis Adriana Vélez Álvarez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Making mistakes is a human characteristic and a mechanism to learn, but at the same time it may become a threat to human beings in some scenarios. Aviation and Medicine are good examples of this. Some data are presented about the frequency of error in Medicine, its ubiquity and the circumstances that favor it. A reflection is done about how the error is being managed and why it is not more often discussed. It is proposed that the first step in learning from an error is to accept it as an unavoidable presence. El errar, que es una característica humana y un mecanismo de aprendizaje, se convierte en una amenaza para el hombre mismo en algunos escenarios como la aviación y la medicina. Se presentan algunos datos acerca de la frecuencia del error en medicina, su ubicuidad y las circunstancias que lo favorecen, y se hace una reflexión acerca de cómo se ha enfrentado el error y de por qué no se habla abiertamente del mismo. Se propone que el primer paso para aprender del error es aceptarlo como una presencia ineludible.

  8. The presence of centrioles and centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells suggests human parthenotes developed in vitro can differentiate into mature cells without a sperm centriole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo Yon, E-mail: boyonlee@gmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Sang Woo; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Seung Bo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sperm centriole is the progenitor of centrosomes in all somatic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Centrioles and centrosomes exist in parthenogenetic ovarian teratoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without a sperm centriole, parthenogenetic oocytes produce centrioles and centrosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parthenogenetic human oocytes can develop and differentiate into mature cells. -- Abstract: In most animals, somatic cell centrosomes are inherited from the centriole of the fertilizing spermatozoa. The oocyte centriole degenerates during oogenesis, and completely disappears in metaphase II. Therefore, the embryos generated by in vitro parthenogenesis are supposed to develop without any centrioles. Exceptional acentriolar and/or acentrosomal developments are possible in mice and in some experimental cells; however, in most animals, the full developmental potential of parthenogenetic cells in vitro and the fate of their centrioles/centrosomes are not clearly understood. To predict the future of in vitro human parthenogenesis, we explored the centrioles/centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells by immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy. We confirmed the presence of centrioles and centrosomes in these well-known parthenogenetic ovarian tumor cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate that, even without a sperm centriole, parthenotes that develop from activated oocytes can produce their own centrioles/centrosomes, and can even develop into the well-differentiated mature tissue.

  9. Development of Some Organs Derived from the Three Embryonic Germ Layer in a Degus Ectopic Pregnancy and Presence of a Cytotrophoblast That Mimics Human Chorionic Placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bosco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of abdominal pregnancy in an adult female degu from which we recovered two large tissular masses from the peritoneal cavity. The bigger one showed a number of thin vascular connections to the serosa layer of the small intestine. It was also directly connected to the smaller mass by a thin membranous process. The surface of the bigger mass facing the small intestine wall showed the presence of chorionic villous that resembled a villous human chorionic placenta, rather than the hemomonochorial labyrinthine placenta, characteristic of this species. This unusual finding leads us to postulate that in the degu’s uterus the cytotrophoblast is exposed to a number of factors that will activate cascades of cellular and molecular events that ultimately will be signaling the cytotrophoblast to develop into a labyrinthine hemomonochorial placenta. In absence of the proper uterine environment, as is the case of the abdominal pregnancy in the peritoneal cavity reported here, the lack of signaling will lead the cytotrophoblast to develop into a villous chorionic placenta, similar to that observed in human.

  10. Human-environment interactions and sustainable urban development: Spatial modeling and landscape prediction the case of Nang Rong town, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnakovida, Pariwate

    It is now well-recognized that, at local, regional, and global scales, land use changes are significantly altering land cover, perhaps at an accelerating pace. Further, the world's scientific community is increasingly recognizing what, in retrospect, should have been obvious, that human behavior and agency is a critical driver of Land Cover and Land Use Change. In this research, using recently developed computer modeling procedures and a rich case study, I develop spatially-explicit model-based simulations of LULCC scenarios within the rubric of sustainability science for Nang Rong town, Thailand. The research draws heavily on recent work in geography and complexity theory. A series of scenarios were built to explore different development trajectories based upon empirically observed relationships. The development models incorporate a) history and spatial pattern of village settlement; b) road development and changing geographic accessibility; c) population; d) biophysical characteristics and e) social drivers. This research uses multi-temporal and spatially-explicit data, analytic results, and dynamic modeling approaches combined with to describe, explain, and explore LULCC as the consequences of different production theories for rural, small town urbanization in the South East Asian context. Two Agent Based models were built: 1) Settlement model and 2) Land-use model. The Settlement model suggests that new development will emerge along the existing road network especially along the major highway and in close proximity to the urban center. If the population doubles in 2021, the settlement process may inhibit development along some corridors creating low density sprawl. The Land-use model under the urban expansion scenario suggests that new settlements will occur in close proximity to the town center and roads; even though, the area is suitable for rice farming or located on a flood plain. The Land-use model under the cash-crop expansion scenario captures that new

  11. Attachment and proliferation of human osteoblast-like cells on guided bone regeneration (GBR) membranes in the absence or presence of nicotine: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Konstantinos A; Markopoulou, Cleopatra E; Gioni, Vassiliki; Mamalis, Anastasios A; Vayouraki, Helen N; Kletsas, Dimitris; Vrotsos, Ioannis A

    2011-01-01

    To compare in vitro the attachment and proliferation of human osteoblast-like cells (MG63) on tissue culture plates and guided bone regeneration (GBR) membranes in the absence or presence of nicotine. Membrane samples were fixed to wells and the cell number (CN) was counted after 24 hours (attachment assay) or 5 days (proliferation assay). The ratio of cell count (RCC) (CN at 5 days/CN at 24 hours) was calculated. The study had three parts: First, five different resorbable GBR membranes were compared (Resolut Adapt LT [RALT], Biocollagen [BC], Bio-Gide [BG], OsseoGuard [OG], and Demokritos Human Tissue Bank [DEM]). Next, cells were cultured on tissue culture plates with five different concentrations of nicotine. Finally, cells were cultured on the membrane that had demonstrated the highest RCC and CN in part 1 with four different concentrations of nicotine. At 24 hours, BG showed the highest CN and OG showed the lowest CN. At 5 days, BG showed the highest CN. The order of RCC was BG > OG > DEM > RALT ~ BC. At 24 hours, lower nicotine concentrations (0.3 and 3 μg/mL) showed higher CNs versus the control, whereas CNs for high nicotine concentrations (30 and 300 μg/mL) were lower than for the control. CN at 5 days and RCC were lowest with 300 μg/mL nicotine. At 24 hours and 5 days, all differences among wells with membrane were statistically insignificant. Nevertheless, CN at 5 days and RCC were highest with the lowest nicotine concentration (3 μg/mL) and lowest with high concentrations. Membrane materials influence attachment and proliferation of bone cells and, therefore, could affect the outcomes of GBR. On both tissue culture plates and membranes, there is a tendency toward a biphasic effect of nicotine, with stimulatory effects at low concentrations and inhibitory effects at high concentrations.

  12. A subset of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long-term non-progressors is characterized by the unique presence of ancestral sequences in the viral population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Gonzalo; Casado, Concepción; Sandonis, Virginia; Alonso-Nieto, Manuela; Vicario, José Luis; García, Soledad; Hernando, Victoria; Rodríguez, Carmen; del Romero, Jorge; López-Galíndez, Cecilio

    2005-02-01

    Within human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients, there are those who have been infected for more than 10 years with a CD4+ cell count of >500 cells microl(-1) and who remain asymptomatic without antiretroviral therapy; these patients are designated long-term non-progressors (LTNPs). In a set of 16 LTNPs, viral dating, DNA viral load, quasispecies heterogeneity and antibody (Ab) titres against gp160 and beta2 microglobulin (beta2m) were determined. Plasma viral RNA and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell numbers were estimated in more than three samples per patient. Host genetic characteristics, such as Delta32-CCR5 genotype and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype and supertypes, and clinical-epidemiological factors were evaluated. Dating of global populations and of DNA and RNA viral quasispecies identified two subsets of patients: one displaying only ancestral sequences and the other displaying predominantly modern sequences. The ancestral patients displayed a significant reduction in RNA and DNA viral loads, quasispecies heterogeneity, CD8+ cell number, anti-gp160 Ab titres and beta2m level, and they were also associated with better use of safe-sex practices and higher presence of the HLA sB58 supertype than the modern subset. Viral dating has therefore permitted the segregation of LTNPs into two subsets that show very different virological, immunological, host and clinical-epidemiological characteristics. Moreover, whereas the modern subset displayed low levels of virus replication, the ancestral group displayed not only a very limited virus replication, often to undetectable levels, but also very slow or arrested viral evolution, maintaining the close relationship of the viral population to the transmitted virus.

  13. Presence of nanosilica (E551) in commercial food products: TNF-mediated oxidative stress and altered cell cycle progression in human lung fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Alsaif, Mohammed A; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman A; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2014-04-01

    Silica (E551) is commonly used as an anti-caking agent in food products. The morphology and the dimension of the added silica particles are not, however, usually stated on the food product label. The food industry has adapted nanotechnology using engineered nanoparticles to improve the quality of their products. However, there has been increased debate regarding the health and safety concerns related to the use of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products. In this study, we investigated the morphology and dimensions of silica (E551) particles in food. The silica content of commercial food products was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The result indicates that 2.74-14. 45 μg/g silica was found in commercial food products; however, the daily dietary intake in increase causes adverse effects on human health. E551 was isolated from food products and the morphology, particle size, crystalline nature, and purity of the silica particles were analyzed using XRD, FTIR, TEM, EDX and DLS. The results of these analyses confirmed the presence of spherical silica nanoparticles (of amorphous nature) in food, approximately 10-50 nm in size. The effects of E551 on human lung fibroblast cell viability, intracellular ROS levels, cell cycle phase, and the expression levels of metabolic stress-responsive genes (CAT, GSTA4, TNF, CYP1A, POR, SOD1, GSTM3, GPX1, and GSR1) were studied. The results suggest that E551 induces a dose-dependent cytotoxicity and changes in ROS levels and alters the gene expression and cell cycle. Treatment with a high concentration of E551 caused significant cytotoxic effects on WI-38 cells. These findings have implications for the use of these nanoparticles in the food industry.

  14. MoS2/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite for sensitive sensing of cysteamine in presence of uric acid in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekin, Fereshteh; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2017-04-01

    A hybrid nanocomposite of MoS 2 nanosheets and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was fabricated by a facile and effective method. The morphology and structure of the nanocomposite (MoS 2 -rGO) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The MoS 2 nanosheets were uniformly anchored on the rGO framework with strong adhesion. A glassy carbon electrode modified by drop-casting with MoS 2 -rGO was used for the electrochemical oxidation of cysteamine (CA) in the presence of uric acid (UA). Under optimum conditions, the anodic peak current of CA shows a linear relation with the CA concentration between 0.01 and 20μM with a detection limit of 7nM. The proposed electrochemical sensor was used for determination of CA in human plasma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Binding of fluphenazine with human serum albumin in the presence of rutin and quercetin: An evaluation of food-drug interaction by spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jiao-Jiao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xin; He, Ling-Ling; Guo, Xue-Yuan; Xu, Ming-Ling; Li, Qian-Yu; Gao, Bo; Dong, Bo-Yang

    2017-09-01

    The interactions between human serum albumin (HSA) and fluphenazine (FPZ) in the presence or absence of rutin or quercetin were studied by fluorescence, absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and molecular modeling. The results showed that the fluorescence quenching mechanism was static quenching by the formation of an HSA-FPZ complex. Entropy change (ΔS0 ) and enthalpy change (ΔH0 ) values were 68.42 J/(mol⋅K) and -4.637 kJ/mol, respectively, which indicated that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds played major roles in the acting forces. The interaction process was spontaneous because the Gibbs free energy change (ΔG0 ) values were negative. The results of competitive experiments demonstrated that FPZ was mainly located within HSA site I (sub-domain IIA). Molecular docking results were in agreement with the experimental conclusions of the thermodynamic parameters and competition experiments. Competitive binding to HSA between flavonoids and FPZ decreased the association constants and increased the binding distances of FPZ binding to HSA. The results of absorption, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, and CD spectra showed that the binding of FPZ to HSA caused conformational changes in HSA and simultaneous effects of FPZ and flavonoids induced further HSA conformational changes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Experimental Study on How Human Lung Surfactant Protein SP-B1-25 is Oxidized by Ozone in the Presence of Fe(II) and Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, A. J.; Enami, S.; Hoffmann, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    We will report the results of experiments on the chemical fate of the human lung surfactant protein SP-B1-25 upon exposure to gaseous ozone in realistic aqueous media simulating the conditions prevalent in epithelial lining fluids in polluted ambient air. Our experiments consist of exposing aqueous microjets containing SP-B1-25, the natural antioxidant ascorbic acid, and the Fe2+ carried by most atmospheric fine particulates, under mild acidic conditions, such as those created by the innate lung host defense response. Reactants and the products of such interactions are detected via online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We will show that ascorbic acid largely inhibits the ozonation of SP-B1-25 in the absence of Fe2+, leading to the formation of an ascorbic acid ozonide (Enami et al., PNAS 2008). In the presence of Fe2+, however, the ozonide decomposes into reactive intermediates that result in the partial oxidation of SP-B1-25, presumable affecting its function as surfactant. We infer that these experimental results establish a plausible causal link for the observed synergic adverse health effects of ambient ozone and fine particulates

  17. Single-strand breaks in the DNA of human cells exposed to visible light from phototherapy lamps in the presence and absence of bilirubin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, T; Reitan, J B; Kinn, G

    1990-11-01

    Clinical evidence indicates that phototherapy of hyperbilirubinaemia in newborn infants is a safe and efficient form of therapy. The short-term side effects are not serious and seem to be well controlled. There are few long-term follow-up studies of phototherapy-treated infants. Therefore one cannot completely exclude the possibility that side effects can be found in future studies. With this background we undertook the present study of possible genotoxic effects of phototherapy. Human cells of the established glioblastoma cell line TMG-1 were used. The cells were exposed to visible light in the presence of different concentrations of bilirubin or in the absence of bilirubin. DNA was unwound in alkaline solution and the induction of strand breaks was assayed by a method taking advantage of the fluorescence from the dye Hoechst 33258. Blue light induced single-strand breaks in the DNA of cells in culture in the absence of bilirubin. During irradiation of bilirubin solutions with blue and green phototherapy light, long-lived toxic photoproducts were formed under in vitro conditions. At high and clinically relevant bilirubin concentrations, the effects of blue and green light were relatively similar. At low concentrations, there was a smaller effect of green light as expected from the absorption spectrum of bilirubin. It remains to be seen whether the genotoxic effect observed in the present studies can occur in vivo.

  18. Investigation of low-level laser therapy potentiality on proliferation and differentiation of human osteoblast-like cells in the absence/presence of osteogenic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloise, Nora; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Minzioni, Paolo; Vercellino, Marco; Benedetti, Laura; De Angelis, Maria Gabriella Cusella; Imbriani, Marcello; Visai, Livia

    2013-12-01

    Several studies have shown that low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) has beneficial effects on bone regeneration. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro effects of LLLI on proliferation and differentiation of a human osteoblast-like cell line (Saos-2 cell line). Cultured cells were exposed to different doses of LLLI with a semiconductor diode laser (659 nm 10 mW power output). The effects of laser on proliferation were assessed daily up to seven days of culture in cells irradiated once or for three consecutive days with laser doses of 1 or 3 J/cm2. The obtained results showed that laser stimulation enhances the proliferation potential of Saos-2 cells without changing their telomerase pattern or morphological characteristics. The effects on cell differentiation were assessed after three consecutive laser irradiation treatments in the presence or absence of osteo-inductive factors on day 14. Enhanced secretion of proteins specific for differentiation toward bone as well as calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity were observed in irradiated cells cultured in a medium not supplemented with osteogenic factors. Taken together these findings indicate that laser treatment enhances the in vitro proliferation of Saos-2 cells, and also influences their osteogenic maturation, which suggest it is a helpful application for bone tissue regeneration.

