WorldWideScience

Sample records for sustained blunt trauma

  1. Blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daphne J

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with a wide range of injuries, many of which are life threatening. This article is a case study demonstrating a variety of traumatic chest injuries, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Literature on the diagnosis and treatment was reviewed, including both theoretical and research literature, from a variety of disciplines. The role of the advance practice nurse in trauma is also discussed as it relates to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with traumatic chest injuries.

  2. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Blunt trauma in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Nancy Beth

    2004-10-01

    Trauma is the most common cause of nonobstetric death among pregnant women in the United States. Motor vehicle crashes, domestic violence, and falls are the most common causes of blunt trauma during pregnancy. All pregnant patients with traumatic injury should be assessed formally in a medical setting because placental abruption can have dire fetal consequences and can present with few or no symptoms. Evaluation and treatment are the same as for nonpregnant patients, except that the uterus should be shifted off the great vessels. After initial stabilization, management includes electronic fetal monitoring, ultrasonography, and laboratory studies. Electronic fetal monitoring currently is the most accurate measure of fetal status after trauma, although the optimal duration of monitoring has not been established. Prevention of trauma through proper seat belt use during pregnancy and recognition of domestic violence during prenatal care is important.

  4. Intractable epilepsy and craniocerebral trauma: analysis of 163 patients with blunt and penetrating head injuries sustained in war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Hadi; Hashemi-Fesharaki, Sohrab; Razaghi, Soodeh; Najafi, Masomeh; Kolivand, Peir Hossein; Kovac, Stjepana; Gorji, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Post-traumatic epileptic seizure is a common complication of brain trauma including military injuries. We present clinical characteristics and correlates of post-traumatic epilepsy in 163 head-injured veterans suffering from intractable epilepsy due to blunt or penetrating head injuries sustained during the Iraq-Iran war. The medical records of 163 war veterans who were admitted by the Epilepsy Department of the Shefa Neuroscience Center between 2005 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up period after developing epilepsy was 17.2 years. The time interval between the trauma and the first seizure was shorter and the seizure frequency was higher in epileptic patients suffering from penetrating head trauma. There was no difference in seizure type between epileptic patients traumatised by blunt or penetrating injury. Patients with seizure frequency of more than 30 per month mostly had simple partial seizure. Frontal and parietal semiologies were observed more frequently in patients with penetrating trauma, whereas patients with blunt trauma showed a higher temporal semiology. The most common brain lesion observed by CT scan was encephalomalacia followed by porencephaly and focal atrophy. There was no association between intracerebral retained fragments and different characteristic features of epilepsy. Patients with military brain injury carry a high risk of intractable post-traumatic epilepsy decades after their injury, and thus require a long-term medical follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. MDCT in blunt intestinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Scaglione, Mariano [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tortora, Giovanni [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Martino, Antonio [Trauma Center, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Di Pietto, Francesco [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Romano, Luigia [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Grassi, Roberto [Department ' Magrassi-Lanzara' , Section of Radiology, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    Injuries to the small and large intestine from blunt trauma represent a defined clinical entity, often not easy to correctly diagnose in emergency but extremely important for the therapeutic assessment of patients. This article summarizes the MDCT spectrum of findings in intestinal blunt lesions, from functional disorders to hemorrhage and perforation.

  6. Tricuspid Valve Avulsion after Blunt Chest Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrotra, Deepak; Dalley, Paul; Mahon, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Blunt cardiac trauma causing tricuspid regurgitation is rare and is most often associated with traffic accidents. Falling from a height can also cause such injuries, resulting in hemodynamic compromise and arrhythmias. The signs of traumatic tricuspid regurgitation can appear early or be delayed, depending upon the severity of injury. We present the case of a 68-year-old woman who fell from a height onto rocks during a hike. She sustained blunt cardiac injury with complete tricuspid valve avu...

  7. Isolated gallbladder perforation following blunt abdominal trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 32-year-old man sustained an isolated perforation of the gallbladder following blunt abdominal trauma. A preoperative diagnosis was made on an ultrasound scan, which showed a pericholecystic fluid collection only. At laparotomy, a gallbladder perforation at the infundibulum was identified with a localised bile collection, ...

