WorldWideScience

Sample records for sustained content-based academic

  1. Navigating Uncharted Waters: An Accelerated Content-Based English for Academic Purposes Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Kelly; Thomas, Michelle; Schuemann, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, Miami Dade College received a $1.9 million Title V grant from the US Department of Education to develop an Accelerated Content-Based English for Academic Purposes (EAP) track called Project ACE for ESL students. The ACE curriculum is anchored by the principles of flexibility, contextualization, and faculty buy-in--critical matters given…

  2. Content-Based Recreational Book Reading and Taiwanese Adolescents' Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Yen; Chang, Hsing-Yu; Yang, Shih Ruey

    2017-01-01

    The linkage between reading for pleasure and language ability has been well established, but the relationship between content-based recreational reading and academic achievement in various subject areas has rarely been explored. To investigate whether reading literature, social studies, and science trade books for pleasure is related to students'…

  3. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF CONTENT-BASED APPROACH IN IMPROVING ACADEMIC WRITING SKILLS OF EFL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Fita Heriyawati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the benefits of the implementation of Content-Based Approach (CBA in academic writing of EFL settings. Therefore, the approach was implemented in writing class in which 35 students participated as the respondents of the study. They were treated with CBA and their essays were then analyzed to examine the effects of the implementation of the approach on their writing products. Besides, this study investigated further the grammatical errors made by the students as reflected on their essays. The findings of this study proved that CBA is beneficial to improve students’ writing skills even though the students still produced grammatical errors.

  4. A Sustainability Education Academic Development Framework (SEAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Sarah; Thomas, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Academic development is one means of reorientating education within higher education (HE) to include sustainability principles. This paper identifies the requirements of academic development programmes that will provide educators with the skills to engage students in the ideas of sustainability and sustainable development. In order to determine…

  5. Education for sustainability through academic freedom | Ekwueme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Past researches are of the opinion that education for sustainable development and academic freedom could assist in solving these ethical menaces. Education for sustainable development allows every human being to acquire knowledge, skills, attitudes and values necessary to shape a sustainable future to make ...

  6. Sustaining Academic Life: A Case for Applying Principles of Social Sustainability to the Academic Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Cathryn; Churchman, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the social sustainability of academic work in Australian tertiary institutions, in addition to offering a summary of recent research on social sustainability with a particular emphasis on Barron and Gauntlett's work. Design/methodology/approach: Barron and Gauntlett's principles of social sustainability are used…

  7. Sustainability Champions? Academic Identities and Sustainability Curricula in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bronwyn E.; Cornforth, Sue; Beals, Fiona; Taylor, Mike; Tallon, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of academic staff who are committed to embedding sustainability within tertiary curricula and pedagogy. Design/Methodology/Approach: The focus of this paper is on a New Zealand university. A survey of staff was undertaken and in-depth interviews conducted with 11 sustainability…

  8. Academic Training: Toward Sustainable Energy Systems?

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 28, 29, 30, 31 March from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Toward Sustainable Energy Systems? F. Tellez / CIEMAT, Madrid, E and D.Martinez / CIEMAT-PSA, Almeria, E Recent work on alternative energies go in the direction of proving the feasibility of solar energy as one of the best alternatives into the future. Europe, as everybody else, has understandably vested interests in insourcing energetic demands as far as affordable. The good news is that solar energy may be its deciding straw, because it has remarkable facilities and projects probing the possibilities of this option. Two european research centers are at the leading edge in this area: ENEA, which is leading 'Archimede', a vast solar array project in Sicily, and CIEMAT, with its Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA, www.psa.es), a major solar energy facility at the south of Spain. Both will become basic poles of the planned 'EURO-MED'electricity interconnection, intending to carry solar electricity fro...

  9. Academic Training: Toward Sustainable Energy Systems?

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 28, 29, 30, 31 March from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Toward Sustainable Energy Systems? F. Tellez / CIEMAT, Madrid, E and D.Martinez / CIEMAT-PSA, Almeria, E Recent work on alternative energies go in the direction of proving the feasibility of solar energy as one of the best alternatives into the future. Europe, as everybody else, has understandably vested interests in insourcing energetic demands as far as affordable. The good news is that solar energy may be its deciding straw, because it has remarkable facilities and projects probing the possibilities of this option. Two european research centers are at the leading edge in this area: ENEA, which is leading 'Archimede', a vast solar array project in Sicily, and CIEMAT, with its Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA, www.psa.es) ,a major solar energy facility at the south of Spain. Both will become basic poles of the planned 'EURO-MED' electricity interconnection, intending to carry solar electricity f...

  10. Academic-community partnerships for sustainable preparedness and response systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Alexander; O'Neal, Patrick; Prescott, John; Stanley, Joan; Herrmann, Jack; Dunlop, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Academic institutions possess tremendous resources that could be important for community disaster response and preparedness activities. In-depth exploration of the role of academic institutions in community disaster response has elicited information about particular academic resources leveraged for and essential to community preparedness and response; factors that contribute to the decision-making process for partner engagement; and facilitators of and barriers to sustainable collaborations from the perspectives of academic institutions, public health and emergency management agencies, and national association and agency leaders. The Academic-Community Partnership Project of the Emory University Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center in collaboration with the Association of Schools of Public Health convened an invitational summit which included leadership from the National Association of County and City Health Officials, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Directors of Public Health Preparedness, Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, CDC Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Association of Schools of Public Health, Association of American Medical Colleges, Association of Academic Health Centers, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and American Association of Poison Control Centers. From this convention, emerged recommendations for building and sustaining academic-public health-community collaborations for preparedness locally and regionally.

  11. Ties That Bind: Creating and sustaining community-academic partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kynna N. Wright

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Growing interest among academics and health professionals in finding new ways to study and address complex health and social problems has manifested in recent years with increasing community demands for research and program implementation that is community-based, rather than merely community placed. In the United States, community-based participatory research (CBPR, with its emphasis on the creation and use of community-university or community-academic partnerships, is the prevailing paradigm to address these complex problems, especially those concerning racial/ethnic disparities in health and health care. While the need to strengthen the relationship between researchers and the community has been recognised, often from the viewpoint of the university partner, discussions on sustainability of partnerships have been few. The aim of this paper is to share reflections, through the eyes of the community members, on the core elements that tie community and academic members together and the challenges in understanding and nurturing those ties so that the community-academic partnership is sustained over time, and to offer possible recommendations for sustainability. This article speaks from the community’s perspective and reflects on the vital elements/components that tie together community-university partnerships and the challenges that may occur when trying to sustain and grow the partnership. It is based on a research CBPR study that was conducted to (1 evaluate the functioning and future sustainability of the community-university partnership of the Community Child Health Network Study Los Angeles (CCHN-LA community-university partnership, and (2 evaluate the experience and beliefs of the current CCHN-LA community-university partnership members in their understanding of current functioning. Keywords Community-academic partnerships; sustainability; challenges; solutions

  12. Examining Success and Sustainability of Academic Writing: A Case Study of Two Writing-Group Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska, Kinga; Lock, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In contemporary higher education there is a growing demand for academics to increase their publication output. This requirement raises the question of how institutions can best support a sustainable academic writing culture, which is needed to challenge the assumption that all academics know how to write for publication. This case study examines…

  13. 25 CFR 39.801 - What is the formula to determine the amount necessary to sustain a school's academic or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... sustain a school's academic or residential program? 39.801 Section 39.801 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... To Sustain an Academic or Residential Program § 39.801 What is the formula to determine the amount necessary to sustain a school's academic or residential program? (a) The Secretary's formula to determine...

  14. Cognitive Content Engagement in Content-Based Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Stella; Hoare, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a study of aspects of pedagogy that can bring about students' cognitive engagement with academic content and, thus, use of the academic language in content-based language lessons in three middle schools in Xi'an, China. Two criteria--academic content level and depth of processing--were used to determine cognitive content…

  15. Sustainability Accounting Courses, Talloires Declaration and Academic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tehmina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to identify the offering and nature (scope) of sustainability accounting courses at universities that have signed the Talloires Declaration and also at universities with prominent sustainability accounting researchers' affiliations. For this purpose a university web sites content analysis for sustainability…

  16. Unraveling the Skilled Mobility for Sustainable Development Mantra: An Analysis of China-EU Academic Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggi W.H. Leung

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the name of sustainable development, skilled persons including scholars, researchers and students have become incorporated in the “sustainable development” visions and strategies of institutions, city centers and nation-states near and far from where these potentially mobile brains are. Policies and programs have widely been implemented to foster move-in move-out mobility of these talents sans frontières who should contribute to the competitiveness of their affiliated institutions and structures in the global knowledge economy. This paper unravels this emergent academic mobility for sustainable development mantra. It unpacks the meanings of “sustainable development” and “sustainability” as used in relation to temporary (often circulatory mobility of students and academics in different contexts. An analysis of European and specifically China-EU academic mobility initiatives illustrates the multi-fold meanings of sustainability in this policy terrain. Zooming into the Chinese-German case, the paper highlights the common dominance of economic and environmental elements in the current “academic mobility for sustainability” construct that sidelines important social components such as equity and diversity. Statistical data and narratives will be provided to illustrate the stark gender and disciplinary bias in the Chinese-German staff academic mobility field. The paper argues for conscious, affirmative efforts by policy-makers and funding agencies to correct existing imbalances.

  17. A Novel Feed-Forward Modeling System Leads to Sustained Improvements in Attention and Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Ashley F; Rose, Maya; Norris, Troy; Gordon, Eric

    2016-01-28

    This study tested a novel feed-forward modeling (FFM) system as a nonpharmacological intervention for the treatment of ADHD children and the training of cognitive skills that improve academic performance. This study implemented a randomized, controlled, parallel design comparing this FFM with a nonpharmacological community care intervention. Improvements were measured on parent- and clinician-rated scales of ADHD symptomatology and on academic performance tests completed by the participant. Participants were followed for 3 months after training. Participants in the FFM training group showed significant improvements in ADHD symptomatology and academic performance, while the control group did not. Improvements from FFM were sustained 3 months later. The FFM appeared to be an effective intervention for the treatment of ADHD and improving academic performance. This FFM training intervention shows promise as a first-line treatment for ADHD while improving academic performance. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Operational Overreach or Academic Under Reach: Preventing Culmination Through Sustainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    sketch nestled deep in the sustainment planning section of the student text.97 Furthermore, consideration of a culmination point is mentioned as one...Printing Office, 2012. ________. Field Manual (FM) 3-0, Operations. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 2008. ________. Field Manual (FM) 3-06...Urban Operations. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 2009. ________. Field Manual (FM) 3-24.2, Tactics in Counterinsurgency. Washington, DC

  19. Late intellectual and academic outcomes following traumatic brain injury sustained during early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Prasad, Mary R; Kramer, Larry; Cox, Charles S; Baumgartner, James; Fletcher, Stephen; Mendez, Donna; Barnes, Marcia; Zhang, Xiaoling; Swank, Paul

    2006-10-01

    Although long-term neurological outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained early in life are generally unfavorable, the effect of TBI on the development of academic competencies is unknown. The present study characterizes intelligence quotient (IQ) and academic outcomes an average of 5.7 years after injury in children who sustained moderate to severe TBI prior to 6 years of age. Twenty-three children who suffered inflicted or noninflicted TBI between the ages of 4 and 71 months were enrolled in a prospective, longitudinal cohort study. Their mean age at injury was 21 months; their mean age at assessment was 89 months. The authors used general linear modeling approaches to compare IQ and standardized academic achievement test scores from the TBI group and a community comparison group (21 children). Children who sustained early TBI scored significantly lower than children in the comparison group on intelligence tests and in the reading, mathematical, and language domains of achievement tests. Forty-eight percent of the TBI group had IQs below the 10th percentile. During the approximately 5-year follow-up period, longitudinal IQ testing revealed continuing deficits and no recovery of function. Both IQ and academic achievement test scores were significantly related to the number of intracranial lesions and the lowest postresuscitation Glasgow Coma Scale score but not to age at the time of injury. Nearly 50% of the TBI group failed a school grade and/or required placement in self-contained special education classrooms; the odds of unfavorable academic performance were 18 times higher for the TBI group than the comparison group. Traumatic brain injury sustained early in life has significant and persistent consequences for the development of intellectual and academic functions and deleterious effects on academic performance.

  20. Academic drug discovery centres: the economic and organisational sustainability of an emerging model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz Kirkegaard, Henriette; Valentin, Finn

    2014-11-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic and organisational sustainability. We take that angle in an in-depth study of four prominent ADDCs. Our findings indicate that there are clear similarities in the way sustainable centres are organised, managed and financed. We also identify factors in the frameworks of academia and research funding affecting their performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Leveraging Lean Six Sigma to Culture, Nurture, and Sustain Assessment and Change in the Academic Library Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, S. A

    2009-01-01

      This paper explores the application of Lean Six Sigma, a business improvement philosophy and methodology, in the academic library environment as one means to nurture and sustain a culture of assessment and change...

  2. Creating Flexible and Sustainable Work Models for Academic Obstetrician-Gynecologists Engaged in Global Health Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Rose; Boatin, Adeline; Farid, Huma; Luckett, Rebecca; Neo, Dayna; Ricciotti, Hope; Scott, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    To describe various work models for obstetrics and gynecology global health faculty affiliated with academic medical centers and to identify barriers and opportunities for pursuing global health work. A mixed-methods study was conducted in 2016 among obstetrics and gynecology faculty and leaders from seven academic medical institutions in Boston, Massachusetts. Global health faculty members were invited to complete an online survey about their work models and to participate in semistructured interviews about barriers and facilitators of these models. Department chairs and residency directors were asked to participate in interviews. The survey response rate among faculty was 65.6% (21/32), of which 76.2% (16/21) completed an interview. Five department leaders (45.5% [5/11]) participated in an interview. Faculty described a range of work models with varied time and compensation, but only one third reported contracted time for global health work. The most common barriers to global health work were financial constraints, time limitations, lack of mentorship, need for specialized training, and maintenance of clinical skills. Career satisfaction, creating value for the obstetrics and gynecology department, and work model flexibility were the most important facilitators of sustainable global health careers. The study identified challenges and opportunities to creating flexible and sustainable work models for academic obstetrics and gynecology clinicians engaged in global health work. Additional research and innovation are needed to identify work models that allow for sustainable careers in global women's health. There are opportunities to create professional standards and models for academic global health work in the obstetrics and gynecology specialty.

  3. Academic psychiatry and health care reform: strategic initiatives for sustaining the clinical mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, O Lee; Gwon, Howard S; McHugh, Paul R; Breakey, William R; Schwartz, Joseph M; Clark, Michael R; Kaminsky, Michael J

    2003-02-01

    Health care reform has posed special challenges for departments of psychiatry in academic medical centers. This report describes one department's strategic responses to a marketplace with high penetration by managed care and provides examples of the kinds of faculty concerns that can arise when major departmental reorganizations are attempted. The department's successful adaptation to a radically altered professional environment is attributed to the following five initiatives: vertical integration and diversification of clinical programs, service line management, outcomes measurement, regional network development, and institutional managed care partnerships Although the authors did not design their adaptive efforts as a research study, they offer objective data to support their conclusion that the viability of their overall clinical enterprise has been sustained despite an external environment inhospitable to academic psychiatry.

  4. Participatory evaluation of a community-academic partnership to inform capacity-building and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Klasko, Lynne B; Fleming, Khaliah; Koskan, Alexis M; Jackson, Nia T; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Luque, John S; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Britt, Lounell; Waddell, Rhondda; Meade, Cathy D; Gwede, Clement K

    2015-10-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) was formed as a partnership comprised of committed community based organizations (grassroots, service, health care organizations) and a National Cancer Institute designated cancer center working together to reduce cancer health disparities. Adhering to principles of community-based participatory research, TBCCN's primary aims are to develop and sustain outreach, training, and research programs that aim to reach medically underserved, multicultural and multilingual populations within the Tampa Bay tri-county area. Using a participatory evaluation approach, we recently evaluated the partnerships' priorities for cancer education and outreach; perspectives on the partnerships' adherence to CBPR principles; and suggestions for sustaining TBCCN and its efforts. The purpose of this paper is to describe implementation and outcomes of this participatory evaluation of a community/academic partnership, and to illustrate the application of evaluation findings for partnership capacity-building and sustainability. Our evaluation provides evidence for partners' perceived benefits and realized expectations of the partnership and illustrates the value of ongoing and continued partnership assessment to directly inform program activities and build community capacity and sustainability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Plan for Academic Biobank Solvency—Leveraging Resources and Applying Business Processes to Improve Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, James; Turner, Barbara; Vroom, James; Short, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Researcher‐initiated biobanks based at academic institutions contribute valuable biomarker and translational research advances to medicine. With many legacy banks once supported by federal funding, reductions in fiscal support threaten the future of existing and new biobanks. When the Brain Bank at Duke University's Bryan Alzheimer's Disease Center (ADRC) faced a funding crisis, a collaborative, multidisciplinary team embarked on a 2‐year biobank sustainability project utilizing a comprehensive business strategy, dedicated project management, and a systems approach involving many Duke University entities. By synthesizing and applying existing knowledge, Duke Translational Medicine Institute created and launched a business model that can be adjusted and applied to legacy and start‐up academic biobanks. This model provides a path to identify new funding mechanisms, while also emphasizing improved communication, business development, and a focus on collaborating with industry to improve access to biospecimens. Benchmarks for short‐term Brain Bank stabilization have been successfully attained, and the evaluation of long‐term sustainability metrics is ongoing. PMID:25996355

  6. A Plan for Academic Biobank Solvency-Leveraging Resources and Applying Business Processes to Improve Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzarski, Diane; Burke, James; Turner, Barbara; Vroom, James; Short, Nancy

    2015-10-01

    Researcher-initiated biobanks based at academic institutions contribute valuable biomarker and translational research advances to medicine. With many legacy banks once supported by federal funding, reductions in fiscal support threaten the future of existing and new biobanks. When the Brain Bank at Duke University's Bryan Alzheimer's Disease Center (ADRC) faced a funding crisis, a collaborative, multidisciplinary team embarked on a 2-year biobank sustainability project utilizing a comprehensive business strategy, dedicated project management, and a systems approach involving many Duke University entities. By synthesizing and applying existing knowledge, Duke Translational Medicine Institute created and launched a business model that can be adjusted and applied to legacy and start-up academic biobanks. This model provides a path to identify new funding mechanisms, while also emphasizing improved communication, business development, and a focus on collaborating with industry to improve access to biospecimens. Benchmarks for short-term Brain Bank stabilization have been successfully attained, and the evaluation of long-term sustainability metrics is ongoing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Students Perspective of Using Content-Based Approach in ESP Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju Yin; Chen, Wen Ching

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the perspectives of using content-based approach on college students in International Trade Business English (ITBE) Class. Content-based Approach (CBA) viewed as language learning with contents for academic subject matter. It provides a cognitive and motivational basis of language learning. CBA approach…

  8. Do Children Who Sustain Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Childhood Need and Receive Academic Services 7 Years After Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingery, Kathleen M; Narad, Megan E; Taylor, H Gerry; Yeates, Keith Owen; Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L

    To examine the prevalence of academic need, academic service utilization, and unmet need as well as factors associated with academic service utilization 6.8 years after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in early childhood. Fifty-eight (16 severe, 14 moderate, 28 complicated mild) children with TBI and 72 children with orthopedic injury (OI) completed the long-term follow-up 6.8 years after injury in early childhood (ages 3-7 years). Injury group differences in rates of need for academic services, academic service utilization, and unmet need as well as factors associated with service utilization and unmet need were examined. Students with moderate and severe TBI had significantly greater rates of need than those with OI. A greater proportion of the severe TBI sample was receiving academic services at long-term follow-up than the OI and complicated mild groups however, among those with an identified need, injury group did not affect academic service utilization. Below average IQ/achievement scores was the only area of need predictive of academic service utilization. Rates of unmet need were high and similar across injury groups (46.2%-63.6%). The need for academic services among patients who sustained a TBI during early childhood remains high 6.8 years post injury. Findings underscore the importance of continued monitoring of behaviors and academic performance in students with a history of early childhood TBI. This may be especially true among children with less severe injuries who are at risk for being underserved.

  9. Unfazed or Dazed and Confused: Does Early Adolescent Marijuana Use Cause Sustained Impairments in Attention and Academic Functioning?

    OpenAIRE

    Pardini, Dustin; White, Helene; Xiong, Shuangyan; Bechtold, Jordan; Chung, Tammy; Loeber, Rolf; Hipwell, Alison

    2015-01-01

    There is some suggestion that heavy marijuana use during early adolescence (prior to age 17) may cause significant impairments in attention and academic functioning that remain following sustained periods of abstinence. However, no longitudinal studies have examined whether both male and female adolescents who engage in low (less than once a month) to moderate (at least once a monthly) marijuana use experience increased problems with attention and academic performance, and whether these probl...

  10. Using Organizational Philosophy to Create a Self-Sustaining Compensation Plan Without Harming Academic Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverence, Robert; Nuttall, Richard; Palmer, Rachel; Segal, Mark; Wood, Alicia; Yancey, Fay; Shuster, Jonathon; Brantly, Mark; Hromas, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Academic physician reimbursement has moved to productivity-based compensation plans. To be sustainable, such plans must be self-funding. Additionally, unless research and education are appropriately valued, faculty involved in these efforts will become disillusioned, yet revenue generation in these activities is less robust than for clinical care activities. Faculty at the Department of Medicine, University of Florida Health, elected a committee of junior and senior faculty and division chiefs to restructure the compensation plan in fiscal year (FY) 2011. This committee was charged with designing a new compensation plan based on seven principles of organizational philosophy: equity, compensation coupled to productivity, authority aligned with responsibility, respect for all academic missions, transparency, professionalism, and self-funding in each academic mission. The new compensation plan was implemented in FY2013. A survey administered at the end of FY2015 showed that 61% (76/125) of faculty were more satisfied with this plan than the previous plan. Since the year before implementation, clinical relative value units per faculty increased 7% (from 3,458 in FY2012 to 3,704 in FY2015, P < .002), incentives paid per faculty increased 250% (from $3,191 in FY2012 to $11,153 in FY2015, P ≤ .001), and publications per faculty increased 15% (from 2.6 in FY2012 to 3.0 in FY2015, P < .001). Grant submissions, external funding, and teaching hours also increased per faculty but did not reach statistical significance. An important next step will be to incorporate quality metrics into the compensation plan, without affecting costs or throughput.

  11. Metadata for Content-Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Sterca

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an image retrieval technique that combines content based image retrieval with pre-computed metadata-based image retrieval. The resulting system will have the advantages of both approaches: the speed/efficiency of metadata-based image retrieval and the accuracy/power of content-based image retrieval.

  12. Sustaining supply of senior academic leadership skills in a shortage environment: a short review of a decade of dental experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Estie; Heitz-Mayfield, Lisa; Tennant, Marc

    2014-06-01

    For the past decade, and expected for the next decade, Australia faces a significant health workforce shortage and an acute maldistribution of health workforce. Against this background the governments at both national and state level have been increasing the training places for all health practitioners and trying to redress the imbalance through a strong regional focus on these developments. Dentistry has been an active participant in these workforce initiatives. This study examines the increasing demand for academics and discusses the existing pathways for increase, and also examines in detail the advantages of a sustainable, shared-model approach, using dentistry as a model for other disciplines. Three non-exclusive pathways for reform are considered: importation of academics, delayed retirement and the shared resource approach. Of the various solutions outlined in this review a detailed explanation of a cost-effective shared model of senior academic leadership is highlighted as a viable, sustainable model for ameliorating the shortage.

  13. In-training factors predictive of choosing and sustaining a productive academic career path in neurological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, R Webster; Asthagiri, Ashok R; Starke, Robert M; Zusman, Edie E; Chiocca, E Antonio; Lonser, Russell R

    2012-04-01

    Factors during neurosurgical residency that are predictive of an academic career path and promotion have not been defined. To determine factors associated with selecting and sustaining an academic career in neurosurgery by analyzing in-training factors for all graduates of American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited programs between 1985 and 1990. Neurological surgery residency graduates (between 1985 and 1990) from ACGME-approved training programs were analyzed to determine factors associated with choosing an academic career path and having academic success. Information was available for 717 of the 720 (99%) neurological surgery resident training graduates (678 male, 39 female). One hundred thirty-eight graduates (19.3%) held full-time academic positions. One hundred seven (14.9%) were professors and 35 (4.9%) were department chairs/chiefs. An academic career path/success was associated with more total (5.1 vs 1.9; P professor or chair/chief was associated with more publications during residency (P professor or chair/chief. Although male trainees published more than female trainees (2.6 vs 0.9 publications; P professor or chair/chief (P > .05). Defined in-training factors including number of total publications, number of first-author publications, and program size are predictive of residents choosing and succeeding in an academic career path.

  14. Financial sustainability of academic health centers: identifying challenges and strategic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Jim P; Li, Tao; Shiyanbola, Oyewale O; Jacobson, Janelle J

    2014-06-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) play a vital role in the health care system. The training of health care personnel and delivery of health care services, especially to the most complex and financially challenged patients, has been a responsibility increasingly shouldered by AHCs over the years. Additionally, AHCs play a significant role in researching and developing new treatment protocols, including discovering and validating new health technologies. However, AHCs face unique financial challenges in fulfilling their social mission in the health care system. Reforms being implemented under the Affordable Care Act and shifting economic patterns are threatening the financial sustainability of AHCs.The authors review challenges facing AHCs, including training new health care professionals with fewer funding resources, disproportionate clinical care of complex and costly patients, charity care to uninsured and underinsured, and reduced research funding opportunities. Then, they provide a review of some potential solutions to these challenges, including new reimbursement methods, improvements in operational efficiency, price regulation, subsidization of education, improved decision making and communication, utilization of industrial management tools, and increasing internal and external cooperation. Devising solutions to the evolving problems of AHCs is crucial to improving health care delivery in the United States. Most likely, a combination of market, government, and system reforms will be needed to improve the viability of AHCs and assist them in fulfilling their social and organizational missions.

  15. Unfazed or Dazed and Confused: Does Early Adolescent Marijuana Use Cause Sustained Impairments in Attention and Academic Functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Dustin; White, Helene R; Xiong, Shuangyan; Bechtold, Jordan; Chung, Tammy; Loeber, Rolf; Hipwell, Alison

    2015-10-01

    There is some suggestion that heavy marijuana use during early adolescence (prior to age 17) may cause significant impairments in attention and academic functioning that remain despite sustained periods of abstinence. However, no longitudinal studies have examined whether both male and female adolescents who engage in low (less than once a month) to moderate (at least once a monthly) marijuana use experience increased problems with attention and academic performance, and whether these problems remain following sustained abstinence. The current study used within-individual change models to control for all potential pre-existing and time-stable confounds when examining this potential causal association in two gender-specific longitudinal samples assessed annually from ages 11 to 16 (Pittsburgh Youth Study N = 479; Pittsburgh Girls Study N = 2296). Analyses also controlled for the potential influence of several pertinent time-varying factors (e.g., other substance use, peer delinquency). Prior to controlling for time-varying confounds, analyses indicated that adolescents tended to experience an increase in parent-reported attention and academic problems, relative to their pre-onset levels, during years when they used marijuana. After controlling for several time-varying confounds, only the association between marijuana use and attention problems in the sample of girls remained statistically significant. There was no evidence indicating that adolescents who used marijuana experienced lingering attention and academic problems, relative to their pre-onset levels, after abstaining from use for at least a year. These results suggest that adolescents who engage in low to moderate marijuana use experience an increase in observable attention and academic problems, but these problems appear to be minimal and are eliminated following sustained abstinence.

  16. Content-based image and video compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xun; Li, Honglin; Ahalt, Stanley C.

    2002-08-01

    The term Content-Based appears often in applications for which MPEG-7 is expected to play a significant role. MPEG-7 standardizes descriptors of multimedia content, and while compression is not the primary focus of MPEG-7, the descriptors defined by MPEG-7 can be used to reconstruct a rough representation of an original multimedia source. In contrast, current image and video compression standards such as JPEG and MPEG are not designed to encode at the very low bit-rates that could be accomplished with MPEG-7 using descriptors. In this paper we show that content-based mechanisms can be introduced into compression algorithms to improve the scalability and functionality of current compression methods such as JPEG and MPEG. This is the fundamental idea behind Content-Based Compression (CBC). Our definition of CBC is a compression method that effectively encodes a sufficient description of the content of an image or a video in order to ensure that the recipient is able to reconstruct the image or video to some degree of accuracy. The degree of accuracy can be, for example, the classification error rate of the encoded objects, since in MPEG-7 the classification error rate measures the performance of the content descriptors. We argue that the major difference between a content-based compression algorithm and conventional block-based or object-based compression algorithms is that content-based compression replaces the quantizer with a more sophisticated classifier, or with a quantizer which minimizes classification error. Compared to conventional image and video compression methods such as JPEG and MPEG, our results show that content-based compression is able to achieve more efficient image and video coding by suppressing the background while leaving the objects of interest nearly intact.

  17. Sustaining Employability: A Process for Introducing Cloud Computing, Big Data, Social Networks, Mobile Programming and Cybersecurity into Academic Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan Bologa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a process for introducing modern technological subjects into the academic curricula of non-technical universities. The process described may increase and contribute to social sustainability by enabling non-technical students’ access to the field of the Internet of Things and the broader Industry 4.0. The process has been defined and tested during a curricular reform project that took place in two large universities in Eastern Europe. In this article, the authors describe the results and impact, over multiple years, of a project financed by the European Union that aimed to introduce the following subjects into the academic curricula of business students: cloud computing, big data, mobile programming, and social networks and cybersecurity (CAMSS. The results are useful for those trying to implement similar curricular reforms, or to companies that need to manage talent pipelines.

  18. Unraveling the skilled mobility for sustainable development mantra: an analysis of China-EU academic mobility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, W.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the name of sustainable development, skilled persons including scholars, researchers and students have become incorporated in the “sustainable development” visions and strategies of institutions, city centers and nation-states near and far from where these potentially mobile brains are.

  19. Investment in Sustainable Development: A UK Perspective on the Business and Academic Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Middleton

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available There are many legislative, stakeholder and supply chain pressures on business to be more ‘sustainable’. Universities have recognised the need for graduate knowledge and understanding of sustainable development issues. Many businesses and universities have responded and introduced Sustainable Development models into their operations with much of the current effort directed at climate change. However, as the current worldwide financial crisis slowly improves, the expectations upon how businesses operate and behave are changing. It will require improved transparency and relationships with all stakeholders, which is the essence of sustainable development. The challenges and opportunities for both business and universities are to understand the requirements of sustainable development and the transformation that is required. They should ensure that knowledge is embedded within the culture of the organisation and wider society in order to achieve a sustainable future.

  20. The Content-based Reading Approaches (COBRA) Model in the ELL and LD Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Yi

    2010-01-01

    The Content-based Reading Approaches (COBRA) framework, constructed by Heerman (2002), was made up of the instructional goals designed for reading-learning integrations in subject matter classrooms. ELL and LD students often fail to have sufficient reading skills to succeed within their different academic subjects, consequently it is important for…

  1. Caravaggio: A Design for an Interdisciplinary Content-Based EAP/ESP Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Michal; Wexler, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Presents a detailed design for a content-based unit, the focus of which is the film "Caravaggio." The unit also includes readings in art history and film and is part of a specialized English for academic purposes/English for special purposes reading comprehension course for first-year students majoring in art history and in a…

  2. Content-Based Personalization Services Integrating Folksonomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musto, Cataldo; Narducci, Fedelucio; Lops, Pasquale; de Gemmis, Marco; Semeraro, Giovanni

    Basic content-based personalization consists in matching up the attributes of a user profile, in which preferences and interests are stored, with the attributes of a content object. The Web 2.0 (r)evolution has changed the game for personalization, from ‘elitary’ Web 1.0, written by few and read by many, to web content generated by everyone (user-generated content - UGC), since the role of people has evolved from passive consumers of information to that of active contributors.

  3. Sustaining the edge: factors influencing strategy selection in academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne M; Szabat, Kathryn

    2002-01-01

    Competition within the acute care sector as well as increased penetration by managed care organizations has influenced the structure and role of academic health centers during the past decade. The market factors confronting academic health centers are not dissimilar from conditions that confront other organizations competing in mature industries characterized by declining profitability and intense rivalry for market share. When confronted with intense competition or adverse external events, organizations in other industries have responded to potential threats by forming alliances, developing joint ventures, or merging with another firm to maintain their competitive advantage. Although mergers and acquisitions dominated the strategic landscape in the healthcare industry during the past decade, recent evidence suggests that other types of strategic ventures may offer similar economic and contracting benefits to member organizations. Academic health centers have traditionally been involved in network relationships with multiple partners via their shared technology, collaborative research, and joint educational endeavors. These quasi-organizational relationships appear to have provided a framework for strategic decisions and allowed executives of academic health centers to select strategies that were competitive yet closely aligned with their organizational mission. The analysis of factors that influenced strategy selection by executives of academic health centers suggests a deliberate and methodical approach to achieving market share objectives, expanding managed care contracts, and developing physician networks.

  4. Mission-focused, productivity-based model for sustainable support of academic hematology/oncology faculty and divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Randall F; Hollinger, Krista J

    2010-03-01

    Adoption of a mission-focused, productivity-based funds-flow model recognizes faculty activities regardless of their primary mission and incentivizes and financially rewards both academic and clinical productivity. We describe here how such a model could be utilized for an academic division of hematology and medical oncology. On the basis of our own experience in managing the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the University of California at Irvine, and results of a survey of hematology/oncology division chiefs, a new model was developed with clear definitions of missions (ascertaining faculty effort toward each mission and definition of productivity benchmarks for each), careful identification of revenue streams, and establishment of base and incentive salary support that rewards productivity. Ongoing performance improvement and monitoring was incorporated into the model. A model for sustainable support of hematology/oncology faculty and divisions was developed that was transparent, flexible, and had buy-in from both the faculty and departmental/school administration. Development of the model was supported by a survey of hematology/oncology division chiefs. It is possible to reorganize a faculty practice and salary structure to achieve a mission-focused, productivity-based paradigm. Although the model described is specifically targeted at academic hematology and medical oncology divisions, with modification, it could serve as a framework for other departments or throughout schools of medicine.

  5. Navigating a Transdisciplinary Research Project with a Non-Traditional Academic Background: Climate Change, Soil Health and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basche, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate and Corn-based Cropping Systems Coordinated Agriculture Project (CSCAP) is a collaboration of 150+ team members spanning a range of scientific disciplinary backgrounds. The project goal is to produce collaborative research, education and extension aimed at mitigating and adapting Midwest cropping systems to climate variability and change. My PhD work in Agronomy and Sustainable Agriculture is a part of the CSCAP although my prior academic background was in applied climate science and biology, thus proposing a potential challenge to the new academic landscape. Further, graduate students within CSCAP are a part of a natural experiment in how the next generation of scientists operates in a transdisciplinary environment. As part of my leadership in the CSCAP, I helped to develop a "roadmap" document outlining the learning opportunities available to students. This document was meant to underscore the skills and experiences that will aid us in future collaborative research projects. Through these leadership experiences, I believe that the underpinning of any successful collaborative research project requires time: to develop relationships, earn trust and develop shared understandings and respect for different academic backgrounds.

  6. Paradigms and Narratives for Sustainable Well-Being in Academic Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Thomas V.

    2013-01-01

    I summarize multidisciplinary paradigms and best practices' recommendations for professional learning by higher education faculty members. This review leads to an innovative narrative model for academic life that synthesizes current personality and vocational psychology theory and positive psychology's emphasis on virtues and character…

  7. Developing a Sustainable Research Culture in an Independent Academic Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Independent academic medical centers (IAMC) are challenged to develop and support a research enterprise and maintain primary goals of healthcare delivery and financial solvency. Strategies for promoting translational research have been shown to be effective at institutions in the top level of federal funding, but not for smaller IAMCs. The…

  8. Establishing and sustaining research partnerships in Africa: a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de-Graft Aikins Ama

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper examines the challenges and opportunities in establishing and sustaining north–south research partnerships in Africa through a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease. Established in 2006 with seed funding from the British Academy, the partnership aimed to bring together multidisciplinary chronic disease researchers based in the UK and Africa to collaborate on research, inform policymaking, train and support postgraduates and create a platform for research dissemination. We review the partnership’s achievements and challenges, applying established criteria for developing successful partnerships. During the funded period we achieved major success in creating a platform for research dissemination through international meetings and publications. Other goals, such as engaging in collaborative research and training postgraduates, were not as successfully realised. Enabling factors included trust and respect between core working group members, a shared commitment to achieving partnership goals, and the collective ability to develop creative strategies to overcome funding challenges. Barriers included limited funding, administrative support, and framework for monitoring and evaluating some goals. Chronic disease research partnerships in low-income regions operate within health research, practice, funding and policy environments that prioritise infectious diseases and other pressing public health and developmental challenges. Their long-term sustainability will therefore depend on integrated funding systems that provide a crucial capacity building bridge. Beyond the specific challenges of chronic disease research, we identify social capital, measurable goals, administrative support, creativity and innovation and funding as five key ingredients that are essential for sustaining research partnerships.

  9. Developing and sustaining community-academic partnerships: lessons from Downstate New York Healthy Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzel, Cheryl; Burrus, Gail; Davis, Jean; Moses, Ngozi; Rumley, Sharon; Walters, Dionna

    2007-10-01

    Partnering with communities is a critical aspect of contemporary health promotion. Linkages between universities and communities are particularly significant, given the prominence of academic institutions in channeling grants. This article describes the collaboration between a school of public health and several community-based organizations on a maternal and infant health grant project. The partnership serves as a model for ways in which a university and community organizations can interrelate and interact. Central lessons include the significance of sharing values and goals, the benefit of drawing on the different strengths of each partner, the gap created by the university's institutional focus on research rather than service and advocacy, and the strains created by power inequities and distribution of funds. A key element of the partnership's success is the emphasis on capacity building and colearning. The project demonstrates the potential of employing community-academic partnerships as a valuable mechanism for implementing community-based health promotion programs.

  10. How Academics in Undergraduate Business Programs at an Australian University View Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Heidt, Tania; Lamberton, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    This article explores conceptualisations of sustainability and perceptions of its importance in curriculum held by business subject and program leaders. Results are reported from an empirical study of the first-year Bachelor of Business program at an Australian university. Research data was collected in 16 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with…

  11. The Impact of Content-Based Network Technologies on Perceptions of Nutrition Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Hannah; Church, E. Mitchell; Brewer, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Consumers are exposed to obesogenic environments on a regular basis. Building nutrition literacy is critical for sustaining healthy dietary habits for a lifetime and reducing the prevalence of chronic disease. Purpose: There is a need to investigate the impact of content-based network (CBN) technologies on perceptions of nutrition…

  12. The Los Angeles Healthy Community Neighborhood Initiative: A Ten Year Experience in Building and Sustaining a Successful Community-Academic Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keyonna M; Morris, D'Ann; Jones, Loretta; Lucas-Wright, Aziza; Jones, Felica; Del Pino, Homero E; Porter, Courtney; Vargas, Roberto; Kahn, Katherine; Brown, Arleen F; Norris, Keith C

    2015-01-01

    Developing effective Community-Academic Partnerships (CAPs) is challenging, and the steps to build and sustain them have not been well documented. This paper describes efforts to form and sustain the Healthy Community Neighborhood Initiative (HCNI), a CAP to improve health in a low-income community in South Los Angeles. Moderated, semi-structured discussions with HCNI community and academic partners were used to develop a framework for CAP formation. We identified two key features, shared values and respect, as critical to the decision to form the HCNI. Five elements were identified as necessary for building and sustaining the HCNI: trust, transparency, equity and fairness, adequate resources and developing protocols to provide structure. We also identified several challenges and barriers and the strategies used in the HCNI to mitigate these challenges. We developed a framework to incorporate and reinforce the key elements identified as crucial in building and sustaining a CAP in a low-income community.