  19. EVALUATION OF SETTING TIME OF MINERAL TRIOXIDE AGGREGATE AND BIODENTINE IN THE PRESENCE OF HUMAN BLOOD AND MINIMAL ESSENTIAL MEDIA - AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopi Krishna Reddy Moosani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to compare the ability of MTA and Biodentine to set in the presence of human blood and minimal essential media. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighty 1 x 3 inches plexi glass sheets were taken. In each sheet, 10 wells were created and divided into 10 groups. Odd number groups were filled with MTA and even groups were filled with Biodentine. Within these groups 4 groups were control groups and the remaining 6 groups were experimental groups (i.e., blood, minimal essential media, blood and minimal essential media. Each block was submerged for 4, 5, 6, 8, 24, 36, and 48 hours in an experimental liquid at 370C with 100% humidity. RESULTS The setting times varied for the 2 materials, with contrasting differences in the setting times between MTA and Biodentine samples. Majority of the MTA samples did not set until 24 hrs. but at 36 hours all the samples of MTA are set. While for Biodentine samples, all of them had set by 6 hours. There is a significant difference in setting time between MTA and Biodentine. CONCLUSION This outcome draws into question the proposed setting time given by each respective manufacturer. Furthermore, despite Biodentine being marketed as a direct competitor to MTA with superior handling properties, MTA consistently set at a faster rate under the conditions of this study.

  20. Assessment of the incidence of squamous cell papilloma of the esophagus and the presence of high-risk human papilloma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantham, Ganesh; Ganesan, Santhi; Einstadter, Douglas; Jin, Ge; Weinberg, Aaron; Fass, Ronnie

    2017-01-01

    There has been a recent increase in the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) associated with high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. We investigated the incidence of esophageal papilloma and the presence of high-risk HPV infection. This is a cross-sectional study conducted at a County teaching hospital. Patients with esophageal papilloma between January 2000 and December 2013 were identified. Patients with sufficient specimens were tested for the HPV virus. Sixty patients with esophageal papilloma lesions were identified from 2000 to 2013. (31 males, age 51 ± 13 years). The incidence was 0.13% in 2000 and increased to 0.57% in 2013 (P papilloma that was more than 5 mm in size, and 20% had multiple lesions. The papilloma was located in the distal esophagus in 35 (58.3%) patients, mid esophagus in 17 (28.3%) patients, and proximal in 8 (13.3%) patients. Three (5%) patients had associated OPC, and 9 (47.4%) of the 19 patients tested were positive for high-risk HPV serotype 16. The incidence of esophageal papilloma has increased by fourfolds over the past 14 years. About half of the tested patients demonstrated high risk HPV. This may suggest a potential growing risk for esophageal squamous cell cancer in the future. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  1. Analyzing the Concept of Planetary Boundaries from a Strategic Sustainability Perspective: How Does Humanity Avoid Tipping the Planet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Henrik Robèrt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an approach for global sustainability, the planetary-boundary approach (PBA, has been proposed, which combines the concept of tipping points with global-scale sustainability indicators. The PBA could represent a significant step forward in monitoring and managing known and suspected global sustainability criteria. However, as the authors of the PBA describe, the approach faces numerous and fundamental challenges that must be addressed, including successful identification of key global sustainability metrics and their tipping points, as well as the coordination of systemic individual and institutional actions that are required to address the sustainability challenges highlighted. We apply a previously published framework for systematic and strategic development toward a robust basic definition of sustainability, i.e., the framework for strategic sustainable development (FSSD, to improve and inform the PBA. The FSSD includes basic principles for sustainability, and logical guidelines for how to approach their fulfillment. It is aimed at preventing unsustainable behavior at both the micro, e.g., individual firm, and macro, i.e., global, levels, even when specific global sustainability symptoms and metrics are not yet well understood or even known. Whereas the PBA seeks to estimate how far the biosphere can be driven away from a "normal" or "natural" state before tipping points are reached, because of ongoing violations of basic sustainability principles, the FSSD allows for individual planners to move systematically toward sustainability before all impacts from not doing so, or their respective tipping points, are known. Critical weaknesses in the PBA can, thus, be overcome by a combined approach, significantly increasing both the applicability and efficacy of the PBA, as well as informing strategies developed in line with the FSSD, e.g., by providing a "global warning system" to help prioritize strategic actions highlighted by the FSSD

  2. Sustainability: A Crucial Quest for Humanity - Welcome to a New Open Access Journal for a Growing Multidisciplinary Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Rosen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability, although often hard to define precisely, is a rapidly growing area of study that is becoming increasingly applied in diverse areas. The definition put forth in 1983 by the World Commission on Environment and Development, informally known as the Brundtland Commission, captures many aspects of the topic. That commission defined sustainable development as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” Other attempts have been made to define what we mean when we refer to sustainability or strive to achieve it as an objective. Despite the differences in definitions, a key theme that emerges is that sustainability is a concept that needs to be incorporated in many if not all of the activities that people undertake. [...

  3. Adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors mediate efficient and sustained transduction of cultured mouse and human dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J; Ginn, S L; Weinberger, R P; Trahair, T N; Smythe, J A; Alexander, I E

    2001-01-01

    Peripheral nervous system (PNS) sensory neurons are directly involved in the pathophysiology of numerous inherited and acquired neurological conditions. Therefore, efficient and stable gene delivery to these postmitotic cells has significant therapeutic potential. Among contemporary vector systems capable of neuronal transduction, only those based on herpes simplex virus have been extensively evaluated in PNS neurons. We therefore investigated the transduction performance of recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) and VSV-G-pseudotyped lentivirus vectors derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in newborn mouse and fetal human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. In dissociated mouse DRG cultures both vectors achieved efficient transduction of sensory neurons at low multiplicities of infection (MOIs) and sustained transgene expression within a 28-day culture period. Interestingly, the lentivirus vector selectively transduced neurons in murine cultures, in contrast to human cultures, in which Schwann and fibroblast-like cells were also transduced. Recombinant AAV transduced all three cell types in both mouse and human cultures. After direct microinjection of murine DRG explants, maximal transduction efficiencies of 20 and 200 transducing units per neuronal transductant were achieved with AAV and lentivirus vectors, respectively. Most importantly, both vectors achieved efficient and sustained transduction of human sensory neurons in dissociated cultures, thereby directly demonstrating the exciting potential of these vectors for gene therapy applications in the PNS.

  4. Sustainable Food & Sustainable Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Mavis Dora

    2012-01-01

    Cuba today is immersed in a very intense process of perfecting its agricultural production structures with the goal of making them more efficient and sustainable in their economic administration and in their social and environmental management. Agricultural cooperatives in Cuba have the responsibility of producing on 73% of the country's farmland. Their contributions are decisive to developing agricultural production and to ensuring more and better food for the population, in addition to redu...

  5. eSIP-Saúde: Mozambique's novel approach for a sustainable human resources for health information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Keith P; Mazivila, Moises Ernesto; Dgedge, Martinho; Necochea, Edgar; Manharlal, Devan; Zuber, Alexandra; de Faria Leão, Beatriz; Bossemeyer, Debora; Vergara, Alfredo E

    2016-11-05

    Over the past decade, governments and international partners have responded to calls for health workforce data with ambitious investments in human resources information systems (HRIS). However, documentation of country experiences in the use of HRIS to improve strategic planning and management has been lacking. The purpose of this case presentation is to document for the first time Mozambique's novel approach to HRIS, sharing key success factors and contributing to the scant global knowledge base on HRIS. Core components of the system are a Government of Mozambique (GOM) registry covering all workers in the GOM payroll and a "health extension" which adds health-sector-specific data to the GOM registry. Separate databases for pre-service and in-service training are integrated through a business intelligence tool. The first aim of the HRIS was to identify the following: who and where are Mozambique's health workers? As of July 2015, 95 % of countrywide health workforce deployment information was populated in the HRIS, allowing the identification of health professionals' physical working location and their pay point. HRIS data are also used to quantify chronic issues affecting the Ministry of Health (MOH) health workforce. Examples include the following: HRIS information was used to examine the deployment of nurses trained in antiretroviral therapy (ART) vis-à-vis the health facilities where ART is being provided. Such results help the MOH align specialized skill sets with service provision. Twenty-five percent of the MOH health workforce had passed the 2-year probation period but had not been updated in the MOH information systems. For future monitoring of employee status, the MOH established a system of alerts in semi-monthly reports. As of August 2014, 1046 health workers were receiving their full salary but no longer working at the facilities. The MOH is now analyzing this situation to improve the retirement process and coordination with Social Security. The

  6. Sustainability needs the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Nancy; van der Pluijm, Ben

    2012-10-01

    Science, Innovation, and Partnerships for Sustainable Solutions: A National Academies Symposium; Washington, D. C., 16-18 May 2012 It is no longer disputed that humanity has drastically changed the face of the planet and its life-support systems. The sustainability challenge is to meet people's needs today and in the future while sustaining life-support systems. This grand challenge demands a new scientific approach: use-inspired, solution-driven research that consciously links scientific research to societal decision-making and action. Sustainability science may help fulfill that need if it can engage communities of expertise across a wide range of disciplines and sectors, including the geosciences.

  7. Defining the inflammatory signature of human lung explant tissue in the presence and absence of glucocorticoid [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy L Rimington

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Airway inflammation is a feature of many respiratory diseases and there is a need for newer, more effective anti-inflammatory compounds. The aim of this study was to develop an ex vivo human lung explant model which can be used to help study the mechanisms underlying inflammatory responses and which can provide a tool to aid drug discovery for inflammatory respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD. Method: Parenchymal lung tissue from 6 individual donors was dissected and cultured with two pro-inflammatory stimuli, lipopolysaccharide (LPS (1 µg/ml and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β (10 ng/ml in the presence or absence of dexamethasone (1 µM.  Inflammatory responses were assessed using Luminex analysis of tissue culture supernatants to measure levels of 21 chemokines, growth factors and cytokines. Results: A robust and reproducible inflammatory signal was detected across all donors for 12 of the analytes measured following LPS stimulation with a modest fold increase (4-fold in CCL3, CCL4, GM-CSF, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-1β.  The inflammatory signal induced by IL-1β stimulation was less than that observed with LPS but resulted in elevated levels of 7 analytes (CXCL8, CCL3, CCL4, GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α.  The inflammatory responses induced by both stimulations was supressed by dexamethasone for the majority of analytes. Conclusions: These data provide proof of concept that this ex vivo human lung explant model is responsive to inflammatory signals and could be used to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of existing and novel compounds.  In addition this model could be used to help define the mechanisms and pathways involved in development of inflammatory airway disease. Abbreviations: COPD: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; ICS: inhaled corticosteroids; LPS: lipopolysaccharide; IL-1β: interleukin-1 beta; PSF: penicillin, streptomycin and fungizone

  8. DC-SIGN and L-SIGN Are Attachment Factors That Promote Infection of Target Cells by Human Metapneumovirus in the Presence or Absence of Cellular Glycosaminoglycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Leah; Gerstenberg, Kathleen; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Parsons, Matthew S.; Farrukee, Rubaiyea; Krabbe, Mark; Spann, Kirsten; Brooks, Andrew G.; Londrigan, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is well established that glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) function as attachment factors for human metapneumovirus (HMPV), concentrating virions at the cell surface to promote interaction with other receptors for virus entry and infection. There is increasing evidence to suggest that multiple receptors may exhibit the capacity to promote infectious entry of HMPV into host cells; however, definitive identification of specific transmembrane receptors for HMPV attachment and entry is complicated by the widespread expression of cell surface GAGs. pgsA745 Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are deficient in the expression of cell surface GAGs and resistant to HMPV infection. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of the Ca2+-dependent C-type lectin receptor (CLR) DC-SIGN (CD209L) or L-SIGN (CD209L) rendered pgsA745 cells permissive to HMPV infection. Unlike infection of parental CHO cells, HMPV infection of pgsA745 cells expressing DC-SIGN or L-SIGN was dynamin dependent and inhibited by mannan but not by pretreatment with bacterial heparinase. Parental CHO cells expressing DC-SIGN/L-SIGN also showed enhanced susceptibility to dynamin-dependent HMPV infection, confirming that CLRs can promote HMPV infection in the presence or absence of GAGs. Comparison of pgsA745 cells expressing wild-type and endocytosis-defective mutants of DC-SIGN/L-SIGN indicated that the endocytic function of CLRs was not essential but could contribute to HMPV infection of GAG-deficient cells. Together, these studies confirm a role for CLRs as attachment factors and entry receptors for HMPV infection. Moreover, they define an experimental system that can be exploited to identify transmembrane receptors and entry pathways where permissivity to HMPV infection can be rescued following the expression of a single cell surface receptor. IMPORTANCE On the surface of CHO cells, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) function as the major attachment factor for human metapneumoviruses (HMPV), promoting dynamin

  9. Presence of E6 and E7 mRNA from human papillomavirus types 16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 in the majority of cervical carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Irene; Molden, Tor; Holm, Ruth; Lie, A Kathrine; Karlsen, Frank; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Skomedal, Hanne

    2006-04-01

    The oncogenic potential of the human papillomavirus (HPV) early genes E6 and E7 is well established and a source of interest with regard to HPV testing for cervical carcinoma. Here we present a study performed with 204 histologically confirmed invasive cervical squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in which we evaluated the HPV E6 and E7 mRNA detection assay PreTect HPV-Proofer for detection of high-risk HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, and 45. For further evaluation, detection of E6 and E7 mRNA from HPV types 35, 52, and 58 by real-time multiplex nucleic acid sequence-based amplification was also included. For comparison and to assess the overall prevalence of various HPV types, samples were also tested for HPV DNA by both consensus and type-specific PCR, reverse line blotting, sequencing, and in situ hybridization. The overall prevalence of HPV was 97%. HPV E6 and E7 transcripts were detected in 188 of 204 (92%) biopsy specimens, of which 181 contained one of the following HPV types: 16, 18, 31, 33, or 45. Consensus PCR and type-specific PCR detected HPV in 187 of 204 and 188 of 204 (92%) specimens, respectively. In conclusion, this study verifies the presence of HPV E6 and E7 mRNA in SCCs and demonstrates that HPV infections among Norwegian women with SCCs are limited mainly to the five high-risk types, 16, 18, 31, 33, and 45. This, together with the fact that PreTect HPV-Proofer detects the HPV oncogenic transcripts, suggests that the assay is a valuable approach in the field of HPV detection in cervical carcinoma.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopic characterization of the diferric-peroxo intermediate of human deoxyhypusine hydroxylase in the presence of its substrate eIF5a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasniewski, Andrew J; Engstrom, Lisa M; Vu, Van V; Park, Myung Hee; Que, Lawrence

    2016-09-01

    Human deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (hDOHH) is an enzyme that is involved in the critical post-translational modification of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). Following the conversion of a lysine residue on eIF5A to deoxyhypusine (Dhp) by deoxyhypusine synthase, hDOHH hydroxylates Dhp to yield the unusual amino acid residue hypusine (Hpu), a modification that is essential for eIF5A to promote peptide synthesis at the ribosome, among other functions. Purification of hDOHH overexpressed in E. coli affords enzyme that is blue in color, a feature that has been associated with the presence of a peroxo-bridged diiron(III) active site. To gain further insight into the nature of the diiron site and how it may change as hDOHH goes through the catalytic cycle, we have conducted X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of hDOHH on five samples that represent different species along its reaction pathway. Structural analysis of each species has been carried out, starting with the reduced diferrous state, proceeding through its O2 adduct, and ending with a diferric decay product. Our results show that the Fe⋯Fe distances found for the five samples fall within a narrow range of 3.4-3.5 Å, suggesting that hDOHH has a fairly constrained active site. This pattern differs significantly from what has been associated with canonical dioxygen activating nonheme diiron enzymes, such as soluble methane monooxygenase and Class 1A ribonucleotide reductases, for which the Fe⋯Fe distance can change by as much as 1 Å during the redox cycle. These results suggest that the O2 activation mechanism for hDOHH deviates somewhat from that associated with the canonical nonheme diiron enzymes, opening the door to new mechanistic possibilities for this intriguing family of enzymes.