  8. Hepatic hydrothorax after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Chiung Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a successful treatment result in a rare case of hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis, who had sustained hydrothorax after blunt thoracoabdominal trauma. This was a female patient with liver cirrhosis, Child–Turcotte–Pugh class A, without ascites before injury. She sustained blunt thoracoabdominal trauma with a left clavicle fracture dislocation and right rib fractures. There was no hemopneumothorax at initial presentation. However, dyspnea and right pleural effusion developed gradually. We inserted a chest tube to relieve the patient's symptoms, and the daily drainage amount remained consistent. Hepatic hydrothorax was confirmed by the intraperitoneal injection of radioisotope 99mTc-sulfur colloid that demonstrated one-way transdiaphragmatic flow of fluid from the peritoneal cavity to pleural cavities. Finally, the hydrothorax was treated successfully by minocycline-induced pleural symphysis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of hepatic hydrothorax developed after thoracoabdominal trauma.

  9. Blunt Head Trauma and Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Chelse

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital examined whether having an isolated headache following minor blunt head trauma was suggestive of traumatic brain injury (TBI among a large cohort of children 2-18 years of age.

  10. Tricuspid valve avulsion after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Deepak; Dalley, Paul; Mahon, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Blunt cardiac trauma causing tricuspid regurgitation is rare and is most often associated with traffic accidents. Falling from a height can also cause such injuries, resulting in hemodynamic compromise and arrhythmias. The signs of traumatic tricuspid regurgitation can appear early or be delayed, depending upon the severity of injury. We present the case of a 68-year-old woman who fell from a height onto rocks during a hike. She sustained blunt cardiac injury with complete tricuspid valve avulsion, and underwent successful repair. In addition, we review the relevant medical literature.

  11. Isolated Duodenal Injuries After Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Raheel; Shafique, Muhammad Salman; Ul Haq, Najibul; Akram, Zohra; Qureshi, Usman; Khan, Jahangir Sarwar

    2016-01-01

    Isolated duodenal injury after blunt abdominal trauma is a very rare entity. In contrast to penetrating injuries, duodenal injuries after blunt trauma are difficult to diagnose. Early diagnosis and management is required to prevent high morbidity and mortality associated with these injuries. We present three young patients of blunt abdominal trauma with an isolated injury to duodenum in which primary repair of perforations were done with good outcomes.

  12. Blunt laryngeal trauma secondary to sporting injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, D; Anderson, J A

    2017-08-01

    Laryngeal injury after blunt trauma is uncommon, but can cause catastrophic airway obstruction and significant morbidity in voice and airway function. This paper aims to discuss a case series of sports-related blunt laryngeal trauma patients and describe the results of a thorough literature review. Retrospective case-based analysis of laryngeal trauma referrals over six years to a tertiary laryngology centre. Twenty-eight patients were identified; 13 (46 per cent) sustained sports-related trauma. Most were young males, presenting with dysphonia, some with airway compromise (62 per cent). Nine patients were diagnosed with a laryngeal fracture. Four patients were managed conservatively and nine underwent surgery. Post-treatment, the majority of patients achieved good voice outcomes (83 per cent) and all had normal airway function. Sports-related neck trauma can cause significant injury to the laryngeal framework and endolaryngeal soft tissues, and most cases require surgical intervention. Clinical presentation may be subtle; a systematic approach along with a high index of suspicion is essential, as early diagnosis and treatment have been reported to improve airway and voice outcome.

  13. Superman play and pediatric blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machi, J M; Gyuro, J; Losek, J D

    1996-01-01

    Two pediatric patients with life-threatening intra-abdominal injuries associated with Superman play are presented. The cases illustrate the importance of knowing the mechanism of injury in the assessment of children with blunt abdominal trauma. The diagnostic value of liver enzymes and the controversies surrounding the radiographic assessment of pediatric blunt abdominal trauma are presented.