  13. Developing an academic health department in Northeast Tennessee: a sustainable approach through student leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Billy; Blackley, David; Masters, Paula; May, Andrew Stephen; Mayes, Gary; Williams, Christian; Pack, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to bridge the gap between public health practice and academia, the Health Resources and Services Administration-funded Tennessee Public Health Training Center (LIFEPATH) has supported establishment of an academic health department (AHD) involving the East Tennessee State University College of Public Health (COPH) and the Sullivan County Regional Health Department (SCRHD). The SCRHD identified a need to increase internal capacity to conduct ongoing community health assessment and community-centered practice. Similarly, the COPH recognized the need to expand evidence-based practice implementation and evaluation opportunities for public health students. Personnel from the SCRHD, LIFEPATH, and the COPH developed a formal AHD agreement during the summer of 2012 and launched the program the subsequent fall semester. One aspect of the COPH/SCRHD/LIFEPATH model that addresses financial barriers experienced by other AHDs is the competitive awarding of the coordinator position to a doctor of public health student from the COPH, demonstrating investment in the model by the college. The doctor of public health student gains leadership experience through project management, coordination of the local health council, and day-to-day facilitation of undergraduate and master's student interns. The SCRHD benefits from the formal academic background of graduate-level interns dedicated to working in the community. This AHD framework offers an opportunity for doctoral-level students to develop practical leadership skills in a health department while enhancing the capacity of the SCRHD and the COPH to serve their community and stakeholders.

  14. A Synthesis Model of Sustainable Market Orientation: Conceptualization, Measurement, and Influence on Academic Accreditation--A Case Study of Egyptian-Accredited Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Warda, Sherein H.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education institutions are increasingly concerned about accreditation. Although sustainable market orientation (SMO) bears on academic accreditation, to date, no study has developed a valid scale of SMO or assessed its influence on accreditation. The purpose of this paper is to construct and validate an SMO scale that was developed in…

  15. A 10-year journey in sustaining fall reduction in an academic medical center in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordiffi, Siti Zubaidah; Ng, Sow Chun; Ang, N K Emily; Lee, Siu Yin; Lee, Margaret; Teng, Siew Tin; Yip, Wai Kin; Quek, Swee Chye; Santos, Diana R

    2016-03-01

    The incidence rate of falls at 1.3 falls/1000 patient-days at a tertiary hospital in 2004 was found to be high when benchmarked against other hospitals' fall rates in Singapore. This marked the starting point of a journey of reducing fall incidence by successfully combining evidence-based healthcare measures with quality-improvement strategies. The aim of this project was to implement fall-reduction strategies in the inpatient care areas in an acute care tertiary hospital. Two action research studies commissioned for ascertaining an appropriate fall-risk assessment and effectiveness of targeted individualized interventions formed the foundation of fall-reduction strategies. Evidence-based healthcare measures were combined with quality-improvement strategies that addressed fall risks to prevent falls and mitigate injuries. The process of managing fall-related incidents was standardized as the fall rate continues to be a key nursing performance indicator. The overall fall trend decreased from 1.09/1000 patient-days in 2008 to 0.82/1000 patient-days in 2012. The decreasing trends were sustained in 2013 and 2014 at 0.91/100 and 0.85/1000, respectively. The fall injury rate reduced from 0.31/1000 patient-days in 2008 and was maintained at a rate of 0.20-0.24 during 2009-2012. The implementation of fall-reduction strategies reduced the fall incidence rate in this acute care setting. However, more work is required to ensure the changes made to the fall assessment, interventions, and processes are sustained and incorporated in patient care.

  16. Interprofessional education and practice guide No. 4: Developing and sustaining interprofessional education at an academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willgerodt, Mayumi A; Abu-Rish Blakeney, Erin; Brock, Douglas M; Liner, Debra; Murphy, Nanci; Zierler, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly health professions schools and academic health centers are required to include interprofessional education (IPE) as a standard part of their core curricula to maintain accreditation. However, challenges continue to surface as faculty struggle to develop and participate in IPE activities while balancing increasing workloads and limited resources, and also trying to keep current in the changing profession-specific accreditation and standards. This guide shares lessons learned from developing and sustaining IPE activities at the University of Washington (UW) based in the United States. In 2008, the UW Schools of Nursing and Medicine were awarded funds to develop, implement, and evaluate an interprofessional program focused on team communication. This funding supported the creation of two annual large-scale IPE events, provided infrastructure support for the Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education, Research and Practice (CHSIERP), and supported numerous interprofessional activities and initiatives in the health professions curricula. Our experiences over the years have yielded several key lessons that are important to consider in any IPE effort. In this guide we report on these lessons learned and provide pragmatic suggestions for designing and implementing IPE in order to maximize long-term success.

  17. Sustaining the Higher Education Hub Model: The Challenge of Adequate Academic and Social Support Structures for International Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Richards

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Education Hub (EH concept has perhaps become the single most important focus of higher education policy in most Asian countries. A particular Asian Education Hub model (e.g. Cheng, 2010 is now globally influential with its emphasis on how governments can harness direct as well as indirect economic benefits of a higher education system. Such a model aims to prepare students for employment in an emerging global economy and also to attract fee-paying international students in terms of education as not just a public good but a key and increasingly important area of national investment and economic development. In a related paper which focused on a comparison between distinct Malaysian and Singaporean versions of Asian EH l models developed over the last two decades (Richards, 2011c, we investigated the dangers as well as opportunities at stake. In this paper, we investigate the linked idea that sufficient academic and social support structures for supporting international as well as local students provide the crucial key to the factors of sustainability needed to support the various versions of the general strategy of Higher Education internationalisation.

  18. The Los Angeles Healthy Community Neighborhood Initiative: A Ten Year Experience in Building and Sustaining a Successful Community-Academic Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keyonna M; Morris, D’Ann; Jones, Loretta; Lucas-Wright, Aziza; Jones, Felica; del Pino, Homero E; Porter, Courtney; Vargas, Roberto; Kahn, Katherine; Brown, Arleen F; Norris, Keith C

    2016-01-01

    Background Developing effective Community-Academic Partnerships (CAPs) is challenging, and the steps to build and sustain them have not been well documented. This paper describes efforts to form and sustain the Healthy Community Neighborhood Initiative (HCNI), a CAP to improve health in a low-income community in South Los Angeles. Methods Moderated, semi-structured discussions with HCNI community and academic partners were used to develop a framework for CAP formation. Results We identified two key features, shared values and respect, as critical to the decision to form the HCNI. Five elements were identified as necessary for building and sustaining the HCNI: trust, transparency, equity and fairness, adequate resources and developing protocols to provide structure. We also identified several challenges and barriers and the strategies used in the HCNI to mitigate these challenges. Conclusion We developed a framework to incorporate and reinforce the key elements identified as crucial in building and sustaining a CAP in a low-income community. PMID:27747314

  19. Teleconsultations using content-based retrieval of parametric images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruminski, J

    2004-01-01

    The problem of medical teleconsultations with intelligent computer system rather than with a human expert is analyzed. System for content-based retrieval of images is described and presented as a use case of a passive teleconsultation. Selected features, crucial for retrieval quality, are introduced including: synthesis of parametric images, regions of interest detection and extraction, definition of content-based features, generation of descriptors, query algebra, system architecture and performance. Additionally, electronic business pattern is proposed to generalize teleconsultation services like content-based retrieval systems.

  20. Content-based multimedia retrieval: indexing and diversification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leuken, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    The demand for efficient systems that facilitate searching in multimedia databases and collections is vastly increasing. Application domains include criminology, musicology, trademark registration, medicine and image or video retrieval on the web. This thesis discusses content-based retrieval

  1. Perceived Attributes of Event Sustainability in the MICE Industry in Thailand: A Viewpoint from Governmental, Academic, Venue and Practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantapop Buathong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impacts of meetings, incentives, conventions, and exhibitions (MICE, Event industries are as far reaching as their economic reach. The travelers who attend events patronize a wide variety of businesses: airlines, car rental agencies, hotels, restaurants, performance venues, and tour operators. The overall research objectives of this study fall on two aspects of sustainability in the event industry: the most prevalent practices that the industry employs and the relative importance of sustainability to convention consumers. This study implements mixed research methods in order to explore the perceptions of sustainable event development in the metropolitan area of Bangkok, Thailand. Empirical evidence on significant issues for event sustainability is provided. Based on the results, recommendations are made to improve sustainable event development in Thailand and offer guidance to the event industry so that it can develop its potential and gain greater prominence on the world MICE stage.

  2. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CONTENT-BASED INSTRUCTION TO TEACH SPEAKING VIEWED FROM STUDENTS’ CREATIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisyah Sunarwan -

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the research are to examine: (1 whether Content-Based Instruction is more effective than Audio-Lingual Method to teach speaking to the third semester students of STAIN Jurai Siwo Metro in the academic year of 2012/2013; (2 whether the students having high creativity have better speaking skill than those having low creativity; and (3 whether there is an interaction between teaching methods and students’ creativity in teaching speaking. The method in this research was experimental study. It was conducted at the third semester students of STAIN Jurai Siwo Metro in the academic year of 2012/2013. The sample of the research was two classes; C consists of 40 students as an experimental class and E consists of 40 students as a control class. The sampling technique used was cluster random sampling. Each class was divided into two groups (the students having high and low creativity. The techniques of collecting data were creativity test and speaking test that were tried out to know their readability. The data were analyzed by using Multifactor Analysis of Variance (ANOVA test of 2 x 2 and Tukey test.The result of data analysis shows that: (1 Content-Based Instruction is more effective than Audio-Lingual Method to teach speaking (2 the students having high creativity have better speaking skill than the students having low creativity and (3 there is an interaction between teaching methods and students’ creativity in teaching speaking. Based on the finding, it can be concluded that Content-Based Instruction is an effective method to teach speaking.

  3. Cobra: A Content-Based Video Retrieval System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkovic, M.; Jonker, Willem

    An increasing number of large publicly available video libraries results in a demand for techniques that can manipulate the video data based on content. In this paper, we present a content-based video retrieval system called Cobra. The system supports automatic extraction and retrieval of high-level

  4. Content-based analysis improves audiovisual archive retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurnink, B.; Snoek, C.G.M.; de Rijke, M.; Smeulders, A.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Content-based video retrieval is maturing to the point where it can be used in real-world retrieval practices. One such practice is the audiovisual archive, whose users increasingly require fine-grained access to broadcast television content. In this paper, we take into account the information needs

  5. Rock and Roll English Teaching: Content-Based Cultural Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tim

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares a content-based English as a Second/Foreign Language (ESL/EFL) workshop that strengthens language acquisition, increases intrinsic motivation, and bridges cultural divides. He uses a rock and roll workshop to introduce an organizational approach with a primary emphasis on cultural awareness content and a…

  6. Application of Bayesian Classification to Content-Based Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Berrick, S.; Gopalan, A.; Hua, X.; Shen, S.; Smith, P.; Yang, K-Y.; Wheeler, K.; Curry, C.

    2004-01-01

    The high volume of Earth Observing System data has proven to be challenging to manage for data centers and users alike. At the Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DAAC), about 1 TB of new data are archived each day. Distribution to users is also about 1 TB/day. A substantial portion of this distribution is MODIS calibrated radiance data, which has a wide variety of uses. However, much of the data is not useful for a particular user's needs: for example, ocean color users typically need oceanic pixels that are free of cloud and sun-glint. The GES DAAC is using a simple Bayesian classification scheme to rapidly classify each pixel in the scene in order to support several experimental content-based data services for near-real-time MODIS calibrated radiance products (from Direct Readout stations). Content-based subsetting would allow distribution of, say, only clear pixels to the user if desired. Content-based subscriptions would distribute data to users only when they fit the user's usability criteria in their area of interest within the scene. Content-based cache management would retain more useful data on disk for easy online access. The classification may even be exploited in an automated quality assessment of the geolocation product. Though initially to be demonstrated at the GES DAAC, these techniques have applicability in other resource-limited environments, such as spaceborne data systems.

  7. Enhancing Image Retrieval System Using Content Based Search ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this work is to design and implement a software that enhances the retrieval of image using the image content base as the criteria. As the size of multimedia databases and other repositories continues to grow, the difficulty of finding multimedia information increases, it becomes practically impossible to depend ...

  8. Content-Based Design and Implementation of Ambient Intelligence Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diggelen, J. van; Grootjen, M.; Ubink, E.M.; Zomeren, M. van; Smets, N.J.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Optimal support of professionals in complex ambient task environments requires a system that delivers the Right Message at the Right Moment in the Right Modality: (RM)3. This paper describes a content-based design methodology and an agent-based architecture to enable real time decisions of

  9. Content-Based Image Retrieval: Color-selection exploited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moens, Marie-Francine; van den Broek, Egon; Vuurpijl, L.G.; de Brusser, Rik; Kisters, P.M.F.; Hiemstra, Djoerd; Kraaij, Wessel; von Schmid, J.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    This research presents a new color selection interface that facilitates query-by-color in Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR). Existing CBIR color selection interfaces, are being judged as non-intuitive and difficult to use. Our interface copes with these problems of usability. It is based on 11

  10. Privacy-Preserving Content-Based Recommendations through Homomorphic Encryption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Z.; Beye, M.; Veugen, P.J.M.; Lagendijk, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    By offering personalized content to users, recommender systems have become a vital tool in ecommerce and online media applications. Content-based algorithms recommend items or products to users, that are most similar to those previously purchased or consumed. Unfortunately, collecting and storing

  11. Privacy-Preserving Content-Based Recommender System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Z.; Beye, M.; Veugen, P.J.M.; Lagendijk, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    By offering personalized content to users, recommender systems have become a vital tool in e-commerce and online media applications. Content-based algorithms recommend items or products to users, that are most similar to those previously purchased or consumed. Unfortunately, collecting and storing

  12. Content-Based Art Retrieval (C-BAR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Boonstra, Onno; Beurne, Leen; Kok, Thijs; Doorn, Peter; Hoenkamp, Eduard; Schouten, Theo E.; van den Herik, Jaap; Petiet, Peter J.; de Nil, Bart; Vuurpijl, Louis G.; Witkamp, Paula

    2005-01-01

    The prototype of an online Content-Based Art Retrieval (C-BAR) system is introduced that provides entrance to the digitized collection of the National Gallery of the Netherlands (the Rijksmuseum). The current online system of the Rijksmuseum is text-based and requires expert knowledge concerning the

  13. Academics for International Criminal Justice: The Role of Legal Scholars in Creating and Sustaining a New Legal Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mikkel Jarle

    The article is a sociological investigation into the crucial role of legal academics in the professional mobilization that characterized the creation and development of international criminal justice. Analyzing the different stages in the evolution of international criminal law culminating with t...

  14. Content-based management service for medical videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendi, Engin; Bayrak, Coskun; Cecen, Songul; Ermisoglu, Emre

    2013-01-01

    Development of health information technology has had a dramatic impact to improve the efficiency and quality of medical care. Developing interoperable health information systems for healthcare providers has the potential to improve the quality and equitability of patient-centered healthcare. In this article, we describe an automated content-based medical video analysis and management service that provides convenience and ease in accessing the relevant medical video content without sequential scanning. The system facilitates effective temporal video segmentation and content-based visual information retrieval that enable a more reliable understanding of medical video content. The system is implemented as a Web- and mobile-based service and has the potential to offer a knowledge-sharing platform for the purpose of efficient medical video content access.

  15. Meeting the Growing Demand for Sustainability-Focused Management Education: A Case Study of a PRME Academic Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Suzanne; Nagpal, Swati

    2013-01-01

    The current business landscape has created the impetus to develop management graduates with capabilities that foster responsible leadership and sustainability. Through the lens of Gitsham's 3C Model (Complexity, Context and Connection) of graduate capabilities, this paper discusses the experience of implementing the United Nations Principles for…

  16. Reengineering the ESL Practitioner for Content-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Lilith M.

    The idea of content-based instruction (CBI) is at odds with the curricula of most English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teacher preparation programs. Nor does it fit easily with the skill-based texts and learning packages that are used widely in the field. There is also little agreement about the methods to be used to effect it at various levels of…

  17. Survey paper on Sketch Based and Content Based Image Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Gaidhani, Prachi A.; Bagal, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This survey paper presents an overview of development of Sketch Based Image Retrieval (SBIR) and Content based image retrieval (CBIR) in the past few years. There is awful growth in bulk of images as well as the far-flung application in too many fields. The main attributes to represent as well index the images are color, shape, texture, spatial layout. These features of images are extracted to check similarity among the images. Generation of special query is the main p...

  18. Commentary: A call to leadership: the role of the academic medical center in driving sustainable health system improvement through performance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedza, Susan M

    2009-12-01

    As the government attempts to address the high cost of health care in the United States, the issues being confronted include variations in the quality of care administered and the inconsistent application of scientifically proven treatments. To improve quality, methods of measurement and reporting with rewards or, eventually, penalties based on performance, must be developed. To date, well-intentioned national policy initiatives, such as value-based purchasing, have focused primarily on the measurement of discrete events and on attempts to construct incentives. While important, the current approach alone cannot improve quality, ensure equitability, decrease variability, and optimize value. Additional thought-leadership is required, both theoretical and applied. Academic medical centers' (AMCs') scholarly and practical participation is needed. Although quality cannot be sustainably improved without measurement, the existing measures alone do not ensure quality. There is not enough evidence to support strong measure development and, further, not enough insight regarding whether the existing measures have their intended effect of enhancing health care delivery that results in quality outcomes for patients. Perhaps the only way that the United States health care system will achieve a standard of quality care is through the strong embrace, effective engagement, intellectual insights, educational contributions, and practical applications in AMCs. Quality will never be achieved through public policies or national initiatives alone but instead through the commitment of the academic community to forward the science of performance measurement and to ensure that measurement leads to better health outcomes for our nation.

  19. Fully aligned academic health centers: a model for 21st-century job creation and sustainable economic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, E Albert; Chrencik, Robert A; Miller, Edward D

    2012-07-01

    Alignment is the degree to which component parts of academic health centers (AHCs) work cohesively. Full alignment allows AHCs to act quickly and cohesively toward common goals and to take advantage of opportunities that present themselves, particularly where collaboration is essential. Maryland's two major AHCs-University of Maryland Medicine (UMM) and Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM)-have experienced periods of significant misalignment during each of their histories. Their most recent periods of misalignment caused significant negative economic and academic impacts. However, the process of realigning their clinical and research missions has not only given them a renewed economic vigor but has also paid significant dividends for the state of Maryland, helping it weather the current recession much better than other regions of the country. The two AHCs' continued economic success during the recession has led Maryland lawmakers to increasingly seek out their expertise in attempts to stimulate economic development. Indeed, UMM, JHM, and other fully aligned AHCs have shown that they can be powerful economic engines and offer a model of job growth and economic development in the 21st century.

  20. Feature representation and compression for content-based retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua; Ortega, Antonio

    2000-12-01

    In semantic content-based image/video browsing and navigation systems, efficient mechanisms to represent and manage a large collection of digital images/videos are needed. Traditional keyword-based indexing describes the content of multimedia data through annotations such as text or keywords extracted manually by the user from a controlled vocabulary. This textual indexing technique lacks the flexibility of satisfying various kinds of queries requested by database users and also requires huge amount of work for updating the information. Current content-based retrieval systems often extract a set of features such as color, texture, shape motion, speed, and position from the raw multimedia data automatically and store them as content descriptors. This content-based metadata differs from text-based metadata in that it supports wider varieties of queries and can be extracted automatically, thus providing a promising approach for efficient database access and management. When the raw data volume grows very large, explicitly extracting the content-information and storing it as metadata along with the images will improve querying performance since metadata requires much less storage than the raw image data and thus will be easier to manipulate. In this paper we maintain that storing metadata together with images will enable effective information management and efficient remote query. We also show, using a texture classification example, that this side information can be compressed while guaranteeing that the desired query accuracy is satisfied. We argue that the compact representation of the image contents not only reduces significantly the storage and transmission rate requirement, but also facilitates certain types of queries. Algorithms are developed for optimized compression of this texture feature metadata given that the goal is to maximize the classification performance for a given rate budget.

  1. Content-Based Analysis of Bumper Stickers in Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Jaradat, Abdullah A.

    2016-01-01

    This study has set out to investigate bumper stickers in Jordan focusing mainly on the themes of the stickers. The study hypothesized that bumper stickers in Jordan reflect a wide range of topics including social, economic, and political. Due to being the first study of this phenomenon, the study has adopted content-based analysis to determine the basic topics. The study has found that the purpose of most bumper sticker is fun and humor; most of them are not serious and do not carry any bitin...

  2. Content-Based Image Retrial Based on Hadoop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DongSheng Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, time complexity of algorithms for content-based image retrial is extremely high. In order to retrieve images on large-scale databases efficiently, a new way for retrieving based on Hadoop distributed framework is proposed. Firstly, a database of images features is built by using Speeded Up Robust Features algorithm and Locality-Sensitive Hashing and then perform the search on Hadoop platform in a parallel way specially designed. Considerable experimental results show that it is able to retrieve images based on content on large-scale cluster and image sets effectively.

  3. Relevance Feedback in Content Based Image Retrieval: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manesh B. Kokare

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the technical achievements in the research area of relevance feedback (RF in content-based image retrieval (CBIR. Relevance feedback is a powerful technique in CBIR systems, in order to improve the performance of CBIR effectively. It is an open research area to the researcher to reduce the semantic gap between low-level features and high level concepts. The paper covers the current state of art of the research in relevance feedback in CBIR, various relevance feedback techniques and issues in relevance feedback are discussed in detail.

  4. Analytical solution of a stochastic content-based network model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mungan, Muhittin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Bogazici University, 34342 Bebek Istanbul (Turkey); Guersey Institute, PO Box 6, Cengelkoey, 34680 Istanbul (Turkey); Kabakoglu, Alkan [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Koc University, 34450 Sariyer Istanbul (Turkey); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Balcan, Duygu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Letters, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak 34469, Istanbul (Turkey); Erzan, Ayse [Guersey Institute, PO Box 6, Cengelkoey, 34680 Istanbul (Turkey); Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Letters, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak 34469, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-11-04

    We define and completely solve a content-based directed network whose nodes consist of random words and an adjacency rule involving perfect or approximate matches for an alphabet with an arbitrary number of letters. The analytic expression for the out-degree distribution shows a crossover from a leading power law behaviour to a log-periodic regime bounded by a different power law decay. The leading exponents in the two regions have a weak dependence on the mean word length, and an even weaker dependence on the alphabet size. The in-degree distribution, on the other hand, is much narrower and does not show any scaling behaviour.

  5. A hybrid contention-based TDMA technique for data transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Duei; Chang, Jin-Fu

    A hybrid contention-based TDMA protocol is proposed. The frame structure of the proposed protocol is organized into variable length frames, and each frame consists of a reservation, fixed, and variable subframe. The functions performed in each of these subframes are discussed. The transient and steady-state behaviors of the protocol are analyzed. The performance of the protocol is compared with the two adaptive reservation multiple-access protocols of Tsai and Chang (1985 and 1986) in terms of queue length and average packet length. An example revealing the applicability of the protocol is presented, and it is noted that the new protocol is suitable for low and high traffic.

  6. Organizing for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William M.; Hamburger, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    A successful campus sustainability effort catalyzes broad engagement of the campus community and integration of sustainability principles into the academic and operational components of campus life. Although many universities have embraced sustainability as a new core value, others have been more sluggish in adopting sustainability principles to…

  7. Automated diagnosis of retinopathy by content-based image retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaum, Edward; Karnowski, Thomas P; Govindasamy, V Priya; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Tobin, Kenneth W

    2008-01-01

    To describe a novel computer-based image analysis method that is being developed to assist and automate the diagnosis of retinal disease. Content-based image retrieval is the process of retrieving related images from large database collections using their pictorial content. The content feature list becomes the index for storage, search, and retrieval of related images from a library based upon specific visual characteristics. Low-level analyses use feature description models and higher-level analyses use perceptual organization and spatial relationships, including clinical metadata, to extract semantic information. We defined, extracted, and tested a large number of region- and lesion-based features from a dataset of 395 retinal images. Using a statistical hold-one-out method, independent queries for each image were submitted to the system and a diagnostic prediction was formulated. The diagnostic sensitivity for all stratified levels of age-related macular degeneration ranged from 75% to 100%. Similarly, the sensitivity of detection and accuracy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy ranged from 75% to 91.7% and for nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, ranged from 75% to 94.7%. The overall purity of the diagnosis (specificity) for all disease states in the dataset was 91.3%. The probabilistic nature of content-based image retrieval permits us to make statistically relevant predictions regarding the presence, severity, and manifestations of common retinal diseases from digital images in an automated and deterministic manner.

  8. Content-based document image retrieval in complex document collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, G.; Argamon, S.; Frieder, O.; Grossman, D.; Lewis, D.

    2007-01-01

    We address the problem of content-based image retrieval in the context of complex document images. Complex documents typically start out on paper and are then electronically scanned. These documents have rich internal structure and might only be available in image form. Additionally, they may have been produced by a combination of printing technologies (or by handwriting); and include diagrams, graphics, tables and other non-textual elements. Large collections of such complex documents are commonly found in legal and security investigations. The indexing and analysis of large document collections is currently limited to textual features based OCR data and ignore the structural context of the document as well as important non-textual elements such as signatures, logos, stamps, tables, diagrams, and images. Handwritten comments are also normally ignored due to the inherent complexity of offline handwriting recognition. We address important research issues concerning content-based document image retrieval and describe a prototype for integrated retrieval and aggregation of diverse information contained in scanned paper documents we are developing. Such complex document information processing combines several forms of image processing together with textual/linguistic processing to enable effective analysis of complex document collections, a necessity for a wide range of applications. Our prototype automatically generates rich metadata about a complex document and then applies query tools to integrate the metadata with text search. To ensure a thorough evaluation of the effectiveness of our prototype, we are developing a test collection containing millions of document images.

  9. Content-Based Visual Landmark Search via Multimodal Hypergraph Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Shen, Jialie; Jin, Hai; Zheng, Ran; Xie, Liang

    2015-12-01

    While content-based landmark image search has recently received a lot of attention and became a very active domain, it still remains a challenging problem. Among the various reasons, high diverse visual content is the most significant one. It is common that for the same landmark, images with a wide range of visual appearances can be found from different sources and different landmarks may share very similar sets of images. As a consequence, it is very hard to accurately estimate the similarities between the landmarks purely based on single type of visual feature. Moreover, the relationships between landmark images can be very complex and how to develop an effective modeling scheme to characterize the associations still remains an open question. Motivated by these concerns, we propose multimodal hypergraph (MMHG) to characterize the complex associations between landmark images. In MMHG, images are modeled as independent vertices and hyperedges contain several vertices corresponding to particular views. Multiple hypergraphs are firstly constructed independently based on different visual modalities to describe the hidden high-order relations from different aspects. Then, they are integrated together to involve discriminative information from heterogeneous sources. We also propose a novel content-based visual landmark search system based on MMHG to facilitate effective search. Distinguished from the existing approaches, we design a unified computational module to support query-specific combination weight learning. An extensive experiment study on a large-scale test collection demonstrates the effectiveness of our scheme over state-of-the-art approaches.

  10. Content based image retrieval using unclean positive examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Ye, Lei

    2009-10-01

    Conventional content-based image retrieval (CBIR) schemes employing relevance feedback may suffer from some problems in the practical applications. First, most ordinary users would like to complete their search in a single interaction especially on the web. Second, it is time consuming and difficult to label a lot of negative examples with sufficient variety. Third, ordinary users may introduce some noisy examples into the query. This correspondence explores solutions to a new issue that image retrieval using unclean positive examples. In the proposed scheme, multiple feature distances are combined to obtain image similarity using classification technology. To handle the noisy positive examples, a new two-step strategy is proposed by incorporating the methods of data cleaning and noise tolerant classifier. The extensive experiments carried out on two different real image collections validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  11. Retrieval Architecture with Classified Query for Content Based Image Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rik Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The consumer behavior has been observed to be largely influenced by image data with increasing familiarity of smart phones and World Wide Web. Traditional technique of browsing through product varieties in the Internet with text keywords has been gradually replaced by the easy accessible image data. The importance of image data has portrayed a steady growth in application orientation for business domain with the advent of different image capturing devices and social media. The paper has described a methodology of feature extraction by image binarization technique for enhancing identification and retrieval of information using content based image recognition. The proposed algorithm was tested on two public datasets, namely, Wang dataset and Oliva and Torralba (OT-Scene dataset with 3688 images on the whole. It has outclassed the state-of-the-art techniques in performance measure and has shown statistical significance.

  12. [Content-based automatic retinal image recognition and retrieval system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiumei; Du, Jianjun; Cheng, Xia; Cao, Hongliang

    2013-04-01

    This paper is aimed to fulfill a prototype system used to classify and retrieve retinal image automatically. With the content-based image retrieval (CBIR) technology, a method to represent the retinal characteristics mixing the fundus image color (gray) histogram with bright, dark region features and other local comprehensive information was proposed. The method uses kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) to further extract nonlinear features and dimensionality reduced. It also puts forward a measurement method using support vector machine (SVM) on KPCA weighted distance in similarity measure aspect. Testing 300 samples with this prototype system randomly, we obtained the total image number of wrong retrieved 32, and the retrieval rate 89.33%. It showed that the identification rate of the system for retinal image was high.

  13. System refinement for content based satellite image retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NourElDin Laban

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We are witnessing a large increase in satellite generated data especially in the form of images. Hence intelligent processing of the huge amount of data received by dozens of earth observing satellites, with specific satellite image oriented approaches, presents itself as a pressing need. Content based satellite image retrieval (CBSIR approaches have mainly been driven so far by approaches dealing with traditional images. In this paper we introduce a novel approach that refines image retrieval process using the unique properties to satellite images. Our approach uses a Query by polygon (QBP paradigm for the content of interest instead of using the more conventional rectangular query by image approach. First, we extract features from the satellite images using multiple tiling sizes. Accordingly the system uses these multilevel features within a multilevel retrieval system that refines the retrieval process. Our multilevel refinement approach has been experimentally validated against the conventional one yielding enhanced precision and recall rates.

  14. Incorporating Semantics into Data Driven Workflows for Content Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, M.; Fernandez-Prieto, M. J.

    Finding meaningful associations between text elements and knowledge structures within clinical narratives in a highly verbal domain, such as psychiatry, is a challenging goal. The research presented here uses a small corpus of case histories and brings into play pre-existing knowledge, and therefore, complements other approaches that use large corpus (millions of words) and no pre-existing knowledge. The paper describes a variety of experiments for content-based analysis: Linguistic Analysis using NLP-oriented approaches, Sentiment Analysis, and Semantically Meaningful Analysis. Although it is not standard practice, the paper advocates providing automatic support to annotate the functionality as well as the data for each experiment by performing semantic annotation that uses OWL and OWL-S. Lessons learnt can be transmitted to legacy clinical databases facing the conversion of clinical narratives according to prominent Electronic Health Records standards.

  15. Building high dimensional imaging database for content based image search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinpei; Sun, Jianyong; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Mingqing; Yang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jianguo

    2016-03-01

    In medical imaging informatics, content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques are employed to aid radiologists in the retrieval of images with similar image contents. CBIR uses visual contents, normally called as image features, to search images from large scale image databases according to users' requests in the form of a query image. However, most of current CBIR systems require a distance computation of image character feature vectors to perform query, and the distance computations can be time consuming when the number of image character features grows large, and thus this limits the usability of the systems. In this presentation, we propose a novel framework which uses a high dimensional database to index the image character features to improve the accuracy and retrieval speed of a CBIR in integrated RIS/PACS.

  16. Content-based TV sports video retrieval using multimodal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yiqing; Liu, Huayong; Wang, Hongbin; Zhou, Dongru

    2003-09-01

    In this paper, we propose content-based video retrieval, which is a kind of retrieval by its semantical contents. Because video data is composed of multimodal information streams such as video, auditory and textual streams, we describe a strategy of using multimodal analysis for automatic parsing sports video. The paper first defines the basic structure of sports video database system, and then introduces a new approach that integrates visual stream analysis, speech recognition, speech signal processing and text extraction to realize video retrieval. The experimental results for TV sports video of football games indicate that the multimodal analysis is effective for video retrieval by quickly browsing tree-like video clips or inputting keywords within predefined domain.

  17. Content-based image retrieval in homomorphic encryption domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellafqira, Reda; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Bouslimi, Dalel; Quellec, Gwenole

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a secure implementation of a content-based image retrieval (CBIR) method that makes possible diagnosis aid systems to work in externalized environment and with outsourced data as in cloud computing. This one works with homomorphic encrypted images from which it extracts wavelet based image features next used for subsequent image comparison. By doing so, our system allows a physician to retrieve the most similar images to a query image in an outsourced database while preserving data confidentiality. Our Secure CBIR is the first one that proposes to work with global image features extracted from encrypted images and does not induce extra communications in-between the client and the server. Experimental results show it achieves retrieval performance as good as if images were processed non-encrypted.

  18. Dental injuries sustained by high school athletes in the United States, from 2008/2009 through 2013/2014 academic years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christy L; McKenzie, Lara B; Ferketich, Amy K; Andridge, Rebecca; Xiang, Huiyun; Comstock, R Dawn

    2016-04-01

    Risk of dental injuries is present in a variety of sports. Mouthguards are effective yet underutilized. This study aimed to estimate the rate of dental injuries among high school athletes and investigate the utilization of mouthguards across multiple high school sports. Athlete exposure and dental injury data were collected during the 2008/2009 through 2013/2014 academic years from a large sample of high schools in the United States as part of the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study. There were 222 dental injuries sustained during 24,787,258 athlete exposures for a rate of 0.90 per 100,000 athlete exposures. The rate of dental injuries in competition (1.8) was three times higher than the rate in practice (0.6) (RR: 3.1, 95% CI: 2.3-4.0). Rates of dental injuries varied by sport with the highest rates in girls' field hockey (3.9) and boys' basketball (2.6). Dental injuries most commonly occurred as a result of contact with another player (61.3%) and contact with a playing apparatus (31.5%). For the majority of dental injuries, the athlete was not wearing a mouthguard (72.5%). Among injuries where athletes were wearing mouthguards, the majority were self-fitted (95.9%). Although dental injuries were relatively uncommon, the majority occurred while the athlete was not wearing a mouthguard. As previous studies have shown that mouthguards are effective in preventing injuries, all high school athletes participating in a sport that places them at risk of sustaining a dental injury should wear a mouthguard consistently in both competition and practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Toward Content Based Image Retrieval with Deep Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Judah E S; Plassard, Andrew J; Fabbri, Daniel; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-19

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) offers the potential to identify similar case histories, understand rare disorders, and eventually, improve patient care. Recent advances in database capacity, algorithm efficiency, and deep Convolutional Neural Networks (dCNN), a machine learning technique, have enabled great CBIR success for general photographic images. Here, we investigate applying the leading ImageNet CBIR technique to clinically acquired medical images captured by the Vanderbilt Medical Center. Briefly, we (1) constructed a dCNN with four hidden layers, reducing dimensionality of an input scaled to 128×128 to an output encoded layer of 4×384, (2) trained the network using back-propagation 1 million random magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images, (3) labeled an independent set of 2100 images, and (4) evaluated classifiers on the projection of the labeled images into manifold space. Quantitative results were disappointing (averaging a true positive rate of only 20%); however, the data suggest that improvements would be possible with more evenly distributed sampling across labels and potential re-grouping of label structures. This prelimainry effort at automated classification of medical images with ImageNet is promising, but shows that more work is needed beyond direct adaptation of existing techniques.

  20. Content-Based Analysis of Bumper Stickers in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A. Jaradat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study has set out to investigate bumper stickers in Jordan focusing mainly on the themes of the stickers. The study hypothesized that bumper stickers in Jordan reflect a wide range of topics including social, economic, and political. Due to being the first study of this phenomenon, the study has adopted content-based analysis to determine the basic topics. The study has found that the purpose of most bumper sticker is fun and humor; most of them are not serious and do not carry any biting messages. They do not present any criticism to the most dominant problems at the level of society including racism, nepotism, anti-feminism, inflation, high taxes, and refugees. Another finding is that politics is still a taboo; no political bumper stickers were found in Jordan. Finally, the themes the stickers targeted are: lessons of life 28.85 %; challenging or warning other drivers 16%; funny notes about social issues 12%; religious sayings 8%; treating the car as a female 7%; the low economic status of the driver 6%; love and treachery 5.5%; the prestigious status of the car 5%; envy 4%; nicknames for the car or the driver 4%; irony 3 %; and English sayings 1.5 %. Keywords: bumper stickers, themes, politics

  1. Biased discriminant euclidean embedding for content-based image retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Wei; Tao, Dacheng

    2010-02-01

    With many potential multimedia applications, content-based image retrieval (CBIR) has recently gained more attention for image management and web search. A wide variety of relevance feedback (RF) algorithms have been developed in recent years to improve the performance of CBIR systems. These RF algorithms capture user's preferences and bridge the semantic gap. However, there is still a big room to further the RF performance, because the popular RF algorithms ignore the manifold structure of image low-level visual features. In this paper, we propose the biased discriminative Euclidean embedding (BDEE) which parameterises samples in the original high-dimensional ambient space to discover the intrinsic coordinate of image low-level visual features. BDEE precisely models both the intraclass geometry and interclass discrimination and never meets the undersampled problem. To consider unlabelled samples, a manifold regularization-based item is introduced and combined with BDEE to form the semi-supervised BDEE, or semi-BDEE for short. To justify the effectiveness of the proposed BDEE and semi-BDEE, we compare them against the conventional RF algorithms and show a significant improvement in terms of accuracy and stability based on a subset of the Corel image gallery.

  2. The Use of QBIC Content-Based Image Retrieval System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yi Wu

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The fast increase in digital images has caught increasing attention on the development of image retrieval technologies. Content-based image retrieval (CBIR has become an important approach in retrieving image data from a large collection. This article reports our results on the use and users study of a CBIR system. Thirty-eight students majored in art and design were invited to use the IBM’s OBIC (Query by Image Content system through the Internet. Data from their information needs, behaviors, and retrieval strategies were collected through an in-depth interview, observation, and self-described think-aloud process. Important conclusions are:(1)There are four types of information needs for image data: implicit, inspirational, ever-changing, and purposive. The types of needs may change during the retrieval process. (2)CBIR is suitable for the example-type query, text retrieval is suitable for the scenario-type query, and image browsing is suitable for the symbolic query. (3)Different from text retrieval, detailed description of the query condition may lead to retrieval failure more easily. (4)CBIR is suitable for the domain-specific image collection, not for the images on the Word-Wide Web.[Article content in Chinese

  3. Using deep learning for content-based medical image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinpei; Yang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Zhiming; Zhang, Jianguo

    2017-03-01

    Content-Based medical image retrieval (CBMIR) is been highly active research area from past few years. The retrieval performance of a CBMIR system crucially depends on the feature representation, which have been extensively studied by researchers for decades. Although a variety of techniques have been proposed, it remains one of the most challenging problems in current CBMIR research, which is mainly due to the well-known "semantic gap" issue that exists between low-level image pixels captured by machines and high-level semantic concepts perceived by human[1]. Recent years have witnessed some important advances of new techniques in machine learning. One important breakthrough technique is known as "deep learning". Unlike conventional machine learning methods that are often using "shallow" architectures, deep learning mimics the human brain that is organized in a deep architecture and processes information through multiple stages of transformation and representation. This means that we do not need to spend enormous energy to extract features manually. In this presentation, we propose a novel framework which uses deep learning to retrieval the medical image to improve the accuracy and speed of a CBIR in integrated RIS/PACS.

  4. Content-Based Object Movie Retrieval and Relevance Feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Greg C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Object movie refers to a set of images captured from different perspectives around a 3D object. Object movie provides a good representation of a physical object because it can provide 3D interactive viewing effect, but does not require 3D model reconstruction. In this paper, we propose an efficient approach for content-based object movie retrieval. In order to retrieve the desired object movie from the database, we first map an object movie into the sampling of a manifold in the feature space. Two different layers of feature descriptors, dense and condensed, are designed to sample the manifold for representing object movies. Based on these descriptors, we define the dissimilarity measure between the query and the target in the object movie database. The query we considered can be either an entire object movie or simply a subset of views. We further design a relevance feedback approach to improving retrieved results. Finally, some experimental results are presented to show the efficacy of our approach.