  11. Beneficial Effects of a Dietary Weight Loss Intervention on Human Gut Microbiome Diversity and Metabolism Are Not Sustained during Weight Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Fangmann, Daniela; Müller, Nike; Schulte, Dominik M; Rühlemann, Malte C; Türk, Kathrin; Settgast, Ute; Lieb, Wolfgang; Baines, John F; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Laudes, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of a very low-calorie diet(VLCD)-based obesity program on human gut microbiome diversity and metabolism during weight loss and weight maintenance. Obese subjects underwent 3 months of VLCD followed by 3 months of weight maintenance. A lean and an obese control group were included. The microbiome was characterized by performing high-throughput dual-indexed 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing. At baseline, a significant difference in the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio between the lean and obese individuals was observed (p = 0.047). The VLCD resulted in significant alterations in gut microbiome diversity from baseline to 3 months (p = 0.0053). Acinetobacter represented an indicator species for the observed effect (indicator value = 0.998, p = 0.006). Metabolic analyses revealed alterations of the bacterial riboflavin pathway from baseline to 3 months (pnom = 0.0078). These changes in diversity and bacterial metabolism induced by VLCD diminished during the weight maintenance phase, despite sustained reductions in body weight and sustained improvements of insulin sensitivity. The present data show that a VLCD is able to beneficially alter both gut microbiome diversity and metabolism in obese humans, but that these changes are not sustained during weight maintenance. This finding might suggest that the microbiome should be targeted during obesity programs. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  12. Accounting for Human Health and Ecosystems Quality in Developing Sustainable Energy Products: The Implications of Wood Biomass-based Electricity Strategies to Climate Change Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldu, Yemane W.

    The prospect for transitions and transformations in the energy sector to mitigate climate change raises concerns that actions should not shift the impacts from one impact category to another, or from one sustainability domain to another. Although the development of renewables mostly results in low environmental impacts, energy strategies are complex and may result in the shifting of impacts. Strategies to climate change mitigation could have potentially large effects on human health and ecosystems. Exposure to air pollution claimed the lives of about seven million people worldwide in 2010, largely from the combustion of solid fuels. The degradation of ecosystem services is a significant barrier to achieving millennium development goals. This thesis quantifies the biomass resources potential for Alberta; presents a user-friendly and sector-specific framework for sustainability assessment; unlocks the information and policy barriers to biomass integration in energy strategy; introduces new perspectives to improve understanding of the life cycle human health and ecotoxicological effects of energy strategies; provides insight regarding the guiding measures that are required to ensure sustainable bioenergy production; validates the utility of the Environmental Life Cycle Cost framework for economic sustainability assessment; and provides policy-relevant societal cost estimates to demonstrate the importance of accounting for human health and ecosystem externalities in energy planning. Alberta is endowed with a wealth of forest and agricultural biomass resources, estimated at 458 PJ of energy. Biomass has the potential to avoid 11-15% of GHG emissions and substitute 14-17% of final energy demand by 2030. The drivers for integrating bioenergy sources into Alberta's energy strategy are economic diversification, technological innovation, and resource conservation policy objectives. Bioenergy pathways significantly improved both human health and ecosystem quality from coal

  13. ICT innovations for sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Aebischer, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    ICT Innovations for Sustainability is an investigation of how information and communication technology can contribute to sustainable development. It presents clear definitions of sustainability, suggesting conceptual frameworks for the positive and negative effects of ICT on sustainable development. It reviews methods of assessing the direct and indirect impact of ICT systems on energy and materials demand, and examines the results of such assessments. In addition, it investigates ICT-based approaches to supporting sustainable patterns of production and consumption, analyzing them at various levels of abstraction – from end-user devices, Internet infrastructure, user behavior, and social practices to macro-economic indicators.   Combining approaches from Computer Science, Information Systems, Human-Computer Interaction, Economics, and Environmental Sciences, the book presents a new, holistic perspective on ICT for Sustainability (ICT4S). It is an indispensable resource for anyone working in the area of ICT...

  14. 21 CFR 201.20 - Declaration of presence of FD&C Yellow No. 5 and/or FD&C Yellow No. 6 in certain drugs for human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Declaration of presence of FD&C Yellow No. 5 and/or FD&C Yellow No. 6 in certain drugs for human use. 201.20 Section 201.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... General Labeling Provisions § 201.20 Declaration of presence of FD&C Yellow No. 5 and/or FD&C Yellow No. 6...

  15. Effect of sustained-release isosorbide dinitrate on post-prandial gastric emptying and gastroduodenal motility in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J L; Rasmussen, S L; Linnet, J

    2004-01-01

    and gastroduodenal motility after a meal. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Each subject ingested 40 mg isosorbide dinitrate orally as a sustained-release formulation or oral placebo, in random order. Gastric emptying and gastroduodenal motility were...

  16. Creating an Online Presence for Hybrid Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerke, Darin; Mosterd, Eric

    2017-01-01

    This chapter explores the web presence needed for instructors, students, administrators, and staff as hybrid courses are implemented at the institutional level and discusses the physical presence (office(s) and staff) needed to effectively provide and sustain online support for hybrid education.

  17. The macroecology of sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joseph R.; Allen, Craig D.; Brown, James H.; Burnside, William R.; Davidson, Ana D.; Fristoe, Trevor S.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; Mercado-Silva, Norman; Nekola, Jeffrey C.; Okie, Jordan G.; Zuo, Wenyun

    2012-01-01

    The discipline of sustainability science has emerged in response to concerns of natural and social scientists, policymakers, and lay people about whether the Earth can continue to support human population growth and economic prosperity. Yet, sustainability science has developed largely independently from and with little reference to key ecological principles that govern life on Earth. A macroecological perspective highlights three principles that should be integral to sustainability science: 1) physical conservation laws govern the flows of energy and materials between human systems and the environment, 2) smaller systems are connected by these flows to larger systems in which they are embedded, and 3) global constraints ultimately limit flows at smaller scales. Over the past few decades, decreasing per capita rates of consumption of petroleum, phosphate, agricultural land, fresh water, fish, and wood indicate that the growing human population has surpassed the capacity of the Earth to supply enough of these essential resources to sustain even the current population and level of socioeconomic development.

  18. The macroecology of sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joseph R; Allen, Craig D; Brown, James H; Burnside, William R; Davidson, Ana D; Fristoe, Trevor S; Hamilton, Marcus J; Mercado-Silva, Norman; Nekola, Jeffrey C; Okie, Jordan G; Zuo, Wenyun

    2012-01-01

    The discipline of sustainability science has emerged in response to concerns of natural and social scientists, policymakers, and lay people about whether the Earth can continue to support human population growth and economic prosperity. Yet, sustainability science has developed largely independently from and with little reference to key ecological principles that govern life on Earth. A macroecological perspective highlights three principles that should be integral to sustainability science: 1) physical conservation laws govern the flows of energy and materials between human systems and the environment, 2) smaller systems are connected by these flows to larger systems in which they are embedded, and 3) global constraints ultimately limit flows at smaller scales. Over the past few decades, decreasing per capita rates of consumption of petroleum, phosphate, agricultural land, fresh water, fish, and wood indicate that the growing human population has surpassed the capacity of the Earth to supply enough of these essential resources to sustain even the current population and level of socioeconomic development.

  19. Human resources for health strategies adopted by providers in resource-limited settings to sustain long-term delivery of ART: a mixed-methods study from Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakumumpa, Henry; Taiwo, Modupe Oladunni; Muganzi, Alex; Ssengooba, Freddie

    2016-10-19

    Human resources for health (HRH) constraints are a major barrier to the sustainability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale-up programs in Sub-Saharan Africa. Many prior approaches to HRH constraints have taken a top-down trend of generalized global strategies and policy guidelines. The objective of the study was to examine the human resources for health strategies adopted by front-line providers in Uganda to sustain ART delivery beyond the initial ART scale-up phase between 2004 and 2009. A two-phase mixed-methods approach was adopted. In the first phase, a survey of a nationally representative sample of health facilities (n = 195) across Uganda was conducted. The second phase involved in-depth interviews (n = 36) with ART clinic managers and staff of 6 of the 195 health facilities purposively selected from the first study phase. Quantitative data was analysed based on descriptive statistics, and qualitative data was analysed by coding and thematic analysis. The identified strategies were categorized into five themes: (1) providing monetary and non-monetary incentives to health workers on busy ART clinic days; (2) workload reduction through spacing ART clinic appointments; (3) adopting training workshops in ART management as a motivation strategy for health workers; (4) adopting non-physician-centred staffing models; and (5) devising ART program leadership styles that enhanced health worker commitment. Facility-level strategies for responding to HRH constraints are feasible and can contribute to efforts to increase country ownership of HIV programs in resource-limited settings. Consideration of the human resources for health strategies identified in the study by ART program planners and managers could enhance the long-term sustainment of ART programs by providers in resource-limited settings.

  20. Provision of Human Capital by Business Schools of Pakistan: A Need for the Sustainability of the Pakistani Banking Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauman, Sarwat; Hussain, Nasreen

    2017-01-01

    Economic growth of Pakistan through the banking sector relies heavily on the human capital dispensed to them by the Pakistani business schools. A conceptual model of the continuous improvement cycle for building human capital is developed through a literature review, with the aim of helping to generate human capital. Six semistructured interviews…

  1. Noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y contribute to initial, but not sustained, vasodilatation in response to local skin warming in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Gary J; Sparks, Paul A

    2014-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Previous work has produced the counterintuitive finding that the vasoconstrictor neurotransmitters noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y are involved in vasodilatation. We aimed to discover whether sympathetic neurotransmitters are required for the sustained vasodilatation in response to local skin warming, as has been previously suggested, and to determine whether noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y are 'mediating' the sustained vasodilator response directly or acting to 'prime' (or kick-start) it. What is the main finding and its importance? We have found that noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y are required at the initiation of vasodilatation in response to local skin warming, if a complete vasodilator response is to be achieved; however, they are not required once vasodilatation has begun. In a three-part study, we examined whether noradrenaline, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were involved in the sustained vasodilatation in response to local skin warming. Forearm skin sites were instrumented with intradermal microdialysis fibres, local skin heaters and laser-Doppler flow probes. Local skin temperature (T(loc)) was increased from 34 to 42°C at a rate of 0.5°C (10 s)(-1). Laser-Doppler flow was expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler flow/mean arterial pressure). In part 1, three skin sites were prepared; two were treated with the study vehicle (lactated Ringer solution), while the third site was treated with yohimbine and propranolol to antagonize α- and β-receptors, and 10 min of baseline data were record at a T(loc) of 34°C. Receptor antagonism was confirmed via infusion of clonidine. The T(loc) was increased to 42°C at all sites. Once CVC had stabilized, site 2 was treated with yohimbine and propranolol to examine the effect of adrenergic receptor blockade on sustained vasodilatation of the skin. Receptor antagonism was again confirmed via infusion of clonidine

  2. Continuing to Build a Community Consensus on the Future of Human Space Flight: Report of the Fourth Community Workshop on Achievability and Sustainability of Human Exploration of Mars (AM IV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Baker, John; Beaty, David; Carberry, Chris; Craig, Mark; Davis, Richard M.; Drake, Bret G.; Cassady, Joseph; Hays, Lindsay; Hoffman, Stephen J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    To continue to build broadly based consensus on the future of human space exploration, the Fourth Community Workshop on Achievability and Sustainability of Human Exploration of Mars (AM IV), organized by Explore Mars, Inc. and the American Astronautical Society, was held at the Double Tree Inn in Monrovia, CA., December 68, 2016. Approximately 60 invited professionals from the industrial and commercial sectors, academia, and NASA, along with international colleagues, participated in the workshop. These individuals were chosen to be representative of the breadth of interests in astronaut and robotic Mars exploration.

  3. Sustainable agriculture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lichtfouse, Eric

    2009-01-01

    ... : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 9 Part I CLIMATE CHANGE Soils and Sustainable Agriculture: A Review : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : Rattan Lal 15 Soils and Food Sufficiency...

  4. Self-feedbacks determine the sustainability of human interventions in eco-social complex systems: Impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Several administrative polices have been implemented in order to reduce the negative impacts of fishing on natural ecosystems. Four eco-social models with different levels of complexity were constructed, which represent the seaweed harvest in central-northern Chile under two different regimes, Management and Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources (MAEBRs) and Open Access Areas (OAAs). The dynamics of both regimes were analyzed using the following theoretical frameworks: (1) Loop Analysis, which allows the local stability or sustainability of the models and scenarios to be assessed; and (2) Hessian´s optimization procedure of a global fishery function (GFF) that represents each dynamics of each harvest. The results suggest that the current fishing dynamics in MAEBRs are not sustainable unless the market demand presents some type of control (i.e. taxes). Further, the results indicated that if the demand changes to a self-negative feedback (self-control) in MAEBRs, the stability is increased and, simultaneously, a relative maximum for the GFF is reached. Contrarily, the sustainability of the model/system representing the harvest (principally by cutting plants) in OAAs is not reached. The implementation of an “ecological” tax for intensive artisanal fisheries with low operational cost is proposed. The network analysis developed here is proposed as a general strategy for studying the effects of human interventions in marine coastal ecosystems under transient (short-term) dynamics. PMID:28453548

  5. Self-feedbacks determine the sustainability of human interventions in eco-social complex systems: Impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Marco; Levins, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Several administrative polices have been implemented in order to reduce the negative impacts of fishing on natural ecosystems. Four eco-social models with different levels of complexity were constructed, which represent the seaweed harvest in central-northern Chile under two different regimes, Management and Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources (MAEBRs) and Open Access Areas (OAAs). The dynamics of both regimes were analyzed using the following theoretical frameworks: (1) Loop Analysis, which allows the local stability or sustainability of the models and scenarios to be assessed; and (2) Hessian´s optimization procedure of a global fishery function (GFF) that represents each dynamics of each harvest. The results suggest that the current fishing dynamics in MAEBRs are not sustainable unless the market demand presents some type of control (i.e. taxes). Further, the results indicated that if the demand changes to a self-negative feedback (self-control) in MAEBRs, the stability is increased and, simultaneously, a relative maximum for the GFF is reached. Contrarily, the sustainability of the model/system representing the harvest (principally by cutting plants) in OAAs is not reached. The implementation of an "ecological" tax for intensive artisanal fisheries with low operational cost is proposed. The network analysis developed here is proposed as a general strategy for studying the effects of human interventions in marine coastal ecosystems under transient (short-term) dynamics.

  6. Sustained-release effervescent floating matrix tablets of baclofen: development, optimization and in vitro-in vivo evaluation in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gande, S; Rao, Ym

    2011-01-01

    Baclofen, a centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxant, is indicated in the long-term treatment of spasticity. It is difficult to formulate baclofen sustained release dosage forms because its absorption on arrival to colon (or even before) is low or nonexistent. In the present investigation efforts were made to improve the bioavailability of baclofen by increasing the residence time of the drug through sustained-release matrix tablet formulation via gastroretentive mechanism. Tablets were prepared by wet granulation technique. The influence of gas generating and gel forming agents, amount of baclofen and total weight of tablet on physical properties, in vitro buoyancy, floating lag time, drug release, DSC, X-ray studies were investigated. The release mechanisms were explored and explained by applying zero order, first order, Higuchi and Korsmeyer equations. The selected formulations were subjected to stability study for the period of three months. For all formulations, kinetics of drug release from tablet followed Higuchi's square root of time kinetic treatment heralding diffusion as predominant mechanism of drug release. Formulations containing 20 mg and 40 mg (F-1 and F-7) showed similar release profiles. There was no significant change in the selected formulations, when subjected to accelerated stability conditions over a period of three months. X-ray imaging in six healthy human volunteers revealed a mean gastric retention period of 5.50±0.7 hrs for the selected formulation. Stable, sustained release effervescent floating matrix tablets of baclofen could be prepared by wet granulation technique.

  7. A diels-alder modulated approach to control and sustain the release of dexamethasone and induce osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Kenneth C.; Alge, Daniel L.; Anseth, Kristi S.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    We report a new approach to controlled drug release based upon exploiting the dynamic equilibrium that exists between Diels-Alder reactants and products, demonstrating the release of a furan containing dexamethasone peptide (dex-KGPQG-furan) from a maleimide containing hydrogel. Using a reaction-diffusion model, the release kinetics were tuned to achieve sustained concentrations conducive to osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Efficacy was first demonstrated in a 2D culture model, in which dexamethasone release induced significant increases in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineral deposition in hMSCs compared to a dexamethasone-free treatment. The results were similar to that observed with a soluble dexamethasone treatment. More dramatic differences were observed in 3D culture, where co-encapsulation of a dexamethasone releasing hydrogel depot within an hMSC-laden extracellular matrix mimetic poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel resulted in a local and robust osteogenic differentiation. ALP activity reached levels that were up to six times higher than the dexamethasone free treatment. Interestingly, at 5 and 10 day time points, the ALP activity exceeded the dexamethasone positive control, suggesting a potential benefit of sustained release in 3D culture. After 21 days, substantial mineralization comparable to the positive control was also observed in the hydrogels. Collectively, these results demonstrate Diels-Alder modulated release as an effective and versatile new platform for controlled drug delivery that may prove especially beneficial for sustaining the release of low molecular weight molecules in hydrogel systems. PMID:23465826

  8. Sustainable Marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, three different conceptions of sustainable marketing are discussed and compared. These different conceptions are referred to as social, green, and critical sustainable marketing. Social sustainable marketing follows the logic of demand-driven marketing management and places the

  9. Social Sciences and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available At the time when the journal Sustainability [1] was launched, as a chemist and a scientist, I started to believe that social sciences may be more important to make humans sustainable. The broad journal title Social Sciences presents the opportunity for all social science scholars to have integrated consideration regarding the sustainability of humanity, because I am sure that science and technology alone cannot help. Science and technology may have in fact been contributing to accelerate the depletion of nonrenewable natural resources and putting human sustainability at risk since the industrial revolution about 150 years ago. I hope all intellectuals studying anthropology, archaeology, administration, communication, criminology, economics, education, government, linguistics, international relations, politics, sociology and, in some contexts, geography, history, law, and psychology publish with us to seek a solution to sustain humanity. Sustainability itself will also be a main topic of the journal Social Sciences. In addition to this integrated forum for social sciences, more topic specific journals, such as the already publishing Societies [2], will be launched. [...