  14. Pectus excavatum in blunt chest trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liodakis Emmanouil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Blunt cardiac rupture is an exceedingly rare injury. Case presentation We report a case of blunt cardiac trauma in a 43-year-old Caucasian German mother with pectus excavatum who presented after a car accident in which she had been sitting in the front seat holding her two-year-old boy in her arms. The mother was awake and alert during the initial two hours after the accident but then proceeded to hemodynamically collapse. The child did not sustain any severe injuries. Intraoperatively, a combined one-cm laceration of the left atrium and right ventricle was found. Conclusion Patients with pectus excavatum have an increased risk for cardiac rupture after blunt chest trauma because of compression between the sternum and spine. Therefore, patients with pectus excavatum and blunt chest trauma should be admitted to a Level I Trauma Center with a high degree of suspicion.

  15. Isolated gallbladder rupture following blunt abdominal trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-03

    Nov 3, 2011 ... with another, direct blow with parts of the motor cycle to the abdomen may be the cause as there were only bruises in the left hypochondrium that led to the earlier suspicion of splenic injury. Several types of GB injuries may result from blunt abdominal trauma. Blunt gallbladder injuries are classified as ...

  16. Tricuspid regurgitation after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Gabrijelčič

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Our data support the fact that an injury of the tricuspid valve due to blunt chest trauma is rare and easily overlooked. Therefore, ultrasound of the heart should be done in all cases of blunt chest trauma. If negative, it should be repeated. Transoesophageal approach is more reliable than the transthoracic one. The gold standard for therapy is a valve repair, which should be done early enough to prevent further morbidity and mortality.

  17. Ventricular septal defect due to blunt chest trauma | Olivier | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blunt chest trauma may cause cardiac trauma, this possibility often being overlooked. Various anatomical structures may be affected. A case of ventr'icular septal defect due to blunt chest trauma is described and the relevant literature is reviewed.

  18. Gastrointestinal Injuries Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice ... Purpose: Gastrointestinal (GI) injuries in children following blunt abdominal trauma is rare; early diagnosis and treatment is important for good outcome. The purpose ... Patients and Methods: From January 1996 June 2006, 168 children were treated at our centre for abdominal trauma.

  19. Blunt Force Trauma in Veterinary Forensic Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, L; Hetzel, U; Ricci, E

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists commonly encounter lesions of blunt trauma. The development of lesions is affected by the object's mass, velocity, size, shape, and angle of impact and by the plasticity and mobility of the impacted organ. Scrape, impact, and pattern abrasions cause localized epidermal loss and sometimes broken hairs and implanted foreign material. Contusions are best identified after reflecting the skin, and must be differentiated from coagulopathies and livor mortis. Lacerations-traumatic tissue tears-may have irregular margins, bridging by more resilient tissue, deviation of the wound tail, crushed hairs, and unilateral abrasion. Hanging or choking can cause circumferential cervical abrasions, contusions and rupture of hairs, hyoid bone fractures, and congestion of the head. Other special forms of blunt trauma include fractured nails, pressure sores, and dog bites. Ocular blunt trauma causes extraocular and intraocular hemorrhages, proptosis, or retinal detachment. The thoracic viscera are relatively protected from blunt trauma but may develop hemorrhages in intercostal muscles, rib fractures, pulmonary or cardiac contusions or lacerations with subsequent hemothorax, pneumothorax, or cardiac arrhythmia. The abdominal wall is resilient and moveable, yet the liver and spleen are susceptible to traumatic laceration or rupture. Whereas extravasation of blood can occur after death, evidence of vital injury includes leukocyte infiltration, erythrophagocytosis, hemosiderin, reparative lesions of fibroblast proliferation, myocyte regeneration in muscle, and callus formation in bone. Understanding these processes aids in the diagnosis of blunt force trauma including estimation of the age of resulting injuries. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Does splenic embolization and grade of splenic injury impact nonoperative management in patients sustaining blunt splenic trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremitsky, Elan; Kao, Amy; Carlton, Chad; Rodriguez, Aurelio; Ong, Adrian