  5. WISE: a content-based Web image search engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guoping; Palmer, R. D.

    2000-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a prototype of a Web Image Search Engine (WISE), which allows users to search for images on the WWW by image examples, in a similar fashion to current search engines that allow users to find related Web pages using text matching on keywords. The system takes an image specified by the user and finds similar images available on the WWW by comparing the image contents using low level image features. The current version of the WISE system consists of a graphical user interface (GUI), an autonomous Web agent, an image comparison program and a query processing program. The users specify the URL of a target image and the URL of the starting Web page from where the program will 'crawl' the Web, finding images along the way and retrieve those satisfying a certain constraints. The program then computes the visual features of the retrieved images and performs content-based comparison with the target image. The results of the comparison are then sorted according to a certain similarity measure, which along with thumbnails and information associated with the images, such as the URLs; image size, etc. are then written to an HTML page. The resultant page is stored on a Web server and is outputted onto the user's Web browser once the search process is complete. A unique feature of the current version of WISE is its image content comparison algorithm. It is based on the comparison of image palettes and it therefore very efficient in retrieving one of the two universally accepted image formats on the Web, 'gif.' In gif images, the color palette is contained in its header and therefore it is only necessary to retrieve the header information rather than the whole images, thus making it very efficient.

  6. A SYSTEM FOR ACCESSING A COLLECTION OF HISTOLOGY IMAGES USING CONTENT-BASED STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camargo J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Histology images are an important resource for research, education and medical practice. The availability of image collections with reference purposes is limited to printed formats such as books and specialized journals. When histology image sets are published in digital formats, they are composed of some tens of images that do not represent the wide diversity of biological structures that can be found in fundamental tissues. Making a complete histology image collection available to the general public having a great impact on research and education in different areas such as medicine, biology and natural sciences. This work presents the acquisition process of a histology image collection with 20,000 samples in digital format, from tissue processing to digital image capturing. The main purpose of collecting these images is to make them available as reference material to the academic comunity. In addition, this paper presents the design and architecture of a system to query and explore the image collection, using content-based image retrieval tools and text-based search on the annotations provided by experts. The system also offers novel image visualization methods to allow easy identification of interesting images among hundreds of possible pictures. The system has been developed using a service-oriented architecture and allows web-based access in http://www.informed.unal.edu.co

  7. A SYSTEM FOR ACCESSING A COLLECTION OF HISTOLOGY IMAGES USING CONTENT-BASED STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F González

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Histology images are an important resource for research, education and medical practice. The availability of image collections with reference purposes is limited to printed formats such as books and specialized journals. When histology image sets are published in digital formats, they are composed of some tens of images that do not represent the wide diversity of biological structures that can be found in fundamental tissues. Making a complete histology image collection available to the general public having a great impact on research and education in different areas such as medicine, biology and natural sciences. This work presents the acquisition process of a histology image collection with 20,000 samples in digital format, from tissue processing to digital image capturing. The main purpose of collecting these images is to make them available as reference material to the academic comunity. In addition, this paper presents the design and architecture of a system to query and explore the image collection, using content-based image retrieval tools and text-based search on the annotations provided by experts. The system also offers novel image visualization methods to allow easy identification of interesting images among hundreds of possible pictures. The system has been developed using a service-oriented architecture and allows web-based access in http://www.informed.unal.edu.co

  8. Automatic Annotation of Formula 1 Races for Content-Based Video Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlovic, V.; Petkovic, M.

    2001-01-01

    Content-based video retrieval is emerging as an important part in the process of utilization of various multimedia documents. In this report we present a novel system for the automatic indexing and content-based retrieval of multimedia documents. We chose the domain of Formula 1 sport videos because

  9. Teaching Concepts of Natural Sciences to Foreigners through Content-Based Instruction: The Adjunct Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satilmis, Yilmaz; Yakup, Doganay; Selim, Guvercin; Aybarsha, Islam

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates three models of content-based instruction in teaching concepts and terms of natural sciences in order to increase the efficiency of teaching these kinds of concepts in realization and to prove that the content-based instruction is a teaching strategy that helps students understand concepts of natural sciences. Content-based…

  10. Design and realisation of an efficient content based music playlist generation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balkema, Jan Wietse

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is on the subject of content based music playlist generation systems. The primary aim is to develop algorithms for content based music playlist generation that are faster than the current state of technology while keeping the quality of the playlists at a level that is at least

  11. Report on RecSys 2016 Workshop on New Trends in Content-Based Recommender Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn; Mobasher, Bamshad

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the CBRecSys 2016 workshop, the third edition of the workshop on New Trends in Content-based Recommender Systems, co-located with RecSys 2016 in Boston, MA. Content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, but it has not seen the same...... for work dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommender systems....... level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. Nevertheless, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either in addition to or instead of ratings and implicit usage data. The CBRecSys workshop series provides a dedicated venue...

  12. Handbook of sustainable engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kun-Mo

    2013-01-01

    "The efficient utilization of energy, sustainable use of natural resources, and large-scale adoption of sustainable technologies is the key to a sustainable future. The Handbook of Sustainable Engineering provides tools that will help us achieve these goals". Nobel Prize Winner Dr. R.K. Pauchauri, Chairman, UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change As global society confronts the challenges of diminishing resources, ecological degradation, and climate change, engineers play a crucial role designing and building technologies and products that fulfil our needs for utility and sustainability. The Handbook of Sustainable Engineering equips readers with the context and the best practices derived from both academic research and practical examples of successful implementations of sustainable technical solutions. The handbook’s content revolves around the two themes, new ways of thinking and new business models, including sustainable production, products, service systems and consumption while addressing key asse...

  13. Content-Based Multimedia Retrieval in the Presence of Unknown User Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beecks, Christian; Assent, Ira; Seidl, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    address the problem of content-based multimedia retrieval in the presence of unknown user preferences. Our idea consists in performing content-based retrieval by considering all possibilities in a family of similarity models simultaneously. To this end, we propose a novel content-based retrieval approach......Content-based multimedia retrieval requires an appropriate similarity model which reflects user preferences. When these preferences are unknown or when the structure of the data collection is unclear, retrieving the most preferable objects the user has in mind is challenging, as the notion...... of similarity varies from data to data, from task to task, and ultimately from user to user. Based on a specific query object and unknown user preferences, retrieving the most similar objects according to some default similarity model does not necessarily include the most preferable ones. In this work, we...

  14. Content Based Retrieval Database Management System with Support for Similarity Searching and Query Refinement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ortega-Binderberger, Michael

    2002-01-01

    ... as a critical area of research. This thesis explores how to enhance database systems with content based search over arbitrary abstract data types in a similarity based framework with query refinement...

  15. Ad-hoc Content-based Queries and Data Analysis for Virtual Observatories Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquilent, Inc. proposes to support ad-hoc, content-based query and data retrieval from virtual observatories (VxO) by developing 1) Higher Order Query Services that...

  16. Single-labelled music genre classification using content-based features

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ajoodha, R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use content-based features to perform automatic classification of music pieces into genres. We categorise these features into four groups: features extracted from the Fourier transform’s magnitude spectrum, features designed...

  17. Second Workshop on New Trends in Content-based Recommender Systems (CBRecSys 2015)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn

    2015-01-01

    While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either...... these data sources should be combined to provided the best recommendation performance. The CBRecSys 2015 workshop aims to address this by providing a dedicated venue for papers dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommendation....

  18. Workshop on New Trends in Content-based Recommender Systems (CBRecSys 2014)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn; Cantádor, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either...... these data sources should be combined to provided the best recommendation performance. The CBRecSys 2014 workshop aims to address this by providing a dedicated venue for papers dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommendation....

  19. Third Workshop on New Trends in Content-based Recommender Systems (CBRecSys 2016)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn; Musto, Cataldo

    2016-01-01

    While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either...... these data sources should be combined to provided the best recommendation performance. The CBRecSys 2016 workshop provides a dedicated venue for papers dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommendation....

  20. The Effect Of Implementing Content-Based Instruction For Young Learners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Isnaini Taufiqur Rohmah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The integration of language and content instruction has become a new phenomenon in language education field. The aim of this research is to explore the implementation of Content-Based Instruction and the effect of implementing Content-Based Instruction for young learners. This research used a qualitative research method, in order to be able to observe and get detail information on how the students react and interact in any situation. This research was conducted on the fifth grade students. The data were taken through interview, observation, and analyze the documents. The Result of this study indicated that (1 the implementation of Content-Based Instruction in the fifth grade was well implemented, they used English language as instructional language but it does not supported by appropriate teaching documents. (2 Content Based Instruction automatically give a significance effect to the students’ speaking ability: students could answer the teacher’s questions; the use of mother tongue was reduced. It also improving class situation: the atmosphere in the whole class became alive, there were many chances for students to practice their speaking skill; students had great motivation, learning process became easy and fun for the students. Key words: Content-Based Instruction, Young Learners.

  1. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  2. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  3. Penn Center for Community Health Workers: Step-by-Step Approach to Sustain an Evidence-Based Community Health Worker Intervention at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anna U; Grande, David T; Carter, Tamala; Long, Judith A; Kangovi, Shreya

    2016-11-01

    Community-engaged researchers who work with low-income communities can be reliant on grant funding. We use the illustrative case of the Penn Center for Community Health Workers (PCCHW) to describe a step-by-step framework for achieving financial sustainability for community-engaged research interventions. PCCHW began as a small grant-funded research project but followed an 8-step framework to engage both low-income patients and funders, determine outcomes, and calculate return on investment. PCCHW is now fully funded by Penn Medicine and delivers the Individualized Management for Patient-Centered Targets (IMPaCT) community health worker intervention to 2000 patients annually.

  4. Sustained impact of MBSR on stress, well-being, and daily spiritual experiences for 1 year in academic health care employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Cara; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2011-10-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to evaluate self-reported stress levels and daily spiritual experiences in academic health care employees before, immediately after, and 1 year after enrolling in a mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) course; and (2) to evaluate the correlation between a potential measure of pulse rate variability and self-reported stress levels. Fifty-nine (59) participants in the MBSR course offered to employees at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston (UTMB) comprised the intervention group, and 94 health care providers in the neonatal nurseries comprised the control group. MBSR is an 8-week course that introduces mindfulness meditation practices. No intervention was offered to the control group. All participants were employees (or relatives of employees) at UTMB. All MBSR participants completed Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale, the SCL-90, the SF-36 Measure of Health and Well-Being, the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale, and a 5-minute measure of pulse rate coherence. This testing was done before and after the MBSR course and 1 year later. Ninety-four (94) neonatal health care providers completed the same series of questionnaires and pulse rate variability (PRV) measures, with 49 of the 94 completing the questionnaires 2 months and 1 year later. MBSR participants improved on all measures except the physical component score of the SF-36 upon completion of the MBSR course, and these results were maintained at the 1-year follow-up. The control group did not significantly change on any of the measures. PRV as measured by the Heart Math system did not correlate with any of the self-report questionnaires. MBSR effectively reduces self-report measures of stress and increases daily spiritual experiences in employees in an academic health care setting, and these effects are stable for at least 1 year. Using a simple measure of PRV was not a clinically reliable biologic measure of stress.

  5. Content-Based Language Instruction: A New Window of Opportunity in Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Susan W.; Davis, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of content-based language instruction (CBI) offers an innovative and effective method for teaching core geographic concepts and skills while students study a second language. This article focuses on a collaborative initiative developed and tested by university and high school level geography and second-language educators. The goal of the…

  6. Content-Based Instruction and Content and Language Integrated Learning: The Same or Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenoz, Jasone

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at the characteristics of Content-Based Instruction (CBI) and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) in order to examine their similarities and differences. The analysis shows that CBI/CLIL programmes share the same essential properties and are not pedagogically different from each other. In fact, the use of an L2 as…

  7. Way Forward in the Twenty-First Century in Content-Based Instruction: Moving towards Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Zarobe, Yolanda; Cenoz, Jasone

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to reflect on the theoretical and methodological underpinnings that provide the basis for an understanding of Content-Based Instruction/Content and Language Integrated Learning (CBI/CLIL) in the field and its relevance in education in the twenty-first century. It is argued that the agenda of CBI/CLIL needs to move towards…

  8. Flipping Every Student? A Case Study of Content-Based Flipped Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Chih

    2017-01-01

    The study aims to explore university-level foreign language learners' perceptions of the content-based flipped classroom approach and factors influencing their perceptions. The research questions guiding the study are three-fold. (a) What attitudes and perceptions do students have about language and knowledge acquisition in the content-based…

  9. Thai EFL Learners' Attitudes and Motivation towards Learning English through Content-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai Yuanxing; Aksornjarung, Prachamon

    2018-01-01

    This study examined EFL learners' attitudes and motivation towards learning English through content-based instruction (CBI) at a university in Thailand. Seventy-one (71) university students, the majority sophomores, answered a 6-point Likert scale questionnaire on attitudes and motivation together with six open-ended questions regarding learning…

  10. A picture is worth a thousand words : content-based image retrieval techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomée, Bart

    2010-01-01

    In my dissertation I investigate techniques for improving the state of the art in content-based image retrieval. To place my work into context, I highlight the current trends and challenges in my field by analyzing over 200 recent articles. Next, I propose a novel paradigm called ‘artificial

  11. The utilization of human color categorization for content-based image retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Rogowitz, Bernice E.; Kisters, Peter M.F.; Pappas, Thrasyvoulos N.; Vuurpijl, Louis G.

    2004-01-01

    We present the concept of intelligent Content-Based Image Retrieval (iCBIR), which incorporates knowledge concerning human cognition in system development. The present research focuses on the utilization of color categories (or focal colors) for CBIR purposes, in particularly considered to be useful

  12. Automating the construction of scene classifiers for content-based video retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, L.; Israël, Menno; Petrushin, V.A.; van den Broek, Egon; van der Putten, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a real time automatic scene classifier within content-based video retrieval. In our envisioned approach end users like documentalists, not image processing experts, build classifiers interactively, by simply indicating positive examples of a scene. Classification consists of a

  13. Design Guidelines for a Content-Based Image Retrieval Color-Selection Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggen, Berry; van den Broek, Egon; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Kisters, Peter M.F.; Willems, Rob; Vuurpijl, Louis G.

    2004-01-01

    In Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) two query-methods exist: query-by-example and query-by-memory. The user either selects an example image or selects image features retrieved from memory (such as color, texture, spatial attributes, and shape) to define his query. Hitherto, research on CBIR

  14. Comparison of color representations for content-based image retrieval in dermatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, Hedde H.W.J.; Petkov, Nicolai; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    Background/purpose: We compare the effectiveness of 10 different color representations in a content-based image retrieval task for dermatology. Methods: As features, we use the average colors of healthy and lesion skin in an image. The extracted features are used to retrieve similar images from a

  15. Content-Based Image Retrieval Benchmarking: Utilizing color categories and color distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Kisters, Peter M.F.; Vuurpijl, Louis G.

    From a human centered perspective three ingredients for Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) were developed. First, with their existence confirmed by experimental data, 11 color categories were utilized for CBIR and used as input for a new color space segmentation technique. The complete HSI color

  16. The Challenges of Planning Language Objectives in Content-Based ESL Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecher, Laura; Farnsworth, Tim; Ediger, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the major patterns in content-based instruction (CBI) lesson plans among practicum teachers at the final stage of an MA TESOL program. One hundred and seven lesson plans were coded according to a typology developed to evaluate clarity and identify areas of potential difficulty in the design of…

  17. Complex event processing for content-based text, image, and video retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowman, E.K.; Broome, B.D.; Holland, V.M.; Summers-Stay, D.; Rao, R.M.; Duselis, J.; Howe, J.; Madahar, B.K.; Boury-Brisset, A.C.; Forrester, B.; Kwantes, P.; Burghouts, G.; Huis, J. van; Mulayim, A.Y.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of an exploratory team of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Information Systems Technology panel into Content-Based Analytics (CBA). The team carried out a technical review into the current status of theoretical and practical developments of methods,

  18. Content based routing in networks with time-fluctuating request rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Folkert; Boucherie, Richardus J.; de Graaf, Maurits

    2008-01-01

    In large-scale distributed applications, a loosely-coupled event-based style of communication as in publish/subcribe systems eases the integration of autonomous, heterogeneous components. In a publish/subscribe system, content based routing - where routing is based on the content of the messages -

  19. Learning effective color features for content based image retrieval in dermatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunte, Kerstin; Biehl, Michael; Jonkman, Marcel F.; Petkov, Nicolai

    We investigate the extraction of effective color features for a content-based image retrieval (CBIR) application in dermatology. Effectiveness is measured by the rate of correct retrieval of images from four color classes of skin lesions. We employ and compare two different methods to learn

  20. Content-Based Instruction Understood in Terms of Connectionism and Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lain, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Despite the number of articles devoted to the topic of content-based instruction (CBI), little attempt has been made to link the claims for CBI to research in cognitive science. In this article, I review the CBI model of foreign language (FL) instruction in the context of its close alignment with two emergent frameworks in cognitive science:…

  1. Roles of frequency, attitudes, and multiple intelligence modality surrounding Electricity Content-Based Reader's Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosier, Julie Winchester

    Integration of subjects is something elementary teachers must do to insure required objectives are covered. Science-based Reader's Theatre is one way to weave reading into science. This study examined the roles of frequency, attitudes, and Multiple Intelligence modalities surrounding Electricity Content-Based Reader's Theatre. This study used quasi-experimental, repeated measures ANOVA with time as a factor design. A convenience sample of two fifth-grade classrooms participated in the study for eighteen weeks. Five Electricity Achievement Tests were given throughout the study to assess students' growth. A Student Reader's Theatre Attitudinal Survey revealed students' attitudes before and after Electricity Content-Based Reader's Theatre treatment. The Multiple Intelligence Inventory for Kids (Faris, 2007) examined whether Multiple Intelligence modality played a role in achievement on Electricity Test 4, the post-treatment test. Analysis using repeated measures ANOVA and an independent t-test found that students in the experimental group, which practiced its student-created Electricity Content-Based Reader's Theatre skits ten times versus two times for the for control group, did significantly better on Electricity Achievement Test 4, t(76) = 3.018, p = 0.003. Dependent t-tests did not find statistically significant differences between students' attitudes about Electricity Content-Based Reader's Theatre before and after treatment. A Kruskal-Wallis test found no statistically significant difference between the various Multiple Intelligence modalities score mean ranks (x2 = 5.57, df = 2, alpha = .062). Qualitative data do, however, indicate students had strong positive feelings about Electricity Content-Based Reader's Theatre after treatment. Students indicated it to be motivating, confidence-building, and a fun way to learn about science; however, they disliked writing their own scripts. Examining the frequency, attitudes, and Multiple Intelligence modalities lead to

  2. Academics respond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK......Contribution to the article "Academics respond: Brexit would weaken UK university research and funding", Guardian Witness, The Guardian, UK...

  3. Academic Jibberish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashen, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about academic jibberish. Alfie Kohn states that a great deal of academic writing is incomprehensible even to others in the same area of scholarship. Academic Jibberish may score points for the writer but does not help research or practice. The author discusses jibberish as a career strategy that impresses those…

  4. A Protocol for Content-Based Communication in Disconnected Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Haillot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In content-based communication, information flows towards interested hosts rather than towards specifically set destinations. This new style of communication perfectly fits the needs of applications dedicated to information sharing, news distribution, service advertisement and discovery, etc. In this paper we address the problem of supporting content-based communication in partially or intermittently connected mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs. The protocol we designed leverages on the concepts of opportunistic networking and delay-tolerant networking in order to account for the absence of end-to-end connectivity in disconnected MANETs. The paper provides an overview of the protocol, as well as simulation results that show how this protocol can perform in realistic conditions.

  5. Content-Based Instruction Approach in Instructional Multimedia for English Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Farani, Rizki

    2012-01-01

    Content-based Instruction (CBI) is an approach in English learning that integrates certain topic and English learning objectives. This approach focuses on using English competencies as a “bridge” to comprehend certain topic or theme in English. Nowadays, this approach can be used in instructional multimedia to support English learning by using computer. Instructional multimedia with computer system refers to the sequential or simultaneous use of variety of media formats in a given presentatio...

  6. A distributed content-based search engine based on mobile code and web service technology

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, V.; Pinsdorf, U.; Peters, J

    2006-01-01

    Current search engines crawl the Web, download content, and digest this content locally. For multimedia content, this involves considerable volumes of data. Furthermore, this process covers only publicly available content because content providers are concerned that they otherwise loose control over the distribution of their intellectual property. We present the prototype of our secure and distributed search engine, which dynamically pushes content based feature extraction to image providers....

  7. A Method for Content-Based Searching of 3D Model Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiale Wang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available With the development of computer graphics and digitalizing technologies, 3D model databases are becoming ubiquitous. This paper presents a method for content-based searching for similar 3D models in databases. To assess the similarity between 3D models, shape feature information of models must be extracted and compared. We propose a new 3D shape feature extraction algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves good retrieval performance with short computation time.

  8. [Determination of film thickness, component and content based on glass surface by using XRF spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yan; Ma, Mi-Xia; Nie, Zuo-Ren

    2013-12-01

    Film thickness, component and content based on glass surface were determined by using XRF technic, measure condition and instrument work condition in every layer were set and adjusted for the best measure effect for every element. Background fundamental parameter (BG-FP) method was built up. Measure results with this method were consistent with the actual preparation course and the method could fit to production application.

  9. Content-Based Instruction Understood in Terms of Connectionism and Constructivism

    OpenAIRE

    Lain, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Despite the number of articles devoted to the topic of content-based instruction (CBI), little attempt has been made to link the claims for CBI to research in cognitive science. In this article, I review the CBI model of foreign language (FL) instruction in the context of its close alignment with two emergent frameworks in cognitive science: connectionism and constructivism. I show that these frameworks offer powerful support for the features of CBI that make it an attractive alternative to t...

  10. Quantification of virtual slides: Approaches to analysis of content-based image information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Kayser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual microscopy, which is the diagnostic work on completely digitized histological and cytological slides as well as blood smears, is at the stage to be implemented in routine diagnostic surgical pathology (tissue-based diagnosis in the near future, once it has been accepted by the US Food and Drug Administration. The principle of content-based image information, its mandatory prerequisites to obtain reproducible and stable image information as well as the different compartments that contribute to image information are described in detail. Automated extraction of content-based image information requires shading correction, constant maximum of grey values, and standardized grey value histograms. The different compartments to evaluate image information include objects, structure, and texture. Identification of objects and derived structure depend on segmentation accuracy and applied procedures; textures contain pixel-based image information only. All together, these image compartments posses the discrimination power to distinguish between object space and background, and, in addition, to reproducibly define regions of interest (ROIs. ROIs are image areas which display the information that is of preferable interest to the viewing pathologist. They contribute to the derived diagnosis to a higher level when compared with other image areas. The implementation of content-based image information algorithms to be applied for predictive tissue-based diagnoses is described in detail.

  11. A Novel Technique for Shape Feature Extraction Using Content Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanoa Jaspreet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of technology and multimedia information, digital images are increasing very quickly. Various techniques are being developed to retrieve/search digital information or data contained in the image. Traditional Text Based Image Retrieval System is not plentiful. Since it is time consuming as it require manual image annotation. Also, the image annotation differs with different peoples. An alternate to this is Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR system. It retrieves/search for image using its contents rather the text, keywords etc. A lot of exploration has been compassed in the range of Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR with various feature extraction techniques. Shape is a significant image feature as it reflects the human perception. Moreover, Shape is quite simple to use by the user to define object in an image as compared to other features such as Color, texture etc. Over and above, if applied alone, no descriptor will give fruitful results. Further, by combining it with an improved classifier, one can use the positive features of both the descriptor and classifier. So, a tryout will be made to establish an algorithm for accurate feature (Shape extraction in Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR. The main objectives of this project are: (a To propose an algorithm for shape feature extraction using CBIR, (b To evaluate the performance of proposed algorithm and (c To compare the proposed algorithm with state of art techniques.

  12. University involvement in sustainability initiatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin; Christensen, Per; Thrane, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    With an outset in the case of Aalborg University, the linkages (actual, potential and missing) between academic work in research & education and sustainability initiatives are explored. The focus is both on the university's core activities as a provider of research and education and on the univer......With an outset in the case of Aalborg University, the linkages (actual, potential and missing) between academic work in research & education and sustainability initiatives are explored. The focus is both on the university's core activities as a provider of research and education...... is Sustainable Development understood at executive level at the university? How (if at all) is sustainable development integrated in the core activities of the university? How is the university attached to ‘real life outside the ivory tower', e.g. through the establishing of Public-Private-Academic Partnerships...

  13. Building the Sustainable Library at Macquarie University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Maxine

    2012-01-01

    This article explores a number of current issues and challenges in sustainability, both of and in academic libraries of the future, using as a case study the new library opened at Macquarie University, Sydney in 2011. Issues covered include sustainable design and operation of library buildings, sustainability in relation to library collections,…

  14. Content-Based Metadata Workbench: An innovative Tool to Compare Geophysical Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, R.; Pfister, R.; Behnke, J.; Sachs, J.; D'Aria, D.

    2002-12-01

    Content Based Metadata Workbench (CBMW) is a prototype that seeks to improve the utility of information hidden in NASA's Earth science data systems by providing a global geophysical parameter data warehouse that is interoperable with metadata search systems. It will provide the following: a mechanism for content-based metadata searching of Earth science data, a research planning tool that includes inter-parameter visualization, and a broad warehouse of meaningful Earth science data to serve as a target for data mining. The team has just completed phase one of the prototype, which includes the development of CBMW data warehouse and integration of ordering interface and visualization of multiple parameters. CBMW takes an innovative approach to identify and compare anomalies and events from higher-level satellite remote sensing data products. CBMW has used level-3 Earth science data products and built a content-metadata "warehouse". This warehouse will serve as a data workbench for other data mining prototypes. CBMW used level 3 data products since they are based on widely accepted algorithms and relatively smaller in volume compared to lower level products. Using products from EOS Terra MODIS atmosphere data, TRMM fire and precipitation data, and AVHRR NDVI data, a database was developed to store geophysical parameters. The database was integrated with a GUI that enables detection of anomalies and relationships between multiple geophysical parameters through visualization. CBMW will provide the following: a mechanism for content-based Metadata searching of Earth science data, a research planning tool that includes inter-parameter visualization, and a broad warehouse of meaningful Earth science data to serve as a target for data mining. CBMW data warehouse is also interoperable with metadata search systems such as ECHO.

  15. Revisiting the Content-Based Instruction in Language Teaching in relation with CLIL: Implementation and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Karim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article has reviewed literature on Content-Based Instruction (CBI along with the Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL in Language Teaching based on the recent development in the field. This includes the learning principle, factors responsible for the successful implementation of CBI/CLIL, their prospect and outcome. The paper is written based on secondary data from different articles providing exploratory account of contexts observed, paying attention to the views and practices of participants, and review papers on previous studies. The goal is to understand the aspects of CBI, its relation with CLIL, success and shortcoming resulted from the implementation in language teaching.

  16. Content-Based Multi-Channel Network Coding Algorithm in the Millimeter-Wave Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai; Wang, Di; Hu, Long

    2016-07-01

    With the development of wireless technology, the widespread use of 5G is already an irreversible trend, and millimeter-wave sensor networks are becoming more and more common. However, due to the high degree of complexity and bandwidth bottlenecks, the millimeter-wave sensor network still faces numerous problems. In this paper, we propose a novel content-based multi-channel network coding algorithm, which uses the functions of data fusion, multi-channel and network coding to improve the data transmission; the algorithm is referred to as content-based multi-channel network coding (CMNC). The CMNC algorithm provides a fusion-driven model based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S) evidence theory to classify the sensor nodes into different classes according to the data content. By using the result of the classification, the CMNC algorithm also provides the channel assignment strategy and uses network coding to further improve the quality of data transmission in the millimeter-wave sensor network. Extensive simulations are carried out and compared to other methods. Our simulation results show that the proposed CMNC algorithm can effectively improve the quality of data transmission and has better performance than the compared methods.

  17. Generic Content-Based Retrieval of Marker-Based Motion Capture Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Na; Jiang, Zifei; Huang, Yan; Meng, Xiangxu; M, Gopi; Peng, Jingliang

    2017-05-09

    In this work, we propose an original scheme for generic content-based retrieval of marker-based motion capture data. It works on motion capture data of arbitrary subject types and arbitrary marker attachment and labelling conventions. Specifically, we propose a novel motion signature to statistically describe both the high-level and the low-level morphological and kinematic characteristics of a motion capture sequence, and conduct the content-based retrieval by computing and ordering the motion signature distance between the query and every item in the database. The distance between two motion signatures is computed by a weighted sum of differences in separate features contained in them. For maximum retrieval performance, we propose a method to pre-learn an optimal set of weights for each type of motion in the database through biased discriminant analysis, and adaptively choose a good set of weights for any given query at the run time. Excellence of the proposed scheme is experimentally demonstrated on various data sets and performance metrics.

  18. Content-Based Multi-Channel Network Coding Algorithm in the Millimeter-Wave Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the development of wireless technology, the widespread use of 5G is already an irreversible trend, and millimeter-wave sensor networks are becoming more and more common. However, due to the high degree of complexity and bandwidth bottlenecks, the millimeter-wave sensor network still faces numerous problems. In this paper, we propose a novel content-based multi-channel network coding algorithm, which uses the functions of data fusion, multi-channel and network coding to improve the data transmission; the algorithm is referred to as content-based multi-channel network coding (CMNC. The CMNC algorithm provides a fusion-driven model based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S evidence theory to classify the sensor nodes into different classes according to the data content. By using the result of the classification, the CMNC algorithm also provides the channel assignment strategy and uses network coding to further improve the quality of data transmission in the millimeter-wave sensor network. Extensive simulations are carried out and compared to other methods. Our simulation results show that the proposed CMNC algorithm can effectively improve the quality of data transmission and has better performance than the compared methods.

  19. Content Based Medical Image Retrieval for Histopathological, CT and MRI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnambiga AYYACHAMY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A content based approach is followed for medical images. The purpose of this study is to access the stability of these methods for medical image retrieval. The methods used in color based retrieval for histopathological images are color co-occurrence matrix (CCM and histogram with meta features. For texture based retrieval GLCM (gray level co-occurrence matrix and local binary pattern (LBP were used. For shape based retrieval canny edge detection and otsu‘s method with multivariable threshold were used. Texture and shape based retrieval were implemented using MRI (magnetic resonance images. The most remarkable characteristics of the article are its content based approach for each medical imaging modality. Our efforts were focused on the initial visual search. From our experiment, histogram with meta features in color based retrieval for histopathological images shows a precision of 60 % and recall of 30 %. Whereas GLCM in texture based retrieval for MRI images shows a precision of 70 % and recall of 20 %. Shape based retrieval for MRI images shows a precision of 50% and recall of 25 %. The retrieval results shows that this simple approach is successful.

  20. Evaluation of shape indexing methods for content-based retrieval of x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.; Lee, Dah-Jye

    2003-01-01

    Efficient content-based image retrieval of biomedical images is a challenging problem of growing research interest. Feature representation algorithms used in indexing medical images on the pathology of interest have to address conflicting goals of reducing feature dimensionality while retaining important and often subtle biomedical features. At the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, a R&D division of the National Library of Medicine, we are developing a content-based image retrieval system for digitized images of a collection of 17,000 cervical and lumbar x-rays taken as a part of the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). Shape is the only feature that effectively describes various pathologies identified by medical experts as being consistently and reliably found in the image collection. In order to determine if the state of the art in shape representation methods is suitable for this application, we have evaluated representative algorithms selected from the literature. The algorithms were tested on a subset of 250 vertebral shapes. In this paper we present the requirements of an ideal algorithm, define the evaluation criteria, and present the results and our analysis of the evaluation. We observe that while the shape methods perform well on visual inspection of the overall shape boundaries, they fall short in meeting the needs of determining similarity between the vertebral shapes based on the pathology.

  1. Content-based histopathological image retrieval for whole slide image database using binary codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yushan; Jiang, Zhiguo; Ma, Yibing; Zhang, Haopeng; Xie, Fengying; Shi, Huaqiang; Zhao, Yu

    2017-03-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) has been widely researched for medical images. In application of histo- pathological images, there are two issues that need to be carefully considered. The one is that the digital slide is stored in a spatially continuous image with a size of more than 10K x 10K pixels. The other is that the size of query image varies in a large range according to different diagnostic conditions. It is a challenging work to retrieve the eligible regions for the query image from the database that consists of whole slide images (WSIs). In this paper, we proposed a CBIR framework for the WSI database and size-scalable query images. Each WSI in the database is encoded and stored in a matrix of binary codes. When retrieving, the query image is first encoded into a set of binary codes and analyzed to pre-choose a set of regions from database using hashing method. Then a multi-binary-code-based similarity measurement based on hamming distance is designed to rank proposal regions. Finally, the top relevant regions and their locations in the WSIs along with the diagnostic information are returned to assist pathologists in diagnoses. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is evaluated in a fine-annotated WSIs database of epithelial breast tumors. The experimental results show that proposed framework is both effective and efficiency for content-based whole slide image retrieval.

  2. Report on RecSys 2015 Workshop on New Trends in Content-Based Recommender Systems (CBRecSys 2015)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the CBRecSys 2015 workshop, the second edition of the workshop on new trends in content-based recommender systems, co-located with RecSys 2015 in Vienna, Austria. Content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, but it has not seen...... venue for work dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommender systems....... the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. Nevertheless, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either in addition to or instead of ratings and implicit usage data. The CBRecSys workshop series provides a dedicated...

  3. Academic Allies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Rebekka Birkebo

    the national associations of European law: Fédération Internationale pour le Droit Européen, the European law journal Common Market Law Review, and the ITL project, carried out at the European University Institute.It carefully documents an alliance between academics and community actors with the aim...... of providing academic support to the constitutional claim, and it argues that the academic discipline of European law was built and developed through a circular attribution of legal ideas, legitimacy, and self-image between the European Court of Justice, the Commission, and academia –most particularly so...

  4. Sustainable Food & Sustainable Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Mavis Dora

    2012-01-01

    Cuba today is immersed in a very intense process of perfecting its agricultural production structures with the goal of making them more efficient and sustainable in their economic administration and in their social and environmental management. Agricultural cooperatives in Cuba have the responsibility of producing on 73% of the country's farmland. Their contributions are decisive to developing agricultural production and to ensuring more and better food for the population, in addition to redu...

  5. Analysis of the effect of the top-down teaching method for training of developing contents based on smart media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jin-Hee Ku

    2011-01-01

    .... In order to develop contents based on smart media, it is necessary to learn new programming language as well as to understand the structure of platforms as device-manufacturers and communication...

  6. A Novel Optimization-Based Approach for Content-Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyu Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Content-based image retrieval is nowadays one of the possible and promising solutions to manage image databases effectively. However, with the large number of images, there still exists a great discrepancy between the users’ expectations (accuracy and efficiency and the real performance in image retrieval. In this work, new optimization strategies are proposed on vocabulary tree building, retrieval, and matching methods. More precisely, a new clustering strategy combining classification and conventional K-Means method is firstly redefined. Then a new matching technique is built to eliminate the error caused by large-scaled scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT. Additionally, a new unit mechanism is proposed to reduce the cost of indexing time. Finally, the numerical results show that excellent performances are obtained in both accuracy and efficiency based on the proposed improvements for image retrieval.

  7. PROTOTYPE CONTENT BASED IMAGE RETRIEVAL UNTUK DETEKSI PEN YAKIT KULIT DENGAN METODE EDGE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dokter spesialis kulit melakukan pemeriksa secara visual objek mata, capture objek dengan kamera digital dan menanyakan riwayat perjalanan penyakit pasien, tanpa melakukan perbandingan terhadap gejala dan tanda yang ada sebelummnya. Sehingga pemeriksaan dan perkiraan jenis penyakit kulit. Pengolahan data citra dalam bentuk digital khususnya citra medis sudah sangat dibutuhkan dengan pra-processing. Banyak pasien yang dilayani di rumah sakit masih menggunakan data citra analog. Data analog ini membutuhkan ruangan khusus untuk menyimpan guna menghindarkan kerusakan mekanis. Uraian mengatasi permasalahan ini, citra medis dibuat dalam bentuk digital dan disimpan dalam sistem database dan dapat melihat kesamaan citra kulit yang baru. Citra akan dapat ditampilkan dengan pra- processing dengan identifikasi kesamaan dengan Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR bekerja dengan cara mengukur kemiripan citra query dengan semua citra yang ada dalam database sehingga query cost berbanding lurus dengan jumlah citra dalam database.

  8. Hierarchical content-based image retrieval by dynamic indexing and guided search

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jane; Cheung, King H.; Liu, James; Guo, Linong

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to content-based image retrieval by using dynamic indexing and guided search in a hierarchical structure, and extending data mining and data warehousing techniques. The proposed algorithms include: a wavelet-based scheme for multiple image feature extraction, the extension of a conventional data warehouse and an image database to an image data warehouse for dynamic image indexing, an image data schema for hierarchical image representation and dynamic image indexing, a statistically based feature selection scheme to achieve flexible similarity measures, and a feature component code to facilitate query processing and guide the search for the best matching. A series of case studies are reported, which include a wavelet-based image color hierarchy, classification of satellite images, tropical cyclone pattern recognition, and personal identification using multi-level palmprint and face features.

  9. Content based image retrieval using local binary pattern operator and data mining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatamanu, Oana Astrid; Frandeş, Mirela; Lungeanu, Diana; Mihalaş, Gheorghe-Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Content based image retrieval (CBIR) concerns the retrieval of similar images from image databases, using feature vectors extracted from images. These feature vectors globally define the visual content present in an image, defined by e.g., texture, colour, shape, and spatial relations between vectors. Herein, we propose the definition of feature vectors using the Local Binary Pattern (LBP) operator. A study was performed in order to determine the optimum LBP variant for the general definition of image feature vectors. The chosen LBP variant is then subsequently used to build an ultrasound image database, and a database with images obtained from Wireless Capsule Endoscopy. The image indexing process is optimized using data clustering techniques for images belonging to the same class. Finally, the proposed indexing method is compared to the classical indexing technique, which is nowadays widely used.

  10. A Probabilistic Framework for Content-Based Diagnosis of Retinal Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Abdelrahman, Mohamed A [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [ORNL; Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in the working age population around the world. Computer assisted analysis has the potential to assist in the early detection of diabetes by regular screening of large populations. The widespread availability of digital fundus cameras today is resulting in the accumulation of large image archives of diagnosed patient data that captures historical knowledge of retinal pathology. Through this research we are developing a content-based image retrieval method to verify our hypothesis that retinal pathology can be identified and quantified from visually similar retinal images in an image archive. We will present diagnostic results for specificity and sensitivity on a population of 395 fundus images representing the normal fundus and 14 stratified disease states.

  11. Content-based searching of multimedia databases by use of approximate digital signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael J; Xie, Liehua; Arce, Gonzalo R; Graveman, Richard F

    2003-10-10

    We propose the use of approximate digital signatures of selected multimedia feature vectors for fast content-based retrieval in large multimedia databases. We adapt and extend the approximate message authentication code (AMAC), introduced by some of the authors recently in the area of message authentication, to the multimedia searching problem. An AMAC is a binary signature with the ability to reflect changes in the message it represents. The Hamming distance between two AMACs is used to measure the degree of the similarity between multimedia objects. We develop a method to compress AMAC signatures to create a direct look-up table that allows for fast searching of a database. The color histogram is used as the example feature space to show how the signature is applied. Experimental results show that the performance of the proposed method is comparable with existing methods based on other popular metrics, but it significantly decreases search time.