  10. Wicked Challenges in the Anthropocene Age: Supply Chain Implications of Sustainable Enterprise Excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Wu, Zhaohui

    Grand global challenges include wicked sustainability ones associated with human influences. Among these are climate change in relation to increased atmospheric presence of CO2 and methane, global warming and increasing intensity and incidence rates of extreme weather events, drought, and deserti...... of SEER2 and selected of its enablers – especially supply chain proficiency – in addressing intersections of selected wicked sustainability challenges are highlighted.......Grand global challenges include wicked sustainability ones associated with human influences. Among these are climate change in relation to increased atmospheric presence of CO2 and methane, global warming and increasing intensity and incidence rates of extreme weather events, drought......, and desertification; food availability and distribution; water pollution, air pollution, and soil contamination; and the connection of these to disease, violence, and terrorism. Wicked challenge traits are discussed in relation to enterprise excellence, sustainability, resilience and robustness (SEER2). The value...

  11. Sustainable built environments

    CERN Document Server

    Haase, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable design is a collective process whereby the built environment achieves unprecedented levels of ecological balance through new and retrofit construction, with the goal of long-term viability and humanization of architecture. Focusing on the environmental context, sustainable design merges the natural, minimum resource conditioning solutions of the past (daylight, solar heat, and natural ventilation) with the innovative technologies of the present.  The desired result is an integrated “intelligent” system that supports individual control with expert negotiation for resource consciousness. International experts in the field address the fundamental questions of sustainable design and landscape management: How should the sustainability of landscapes and buildings be evaluated? Which targets have to be set and which thresholds should not be exceeded? What forms of planning and governance structures exist and to what extent do they further the goals of sustainability?  Gathering 30 peer-reviewed ent...

  12. Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Caporali

    Full Text Available In the framework of the 16th National Meeting of the Italian Ecological Society (“Global Change, Ecological Diversity and Sustainability”, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, 19-22 September 2006, a symposium was devoted to “Agroecology and Sustainable Development”. A major goal of this symposium was to contribute to keeping the dialogue among the experts of the various disciplines alive. Sustainability of agriculture is a challenge for society world wide. Universities and society as a whole have a responsibility in re-examining current perception of nature, of the world and of human society in the light of natural resources depletion, increasing pollution and social inequalities. The urgency to address sustainability issues is increasingly being reflected in the manner in which institutions of higher education around the world are giving priority to the teaching, research and practice of sustainability. The University of Tuscia is involved in international initiatives concerning teaching and research in Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture.

  13. Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Caporali

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the 16th National Meeting of the Italian Ecological Society (“Global Change, Ecological Diversity and Sustainability”, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, 19-22 September 2006, a symposium was devoted to “Agroecology and Sustainable Development”. A major goal of this symposium was to contribute to keeping the dialogue among the experts of the various disciplines alive. Sustainability of agriculture is a challenge for society world wide. Universities and society as a whole have a responsibility in re-examining current perception of nature, of the world and of human society in the light of natural resources depletion, increasing pollution and social inequalities. The urgency to address sustainability issues is increasingly being reflected in the manner in which institutions of higher education around the world are giving priority to the teaching, research and practice of sustainability. The University of Tuscia is involved in international initiatives concerning teaching and research in Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture.

  14. Sovereignty, individuality, and sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cairns Jr.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Humans must acknowledge that the biosphere is the essential support for all living organisms. In order to achieve sustainable use of the planet, humans must proceed beyond egocentrism, ethnocentrism, homocentrism, and biocentrism to ecocentrism. National states, with present policies, are a major obstacle to sustainable use of the planet. However, there is some evidence that the individual has increasing sovereignty at the expense of both nation states and the environment. Still, the primary obstacle to sustainability is inherent in the present system of sovereign nation states. The basic question is how much sovereignty must nation-states and individuals relinquish to preserve the health of Earth's biospheric life support system. A free and open exchange of thoughts on this subject is long overdue. To acheive sustainable use of the planet, humankind must view its identity within the context of the interdependent web of life.

  15. Safety, tolerability and sustained weight loss over 2 years with the once-daily human GLP-1 analog, liraglutide

    OpenAIRE

    Astrup, A; Carraro, R; Finer, N; Harper, A; Kunesova, M; Lean, M E J; Niskanen, L; Rasmussen, M F; Rissanen, A; Rössner, S; Savolainen, M J; Van Gaal, L

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Having demonstrated short-term weight loss with liraglutide in this group of obese adults, we now evaluate safety/tolerability (primary outcome) and long-term efficacy for sustaining weight loss (secondary outcome) over 2 years. Design: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 20-week study with 2-year extension (sponsor unblinded at 20 weeks, participants/investigators at 1 year) in 19 European clinical research centers. Subjects: A total of 564 adults (n=90–98 per group; bo...

  16. Sustainable Enterprise Excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Williams, Joseph; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær

    Sustainable Enterprise Excellence balances complementary and competing interests of key stakeholder segments, including society and the natural environment and increases the likelihood of superior and sustainable competitive positioning and hence long-term enterprise success that is defined...... by continuously relevant and responsible governance, strategy, actions and performance consistent with high-level organizational resilience, robustness and resplendence (R3). This is accomplished through organizational design and function emphasizing innovation, enterprise intelligence & analytics, operational......, supply chain, customer-related, human capital, financial, marketplace, societal, and environmental performance. Sustainable Enterprise Excellence integrates ethical, efficient and effective (E3) enterprise governance with 3E (equity, ecology, economy) Triple Top Line strategy throughout enterprise...

  17. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison) with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison) caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been shown to augment infection with P....... aeruginosa in mice and to promote adhesion of P. aeruginosa to human respiratory cells. Findings We tested 50 lung specimens from mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia for bovine RSV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for human RSV by a commercial real-time PCR. RSV was not found...

  18. VENOUS AIR-EMBOLISM, PRESERVATION REPERFUSION INJURY, AND THE PRESENCE OF INTRAVASCULAR AIR COLLECTIONS IN HUMAN DONOR LIVERS - A RETROSPECTIVE CLINICAL-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; SLUITER, WJ; BALLAST, A; VANDAM, RM; SLOOFF, MJH

    In human liver transplantation, air embolism is seldom encountered after graft reperfusion. Nevertheless, despite adequate flushing and clamping routines, air emboli have been reported in transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) studies performed during the reperfusion phase, We retrospectively

  19. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomonsen Charlotte M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV has been shown to augment infection with P. aeruginosa in mice and to promote adhesion of P. aeruginosa to human respiratory cells. Findings We tested 50 lung specimens from mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia for bovine RSV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR and for human RSV by a commercial real-time PCR. RSV was not found. Conclusions This study indicates that human and bovine RSV is not a major co-factor for development of hemorrhagic pneumonia in Danish mink.

  20. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison) with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte M; Breum, Solvej Ø; Larsen, Lars E; Jakobsen, Jeanette; Høiby, Niels; Hammer, Anne S

    2012-11-26

    Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison) caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been shown to augment infection with P. aeruginosa in mice and to promote adhesion of P. aeruginosa to human respiratory cells. We tested 50 lung specimens from mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia for bovine RSV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for human RSV by a commercial real-time PCR. RSV was not found. This study indicates that human and bovine RSV is not a major co-factor for development of hemorrhagic pneumonia in Danish mink.

  1. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development....... The tools have been applied in practice in collaboration with 11 small and medium sized companies (SMEs). The study investigates these approaches to further understand how design thinking can contribute to sustainable transition in a business context. The study and the findings are relevant to organizations...... invested in the issue of sustainable business development, in particular the leaders and employees of SMEs, but also to design education seeking new ways to consciously handle and teach the complexity inherent in sustainable transformation. Findings indicate that the SD design thinking approach contributes...

  2. Computational sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Kersting, Kristian; Morik, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The book at hand gives an overview of the state of the art research in Computational Sustainability as well as case studies of different application scenarios. This covers topics such as renewable energy supply, energy storage and e-mobility, efficiency in data centers and networks, sustainable food and water supply, sustainable health, industrial production and quality, etc. The book describes computational methods and possible application scenarios.

  3. Sustainable transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nicolai Bo

    This paper is about sustainable transformation with a particular focus on listed buildings. It is based on the notion that sustainability is not just a question of energy conditions, but also about the building being robust. Robust architecture means that the building can be maintained and rebuilt...... theoretical lenses. It is proposed that three parameters concerning the ꞌtransformabilityꞌ of the building can contribute to a more nuanced understanding of sustainable transformation: technical aspects, programmatic requirements and narrative value. It is proposed that the concept of ꞌsustainable...

  4. A new form of Filgrastim with sustained duration in vivo and enhanced ability to mobilize PBPC in both mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineux, G; Kinstler, O; Briddell, B; Hartley, C; McElroy, P; Kerzic, P; Sutherland, W; Stoney, G; Kern, B; Fletcher, F A; Cohen, A; Korach, E; Ulich, T; McNiece, I; Lockbaum, P; Miller-Messana, M A; Gardner, S; Hunt, T; Schwab, G

    1999-12-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has proven effective in the prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and as a mobilizer of peripheral blood progenitor cells. The longevity of G-CSF action is limited by its removal from the body by two mechanisms. The first is thought to be mediated via receptors (receptor mediated clearance [RMC]) predominantly on neutrophils, the second process is likely the result of renal clearance. With the intention of developing a novel form of Filgrastim (r-met HuG-CSF) with a sustained duration of action in vivo, a new derivative named SD/01 has been made by association of Filgrastim with poly(ethylene glycol). The desired properties of this new agent would include a prolonged duration of action sufficient to cover a complete single course of chemotherapy. SD/01 is shown here to sustain significantly elevated neutrophil counts in hematopoietically normal mice for 5 days. In neutropenic mice effects were noted for at least 9 days, accompanying a significant reduction in the duration of chemotherapy induced neutropenia. Normal human volunteers showed higher than baseline ANC for around 9 to 10 days after a single injection of SD/01. Data from these normal volunteers also indicate that mobilization of CD34+ cells and progenitors may occur in a more timely manner and to around the same absolute numbers as with repeated daily injections of unmodified Filgrastim. These data indicate that SD/01 represents an efficacious novel form of Filgrastim with actions sustained for between one and two weeks from a single injection.

  5. Sustained-release effervescent floating matrix tablets of baclofen: development, optimization and in vitro-in vivo evaluation in healthy human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YM Rao

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available "n  Background and the purpose of the study: Baclofen, a centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxant, is indicated in the long-term treatment of spasticity. It is difficult to formulate baclofen sustained release dosage forms because its absorption on arrival to colon (or even before is low or nonexistent. In the present investigation efforts were made to improve the bioavailability of baclofen by increasing the residence time of the drug through sustained-release matrix tablet formulation via gastroretentive mechanism. "n  Methods: Tablets were prepared by wet granulation technique. The influence of gas generating and gel forming agents, amount of baclofen and total weight of tablet on physical properties, in vitro buoyancy, floating lag time, drug release, DSC, X-ray studies were investigated. The release mechanisms were explored and explained by applying zero order, first order, Higuchi and Korsmeyer equations. The selected formulations were subjected to stability study for the period of three months. "n  Results: For all formulations, kinetics of drug release from tablet followed Higuchi's square root of time kinetic treatment heralding diffusion as predominant mechanism of drug release. Formulations containing 20 mg and 40 mg (F-1 and F-7 showed similar release profiles. There was no significant change in the selected formulations, when subjected to accelerated stability conditions over a period of three months. X-ray imaging in six healthy human volunteers revealed a mean gastric retention period of 5.50±0.7 hrs for the selected formulation. "n  Conclusion:Stable, sustained release effervescent floating matrix tablets of baclofen could be prepared by wet granulation technique.

  6. CYTOKINE PRODUCTION BY THE HUMAN BLADDER-CARCINOMA CELL-LINE T24 IN THE PRESENCE OF BACILLUS-CALMETTE-GUERIN (BCG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Reijke, T. M.; Vos, P. C.; de Boer, E. C.; Bevers, R. F.; de Muinck Keizer, W. H.; Kurth, K. H.; Schamhart, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    The study was initiated as an in vitro approach to the situation existing during intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) instillation in patients with superficial bladder cancer. Cytokine secretion of a human bladder carcinoma cell line T 24 treated with BCG was investigated. A 24-h treatment of

  7. Characterisation of Escherichia coli O157 isolates from Danish cattle and human patients by genotyping and presence and variants of virulence genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva Møller; Scheutz, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    of the cattle strains were compared to human clinical isolates from the same time period. All verocytotoxin (VT)-producing E. coli O157 (VTEC O157) from cattle possessed all typical VTEC O157:H7 virulence factors and had either the VT2c-variant alone or together with VT1. Among human isolates the dominant toxin...... gene and all other genotypic and phenotypic traits typical for E. coli O157:H7. On the basis of the virulence characteristics, it is concluded that the VTEC O157 strains isolated from Danish cattle are potential human pathogens. However, the observed differences between cattle and human isolates...... profile was VT2 + VT2c. Only one PFGE group was represented on each farm, indicating that introduction and establishment of new E. coli O157 strains to these cattle farms is probably not common. Among E. coli O157 isolates from cattle, 22.8% were not VT-producing. The majority of these possessed the eae...

  8. Search for the presence of six Mycoplasma species in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of subjects seropositive and seronegative for human immunodeficiency virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacic, R; Launay, V; Tuppin, P; Lafeuillade, A; Feuillie, V; Montagnier, L; Grau, O

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence of Mycoplasma fermentans, Mycoplasma pirum, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, and Mycoplasma penetrans was investigated by using specific PCR assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects infected or not infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Only M. fermentans was detected in 5.8% of 154 HIV-seropositive and 11.1% of 90 HIV-seronegative subjects.

  9. Repeat dose NRPT (nicotinamide riboside and pterostilbene) increases NAD+levels in humans safely and sustainably: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, Ryan W; Santos, Santiago Roel; Morris, Mark; Evans, Mal; Alminana, Dan; Guarente, Leonard; Marcotulli, Eric

    2017-01-01

    NRPT is a combination of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD +) precursor vitamin found in milk, and pterostilbene (PT), a polyphenol found in blueberries. Here, we report this first-in-humans clinical trial designed to assess the safety and efficacy of a repeat dose of NRPT (commercially known as Basis). NRPT was evaluated in a randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study in a population of 120 healthy adults between the ages of 60 and 80 years. The study consisted of three treatment arms: placebo, recommended dose of NRPT (NRPT 1X), and double dose of NRPT (NRPT 2X). All subjects took their blinded supplement daily for eight weeks. Analysis of NAD + in whole blood demonstrated that NRPT significantly increases the concentration of NAD + in a dose-dependent manner. NAD + levels increased by approximately 40% in the NRPT 1X group and approximately 90% in the NRPT 2X group after 4 weeks as compared to placebo and baseline. Furthermore, this significant increase in NAD + levels was sustained throughout the entire 8-week trial. NAD + levels did not increase for the placebo group during the trial. No serious adverse events were reported in this study. This study shows that a repeat dose of NRPT is a safe and effective way to increase NAD + levels sustainably.

  10. Global sustainability: Toward definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Becky J.; Hanson, Mark E.; Liverman, Diana M.; Merideth, Robert W.