    2011-02-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) for blunt splenic trauma (BST) is an established practice. The impact of splenic embolization (SE) in the algorithm for NOM has not been well studied. This study evaluates the role of SE and spleen injury grade on failure of NOM. Retrospective cohort of trauma registry over a 7-year period (2000-2006) for patients who suffered BST was studied. Data including demographics, splenic injury grade, and SE were recorded. Characteristics were compared between the successful and failed NOM groups. Kaplan-Meier, life table, and Cox-proportional hazard regression analyses were performed. Of the 499 patients who suffered BST, 407 (81.6%) patients had successful NOM and 92 (18.4%) patients failed NOM (including splenectomies performed within 1 hour of admission). Failed NOM group had a higher splenic injury grade compared with the successful NOM group (P NOM occurred by 24 hours. Grade 3 and 4 injuries that failed NOM occurred by 150 hours. SE was protective against splenectomy (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.18, 95% confidence interval: 0.06-0.55, P = 0.004), whereas splenic injury grades III or higher was associated with increased risk of splenectomy (grade III: HR 5.26, P = 0.003; grade IV: HR 6.84, P = 0.002; grade V: HR 9.81, P = 0.002) compared with those with splenic injury grade I. Splenic embolization is a protective measure to reduce the failure of NOM. Spleen injury grade III and higher was significantly associated with NOM failure and would require a 5-day inpatient observation.

  1. Thyroid Gland Hematoma After Blunt Neck Trauma

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    Saylam, Baris

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhage of a previously normal thyroid gland as a result of blunt trauma is a very rare condition. We report a case of blunt trauma that caused acute hemorrhage into the thyroid gland and presented with hoarseness. The diagnosis of thyroid gland hematoma was made with a combination of fiberoptic laryngoscopy, cervical computed tomography, and carotid angiography. The patient was treated conservatively, had a favorable course without further complications, and was discharged four days after admission.[West J Emerg Med. 2009;10(4:247-249.

  2. The double jeopardy of blunt thoracoabdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Regan J; Okoye, Obi; Teixeira, Pedro G; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2012-06-01

    To examine the specific injuries, need for operative intervention, and clinical outcomes of patients with blunt thoracoabdominal trauma. Trauma registry and medical record review. Level I trauma center in Los Angeles, California. All patients with thoracoabdominal injuries from January 1996 to December 2010. Injuries, incidence and type of operative intervention, clinical outcomes, and risk factors for mortality. Blunt thoracoabdominal injury occurred in 1661 patients. Overall, 474 (28.5%) required laparotomy, 31 (1.9%) required thoracotomy (excluding resuscitative thoracotomy), and 1146 (69.0%) required no thoracic or abdominal operation. Overall incidence of intraabdominal solid organ injury was 59.7% and hollow viscus injury, 6.0%. Blunt cardiac trauma occurred in 6.3%; major thoracic vessel injury, in 4.6%; and diaphragmatic trauma, in 6.0%. The majority of solid organ injuries were managed nonoperatively (liver, 83.9%; spleen, 68.3%; and kidney, 91.2%). Excluding patients with severe head trauma, mortality ranged from 4.5% with nonoperative management to 18.1% and 66.7% in those requiring laparotomy and dual cavitary exploration, respectively. Age 55 years or older, Injury Severity Score of 25 or more, Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less, initial hypotension, massive transfusion, and liver, cardiac, or abdominal vascular trauma were all independent risk factors for mortality. Most patients with blunt thoracoabdominal trauma are managed nonoperatively. The need for non-resuscitative thoracotomy or combined thoracoabdominal operation is rare. The abdomen contains the overwhelming majority of injuries requiring operative intervention and should be the initial cavity of exploration in the patient requiring emergent surgery without directive radiologic data.

  3. Cardiogenic shock following blunt chest trauma

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    Rodríguez-González Fayna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac contusion, usually caused by blunt chest trauma, has been recognized with increased frequency over the past decades. Traffic accidents are the most frequent cause of cardiac contusions resulting from a direct blow to the chest. Other causes of blunt cardiac injury are numerous and include violent fall impacts, interpersonal aggression, explosions, and various types of high-risk sports. Myocardial contusion is difficult to diagnose; clinical presentation varies greatly, ranging from lack of symptoms to cardiogenic shock and arrhythmia. Although death is rare, cardiac contusion can be fatal. We present a case of cardiac contusion due to blunt chest trauma secondary to a fall impact, which manifested as cardiogenic shock.