  12. Exploring access to scientific literature using content-based image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno, Thomas M.; Antani, Sameer; Long, Rodney

    2007-03-01

    The number of articles published in the scientific medical literature is continuously increasing, and Web access to the journals is becoming common. Databases such as SPIE Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, indices such as PubMed, and search engines such as Google provide the user with sophisticated full-text search capabilities. However, information in images and graphs within these articles is entirely disregarded. In this paper, we quantify the potential impact of using content-based image retrieval (CBIR) to access this non-text data. Based on the Journal Citations Report (JCR), the journal Radiology was selected for this study. In 2005, 734 articles were published electronically in this journal. This included 2,587 figures, which yields a rate of 3.52 figures per article. Furthermore, 56.4% of these figures are composed of several individual panels, i.e. the figure combines different images and/or graphs. According to the Image Cross-Language Evaluation Forum (ImageCLEF), the error rate of automatic identification of medical images is about 15%. Therefore, it is expected that, by applying ImageCLEF-like techniques, already 95.5% of articles could be retrieved by means of CBIR. The challenge for CBIR in scientific literature, however, is the use of local texture properties to analyze individual image panels in composite illustrations. Using local features for content-based image representation, 8.81 images per article are available, and the predicted correctness rate may increase to 98.3%. From this study, we conclude that CBIR may have a high impact in medical literature research and suggest that additional research in this area is warranted.

  13. Identifying content-based and relational techniques to change behaviour in motivational interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Sarah J; Fortier, Michelle; Blake, Nicola; Hagger, Martin S

    2017-03-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a complex intervention comprising multiple techniques aimed at changing health-related motivation and behaviour. However, MI techniques have not been systematically isolated and classified. This study aimed to identify the techniques unique to MI, classify them as content-related or relational, and evaluate the extent to which they overlap with techniques from the behaviour change technique taxonomy version 1 [BCTTv1; Michie, S., Richardson, M., Johnston, M., Abraham, C., Francis, J., Hardeman, W., … Wood, C. E. (2013). The behavior change technique taxonomy (v1) of 93 hierarchically clustered techniques: Building an international consensus for the reporting of behavior change interventions. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 46, 81-95]. Behaviour change experts (n = 3) content-analysed MI techniques based on Miller and Rollnick's [(2013). Motivational interviewing: Preparing people for change (3rd ed.). New York: Guildford Press] conceptualisation. Each technique was then coded for independence and uniqueness by independent experts (n = 10). The experts also compared each MI technique to those from the BCTTv1. Experts identified 38 distinct MI techniques with high agreement on clarity, uniqueness, preciseness, and distinctiveness ratings. Of the identified techniques, 16 were classified as relational techniques. The remaining 22 techniques were classified as content based. Sixteen of the MI techniques were identified as having substantial overlap with techniques from the BCTTv1. The isolation and classification of MI techniques will provide researchers with the necessary tools to clearly specify MI interventions and test the main and interactive effects of the techniques on health behaviour. The distinction between relational and content-based techniques within MI is also an important advance, recognising that changes in motivation and behaviour in MI is a function of both intervention content and the interpersonal style

  14. Content-based retrieval using MPEG-7 visual descriptor and hippocampal neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ho; Joung, Lyang-Jae; Kang, Dae-Seong

    2005-12-01

    As development of digital technology, many kinds of multimedia data are used variously and requirements for effective use by user are increasing. In order to transfer information fast and precisely what user wants, effective retrieval method is required. As existing multimedia data are impossible to apply the MPEG-1, MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 technologies which are aimed at compression, store and transmission. So MPEG-7 is introduced as a new technology for effective management and retrieval for multimedia data. In this paper, we extract content-based features using color descriptor among the MPEG-7 standardization visual descriptor, and reduce feature data applying PCA(Principal Components Analysis) technique. We remodel the cerebral cortex and hippocampal neural networks as a principle of a human's brain and it can label the features of the image-data which are inputted according to the order of hippocampal neuron structure to reaction-pattern according to the adjustment of a good impression in Dentate gyrus region and remove the noise through the auto-associate- memory step in the CA3 region. In the CA1 region receiving the information of the CA3, it can make long-term or short-term memory learned by neuron. Hippocampal neural network makes neuron of the neural network separate and combine dynamically, expand the neuron attaching additional information using the synapse and add new features according to the situation by user's demand. When user is querying, it compares feature value stored in long-term memory first and it learns feature vector fast and construct optimized feature. So the speed of index and retrieval is fast. Also, it uses MPEG-7 standard visual descriptors as content-based feature value, it improves retrieval efficiency.

  15. AN INVESTIGATION OF TEACHERS’ PEDAGOGICAL SKILLS AND CONTENT KNOWLEDGE IN A CONTENT-BASED INSTRUCTION CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengku Nor Rizan Tengku Mohamad Maasum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Advocates of the content-based approach believed that a language can be learnt effectively when it is the medium of instruction rather than just a subject.  Integrating English and content as part of instruction has become one of the cornerstones of second language pedagogy. Researchers claimed that there are many benefits of integrating English and content instruction.  Among the benefits are the increase in students’ interest with content themes, meaningful input and understanding. In 2003, the Malaysian Ministry of Education introduced the teaching and learning of science and mathematics in English for Year One, Form One and Lower Six Form in all government public schools. This paper describes the challenges faced by teachers when they are required to teach content subjects such as science and mathematics in English.  The focus of the paper is on the teachers’ pedagogical skills  and content knowldge which comprises subject matter content, pedagogical approach, classroom management, use of resources, assessment, preparation of teaching materials, managing students, teachers’ compensatory communication strategies, use of first language and teachers’ perspectives of teaching content subjects in English. Data were obtained from a self-report questionnaire administered to 495 secondary school teachers in West Malaysia. Results from the study provide implications for school administrators in making decisions in assignment of  capable teachers to teach the various levels of classes. Suggestions for teacher self-development and life-long learning efforts are also provided.   Key words: Content-based instruction, ESL instruction, second language, first language and second language pedagogy

  16. Academic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Vivian E; Horner, Keith

    2008-07-01

    Since 1988, thirteen dental schools have provided dental undergraduate programmes within the United Kingdom (UK). In 2006, two new dental schools were created supporting dental education in the community. A further new dental school in Scotland will be accepting students in autumn 2008. In the past 25 years, extensive reorganisation of the NHS has resulted in long-term implications for the training of medical and dental academic staff. The number of academic clinicians is below the minimum viable level and external constraints, combined with a lack of suitable applicants, have led to a moratorium on academic recruitment within some Dental Schools. A detailed review of the historical and associated factors which have led to the problems presently besetting academic dentistry are discussed along with the initiatives introduced in the last 10 years to revitalise the speciality. Also, the present and future outlook for academic dentistry in other countries are discussed. Opinion is divided as to the appropriate setting for the training of undergraduate students between those who support community-based dental education and those who believe dental education should remain within research led dental establishments. External factors are moulding an unsatisfactory situation that is proving increasingly unattractive to the potential dental academic and the case for reform is obvious.

  17. Sustainability in nursing: a concept analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anåker, Anna; Elf, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe, explore and explain the concept of sustainability in nursing. Background Although researchers in nursing and medicine have emphasised the issue of sustainability and health, the concept of sustainability in nursing is undefined and poorly researched. A need exists for theoretical and empirical studies of sustainability in nursing. Design Concept analysis as developed by Walker and Avant. Method Data were derived from dictionaries, international healthcare organisations and literature searches in the CINAHL and MEDLINE databases. Inclusive years for the search ranged from 1990 to 2012. A total of fourteen articles were found that referred to sustainability in nursing. Results Sustainability in nursing involves six defining attributes: ecology, environment, future, globalism, holism and maintenance. Antecedents of sustainability require climate change, environmental impact and awareness, confidence in the future, responsibility and a willingness to change. Consequences of sustainability in nursing include education in the areas of ecology, environment and sustainable development as well as sustainability as a part of nursing academic programs and in the description of the academic subject of nursing. Sustainability should also be part of national and international healthcare organisations. The concept was clarified herein by giving it a definition. Conclusion Sustainability in nursing was explored and found to contribute to sustainable development, with the ultimate goal of maintaining an environment that does not harm current and future generations′ opportunities for good health. This concept analysis provides recommendations for the healthcare sector to incorporate sustainability and provides recommendations for future research. PMID:24602178

  18. Content Based Image Retrieval by Using Color Descriptor and Discrete Wavelet Transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Rehan; Ahmed, Mudassar; Jabbar, Sohail; Khalid, Shehzad; Ahmad, Awais; Din, Sadia; Jeon, Gwangil

    2018-01-25

    Due to recent development in technology, the complexity of multimedia is significantly increased and the retrieval of similar multimedia content is a open research problem. Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) is a process that provides a framework for image search and low-level visual features are commonly used to retrieve the images from the image database. The basic requirement in any image retrieval process is to sort the images with a close similarity in term of visually appearance. The color, shape and texture are the examples of low-level image features. The feature plays a significant role in image processing. The powerful representation of an image is known as feature vector and feature extraction techniques are applied to get features that will be useful in classifying and recognition of images. As features define the behavior of an image, they show its place in terms of storage taken, efficiency in classification and obviously in time consumption also. In this paper, we are going to discuss various types of features, feature extraction techniques and explaining in what scenario, which features extraction technique will be better. The effectiveness of the CBIR approach is fundamentally based on feature extraction. In image processing errands like object recognition and image retrieval feature descriptor is an immense among the most essential step. The main idea of CBIR is that it can search related images to an image passed as query from a dataset got by using distance metrics. The proposed method is explained for image retrieval constructed on YCbCr color with canny edge histogram and discrete wavelet transform. The combination of edge of histogram and discrete wavelet transform increase the performance of image retrieval framework for content based search. The execution of different wavelets is additionally contrasted with discover the suitability of specific wavelet work for image retrieval. The proposed algorithm is prepared and tried to implement for

  19. Expatriate academics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The literature on business expatriates has been increasing rapidly, but research on expatriate academics has remained scant, despite the apparent increasing globalisation of the academic world. Therefore, more research is needed on the latter group of expatriates. This paper aims to fill...... some of the gaps. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was directed electronically towards expatriate academics occupying regular positions in science faculty departments in universities in northern Europe. Findings – Results showed that job clarity was the dominating job factor with strong...... relationships with all of the five investigated work outcome variables, work adjustment, work performance, work effectiveness, job satisfaction, and time to proficiency. Job conflict and job freedom had an association with some of the work outcome variables but not with all of them. Neither workload nor job...

  20. A web-accessible content-based cervicographic image retrieval system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhiyun; Long, L. Rodney; Antani, Sameer; Jeronimo, Jose; Thoma, George R.

    2008-03-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) is the process of retrieving images by directly using image visual characteristics. In this paper, we present a prototype system implemented for CBIR for a uterine cervix image (cervigram) database. This cervigram database is a part of data collected in a multi-year longitudinal effort by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and archived by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), for the study of the origins of, and factors related to, cervical precancer/cancer. Users may access the system with any Web browser. The system is built with a distributed architecture which is modular and expandable; the user interface is decoupled from the core indexing and retrieving algorithms, and uses open communication standards and open source software. The system tries to bridge the gap between a user's semantic understanding and image feature representation, by incorporating the user's knowledge. Given a user-specified query region, the system returns the most similar regions from the database, with respect to attributes of color, texture, and size. Experimental evaluation of the retrieval performance of the system on "groundtruth" test data illustrates its feasibility to serve as a possible research tool to aid the study of the visual characteristics of cervical neoplasia.

  1. Optimizing top precision performance measure of content-based image retrieval by learning similarity function

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Ru-Ze

    2017-04-24

    In this paper we study the problem of content-based image retrieval. In this problem, the most popular performance measure is the top precision measure, and the most important component of a retrieval system is the similarity function used to compare a query image against a database image. However, up to now, there is no existing similarity learning method proposed to optimize the top precision measure. To fill this gap, in this paper, we propose a novel similarity learning method to maximize the top precision measure. We model this problem as a minimization problem with an objective function as the combination of the losses of the relevant images ranked behind the top-ranked irrelevant image, and the squared Frobenius norm of the similarity function parameter. This minimization problem is solved as a quadratic programming problem. The experiments over two benchmark data sets show the advantages of the proposed method over other similarity learning methods when the top precision is used as the performance measure.

  2. Toward content-based image retrieval with deep convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Judah E. S.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Fabbri, Daniel; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) offers the potential to identify similar case histories, understand rare disorders, and eventually, improve patient care. Recent advances in database capacity, algorithm efficiency, and deep Convolutional Neural Networks (dCNN), a machine learning technique, have enabled great CBIR success for general photographic images. Here, we investigate applying the leading ImageNet CBIR technique to clinically acquired medical images captured by the Vanderbilt Medical Center. Briefly, we (1) constructed a dCNN with four hidden layers, reducing dimensionality of an input scaled to 128x128 to an output encoded layer of 4x384, (2) trained the network using back-propagation 1 million random magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images, (3) labeled an independent set of 2100 images, and (4) evaluated classifiers on the projection of the labeled images into manifold space. Quantitative results were disappointing (averaging a true positive rate of only 20%); however, the data suggest that improvements would be possible with more evenly distributed sampling across labels and potential re-grouping of label structures. This preliminary effort at automated classification of medical images with ImageNet is promising, but shows that more work is needed beyond direct adaptation of existing techniques.

  3. Deeply learnt hashing forests for content based image retrieval in prostate MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amit; Conjeti, Sailesh; Navab, Nassir; Katouzian, Amin

    2016-03-01

    Deluge in the size and heterogeneity of medical image databases necessitates the need for content based retrieval systems for their efficient organization. In this paper, we propose such a system to retrieve prostate MR images which share similarities in appearance and content with a query image. We introduce deeply learnt hashing forests (DL-HF) for this image retrieval task. DL-HF effectively leverages the semantic descriptiveness of deep learnt Convolutional Neural Networks. This is used in conjunction with hashing forests which are unsupervised random forests. DL-HF hierarchically parses the deep-learnt feature space to encode subspaces with compact binary code words. We propose a similarity preserving feature descriptor called Parts Histogram which is derived from DL-HF. Correlation defined on this descriptor is used as a similarity metric for retrieval from the database. Validations on publicly available multi-center prostate MR image database established the validity of the proposed approach. The proposed method is fully-automated without any user-interaction and is not dependent on any external image standardization like image normalization and registration. This image retrieval method is generalizable and is well-suited for retrieval in heterogeneous databases other imaging modalities and anatomies.

  4. An efficient similarity measure for content based image retrieval using memetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutasem K. Alsmadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Content based image retrieval (CBIR systems work by retrieving images which are related to the query image (QI from huge databases. The available CBIR systems extract limited feature sets which confine the retrieval efficacy. In this work, extensive robust and important features were extracted from the images database and then stored in the feature repository. This feature set is composed of color signature with the shape and color texture features. Where, features are extracted from the given QI in the similar fashion. Consequently, a novel similarity evaluation using a meta-heuristic algorithm called a memetic algorithm (genetic algorithm with great deluge is achieved between the features of the QI and the features of the database images. Our proposed CBIR system is assessed by inquiring number of images (from the test dataset and the efficiency of the system is evaluated by calculating precision-recall value for the results. The results were superior to other state-of-the-art CBIR systems in regard to precision.

  5. MetaSEEk: a content-based metasearch engine for images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Mandis; Benitez, Ana B.; Chang, Shih-Fu

    1997-12-01

    Search engines are the most powerful resources for finding information on the rapidly expanding World Wide Web (WWW). Finding the desired search engines and learning how to use them, however, can be very time consuming. The integration of such search tools enables the users to access information across the world in a transparent and efficient manner. These systems are called meta-search engines. The recent emergence of visual information retrieval (VIR) search engines on the web is leading to the same efficiency problem. This paper describes and evaluates MetaSEEk, a content-based meta-search engine used for finding images on the Web based on their visual information. MetaSEEk is designed to intelligently select and interface with multiple on-line image search engines by ranking their performance for different classes of user queries. User feedback is also integrated in the ranking refinement. We compare MetaSEEk with a base line version of meta-search engine, which does not use the past performance of the different search engines in recommending target search engines for future queries.

  6. Combining semantic technologies with a content-based image retrieval system - Preliminary considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, P.; Ganzha, M.; Jaworska, T.; Paprzycki, M.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, as a part of systematic growth of volume, and variety, of information that can be found on the Internet, we observe also dramatic increase in sizes of available image collections. There are many ways to help users browsing / selecting images of interest. One of popular approaches are Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) systems, which allow users to search for images that match their interests, expressed in the form of images (query by example). However, we believe that image search and retrieval could take advantage of semantic technologies. We have decided to test this hypothesis. Specifically, on the basis of knowledge captured in the CBIR, we have developed a domain ontology of residential real estate (detached houses, in particular). This allows us to semantically represent each image (and its constitutive architectural elements) represented within the CBIR. The proposed ontology was extended to capture not only the elements resulting from image segmentation, but also "spatial relations" between them. As a result, a new approach to querying the image database (semantic querying) has materialized, thus extending capabilities of the developed system.

  7. Automated and effective content-based image retrieval for digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vibhav Prakash; Srivastava, Subodh; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, huge number of mammograms has been generated in hospitals for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) can contribute more reliable diagnosis by classifying the query mammograms and retrieving similar mammograms already annotated by diagnostic descriptions and treatment results. Since labels, artifacts, and pectoral muscles present in mammograms can bias the retrieval procedures, automated detection and exclusion of these image noise patterns and/or non-breast regions is an essential pre-processing step. In this study, an efficient and automated CBIR system of mammograms was developed and tested. First, the pre-processing steps including automatic labelling-artifact suppression, automatic pectoral muscle removal, and image enhancement using the adaptive median filter were applied. Next, pre-processed images were segmented using the co-occurrence thresholds based seeded region growing algorithm. Furthermore, a set of image features including shape, histogram based statistical, Gabor, wavelet, and Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) features, was computed from the segmented region. In order to select the optimal features, a minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) feature selection method was then applied. Finally, similar images were retrieved using Euclidean distance similarity measure. The comparative experiments conducted with reference to benchmark mammographic images analysis society (MIAS) database confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed work concerning average precision of 72% and 61.30% for normal & abnormal classes of mammograms, respectively.

  8. Keyframes Global Map Establishing Method for Robot Localization through Content-Based Image Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-localization and mapping are important for indoor mobile robot. We report a robust algorithm for map building and subsequent localization especially suited for indoor floor-cleaning robots. Common methods, for example, SLAM, can easily be kidnapped by colliding or disturbed by similar objects. Therefore, keyframes global map establishing method for robot localization in multiple rooms and corridors is needed. Content-based image matching is the core of this method. It is designed for the situation, by establishing keyframes containing both floor and distorted wall images. Image distortion, caused by robot view angle and movement, is analyzed and deduced. And an image matching solution is presented, consisting of extraction of overlap regions of keyframes extraction and overlap region rebuild through subblocks matching. For improving accuracy, ceiling points detecting and mismatching subblocks checking methods are incorporated. This matching method can process environment video effectively. In experiments, less than 5% frames are extracted as keyframes to build global map, which have large space distance and overlap each other. Through this method, robot can localize itself by matching its real-time vision frames with our keyframes map. Even with many similar objects/background in the environment or kidnapping robot, robot localization is achieved with position RMSE <0.5 m.

  9. [The new method monitoring crop water content based on NIR-Red spectrum feature space].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao-juan; Xu, Xin-gang; Chen, Tian-en; Yang, Gui-jun; Li, Zhen-hai

    2014-06-01

    Moisture content is an important index of crop water stress condition, timely and effective monitoring of crop water content is of great significance for evaluating crop water deficit balance and guiding agriculture irrigation. The present paper was trying to build a new crop water index for winter wheat vegetation water content based on NIR-Red spectral space. Firstly, canopy spectrums of winter wheat with narrow-band were resampled according to relative spectral response function of HJ-CCD and ZY-3. Then, a new index (PWI) was set up to estimate vegetation water content of winter wheat by improveing PDI (perpendicular drought index) and PVI (perpendicular vegetation index) based on NIR-Red spectral feature space. The results showed that the relationship between PWI and VWC (vegetation water content) was stable based on simulation of wide-band multispectral data HJ-CCD and ZY-3 with R2 being 0.684 and 0.683, respectively. And then VWC was estimated by using PWI with the R2 and RMSE being 0.764 and 0.764, 3.837% and 3.840%, respectively. The results indicated that PWI has certain feasibility to estimate crop water content. At the same time, it provides a new method for monitoring crop water content using remote sensing data HJ-CCD and ZY-3.

  10. Textual and visual content-based anti-phishing: a Bayesian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Gang; Chow, Tommy W S; Liu, Wenyin

    2011-10-01

    A novel framework using a Bayesian approach for content-based phishing web page detection is presented. Our model takes into account textual and visual contents to measure the similarity between the protected web page and suspicious web pages. A text classifier, an image classifier, and an algorithm fusing the results from classifiers are introduced. An outstanding feature of this paper is the exploration of a Bayesian model to estimate the matching threshold. This is required in the classifier for determining the class of the web page and identifying whether the web page is phishing or not. In the text classifier, the naive Bayes rule is used to calculate the probability that a web page is phishing. In the image classifier, the earth mover's distance is employed to measure the visual similarity, and our Bayesian model is designed to determine the threshold. In the data fusion algorithm, the Bayes theory is used to synthesize the classification results from textual and visual content. The effectiveness of our proposed approach was examined in a large-scale dataset collected from real phishing cases. Experimental results demonstrated that the text classifier and the image classifier we designed deliver promising results, the fusion algorithm outperforms either of the individual classifiers, and our model can be adapted to different phishing cases. © 2011 IEEE

  11. Content-based image retrieval for interstitial lung diseases using classification confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Jatindra Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Prabhakar, Nidhi; Garg, Mandeep; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) system could exploit the wealth of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) data stored in the archive by finding similar images to assist radiologists for self learning and differential diagnosis of Interstitial Lung Diseases (ILDs). HRCT findings of ILDs are classified into several categories (e.g. consolidation, emphysema, ground glass, nodular etc.) based on their texture like appearances. Therefore, analysis of ILDs is considered as a texture analysis problem. Many approaches have been proposed for CBIR of lung images using texture as primitive visual content. This paper presents a new approach to CBIR for ILDs. The proposed approach makes use of a trained neural network (NN) to find the output class label of query image. The degree of confidence of the NN classifier is analyzed using Naive Bayes classifier that dynamically takes a decision on the size of the search space to be used for retrieval. The proposed approach is compared with three simple distance based and one classifier based texture retrieval approaches. Experimental results show that the proposed technique achieved highest average percentage precision of 92.60% with lowest standard deviation of 20.82%.

  12. Sustainable agriculture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lichtfouse, Eric

    2009-01-01

    ... : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 9 Part I CLIMATE CHANGE Soils and Sustainable Agriculture: A Review : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : Rattan Lal 15 Soils and Food Sufficiency...

  13. Sustainable Marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, three different conceptions of sustainable marketing are discussed and compared. These different conceptions are referred to as social, green, and critical sustainable marketing. Social sustainable marketing follows the logic of demand-driven marketing management and places the

  14. Report on RecSys 2014 Workshop on New Trends in Content-Based Recommender Systems (CBRecSys 2014)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn; Cantádor, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either in...... these data sources should be combined to provided the best recommendation performance. The CBRecSys 2014 workshop aimed to address this by providing a dedicated venue for papers dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommender systems.......While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either...

  15. Towards sustainable empowering learning environments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Towards sustainable empowering learning environments: Unmasking apartheid legacies through scholarship of engagement. ... This article reports, from the insider's perspective, on a research project comprising fifteen academics in the Faculty of Education Sciences at the North-West University and fifteen senior officials ...

  16. academic libraries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    libraries in general) can now organise their collections in digital formats such as, electronic books, databases, media resources, ..... Consensus report. ASSAf: Pretoria. Blaxter, L., Hughes, C., & Tight, M. (1998). Writing on academic careers. Studies in. Higher Education, 23 (3)281–295. Eysenbach, G. (2006). Citation ...

  17. Academic Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    12, 13, 14, March LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 POSTPONED! - Modern Project Management Methods - POSTPONED! By G. Vallet / Ed. Highware, Paris, F. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  19. Academic Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Brian G.

    The strength of academic freedom has always depended upon historical circumstances. In the United States, higher education began with institutions founded and controlled by religious sects. The notion of who gets educated and to what ends expanded as American democracy expanded. By the 1980's, legitimate calls for equality became a general…

  20. Academic Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As colleges and universities become even more complex organizations, advancement professionals need to have the skills, experience, and academic credentials to succeed in this ever-changing environment. Advancement leaders need competencies that extend beyond fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing. The author encourages…

  1. Sustainable School Leadership: The Teachers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable school leadership is essential to the academic growth of students and professional growth of faculty and staff. Shedding light on what constitutes sustainable leadership from the perspective of teachers will increase our understanding of how specific leadership practices and processes impact those in the learning community who are…

  2. Sustainability in Project Management: Reality Bites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert Gilbert Silvius; Ron Schipper; Snezana Nedeski

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between project management and sustainable development is rapidly gaining interest from both practitioners and academics. Studies on the integration of the concepts of sustainability into project management, approach this topic mostly from a conceptual, logical or moral point of

  3. Content-based VLE designs improve learning efficiency in constructivist statistics education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Wessa

    population under investigation. The findings demonstrate that a content-based design outperforms the traditional VLE-based design.

  4. PetroSPIRE: a multimodal content-based retrieval system for petroleum applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Lawrence D.; Castelli, Vittorio; Li, Chung-Sheng; Tilke, Peter; Bryant, Ian

    1999-08-01

    In this paper we present a novel content-based search application for petroleum exploration and production. The target application is specification of and search for geologically significant features to be extracted from 2D imagery acquired from oil well bores, in conjunction with 1D parameter traces. The PetroSPIRE system permits a user to define rock strata using image examples in conjunction with parameter constraints. Similarity retrieval is based multimodal search, an relies on texture-matching techniques using pre-extracted texture features, employing high- dimensional indexing and nearest neighbor search. Special- purpose visualization techniques allow a user to evalute object definitions, which can then be iteratively refined by supplying multiple positive and negative image examples as well as multiple parameter constraints. Higher-level semantic constructs can be created from simpler entities by specifying sets of inter-object constraints. A delta-lobe riverbed, for examples, might be specified as layer of siltstone which is above and within 10 feet of a layer of sandstone, with an intervening layer of shale. These 'compound objects', along with simple objects, from a library of searchable entities that can be used in an operational setting. Both object definition and search are accomplished using a web-based Java client, supporting image and parameter browsing, drag-and-drop query specification, and thumbnail viewing of query results. Initial results from this search engine have been deemed encouraging by oil- industry E and P researchers. A more ambitious pilot is underway to evaluate the efficacy of this approach on a large database from a North Sea drilling site.

  5. Design of Content Based Image Retrieval Scheme for Diabetic Retinopathy Images using Harmony Search Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakamasundari, J; Natarajan, V

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a disorder that affects the structure of retinal blood vessels due to long-standing diabetes mellitus. Automated segmentation of blood vessel is vital for periodic screening and timely diagnosis. An attempt has been made to generate continuous retinal vasculature for the design of Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) application. The typical normal and abnormal retinal images are preprocessed to improve the vessel contrast. The blood vessels are segmented using evolutionary based Harmony Search Algorithm (HSA) combined with Otsu Multilevel Thresholding (MLT) method by best objective functions. The segmentation results are validated with corresponding ground truth images using binary similarity measures. The statistical, textural and structural features are obtained from the segmented images of normal and DR affected retina and are analyzed. CBIR in medical image retrieval applications are used to assist physicians in clinical decision-support techniques and research fields. A CBIR system is developed using HSA based Otsu MLT segmentation technique and the features obtained from the segmented images. Similarity matching is carried out between the features of query and database images using Euclidean Distance measure. Similar images are ranked and retrieved. The retrieval performance of CBIR system is evaluated in terms of precision and recall. The CBIR systems developed using HSA based Otsu MLT and conventional Otsu MLT methods are compared. The retrieval performance such as precision and recall are found to be 96% and 58% for CBIR system using HSA based Otsu MLT segmentation. This automated CBIR system could be recommended for use in computer assisted diagnosis for diabetic retinopathy screening.

  6. [Research on fast detecting tomato seedlings nitrogen content based on NIR characteristic spectrum selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-zhu; Wang, Feng-zhu; Wang, Li-li; Zhang, Xiao-chao; Mao, Wen-hua

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the accuracy and robustness of detecting tomato seedlings nitrogen content based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR), 4 kinds of characteristic spectrum selecting methods were studied in the present paper, i. e. competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS), Monte Carlo uninformative variables elimination (MCUVE), backward interval partial least squares (BiPLS) and synergy interval partial least squares (SiPLS). There were totally 60 tomato seedlings cultivated at 10 different nitrogen-treatment levels (urea concentration from 0 to 120 mg . L-1), with 6 samples at each nitrogen-treatment level. They are in different degrees of over nitrogen, moderate nitrogen, lack of nitrogen and no nitrogen status. Each sample leaves were collected to scan near-infrared spectroscopy from 12 500 to 3 600 cm-1. The quantitative models based on the above 4 methods were established. According to the experimental result, the calibration model based on CARS and MCUVE selecting methods show better performance than those based on BiPLS and SiPLS selecting methods, but their prediction ability is much lower than that of the latter. Among them, the model built by BiPLS has the best prediction performance. The correlation coefficient (r), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and ratio of performance to standard derivate (RPD) is 0. 952 7, 0. 118 3 and 3. 291, respectively. Therefore, NIR technology combined with characteristic spectrum selecting methods can improve the model performance. But the characteristic spectrum selecting methods are not universal. For the built model based or single wavelength variables selection is more sensitive, it is more suitable for the uniform object. While the anti-interference ability of the model built based on wavelength interval selection is much stronger, it is more suitable for the uneven and poor reproducibility object. Therefore, the characteristic spectrum selection will only play a better role in building model

  7. Improving performance of content based image retrieval system with color features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Hladnik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Content based image retrieval (CBIR encompasses a variety of techniques with a goal to solve the problem of searching for digital images in a large database by their visual content. Applications where the retrieval of similar images plays a crucial role include personal photo and art collections, medical imaging, multimedia publications and video surveillance. Main objective of our study was to try to improve the performance of the query-by-example image retrieval system based on texture features – Gabor wavelet and wavelet transform – by augmenting it with color information about the images, in particular color histogram, color autocorrelogram and color moments. Wang image database comprising 1000 natural color images grouped into 10 categories with 100 images was used for testing individual algorithms. Each image in the database served as a query image and the retrieval performance was evaluated by means of the precision and recall. e number of retrieved images ranged from 10 to 80. e best CBIR performance was obtained when implementing a combination of all 190 texture- and color features. Only slightly worse were the average precision and recall for the texture- and color histogram-based system. is result was somewhat surprising, since color histogram features provide no color spatial informa- tion. We observed a 23% increase in average precision when comparing the system containing a combination of texture- and all color features with the one consisting of exclusively texture descriptors when using Euclidean distance measure and 20 retrieved images. Addition of the color autocorrelogram features to the texture de- scriptors had virtually no e ect on the performance, while only minor improvement was detected when adding rst two color moments – the mean and the standard deviation. Similar to what was found in the previous studies with the same image database, average precision was very high in case of dinosaurs and owers and very low

  8. Schools for health and sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Katrine Dahl; Nordin, Lone Lindegard; Simovska, Venka

    2015-01-01

    in Denmark with its aims of ensuring overall school improvement, increasing pupil wellbeing and improving academic outcomes. Analysis of international policy documents, as well as of research literature in both fields, shows that school-based health education (HE) and education for sustainable development...... in this chapter focuses on a common tendency when health and sustainability education in schools are framed in national action plans: certain critical educational aspects are lost by narrowing the concepts of health and sustainability to fit particular school subjects (e.g. physical education or science......This chapter addresses the relationships between international and national (Danish) policies regarding sustainability and health promotion which have the potential to affect school-based health education/promotion and education for sustainable development. Based on policy mapping and analysis...

  9. Academic Identity Tensions in the Public University: Which Values Really Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Richard P.; O'Donohue, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Our study explores the relationship between values and academic identity in the public university. Framing the study is the proposition public universities face academic identity tensions arising from pressures to combine and sustain competing and contradictory managerial (economic) and academic (professional) values systems. Academic responses to…

  10. Sustainable Urban Development and Social Sustainability in the Urban Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruq Ibnul Haqi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Social sustainability and sustainable urban developments are major challenges across the world both developed and developing countries. In general there is a conflict between the approach of sustainable development and social sustainability in the urban context. The concept of sustainability brings a key framework for extensive literature on urban design, architecture and planning. Nevertheless there is a considerable overlap between the social dimensions of sustainability and the theories or notions, for instance the ‘sustainable societies’ that are highlighted in the midst of other aspects: social equity and justice. Such society is widely expected to offer a situation for long-term social relations and activities which are sustainable, inclusive and equitable in a wider perception of the term (environmentally, socially and economically. The method adopted to address this aim involves a content analysis of available academic literature, with focus on the planning sustainable development, built environment, social sustainability, and urban planning fields. The findings demonstrate that in spite of some opposing evidence, many studies have confirmed that there has been displacement of the debate on the term of ‘sustainability’ from ‘ecological and environmental aspects into social and economic aspects’. It is related to how the community feel safe and comfortable living in their own communities, how have they felt of proud of the place where they live. The aim of the paper is to improve our understanding of current theories and practices of planning sustainable development and discuss whether the approach of sustainable development aligns with social sustainability objectives.

  11. Academic Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Heine, Carmen

    Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt kildeangive......Vejledning i at undgå plagiering ved at følge de normer, der gælder for good academic practice. Dette indebærer at man angiver kilder korrekt, og når det er nødvendigt, og at man har en korrekt udformet fortegnelse over referencer. Vejledningen indeholder konkrete eksempler på korrekt...

  12. A Review of Research on Content-Based Foreign/Second Language Education in US K-12 Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedick, Diane J.; Wesely, Pamela M.

    2015-01-01

    This review of the extant research literature focuses on research about content-based language instruction (CBI) programmes in K-12 foreign/second language education in the USA. The review emphasises studies on one-way language immersion (OWI) and two-way language immersion (TWI) programmes, which are school-based and subject matter-driven. OWI…

  13. Interdisciplinary Education and Critical Thinking in Religion and History: The Delivery of Two "Content-Based" Linked Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Roseanne; LaMonica, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Primary sources in religion and history enable first year university students to connect "content-based" linked courses in the core curriculum. Fifty-four first year university students in three separate pairs of courses worked in teams to present oral critical reports on texts related to the Reformation, the Enlightenment, and the…

  14. Awareness of Christian College Professors Concerning English Language Learners in the Content-Based Classroom and Implementation of Effective Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedding, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to understand Christian college professors' levels of awareness to the needs of English Language Learners (ELLs) in content-based classrooms and to identify effective practices for language learning that are being implemented, a quantitative study using descriptive research was carried out. A survey was used to collect data to…

  15. Language-Building Activities and Interaction Variations with Mixed-Ability ESL University Learners in a Content-Based Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna Dimas, Héctor Manuel; Ruíz Castellanos, Erika

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of both language-building activities and a variety of teacher/student interaction patterns increase both oral language participation and content learning in a course of manual therapy with mixed-language ability students. In this article, the researchers describe their collaboration in a content-based course in English with English…

  16. Teaching "Cross-Cultural Communication" through Content Based Instruction: Curriculum Design and Learning Outcome from EFL Learners' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chia-Ti Heather

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate EFL learners' perspectives for the effectiveness of content-based instruction in a cross-cultural communication course. The main objectives of this study are three-folds: (1) to examine students' perspectives regarding the effectiveness of content learning; (2) to examine students' perspectives regarding the…

  17. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development....... The tools have been applied in practice in collaboration with 11 small and medium sized companies (SMEs). The study investigates these approaches to further understand how design thinking can contribute to sustainable transition in a business context. The study and the findings are relevant to organizations...... invested in the issue of sustainable business development, in particular the leaders and employees of SMEs, but also to design education seeking new ways to consciously handle and teach the complexity inherent in sustainable transformation. Findings indicate that the SD design thinking approach contributes...

  18. Computational sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Kersting, Kristian; Morik, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The book at hand gives an overview of the state of the art research in Computational Sustainability as well as case studies of different application scenarios. This covers topics such as renewable energy supply, energy storage and e-mobility, efficiency in data centers and networks, sustainable food and water supply, sustainable health, industrial production and quality, etc. The book describes computational methods and possible application scenarios.

  19. Comparing features sets for content-based image retrieval in a medical-case database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Henning; Rosset, Antoine; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2004-04-01

    Content-based image retrieval systems (CBIRSs) have frequently been proposed for the use in medical image databases and PACS. Still, only few systems were developed and used in a real clinical environment. It rather seems that medical professionals define their needs and computer scientists develop systems based on data sets they receive with little or no interaction between the two groups. A first study on the diagnostic use of medical image retrieval also shows an improvement in diagnostics when using CBIRSs which underlines the potential importance of this technique. This article explains the use of an open source image retrieval system (GIFT - GNU Image Finding Tool) for the retrieval of medical images in the medical case database system CasImage that is used in daily, clinical routine in the university hospitals of Geneva. Although the base system of GIFT shows an unsatisfactory performance, already little changes in the feature space show to significantly improve the retrieval results. The performance of variations in feature space with respect to color (gray level) quantizations and changes in texture analysis (Gabor filters) is compared. Whereas stock photography relies mainly on colors for retrieval, medical images need a large number of gray levels for successful retrieval, especially when executing feedback queries. The results also show that a too fine granularity in the gray levels lowers the retrieval quality, especially with single-image queries. For the evaluation of the retrieval peformance, a subset of the entire case database of more than 40,000 images is taken with a total of 3752 images. Ground truth was generated by a user who defined the expected query result of a perfect system by selecting images relevant to a given query image. The results show that a smaller number of gray levels (32 - 64) leads to a better retrieval performance, especially when using relevance feedback. The use of more scales and directions for the Gabor filters in the

  20. Indexing data cubes for content-based searches in radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, M.; Candia, G.; Gregorio, R.; Mendoza, M.; Solar, M.

    2016-01-01

    seeks to provide the capability of content-based searches on data cubes to the astronomical community.