    1987-11-01

    Sustainability is increasingly viewed as a desired goal of development and environmental management. This term has been used in numerous disciplines and in a variety of contexts, ranging from the concept of maximum sustainable yield in forestry and fisheries management to the vision of a sustainable society with a steady-state economy. The meaning of the term is strongly dependent on the context in which it is applied and on whether its use is based on a social, economic, or ecological perspective, Sustainability may be defined broadly or narrowly, but a useful definition must specify explicitly the context as well as the temporal and spatial scales being considered. Although societies differ in their conceptualizations of sustainability, indefinite human survival on a global scale requires certain basic support systems, which can be maintained only with a healthy environment and a stable human population. A clearer understanding of global sustainability and the development of appropriate indicators of the status of basic support systems would provide a useful framework for policy making.

  11. Sustainable Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Ralph P.; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Marsden, Greg

    2014-01-01

    that relate to the construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure and the operation or use of the different transportation modes. The concept of sustainable transportation emerged in response to these concerns as part of the broader notion of sustainable development. Given the transportation...

  12. Sustaining dairy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villarreal Herrera, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Dairy in Europe has undergone many changes in the last few years—the abolition of milk production quotas being a fundamental one. This study explores these changes in relation to the sustained social and environmental viability of the sector and how dairy processors' sustainability

  13. Sustainable Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2011-01-01

    . Declarations tend to have impact on three trends. Firstly, there is emerging international consensus on the university’s role and function in relation to sustainable development; secondly, the emergence of national legislation, and thirdly, an emerging international competition to be leader in sustainable...... campus performance....

  14. Sustainable Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole Erik; Søndergård, Bent

    2014-01-01

    of agendas/vision, technologies, actors and institutions in the emergent design of an urban mobility system based on an electric car sharing system. Why. Designing for sustainability is a fundamental challenge for future design practices; designers have to obtain an ability to contribute to sustainable...

  15. Sustainable Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwell, Louise; Dillon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Green schools have moved into a new era that focuses on building a culture of sustainability in every aspect of learning in schools. In the early stages of sustainability education, the focus was on recycling and turning off the lights. Now, students and adults together are moving into the areas of advocacy and action that are based on a deep…

  16. Investigation of Sustainable Housing Criteria

    OpenAIRE

    roshanfekr Somayeh; Tawil N.M.; Goh N.A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid to sustainable development in cities. The quality of human life is directly related to environmental quality. Because many people live in cities as a place of social, economic and cultural relationships, certain issues such as environmental crises, energy, air and noise pollution and traffic jams are some of the factors that can alter the quality of human life. Therefore, in order to improve the quality of human life, attention to sustainable development...

  17. Sustaining Knowledge Exchange and Research Impact in the Social Sciences and Humanities: Investing in Knowledge Broker Roles in UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightowler, Claire; Knight, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, higher education policy in the United Kingdom (UK) has increasingly focused on the impact of academic research. This has resulted in the emergence of specialist knowledge brokers within UK universities in the social sciences and humanities. Our empirical research identified a tension between the research impact agenda and the…

  18. H3ABioNet, a sustainable pan-African bioinformatics network for human heredity and health in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Nicola J.; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; Alami, Raouf; Benkahla, Alia; Brandful, James; Doumbia, Seydou; Everett, Dean; Fadlelmola, Faisal M.; Gaboun, Fatima; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Ghazal, Hassan; Hazelhurst, Scott; Hide, Winston; Ibrahimi, Azeddine; Jaufeerally Fakim, Yasmina; Jongeneel, C. Victor; Joubert, Fourie; Kassim, Samar; Kayondo, Jonathan; Kumuthini, Judit; Lyantagaye, Sylvester; Makani, Julie; Mansour Alzohairy, Ahmed; Masiga, Daniel; Moussa, Ahmed; Nash, Oyekanmi; Ouwe Missi Oukem-Boyer, Odile; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Panji, Sumir; Patterton, Hugh; Radouani, Fouzia; Sadki, Khalid; Seghrouchni, Fouad; Tastan Bishop, Özlem; Tiffin, Nicki; Ulenga, Nzovu

    2016-01-01

    The application of genomics technologies to medicine and biomedical research is increasing in popularity, made possible by new high-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies and improved data analysis capabilities. Some of the greatest genetic diversity among humans, animals, plants, and microbiota occurs in Africa, yet genomic research outputs from the continent are limited. The Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) initiative was established to drive the development of genomic research for human health in Africa, and through recognition of the critical role of bioinformatics in this process, spurred the establishment of H3ABioNet, a pan-African bioinformatics network for H3Africa. The limitations in bioinformatics capacity on the continent have been a major contributory factor to the lack of notable outputs in high-throughput biology research. Although pockets of high-quality bioinformatics teams have existed previously, the majority of research institutions lack experienced faculty who can train and supervise bioinformatics students. H3ABioNet aims to address this dire need, specifically in the area of human genetics and genomics, but knock-on effects are ensuring this extends to other areas of bioinformatics. Here, we describe the emergence of genomics research and the development of bioinformatics in Africa through H3ABioNet. PMID:26627985

  19. Sustained small and intermediate size proteins expression in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycine prolonged stimulated human fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Abedian

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: Human fibroblasts produce some small to intermediate sized proteins with specific SDS-PAGE profile upon cell activation. Most of these proteins can be excreted in urine and can be immunogen theoretically so this data provided a reliable clue for fibrosis biomarker screening based on designation of an appropriated immunoassay.

  20. Human-Centred Design: sustainable ideas and scenarios for the development of projects and products based on knowledge and human abilities

    OpenAIRE

    Sbordone, Maria Antonietta

    2008-01-01

    Human-Centred Design is defined as the discipline relating to products and services that, in different ways, takes into account the psycho-physical wellness of human beings, and is formulated according to an approach based on User-Centred Design (UCD). The User-Centred Design approach considers the relationships and the interactions users have with products while using them, and is developed within disciplines not properly belonging to the field of design. At the beginning of last century, wi...

  1. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce P. Hallbert; J. J. Persensky; Carol Smidts; Tunc Aldemir; Joseph Naser

    2009-08-01

    . As an initial step in accomplishing this effort, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies was held March 20–21, 2009, in Columbus, Ohio, to enable industry stakeholders and researchers in identification of the nuclear industry’s needs in the areas of future I&C technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. Approaches for collaboration to bridge or fill the technology gaps were presented and R&D activities and priorities recommended. This report documents the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for the plan under development to achieve the goals of the I&C research pathway.

  2. Presence of Social Presence during Disasters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukkamala, Alivelu Manga; Beck, Roman

    2017-01-01

    analyze the whole dataset of 1.65 million tweets. The results showed that the majority of the immediacy tweets are conveying the needs and urgencies of affected people requesting for help. We argue that during disasters, the online social presence creates a sense of responsibility and common identity...

  3. Decreased VEGF-A and sustained PEDF expression in a human retinal pigment epithelium cell line cultured under hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Takeyama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous reports have described a decrease in retinal temperature and clinical improvement of wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD after vitrectomy. We hypothesized that the retinal temperature decrease after vitrectomy plays a part in the suppression of wet AMD development. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the temperature dependence of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A and in vitro angiogen-esis in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. RESULTS: We cultured ARPE-19 cells at 37, 35, 33 and 31°C and measured the expression of VEGF-A, VEGF-A splicing variants, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF. We performed an in vitro tube formation assay. The dehydrogenase activity was also evaluated at each temperature. Expression of VEGF-A significantly decreased with decreased temperature while PEDF expression did not. VEGF165 expression and in vitro angiogenesis also were temperature dependent. The dehydrogenase activity significantly decreased as the culture temperature decreased. CONCLUSIONS: RPE cultured under hypothermia that decreased cellular metabolism also had decreased VEGF-A and sustained PEDF expression, creating an anti-angiogenic environment. This mechanism may be associated with a beneficial effect after vitrectomy in patients with wet AMD.

  4. DAMP production by human islets under low oxygen and nutrients in the presence or absence of an immunoisolating-capsule and necrostatin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Paredes-Juarez, Genaro A.; Sahasrabudhe, Neha M.; Reina S. Tjoelker; de Haan, Bart J.; Marten A. Engelse; de Koning, Eelco J.P.; Faas, Marijke M.; Paul de Vos

    2015-01-01

    In between the period of transplantation and revascularization, pancreatic islets are exposed to low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions. In the present study we mimicked those conditions in vitro to study the involvement of different cell death processes, release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMP), and associated in vitro immune activation. Under low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions, apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis occur in human islets. Necroptosis is responsible for DAMP-...

  5. A novel gene, optrA, that confers transferable resistance to oxazolidinones and phenicols and its presence in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium of human and animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Lv, Yuan; Cai, Jiachang; Schwarz, Stefan; Cui, Lanqing; Hu, Zhidong; Zhang, Rong; Li, Jun; Zhao, Qin; He, Tao; Wang, Dacheng; Wang, Zheng; Shen, Yingbo; Li, Yun; Feßler, Andrea T; Wu, Congming; Yu, Hao; Deng, Xuming; Xia, Xi; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-08-01

    The oxazolidinone-resistant Enterococcus faecalis E349 from a human patient tested negative for the cfr gene and 23S rRNA mutations. Here we report the identification of a novel oxazolidinone resistance gene, optrA, and a first investigation of the extent to which this gene was present in E. faecalis and Enterococcus faecium from humans and food-producing animals. The resistance gene optrA was identified by whole-plasmid sequencing and subsequent cloning and expression in a susceptible Enterococcus host. Transformation and conjugation assays served to investigate the transferability of optrA. All optrA-positive E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates of human and animal origin were analysed for their MICs and their genotype, as well as the location of optrA. The novel plasmid-borne ABC transporter gene optrA from E. faecalis E349 conferred combined resistance or elevated MICs (when no clinical breakpoints were available) to oxazolidinones (linezolid and tedizolid) and phenicols (chloramphenicol and florfenicol). The corresponding conjugative plasmid pE349, on which optrA was located, had a size of 36 331 bp and also carried the phenicol exporter gene fexA. The optrA gene was functionally expressed in E. faecalis, E. faecium and Staphylococcus aureus. It was detected more frequently in E. faecalis and E. faecium from food-producing animals (20.3% and 5.7%, respectively) than from humans (4.2% and 0.6%, respectively). Enterococci with elevated MICs of linezolid and tedizolid should be tested not only for 23S rRNA mutations and the gene cfr, but also for the novel resistance gene optrA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Methyl gallate isolated from Spondias pinnata exhibits anticancer activity against human glioblastoma by induction of apoptosis and sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Dipankar; Ghate, Nikhil Baban; Singh, Sudhir Shankar; Mandal, Nripendranath

    2015-01-01

    Spondias pinnata has been reported for its efficient anticancer effects, but the studies were mostly focused on its extract. Since its bioactive compounds are largely unknown, this study was designed to characterize the lead components present in it and their anticancer activity against human glioblastoma cell line (U87). Major compounds from the ethyl acetate fraction were isolated by column chromatography and their anticancer potentials against U87 cells were evaluated. Furthermore, flow cytometric and immunoblotting analyses were performed to demonstrate the mechanism of apoptosis inducing activity of methyl gallate (MG) against U87 cell line. Four major compounds were isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction. Amongst these, two compounds showed promising activities and with the help of different spectroscopic methods they were identified as gallic acid and MG. Flow cytometric studies revealed that MG-induced apoptosis in U87 cells dose-dependently; the same was confirmed by activation of caspases through cleavage of endogenous substrate poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase. MG treatment also induced the expression of p53 and B-cell lymphoma-2-associated X and cleavage of BH3 interacting-domain with a concomitant decrease in B-cell lymphoma-2 expression. Moreover, MG-induced sustained phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) in U87 cells with no change in the phosphorylation of other mitogen-activated protein kinases (c-Jun N-terminal of stress-activated protein kinases, p38). MG is a potent antioxidant and it induces sustained ERK1/2 activation and apoptosis in human glioblastoma U87, and provide a rationale for evaluation of MG for other brain carcinoma cell lines for the advancement of glioblastoma therapy.

  7. Comparison of osteo/odontogenic differentiation of human adult dental pulp stem cells and stem cells from apical papilla in the presence of platelet lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuarqoub, Duaa; Awidi, Abdalla; Abuharfeil, Nizar

    2015-10-01

    Human dental pulp cells (DPSCs) and stem cells from apical papilla have been used for the repair of damaged tooth tissues. Human platelet lysate (PL) has been suggested as a substitute for fetal bovine serum (FBS) for large scale expansion of dental stem cells. However, biological effects and optimal concentrations of PL for proliferation and differentiation of human dental stem cells remain to be elucidated. DPSCs and SCAP cells were isolated from impacted third molars of young healthy donors, at the stage of root development and identified by markers using flow cytometry. For comparison the cells were cultured in media containing PL (1%, 5% and 10%) and FBS, with subsequent induction for osteogenic/odontogenic differentiation. The cultures were analyzed for; morphology, growth characteristics, mineralization potential (Alizarin Red method) and differentiation markers using ELISA and real time -polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The proliferation rates of DPSCs and SCAP significantly increased when cells were treated with 5% PL (7X doubling time) as compared to FBS. 5% PL also enhanced mineralized differentiation of DPSCs and SCAP, as indicated by the measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin and osteopontin, calcium deposition and q-PCR. Our findings suggest that using 5% platelet lysate, proliferation and osteo/odontogenesis of DPSCs and SCAP for a short period of time (15 days), was significantly improved. This may imply its use as an optimum concentration for expansion of dental stem cells in bone regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. RT-PCR detection of Na,K-ATPase subunit isoforms in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC): evidence for the presence of alpha1 and beta3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, S; Compe, E; Grillasca, J P; Plannells, R; Sampol, J; Pressley, T A; Maixent, J M

    2001-03-01

    The endothelial Na,K-ATPase is an active component in maintaining a variety of normal vascular functions. The enzyme is characterized by a complex molecular heterogeneity that results from differential expression and association of multiple isoforms of both its alpha- and beta-subunits. The aim of the present study was to determine which isoforms of the Na,K-ATPase are expressed in human endothelial cells. HUVEC (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) were used as a model of well known human endothelial cells. The high sensitive method RT-PCR was used with primers specific for the various isoforms of the alpha- and beta-subunits of the Na,K-ATPase. The results show that HUVEC express alpha1-, but not alpha2-, alpha3- or alpha4-isoforms of the catalytic subunit and that beta3- but not beta2- or beta1-isoforms is present in these cells. These findings are in contradiction with our previous detection of Na,K-ATPase isoforms in HUVEC using antibodies (14). Such results raise the technical problem of the specificity of the available antibodies directed against the different isoforms as well as the question of the physiological relevance of the diversity of the Na,K-ATPase isoforms.

  9. Performing Presence in the Pop Art Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Dixi Louise

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the author's entry into a virtual world, Second Life, to conduct a case study on 'presence in virtual worlds'. The object of study is not the IT platform that might provide opportunities for presence, nor the human actors that might experience presence, but what happens when t...

  10. Presence of Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and human papillomavirus in normal oral mucosa of HIV-infected and renal transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammatuna, P; Campisi, G; Giovannelli, L; Giambelluca, D; Alaimo, C; Mancuso, S; Margiotta, V

    2001-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of EBV-DNA, CMV-DNA and HPV-DNA in oral healthy mucosa of HIV-infected and renal transplant patients. To associate the detection of viral genomes with laboratory parameters of immunodeficiency, gender, antiretroviral and immunosuppressive therapy. A cross-sectional analysis of lingual and buccal cytobrushings from HIV-infected and renal transplant patients. Lingual and buccal cytobrushings were obtained from clinically normal oral mucosa of 57 HIV+, 40 renal transplant patients and 30 healthy uninfected controls, all matched for age at baseline of examination. Presence of EBV-, CMV- and HPV-DNA was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We evaluated their association, in HIV+ subjects, with gender, CD4+ cell count, HIV-RNA load, and antiretroviral therapy; and in renal transplant patients, with gender, CD4/CD8 ratio, and immunosuppressive therapy. Data were managed and analysed by Epi-Info 6.0. EBV-DNA was detected in 42.1% of HIV+ (24/57), in 65.0% of transplant patients (26/40), and in 16.6% of controls (5/30) (P = 0.03 and P = 0.0001, respectively). Furthermore, male gender in HIV+ group was found to be significantly associated with the presence of EBV-DNA (P = 0.02) vs females, after adjusting for CD4+ cell count and HIV-RNA load. CMV- and HPV-DNA were detected in 3.5% and 7.0% of HIV+, and in none and 20.0% of transplant patients, respectively. No relationship was found between the epithelial detection of these two viruses and any parameter evaluated. EBV genome was significantly detected in clinically normal oral mucosa of renal transplant and HIV+ patients. A significant gender association was found among HIV+, suggesting that oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) is more likely to occur in HIV+ men than women.

  11. Engineered collagen hydrogels for the sustained release of biomolecules and imaging agents: promoting the growth of human gingival cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghoon; Park, Hoyoung; Kim, Taeho; Jeong, Yoon; Oh, Myoung Hwan; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Gilad, Assaf A; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2014-01-01

    We present here the in vitro release profiles of either fluorescently labeled biomolecules or computed tomography contrast nanoagents from engineered collagen hydrogels under physiological conditions. The collagen constructs were designed as potential biocompatible inserts into wounded human gingiva. The collagen hydrogels were fabricated under a variety of conditions in order to optimize the release profile of biomolecules and nanoparticles for the desired duration and amount. The collagen constructs containing biomolecules/nanoconstructs were incubated under physiological conditions (ie, 37°C and 5% CO2) for 24 hours, and the release profile was tuned from 20% to 70% of initially loaded materials by varying the gelation conditions of the collagen constructs. The amounts of released biomolecules and nanoparticles were quantified respectively by measuring the intensity of fluorescence and X-ray scattering. The collagen hydrogel we fabricated may serve as an efficient platform for the controlled release of biomolecules and imaging agents in human gingiva to facilitate the regeneration of oral tissues.

  12. Sustainability: What the Entrepreneurship Educators Think

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyness, Lynne; Jones, Paul; Klapper, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to consider the understanding and presence of sustainability within entrepreneurship education. The extant literature on sustainability within the entrepreneurship discipline remains extremely limited. Previously, sustainability within an entrepreneurship context has related to economic viability as opposed to…

  13. The Relationship between Plants Used to Sustain Finches (Fringillidae) and Uses for Human Medicine in Southeast Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Antonio; Peiró, Victoriano; Seva, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed plants that are traditionally used by wild bird hunters and breeders to capture and promote captive breeding of Fringillidae (finches or songbirds) in the province of Alicante, Spain. The majority of plants used in songbird breeding have medicinal properties in traditional human medicine (48 different uses); thus, another main goal was to show their relationships with human medical uses. We compiled a list of 97 plant species from 31 botanical families that are used to attract finches and identified 11 different use categories for these plants in finch keeping. The most common uses were for trapping birds and as a source of food for birds in captivity. Cannabis sativa has the greatest cultural importance index (CI = 1.158), and Phalaris canariensis (annual canary grass or alpist) was the most common species used to attract Fringillidae and was used by all informants (n = 158). Most of the 97 species are wild plants and mainly belong to the families Compositae, Gramineae, Cruciferae, and Rosaceae and also have medicinal properties for humans. In the study area, the intensification of agriculture and abandonment of traditional management practices have caused the population of many songbirds to decline, as well as the loss of popular ethnographic knowledge. PMID:22611428

  14. The Relationship between Plants Used to Sustain Finches (Fringillidae and Uses for Human Medicine in Southeast Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Belda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed plants that are traditionally used by wild bird hunters and breeders to capture and promote captive breeding of Fringillidae (finches or songbirds in the province of Alicante, Spain. The majority of plants used in songbird breeding have medicinal properties in traditional human medicine (48 different uses; thus, another main goal was to show their relationships with human medical uses. We compiled a list of 97 plant species from 31 botanical families that are used to attract finches and identified 11 different use categories for these plants in finch keeping. The most common uses were for trapping birds and as a source of food for birds in captivity. Cannabis sativa has the greatest cultural importance index (CI = 1.158, and Phalaris canariensis (annual canary grass or alpist was the most common species used to attract Fringillidae and was used by all informants (=158. Most of the 97 species are wild plants and mainly belong to the families Compositae, Gramineae, Cruciferae, and Rosaceae and also have medicinal properties for humans. In the study area, the intensification of agriculture and abandonment of traditional management practices have caused the population of many songbirds to decline, as well as the loss of popular ethnographic knowledge.

  15. THE IMPORTANCE OF ASSESSING HUMAN RESOURCES FOR THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT-A STUDY CASE, SOUTH WEST OLTENIA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reta CONDEI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the center of all the activities of an organization is the human being. All the other resources such as land, buildings, equipments, vehicles or money are only of a secondary importance. Without people, business cannot be achieved. The importance of the human being in the success management of a business is to make from the”Human Resource Management” the essential competence for all the managers. This responsibility is not only to give people jobs, to guide them how to work and to record their performances, although the managers have to do this thing. Beside all these, there is an investment: to give people the power they need to act efficiently and effective. It also means to exploit the individual knowledge, the talents, the imagination and creativity for the common good. The world changes with an unprecedented speed determine each organization to employ competent, well informed, loyal, flexible and talented personnel. The managers should think well at what they offer to employees and at what they expect from them if they want to reach high performance and increase the firm competitiveness.

  16. The Relationship between Plants Used to Sustain Finches (Fringillidae) and Uses for Human Medicine in Southeast Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Antonio; Peiró, Victoriano; Seva, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed plants that are traditionally used by wild bird hunters and breeders to capture and promote captive breeding of Fringillidae (finches or songbirds) in the province of Alicante, Spain. The majority of plants used in songbird breeding have medicinal properties in traditional human medicine (48 different uses); thus, another main goal was to show their relationships with human medical uses. We compiled a list of 97 plant species from 31 botanical families that are used to attract finches and identified 11 different use categories for these plants in finch keeping. The most common uses were for trapping birds and as a source of food for birds in captivity. Cannabis sativa has the greatest cultural importance index (CI = 1.158), and Phalaris canariensis (annual canary grass or alpist) was the most common species used to attract Fringillidae and was used by all informants (n = 158). Most of the 97 species are wild plants and mainly belong to the families Compositae, Gramineae, Cruciferae, and Rosaceae and also have medicinal properties for humans. In the study area, the intensification of agriculture and abandonment of traditional management practices have caused the population of many songbirds to decline, as well as the loss of popular ethnographic knowledge.

  17. Integrating Ethno-Ecological and Scientific Knowledge of Termites for Sustainable Termite Management and Human Welfare in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudeta W. Sileshi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite their well-known role as pests, termites also provide essential ecosystem services. In this paper, we undertook a comprehensive review of studies on human-termite interactions and farmers' indigenous knowledge across Sub-Saharan Africa in an effort to build coherent principles for termite management. The review revealed that local communities have comprehensive indigenous knowledge of termite ecology and taxonomy, and apply various indigenous control practices. Many communities also have elaborate knowledge of the nutritional and medicinal value of termites and mushrooms associated with termite nests. Children and women also widely consume termite mound soil for nutritional or other benefits encouraged by indigenous belief systems. In addition, subsistence farmers use termites as indicators of soil fertility, and use termite mound soil in low-risk farming strategies for crop production. In the past, chemical control of termites has been initiated without empirical data on the termite species, their damage threshold, and the social, ecological, or economic risks and trade-offs of the control. This review has provided new insights into the intimate nature of human-termite interactions in Africa and the risks of chemical control of termites to human welfare and the environment. We recommend that management of termites in future should be built on farmers' indigenous knowledge and adequate understanding of the ecology of the local termite species.

  18. Sustainability and sacred values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cairns Jr.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Successful implementation of the quest for sustainable use of the planet requires that human society both reexamine and expand present views of what is sacred and what is not. The most important aspect will be going beyond a homocentric focus to a biocentric emphasis. A unifying theme would be the desire to leave a habitable planet for human descendants and those of other species. It is unlikely that society can be confident of achieving sustainability until persuasive evidence supporting this belief has existed for several generations. In order for sustainable use of the planet to persist indefinitely, the conditions essential to this state must be morally preserved on sacred grounds. Viewing natural systems as sacred requires not only preventing damage to them but, wherever possible, repairing damage to them caused by humankind.

  19. Sustainability & Organization Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Bygvraa; Obel, Børge; Kallehave, Pernille

    of global governance to match the new dynamics and consequences of globalization. Governments are re-examining corporate accountability to society and how companies earn their license to operate. Furthermore companies are re-examining their code of conduct and leadership values. Thus, sustainability...... is an important driver in organizations and its impact and effect on organization design is critical. Development of organization design, structure, processes, and human skills and values are needed to create the sustainable organization for the future. This paper discusses the requirements to be a sustainable...... organization. Here we follow the Global Compact criteria. The consequences for processes, structure, and human skills and values are analyzed. In particular the analysis will investigate exploration and exploitation from a holistic perspective using the principles of requisite variety and information...

  20. Fish and its multiple human health effects in times of threat to sustainability and affordability: are there alternatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo; Hu, Xiaojie

    2009-01-01

    Fish (finfish or shellfish) has been classified as healthy by health professionals despite containing contaminants, since fish is high in long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids which have multiple beneficial health effects such as decreased risk of stroke via anti-thrombotic and vasodilative effects, increased heart rate variability, reducing serum triacylglycerol and blood pressure, anti-inflammatory activities, improving visual function, improving attention-deficit conditions/ hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenic and dementia; and may be effective in managing depression in adults. All these beneficial effects are thought to be mediated through altering cell membrane composition, fluidity, receptors and membrane-bound enzymes, gene expression and eicosanoid production. However, natural marine and freshwater fish populations are declining as a result of over-fishing, temperature and climate changes etc. To re-establish and maintain the fish population in China, fishing has been banned for 2-3 months during specified periods of the year, which differs depending on the area, since 1995. The fish population has recovered since implementation of these banned fishing periods, and thereby maintaining the sustainability and affordability of fish. Aquaculture products have had a significant contribution to China's food system, with significant increase in output over the past few decades, from one million tons in 1978 to 32 million tons in 2007. Aquaculture fish represents a higher portion of total aquatic products compared with natural marine and freshwater fish, which has only been achieved in China, and this has contributed greatly to food and health security. China's success in this area is a good model for other developing countries.

  1. High-Avidity Monoclonal Antibodies against the Human Scavenger Class B Type I Receptor Efficiently Block Hepatitis C Virus Infection in the Presence of High-Density Lipoprotein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Catanese, Maria Teresa; Graziani, Rita; von Hahn, Thomas; Moreau, Martine; Huby, Thierry; Paonessa, Giacomo; Santini, Claudia; Luzzago, Alessandra; Rice, Charles M.; Cortese, Riccardo; Vitelli, Alessandra; Nicosia, Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    The human scavenger class B type 1 receptor (SR-B1/Cla1) was identified as a putative receptor for hepatitis C virus (HCV) because it binds to soluble recombinant HCV envelope glycoprotein E2 (sE2). High-density lipoprotein (HDL), a natural SR-B1 ligand, was shown to increase the in vitro infectivity of retroviral pseudoparticles bearing HCV envelope glycoproteins and of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc), suggesting that SR-B1 promotes viral entry in an HDL-dependent manner. To determine wheth...

  2. Artificial extracellular matrices of collagen and sulphated hyaluronan enhance the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in the presence of dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, V; Miron, A; Möller, S; Schnabelrauch, M; Heinemann, S; Worch, H; Scharnweber, D

    2014-04-01

    In this study we investigated the potential of artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) coatings containing collagen II and two types of glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) with different degrees of sulphation to promote human bone formation in biomedical applications. To this end their impact on growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was assessed. The cell proliferation was found to be significantly retarded in the first 14 days of culture on surfaces coated with collagen II and GAGs (coll-II/GAG) as compared to tissue culture polystyrol (TCPS) and those coated with collagen II. At later time points it only tended to be retarded on coll-II/sHya3.1. Heat-inactivation of the serum significantly reduced cell numbers on collagen II and coll-II/sHya3.1. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition, on the other hand, were higher for coatings containing sHya3.1 and were not significantly changed by heat-inactivation of the serum. Expression levels of the bone matrix proteins bone sialoprotein (BSP-II) and osteopontin (OP) were also increased on aECM coatings as compared to TCPS, which further validated the differentiation of hMSCs towards the osteogenic lineage. These observations reveal that aECM coatings, in particular those containing sHya3.1, are suitable to promote the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. HCI and sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllenbach, Emilie; Hoff, Jens Villiam; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    Sustained behavior changes are required to reduce the impact of human society on the environment. Much research on how HCI may help to do so focuses on changing behaviour by providing information directed at an individual or a microstructure (e.g. household). We propose societal macrostructures (e...

  4. Sustainability and the University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, G. Wayne; Chameau, Jean-Lou; Carmichael, Carol

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors state that one of the major challenges facing the human race is charting a course for the future that allows economic growth while protecting the fragile planet. The authors discuss the role that higher education must play to help create a vibrant economy and high quality of life, while sustaining natural resources.…

  5. Hybrids monosomal for human chromosome 5 reveal the presence of a spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) carrier with two SMN1 copies on one chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailman, M D; Hemingway, T; Darsey, R L; Glasure, C E; Huang, Y; Chadwick, R B; Heinz, J W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Schafer, R W; Abuelo, D N; Reich, E W; Theil, K S; Burghes, A H; de la Chapelle, A; Prior, T W

    2001-02-01

    We have analyzed the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) dosage in 100 parents of children with homozygous SMN1 deletions. Of these parents, 96 (96%) demonstrated the expected one-copy SMN1 carrier genotype. However, four parents (4%) were observed to have a normal two-copy SMN1 dosage. The presence of two intact SMN1 genes in the parent of an affected child indicates either the occurrence of a de novo mutation event or a situation in which one chromosome has two copies of SMN1, whereas the other is null. We have separated individual chromosomes from two of these parents with two-copy SMN1 dosage by somatic cell hybridization and have employed a modified quantitative dosage assay to provide direct evidence that one parent is a two-copy/ zero-copy SMN1 carrier, whereas the other parent had an affected child as the result of a de novo mutation. These findings are important for assessing the recurrence risk of parents of children with spinal muscular atrophy and for providing accurate family counseling.

  6. Sustainable consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prothero, Andrea; Dobscha, Susan; Freund, Jim

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores sustainable consumption and considers possible roles for marketing and consumer researchers and public policy makers in addressing the many sustainability challenges that pervade our planet. Future research approaches to this interdisciplinary topic need to be comprehensive...... and systematic and will benefit from a variety of different perspectives. There are a number of opportunities for future research, and three areas are explored in detail. First, the essay considers the inconsistency between the attitudes and behaviors of consumers with respect to sustainability; next, the agenda...... is broadened to explore the role of individual citizens in society; and finally, a macro institutional approach to fostering sustainability is explored. Each of these areas is examined in detail and possible research avenues and public policy initiatives are considered within each of these separate...

  7. Stabilizing Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reitan Andersen, Kirsti

    The publication of the Brundtland Report in 1987 put the topic of sustainable development on the political and corporate agenda. Defining sustainable development as “a development that meets the needs of the future without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs......” (WCED, 1987, p. 43), the Report also put a positive spin on the issue of sustainability by upholding capitalist beliefs in the possibility of infinite growth in a world of finite resources. While growth has delivered benefits, however, it has done so unequally and unsustainably. This thesis focuses...... on the textile and fashion industry, one of the world’s most polluting industries and an industry to some degree notorious for leading the ‘race to the bottom’ in global labour standards. Despite being faced with increasing demands to practise sustainability, most textile and fashion companies continue to fail...

  8. Sustainability reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.

    2005-01-01

    This article gives an overview of developments in sustainability (also sometimes labelled corporate social responsibility) reporting. The article will first briefly indicate how accountability on social and environmental issues started, already in the 1970s when social reports were published.

  9. Sustainable Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georg, Susse; Garza de Linde, Gabriela Lucía

    Judging from the number of communities and cities striving or claiming to be sustainable and how often eco-development is invoked as the means for urban regeneration, it appears that sustainable and eco-development have become “the leading paradigm within urban development” (Whitehead 2003......), urban design competitions are understudied mechanisms for bringing about field level changes. Drawing on actor network theory, this paper examines how urban design competitions may bring about changes within the professional field through the use of intermediaries such as a sustainable planning....../assessment tool. The context for our study is urban regeneration in one Danish city, which had been suffering from industrial decline and which is currently investing in establishing a “sustainable city”. Based on this case study we explore how the insights and inspiration evoked in working with the tool...