  1. Content-based image retrieval of digitized histopathology in boosted spectrally embedded spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Akshay; Doyle, Scott; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems allow for retrieval of images from within a database that are similar in visual content to a query image. This is useful for digital pathology, where text-based descriptors alone might be inadequate to accurately describe image content. By representing images via a set of quantitative image descriptors, the similarity between a query image with respect to archived, annotated images in a database can be computed and the most similar images retrieved. Recently, non-linear dimensionality reduction methods have become popular for embedding high-dimensional data into a reduced-dimensional space while preserving local object adjacencies, thereby allowing for object similarity to be determined more accurately in the reduced-dimensional space. However, most dimensionality reduction methods implicitly assume, in computing the reduced-dimensional representation, that all features are equally important. In this paper we present boosted spectral embedding(BoSE), which utilizes a boosted distance metric to selectively weight individual features (based on training data) to subsequently map the data into a reduced-dimensional space. BoSE is evaluated against spectral embedding (SE) (which employs equal feature weighting) in the context of CBIR of digitized prostate and breast cancer histopathology images. The following datasets, which were comprised of a total of 154 hematoxylin and eosin stained histopathology images, were used: (1) Prostate cancer histopathology (benign vs. malignant), (2) estrogen receptor (ER) + breast cancer histopathology (low vs. high grade), and (3) HER2+ breast cancer histopathology (low vs. high levels of lymphocytic infiltration). We plotted and calculated the area under precision-recall curves (AUPRC) and calculated classification accuracy using the Random Forest classifier. BoSE outperformed SE both in terms of CBIR-based (area under the precision-recall curve) and classifier-based (classification accuracy

  2. Towards case-based medical learning in radiological decision making using content-based image retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Rolf W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiologists' training is based on intensive practice and can be improved with the use of diagnostic training systems. However, existing systems typically require laboriously prepared training cases and lack integration into the clinical environment with a proper learning scenario. Consequently, diagnostic training systems advancing decision-making skills are not well established in radiological education. Methods We investigated didactic concepts and appraised methods appropriate to the radiology domain, as follows: (i Adult learning theories stress the importance of work-related practice gained in a team of problem-solvers; (ii Case-based reasoning (CBR parallels the human problem-solving process; (iii Content-based image retrieval (CBIR can be useful for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD. To overcome the known drawbacks of existing learning systems, we developed the concept of image-based case retrieval for radiological education (IBCR-RE. The IBCR-RE diagnostic training is embedded into a didactic framework based on the Seven Jump approach, which is well established in problem-based learning (PBL. In order to provide a learning environment that is as similar as possible to radiological practice, we have analysed the radiological workflow and environment. Results We mapped the IBCR-RE diagnostic training approach into the Image Retrieval in Medical Applications (IRMA framework, resulting in the proposed concept of the IRMAdiag training application. IRMAdiag makes use of the modular structure of IRMA and comprises (i the IRMA core, i.e., the IRMA CBIR engine; and (ii the IRMAcon viewer. We propose embedding IRMAdiag into hospital information technology (IT infrastructure using the standard protocols Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM and Health Level Seven (HL7. Furthermore, we present a case description and a scheme of planned evaluations to comprehensively assess the system. Conclusions The IBCR-RE paradigm

  3. Comparing the quality of accessing medical literature using content-based visual and textual information retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Henning; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Kahn, Charles E., Jr.; Hersh, William

    2009-02-01

    Content-based visual information (or image) retrieval (CBIR) has been an extremely active research domain within medical imaging over the past ten years, with the goal of improving the management of visual medical information. Many technical solutions have been proposed, and application scenarios for image retrieval as well as image classification have been set up. However, in contrast to medical information retrieval using textual methods, visual retrieval has only rarely been applied in clinical practice. This is despite the large amount and variety of visual information produced in hospitals every day. This information overload imposes a significant burden upon clinicians, and CBIR technologies have the potential to help the situation. However, in order for CBIR to become an accepted clinical tool, it must demonstrate a higher level of technical maturity than it has to date. Since 2004, the ImageCLEF benchmark has included a task for the comparison of visual information retrieval algorithms for medical applications. In 2005, a task for medical image classification was introduced and both tasks have been run successfully for the past four years. These benchmarks allow an annual comparison of visual retrieval techniques based on the same data sets and the same query tasks, enabling the meaningful comparison of various retrieval techniques. The datasets used from 2004-2007 contained images and annotations from medical teaching files. In 2008, however, the dataset used was made up of 67,000 images (along with their associated figure captions and the full text of their corresponding articles) from two Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) scientific journals. This article describes the results of the medical image retrieval task of the ImageCLEF 2008 evaluation campaign. We compare the retrieval results of both visual and textual information retrieval systems from 15 research groups on the aforementioned data set. The results show clearly that, currently

  4. Sustainable transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nicolai Bo

    This paper is about sustainable transformation with a particular focus on listed buildings. It is based on the notion that sustainability is not just a question of energy conditions, but also about the building being robust. Robust architecture means that the building can be maintained and rebuilt...... theoretical lenses. It is proposed that three parameters concerning the ꞌtransformabilityꞌ of the building can contribute to a more nuanced understanding of sustainable transformation: technical aspects, programmatic requirements and narrative value. It is proposed that the concept of ꞌsustainable...

  5. School Culture, Basic Psychological Needs, Intrinsic Motivation and Academic Achievement: Testing a Casual Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Badri, Rahim; Amani-Saribaglou, Javad; Ahrari, Ghafour; Jahadi, Navideh; Mahmoudi, Hojjat

    2014-01-01

    .... Motivation involves the processes that energize, direct, and sustain behavior. It seems that school culture, basic psychological needs and motivation has immense effect on academic achievement...

  6. Sustainable Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Ralph P.; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Marsden, Greg

    2014-01-01

    that relate to the construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure and the operation or use of the different transportation modes. The concept of sustainable transportation emerged in response to these concerns as part of the broader notion of sustainable development. Given the transportation...

  7. Sustaining dairy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villarreal Herrera, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Dairy in Europe has undergone many changes in the last few years—the abolition of milk production quotas being a fundamental one. This study explores these changes in relation to the sustained social and environmental viability of the sector and how dairy processors' sustainability

  8. Sustainable Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2011-01-01

    . Declarations tend to have impact on three trends. Firstly, there is emerging international consensus on the university’s role and function in relation to sustainable development; secondly, the emergence of national legislation, and thirdly, an emerging international competition to be leader in sustainable...... campus performance....

  9. Sustainable Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole Erik; Søndergård, Bent

    2014-01-01

    of agendas/vision, technologies, actors and institutions in the emergent design of an urban mobility system based on an electric car sharing system. Why. Designing for sustainability is a fundamental challenge for future design practices; designers have to obtain an ability to contribute to sustainable...

  10. Sustainable Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwell, Louise; Dillon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Green schools have moved into a new era that focuses on building a culture of sustainability in every aspect of learning in schools. In the early stages of sustainability education, the focus was on recycling and turning off the lights. Now, students and adults together are moving into the areas of advocacy and action that are based on a deep…

  11. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  12. Green Curriculum: Sustainable Learning at a Higher Education Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Willa

    2013-01-01

    The United Nations (UN) constituted 2005-2014 as the decade for educational sustainable development when bridges have to be built between academic institutions and their communities. In this article I will therefore do a literature search from 2005-2011 on what it means to be a sustainable university with a sustainable curriculum by looking at…

  13. Business Sustainability and Undergraduate Management Education: An Australian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Josie; Bonn, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    The academic literature arguing that there is an urgent requirement for businesses to become more sustainable is rapidly expanding. There is also a demonstrated need for managers to develop a better understanding of sustainability and the appropriate strategies required to improve business sustainability. In addition, there have been international…

  14. Quantifying the margin sharpness of lesions on radiological images for content-based image retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Jiajing; Napel, Sandy; Greenspan, Hayit; Beaulieu, Christopher F.; Agrawal, Neeraj; Rubin, Daniel [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    . Equivalence across deformations was assessed using Schuirmann's paired two one-sided tests. Results: In simulated images, the concordance correlation between measured gradient and actual gradient was 0.994. The mean (s.d.) and standard deviation NDCG score for the retrieval of K images, K = 5, 10, and 15, were 84% (8%), 85% (7%), and 85% (7%) for CT images containing liver lesions, and 82% (7%), 84% (6%), and 85% (4%) for CT images containing lung nodules, respectively. The authors' proposed method outperformed the two existing margin characterization methods in average NDCG scores over all K, by 1.5% and 3% in datasets containing liver lesion, and 4.5% and 5% in datasets containing lung nodules. Equivalence testing showed that the authors' feature is more robust across all margin deformations (p < 0.05) than the two existing methods for margin sharpness characterization in both simulated and clinical datasets. Conclusions: The authors have described a new image feature to quantify the margin sharpness of lesions. It has strong correlation with known margin sharpness in simulated images and in clinical CT images containing liver lesions and lung nodules. This image feature has excellent performance for retrieving images with similar margin characteristics, suggesting potential utility, in conjunction with other lesion features, for content-based image retrieval applications.

  15. Sustainable Academia : Translating the Vision of a Fully Sustainable University into a Measurable Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maragakis, A.

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing public expectation that universities should start focusing on delivering sustainability. The topic of sustainability in higher education has gathered a significant amount of interest from students, academics, governments and international organizations.

    With a plethora of

  16. Gaps in Sustainability Education: The Impact of Higher Education Coursework on Perceptions of Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, P. Brian; McAdams, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine how both the amount and type of coursework impact students' conceptualizations of sustainability. Previous research demonstrates that academic coursework influences students' environmental attitudes, yet few studies have examined the impact of coursework on how students conceptualize "sustainability".…

  17. Barriers Approach to Innovation in Academic Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hsuan Chuang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Innovation in academic libraries is not a brand new issue. Academic libraries can benefit from successful innovation, since innovation is a key contributor to gaining and sustaining competitive advantage for survival. Building on two case studies, 28 participants from leadership teams to practitioners are involved, the qualitative findings identified the specific two types of barriers that academic libraries face by applying a barriers approach to innovation, that’s, environmental and organizational barriers. Especially, seven dimensions of two types of barriers to innovation are found.

  18. Sustainability in coastal tourism development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Marie Visbech; Blichfeldt, Bodil Stilling; Liburd, Janne J.

    2018-01-01

    Denmark’s coastlines have been protected from tourism development and construction for more than 80 years. In 2014, the Danish politicians opened up for softer regulation of the coastlines and invited proposals for tourism development projects within the hitherto protected coastal zone. The call ...... benefits are emphasized. Key findings also indicate weak political leadership in the envisaged transfer towards sustainable tourism development.......Denmark’s coastlines have been protected from tourism development and construction for more than 80 years. In 2014, the Danish politicians opened up for softer regulation of the coastlines and invited proposals for tourism development projects within the hitherto protected coastal zone. The call...... explicitly requested nominations for sustainable tourism projects. A comparison between academic sustainability discourse and the approved projects suggests that tourism actors do not address sustainable tourism development as a holistic concept. Long-term perspectives are largely absent, whereas economic...

  19. THE WHATS, WHYS, HOWS AND WHOS OF CONTENT-BASED INSTRUCTION IN SECOND/FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dueñas

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available As an instructional practice in second and foreign language education, content-based instruction is not a fully revolutionary paradigm, but a spin-off approach which derives from the evolution of Communicative Language Teaching. Sharing with CLT the same fundamental principies, CBI bases its idiosyncrasy on promoting the use of subject matter for secondlforeign language teaching purposes. This article aims at exploring the nature and scope of the content-based methodological framework -the whats-, the theoretical foundations that support it -the whys-, and the different prototype models for application in compliance with parameters such as institutional requirements, educational leve], and the particular nature and object of instruction -the hows. Additionally, it will also undertake a review of a copious nurnber of references selected from the existing literature, mostly contributed by researchers and experienced practitioners in the field -the whos.

  20. Institutionalizing the academic health department within the context of the 3-fold academic mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingood, William C; Goldhagen, Jeffrey; Bryant, Thomas; Harmon, Robert G; Wood, David L

    2014-01-01

    A mature model of an academic health department (AHD) that has been institutionalized over 2 decades is described within the context of the 3-fold traditional mission of academics (teaching, research, and service/practice). This adaptive model for AHDs, based on mutual benefits that can be viewed through the lenses of both the academic health center mission and the public health functions and services, has important implications for AHD sustainability. Continued collaboration in any academic-public health partnership will depend in part on the commitments of the changing leadership. However, institutionalizing support for the academic mission enables this collaboration to transcend changing leadership styles and priorities. The collaboration of Duval County Health Department and University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville is an example of a model of AHD that has endured major changes in leadership within both the academic center and the Duval County Health Department.

  1. Designing and implementing content-based courses in english with a non-language faculty at a public colombian university

    OpenAIRE

    Arismendi Gómez, Fabio Alberto; Díaz Mosquera, Claudia Patricia; Salazar Valencia, Leidy Natalia

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the findings of an investigation into the experience of a group of eight professors from undergraduate programs in hard sciences who participated in a multi-site study to implement content-based (CB) courses in English. The professors, who had a high level of proficiency in English, worked in collaboration with language faculty. The data gathered from focus groups, class observations and in-depth interviews reveal some factors which influence the professors’ teaching prac...

  2. The Effect of Teaching Communication Strategies on Iranian EFL Learners’ Speaking Self- efficacy in Content-based Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Saeidi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of teaching communication strategies on students’ self-efficacy in speaking in content-based courses in Iranian EFL context. To this end, 30 students in two content-based classes, one as the experimental group and another as the control group, in SAMA private junior high school school in Tabriz, participated in this study. Communication strategy instruction was taught explicitly over a period of 16 one-hour sessions to the experimental group, while the control group didn’t receive any explicit communication strategy teaching. Data on the learners’ self-efficacy in speaking were collected through a researcher made questionnaire. The results of the data analysis using ANCOVA revealed the positive effect of teaching communication strategies (CSs on students’ self efficacy in speaking in content-based courses in Iranian EFL context. The findings of this study have important implications for material developers for designing activities involving communication strategies and for teacher training programs for teaching communication strategies to improve learners’ self-efficacy regarding speaking skill.

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  4. Sustainable consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prothero, Andrea; Dobscha, Susan; Freund, Jim

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores sustainable consumption and considers possible roles for marketing and consumer researchers and public policy makers in addressing the many sustainability challenges that pervade our planet. Future research approaches to this interdisciplinary topic need to be comprehensive...... and systematic and will benefit from a variety of different perspectives. There are a number of opportunities for future research, and three areas are explored in detail. First, the essay considers the inconsistency between the attitudes and behaviors of consumers with respect to sustainability; next, the agenda...... is broadened to explore the role of individual citizens in society; and finally, a macro institutional approach to fostering sustainability is explored. Each of these areas is examined in detail and possible research avenues and public policy initiatives are considered within each of these separate...

  5. Stabilizing Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reitan Andersen, Kirsti

    The publication of the Brundtland Report in 1987 put the topic of sustainable development on the political and corporate agenda. Defining sustainable development as “a development that meets the needs of the future without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs......” (WCED, 1987, p. 43), the Report also put a positive spin on the issue of sustainability by upholding capitalist beliefs in the possibility of infinite growth in a world of finite resources. While growth has delivered benefits, however, it has done so unequally and unsustainably. This thesis focuses...... on the textile and fashion industry, one of the world’s most polluting industries and an industry to some degree notorious for leading the ‘race to the bottom’ in global labour standards. Despite being faced with increasing demands to practise sustainability, most textile and fashion companies continue to fail...

  6. Sustainability reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.

    2005-01-01

    This article gives an overview of developments in sustainability (also sometimes labelled corporate social responsibility) reporting. The article will first briefly indicate how accountability on social and environmental issues started, already in the 1970s when social reports were published.

  7. Sustainable Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georg, Susse; Garza de Linde, Gabriela Lucía

    Judging from the number of communities and cities striving or claiming to be sustainable and how often eco-development is invoked as the means for urban regeneration, it appears that sustainable and eco-development have become “the leading paradigm within urban development” (Whitehead 2003......), urban design competitions are understudied mechanisms for bringing about field level changes. Drawing on actor network theory, this paper examines how urban design competitions may bring about changes within the professional field through the use of intermediaries such as a sustainable planning....../assessment tool. The context for our study is urban regeneration in one Danish city, which had been suffering from industrial decline and which is currently investing in establishing a “sustainable city”. Based on this case study we explore how the insights and inspiration evoked in working with the tool...

  8. Sustainable responsibilities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2015-01-01

    This working paper analyzes the conceptions of corporate responsibility for sustainable development in EU policies on CSR. The notion of corporate responsibility has until recently been limited to economical and legal responsibilities. Based on this narrow conception of corporate responsibility.......e. a combination of destruction and construction, this chapter will deconstruct conceptions of responsibility for sustainable development in these EU documents on CSR. A deconstructive conceptual analysis involves destructing dominant interpretations of a text and allowing for constructions of alternative...... such as sustainability actually means, but on what the concept says and does not say. A deconstructive analysis of EU policies on CSR, then, pinpoints that such policies are sites of conceptual struggles. This kind of analysis is suitable for studying conceptions of corporate responsibility for sustainable development...

  9. Agriculture: Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainability creates and maintains the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the food, feed, and fiber needs of our country and the social, economic and other requirements.

  10. Sustainable finance

    OpenAIRE

    Boersma-de Jong, Margreet F.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation for Springschool of Strategy, University of Groningen, 10 October 2012. The role of CSR is to stimulate ethical behaviour, and as a result, mutual trust in society. Advantage of CSR for the company and the evolution of CSR. From CSR to Sustainable Finance: how does CSR influence Sustainable Business Administration & Management Accounting, Financial Leadership and what is the importance of CSR in the financial sector

  11. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda STEG

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses possible contributions of psychologists to sustainable transportation. It is argued that in order to reach sustainable transportation, among others, behaviour changes of individual car users are needed. As transport policies will be more effective if they target important antecedents of travel behaviour, first, factors influencing such behaviour are discussed. It is argued that car use is very attractive and sometimes even necessary for many different reasons. This implies that a combination of policies is called for, each targeting different factors that support car use and hinder the use of more sustainable modes of transport. Next, the paper elaborates on policy strategies that may be employed to achieve sustainable transportation by changing car use. Increasing the attractiveness of sustainable transport modes by means of pull measures seems not sufficient to reduce the level of car use. Besides, car use should be made less attractive by means of push measures to force drivers to reconsider their travel behaviour. The acceptability of such policies may be increased by clearly communicating the aim of these policies, and the expected positive consequences (e.g., less congestion, improved environmental quality. Moreover, possible negative effects for individual freedom may be compensated by implementing additional policies aimed at facilitating the use of sustainable transport modes.

  12. Sustainable markets for sustainable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, J.; Smyser, C.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses how the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is involved in sustainable energy development. It presently has 50 loans and grants for non conventional renewable energy projects and ten grants for efficiency programs for $600 and $17 million respectively, representing 100 MW of power. The IDB is concerned with how to create a sustainable market for sustainable energy projects. The IDB is trying to work with government, private sector, NGOs, trading allies, credit sources, and regulators to find proper roles for such projects. He discusses how the IDB is working to expand its vision and objectives in renewable energy projects in Central and South America.

  13. Revitalising the Essay in an English for Academic Purposes Course: Critical Engagement, Multiliteracies and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a content-based English for academic purposes (EAP) course, "Language and Public Life", and its major assignment, a research essay that critiques media coverage of a current event or social issue. The pedagogical context in which this assignment is realised underpins the forms of critical inquiry expected. The selection of…

  14. Adult ESL in Higher Education: Balancing Academic Learning, Speech Science and English Language Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttaro, Lucia

    2004-01-01

    Replicating earlier studies, 66 English as a second language speech students at a community college undertook content-based second language learning in psychology, sociology, and history. End-of-semester assessments showed they had improved second-language confidence and learned academic subject matter; most agreed sheltered courses were a useful…

  15. Sustainability in nursing: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anåker, Anna; Elf, Marie

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe, explore and explain the concept of sustainability in nursing. Although researchers in nursing and medicine have emphasised the issue of sustainability and health, the concept of sustainability in nursing is undefined and poorly researched. A need exists for theoretical and empirical studies of sustainability in nursing. Concept analysis as developed by Walker and Avant. Data were derived from dictionaries, international healthcare organisations and literature searches in the CINAHL and MEDLINE databases. Inclusive years for the search ranged from 1990 to 2012. A total of fourteen articles were found that referred to sustainability in nursing. Sustainability in nursing involves six defining attributes: ecology, environment, future, globalism, holism and maintenance. Antecedents of sustainability require climate change, environmental impact and awareness, confidence in the future, responsibility and a willingness to change. Consequences of sustainability in nursing include education in the areas of ecology, environment and sustainable development as well as sustainability as a part of nursing academic programs and in the description of the academic subject of nursing. Sustainability should also be part of national and international healthcare organisations. The concept was clarified herein by giving it a definition. Sustainability in nursing was explored and found to contribute to sustainable development, with the ultimate goal of maintaining an environment that does not harm current and future generations' opportunities for good health. This concept analysis provides recommendations for the healthcare sector to incorporate sustainability and provides recommendations for future research. © 2014 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science.

  16. Information Systems Education: The Case for the Academic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mew, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how cloud computing can be leveraged to add value to academic programs in information systems and other fields by improving financial sustainment models for institutional technology and academic departments, relieving the strain on overworked technology support resources, while adding richness and improving pedagogical…

  17. Emotional Intelligence, Academic Procrastination and Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academic achievement is the main measure of the level of education attained, which is meant to achieve the curriculum objective of success and priority. The study investigated effect of emotional intelligence and academic procrastination on academic achievement of students in two Nigerian Universities. The study adopted ...

  18. Assessing an Academic Library Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, Karen R.; O'Toole, Erin; Sassen, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    Professional development programs have been established in many academic libraries to support the research and scholarly activities of librarians. Continuous assessment can contribute to the sustainability and effectiveness of these programs. This study describes how measures of need, participation, satisfaction, and impact were employed to assess…

  19. Teacher Education that Works: Preparing Secondary-Level Math and Science Teachers for Success with English Language Learners Through Content-Based Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margo Elisabeth DelliCarpini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Little research exists on effective ways to prepare secondary mathematics and science teachers to work with English language learners (ELLs in mainstream mathematics and science (subsequently referred to as STEM classrooms. Given the achievement gap that exists between ELLs and their native-speaking counterparts in STEM subjects, as well as the growing numbers of ELLs in US schools, this becomes a critical issue, as academic success for these students depends on the effectiveness of instruction they receive not only in English as a second language classes (ESL, but in mainstream classrooms as well. This article reports on the effects of a program restructuring that implemented coursework specifically designed to prepare pre-service and in-service mathematics, science, and ESL teachers to work with ELLs in their content and ESL classrooms through collaboration between mainstream STEM and ESL teachers, as well as effective content and language integration. We present findings on teachers’ attitudes and current practices related to the inclusion of ELLs in the secondary-level content classroom and their current level of knowledge and skills in collaborative practice. We further describe the rationale behind the development of the course, provide a description of the course and its requirements as they changed throughout its implementation during two semesters, and present findings from the participants enrolled. Additionally, we discuss the lessons learned; researchers’ innovative approaches to implementation of content-based instruction (CBI and teacher collaboration, which we term two-way CBI (DelliCarpini & Alonso, 2013; and implications for teacher education programs.

  20. Roundtabling Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponte, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The willingness of public authority to delegate social and environmental regulation to the private sector has varied from sector to sector, but has often led to the establishment of ‘voluntary’ standards and certifications on sustainability. Many of these have taken the form of ‘stewardship...... councils’ and ‘sustainability roundtables’ and have been designed around a set of institutional features seeking to establish legitimacy, fend off possible criticism, and ‘sell’ certifications to potential users. The concept of ‘roundtabling’ emphasizes the fitting a variety of commodity......-specific sustainability situations into a form that not only ‘hears more voices’ (as in ‘multi-stakeholder’), but also portrays to give them equal standing at the table of negotiations (roundtable), thus raising higher expectations on accountability, transparency and inclusiveness. In this article, I examine to what...

  1. Sustainability Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichnothe, Heinz

    2017-03-17

    The long-term substitution of fossil resources can only be achieved through a bio-based economy, with biorefineries and bio-based products playing a major role. However, it is important to assess the implications of the transition to a bio-based economy. Life cycle-based sustainability assessment is probably the most suitable approach to quantify impacts and to identify trade-offs at multiple levels. The extended utilisation of biomass can cause land use change and affect food security of the most vulnerable people throughout the world. Although this is mainly a political issue and governments should be responsible, the responsibility is shifted to companies producing biofuels and other bio-based products. Organic wastes and lignocellulosic biomass are considered to be the preferred feedstock for the production of bio-based products. However, it is unlikely that a bio-based economy can rely only on organic wastes and lignocellulosic biomass.It is crucial to identify potential problems related to socio-economic and environmental issues. Currently there are many approaches to the sustainability of bio-based products, both quantitative and qualitative. However, results of different calculation methods are not necessarily comparable and can cause confusion among decision-makers, stakeholders and the public.Hence, a harmonised, globally agreed approach would be the best solution to secure sustainable biomass/biofuels/bio-based chemicals production and trade, and to avoid indirect effects (e.g. indirect land use change). However, there is still a long way to go.Generally, the selection of suitable indicators that serve the purpose of sustainability assessment is very context-specific. Therefore, it is recommended to use a flexible and modular approach that can be adapted to various purposes. A conceptual model for the selection of sustainability indicators is provided that facilitates identifying suitable sustainability indicators based on relevance and significance in a

  2. A New Content-Based Image Retrieval Using the Multidimensional Generalization of Wald-Wolfowitz Runs Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leauhatong, Thurdsak; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Atsuta, Kiyoaki; Kondo, Shozo

    This paper proposes two new similarity measures for the content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems. The similarity measures are based on the k-means clustering algorithm and the multidimensional generalization of the Wald-Wolfowitz (MWW) runs test. The performance comparisons between the proposed similarity measures and a current CBIR similarity measure based on the MWW runs test were performed, and it can be seen that the proposed similarity measures outperform the current similarity measure with respect to the precision and the computational time.

  3. Pluralism in Search of Sustainability: Ethics, Knowledge and Methdology in Sustainability Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellinor Isgren

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability Science is an emerging, transdisciplinary academic field that aims to help build a sustainable global society by drawing on and integrating research from the humanities and the social, natural, medical and engineering sciences. Academic knowledge is combined with that from relevant actors from outside academia, such as policy-makers, businesses, social organizations and citizens. The field is focused on examining the interactions between human, environmental, and engineered systems to understand and contribute to solutions for complex challenges that threaten the future of humanity and the integrity of the life support systems of the planet, such as climate change, biodiversity loss, pollution, and land and water degradation. Since its inception in around the year 2000, and as expressed by a range of proponents in the field, sustainability science has become an established international platform for interdisciplinary research on complex social problems [1]. This has been done by exploring ways to promote ‘greater integration and cooperation in fulfilling the sustainability science mandate’ [2]. Sustainability science has thereby become an extremely diverse academic field, yet one with an explicit normative mission. After nearly two decades of sustainability research, it is important to reflect on a major question: what critical knowledge can we gain from sustainability science research on persistent socio-ecological problems and new sustainability challenges?

  4. The Role of Higher Education for Sustainable Development in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... resource development, management and conservation, biodiversity preservation and so forth. Traditional academic/disciplinary structures cannot cope with these demands adequately. The problem-driven nature of sustainable development concern is changing the relationship between university and communities.

  5. CONCEPTUAL DELIMITATIONS ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ienciu Ionel-Alin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a model for resource use meant to satisfy human needs, without polluting the environment, so that these needs can be satisfied not only in the present, but in the future as well. It is a concept of nowadays with no generally accepted definition, placing environment first and foremost, aiming at implementing the environmental policies in all structures and at all economic levels. Within the present study we have aimed at creating a conceptual delimitation on sustainable development, sustainability and socialresponsibility, concepts of present interest, that tend to become a mystery for the academic community and practitioners by their variety and complexity of approaches. During our scientific endeavor we believe that social responsibility is the foundation of sustainable development. Sustainable development is a concept used especially at macro-economic level, while social responsibility is used at entity level and incorporates the economic, environmental and social dimension, which has a voluntary character and tries to respond to the information needs of the society and other stakeholders. Sustainability at the entity\\'s level is the goal or final objective of sustainable development – satisfaction of present needs without compromising the possibility for future generations to satisfy their own needs, while social responsibility is an intermediate phase of sustainability wherein entities try to balance the economic, social and environmental dimension. Thus, we can state we include ourselves within social corporatism, slightly close to social institutionalism, which is characteristic to developed countries, giving a particular importance to social contract and relations between entity and society. We believe that in Romania, a POSDRU funded project should be regarded as a legal person with social values, which must be based on sustainable development and to promote, besides legal liability of automatically deriving

  6. Sustainable Soesterkwartier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahams, H.; Goosen, H.; Jong, de F.; Sickmann, J.; Prins, D.

    2010-01-01

    The municipality of Amersfoort wants to construct an endurable and sustainable eco-town in the Soesterkwartier neighbourhood, by taking future climate change into account. The impact of climate change at the location of the proposed eco-town was studied by a literature review.

  7. Sustainable agriculture

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    New farming techniques, better food security. Since 1970, IDRC-supported research has introduced sustainable agricultural practices to farmers and communities across the devel- oping world. The result: higher productivity, less poverty, greater food security, and a healthier environment. Opportunities grow on trees in ...

  8. Sustainable Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tsegai Berhane Ghebretekle

    Abstract. This article examines the concept of sustainable development after the Post-. 2015 Paris Climate Change Agreement with particular emphasis on Ethiopia. Various African countries are vulnerable to climate change, as is evidenced by recent droughts. Ethiopia is selected as a case study in light of its pace in.

  9. Sustainable machining

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an overview on current sustainable machining. Its chapters cover the concept in economic, social and environmental dimensions. It provides the reader with proper ways to handle several pollutants produced during the machining process. The book is useful on both undergraduate and postgraduate levels and it is of interest to all those working with manufacturing and machining technology.

  10. Architecture Sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Stal, Michael; Hilliard, Rich

    2013-01-01

    Software architecture is the foundation of software system development, encompassing a system's architects' and stakeholders' strategic decisions. A special issue of IEEE Software is intended to raise awareness of architecture sustainability issues and increase interest and work in the area. The

  11. Sustainability reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.

    2005-01-01

    This article gives an overview of developments in sustainability (also sometimes labelled corporate social responsibility) reporting. It The article will first briefly indicate how accountability on social and environmental issues started, already in the 1970s when social reports were published.

  12. Exergy sustainability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Wilson, David Gerald; Reed, Alfred W.

    2006-05-01

    Exergy is the elixir of life. Exergy is that portion of energy available to do work. Elixir is defined as a substance held capable of prolonging life indefinitely, which implies sustainability of life. In terms of mathematics and engineering, exergy sustainability is defined as the continuous compensation of irreversible entropy production in an open system with an impedance and capacity-matched persistent exergy source. Irreversible and nonequilibrium thermodynamic concepts are combined with self-organizing systems theories as well as nonlinear control and stability analyses to explain this definition. In particular, this paper provides a missing link in the analysis of self-organizing systems: a tie between irreversible thermodynamics and Hamiltonian systems. As a result of this work, the concept of ''on the edge of chaos'' is formulated as a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for stability and performance of sustainable systems. This interplay between exergy rate and irreversible entropy production rate can be described as Yin and Yang control: the dialectic synthesis of opposing power flows. In addition, exergy is shown to be a fundamental driver and necessary input for sustainable systems, since exergy input in the form of power is a single point of failure for self-organizing, adaptable systems.

  13. Sustainable processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Heine

    2004-01-01

    Kristensen_NH and_Beck A: Sustainable processing. In Otto Schmid, Alexander Beck and Ursula Kretzschmar (Editors) (2004): Underlying Principles in Organic and "Low-Input Food" Processing - Literature Survey. Research Institute of Organic Agriculture FiBL, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland. ISBN 3-906081-58-3...

  14. Sustainable finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Margreet F. Boersma-de Jong

    2012-01-01

    Presentation for Springschool of Strategy, University of Groningen, 10 October 2012. The role of CSR is to stimulate ethical behaviour, and as a result, mutual trust in society. Advantage of CSR for the company and the evolution of CSR. From CSR to Sustainable Finance: how does CSR influence

  15. Plurality or convergence in sustainability reporting standards?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Albu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years an increasing number of companies issued Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR or Sustainability Reports to complement their traditional financial reporting. Companies use various sustainability reporting standards or develop their own reporting frameworks starting from the existing ones. This variation of practices pointed out by empirical research raises questions about the quality and comparability of sustainability reporting, its role in the sustainable development, and also about the suitability of accepting the plurality of reporting frameworks or the need for convergence. This study aims to investigate the issues of plurality and convergence in sustainability reporting standards, by mobilizing the discourses on regulation and the case of a group of companies in the IT industry in order to shed some light on the current challenges in this area. We frame a discussion on the opportunities and pitfalls of convergence in sustainability reporting regulations and contribute to a better understanding of this issue by academics, preparers, users and standard setters

  16. Stress and morale of academic biomedical scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Warren L; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila M; Gritz, Ellen R

    2015-05-01

    Extensive research has shown high rates of burnout among physicians, including those who work in academic health centers. Little is known, however, about stress, burnout, and morale of academic biomedical scientists. The authors interviewed department chairs at one U.S. institution and were told that morale has plummeted in the past five years. Chairs identified three major sources of stress: fear of not maintaining sufficient funding to keep their positions and sustain a career; frustration over the amount of time spent doing paperwork and administrative duties; and distrust due to an increasingly adversarial relationship with the executive leadership.In this Commentary, the authors explore whether declining morale and concerns about funding, bureaucracy, and faculty-administration conflict are part of a larger national pattern. The authors also suggest ways that the federal government, research sponsors, and academic institutions can address these concerns and thereby reduce stress and burnout, increase productivity, and improve overall morale of academic biomedical scientists.

  17. Sustainable spatial development in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Terlević

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is not only a great challenge for society as a whole, but also for higher education institutions, which have been rapidly including sustainable development in their educational process in the last two decades. Directly or indirectly, education for sustainable spatial development includes all aspects of sustainable development: environmental, economic, social and cultural. Space is a junction of various interests, which requires coordinating the entire process of spatial planning, taking into account the goal of sustainable spatial development. The existing values of space are insufficient for the rapid implementation of a sustainable spatial development paradigm. Suitable education is needed by both individuals and spatial planning professionals and at all levels of education. It is therefore necessary to transform some of the academic programs in the higher education curriculum by integrating teaching content and methods that include long-term knowledge and holistic thinking, taking into account the importance of interdisciplinary integration. This article reviews literature in sustainable development in higher education from 2002 to 2013. Topics discussed include students’ and teachers’ conceptions of sustainable development, the presence of sustainable development and sustainable spatial development in higher education and the reasons for the slow introduction of this material into the curriculum. Based on a literature analysis, the last section identifies important drivers that can contribute to a more rapid integration of a sustainable spatial development paradigm into higher education.

  18. A Cosmetic Content-Based Nutrition Education Program Improves Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Grade 11 Thai Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somsri, Pattraporn; Satheannoppakao, Warapone; Tipayamongkholgul, Mathuros; Vatanasomboon, Paranee; Kasemsup, Rachada

    2016-03-01

    To examine and compare the effectiveness of a cosmetic content-based nutrition education (CCBNEd) program and a health content-based nutrition education (HCBNEd) program on the promotion of fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption. Quasi-experimental. Three secondary schools in Nonthaburi, Thailand. Three classes of students were randomly assigned to 3 study groups: experimental group 1 (n = 41) participated in the CCBNEd program, experimental group 2 (n = 35) experienced the HCBNEd program, and a comparison group (n = 37) did not participate in a program. All groups received F&V information. Data were collected between July and September, 2013. Knowledge about F&V, attitude toward F&V consumption, and the amount and variety of F&V consumed were measured at baseline, posttest, and follow-up. Nonparametric statistics were used to compare the programs' effectiveness. After the test, experimental group 1 had significantly increased knowledge scores, attitude scores, and the amount and variety of F&V consumed compared with those at baseline (P attitude scores increased (P < .001) at posttest and then decreased at follow-up whereas the comparison group positively changed only in knowledge. The CCBNEd program was most effective at increasing F&V consumption. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. SUSTAINABLE CORPORATE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DORU CÎRNU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the image of the international business environment has changed significantly. Studies conducted by UNCTAD shows that corporate phenomenon developments in the world economy is growing. Without claiming to present an exhaustive topic so vast we tried to capture some "facets" of sustainable development from the perspective of multinational corporations, given the expansion of these economic entities and strengthening their power in the global economy. We present more negative aspects of the actions of multinational corporations in terms of sustainable development, it is very important to know both sides of the coin, which will not only help transnational giants including release. Based on issues such as corporate social responsibility, environmental pollution and workers' rights, we sought to counter official statements. The conclusion is that these economic entities are real forces that can not be ignored in today's world and the obvious problem of sustainable development can not be addressed independently of the phenomenon, context we also identified some possible solutions to conflict of corporations and essence of the concept of sustainable development.

  20. Sustainable Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2015-01-01

    in wider social, economic and technological frameworks is emphasised. In particular, the chapter is inspired by practice theory and transition theory. First, various trends in consumption are outlined to highlight some of the challenges for sustainability transitions. Then, it is discussed how consumption...... patterns are shaped over time and what should be considered in sustainability strategies. While discussions on consumption often take their point of departure in the perspective of the individual and then zoom to the wider context, the present approach is the opposite. The outline starts with the basic...... biophysical, distributional and economic conditions for high consumption in rich countries and then zooms in on the coevolution of provision systems and consumption, and how consumption is shaped by practices and projects in everyday life. Furthermore, the paper discusses whether and how transition...

  1. Sustainable Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Elle, Morten

    The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems that ...... that need urgent action. The built environment is an obvious area to put effort into because of the large and cost-effective energy saving potential and potential for Renewable Energy-based supply systems for buildings.......The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems...

  2. Factors influencing the academic motivation of individual college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masaaki; Mizuno, Kei; Ishii, Akira; Nozaki, Kumi; Urakawa, Ayako; Cho, Yuki; Kataoka, Yosky; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2008-10-01

    Motivation is an important psychological concept in academic learning. Subjects performed jigsaw puzzle and square puzzle sessions (as difficulty variant task) and 80%, 50%, and 20% completion sessions (as completion variant task). After square puzzle or 20% completion sessions, subjective motivation decreased. Although baseline scores on an academic motivation scale were negatively correlated with changes in subjective motivation for the square puzzle session, a positive correlation was observed for the 20% completion session. These suggest that while continual completion of facile task trials may support the motivation of college students with lower academic motivation, attempting difficult task trials may sustain that of those with higher academic motivation.

  3. Commercializing Academic Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin; Schneider, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge produced by academic scientists has been identified as a potential key driver of technological progress. Recent policies in Europe aim at increasing commercially orientated activities in academe. Based on a sample of German scientists across all fields of science, we investigate...... the importance of academic patenting. Our findings suggest that academic involvement in patenting results in a citation premium, as academic patents appear to generate more forward citations. We also find that in the European context of changing research objectives and funding sources since the mid-1990s......, the “importance” of academic patents declines over time. We show that academic entrants have patents of lower “quality” than academic incumbents but they did not cause the decline, since the relative importance of patents involving academics with an existing patenting history declined over time as well. Moreover...

  4. Reflections on academic video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thommy Eriksson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As academics we study, research and teach audiovisual media, yet rarely disseminate and mediate through it. Today, developments in production technologies have enabled academic researchers to create videos and mediate audiovisually. In academia it is taken for granted that everyone can write a text. Is it now time to assume that everyone can make a video essay? Using the online journal of academic videos Audiovisual Thinking and the videos published in it as a case study, this article seeks to reflect on the emergence and legacy of academic audiovisual dissemination. Anchoring academic video and audiovisual dissemination of knowledge in two critical traditions, documentary theory and semiotics, we will argue that academic video is in fact already present in a variety of academic disciplines, and that academic audiovisual essays are bringing trends and developments that have long been part of academic discourse to their logical conclusion.

  5. Humanity and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available So far our open access publishing company MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute has published mainly science, medicine and technology journals. To become a multidisciplinary publisher, we launched the journal Sustainability [1]. More recently, we started to run several social science journals, including Societies [2], Religions [3], Administrative Sciences [4] and Behavioral Sciences [5]. Today we published the first paper [6] of the inaugural issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787. This will be an international open access journal, publishing scholarly papers of high quality across all humanities disciplines. As a publisher, I would like to publish journals surrounding the topics of sustainability and I believe the humanities as a discipline of academic studies are very important. As a scientist, I believed science and technology will only benefit human beings. I was raised in a small village, living a very primitive life in a peasant family: no electricity, no machines, of course no TV and no refrigerator. Now, the life of my children is completely different. Even my own life has completely changed. I have witnessed very rapid changes: more and more machines are used to consume mineral resources and energy and to pollute the environment, in order to produce more and more powerful machines (we are also launching a journal titled Machines, in which the relationship between Man and machine should be an interesting topic.. Machines are more and more like human individuals consuming resources themselves (we are launching a journal titled Resources. [...

  6. Sustained Experiential Learning: Modified Monasticism and Pilgrimage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This article outlines a template for sustained experiential learning designed to provide a context for learning the affective and performative as well as intellectual power of religion. This approach was developed for a traditional academic framework, adapting pedagogies developed for experiential learning, aesthetic training, and study abroad,…

  7. Sustainable Education: Basic Principles and Strategic Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Branden, Kris

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the guiding principles of sustainable education. It starts from the observation that many education systems around the world have launched ambitious programs aiming to raise academic standards and to reconcile concerns for excellence with concerns for equity. However, many of these programs have failed to reach their…

  8. Effective Strategies for Sustaining Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Patricia R.

    2010-01-01

    Professional Learning Communities (PLCs), in which educators work collaboratively to improve learning for students, need effective strategies to sustain them. PLCs promote continuous improvement in student learning and build academic success with increased teacher expertise. Grounded in organizational systems theory, participative leadership…

  9. Self-Adapting Routing Overlay Network for Frequently Changing Application Traffic in Content-Based Publish/Subscribe System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Chi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the large-scale distributed simulation area, the topology of the overlay network cannot always rapidly adapt to frequently changing application traffic to reduce the overall traffic cost. In this paper, we propose a self-adapting routing strategy for frequently changing application traffic in content-based publish/subscribe system. The strategy firstly trains the traffic information and then uses this training information to predict the application traffic in the future. Finally, the strategy reconfigures the topology of the overlay network based on this predicting information to reduce the overall traffic cost. A predicting path is also introduced in this paper to reduce the reconfiguration numbers in the process of the reconfigurations. Compared to other strategies, the experimental results show that the strategy proposed in this paper could reduce the overall traffic cost of the publish/subscribe system in less reconfigurations.

  10. The Integration of Language and Content: Form-Focused Instruction in a Content-Based Language Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Valeo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This comparative, classroom-based study investigated the effect and effectiveness of introducing a focus on form approach to a content-based, occupation-specific language program for adults. Thirty-six adults in two classes participated in a 10-week study. One group of 16 adults received content-based instruction that included a focus on form component while the other group of 20 adults received the same content-based instruction with a focus on meaning only. Pre-tests/post-tests/delayed post-tests measured learning of two grammatical forms, the present conditional and the simple past tense, as well as occupational content knowledge. Results indicated significant gains on most of the language measures for both learner groups but significant advantages for the form-focused group on the content knowledge tests. The results are discussed in relation to the impact of specific strategies designed to focus on form and the relationship between attention to form and comprehension of content in the context of content-based language programs. Résumé Cette étude comparative menée en salle de classe a examiné l'effet et l'efficacité d’un enseignement mettant l’accent sur ​​la forme dans un programme de langues professionnelles pour adultes. Trente-six apprenants de deux classes intactes ont participé à cette recherche pendant 10 semaines. Un groupe de 16 personnes a reçu les instructions qui se concentraient sur la forme, tandis que l'autre groupe de 20 personnes a reçu les mêmes instructions qui portaient sur ​​le sens seulement. Des pré-tests, des post-tests ainsi que des post-tests retardés ont mesuré l'apprentissage de la langue et du contenu de deux traits grammaticaux; premièrement, la connaissance du conditionnel et du passé et, deuxièmement, la connaissance du contenu professionnel. Les résultats ont indiqué une amélioration sensible de la plupart des compétences linguistiques pour les deux groupes d

  11. SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY FOR SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rizzuto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foundry Alfe Chem is an industrial reality working in the field of lubrication and chemical auxiliaries for industrial processes, which falls within the framework of the emerging and increasingly important «green chemistry». The goal of the company is to develop products that are more environmentally friendly by using raw materials from renewable sources; specifically, Foundry Alfe Chem has a program of self-sustainability that contemplates, for the foreseeable future, the direct production of renewable raw materials. The company has developed a new dedicated product line, Olitema, whose purpose is to offer highly technological solutions with complete environmental sustainability. In this context, Foundry Alfe CHEM has created a new product which represents a breakthrough in the class of HFC hydraulic fluids: Ecosafe Plus is a biodegradable fire-resistant hydraulic fluid with high engineering and technological performances, high environmental sustainability and the best security guarantees in workplaces. Its formulation is glycols-free, and it allows for easier disposal of the exhausted fluid, compared to a traditional water/ glycol-based HFC hydraulic fluid. For what concern the technological properties, Ecosafe Plus has been tested by accredited laboratories with tribological trials (4 Ball wear test ASTM D 4172, Ball on disc test ASTM 6425, Brugger test DIN 51347, Vickers test ASTM D 2882, with elastomer compatibility test (ASTM D 471 and biodegradability test (OECD 310 F.

  12. European Food and Drink Wholesalers and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jones

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose- The aim of this paper is to review and reflect on the sustainability agendas and achievements reported by Europe's leading food and drinks wholesalers. Design/Methodology/Approach- The paper begins with a short introduction to corporate sustainability, sustainability reporting and food and drinks wholesaling within Europe and the empirical material for the paper is drawn from reports and information posted on the leading food and drinks wholesalers' corporate websites. Findings- There are marked variations in the extent to which Europe's leading food and drinks wholesalers reported and provided information on their sustainability agendas and achievements. These agendas and achievements embraced a wide range of environmental, social and economic issues but the reporting process had a number of weaknesses that undermine its transparency and credibility. The authors also argue that the leading food and drinks wholesalers' definitions of, and commitments to, sustainability are principally driven by business imperatives as by any fundamental concern to maintain the viability and integrity of natural and social capital. More critically the authors argue that this approach is couched within existing business models centred on continuing growth and consumption Limitations- The paper is a preliminary review of the sustainability agendas and achievements publicly reported by Europe's leading food and drinks wholesalers. Originality- The role of Europe's wholesale sector in addressing sustainability has received scant attention in the academic literature and this paper will interest academics and students in business management and marketing and employees and executives working in the distribution sector of the economy.

  13. Academic Delay of Gratification and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2011-01-01

    The ability to delay gratification is the cornerstone of all academic achievement and education. It is by delaying gratification that learners can pursue long-term academic and career goals. In general, "delay of gratification" refers to an individual's ability to forgo immediate rewards for the sake of more valuable ones later (Mischel, 1996).…

  14. Content Based Text Handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Christoph

    1990-01-01

    Gives an overview of various linguistic software tools in the field of intelligent text handling that are being developed in Germany utilizing artificial intelligence techniques in the field of natural language processing. Syntactical analysis of documents is described and application areas are discussed. (10 references) (LRW)

  15. Integration: The Key to Sustaining Kinesiology in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Diane L.

    2007-01-01

    Integration is the key to sustaining kinesiology as an academic and professional discipline in higher education. Following the vision of Amy Morris Homans, this paper focuses on integration in three ways. First, integration of our multidisciplinary scholarship, with a clear focus on physical activity, is essential to sustaining kinesiology as a…

  16. Sustainability in Design Engineering Education; Experiences in Northern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewulf, K.; Wever, R.; Boks, C.; Bakker, C.; D'hulster, F.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the implementation of sustainability into the curricula of engineering has become increasingly important. This paper focuses on the experiences of integrating sustainability in Design Engineering education in the academic bachelor programs at Delft University of Technology in The

  17. Higher Education for Sustainable Development: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yen-Chun Jim; Shen, Ju-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to provide a complete understanding of academic research into higher education for sustainable development (HESD). Design/methodology/approach: This study utilizes a systematic review of four scientific literature databases to outline topics of research during the UN's Decade of Education for Sustainable Development…

  18. Balancing the Disciplines: A Multidisciplinary Perspective on Sustainability Curriculum Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherren, Kate

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores appropriate disciplinary content for generalist sustainability degrees, based on two recent surveys. A questionnaire was used to extract from a multidisciplinary, largely academic audience--all of whom share an interest in sustainability--their views as to the disciplinary knowledge that a university-based sustainability…

  19. Sustainable Procurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telles, Pedro; Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard

    2017-01-01

    and within it how sustainable requirements have increased the level of compliance required, particularly regulatory compliance. Compliance was already present in previous EU public procurement frameworks, but its extent on Directive 2014/24/EU leads the authors to consider the current legal framework...... as subject to substantial regulatory compliance obligations external to the process of procurement. In short, procurement has been transformed in a way to enforce regulatory obligations that are not intrinsic to the process of buying. This leads to the conclusion that questions such as the cost and trade...

  20. Student self-esteem and academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Nikoleta M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing belief that academic achievement is the product of a complex network of teacher-student relations, where the identity of successful and unsuccessful student is developing with high, moderate or low self-esteem level. Self-esteem is most often defined as a conscious cognitive-affective expression of self-evaluation which is one of the most immediate indicators of self-concept integration degree. A number of authors view high self-esteem level as an important prerequisite for high academic achievement. In contrast, academic achievement and other experiences related to teaching and learning are considered to exert significant influence on self-esteem and a student should be successful at school first so as to develop a positive self-image and his academic abilities. The debate on what comes first - self-esteem or academic achievement - is in its character more academic than practical. This claim is supported by an increasing number of studies indicating the dynamism and reciprocity of correlation between academic achievement and self-esteem. The paper gives recommendations for educational practice to promote self-esteem and development of personal and social responsibility, which contributes to better student academic achievement. It is pointed out that teacher education in the field is necessary and that self-esteem and responsibility must become essential segments of curricula. Teacher is expected to become sensitive to the needs of students who are at risk to be unsuccessful and to largely apply cooperative learning methods. Findings demonstrate that cooperative learning either sustain or increase student self-esteem, whereas traditional teaching methods, in general, lead to its decline. Cooperative relations improve student self-image in respect of academic abilities and social interactions. Positive feedback, peer support, more frequent experience of learning achievement leads mainly to general increase in self-esteem and

  1. Sustainable consumption and marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable development in global food markets is hindered by the discrepancy between positive consumer attitudes towards sustainable development or sustainability and the lack of corresponding sustainable consumption by a majority of consumers. Apparently for many (light user) consumers the

  2. Academic Entitlement and Academic Performance in Graduating Pharmacy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffres, Meghan N.; Barclay, Sean M.; Stolte, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To determine a measurable definition of academic entitlement, measure academic entitlement in graduating doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, and compare the academic performance between students identified as more or less academically entitled.

  3. Academic Engagement and Commercialisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkmann, Markus; Tartari, Valentina; McKelvey, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    A considerable body of work highlights the relevance of collaborative research, contract research, consulting and informal relationships for university–industry knowledge transfer. We present a systematic review of research on academic scientists’ involvement in these activities to which we refer...... as ‘academic engagement’. Apart from extracting findings that are generalisable across studies, we ask how academic engagement differs from commercialisation, defined as intellectual property creation and academic entrepreneurship. We identify the individual, organisational and institutional antecedents...

  4. What Is Academic Vocabulary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, James F.; Graves, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors address the construct of "academic vocabulary." First, they attempt to bring some clarity to a constellation of terms surrounding academic vocabulary. Second, they compare and contrast definitions of academic vocabulary. Third, they review typologies that researchers and writers have proposed to organize academic…

  5. Academic Inbreeding in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael H.

    1977-01-01

    Academic inbreeding, the employment for faculty positions of persons who receive their graduate training at the same academic institution, is considered detrimental to an institution's academic environment. Results of a study conducted at 54 universities revealed that almost half the faculty (48 percent) in collegiate nursing programs are drawn…

  6. Sustainability in the hospitality industry: some personal reflections on corporate challenges and research agendas

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Peter; Hillier, David; Comfort, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this commissioned paper is to offer some personal reflections on\\ud sustainability within the hospitality industry.\\ud The paper opens by identifying sustainability as a teasing\\ud paradox for the hospitality industry and a short discussion of the characteristics of sustainability. It\\ud then explores the growing interest in corporate sustainability and offers a review of the range of\\ud academic research into sustainability within the hospitality industry literature. More gene...

  7. SUSTAINABILITY OF TAX SYSTEM IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patricia HOMORODEAN (CSATLOS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the context of globalization, sustainable development is the key to the development of contemporary society and future generations. Sustainability has become a key point for the debates in the political, economic, and academic environment. Therefore, today wehave reached the point when we speak of a country or company sustainability, of environmentalor agricultural sustainability, while speaking,at the same time, of fiscal policy sustainability. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Romanian fiscal policy sustainability in terms of tax revenues. The methodology used in this research is bibliographical analysis of specialist literature and statistical analysis of data. Bibliographical analysis was used to define operating concepts: fiscal sustainability and tax revenues. Statistical analysis was used to analyze the evolution of tax revenues in Romania between2005and2013, as well as the share of tax revenues in the general consolidated budget of Romania. Statistical data were processed using Microsoft Excel and presented as evolution diagrams. The novelty and originality of the present work consist in the bibliographical study on Romanian fiscal policy sustainability, the statistical study on the evolution of tax revenues in Romania between 2005and2013, and the analysisof fiscal policy sustainability in Romania in terms of tax revenues.

  8. Virtual Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Sims Bainbridge

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In four ways, massively multiplayer online role-playing games may serve as tools for advancing sustainability goals, and as laboratories for developing alternatives to current social arrangements that have implications for the natural environment. First, by moving conspicuous consumption and other usually costly status competitions into virtual environments, these virtual worlds might reduce the need for physical resources. Second, they provide training that could prepare individuals to be teleworkers, and develop or demonstrate methods for using information technology to replace much transportation technology, notably in commuting. Third, virtual worlds and online games build international cooperation, even blending national cultures, thereby inching us toward not only the world consciousness needed for international agreements about the environment, but also toward non-spatial government that cuts across archaic nationalisms. Finally, realizing the potential social benefits of this new technology may urge us to reconsider a number of traditional societal institutions.

  9. Sustainability; Sustentabilidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-10-15

    This chapter analyses the production chain of ethanol, considering the impacts on the quality of the air, water supplies, soil occupation and biodiversity, and the efforts for the soil preservation. It is pointed out the activities of the production cycle and use of bio ethanol due to great uncertainties as far the environmental impacts is concerning and that will deserve more attention in future evaluations. At same time, the chapter highlights another activities where the present acknowledge is sufficient to assure the control and/or prediction of consequences of the desired intervention on the environment media to accommodate the sugar and ethanol production expansion. The consideration is not conservative but to promote the sustainable development.

  10. Sustainability Science Needs Sustainable Data!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, R. R.; Chen, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Sustainability science (SS) is an 'emerging field of research dealing with the interactions between natural and social systems, and with how those interactions affect the challenge of sustainability: meeting the needs of present and future generations while substantially reducing poverty and conserving the planet's life support systems' (Kates, 2011; Clark, 2007). Bettencourt & Kaur (2011) identified more than 20,000 scientific papers published on SS topics since the 1980s with more than 35,000 distinct authors. They estimated that the field is currently growing exponentially, with the number of authors doubling approximately every 8 years. These scholars are undoubtedly using and generating a vast quantity and variety of data and information for both SS research and applications. Unfortunately we know little about what data the SS community is actually using, and whether or not the data that SS scholars generate are being preserved for future use. Moreover, since much SS research is conducted by cross-disciplinary, multi-institutional teams, often scattered around the world, there could well be increased risks of data loss, reduced data quality, inadequate documentation, and poor long-term access and usability. Capabilities and processes therefore need to be established today to support continual, reliable, and efficient preservation of and access to SS data in the future, especially so that they can be reused in conjunction with future data and for new studies not conceived in the original data collection activities. Today's long-term data stewardship challenges include establishing sustainable data governance to facilitate continuing management, selecting data to ensure that limited resources are focused on high priority SS data holdings, securing sufficient rights to allow unforeseen uses, and preparing data to enable use by future communities whose specific research and information needs are not yet known. Adopting sustainable models for archival

  11. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  12. Challenges and perspectives of academic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Inacio P M Bastos

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Academic evaluation has been an essential component of modern science since its inception, as science has moved away from personalized patronage toward its contemporary role as an essential enterprise of contemporary, democratic societies. In recent years, Brazil has experienced sustained growth in its scientific output, which is nowadays fully compatible with its status as a high middle-income country striving to become a fully developed, more equitable country in the years to come. Growth usually takes place amidst challenges and dilemmas and, in Brazil as elsewhere, academic evaluation is not exempt from such difficulties. In a large, profoundly heterogeneous country with a national evaluation system and nationwide on-line platforms disseminating information on the most disparate fields of knowledge, the main challenges refer to how to pay attention to detail without losing sight of comprehensiveness and how to handle social and regional diversity while preserving academic excellence as the fundamental benchmark.

  13. Academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement : mediating and additive effects

    OpenAIRE

    Guay, Frédéric; Ratelle, Catherine; Roy, Amélie; Litalien, David

    2010-01-01

    Three conceptual models were tested to examine the relationships among academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement. This allowed us to determine whether 1) autonomous academic motivation mediates the relation between academic self-concept and achievement, 2) academic self-concept mediates the relation between autonomous academic motivation and achievement, or 3) both motivational constructs have an additive effect on academic achievement. A total of 925 hig...

  14. A contention-based efficient-information perception algorithm (CEiPA) for vehicular ad hoc networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Lijia; Jiang Hao; Yan Puliu

    2009-01-01

    The problem of information dissemination is researched for vehicular ad-hoc networks (VANET) in this paper, and a contention-based efficient-information perception algorithm (CEiPA) is proposed. The idea of CEiPA is that beacons are delivered over VANET with limited lifetime and efficient information. CEiPA consists of two phases. The first one is initialization phase, during which the count timers Tcycle and Tlocal are set to start beacon delivery while Tcycle is also used to monitor and restart beaconing. The second one is beacon delivery phase. An elaborate distance function is employed to set contention delay for beacons of each vehicle. In this way beacons will be sent in order, which decreases the collision of beacons. Simulation results show that CEiPA enables each beacon to carry more efficient information and spread them over more vehicles with lower network overhead than the periodic beacon scheme. CEiPA is also flexible and scalable because the efficient information threshold it employs is a balance among the freshness of information, network overhead and perception area of a vehicle.

  15. Workflow management of content-based image retrieval for CAD support in PACS environments based on IHE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Petra; Hocken, Christian; Deserno, Thomas M; Grouls, Christoph; Günther, Rolf W

    2010-07-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) bears great potential for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). However, current CBIR systems are not able to integrate with clinical workflow and PACS generally. One essential factor in this setting is scheduling. Applied and proved with modalities and the acquisition of images for a long time, we now establish scheduling with CBIR. Our workflow is based on the IHE integration profile 'Post-Processing Workflow' (PPW) and the use of a DICOM work list. We configured dcm4chee PACS and its including IHE actors for the application of CBIR. In order to achieve a convenient interface for integrating arbitrary CBIR systems, we realized an adapter between the CBIR system and PACS. Our system architecture constitutes modular components communicating over standard protocols. The proposed workflow management system offers the possibility to embed CBIR conveniently into PACS environments. We achieve a chain of references that fills the information gap between acquisition and post-processing. Our approach takes into account the tight and solid organization of scheduled and performed tasks in clinical settings.

  16. Using an image-extended relational database to support content-based image retrieval in a PACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traina, Caetano; Traina, Agma J M; Araújo, Myrian R B; Bueno, Josiane M; Chino, Fabio J T; Razente, Humberto; Azevedo-Marques, Paulo M

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a new Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), called cbPACS, which has content-based image retrieval capabilities. The cbPACS answers range and k-nearest- neighbor similarity queries, employing a relational database manager extended to support images. The images are compared through their features, which are extracted by an image-processing module and stored in the extended relational database. The database extensions were developed aiming at efficiently answering similarity queries by taking advantage of specialized indexing methods. The main concept supporting the extensions is the definition, inside the relational manager, of distance functions based on features extracted from the images. An extension to the SQL language enables the construction of an interpreter that intercepts the extended commands and translates them to standard SQL, allowing any relational database server to be used. By now, the system implemented works on features based on color distribution of the images through normalized histograms as well as metric histograms. Metric histograms are invariant regarding scale, translation and rotation of images and also to brightness transformations. The cbPACS is prepared to integrate new image features, based on texture and shape of the main objects in the image.

  17. Biomedical information from a national collection of spine x-rays: film to content-based retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, L. Rodney; Antani, Sameer; Lee, Dah-Jye; Krainak, Daniel M.; Thoma, George R.

    2003-05-01

    We summarize research and development for the extraction and distribution of biomedical information from a collection of 17,000 spine x-ray images collected by the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). We present a history of the technical milestones of this work, including the data collection as film, digitization, quality control, archiving technology, database organization, medical expert content evaluation, and Web data distribution. We conclude by presenting our current work in content-based image retrieval (CBIR) to exploit the information content of these images directly by using image processing. We provide an overview and current research results from this CBIR work, which includes: extensive segmentation research, focusing on Active Shape Modeling and Active Contour methods; alternative techniques for shape representation, including invariant moments, simple polygon approximation, and Fourier descriptors; neural network classification of shapes into biomedical categories, such as "anterior osteophytes present/not present" and the implementation of a prototype CBIR system for the vertebrae that supports hybrid text/image queries using MATLAB and the MySQL relational database system.

  18. Computer-Aided Diagnosis in Mammography Using Content-Based Image Retrieval Approaches: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zheng

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available As the rapid advance of digital imaging technologies, the content-based image retrieval (CBIR has became one of the most vivid research areas in computer vision. In the last several years, developing computer-aided detection and/or diagnosis (CAD schemes that use CBIR to search for the clinically relevant and visually similar medical images (or regions depicting suspicious lesions has also been attracting research interest. CBIR-based CAD schemes have potential to provide radiologists with “visual aid” and increase their confidence in accepting CAD-cued results in the decision making. The CAD performance and reliability depends on a number of factors including the optimization of lesion segmentation, feature selection, reference database size, computational efficiency, and relationship between the clinical relevance and visual similarity of the CAD results. By presenting and comparing a number of approaches commonly used in previous studies, this article identifies and discusses the optimal approaches in developing CBIR-based CAD schemes and assessing their performance. Although preliminary studies have suggested that using CBIR-based CAD schemes might improve radiologists’ performance and/or increase their confidence in the decision making, this technology is still in the early development stage. Much research work is needed before the CBIR-based CAD schemes can be accepted in the clinical practice.

  19. iPixel: a visual content-based and semantic search engine for retrieving digitized mammograms by using collective intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alor-Hernández, Giner; Pérez-Gallardo, Yuliana; Posada-Gómez, Rubén; Cortes-Robles, Guillermo; Rodríguez-González, Alejandro; Aguilar-Laserre, Alberto A

    2012-09-01

    Nowadays, traditional search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing facilitate the retrieval of information in the format of images, but the results are not always useful for the users. This is mainly due to two problems: (1) the semantic keywords are not taken into consideration and (2) it is not always possible to establish a query using the image features. This issue has been covered in different domains in order to develop content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems. The expert community has focussed their attention on the healthcare domain, where a lot of visual information for medical analysis is available. This paper provides a solution called iPixel Visual Search Engine, which involves semantics and content issues in order to search for digitized mammograms. iPixel offers the possibility of retrieving mammogram features using collective intelligence and implementing a CBIR algorithm. Our proposal compares not only features with similar semantic meaning, but also visual features. In this sense, the comparisons are made in different ways: by the number of regions per image, by maximum and minimum size of regions per image and by average intensity level of each region. iPixel Visual Search Engine supports the medical community in differential diagnoses related to the diseases of the breast. The iPixel Visual Search Engine has been validated by experts in the healthcare domain, such as radiologists, in addition to experts in digital image analysis.

  20. A Visual Analytics Approach Using the Exploration of Multidimensional Feature Spaces for Content-Based Medical Image Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashnil; Nette, Falk; Klein, Karsten; Fulham, Michael; Kim, Jinman

    2015-09-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) is a search technique based on the similarity of visual features and has demonstrated potential benefits for medical diagnosis, education, and research. However, clinical adoption of CBIR is partially hindered by the difference between the computed image similarity and the user's search intent, the semantic gap, with the end result that relevant images with outlier features may not be retrieved. Furthermore, most CBIR algorithms do not provide intuitive explanations as to why the retrieved images were considered similar to the query (e.g., which subset of features were similar), hence, it is difficult for users to verify if relevant images, with a small subset of outlier features, were missed. Users, therefore, resort to examining irrelevant images and there are limited opportunities to discover these "missed" images. In this paper, we propose a new approach to medical CBIR by enabling a guided visual exploration of the search space through a tool, called visual analytics for medical image retrieval (VAMIR). The visual analytics approach facilitates interactive exploration of the entire dataset using the query image as a point-of-reference. We conducted a user study and several case studies to demonstrate the capabilities of VAMIR in the retrieval of computed tomography images and multimodality positron emission tomography and computed tomography images.

  1. Content-Based High-Resolution Remote Sensing Image Retrieval via Unsupervised Feature Learning and Collaborative Affinity Metric Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansheng Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With the urgent demand for automatic management of large numbers of high-resolution remote sensing images, content-based high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval (CB-HRRS-IR has attracted much research interest. Accordingly, this paper proposes a novel high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval approach via multiple feature representation and collaborative affinity metric fusion (IRMFRCAMF. In IRMFRCAMF, we design four unsupervised convolutional neural networks with different layers to generate four types of unsupervised features from the fine level to the coarse level. In addition to these four types of unsupervised features, we also implement four traditional feature descriptors, including local binary pattern (LBP, gray level co-occurrence (GLCM, maximal response 8 (MR8, and scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT. In order to fully incorporate the complementary information among multiple features of one image and the mutual information across auxiliary images in the image dataset, this paper advocates collaborative affinity metric fusion to measure the similarity between images. The performance evaluation of high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval is implemented on two public datasets, the UC Merced (UCM dataset and the Wuhan University (WH dataset. Large numbers of experiments show that our proposed IRMFRCAMF can significantly outperform the state-of-the-art approaches.

  2. Academic Self-Concept, Autonomous Academic Motivation, and Academic Achievement: Mediating and Additive Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Frederic; Ratelle, Catherine F.; Roy, Amelie; Litalien, David

    2010-01-01

    Three conceptual models were tested to examine the relationships among academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement. This allowed us to determine whether 1) autonomous academic motivation mediates the relation between academic self-concept and achievement, 2) academic self-concept mediates the relation between…

  3. Building Capacity for Sustainability through Curricular and Faculty Development: A Learning Outcomes Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer H.; Gerwing, Jeffrey J.; McBride, Leslie G.

    2010-01-01

    Portland State University has made integration of sustainability across its academic programs an institutional priority. This article describes the strategies that have been used to engage faculty in developing sustainability curricula, including adopting sustainability as one of eight campus-wide learning outcomes, incorporating sustainability…

  4. Communicating Sustainability: A Content Analysis of Website Communications in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade, Aurali; Hassenzahl, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate how institutions of higher education (IHEs) in the USA communicate sustainability through their websites. Specifically, the authors compare how and to what extent sustainability is communicated through an institution-wide sustainability website versus operational and academic department websites.…

  5. The Changing Fiscal Environment for Academic Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmel, Dana N; Lloyd, James W

    2015-01-01

    The fiscal environment for academic veterinary medicine has changed substantially over the past 50 years. Understanding the flux of state and federal government support and the implications for student debt, academic programs, and scholarly work is critical for planning for the future. The recent precipitous decline in public funding highlights the urgent need to develop and maintain an economically sustainable model that can adapt to the changing landscape and serve societal needs.

  6. Sustainable Scientists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Evan

    2008-12-31

    Scientists are front and center in quantifying and solving environmental problems. Yet, as a spate of recent news articles in scientific journals point out, much can be done to enhance sustainability within the scientific enterprise itself, particularly by trimming the energy use associated with research facilities and the equipment therein (i,ii,iii, iv). Sponsors of research unwittingly spend on the order of $10 billion each year on energy in the U.S. alone, and the underlying inefficiencies drain funds from the research enterprise while causing 80 MT CO2-equivalent greenhouse-gas emissions (see Box). These are significant sums considering the opportunity costs in terms of the amount of additional research that could be funded and emissions that could be reduced if the underlying energy was used more efficiently. By following commercially proven best practices in facility design and operation, scientists--and the sponsors of science--can cost-effectively halve these costs, while doing their part to put society on alow-carbon diet.

  7. Designing for sustainability: ergonomics--carpe diem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, K; Legg, S; Brown, C

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability is a global issue that has worldwide attention but the role of ergonomics in designing for sustainability is poorly understood and seldom considered. An analysis of the literature on ergonomics, design and sustainability was conducted via a search of electronic databases: Scopus, Business Source Complete, Google Scholar, Emerald Publishing, Academic Search Premiere, Web of Science, Discover and Ergonomics Abstracts, for the years 1995-2012. A total of 1934 articles fulfilled the search criteria, but content analysis of the abstracts indicated that only 14 refereed articles addressed the main search criteria. Of those seven were in ergonomics journals and seven were in other journals (and were not written by ergonomists). It is concluded that the contribution of ergonomics to sustainability and sustainable design has been limited, even though the goals of sustainability and ergonomics are congruent. Ergonomists have not been at the forefront of research contributing to sustainability - and it is time for them to 'seize the day' - 'carpe diem'. This literature review shows that ergonomics contribution to sustainability is limited but since there is congruence between the disciplines it calls for ergonomists to become more involved and to seize the day - carpe diem.

  8. Sustainable agriculture - selected papers

    OpenAIRE

    Krasowicz, Stanisław; Wrzaszcz, Wioletta; Zegar, Jozef St.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of research on socially sustainable agriculture. Features of sustainable agriculture. Sustainability of private farms in the light of selected criteria. Subsistence agricultural holdings and the sustainable development of agriculture. Sustainable farms in the light of the FADN data. Description of organic holdings in Poland.

  9. Multiple helix ecosystems for sustainable competitiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, João; Farinha, Luís; Fernandes, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the main issues, challenges, opportunities, and trends involving the interactions between academia, industry, government and society. Specifically, it aims to explore how these interactions enhance the ways in which companies deliver products and services in order to achieve sustainable competitiveness in the marketplace. Sustainable competitiveness has been widely discussed by academics and practitioners, considering the importance of protecting the environment while sustaining the economic goals of organizations. The Quintuple Helix innovation model is a framework for facilitating knowledge, innovation and sustainable competitive advantage. It embeds the Triple and the Quadruple Helix models by adding a fifth helix, the “natural environment.” The Triple Helix model focuses on the university-industry-government triad, while the Quadruple adds civil society (the media- and culture-driven public) as a fourth helix. The Quintuple Helix model facilitates research, public policy, and pract...

  10. Sustainable NREL - Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-01-01

    NREL's Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 reports on sustainability plans for the lab for the year 2015 based on Executive Order Goals and provides the status on planned actions cited in the FY 2014 report.

  11. Interactive content-based image retrieval (CBIR) computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) system for ultrasound breast masses using relevance feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-chong; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Paramagul, Chintana; Helvie, Mark; Nees, Alexis V.

    2012-03-01

    We designed a Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CADx) system to assist radiologists in characterizing masses on ultrasound images. The CADx system retrieves masses that are similar to a query mass from a reference library based on computer-extracted features that describe texture, width-to-height ratio, and posterior shadowing of a mass. Retrieval is performed with k nearest neighbor (k-NN) method using Euclidean distance similarity measure and Rocchio relevance feedback algorithm (RRF). In this study, we evaluated the similarity between the query and the retrieved masses with relevance feedback using our interactive CBIR CADx system. The similarity assessment and feedback were provided by experienced radiologists' visual judgment. For training the RRF parameters, similarities of 1891 image pairs obtained from 62 masses were rated by 3 MQSA radiologists using a 9-point scale (9=most similar). A leave-one-out method was used in training. For each query mass, 5 most similar masses were retrieved from the reference library using radiologists' similarity ratings, which were then used by RRF to retrieve another 5 masses for the same query. The best RRF parameters were chosen based on three simulated observer experiments, each of which used one of the radiologists' ratings for retrieval and relevance feedback. For testing, 100 independent query masses on 100 images and 121 reference masses on 230 images were collected. Three radiologists rated the similarity between the query and the computer-retrieved masses. Average similarity ratings without and with RRF were 5.39 and 5.64 on the training set and 5.78 and 6.02 on the test set, respectively. The average Az values without and with RRF were 0.86+/-0.03 and 0.87+/-0.03 on the training set and 0.91+/-0.03 and 0.90+/-0.03 on the test set, respectively. This study demonstrated that RRF improved the similarity of the retrieved masses.

  12. Content-based image retrieval using spatial layout information in brain tumor T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyan Huang

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop content-based image retrieval (CBIR system for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR (CE-MR images of brain tumors. When a tumor region is fed to the CBIR system as a query, the system attempts to retrieve tumors of the same pathological category. The bag-of-visual-words (BoVW model with partition learning is incorporated into the system to extract informative features for representing the image contents. Furthermore, a distance metric learning algorithm called the Rank Error-based Metric Learning (REML is proposed to reduce the semantic gap between low-level visual features and high-level semantic concepts. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain T1-weighted CE-MR dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor. Using the BoVW model with partition learning, the mean average precision (mAP of retrieval increases beyond 4.6% with the learned distance metrics compared with the spatial pyramid BoVW method. The distance metric learned by REML significantly outperforms three other existing distance metric learning methods in terms of mAP. The mAP of the CBIR system is as high as 91.8% using the proposed method, and the precision can reach 93.1% when the top 10 images are returned by the system. These preliminary results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and feasible for the retrieval of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MR Images.

  13. Multimedia human brain database system for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy with content-based image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Fotouhi, Farshad A.; Elisevich, Kost

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a human brain multimedia database for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy. The focus of the paper is on content-based image management, navigation and retrieval. Several medical image-processing methods including our newly developed segmentation method are utilized for information extraction/correlation and indexing. The input data includes T1-, T2-Weighted MRI and FLAIR MRI and ictal and interictal SPECT modalities with associated clinical data and EEG data analysis. The database can answer queries regarding issues such as the correlation between the attribute X of the entity Y and the outcome of a temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. The entity Y can be a brain anatomical structure such as the hippocampus. The attribute X can be either a functionality feature of the anatomical structure Y, calculated with SPECT modalities, such as signal average, or a volumetric/morphological feature of the entity Y such as volume or average curvature. The outcome of the surgery can be any surgery assessment such as memory quotient. A determination is made regarding surgical candidacy by analysis of both textual and image data. The current database system suggests a surgical determination for the cases with relatively small hippocampus and high signal intensity average on FLAIR images within the hippocampus. This indication pretty much fits with the surgeons" expectations/observations. Moreover, as the database gets more populated with patient profiles and individual surgical outcomes, using data mining methods one may discover partially invisible correlations between the contents of different modalities of data and the outcome of the surgery.

  14. A novel content-based medical image retrieval method based on query topic dependent image features (QTDIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Qiu, Bo; Tian, Qi; Mueller, Henning; Xu, Changsheng

    2005-04-01

    Medical image retrieval is still mainly a research domain with a large variety of applications and techniques. With the ImageCLEF 2004 benchmark, an evaluation framework has been created that includes a database, query topics and ground truth data. Eleven systems (with a total of more than 50 runs) compared their performance in various configurations. The results show that there is not any one feature that performs well on all query tasks. Key to successful retrieval is rather the selection of features and feature weights based on a specific set of input features, thus on the query task. In this paper we propose a novel method based on query topic dependent image features (QTDIF) for content-based medical image retrieval. These feature sets are designed to capture both inter-category and intra-category statistical variations to achieve good retrieval performance in terms of recall and precision. We have used Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM) and blob representation to model medical images and construct the proposed novel QTDIF for CBIR. Finally, trained multi-class support vector machines (SVM) are used for image similarity ranking. The proposed methods have been tested over the Casimage database with around 9000 images, for the given 26 image topics, used for imageCLEF 2004. The retrieval performance has been compared with the medGIFT system, which is based on the GNU Image Finding Tool (GIFT). The experimental results show that the proposed QTDIF-based CBIR can provide significantly better performance than systems based general features only.

  15. Ethics and academic integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Constance L

    2015-01-01

    Academics from across the globe must navigate ever-increasing demands for research, practice, and educational productivity. With the increased demands, nurse faculty must choose value priorities and actions that reflect academic integrity. What does it mean to choose actions that reflect personal integrity in the academic arena? This article begins an important nursing philosophical and theoretical discussion that members and future members of the discipline of nursing must reflect upon and grapple with as they consider what it potentially means to act with straight thinking and integrity in academics. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. The Academic Structure in Japan: Institutional Hierarchy and Academic Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Akira

    The characteristics of the Japanese academic structure are examined with attention to the evolution of institutional hierarchy, the closed academic structure, and the effects of the academic structure upon academic research. The evolution of Japan's institutional hierarchy in academics has been tightly related to factors of nationalism,…

  17. Sustainability in Transport Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Greve, Carsten

    Contribution to session J: Joint University Sustainability Initiatives. This session will provide an inspiring overview of interdisciplinary research and teaching activities on sustainability bridging DTU, KU, and CBS, and introduce the joint collaboration Copenhagen Sustainability Initiative (COSI...

  18. Sustainability : Politics and governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinrichs, Harald; Biermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    he article gives an overview of global sustainability policy and politics. It is shown how international policy making on sustainable development has progressed from environmental policy toward recent approaches of Earth system governance. Key challenges of international sustainability politics are

  19. Textiles and clothing sustainability sustainable technologies

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This is the first book to deal with the innovative technologies in the field of textiles and clothing sustainability. It details a number of sustainable and innovative technologies and highlights their implications in the clothing sector. There are currently various measures to achieve sustainability in the textiles and the clothing industry, including innovations in the manufacturing stage, which is the crux of this book.

  20. Lean management in academic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collar, Ryan M; Shuman, Andrew G; Feiner, Sandra; McGonegal, Amy K; Heidel, Natalie; Duck, Mary; McLean, Scott A; Billi, John E; Healy, David W; Bradford, Carol R

    2012-06-01

    Lean is a management system designed to enhance productivity by eliminating waste. Surgical practice offers many opportunities for improving efficiency. Our objective was to determine whether systematic implementation of lean thinking in an academic otolaryngology operating room improves efficiency and profitability and preserves team morale and educational opportunities. In an 18-month prospective quasi-experimental study, a multidisciplinary task force systematically implemented lean thinking within an otolaryngology operating room of an academic health system. Operating room turnover time and turnaround time were measured during a baseline period; an observer-effect period in which workers were made aware that their efficiency was being measured but before implementing lean changes; and an intervention period after redesign principles had been used. The impact on teamwork, morale, and surgical resident education were measured during the baseline and intervention periods through validated surveys. A profit model was applied to estimate the financial implications of the study. There was no difference between the baseline and observer-effect periods of the study for turnover time (p = 0.98) or turnaround time (p = 0.20). During the intervention period, the mean turnover time and turnaround time were significantly shorter than during the baseline period (29 vs 38 minutes; p lean thinking could create 6,500 hours of capacity annually. Application of lean management techniques to a single operating room and surgical service improved operating room efficiency and morale, sustained resident education, and can provide considerable financial gains when scaled to an entire academic surgical suite. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Teachers' instructional behaviors as important predictors of academic motivation : Changes and links across the school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Bosker, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Learning environments play an important role for students' learning and outcomes. Research indicates that many students show poor academic motivation. Teachers' behavior can function as a protective factor for sustaining students' interest and active engagement in schools. However, the knowledge

  2. Can engineering solutions really provide a sustainable future?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Sustainability is a word which is very often (mis)used in various public debates. In engineering, however, it is perhaps easier to define the term, then in other academic fields. We advocate the principle that only those activities, which can be sustained for at least a few centuries using known...... technology and resources, should be called sustainable. Using this definition of sustainability one particularly big challenge field is energy supply, but the importance of the issue - “The energy problem” - is clear. To illustrate one central aspect of the energy problem we introduce the “1 TW benchmark...

  3. Looking beyond the ELT Approach in China's Higher Education from the Perspective of Bilingual Education: Immersion, Content-Based Instruction or Something Else?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    This article starts with definitions of bilingualism with a focus on the analysis of bilingual competence. Then the aims and types of bilingual education in developing bilingual competence are introduced with focus on analyses of immersion and content-based instruction. Subsequently, the contextual settings of the study are briefly presented.…

  4. The Effect of Gender on Motivation and Student Achievement in Digital Game-Based Learning: A Case Study of a Contented-Based Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Liang-Yi; Chang, Rong-Chi

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to probe into the impact of learners' gender on learning outcomes and motivation. A digital game focusing on the topic of emergency first aid is designed for the purpose of this present study, according to the curriculum objectives for a content-based instruction (CBI) course as part of the experiment. In the process of playing…

  5. The Academic Publishing Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nell, Phillip Christopher; Wenzel, Tim Ole; Schmidt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    The case starts with introducing the outstanding profitability of academic journal publishers such as Elsevier and then dives into describing the research process from an idea to conducting research and to publishing the results in academic journals. Subsequently, demand and supply for scientific...