  10. Sustainable responsibilities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2015-01-01

    This working paper analyzes the conceptions of corporate responsibility for sustainable development in EU policies on CSR. The notion of corporate responsibility has until recently been limited to economical and legal responsibilities. Based on this narrow conception of corporate responsibility.......e. a combination of destruction and construction, this chapter will deconstruct conceptions of responsibility for sustainable development in these EU documents on CSR. A deconstructive conceptual analysis involves destructing dominant interpretations of a text and allowing for constructions of alternative...... such as sustainability actually means, but on what the concept says and does not say. A deconstructive analysis of EU policies on CSR, then, pinpoints that such policies are sites of conceptual struggles. This kind of analysis is suitable for studying conceptions of corporate responsibility for sustainable development...

  11. Enhanced and sustained activation of human B cells by anti-immunoglobulin conjugated to the EBV glycoprotein gp350.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeckeritz, B E; Lees, A; Vos, Q; Tsokos, G C; Kuhlbusch, K; Mond, J J

    2000-03-01

    We coupled a monoclonal anti-human IgD to the gp350 gylcoprotein of Epstein-Barr virus, which has been shown to bind to the complement receptor 2 (CR2), and compared its B cell stimulatory ability to that of anti-Ig and to a multivalent anti-Ig-dextran conjugate. The anti-Ig-gp350 conjugate stimulated higher levels of human B cell proliferation in vitro than did anti-Ig or anti-Ig conjugated to control viral protein, comparable to the proliferation stimulated by the multivalent anti-Ig-dextran. This enhanced proliferation was dependent on binding of the conjugate to CR2, inasmuch as an anti-CD2 antibody blocked the enhanced proliferative response. This enhanced proliferative response was associated with prolonged elevations of intracellular ionized calcium, which was comparable to the response stimulated by anti-Ig-dextran. These findings suggest the use of gp350 as a carrier molecule for weakly immunogenic peptides or antigens which, when bound to gp350, would enhance B cell clonal expansion and activation of antigen-specific B cells.

  12. Lipid Profile in Human Frontal Cortex is Sustained Throughout Healthy Adult Lifespan to Decay at Advanced Ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabré, Rosanna; Naudí, Alba; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Mayelin; Jové, Mariona; Ayala, Victòria; Mota-Martorell, Natalia; Pradas, Irene; Nogueras, Lara; Rué, Montserrat; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Ferrer, Isidro; Pamplona, Reinald

    2017-08-31

    Fatty acids are key components in the structural diversity of lipids and play a strategic role in the functional properties of lipids which determine the structural and functional integrity of neural cell membranes, the generation of lipid signaling mediators, and the chemical reactivity of acyl chains. The present study analyzes the profile of lipid fatty acid composition of membranes of human frontal cortex area 8 in individuals ranging from 40 to 90 years old. Different components involved in polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis pathways, as well as adaptive defense mechanisms involved in the lipid-mediated modulation of inflammation, are also assessed. Our results show that the lipid profile in human frontal cortex is basically preserved through the adult lifespan to decay at advanced ages, which is accompanied by an adaptive pro-active anti-inflammatory response possibly geared to ensuring cell survival and function. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Primary Human Uterine Leiomyoma Cell Culture Quality Control: Some Properties of Myometrial Cells Cultured under Serum Deprivation Conditions in the Presence of Ovarian Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazza, Camila; Andrade, Sheila Siqueira; Sumikawa, Joana Tomomi; Batista, Fabrício Pereira; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Girão, Manoel J B C; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Castro, Rodrigo Aquino

    2016-01-01

    Cell culture is considered the standard media used in research to emulate the in vivo cell environment. Crucial in vivo experiments cannot be conducted in humans and depend on in vitro methodologies such as cell culture systems. However, some procedures involving the quality control of cells in culture have been gradually neglected by failing to acknowledge that primary cells and cell lines change over time in culture. Thus, we report methods based on our experience for monitoring primary cell culture of human myometrial cells derived from uterine leiomyoma. We standardized the best procedure of tissue dissociation required for the study of multiple genetic marker systems that include species-specific antigens, expression of myofibroblast or myoblast markers, growth curve, serum deprivation, starvation by cell cycle synchronization, culture on collagen coated plates, and 17 β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) effects. The results showed that primary myometrial cells from patients with uterine leiomyoma displayed myoblast phenotypes before and after in vitro cultivation, and leiomyoma cells differentiated into mature myocyte cells under the appropriate differentiation-inducing conditions (serum deprivation). These cells grew well on collagen coated plates and responded to E2 and P4, which may drive myometrial and leiomyoma cells to proliferate and adhere into a focal adhesion complex involvement in a paracrine manner. The establishment of these techniques as routine procedures will improve the understanding of the myometrial physiology and pathogenesis of myometrium-derived diseases such as leiomyoma. Mimicking the in vivo environment of fibrotic conditions can prevent false results and enhance results that are based on cell culture integrity.

  14. High-avidity monoclonal antibodies against the human scavenger class B type I receptor efficiently block hepatitis C virus infection in the presence of high-density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanese, Maria Teresa; Graziani, Rita; von Hahn, Thomas; Moreau, Martine; Huby, Thierry; Paonessa, Giacomo; Santini, Claudia; Luzzago, Alessandra; Rice, Charles M; Cortese, Riccardo; Vitelli, Alessandra; Nicosia, Alfredo

    2007-08-01

    The human scavenger class B type 1 receptor (SR-B1/Cla1) was identified as a putative receptor for hepatitis C virus (HCV) because it binds to soluble recombinant HCV envelope glycoprotein E2 (sE2). High-density lipoprotein (HDL), a natural SR-B1 ligand, was shown to increase the in vitro infectivity of retroviral pseudoparticles bearing HCV envelope glycoproteins and of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc), suggesting that SR-B1 promotes viral entry in an HDL-dependent manner. To determine whether SR-B1 participates directly in HCV infection or facilitates HCV entry through lipoprotein uptake, we generated a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against native human SR-B1. Two of them, 3D5 and C167, bound to conformation-dependent SR-B1 determinants and inhibited the interaction of sE2 with SR-B1. These antibodies efficiently blocked HCVcc infection of Huh-7.5 hepatoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. To examine the role of HDL in SR-B1-mediated HCVcc infection, we set up conditions for HCVcc production and infection in serum-free medium. HCVcc efficiently infected Huh-7.5 cells in the absence of serum lipoproteins, and addition of HDL led to a twofold increase in infectivity. However, the HDL-induced enhancement of infection had no impact on the neutralization potency of MAb C167, despite its ability to inhibit both HDL binding to cells and SR-B1-mediated lipid transfer. Of note, MAb C167 also potently blocked Huh-7.5 infection by an HCV strain recovered from HCVcc-infected chimpanzees. These results demonstrate that SR-B1 is essential for infection with HCV produced in vitro and in vivo and suggest the possible use of anti-SR-B1 antibodies as therapeutic agents.

  15. Sustainable finance

    OpenAIRE

    Boersma-de Jong, Margreet F.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation for Springschool of Strategy, University of Groningen, 10 October 2012. The role of CSR is to stimulate ethical behaviour, and as a result, mutual trust in society. Advantage of CSR for the company and the evolution of CSR. From CSR to Sustainable Finance: how does CSR influence Sustainable Business Administration & Management Accounting, Financial Leadership and what is the importance of CSR in the financial sector

  16. Teaching Young Learners about Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, Mindy; Eckhoff, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Sustainability is a core 21st-century movement that stresses keeping interrelationships among the environment, human cultures, and economic systems healthy now--and for future generations--across local, regional, national, and global levels. The ideal sustainable community is able to maintain this balance among the social, environmental, and…

  17. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda STEG

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses possible contributions of psychologists to sustainable transportation. It is argued that in order to reach sustainable transportation, among others, behaviour changes of individual car users are needed. As transport policies will be more effective if they target important antecedents of travel behaviour, first, factors influencing such behaviour are discussed. It is argued that car use is very attractive and sometimes even necessary for many different reasons. This implies that a combination of policies is called for, each targeting different factors that support car use and hinder the use of more sustainable modes of transport. Next, the paper elaborates on policy strategies that may be employed to achieve sustainable transportation by changing car use. Increasing the attractiveness of sustainable transport modes by means of pull measures seems not sufficient to reduce the level of car use. Besides, car use should be made less attractive by means of push measures to force drivers to reconsider their travel behaviour. The acceptability of such policies may be increased by clearly communicating the aim of these policies, and the expected positive consequences (e.g., less congestion, improved environmental quality. Moreover, possible negative effects for individual freedom may be compensated by implementing additional policies aimed at facilitating the use of sustainable transport modes.

  18. Factors Affecting Entrepreneurship and Business Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tur-Porcar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is becoming increasingly important for society, and the creation of business ventures is one area where sustainability is critical. We examined the factors affecting actions that are designed to foster business sustainability. These factors are related to the environment, behavior, human relations, and business activity. Based on questionnaire responses from experts, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP method was used to rank sustainable business criteria according to their importance for entrepreneurs starting sustainable businesses. The results indicate that the most important drivers of sustainable entrepreneurship are behavioral factors and business factors. Ethical principles and values, together with competitive intelligence, are crucial for undertaking actions that lead to sustainability.

  19. Sustainable markets for sustainable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, J.; Smyser, C.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses how the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is involved in sustainable energy development. It presently has 50 loans and grants for non conventional renewable energy projects and ten grants for efficiency programs for $600 and $17 million respectively, representing 100 MW of power. The IDB is concerned with how to create a sustainable market for sustainable energy projects. The IDB is trying to work with government, private sector, NGOs, trading allies, credit sources, and regulators to find proper roles for such projects. He discusses how the IDB is working to expand its vision and objectives in renewable energy projects in Central and South America.

  20. Sustainable Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklas Scholz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable water systems often comprise complex combinations of traditional and new system components that mimic natural processes. These green systems aim to protect public health and safety, and restore natural and human landscapes. Green infrastructure elements such as most sustainable drainage systems trap storm water but may contaminate groundwater. There is a need to summarize recent trends in sustainable water systems management in a focused document. The aim of this special issue is therefore to disseminate and share scientific findings on novel sustainable water systems addressing recent problems and opportunities. This special issue focuses on the following key topics: climate change adaptation and vulnerability assessment of water resources systems; holistic water management; carbon credits; potable water savings; sustainable water technologies; nutrient management; holistic storm water reuse; water and wastewater infrastructure planning; ecological status of watercourses defined by the Water Framework Directive. The combined knowledge output advances the understanding of sustainable water, wastewater and storm water systems in the developed and developing world. The research highlights the need for integrated decision-support frameworks addressing the impact of climate change on local and national water resources management strategies involving all relevant stakeholders at all levels.

  1. The role of the human capital and investment in human capital within the sustainable socio-economic development. How labour force migration affects competitiveness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana SON

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to analyse the role played by the human capital investment in shaping international migration trends and influencing socio-economic development for the EU New Member States during the last decade. Our analysis is based on developing double-log macro-econometric models that combine cross-sections and time series in a panel structure, by using a set of indicators specific for the migration process, as well as for the economic activity and education, as main explanatory variables. Furthermore, the study focuses on a comparative approach for New Member States, our random and fixed effects models using several quantitative and qualitative proxies in order to highlight the relationship and interdependence between emigration, human capital investment and socio-economic development.

  2. A compartment model of VEGF distribution in humans in the presence of soluble VEGF receptor-1 acting as a ligand trap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence T H Wu

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, through its activation of cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases including VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, is a vital regulator of stimulatory and inhibitory processes that keep angiogenesis--new capillary growth from existing microvasculature--at a dynamic balance in normal physiology. Soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR1--a naturally-occurring truncated version of VEGFR1 lacking the transmembrane and intracellular signaling domains--has been postulated to exert inhibitory effects on angiogenic signaling via two mechanisms: direct sequestration of angiogenic ligands such as VEGF; or dominant-negative heterodimerization with surface VEGFRs. In pre-clinical studies, sVEGFR1 gene and protein therapy have demonstrated efficacy in inhibiting tumor angiogenesis; while in clinical studies, sVEGFR1 has shown utility as a diagnostic or prognostic marker in a widening array of angiogenesis-dependent diseases. Here we developed a novel computational multi-tissue model for recapitulating the dynamic systemic distributions of VEGF and sVEGFR1. Model features included: physiologically-based multi-scale compartmentalization of the human body; inter-compartmental macromolecular biotransport processes (vascular permeability, lymphatic drainage; and molecularly-detailed binding interactions between the ligand isoforms VEGF(121 and VEGF(165, signaling receptors VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, non-signaling co-receptor neuropilin-1 (NRP1, as well as sVEGFR1. The model was parameterized to represent a healthy human subject, whereupon we investigated the effects of sVEGFR1 on the distribution and activation of VEGF ligands and receptors. We assessed the healthy baseline stability of circulating VEGF and sVEGFR1 levels in plasma, as well as their reliability in indicating tissue-level angiogenic signaling potential. Unexpectedly, simulated results showed that sVEGFR1 - acting as a diffusible VEGF sink alone, i.e., without sVEGFR1-VEGFR heterodimerization

  3. Using Webb gliders to maintain a sustained ocean presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.; Glenn, S.

    2009-05-01

    Buoyancy driven Slocum gliders were a vision of Douglas Webb, which Henry Stommel championed in a vision published in 1989. Slocum gliders have transitioned from a concept to a technology serving research and environmental stewardship. The long duration and low costs of gliders allow them to anchor spatial time series. Large distances, over 600 km, can be covered using a set of alkaline batteries. Lithium batteries can anchor missions that are thousands of kilometers in length. Since the initial tests, a wide range of physical and optical sensors have been integrated into the glider allowing measurements of temperature, salinity, depth averaged currents, surface currents, fluorescence, apparent/inherent optical properties active and passive acoustics. A command/control center, entitled Dockserver, has been developed that allows users to fly fleets of gliders simultaneously in multiple places around the world via the Internet. Since October 2003, Rutgers gliders have conducted 157 missions, traversed >55,000 kilometers, logged >2600 days at sea, and logged ~350,000 vertical profiles. The capabilities of the glider make them an indispensable tool for the growing global effort to build integrated ocean observatories. For example, gliders are now a central tool within the National Science Foundation Ocean Observatory Initiative (OOI) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). Gliders provide a new magnet in which to attract young people into the ocean science and engineering. For example Rutgers undergraduates now anchor long duration flights of gliders world-wide beginning their freshmen year. This is critical to training the next generation.

  4. Traffic of human α-mannosidase in plant cells suggests the presence of a new endoplasmic reticulum-to-vacuole pathway without involving the Golgi complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele; Pompa, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    The transport of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the vacuole requires sorting signals as well as specific transport mechanisms. This work is focused on the transport in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants of a human α-mannosidase, MAN2B1, which is a lysosomal enzyme involved in the turnover of N-linked glycoproteins and can be used in enzyme replacement therapy. Although ubiquitously expressed, α-mannosidases are targeted to lysosomes or vacuoles through different mechanisms according to the organisms in which these proteins are produced. In tobacco cells, MAN2B1 reaches the vacuole even in the absence of mannose-6-phosphate receptors, which are responsible for its transport in animal cells. We report that MAN2B1 is targeted to the vacuole without passing through the Golgi complex. In addition, a vacuolar targeting signal that is recognized in plant cells is located in the MAN2B1 amino-terminal region. Indeed, when this amino-terminal domain is removed, the protein is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, when this domain is added to a plant-secreted protein, the resulting fusion protein is partially redirected to the vacuole. These results strongly suggest the existence in plants of a new type of vacuolar traffic that can be used by leaf cells to transport vacuolar proteins.

  5. DAMP production by human islets under low oxygen and nutrients in the presence or absence of an immunoisolating-capsule and necrostatin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Juarez, Genaro A; Sahasrabudhe, Neha M; Tjoelker, Reina S; de Haan, Bart J; Engelse, Marten A; de Koning, Eelco J P; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2015-09-30

    In between the period of transplantation and revascularization, pancreatic islets are exposed to low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions. In the present study we mimicked those conditions in vitro to study the involvement of different cell death processes, release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMP), and associated in vitro immune activation. Under low-oxygen and low-nutrient conditions, apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis occur in human islets. Necroptosis is responsible for DAMP-release such as dsDNA, uric acid, and HMGB1. The sensors of the innate immune system able to recognize these DAMPs are mainly TLR, NOD receptors, and C-type lectins. By using cell-lines with a non-functional adaptor molecule MyD88, we were able to show that the islet-derived DAMPs signal mainly via TLR. Immunoisolation in immunoprotective membranes reduced DAMP release and immune activation via retention of the relative large DAMPs in the capsules. Another effective strategy was suppressing necroptosis using the inhibitor nec-1. Although the effect on cell-survival was minor, nec-1 was able to reduce the release of HMGB1 and its associated immune activation. Our data demonstrate that in the immediate post-transplant period islets release DAMPs that in vitro enhance responses of innate immune cells. DAMP release can be reduced in vitro by immunoisolation or intervention with nec-1.

  6. The presence of carbon nanostructures in bakery products induces metabolic stress in human mesenchymal stem cells through CYP1A and p53 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadi, Ahmed M; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    Ingredients commonly present in processed foods are excellent substrates for chemical reactions during modern thermal cooking or processing, which could possibly result in deteriorative carbonization changes mediated by a variety of thermal reactions. Spontaneous self-assembling complexation or polymerization of partially combusted lipids, proteins, and other food macromolecules with synthetic food additives during high temperature food processing or baking (200-250 °C) would result in the formation of carbon nanostructures (CNs). These unknown nanostructures may produce adverse physiological effects or potential health risks. The present work aimed to identify and characterize the nanostructures from the crusts of bread. Furthermore, a toxicological risk assessment of these nanostructures was conducted using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as a model for cellular uptake and metabolic oxidative stress, with special reference to induced adipogenesis. CNs isolated from bread crusts were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The in vitro risk assessment of the CNs was carried out in hMSCs using an MTT assay, cell morphological assessment, a reactive oxygen species assay, a mitochondrial trans-membrane potential assay, cell cycle progression assessment and gene expression analysis. Our results revealed that bread crusts contain CNs, which may form during the bread-making process. The in vitro results indicate that carbon nanostructures have moderately toxic effects in the hMSCs at a high dose (400 μg/mL). The mitochondrial trans-membrane potentials and intracellular ROS levels of the hMSCs were altered at this dose. The levels of the mRNA transcripts of metabolic stress-responsive genes such as CAT, GSR, GSTA4, CYP1A and p53 were significantly altered in response to CNs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Human blood mononuclear cell in vitro cytokine response before and after two different strenuous exercise bouts in the presence of bloodroot and Echinacea extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchina, David S; Hallam, Justus E; Dias, Amila S; Perera, M Ann

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this multidisciplinary investigation was to characterize cytokine production by human blood mononuclear cells after 2 contrasting exercise bouts (a maximal graded oxygen consumption [VO(2)max] test and 90 min of cycling at 85% of ventilatory threshold [VT]) when stimulated in vitro with extracts from bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis), coneflower (Echinacea tennesseensis), or solvent vehicle controls. Blood was sampled pre- and post-exercise. Production of TNF, IL-1beta, and IL-10 were measured at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. In the VO(2)max test there was a main effect of exercise such that exercise increased cytokine synthesis and a main effect of stimulant such that bloodroot extracts significantly increased cytokine production compared to other stimulants or controls. In the 90-min bout, there was a main effect of exercise for TNF and IL-1beta (but not IL-10) such that exercise decreased cytokine synthesis and a main effect of stimulant such that bloodroot extracts significantly increased cytokine production compared to other stimulants or controls, with exercisexstimulant interactions for both IL-1beta and IL-10. A similar though weaker effect was seen with Echinacea extracts; subsequent biochemical analyses suggested this was related to alkamide decay during 3 years undisturbed storage at ultralow (-80 degrees C) temperature. In this study, the VO(2)max test was associated with enhanced cytokine production whereas the 90-min cycling at 85% VT was associated with suppressed cytokine production. Bloodroot extracts were able to increase cytokine production in both contexts. Herbal extracts purported to offset exercise-associated effects on immune activity warrant continued investigation.

  8. Towards environmentally sustainable human behaviour: targeting non-conscious and conscious processes for effective and acceptable policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteau, Theresa M.

    2017-05-01

    Meeting climate change targets to limit global warming to 2°C requires rapid and large reductions in demand for products that most contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These include production of bulk materials (e.g. steel and cement), energy supply (e.g. fossil fuels) and animal source foods (particularly ruminants and their products). Effective strategies to meet these targets require transformative changes in supply as well as demand, involving changes in economic, political and legal systems at local, national and international levels, building on evidence from many disciplines. This paper outlines contributions from behavioural science in reducing demand. Grounded in dual-process models of human behaviour (involving non-conscious and conscious processes) this paper considers first why interventions aimed at changing population values towards the environment are usually insufficient or unnecessary for reducing demand although they may be important in increasing public acceptability of policies that could reduce demand. It then outlines two sets of evidence from behavioural science towards effective systems-based strategies, to identify interventions likely to be effective at: (i) reducing demand for products that contribute most to GHG emissions, mainly targeting non-conscious processes and (ii) increasing public acceptability for policy changes to enable these interventions, targeting conscious processes. This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'.

  9. Towards environmentally sustainable human behaviour: targeting non-conscious and conscious processes for effective and acceptable policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Meeting climate change targets to limit global warming to 2°C requires rapid and large reductions in demand for products that most contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These include production of bulk materials (e.g. steel and cement), energy supply (e.g. fossil fuels) and animal source foods (particularly ruminants and their products). Effective strategies to meet these targets require transformative changes in supply as well as demand, involving changes in economic, political and legal systems at local, national and international levels, building on evidence from many disciplines. This paper outlines contributions from behavioural science in reducing demand. Grounded in dual-process models of human behaviour (involving non-conscious and conscious processes) this paper considers first why interventions aimed at changing population values towards the environment are usually insufficient or unnecessary for reducing demand although they may be important in increasing public acceptability of policies that could reduce demand. It then outlines two sets of evidence from behavioural science towards effective systems-based strategies, to identify interventions likely to be effective at: (i) reducing demand for products that contribute most to GHG emissions, mainly targeting non-conscious processes and (ii) increasing public acceptability for policy changes to enable these interventions, targeting conscious processes. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Material demand reduction’. PMID:28461435

  10. The macroecology of sustainability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Burger

    Full Text Available The discipline of sustainability science has emerged in response to concerns of natural and social scientists, policymakers, and lay people about whether the Earth can continue to support human population growth and economic prosperity. Yet, sustainability science has developed largely independently from and with little reference to key ecological principles that govern life on Earth. A macroecological perspective highlights three principles that should be integral to sustainability science: 1 physical conservation laws govern the flows of energy and materials between human systems and the environment, 2 smaller systems are connected by these flows to larger systems in which they are embedded, and 3 global constraints ultimately limit flows at smaller scales. Over the past few decades, decreasing per capita rates of consumption of petroleum, phosphate, agricultural land, fresh water, fish, and wood indicate that the growing human population has surpassed the capacity of the Earth to supply enough of these essential resources to sustain even the current population and level of socioeconomic development.

  11. Environmental law and sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Oliva Sirgo Álvarez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the origin and birth of the human right to a safe and healthy environment in order to allow everyone to live a dignified and quality life. It also analyses the essential content of sustainable development, which must always guide the development of environmental law to ensure a healthy environment for human present and future generations, and a sustainable economic growth that contributes to the development of equal opportunities for all people.

  12. Roundtabling Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponte, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The willingness of public authority to delegate social and environmental regulation to the private sector has varied from sector to sector, but has often led to the establishment of ‘voluntary’ standards and certifications on sustainability. Many of these have taken the form of ‘stewardship...... councils’ and ‘sustainability roundtables’ and have been designed around a set of institutional features seeking to establish legitimacy, fend off possible criticism, and ‘sell’ certifications to potential users. The concept of ‘roundtabling’ emphasizes the fitting a variety of commodity......-specific sustainability situations into a form that not only ‘hears more voices’ (as in ‘multi-stakeholder’), but also portrays to give them equal standing at the table of negotiations (roundtable), thus raising higher expectations on accountability, transparency and inclusiveness. In this article, I examine to what...

  13. Sustainability Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichnothe, Heinz

    2017-03-17

    The long-term substitution of fossil resources can only be achieved through a bio-based economy, with biorefineries and bio-based products playing a major role. However, it is important to assess the implications of the transition to a bio-based economy. Life cycle-based sustainability assessment is probably the most suitable approach to quantify impacts and to identify trade-offs at multiple levels. The extended utilisation of biomass can cause land use change and affect food security of the most vulnerable people throughout the world. Although this is mainly a political issue and governments should be responsible, the responsibility is shifted to companies producing biofuels and other bio-based products. Organic wastes and lignocellulosic biomass are considered to be the preferred feedstock for the production of bio-based products. However, it is unlikely that a bio-based economy can rely only on organic wastes and lignocellulosic biomass.It is crucial to identify potential problems related to socio-economic and environmental issues. Currently there are many approaches to the sustainability of bio-based products, both quantitative and qualitative. However, results of different calculation methods are not necessarily comparable and can cause confusion among decision-makers, stakeholders and the public.Hence, a harmonised, globally agreed approach would be the best solution to secure sustainable biomass/biofuels/bio-based chemicals production and trade, and to avoid indirect effects (e.g. indirect land use change). However, there is still a long way to go.Generally, the selection of suitable indicators that serve the purpose of sustainability assessment is very context-specific. Therefore, it is recommended to use a flexible and modular approach that can be adapted to various purposes. A conceptual model for the selection of sustainability indicators is provided that facilitates identifying suitable sustainability indicators based on relevance and significance in a

  14. Leverage points for sustainability transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abson, David J; Fischer, Joern; Leventon, Julia; Newig, Jens; Schomerus, Thomas; Vilsmaier, Ulli; von Wehrden, Henrik; Abernethy, Paivi; Ives, Christopher D; Jager, Nicolas W; Lang, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    Despite substantial focus on sustainability issues in both science and politics, humanity remains on largely unsustainable development trajectories. Partly, this is due to the failure of sustainability science to engage with the root causes of unsustainability. Drawing on ideas by Donella Meadows, we argue that many sustainability interventions target highly tangible, but essentially weak, leverage points (i.e. using interventions that are easy, but have limited potential for transformational change). Thus, there is an urgent need to focus on less obvious but potentially far more powerful areas of intervention. We propose a research agenda inspired by systems thinking that focuses on transformational 'sustainability interventions', centred on three realms of leverage: reconnecting people to nature, restructuring institutions and rethinking how knowledge is created and used in pursuit of sustainability. The notion of leverage points has the potential to act as a boundary object for genuinely transformational sustainability science.

  15. Assignment of the human fast skeletal troponin T gene (TNNT3) to chromosome 11p15.5: Evidence for the presence of 11pter in a monochromosome 9 somatic cell hybrid in NIGMS mapping panel 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Chengjian; Jha, P.K.; Sarkar, S. [Tufts Univ., Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    Human fast skeletal troponin T (TnT{sub f}), the tropomyosin binding component of the multisubunit troponin complex, plays an important role in the Ca{sup 2+} regulation of striated muscle contraction. Specific primers designed from the 3{prime} end of human TnT{sub f} cDNA were used to amplify an intronic region by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This TnT{sub f}-specific PCR product was detected from two somatic cell hybrids containing human chromosomes 9 and 11, respectively, in NIGMS mapping panel 2. However, further studies with other somatic hybrid cell lines (Bios Laboratory) localized the TnT{sub f} genomic probe generated by extended PCR, showing the sublocalization of the gene to band p15.5 on chromosome 11. This locus is of specific interest, as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and various childhood and adult tumor-related abnormalities have been mapped to this region. The study also indicates the presence of an 11pter region in the NIGMS cell hybrid GM10611, which has previously been reported to contain only human chromosome 9. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Sustainability on-the-go

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    How are the available means for interaction about sustainability affected by mobile communication technologies? What are the implications of this change for communicating sustainable values? This presentation compares strategies between three organizations whose values and objectives focus...... on sustainability-- The Good Guide, Carrotmob and Colalife. Each organization demonstrates a web presence through social media that are available on mobile devices. This paper examines the mobile space as a space for examining the potential impacts of a technology mediated interaction focused on sustainability....... To explore this mobile space as a space not only for communication, but for identification (Burke 1950), Gee’s concepts of (D) and (d) discourse are used and synthesized with Burke’s notions of terministic screens and entitlement (Burke 1966), leading to an understanding of sustainability values...

  17. Generation of a replication-competent simian-human immunodeficiency virus, the neutralization sensitivity of which can be enhanced in the presence of a small-molecule CD4 mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Hiroyuki; Hishiki, Takayuki; Miura, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Chie; Narumi, Tetsuo; Tamamura, Hirokazu; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Matsushita, Shuzo; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko

    2013-12-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) carrying the envelope from the clade B clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolate MNA, designated SHIV MNA, was generated through intracellular homologous recombination. SHIV MNA inherited biological properties from the parental HIV-1, including CCR5 co-receptor preference, resistance to neutralization by the anti-V3 loop mAb KD-247 and loss of resistance in the presence of the CD4-mimic small-molecule YYA-021. SHIV MNA showed productive replication in rhesus macaque PBMCs. Experimental infection of a rhesus macaque with SHIV MNA caused a transient but high titre of plasma viral RNA and a moderate antibody response. Immunoglobulin in the plasma at 24 weeks post-infection was capable of neutralizing SHIV MNA in the presence but not in the absence of YYA-021. SHIV MNA could serve a model for development of novel therapeutic interventions based on CD4-mimic-mediated conversion of envelope protein susceptible to antibody neutralization.

  18. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Remote Sensing of the Urban Heat Island Effect: Assessment of Risks to Human Health and Development of Mitigation Strategies for Sustainable Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Laymon, Charles A.; Crosson, William; Howell, Burgess F.; Gillani, Noor V.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and in areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 80% of the world's population will live in cities. One of the more egregious side effects of urbanization is the deterioration in air quality as a result of increased vehicular traffic, industrialization and related activities. In the United States alone, under the more stringent air quality guidelines established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1997, nearly 300 counties in 34 states will not meet the new air quality standards for ground level ozone. The mitigation of one the physical/environmental characteristics of urbanization known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect, is now being looked at more closely as a possible way to bring down ground level ozone levels in cities and assist states in improving air quality. The UHI results from the replacement of "natural" land covers (e.g., trees, grass) with urban land surface types, such as pavement and buildings. Heat stored in these surfaces is released into the air and results in a "dome" of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities. The effect of this dome of elevated air temperatures is known as the UHI, which is most prevalent about 2-3 hours after sunset on days with intense solar radiation and calm winds. Given the local and regional impacts of the UHI, there are significant potential affects on human health, particularly as related to heat stress and ozone on body temperature regulation and on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. In this study we are using airborne and satellite remote sensing data to analyze how differences in the urban landscape influence or drive the development of the UHI over four U.S. cities. Additionally, we are assessing what the potential impact is on risks to human health, and developing mitigation strategies to make urban areas more environmentally sustainable.

  19. Remote Sensing of the Urban Heat Island Effect: Assessment of Risks to Human Health and Development of Mitigation Strategies for Sustainable Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Laymon, Charles A.; Crosson, William; Howell, Burgess F.; Gillani, Noor V.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and in areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 80% of the world's population will live in cities. One of the more egregious side effects of urbanization is the deterioration in air quality as a result of increased vehicular traffic, industrialization and related activities. In the United States alone, under the more stringent air quality guidelines established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1997, nearly 300 counties in 34 states will not meet the new air quality standards for ground level ozone. The mitigation of one the physical/environmental characteristics of urbanization known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect, is now being looked at more closely as a possible way to bring down ground level ozone levels in cities and assist states in improving air quality. The UHI results from the replacement of "natural" land covers (e.g., trees, grass) with urban land surface types, such as pavement and buildings. Heat stored in these surfaces is released into the air and results in a "dome" of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities. The effect of this dome of elevated air temperatures is known as the UHI, which is most prevalent about 2-3 hours after sunset on days with intense solar radiation and calm winds. Given the local and regional impacts of the UHI, there are significant potential affects on human health, particularly as related to heat stress and ozone on body temperature regulation and on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. In this study we are using airborne and satellite remote sensing data to analyze how differences in the urban landscape influence or drive the development of the UHI over four U.S. cities. Additionally, we are assessing what the potential impact is on risks to human health, and developing mitigation strategies to make urban areas more environmentally sustainable.

  20. Sustainable Soesterkwartier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahams, H.; Goosen, H.; Jong, de F.; Sickmann, J.; Prins, D.

    2010-01-01

    The municipality of Amersfoort wants to construct an endurable and sustainable eco-town in the Soesterkwartier neighbourhood, by taking future climate change into account. The impact of climate change at the location of the proposed eco-town was studied by a literature review.