  6. Gender and Academic Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershott, Anne; Drinan, Patrick F.; Cross, Megan

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the academic integrity climate of a mid-sized, comprehensive, private university. Seeks to assess gender differences in motivations surrounding cheating behaviors among 532 undergraduate students. Findings indicate that while both males and females are reluctant to report instances of academic dishonesty that they witness, there…

  7. Networking into Academic Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warschauer, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Examines the experiences of three instructors in Hawaii who have attempted to integrate online communication into their academic writing courses. Emphasizes that the underlying assumptions of what academic writing constitutes are fundamental in influencing how teachers integrate technology in the classroom. (Author/VWL)

  8. Arbitration in Academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Joel, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Questions and issues critical to an understanding of arbitration in higher education are discussed. Aspects of the academic arbitration model are defined. The following four topics are examined: (1) the procedural similarities and differences between academic arbitration and the industrial model; (2) the possible inherent conflict between academic…

  9. Academic Identities under Threat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Sue

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the lived experience of practising academics as part of an inquiry into the vexed question of "academic identities". Identity is understood not as a fixed property, but as part of the lived complexity of a person's project. The article reports on data from a small study in one university. The data suggest that…

  10. Association of Academic Physiatrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... currPanel = 0; autoPlayDelaySeconds = slidePanel(currPanel); autoPlay(); }, (autoPlayDelaySeconds*1000)); } $(document).ready(function (){ $slider.children('.slide-panel.notactive').hide(); ... Academic Home for Physiatry The Association of Academic Physiatrists ( ...

  11. Impulsivity and Academic Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relations between academic cheating and impulsivity in a large sample of adolescents enrolled in high school health education classes. Results indicated that impulsivity predicts academic cheating for students who report extensive involvement in cheating. However, students who engage in extensive cheating are less likely…

  12. Academic Work and Performativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, John

    2017-01-01

    Neoliberal reforms in higher education have resulted in corporate managerial practices in universities and a drive for efficiency and productivity in teaching and research. As a result, there has been an intensification of academic work, increased stress for academics and an emphasis on accountability and performativity in universities. This paper…

  13. Marketing Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Melissa, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Ask any academic librarian if marketing their library and its services is an important task, and the answer will most likely be a resounding "yes!" Particularly in economically troubled times, librarians are increasingly called upon to promote their services and defend their library's worth. Since few academic libraries have in-house marketing…

  14. Confronting Academic Dishonesty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    The issue of academic dishonesty, including plagiarism, cheating on tests, and falsification of data by students, is examined. Legal cases are reviewed; the University of Iowa school of social work's policy on academic misconduct is presented; and other avenues of intervention and prevention are discussed. (Author/MSE)

  15. Thinking Academic Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Lis

    2016-01-01

    This lecture argues that the politicisation and instrumentalisation of the university caused by neoliberal frames has as a result the depoliticisation of knowledge and of the academic as individual. This depoliticisation has turned academic freedom into a right to disengage not only from the political fight around these issues but also from the…

  16. Transitions in Sustainable Product Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boks, Casper; McAloone, Tim C.

    2009-01-01

    , this research area has expanded considerably; from a bunch of opportunistic eco-pathfinders trying to make products better recyclable into acknowledged scientific research regarding technology transfer and commercialisation. This paper proposes that this maturing process took place through a number......By the early 1990s, sustainable product innovation (or ecodesign, or Design for environment) had gained sufficient critical mass in academic research to be identified as a distinct research area. In the past 15 years, stimulated by a growing environmental concern and awareness in the media...... of transitions; this is illustrated by discussing characteristic aspects of each transition, which together provide a historic account of how academic research into sustainable product innovation had matured. In conclusion, a number of possible future transitions or extensions of the research area are discussed....

  17. Does Academic Work Make Australian Academics Happy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Roderick; Tilbrook, Kerry; Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka

    2015-01-01

    Happiness research is a rapidly-growing area in social psychology and has emphasised the link between happiness and workplace productivity and creativity for knowledge workers. Recent articles in this journal have raised concerns about the level of happiness and engagement of Australian academics with their work, however there is little research…

  18. A practical guide to sustainable fashion

    OpenAIRE

    Gwilt, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Packed with full-colour images from contributors such as Vivienne Westwood, Stella McCartney, Edun and People Tree, A Practical Guide to Sustainable Fashion is a much-needed handbook for academics, researchers, students and professionals in the fashion and textiles industries.\\ud Beginning with a reflection on current models of fashion design and production, this book introduces the key issues associated with the production, use and disposal of fashion clothing and provides a framework on how...

  19. Assessing sustainable remediation frameworks using sustainability principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridsdale, D Reanne; Noble, Bram F

    2016-12-15

    The remediation industry has grown exponentially in recent decades. International organizations of practitioners and remediation experts have developed several frameworks for integrating sustainability into remediation projects; however, there has been limited attention to how sustainability is approached and operationalized in sustainable remediation frameworks and practices - or whether sustainability plays any meaningful role at all in sustainable remediation. This paper examines how sustainability is represented in remediation frameworks and the guidance provided for practical application. Seven broad sustainability principles and review criteria are proposed and applied to a sample of six international remediation frameworks. Not all review criteria were equally satisfied and none of the frameworks fully met all criteria; however, the best performing frameworks were those identified as sustainability remediation frameworks. Intra-generational equity was addressed by all frameworks. Integrating social, economic and biophysical components beyond triple-bottom-line indicators was explicitly addressed only by the sustainable remediation frameworks. No frameworks provided principle- or rule-based guidance for dealing with trade-offs in sustainability decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Technology and sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, C.; Boersema, J.J.; Tellegen, E.; Cremers, A.

    2011-01-01

    In ten essays, this book addresses a broad range of issues related to the interplay of sustainability and technology. How do population growth and technology relate to sustainable development? Can globalization be reconciled with sustainable development? Is sustainability a subjective or an

  1. Collaboration, Reputation, and Ethics in American Academic Life: Hans H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Guy; Vidich, Arthur J.

    Using the collaboration between sociologist C. Wright Mills and Hans H. Gerth and their studies of the work of Max Weber as a point of departure for a sustained discussion of academic ethics, this book explores how concealment, secrecy, and deception contribute to the building of academic reputation and how the balance of knowledge and power in a…

  2. Successful first-year learning: A social cognitive view of academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    underline the fact that successful learning is a complex and multi-layered process that is ongoing and that needs to be monitored, sustained and evaluated throughout students' study careers. The students' personal perspectives on academic study provided not only evidence that the development of academic literacy is ...

  3. Sustainability Assessment of Higher Education Institutions in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib M. Alshuwaikhat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Universities are paramount change drivers in bringing about a culture of sustainability in society by setting themselves up as models and nurseries for sustainable development. Thus, assessment of sustainability integration within universities is key to their impact on sustainable development. This study conducted an assessment of different public sector universities of Saudi Arabia based on five components: (i Teaching and Curriculum; (ii Research and Scholarship; (iii Campus Operations; (iv Management and Community; and (v Financial Management. The sustainability assessment questionnaire (SAQ was utilized as a tool to discern the component-wise sustainability assessment for Saudi universities. The outcomes of the survey reveal that, in stark contrast with the universities of the developed world, offerings of sustainability relevant academic courses in Saudi Arabia are still lacking. Most Saudi universities still need to integrate research and scholarship in the area of sustainability; sustainable-campus operations in the current scenario are not sufficient. The results also reveal that sustainability-related projects are not prioritized within universities and sustainable financial management practices are not significant. This article concludes by proposing some recommendations emphasizing the importance of adopting sustainability practices in Saudi universities.

  4. Action Research for Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egmose, Jonas

    by analysing processes of social learning. The book addresses the need to move towards sustainability at societal level as a democratic challenge questioning the way we live on planet earth. By conceptualising sustain-ability as an immanent and emergent ability of ecological and social life, continuously...... to renew itself without eroding its own foundation of existence, it argues that since sustainability cannot be invented but only supported (or eroded) by science, we need to reframe science in the role of sustaining sustain-ability. Through analyses of a three year action research programme, aiming...

  5. Sustainable Investment. Literature Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weda, J.; Kerste, M.; Rosenboom, N.

    2010-08-15

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), or sustainability at the company level, entails incorporating ecological (environmental stakeholders) and social aspects (stakeholders other than shareholders and environmental stakeholders) when doing business. Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) concerns sustainability at the investment, fund or portfolio level and involves screening the sustainability of companies before investing in them. This report highlights leading literature and empirical findings on 'sustainable investment', amongst others addressing the economic rationale for CSR and SRI. This report is part of a set of SEO-reports on finance and sustainability. The other reports deal with: Financing the Transition to Sustainable Energy; Carbon Trading; Innovations in financing environmental and social sustainability.

  6. Academic entitlement and academic performance in graduating pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffres, Meghan N; Barclay, Sean M; Stolte, Scott K

    2014-08-15

    To determine a measurable definition of academic entitlement, measure academic entitlement in graduating doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, and compare the academic performance between students identified as more or less academically entitled. Graduating students at a private health sciences institution were asked to complete an electronic survey instrument that included demographic data, academic performance, and 2 validated academic entitlement instruments. One hundred forty-one of 243 students completed the survey instrument. Fourteen (10%) students scored greater than the median total points possible on 1 or both of the academic entitlement instruments and were categorized as more academically entitled. Less academically entitled students required fewer reassessments and less remediation than more academically entitled students. The highest scoring academic entitlement items related to student perception of what professors should do for them. Graduating pharmacy students with lower levels of academic entitlement were more academically successful than more academically entitled students. Moving from an expert opinion approach to evidence-based decision-making in the area of academic entitlement will allow pharmacy educators to identify interventions that will decrease academic entitlement and increase academic success in pharmacy students.

  7. Academic Entitlement and Academic Performance in Graduating Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Sean M.; Stolte, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To determine a measurable definition of academic entitlement, measure academic entitlement in graduating doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, and compare the academic performance between students identified as more or less academically entitled. Methods. Graduating students at a private health sciences institution were asked to complete an electronic survey instrument that included demographic data, academic performance, and 2 validated academic entitlement instruments. Results. One hundred forty-one of 243 students completed the survey instrument. Fourteen (10%) students scored greater than the median total points possible on 1 or both of the academic entitlement instruments and were categorized as more academically entitled. Less academically entitled students required fewer reassessments and less remediation than more academically entitled students. The highest scoring academic entitlement items related to student perception of what professors should do for them. Conclusion. Graduating pharmacy students with lower levels of academic entitlement were more academically successful than more academically entitled students. Moving from an expert opinion approach to evidence-based decision-making in the area of academic entitlement will allow pharmacy educators to identify interventions that will decrease academic entitlement and increase academic success in pharmacy students. PMID:25147388

  8. Collective academic supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Thomsen, Rie; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    are interconnected. Collective Academic Supervision provides possibilities for systematic interaction between individual master students in their writing process. In this process they learn core academic competencies, such as the ability to assess theoretical and practical problems in their practice and present them...... process. This article fills these gaps by discussing potentials and challenges in “Collective Academic Supervision”, a model for supervision at the Master of Education in Guidance at Aarhus University in Denmark. The pedagogical rationale behind the model is that students’ participation and learning...

  9. Navigating disciplinary challenges to global sustainability science: an archaeological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Hudson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Current threats posed by anthropogenic climate change, biodiversity loss, the degradation of ecosystem services, and other related impacts of human activity require a concerted res- ponse through a global science of sustainability. The threats faced by humanity are so extensive that all academic disciplines are affected in some way and all have a role to play in developing potential responses. Given that few academic disciplines have traditionally focused on issues of ecology or sustainability, however, major challenges remain with respect to how we might build a global science of sustainability that can support concrete policy and interventions. This paper proposes a developmental model with five levels of research and practice required for an effective global sustainability science and examines some of the challenges faced by archaeology in moving up these levels.

  10. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  11. Advancing higher education for sustainable development: international insights and critical reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, R.; Lozano, F.J.; Mulder, K. de; Huisingh, D.; Waas, T.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, universities have played many roles in transforming societies, by educating decision-makers, leaders, entrepreneurs, and academics. However, education and research on sustainability in universities is at an early stage in many institutions. This introduction highlights findings from

  12. Moving global health forward in academic institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Wernli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Global health has attracted growing attention from academic institutions. Its emergence corresponds to the increasing interdependence that characterizes our time and provides a new worldview to address health challenges globally. There is still a large potential to better delineate the limits of the field, drawing on a wide perspective across sciences and geographical areas. As an implementation and integration science, academic global health aims primarily to respond to societal needs through research, education, and practice. From five academic institutions closely engaged with international Geneva, we propose here a definition of global health based on six core principles: 1 cross–border/multilevel approach, 2 inter–/trans–disciplinarity, 3 systems thinking, 4 innovation, 5 sustainability, and 6 human rights/equity. This definition aims to reduce the century–old divide between medicine and public health while extending our perspective to other highly relevant fields. Overall, this article provides an intellectual framework to improve health for all in our contemporary world with implications for academic institutions and science policy.

  13. Academic streaming in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falaschi, Alessandro; Mønster, Dan; Doležal, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    The TF-NETCAST task force was active from March 2003 to March 2004, and during this time the mem- bers worked on various aspects of streaming media related to the ultimate goal of setting up common services and infrastructures to enable netcasting of high quality content to the academic community...... in Europe. We report on a survey of the use of streaming media in the academic community in Europe, an open source content delivery network, and a portal for announcing live streaming events to the global academic community.......The TF-NETCAST task force was active from March 2003 to March 2004, and during this time the mem- bers worked on various aspects of streaming media related to the ultimate goal of setting up common services and infrastructures to enable netcasting of high quality content to the academic community...

  14. Academic librarianship today

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Intended for use by both librarians and students in LIS programs, Academic Librarianship Today is the most current, comprehensive overview of the field available today. Key features include: Each chapter was commissioned specifically for this new book, and the authors are highly regarded academic librarians or library school faculty— or both Cutting-edge topics such as open access, copyright, digital curation and preservation, emerging technologies, new roles for academic librarians, cooperative collection development and resource sharing, and patron-driven acquisitions are explored in depth Each chapter ends with thought-provoking questions for discussion and carefully constructed assignments that faculty can assign or adapt for their courses The book begins with Gilman’s introduction, an overview that briefly synthesizes the contents of the contributors’ chapters by highlighting major themes. The main part of the book is organized into three parts: The Academic Library Landscape Today, ...

  15. Sexual Harassment in Academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuana, Nancy

    1985-01-01

    The extent and nature of sexual harassment of students by college faculty are examined, and practical suggestions for institutions to eradicate academic sexual harassment are made, including a published code of conduct and educational programs. (MSE)

  16. Declaration of Academic Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan ÇETİNSAYA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. Universities are the institutions where all the opinions, various truth claims as well as social and political problems are discussed in a liberal and civilized way and the complicated problems are expressed clearly without any oppression and prevention. 2. Academic freedom includes first and foremost the right of freedom of research and thus freedom of using the essential knowledge methods, the right of possessing the necessary tools and conditions required for the research and the rights of scientific production, informing, learning and dissemination. 3. Academics possess the rights to benefit from the academic freedom without any limitation, to research and investigate according to their own preferences and interests, and to teach these without being exposed to any oppression and prevention. 4. This freedom of teaching that the academics have should not be used in a manner restricting students' freedom of learning; academics should avoid from being dogmatic in the research and education processes and respect students' rights of thinking differently and expressing themselves. 5. Academics accordingly should lead the students to evaluate and understand the new thoughts as a whole and to be tolerant to the thoughts they do not agree and to think in various ways. Also, academics should encourage the students to create their own opinions based on evidences and enable them to express these opinions freely and respect their freedom of expression. 6. Campuses should be safe environments where the students can express their own opinions freely. Suppressing the intellectual diversity and the plurality of viewpoints will decrease the productivity of teaching and learning process, restrict students' freedom of learning, and constrain the chance of formation of critical and in-depth thinking. 7. Critical thinking develops only in the campuses where various thoughts are expressed in a liberal way. Students should feel that they would not be prevented

  17. Relocalising academic literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Nana; Holm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students’ educational and discursive experiences, we examine...... the negotiation and relocalisation of academic literacy among students of the international master’s programme, Anthropology of Education and Globalisation (AEG), University of Aarhus, Denmark. The article draws on an understanding of academic literacy as a local practice situated in the social and institutional...... contexts in which it appears. Based on qualitative interviews with eleven AEG-students, we analyse students’ individual experiences of, and perspectives on, the academic literacy practices of this study programme. Our findings reveal contradictory understandings of internationalism and indicate a learning...

  18. Action Research for Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egmose, Jonas

    How can action research further new research orientations towards sustainability? This book, empirically situated in the field of upstream public engagement, involving local residents, researchers and practitioners in bottom-up processes deliberating on urban sustainability, answers this question...... by analysing processes of social learning. The book addresses the need to move towards sustainability at societal level as a democratic challenge questioning the way we live on planet earth. By conceptualising sustain-ability as an immanent and emergent ability of ecological and social life, continuously...... to renew itself without eroding its own foundation of existence, it argues that since sustainability cannot be invented but only supported (or eroded) by science, we need to reframe science in the role of sustaining sustain-ability. Through analyses of a three year action research programme, aiming...

  19. Perspectives on academic dishonesty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, M J; Lowenstein, A J

    1990-01-01

    Academic dishonest behaviors, such as lying, cheating, and plagiarism, are destructive and must be recognized and addressed early in the development of professional nurses. Faculty must be concerned with the relationship between student integrity in the classroom and clinical or professional behaviors. The authors discuss student motivation and attitudes toward unethical practices, faculty responses, and responsibilities when these incidents arise, and strategies for preventing academic dishonesty.

  20. Information Systems Solutions for Environmental Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Roya; Watson, Richard T.; Hasan, Helen

    2016-01-01

    themselves in creating solutions for environmental problems. Moreover, information is a perquisite for assessing the state of the environment and making appropriate decisions to ameliorate identified problems. Indeed, the IS scholarly community needs to help create a sustainable society. While......We contend that too few information systems (IS) academics engage in impactful research that offers solutions to global warming despite the fact that climate change is one of the most critical challenges facing this generation. Climate change is a major threat to global sustainability in the 21st...... century. Unfortunately, from submissions of our call for papers presenting IS solutions for environmental sustainability, we found only one paper worthy of publication. Given that IS have been the major force for productivity increases in the last half-century, we suggest that IS scholars should immerse...

  1. Nature tourism: a sustainable tourism product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violante Martínez Quintana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nature tourism has emerged in the tourism field as a result of a logical evolution in line with public policies and academic research. After negative outcomes from traditional models first raised the alarm, the entire sector has tried to foster local development based on models of responsibility and sustainability. This article revises key concepts of nature – based tourism and shows new tendencies and the perception of cultural landscapes that are seen as tourism products. Finally, it concludes by analysing new tendencies to foster alternative nature – based tourism. It also presents a planning proposal based on a responsible and sustainable tourism model to guarantee a sustainable tourism product within the natural and cultural heritage context.

  2. Sustainable Academia: Translating the Vision of a Full Sustainable University into a Measurable Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios Maragakis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing public expectation that universities should start focusing on delivering sustainability. The topic of sustainability in higher education has gathered a significant amount of interest from students, academics, governments and international organizations.With a plethora of declarations, initiatives, marketing and assessments, there is a need to assess what the stakeholders want in order to make decisions regarding an institutions sustainability. Ultimately, students are the ones using these sustainability marketing materials to assist in their decision at which institution they will pursue their studies. The sheer volume of interpretations of the word sustainability with regards to higher education institution leaves ample room for potentially misguided initiatives or marketing.A universal system for assessing a higher educational institution’s sustainability has not been translated into a measurable reality. It is proposed that a universal system would help create a common understanding of sustainability within higher education institutions and would help in stakeholder understanding, institutional accountability and impactful application of sustainable initiatives.This research looked to answer if a holistic framework could be created that would aid stakeholders in reviewing a university’s level of sustainability. And, if so, if this vision of a fully sustainable university could be translated into a measurable reality.The research was approached in a structured way. Each chapter represents a published and peer-reviewed step towards addressing if a holistic framework could be created that would aid students in reviewing sustainability tools, assessments and marketing. The qualitative and quantitative conclusions from each chapter influenced the subsequent chapters, eventually leading to the creation and testing of two digital tools. The interpretations of these published chapters are found in the conclusion of this

  3. Sustaining Rural Communities through Sustainable Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikerd, John

    A 5-year collaborative project between Missouri, Michigan State, and Nebraska Universities to provide new opportunities for rural community self-development through sustainable agriculture had mixed results. This happened because community members did not understand the principles of sustainability, and because the extension education system was…

  4. Does query expansion limit our learning? A comparison of social-based expansion to content-based expansion for medical queries on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentoney, Christopher; Harwell, Jeff; Leroy, Gondy

    2014-01-01

    Searching for medical information online is a common activity. While it has been shown that forming good queries is difficult, Google's query suggestion tool, a type of query expansion, aims to facilitate query formation. However, it is unknown how this expansion, which is based on what others searched for, affects the information gathering of the online community. To measure the impact of social-based query expansion, this study compared it with content-based expansion, i.e., what is really in the text. We used 138,906 medical queries from the AOL User Session Collection and expanded them using Google's Autocomplete method (social-based) and the content of the Google Web Corpus (content-based). We evaluated the specificity and ambiguity of the expansion terms for trigram queries. We also looked at the impact on the actual results using domain diversity and expansion edit distance. Results showed that the social-based method provided more precise expansion terms as well as terms that were less ambiguous. Expanded queries do not differ significantly in diversity when expanded using the social-based method (6.72 different domains returned in the first ten results, on average) vs. content-based method (6.73 different domains, on average).

  5. The Academic Spoken Word List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thi Ngoc Yen; Coxhead, Averil; Webb, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    The linguistic features of academic spoken English are different from those of academic written English. Therefore, for this study, an Academic Spoken Word List (ASWL) was developed and validated to help second language (L2) learners enhance their comprehension of academic speech in English-medium universities. The ASWL contains 1,741 word…

  6. Academic Writing and Tacit Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    The genre of academic writing is discipline dependent, so that neither specialists in academic writing nor practising academics in a discipline can, independently of each other, provide students with the necessary help to develop the ability to write in their academic disciplines. Furthermore, the rules are largely tacit, i.e. they are not…

  7. Sustainable Marketing : The Importance of Being a Sustainable Business

    OpenAIRE

    Reutlinger, Janina

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with sustainable marketing, as well as the necessity for more sustainability. The purpose of this thesis was to determine the importance of sustainable marketing for companies. The theoretical part is divided into sustainability and sustainable marketing. Sustainability covers current issues and sustainable development, which form a background for a better understanding of sustainable marketing. Sustainable marketing includes a definition of the concept, as well as susta...

  8. Building bridges: an innovative academic-service partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Teri A; Crain, Christine; Meyer, Geralyn A; McDonough, Mary Ellen; Schweiss, Deirdre M

    2010-01-01

    Academic and service entities can create sustainable models of collaboration that realign relationships and resources to enhance the critical competencies essential for entry into practice. Our hospital and school collaborated to implement an innovative academic-service partnership model in which the academic and the care delivery enterprises intersected to accomplish goals of mutual interest and enhance and enrich the practice environment. Two existing resources-the staff nurse and faculty-were used to realign the educational process with the realities of nursing practice in an interpretive, contextual, live unfolding clinical environment that was relevant and memorable. The students were better integrated into the clinical operations and showed increased levels of critical thinking, clinical decision-making, and clinical inquiry skills. The model holds promise to improve transition to practice, make better use of existing resources, and foster collaborative relationships among the academic, practice, and regulatory enterprises. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Network DEA: an application to analysis of academic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saniee Monfared, Mohammad Ali; Safi, Mahsa

    2013-05-01

    As governmental subsidies to universities are declining in recent years, sustaining excellence in academic performance and more efficient use of resources have become important issues for university stakeholders. To assess the academic performances and the utilization of the resources, two important issues need to be addressed, i.e., a capable methodology and a set of good performance indicators as we consider in this paper. In this paper, we propose a set of performance indicators to enable efficiency analysis of academic activities and apply a novel network DEA structure to account for subfunctional efficiencies such as teaching quality, research productivity, as well as the overall efficiency. We tested our approach on the efficiency analysis of academic colleges at Alzahra University in Iran.

  10. Action Research for Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egmose, Jonas

    Analysing processes of social learning this work addresses how action research can further new research orientations towards sustainability. Empirically situated in the field of upstream public engagement, involving local residents, researchers and practitioners in bottom-up processes deliberating...... on urban sustainability the need to move towards sustainability at societal level is conceptualised as a democratic challenge questioning the way we live on planet earth. By understanding sustainability as an immanent and emergent ability of ecological and social life, continuously to renew itself without...... eroding its own foundation of existence, it argues that since sustainability cannot be invented but only supported (or eroded) by science, we need to reframe science in the role of sustaining sustain-ability. Through analyses of a three year action research programme, aiming to provide local citizens...

  11. FORUM: Is Ecotourism Sustainable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall

    1997-07-01

    / It is legitimate to ask whether and in what form tourism might contribute to sustainable development. This is not the same as sustainable tourism which, as a single-sector approach to development, may overlook important linkages with other sectors. If tourism is to contribute to sustainable development, then it must be economically viable, ecologically sensitive and culturally appropriate. Ecotourism is often advocated as being a sustainable form of tourism but imprecision in terminology clouds basic issues and there are strong economic, ecological, and cultural reasons for believing that, even in its purest forms, ecotourism is likely to present substantial challenges to destination areas, particularly if it competes for scarce resources and displaces existing uses and users. Sustainable tourism and ecotourism are not synonyms, many forms of ecotourism may not be sustainable, and if ecotourism is to contribute to sustainable development, then careful planning and management will be required.KEY WORDS: Ecotourism; Sustainable development; Development; Tourism

  12. Livestock biodiversity and sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, I.

    2011-01-01

    Sustainable development equally includes environmental protection including biodiversity, economic growth and social equity, both within and between generations. The paper first reviews different aspects related to the sustainable use of livestock biodiversity and property regimes that influence

  13. Sustainable Public Bids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil César Costa de Paula

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will discuss the issue of sustainability in public procurement, given that the government in Brazil is constituted as a great promoter of economic development and needs to adapt its acquisitions worldwide sustainability agenda.

  14. Indicators for environmental sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yan; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2017-01-01

    . In this study, we reviewed indicators applied in life cycle assessment (LCA), planetary boundary framework (PB), and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) developed under United Nation. The aim is to 1) identify their applications and relevant decision context; 2) Review their indicators and categorize them......Decision making on sustainable consumption and production requires scientifically based information on sustainability. Different environmental sustainability targets exist for specific decision problems. To observe how well these targets are met, relevant environmental indicators are needed...

  15. Sustainable Learning Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Luis E.; Esquer, Javier; Munguia, Nora E.; Moure-Eraso, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to debate how companies may better become a sustainable learning organization by offering the most used and insightful concepts of sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: Through literature review, learning organization and sustainability perspectives are explored and compared. Findings: Learning…

  16. Measuring Educational Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvanathan, Rani G.

    2013-01-01

    There are many definitions that are attributable to the meaning of sustainability. Sustainability can be viewed as long-lasting, effective result of a project, venture, action, or investment without consuming additional future resources. Because of the wide nature of its applicability, a universal measure of sustainability is hard to come by. This…

  17. ORNL Annual Sustainability Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapsa, Melissa Voss [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nichols, Teresa A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-02-01

    As described in this report, we have made substantial progress across the 25 roadmaps of the Sustainable Campus Initiative. The report also outlines our plans to continue integrating sustainable practices into the planning, execution, and evaluation of all ORNL activities. We appreciate your interest in our journey to sustainability, and we welcome your comments, questions, and suggestions.

  18. Toward sustainable logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soysal, Mehmet; Bloemhof-Ruwaard, Jacqueline M.

    2017-01-01

    The fast evolution of sustainability leads to the development of a new fast-growing concept called sustainable logistics management. This research addresses recent business trends and challenges in logistics and their implications for sustainable logistics management. Additionally, we discuss policy

  19. LCA and Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moltesen, Andreas; Bjørn, Anders

    2017-01-01

    LCA is often presented as a sustainability assessment tool. This chapter analyses the relationship between LCA and sustainability. This is done by first outlining the history of the sustainability concept, which gained momentum with the Brundtland Commission’s report ‘Our Common Future report ’ i...

  20. Lean maturity, lean sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Matthiesen, Rikke; Nielsen, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Although lean is rapidly growing in popularity, its implementation is far from problem free and companies may experience difficulties sustaining long term success. In this paper, it is suggested that sustainable lean requires attention to both performance improvement and capability development...... that support lean capability development and consequently, lean sustainability....

  1. Food sustainability: diverging interpretations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aiking, H.; de Boer, J.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of sustainability in general and food sustainability, in particular, entails many aspects and many interpretations. During a conference on food sustainability a broad, multidisciplinary picture was painted and many key issues were dealt with, from ecology, economy and society. In

  2. Transferring Education for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Umer Farooque, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability stands for sustaining the past, meeting needs of the present without compromising the ability to meet future needs. It should meet the individual and social needs, present and future needs local and global needs. A sustainable education that meets this requirements surely be a transferable education; an education that transfers from…

  3. Sustainability: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormsley, W. E.

    1990-01-01

    This article introduces a group of six papers on sustainability of programs for visually handicapped persons in developing countries. Sustainability is discussed from an anthropological perspective, noting the importance of a social soundness analysis and a social impact assessment, enemies of sustainability, and the need for broad local input in…

  4. Sustainability in logistics practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans-Heinrich Glöckner; Reinder Pieters; Stef Weijers

    2009-01-01

    This conceptual paper wants to emphasis the use of the concept of sustainability within logistics and especially transportation. While working on a new tool to help companies develop sustainable European networks, we discovered that we want to use a specific concept of sustainability: People, planet

  5. Whistleblowing in academic medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, R; Strain, J

    2004-01-01

    The authors present and discuss cases of academic medicine failing to address unethical behaviour in academic science and, thereby, illustrate the scope and seriousness of the problem. The Olivieri/Apotex affair is just another instance of academic medicine's dereliction in a case of scientific fraud and misconduct. Instead of vigorously supporting their faculty member in her efforts to honestly communicate her findings and to protect patients from the risks associated with the use of the study drug, the University of Toronto collaborated with the Apotex company's "stalling tactics," closed down Dr Olivieri's laboratory, harassed her, and ultimately dismissed her. The authors argue that the incentives for addressing problematic behaviour have to be revised in order to effect a change in the current pattern of response that occurs in academic medicine. An externally imposed realignment of incentives could convert the perception of the whistleblower, from their present caste as the enemy within, into a new position, as valued friend of the institution. The authors explain how such a correction could encourage appropriate reactions to scientific misconduct from academic medicine. PMID:14872069

  6. Academic effects of concussion in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Danielle M; Vaughan, Christopher G; Pratson, Lincoln; Sady, Maegan D; McGill, Catherine A; Gioia, Gerard A

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work is to study the nature and extent of the adverse academic effects faced by students recovering from concussion. A sample of 349 students ages 5 to 18 who sustained a concussion and their parents reported academic concerns and problems (eg, symptoms interfering, diminished academic skills) on a structured school questionnaire within 4 weeks of injury. Postconcussion symptoms were measured as a marker of injury severity. Results were examined based on recovery status (recovered or actively symptomatic) and level of schooling (elementary, middle, and high school). Actively symptomatic students and their parents reported higher levels of concern for the impact of concussion on school performance (P academic effects than their younger counterparts (P academic effects, regardless of time since injury (P academic learning and performance, with more adverse effects reported by students who had not yet recovered from the injury. School-based management with targeted recommendations informed by postinjury symptoms may mitigate adverse academic effects, reduce parent and student concerns for the impact of the injury on learning and scholastic performance, and lower the risk of prolonged recovery for students with active postconcussion symptoms. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Academic Training: 2003 - 2004 Academic Training Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch 3rd Term - 5 April to 2nd July 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 April Complex Systems, Chaos and Measurements by P. Collet / Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France 26, 27, 28, 29 April The Theory of Heavy Ion Collisions by U. Wiedemann / CERN-PH/TH 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 May Particle Identification at the LHC by D. Fournier / LAL, Orsay, France 1, 2, 3, 4 June Neural Systems, Genetic Algorithms by V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. Politecnica de Madrid E. 7, 8, 9, June Real Time Process Control by T. Riesco / CERN-TS 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 June The Cosmic Microwave Background by M. Zaldarriaga / Harvard University, USA 21, 22, 23, June Fixed Target Physics at CERN : Results and Prospects by J. Engelen / CERN-DG 28, 29, 30 June, 1, 2, July Search for Dark Matter by B. Sadoulet / Univ. of California, Berkeley, USA The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstrac...

  8. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form a...

  9. Higher education : Features, trends and needs in relation to sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maragakis, A.; Van den Dobbelsteen, A.A.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    The progress of sustainability within higher education has steadily increased in focus over the last decade and has increasingly become a topic of academic research. With various scholars, journals and conferences exclusively dealing with the subject, a wealth of literature has been produced on best

  10. Framework for measuring the sustainability performance of ecodesign implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Vinicius Picanco; Pigosso, Daniela Cristina Antelmi; McAloone, Tim C.

    Companies and academic studies are consistently reporting several potential business benefits gained fromecodesign implementation, such as increased innovation potential, development of new markets and business models, reduction in environmental liability, risks and costs, improvement of organiza......, in alignment with corporate sustainability strategy and main drivers....

  11. Sustainability in the Real Property Law Curriculum: Why and How

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally considered the preserve of environmental law, for the lawyer and the legal academic, sustainability does not immediately come to mind in considering the subjects of the core curriculum. Yet in light of the contemporary imperative to deal with serious ecological decline and its social and economic implications, a law degree that fails…

  12. Creating a Sustainable University and Community through a Common Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Omar S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to provide an overview of Texas State University's Common Experience, an innovative initiative that engaged tens of thousands of people in shared consideration of sustainability as a single topic during academic year 2010-2011. Design/methodology/approach: The discourse begins with an overview of the Common Experience…

  13. Social sustainability of Brazilian biodiesel: The role of agricultural cooperatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stattman, S.L.; Mol, A.P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofuels have been criticized in academic and activist circles not only for their environmental consequences but also for their social impacts on food availability and on small-scale family farming. Meanwhile (global) initiatives and policies have been developed to stimulate "sustainable biofuels".

  14. Moving Sustainability Forward: Energy Efficient Renovations and Solar Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Bill

    2011-01-01

    For any goal to be a "smart goal" it needs to be specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time sensitive. This is equally true for sustainability goals for educational facilities. Evidence abounds that "green strategies" greatly impact both the academic and operational performance of a school. Agencies from the U.S. Environmental Protection…

  15. Academic Training: String Theory

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 June from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 6, 7, 8 & 10 June, TH Auditorium, bldg. 4, 3rd floor on 9 June String Theory by C. Johnson / Univ. of Southern California, USA ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  16. Academic Vocational Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willert, Søren; Keller, Hanne Dauer; Stegeager, Nikolaj

    2010-01-01

    Danish society puts a high value on education which is traditionally seen as a crucial vehicle for development in all spheres of social and economic life. Large sums are spent on work-related adult learning, an important example being academically based masters programs. Yet, the actual effects o......, with examples, a framework for designing educational programs which can help make academic teaching relevant to production-oriented life in organizations. The paper may be read as a statement from which criteria for evaluating the said masters programs can be generated....... in planning, managing and teaching at masters programs at Aalborg University, Denmark. Programs are carefully designed with a view to strengthening the link between the educational space (the curriculum and academic priorities) and the students’ habitual working environment (the organizations from which...

  17. An academic writing paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    A key to understanding academic writing for publication lies in the tension between the need for scholars to demonstrate originality, and the need for academic discourse communities to continue using their shared repetoire1 of concepts, vocabulary, and genre structures. This tension can...... be highlighted through a lens which connects Wenger’s conceptualization of knowledge as based in learning, meaning and identity in Communities of Practice, and Nonaka’s SECI model for knowledge conversion which offers a perspective on knowledge creation for innovation. Both innovation and Communities of Practice...... draw on knowledge resources available in organizational and cultural contexts. To explore this tension in different cultural contexts, this paper examines how Ph.d students recognize and use knowledge resources as they learn about and respond to academic publishing. Sites of research include East...

  18. LCA and Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moltesen, Andreas; Bjørn, Anders

    2017-01-01

    LCA is often presented as a sustainability assessment tool. This chapter analyses the relationship between LCA and sustainability. This is done by first outlining the history of the sustainability concept, which gained momentum with the Brundtland Commission’s report ‘Our Common Future report...... is then demonstrated, and the strategy of LCA to achieving environmental protection, namely to guide the reduction of environmental impacts per delivery of a function, is explained. The attempt to broaden the scope of LCA, beyond environmental protection, by so-called life cycle sustainability assessment (LCSA......) is outlined. Finally, the limitations of LCA in guiding a sustainable development are discussed....

  19. From sustainable buildings to sustainable business

    OpenAIRE

    Mia Andelin

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) Sustainable Buildings & Climate Initiative reports that buildings are responsible for more than 40 percent of global energy use and over one third of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The construction and real estate sector has the potential to play a significant role in the response to climate change. During the latest years the increase in attention to sustainability and green building by planners, developers, and investors has been remarka...

  20. Supporting the academic mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, N Reed

    2010-03-01

    The mission of an academic radiology department includes not only high-quality patient care, but also the educating of a broad variety of health care professionals, the conducting of research to advance the field, and volunteering service to the medical center and our professional societies. While funding is available for the research and educational aspects, it is insufficient to cover the actual costs. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly difficult to make up the deficit by using a portion of the clinical revenues. Development and revenues derived from intellectual property are becoming essential to support the academic mission.

  1. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic and organi......Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...

  2. #IWD2016 Academic Inspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna

    2016-01-01

    What academics or books have inspired you in your writing and research, or helped to make sense of the world around you? In this feature essay, Ninna Meier returns to her experience of reading Hannah Arendt as she sought to understand work and how it relates to value production in capitalist...... economies. Meier recounts how Arendt’s book On Revolution (1963) forged connective threads between the ‘smallest parts’ and the ‘largest wholes’ and showed how academic work is never fully relegated to the past, but can return in new iterations across time....

  3. Action Research for Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egmose, Jonas

    to renew itself without eroding its own foundation of existence, it argues that since sustainability cannot be invented but only supported (or eroded) by science, we need to reframe science in the role of sustaining sustain-ability. Through analyses of a three year action research programme, aiming...... to provide local citizens with a greater say in the future of urban sustainability research, this book shows how action research can make important methodological contributions to processes of social learning between citizens and scientists by enabling free spaces in peoples everyday life and within academia......How can action research further new research orientations towards sustainability? This book, empirically situated in the field of upstream public engagement, involving local residents, researchers and practitioners in bottom-up processes deliberating on urban sustainability, answers this question...

  4. Action Research for Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egmose, Jonas

    to provide local citizens with a greater say in the future of urban sustainability research, this book shows how action research can make important methodological contributions to processes of social learning between citizens and scientists by enabling free spaces in peoples everyday life and within academia...... to renew itself without eroding its own foundation of existence, it argues that since sustainability cannot be invented but only supported (or eroded) by science, we need to reframe science in the role of sustaining sustain-ability. Through analyses of a three year action research programme, aiming......How can action research further new research orientations towards sustainability? This book, empirically situated in the field of upstream public engagement, involving local residents, researchers and practitioners in bottom-up processes deliberating on urban sustainability, answers this question...

  5. Sustainability in Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollin, Karin; Vej, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    How do companies integrate sustainability into their strategy and practices, and what factors explain their approach? In this paper a typology of sustainability strategies is presented as well as a conceptual framework relating sustainability at the company level to the functional level...... of marketing. The central contribution of the typology is a strategic and managerial view on sustainability. Furthermore, the typology shows that sustainability in business is enacted from different areas of competences and fields in the literature (e.g. supply chain management, corporate branding, value...... creation, product innovation and business model innovation). The empirical basis for the typology is an exploratory study of managers' mindsets about sustainability as strategy. Ten top managers involved with integrating sustainability within their companies have been interviewed. In order to reveal...

  6. Fur and Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold, Else; Csaba, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the notion of deeper luxury, which insists that 'real' luxury should involve sustainable practices in the production and consumption of luxury goods. It traces historical and recent developments in the field of fur, to understand the implications, uncertainties and ambiguities...... of luxury’s confrontation with sustainability. Considering fur in relation to future standards for luxury products, we raise questions about moral problematisation and justification of luxury in terms of sustainability. We first examine the encounter of luxury with sustainability and explain...... the significance of the notion of ‘deeper luxury’. After taking stock of the impact of sustainability on luxury and various directions in which sustainable luxury is evolving, we discuss concepts of sustainable development in relation to the history of moral problematisation of luxury. This leads to the case...

  7. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  8. High Performance Education Fails in Sustainability?--A Reflection on Finnish Primary Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Lili-Ann; Sjöblom, Pia; Hofman-Bergholm, Maria; Palmberg, Irmeli

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability is internationally often emphasized as an essential aim of higher education, but more as a principle than on the practical level. This is also obvious in the academic education of primary teachers in Finland. Therefore, it is a great challenge for Finnish teachers to include sustainability in their teaching and everyday life in…

  9. An Auto-Photographic Study of Undergraduate Students' Conceptions of Ocean Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-I; Li, Yuh-Yuh

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate students' understandings of ocean sustainability and the pedagogical influence of higher education on those conceptions. Design/methodology/approach: The conceptions of ocean sustainability of 54 university students of various academic disciplines enrolled in the 2014/2015 semester course…

  10. Using Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment to trade off sourcing strategies for humanitarian relief items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kempen, E.; Spiliotopoulou, E.; Stojanovski, G.; de Leeuw, S.L.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: While interest in supply chain sustainability has risen over the past few years in academic and business worlds, very little research has been conducted on sustainability in humanitarian supply chains, specifically. This study aims to contribute to the development of the field by conducting

  11. Environmental Education for Sustainability in Higher Education Institutions in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galang, Angelina P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present a national profile of developments in higher education for sustainable development in the Philippines and to analyse a new initiative to accelerate environmental education for sustainable development (EESD) within academic institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This is an evaluative review that examines the design and…

  12. Sustainability reporting in public sector organisations: Exploring the relation between the reporting process and organisational change management for sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Ana Rita; Lozano, Rodrigo; Ceulemans, Kim; Ramos, Tomás B

    2017-05-01

    Sustainability Reporting has become a key element in different organisations. Although there have been a number of academic publications discussing the adoption of sustainability reports in the public sector, their numbers have been quite low when compared to those focussing on corporate reports. Additionally, there has been little research on the link between sustainability reporting in Public Sector Organisations (PSOs) and Organisational Change Management for Sustainability (OCMS). This paper focuses on the contribution of sustainability reporting to OCMS. A survey was sent to all PSOs that have published at least one sustainability report based on the GRI guidelines. The study provides a critical analysis of the relation between sustainability reporting and OCMS in PSOs, including the drivers for reporting, the impacts on organisation change management, and the role of stakeholders in the process. Despite still lagging in sustainability reporting journey, PSOs are starting to use sustainability reporting as a communication tool, and this could drive organisational changes for sustainability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Health and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjӕrgård, Bente; Land, Birgit; Bransholm Pedersen, Kirsten

    2014-09-01

    In the present article, we explore how sustainable development strategies and health promotion strategies can be bridged. The concept of the 'duality of structure' is taken as our starting point for understanding the linkages between health promotion and sustainable development, and for uncovering the structural properties or conditions which either enable or constrain sustainable public health initiatives. We argue that strategies towards health promotion are not sufficiently integrated with strategies for sustainable development, and thus political strategies aimed at solving health problems or sustainability problems may cause new, undesired and unforeseen environmental or health problems. First, we explore how the relation between health and sustainability is articulated in international policy documents. Next, we develop a model for understanding the relation between health promotion and sustainability. Third, we use examples from agriculture and food production to illustrate that health and sustainability are mutually enabling and constraining. We conclude that while the renewed focus on food security and food inequalities has brought the health and sustainability dimensions of the food system onto the political agenda, the conceptualization of duality between health and sustainability could be a new platform for a critical and theoretical stance towards the market-oriented food system strategy. Thinking along the lines of duality means that the integration of health promotion strategies and sustainable development strategies cannot be based on an approach to integration in which either health or sustainability is given precedence over the other. From a duality perspective, integration means conceiving sustainability from a health perspective and health from a sustainability perspective. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Productive procrastination: academic procrastination style predicts academic and alcohol outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Erin C; Wormington, Stephanie V; Oleson, Kathryn C; Lindgren, Kristen P

    2017-03-01

    Productive procrastination replaces one adaptive behavior with another adaptive-albeit less important-behavior (e.g., organizing notes instead of studying for an exam). We identified adaptive and maladaptive procrastination styles associated with academic and alcohol outcomes in 1106 college undergraduates. Cluster analysis identified five academic procrastination styles- non-procrastinators , academic productive procrastinators , non-academic productive procrastinators, non-academic procrastinators , and classic procrastinators . Procrastination style differentially predicted alcohol-related problems, cravings, risk of alcohol use disorders, and GPA (all ps procrastination and academic productive procrastination were most adaptive overall; non-academic productive procrastination, non-academic procrastination, and classic procrastination were least adaptive. Productive procrastination differed from other procrastination strategies, and maladaptive procrastination styles may be a useful risk indicator for preventative and intervention efforts.

  15. Innovations in Financing Environmental and Social Sustainability. Literature Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerste, M.; Weda, J.; Rosenboom, N.

    2010-12-15

    Innovative finance instruments can help increase funding of investments aimed at environmental and social sustainability.This report highlights leading literature and empirical findings on innovations in financing environmental and social sustainability. Many of these instruments have not been implemented for long, as yet, or are even still in their design phase. Being a relatively young (academic) discipline, the report starts off with designing a framework to describe and assess innovative finance instruments. Thereafter, a sample of instruments is discussed based on this framework, respectively Green Bonds, Index-Linked Carbon Bonds, Payment for Environmental Services, Kiva, and Gender budgeting. This report is part of a set of SEO-reports on finance and sustainability. The other reports deal with: Financing the Transition to Sustainable Energy; Carbon Trading; and Sustainable investment.

  16. Linking health education and sustainability education in schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Katrine Dahl; Nordin, Lone Lindegaard; Simovska, Venka

    2015-01-01

    This chapter addresses the relationship between international and national policies regarding sustainability and health promotion which have the potential to affect school-based health education/promotion and education for sustainable development in Denmark. Based on policy mapping and analysis...... education in Denmark with its aims of ensuring overall school improvement, increasing pupil wellbeing and improving academic outcomes. Analysis of international policy documents, as well as of research literature shows that school-based health education (HE) and education for sustainable development (ESD...... on the common tendency that when health and sustainability education in schools are framed in national action plans, certain critical educational aspects are lost by narrowing the concepts of health and sustainability to fit particular school subjects (e.g. physical education or science), and defining outcomes...

  17. Defining Sustainability in Relation to the Renovation of Modern Housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Terri

    2011-01-01

    Summary This paper focuses on comparing practice-based and academic definitions and metrics of “sustainability” as they relate to the transformation of Modern housing in Denmark. Keywords:Sustainability, Renovation, Architecture, Denmark, Modern housing 1. Introduction to the Study Buildings...... must focus on other parameters as well as energy use because there is more to designing sustainable building than energy savings. In the building industry, there is an increasing focus in building engineering approaches relating to “low energy buildings” and architectural approaches to “sustainability......”. 2. Background to the Study and Study Context Despite the increasing focus on low energy buildings and sustainability, the definitions of key terms in these areas are unclear. This paper focuses on architectural approaches to sustainable building, rather than engineering or other ways of approaching...

  18. Reactor and process design in sustainable energy technology

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Reactor Process Design in Sustainable Energy Technology compiles and explains current developments in reactor and process design in sustainable energy technologies, including optimization and scale-up methodologies and numerical methods. Sustainable energy technologies that require more efficient means of converting and utilizing energy can help provide for burgeoning global energy demand while reducing anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions associated with energy production. The book, contributed by an international team of academic and industry experts in the field, brings numerous reactor design cases to readers based on their valuable experience from lab R&D scale to industry levels. It is the first to emphasize reactor engineering in sustainable energy technology discussing design. It provides comprehensive tools and information to help engineers and energy professionals learn, design, and specify chemical reactors and processes confidently. Emphasis on reactor engineering in sustainable energy techn...

  19. Academic staff reward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    structures and management systems. As a result, many universities are rethinking their reward strategies to better align them with the new realities in order to improve teaching staff motivation and retention. This study was conducted to identify academic staff reward related problems and to examine the effectiveness of both ...

  20. Academic staff reward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    has a major role to play in achieving the objectives of the institution. ... Exceptionally, well motivated academic staff can, with appropriate ... significance attributed to the work. **To perform at their best, most individuals need to have financial or other extrinsic rewards tied to their performance. Rewards. Intrinsic*. Extrinsic**.

  1. The Academic Chairperson's Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; And Others

    This book champions the importance of chairing an academic department (or division) and focuses attention on the strategies "excellent" chairs use in building a positive work environment for faculty and releasing individual faculty potential. The framework is based on human, organizational, and career development; systems theory; and interpersonal…

  2. Unique Academic Skillsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    For the past eighty-two years, Monroe College has been committed to being a national leader in urban and international education. Established in the fall of 2004, the honors program has been transformative for the college, bringing together a wide range of professionals from across disciplines to provide innovative academic offerings. The program…

  3. Confronting Academic Snobbery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brian; Sørensen, Majken Jul

    2014-01-01

    Snobbery in academia can involve academics, general staff, students and members of the public, and can be based on degrees, disciplines, cliques and other categories. Though snobbery is seldom treated as a significant issue, it can have damaging effects on morale, research and public image. Strategies against snobbery include avoidance, private…

  4. Academic Nightmares: Predatory Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuland, Sonya E.; Rogers, Kem A.

    2017-01-01

    Academic researchers who seek to publish their work are confronted daily with a barrage of e-mails from aggressive marketing campaigns that solicit them to publish their research with a specialized, often newly launched, journal. Known as predatory journals, they often promise high editorial and publishing standards, yet their exploitive business…

  5. The academic rat race

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landes, Xavier; Andersen, Martin Marchman; Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2012-01-01

    : an increased pressure to produce articles (in peer-reviewed journals) has created an unbalanced emphasis on the research criterion at the expense of the latter two. More fatally, this pressure has turned academia into a rat race, leading to a deep change in the fundamental structure of academic behaviour...

  6. An Academic Definitions Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Daniel Richard

    2017-01-01

    L2 vocabulary is commonly conceptualized in terms of a size or depth of one's total lexical knowledge and tested discretely with selection-type items. Concerns exist, however, regarding L2 users' ability to cope with unknown vocabulary, especially in the context of academic reading. This motivated the creation of a test which measures the ability…

  7. Online Academic Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, David F.; Peszka, Jennifer; Lilly, Deborah R.

    2009-01-01

    Psychology students completed a task with reinforcement for successful performance. We tested academic integrity under randomly assigned conditions of check mark acknowledgment of an honor pledge, typed honor pledge, or no pledge. Across all conditions, 14.1% of students inflated their self-reported performance (i.e., cheated). We found no…

  8. Academic Libraries in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Rowena; Nagata, Haruki

    2008-01-01

    Academic libraries in Japan are well resourced by international standards, and support Japan's internationally recognized research capability well, but there are also ways in which they reflect Japan's strong bureaucratic culture. Recent changes to the status of national university libraries have seen a new interest in customer service, and…

  9. Minnesota Academic Standards: Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Education, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This document contains all of the Minnesota kindergarten academic standards in the content areas of Arts, English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies. For each content area there is a short overview followed by a coding diagram of how the standards are organized and displayed. This document is adapted from the official versions…

  10. Bilingualism and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wen-Jui

    2012-01-01

    Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort, this study examines the role that bilingualism plays in children's academic developmental trajectories during their early school years, with particular attention on the school environment (N = 16,380). Growth-curve results showed that despite starting with lower math scores in…

  11. Correlates of Academic Procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, Norman A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated concurrent correlates of academic procrastination in Israeli college preparatory students (n=113). Procrastination in one course of study was found to be moderately correlated with procrastination in another but not to procrastination in routine tasks of daily living. Procrastination was weakly related to emotional upset about it and…

  12. Kompetenceprofil for academic developers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Rie; Mørcke, Anne Mette

    gerne vil udføre? Vi vil også diskutere hvilke positive og negative konsekvenser en (mulig fælles nordisk) kompetenceprofil kunne få.Referencer:Ansela, M. & Maikkola, M. (2007). ACADEMIC DEVELOPER’S COMPETENCE-BASED DESCRIPTION:Core and basic competences. Retrieved 22/01/15 at http://www.peda-forum.fi/index.php...

  13. Towards Transnational Academic Capitalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Ilkka

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to current debates on the relationship between globalisation and higher education. The main argument of the paper is that we are currently witnessing transnationalisation of academic capitalism. This argument is illustrated by examining the collaboration between transnational corporations and research universities, and how…

  14. Academic Work and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Reading current accounts of higher education demonstrates the flux and damage of rapid neoliberal changes to the type and conduct of academic work. Opening the Times Higher Education magazine on the 28 April 2011 shows articles about cuts in staffing and undergraduate provision in England, concerns about the quality of for-profit higher education…

  15. Why Do Academics Use Academic Social Networking Sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meishar-Tal, Hagit; Pieterse, Efrat

    2017-01-01

    Academic social-networking sites (ASNS) such as Academia.edu and ResearchGate are becoming very popular among academics. These sites allow uploading academic articles, abstracts, and links to published articles; track demand for published articles, and engage in professional interaction. This study investigates the nature of the use and the…

  16. The Effect of Academic Advising on Academic Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although academic advising in Kenyan universities exists, no research has been done to find out how it impacts on students' educational and career goals. This research aimed at establishing the effect of academic advising on academic performance and the influence of year of study and gender on students' tendency to ...

  17. The New Academic Environment and Faculty Misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Renée; Friedli, Amy; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena

    2016-02-01

    Faculty members are expected to abide by codes of conduct that are delineated in institutional policies and to behave ethically when engaging in scientific pursuits. As federal funds for research decrease, faculty members face increasing pressure to sustain their research activities, and many have developed new collaborations and pursued new entrepreneurial opportunities. As research collaborations increase, however, there may be competition to get credit as the first person to develop ideas, make new discoveries, and/or publish new findings. This increasingly competitive academic environment may contribute to intentional or unintentional faculty misconduct. The authors, who work in the Dean's Office at a large U.S. medical school (University of California, San Francisco), investigate one to two cases of alleged misconduct each month. These investigations, which are stressful and unpleasant, may culminate in serious disciplinary action for the faculty member. Further, these allegations sometimes result in lengthy and acrimonious civil litigation. This Perspective provides three examples of academic misconduct: violations of institutional conflict-of-interest policies, disputes about intellectual property, and authorship conflicts.The authors also describe prevention and mitigation strategies that their medical school employs, which may be helpful to other institutions. Prevention strategies include training campus leaders, using attestations to reduce violations of institutional policies, encouraging open discussion and written agreements about individuals' roles and responsibilities, and defining expectations regarding authorship and intellectual property at the outset. Mitigation strategies include using mediation by third parties who do not have a vested academic, personal, or financial interest in the outcome.

  18. Facilitating Community Engagement in Academic Pharmacy Careers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Palombi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the recognized value of community engagement in academic pharmacy, the implementation of sustainable and fruitful community partnerships can be challenging. This manuscript will highlight a junior faculty member’s journey with community engagement, sharing the ways that community engagement can guide an academic career and the benefits of community engagement in teaching, research and service. Also highlighted is the role – and argued responsibility - of the academic institution in community engagement, as well as an identification of the barriers that might be interfering with pharmacy faculty community engagement. Considerations for the development of faculty members striving to more fully incorporate engagement into their teaching, research, and service are provided. Conflict of Interest I declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Commentary

  19. [What is sustainability science?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Guo; Guo, Xiao-Chuan; Yang, Jie; Qian, Gui-Xia; Niu, Jian-Ming; Liang, Cun-Zhu; Zhang, Qing; Li, Ang

    2014-01-01

    Sustainability is the theme of our time and also the grandest challenge to humanity. Since the 1970s, the term, sustainable development, has frequently appeared in the scientific literature, governmental documents, media promotions for public goods, and commercial advertisements. However, the science that provides the theoretical foundation and practical guidance for sustainable development--sustainability science--only began to emerge in the beginning of the 21st century. Nevertheless, the field has rapidly developed in depth and expanded in scope during the past decade, with its core concepts and research methods coalescing. China, as the most populous country in the world and home to the philosophical root of sustainability science-the unity of man and nature, is obligated to take upon the challenge of our time, to facilitate global sustainability while pursuing the Chinese Dream, and to play a leading role in the development of sustainability science. Toward this grandiose goal, this paper presents the first Chinese introduction to sustainability science, which discusses its basic concepts, research questions, and future directions. Sustainability science is the study of the dynamic relationship between humans and the environment, particularly focusing on the vulnerability, robustness, resilience, and stability of the coupled human-environment system. It is a transdisciplinary science that integrates natural sciences with humanities and social sciences. It hinges on the environment-economy-society nexus, and merges basic and applied research. The key components of sustainability often change with time, place, and culture, and thus sustainability science needs to emphasize multi-scale studies in space and time, with emphasis on landscapes and regions over a horizon of 50 to 100 years. It needs to focus on the relationship between ecosystem services and human well-being, as influenced by biodiversity and ecosystem processes as well as climate change, land use

  20. decolonising sustainability: subverting and appropriating

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    magnitude for environmental education. We can speak of sustainable development, sustainable economies, sustainable democracy, a sustainable world order, and sustainable modes of health maintenance, but when we turn to spiritual matters we are faced with the black hole of green· politics: what constitutes sustainable.

  1. The Specter of Academic Malpractice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Carol

    1978-01-01

    The concept of academic malpractice is discussed in terms of student gains in consumerism regarding institutional accountability, and in terms of faculty rights to academic freedom and relationships with administrators. (LBH)

  2. More talking, more doing: because we can. : Comparative study of effectiveness of sustainability integration strategies.

    OpenAIRE

    Jablonski, Przemyslaw; Kanwal, Khadija

    2017-01-01

    This research study measures the impact of academic engagement and operational engagement, the strategies that are used by business schools for sustainability integration. The effectiveness of these strategies is studied through their impact on business students’ sustainability perception, their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) attitude, and their current behavior regarding sustainability. It is a quantitative study in which Independent sample t-test is used based on sample of 158 busine...

  3. SMART SUSTAINABLE ISLANDS VS SMART SUSTAINABLE CITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Pantazis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper has several aims: a the presentation of a critical analysis of the terms “smart sustainable cities” and “smart sustainable islands” b the presentation of a number of principles towards to the development methodological framework of concepts and actions, in a form of a manual and actions guide, for the smartification and sustainability of islands. This kind of master plan is divided in thematic sectors (key factors which concern the insular municipalities c the creation of an island’s smartification and sustainability index d the first steps towards the creation of a portal for the presentation of our smartification actions manual, together with relative resources, smart applications examples, and, in the near future the first results of our index application in a number of Greek islands and e the presentation of some proposals of possible actions towards their sustainable development and smartification for the municipalities - islands of Paros and Antiparos in Greece, as case studies.

  4. Academic Achievements: Grades versus Duration

    OpenAIRE

    BRUGIAVINI, Agar; CARRARO, Carlo; Kovacic, Matija

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of academic achievements of post-reform undergraduate students of Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. Academic achievements are measured with the students’ grade point averages and time to graduation. The set of independent variables contains information on students’ personal characteristics, prior academic achievements, family background, academic track at university, and several “peer-group” effects. The novelty of this paper is threefold: i) we use a ...

  5. Comparing Sustainable Forest Management Certifications Standards: A Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rawson. Clark

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To solve problems caused by conventional forest management, forest certification has emerged as a driver of sustainable forest management. Several sustainable forest management certification systems exist, including the Forest Stewardship Council and those endorsed by the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification, such as the Canadian Standards Association - Sustainable Forestry Management Standard CAN/CSA - Z809 and Sustainable Forestry Initiative. For consumers to use certified products to meet their own sustainability goals, they must have an understanding of the effectiveness of different certification systems. To understand the relative performance of three systems, we determined: (1 the criteria used to compare the Forest Stewardship Council, Canadian Standards Association - Sustainable Forestry Management, and Sustainable Forestry Initiative, (2 if consensus exists regarding their ability to achieve sustainability goals, and (3 what research gaps must be filled to improve our understanding of how forest certification systems affect sustainable forest management. We conducted a qualitative meta-analysis of 26 grey literature references (books, industry and nongovernmental organization publications and 9 primary literature references (articles in peer-reviewed academic journals that compared at least two of the aforementioned certification systems. The Forest Stewardship Council was the highest performer for ecological health and social sustainable forest management criteria. The Canadian Standards Association - Sustainable Forestry Management and Sustainable Forestry Initiative performed best under sustainable forest management criteria of forest productivity and economic longevity of a firm. Sixty-two percent of analyses were comparisons of the wording of certification system principles or criteria; 34% were surveys of foresters or consumers. An important caveat to these results is that only one comparison was based on

  6. Sustainable Building Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2009-01-01

    Energy-savings in the existing building stock have becomes a main goal in national and international policies. Often focus is on building-renovations, whereas the potential of sustainable building operation to a large extent has been neglected. Nevertheless, international research as well...... as practical experiences from Danish housing estates indicates that there are large potentials for energy savings by focusing on the operation of the buildings. We suggest that in order to achieve sustainability in the existing housing, renovation and operations should be seen as integrated parts...... and that sustainable building operation can pave the way for sustainable building renovation. This paper discusses the use of sustainability building operation in Danish housing estates: Which tools, methods and technologies is being used, where are the barriers and where are the potentials? We define sustainable...

  7. Health and Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Land, Birgit; Pedersen, Kirsten Bransholm; Kjærgård, Bente

    2014-01-01

    In the present article, we explore how sustainable development strategies and health promotion strategies can be bridged. The concept of the ‘duality of structure’ is taken as our starting point for understanding the linkages between health promotion and sustainable development, and for uncovering...... the structural properties or conditions which either enable or constrain sustainable public health initiatives. We argue that strategies towards health promotion are not sufficiently integrated with strategies for sustainable development, and thus political strategies aimed at solving health problems...... or sustainability problems may cause new, undesired and unforeseen environmental or health problems. First, we explore how the relation between health and sustainability is articulated in international policy documents. Next, we develop a model for understanding the relation between health promotion...

  8. Sustainability and Entrepreneurial Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen T.; Anderson, Alistair

    Abstract Objectives - This paper explores how entrepreneurial action can lead to environmental sustainability. It builds on the assumption that the creation of sustainble practices is one of the most important challenges facing the global society, and that entrepreneurial action is a vital...... instrument in the pursuit of sustainability.  Prior Work - Extant literature identifies two main approaches to sustainable entrepreneurship. (i) traditional exploitation of environmentally relevant opportunities and (ii) institutional entrepreneurship creating opportunities. We identify a novel form......: resource oriented sustainable entrepreneurial action.  Approach - The paper uses a case study approach to build deeper theoretical knowledge of environmentally sustainable entrepreneurship.  Results - The paper identifies and analyses a distinct form of sustainable entrepreneurship -  resource oriented...

  9. At Home with Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hale, Lara

    2018-01-01

    of default rules in subconscious decision-making, this research finds that, ultimately, awareness drives the demand necessary for the creation of sustainable consumption. Whereas direct appeal to individuals has a disappointing level of influence on sustainability choices, it is understood that green......-fuel-based energy. To act otherwise requires additional effort and is less likely. Motivated by a need to understand how defaults might bridge standards and sustainable consumption, I investigate how organizational processes potentially lead from standardized green default rules to individual awareness that can...... spread and facilitate sustainable consumption. This paper examines the Active House sustainable building demonstrations in Europe in order to understand how (1) communications and market creation and (2) responsible, user-centered experimentation are organized to move from defaults to sustainable...

  10. ICT innovations for sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Aebischer, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    ICT Innovations for Sustainability is an investigation of how information and communication technology can contribute to sustainable development. It presents clear definitions of sustainability, suggesting conceptual frameworks for the positive and negative effects of ICT on sustainable development. It reviews methods of assessing the direct and indirect impact of ICT systems on energy and materials demand, and examines the results of such assessments. In addition, it investigates ICT-based approaches to supporting sustainable patterns of production and consumption, analyzing them at various levels of abstraction – from end-user devices, Internet infrastructure, user behavior, and social practices to macro-economic indicators.   Combining approaches from Computer Science, Information Systems, Human-Computer Interaction, Economics, and Environmental Sciences, the book presents a new, holistic perspective on ICT for Sustainability (ICT4S). It is an indispensable resource for anyone working in the area of ICT...

  11. Sustainability and substitutability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Eli P; Zhao, Jinhua

    2015-02-01

    Developing a quantitative science of sustainability requires bridging mathematical concepts from fields contributing to sustainability science. The concept of substitutability is central to sustainability but is defined differently by different fields. Specifically, economics tends to define substitutability as a marginal concept while fields such as ecology tend to focus on limiting behaviors. We explain how to reconcile these different views. We develop a model where investments can be made in knowledge to increase the elasticity of substitution. We explore the set of sustainable and optimal trajectories for natural capital extraction and built and knowledge capital accumulation. Investments in substitutability through knowledge stock accumulation affect the value of natural capital. Results suggest that investing in the knowledge stock, which can enhance substitutability, is critical to desirable sustainable outcomes. This result is robust even when natural capital is not managed optimally. This leads us to conclude that investments in the knowledge stock are of first order importance for sustainability.

  12. Sustainable Concrete Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The growing concern over global warming and significant ecological changes requires sustainable development in all fields of science and technology. Concrete not only consumes huge amount of energy and natural sources, but also emits large amount of CO2, mainly due to the production of cement. It is evident that such large amount of concrete production has put significant impact on the energy, resource, environment, and ecology of the society. Hence, how to develop the concrete technology in a sustainable way has become a significant issue. In this paper, some of Korean researches for sustainable development of concrete are presented. These are sustainable strengthening for deteriorated concrete structure, sustainable reinforcement of new concrete structure, sustainable concrete using recycled aggregate and supplementary cementing materials and finally application of each technique to precast concrete.

  13. Schooling Background and Academic Academic Achievement of Agricultural Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jayakumar, N.; M. Surudhi

    2016-01-01

    In our society academic achievement is considered as a key criterion to judge one’s total potentiality and capability. Academic achievement is seen as a students’ grade point averages in many academic settings. Academic achievement has become an index of students’ future in this highly competitive world and Agricultural education is no exception.  Hence it becomes necessary to find out the factors that determine better academic performance. In this context the present study had been carried o...

  14. Sustainable fashion: New approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Niinimäki, Kirsi

    2013-01-01

    This publication is intended to be used as a source of inspiration for designers and companies, and all stakeholders whose interest lies in the area of sustainable fashion. While the strategies for sustainability are complex and approaches are many, this publication presents only a few ways to approach sustainable fashion. I hope the publication offers inspiration on how to make positive change in current practices and how to effect new mindsets, creating transformative fashion. Theoretica...

  15. Education for sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiting, Søren

    2009-01-01

     An introduction to the idea of sustainable development (SD) and education for sustainable development (ESD) with reference to the international Decade for Education for Sustainable Development . The chapter includes a focus on conflicting interests between present and future generations related...... to the use of natural resources and other matters, and how that kind of issues can be dealt with in education as ESD....

  16. A highly sustainable house

    OpenAIRE

    Cordero, Raúl; Mercader-Moyano, Pilar (Coordinador)

    2017-01-01

    A sustainable house is capable of generating and self-sustaining energy by itself to function autonomously, that is to say, without depending on external supply networks. That is possible by supplying the internal energy consumption through renewable energy. This work describes and analyzes the construction of a sustainable house in Paute, Ecuador. The goal of this house was to achieve selfsustainability in several aspects such as construction techniques, creative and functi...

  17. Sustainability Assessment Circle

    OpenAIRE

    Schlör, H.; Hake, J.-Fr.

    2015-01-01

    Since the nineteen seventies, science and society have been discussing the worldwide ecological, economic, and social problems caused by industrialization and globalization. Sustainable development is perceived as a strategy for coping with these problems. The Rio +20 conference in 2012 confirmed the sustainability concept and introduced the green economy and the life cycle sustainable assessment as its implementation and operationalization strategy and tool.In the following, we will demonstr...

  18. Predicting Academic Entitlement in Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohr-Preston, Sara; Boswell, Stefanie S.

    2015-01-01

    Academic entitlement (AE) is a common source of frustration for college personnel. This investigation examined predictors (self-concept, academic dishonesty, locus of control, and family functioning) of AE in male and female college students. Academic dishonesty and the interaction between locus of control and family functioning significantly…

  19. Life Stress and Academic Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hui; Huang, Yun-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Stress has been shown to negatively affect learning. Academic burnout is a significant problem associated with poor academic performance. Although there has been increased attention on these two issues, literature on the relationship between students' life stress and burnout is relatively limited. This study surveys academic burnout and life…

  20. Understanding Academic Identity through Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billot, Jennie; King, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Metaphors used by higher education teachers in their narratives of academic life provide insight into aspects of academic identity. Drawing on an international study of leader/follower dynamics, the teachers' narratives reveal how academics interpret their interactions with leaders; the perceived distance between expectations and experience, and…

  1. Academic Freedom Requires Constant Vigilance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, academic freedom has been understood as an individual right and a negative liberty. As William Tierney and Vincente Lechuga explain, "Academic freedom, although an institutional concept, was vested in the individual professor." The touchstone document on academic freedom, the American Association of University Professor's (AAUP)…

  2. Academic Freedom and Indentured Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Discussion of academic freedom usually focuses on faculty, and it usually refers to speech. That is the gist of the 1915 "General Report of the Committee on Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure," appearing in the inaugural AAUP "Bulletin" as a kind of mission statement. Given the conditions of the American system of higher education--decentralized…

  3. Another Discussion about Academic Corruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changgeng, Li

    2007-01-01

    Academic corruption is a commonplace matter about which all people are clearly aware. However, people often overlook many hidden or latent manifestations of academic corruption. This article discusses eight of these manifestations: indiscriminate use of the academic team spirit, the proliferation of "word games," deliberate attacks on…

  4. Sustainability assessment and complementarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo F. Alrøe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability assessments bring together different perspectives that pertain to sustainability to produce overall assessments, and a wealth of approaches and tools have been developed in the past decades. However, two major problems remain. The problem of integration concerns the surplus of possibilities for integration; different tools produce different assessments. The problem of implementation concerns the barrier between assessment and transformation; assessments do not lead to the expected changes in practice. We aim to analyze issues of complementarity in sustainability assessment and transformation as a key to better handling the problems of integration and implementation. Based on a generalization of Niels Bohr's complementarity from quantum mechanics, we have identified two forms of complementarity in sustainability assessment, observer stance complementarity and value complementarity. Unlike many other problems of sustainability assessment, complementarity is of a fundamental character connected to the very conditions for observation. Therefore, complementarity cannot be overcome methodologically, only handled better or worse. Science is essential to the societal goal of sustainability, but these issues of complementarity impede the constructive role of science in the transition to more sustainable structures and practices in food systems. The agencies of sustainability assessment and transformation need to be acutely aware of the importance of different perspectives and values and the complementarities that may be connected to these differences. An improved understanding of complementarity can help to better recognize and handle issues of complementarity. These deliberations have relevance not only for sustainability assessment, but more generally for transdisciplinary research on wicked problems.

  5. Predicting Sustainable Work Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Kim Sundtoft

    2013-01-01

    . Employee characteristics and general attitudes towards safety and work condition are included in the extended model. A survey was handed out to 654 employees in Chinese factories. This research contributes by demonstrating how employee- characteristics and general attitudes towards safety and work...... condition influence their sustainable work behavior. A new definition of sustainable work behavior is proposed.......Sustainable work behavior is an important issue for operations managers – it has implications for most outcomes of OM. This research explores the antecedents of sustainable work behavior. It revisits and extends the sociotechnical model developed by Brown et al. (2000) on predicting safe behavior...

  6. Sustainability needs the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Nancy; van der Pluijm, Ben

    2012-10-01

    Science, Innovation, and Partnerships for Sustainable Solutions: A National Academies Symposium; Washington, D. C., 16-18 May 2012 It is no longer disputed that humanity has drastically changed the face of the planet and its life-support systems. The sustainability challenge is to meet people's needs today and in the future while sustaining life-support systems. This grand challenge demands a new scientific approach: use-inspired, solution-driven research that consciously links scientific research to societal decision-making and action. Sustainability science may help fulfill that need if it can engage communities of expertise across a wide range of disciplines and sectors, including the geosciences.

  7. Sustainable wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Zhongming; Xuemin

    2013-01-01

    This brief focuses on network planning and resource allocation by jointly considering cost and energy sustainability in wireless networks with sustainable energy. The characteristics of green energy and investigating existing energy-efficient green approaches for wireless networks with sustainable energy is covered in the first part of this brief. The book then addresses the random availability and capacity of the energy supply. The authors explore how to maximize the energy sustainability of the network and minimize the failure probability that the mesh access points (APs) could deplete their

  8. Sustainable Management of Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    To provide information to organizations to help them implement sustainable food management, including joining the Food Recovery Challenge. To provide education and information to communities and concerned citizens.

  9. Green networking and communications ICT for sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shafiullah

    2013-01-01

    Although the information and communication technology (ICT) industry accounted for only 2 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions in 2007, the explosive increase in data traffic brought about by a rapidly growing user base of more than a billion wireless subscribers is expected to nearly double that number by 2020. It is clear that now is the time to rethink how we design and build our networks.Green Networking and Communications: ICT for Sustainability brings together leading academic and industrial researchers from around the world to discuss emerging developments in energy-efficient netw

  10. Computer Anxiety, Academic Stress, and Academic Procrastination on College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Rahardjo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Academic procrastination is fairly and commonly found among college students. The lack of understanding in making the best use of computer technology may lead to anxiety in terms of operating computer hence cause postponement in completing course assignments related to computer operation. On the other hand, failure in achieving certain academic targets as expected by parents and/or the students themselves also makes students less focused and leads to tendency of postponing many completions of course assignments. The aim of this research is to investigate contribution of anxiety in operating computer and academic stress toward procrastination on students. As much as 65 students majoring in psychology became participants in this study. The results showed that anxiety in operating computer and academic stress play significant role in influencing academic procrastination among social sciences students. In terms of academic procrastination tendencies, anxiety in operating computer and academic stress, male students have higher percentage than female students.

  11. Campus sustainable food projects: critique and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, Peggy F

    2011-01-01

    Campus sustainable food projects recently have expanded rapidly. A review of four components - purchasing goals, academic programs, direct marketing, and experiential learning - shows both intent and capacity to contribute to transformational change toward an alternative food system. The published rationales for campus projects and specific purchasing guidelines join curricular and cocurricular activities to evaluate, disseminate, and legitimize environmental, economic, social justice, and health concerns about conventional food. Emerging new metrics of food service practices mark a potential shift from rhetoric to market clout, and experiential learning builds new coalitions and can reshape relations with food and place. Campus projects are relatively new and their resilience is not assured, but leading projects have had regional, state, and national impact. The emergence of sustainability rankings in higher education and contract-based compliance around purchasing goals suggests that if support continues, higher education's leadership can extend to the broader agrifood system.

  12. Bilingualism and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wen-Jui

    2012-01-01

    Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort, this study examines the role that bilingualism plays in children's academic developmental trajectories during their early school years, with particular attention on the school environment (N = 16,380). Growth-curve results showed that despite starting with lower math scores in kindergarten, Mixed Bilingual children fully closed the math gap with their White English Monolingual peers by fifth grade. However, because non-English-Dominant Bilinguals and non-English Monolinguals started kindergarten with significantly lower reading and math scores compared to their English Monolingual peers, by fifth grade the former groups still had significantly lower scores. School-level factors explained about one third of the reductions in the differences in children's academic performance. © 2011 The Author. Child Development © 2011 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  13. Participatory academic communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Janus Holst; Nørgård, Rikke Toft

    2015-01-01

    Th is article explores community-driven participation in education beyond the institution. By refl ecting on two MA courses at Aarhus University and including educatees’ refl ections in the article, the concept of Participatory Academic Community is developed. Th e article discusses how an evolved...... understanding of participation in edu-cation can move educatees’ learning beyond institutions through focusing on educatees as researchers, participat-ing in society, building a research community and obtaining academic citizenship. Further, the article discusses how a value-based, vision-driven approach...... to education and the use of ICT might nurture participation and construction of community within education. Th e article is genuinely transdisciplinary in its approach, apply-ing diff erent theoretical lenses to obtain a more holistic view on participation in education. Th e article creates a prismatic lens...

  14. From ERPs to academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Charles H; Pontifex, Matthew B; Motl, Robert W; O'Leary, Kevin C; Johnson, Christopher R; Scudder, Mark R; Raine, Lauren B; Castelli, Darla M

    2012-02-15

    Standardized tests have been used to forecast scholastic success of school-age children, and have been related to intelligence, working memory, and inhibition using neuropsychological tests. However, ERP correlates of standardized achievement have not been reported. Thus, the relationship between academic achievement and the P3 component was assessed in a sample of 105 children during performance on a Go/NoGo task. The Wide Range Achievement Test - 3rd edition was administered to assess aptitude in reading, spelling, and arithmetic. Regression analyses indicated an independent contribution of P3 amplitude to reading and arithmetic achievement beyond the variance accounted for by IQ and school grade. No such relationship was observed for spelling. These data suggest that the P3, which reflects attentional processes involved in stimulus evaluation and inhibitory control may be a biomarker for academic achievement during childhood. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Academic dishonesty among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Linda

    2014-02-01

    This quantitative study identified sociodemographic and situational conditions that affected 336 nursing students' engagement in academic dishonesty, their attitudes regarding various forms of academic dishonesty, and the prevalence of academic dishonesty in which they engaged and witnessed. More than half of the participants reported cheating in the classroom and in the clinical settings. A positive relationship was found between the frequency of cheating in classroom and clinical settings. Results revealed differences in frequency of engagement in and attitudes toward academic dishonesty by gender, semester in the program, and ethnicity. Relationships were also found among peer behavior, personal beliefs and values, and frequency of engaging in academic dishonesty. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Academic Manager or Managed Academic? Academic Identity Schisms in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between values and academic identity has received scant attention in the higher education literature with some notable exceptions (Churchman, 2006; Harley, 2002; Henkel, 2005). This paper contends that the perceived need to align all academics around corporate values and goals has given rise to academic identity schisms in higher…

  17. The "Secrets" of Chinese Students' Academic Success: Academic Resilience among Students from Highly Competitive Academic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibin

    2017-01-01

    Given Chinese students often perform well academically despite the challenges of their competitive academic environments, it is important to explore what enables the academic resilience of these students. Moreover, because the extant resilience literature is biased towards Western accounts of resilience, it is crucial that non-Western perspectives…

  18. Gender Differences in the Relationship between Academic Procrastination, Satisfaction with Academic Life and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkis, Murat; Duru, Erdinç

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Procrastination has become one of the most researched topics due its adverse effects on the both general and student population in social sciences. The general tendency toward delaying academic tasks has been conceptualized as academic procrastination in academic setting. It is a prevalent issue among students and a numerous students…

  19. Plagiarism in Academic Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Eugenia Rojas-Porras

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The ethical and social responsibility of citing the sources in a scientific or artistic work is undeniable. This paper explores, in a preliminary way, academic plagiarism in its various forms. It includes findings based on a forensic analysis. The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness on the importance of considering these details when writing and publishing a text. Hopefully, this analysis may put the issue under discussion.

  20. Declaration of Academic Freedom

    OpenAIRE

    ÇETİNSAYA, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    1. Universities are the institutions where all the opinions, various truth claims as well as social and political problems are discussed in a liberal and civilized way and the complicated problems are expressed clearly without any oppression and prevention. 2. Academic freedom includes first and foremost the right of freedom of research and thus freedom of using the essential knowledge methods, the right of possessing the necessary tools and conditions required for the research and the rig...