  4. Tetanus after blunt lawn mower trauma

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    Camilla Normand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient presented with tetanus ten days after blunt trauma with a lawn mower. Our case describes the diagnosis and treatment of this patient with an infectious disease commonly seen in the developing world but rarely seen in the developed world.

  5. BRONCHIAL FRACTURE FOLLOWING BLUNT CHEST TRAUMA*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-01-02

    Jan 2, 1971 ... BRONCHIAL FRACTURE FOLLOWING BLUNT CHEST TRAUMA*. J. F. HITCHCOCK, M.B., CH.B., M.MED. (SURG.), Department of Cardiolhoracic SlIrger.\\", Croote Schllllr Hospilal,. Cape Town. Fractures of the trachea or major bronchi are becoming increasingly common. in particu:ar fractures of one or.

  6. An evidence based blunt trauma protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, R. van; Kool, D.R.; Lubeek, S.F.K.; Dekker, H.M.; Brink, M.; Deunk, J.; Edwards, M.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Currently CT is rapidly implemented in the evaluation of trauma patients. In anticipation of a large international multicentre trial, this study's aim was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of a new diagnostic protocol, used for the primary radiological evaluation in adult blunt

  7. Predictors of abdominal injuries in blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrath, Samiris; Parreira, José Gustavo; Perlingeiro, Jacqueline A G; Solda, Silvia C; Assef, José Cesar

    2012-01-01

    To identify predictors of abdominal injuries in victims of blunt trauma. retrospective analysis of trauma protocols (collected prospectively) of adult victims of blunt trauma in a period of 15 months. Variables were compared between patients with abdominal injuries (AIS>0) detected by computed tomography or/and laparotomy (group I) and others (AIS=0, group II). Student's t, Fisher and qui-square tests were used for statistical analysis, considering p3) in head (18.5% vs. 7.9%), thorax (29.2% vs. 2.4%) and extremities (40.0% vs. 13.7%). The highest odds ratios for the diagnosis of abdominal injuries were associated flail chest (21.8) and pelvic fractures (21.0). Abdominal injuries were more frequently observed in patients with hemodynamic instability, changes in Glasgow coma scale and severe lesions to the head, chest and extremities.

  8. Blunt and Penetrating Cardiac Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellister, Seth A; Dennis, Bradley M; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Patients with traumatic cardiac injuries can present with wide variability in their severity of illness. The most severe will present in cardiac arrest, whereas the most benign may be altogether asymptomatic; most will fall somewhere in between. Management of cardiac injuries largely depends on mechanism of injury and patient physiology. Understanding the spectrum of injuries and their associated manifestations can help providers react more quickly and initiate potentially life-saving therapies more efficiently when time is critical. This article discusses the workup and management of both blunt and penetrating cardiac injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chylothorax after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

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    Pawit Sriprasit

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic chylothorax after blunt chest trauma alone is considered rare. Our patient was a 27-year-old female who was in a motorcycle accident and sustained blunt thoracic and traumatic thoracic aortic injuries with T1–T2 vertebral subluxation. She underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair from T4 to T9 without any thoracic or spinal surgery. On postoperative day 7, the drainage from her left chest turned into a milky- white fluid indicative of chyle leakage. The patient was treated conservatively for 2 weeks and then the chest drain was safely removed. The results show that traumatic chylothorax can be successfully managed with conservative treatment.

  10. Ventricular septal defect following blunt chest trauma

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    Lisa Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 32-year-old male with ventricular septal defect (VSD following blunt chest trauma. Traumatic VSD is a rare but potentially life-threatening injury, the severity, course and presentation of which are variable. While the diagnosis of myocardial injury may be challenging, cardiac troponins are useful as a screening and diagnostic test. The proposed pathophysiological mechanisms in the development of traumatic VSD are early mechanical rupture and delayed inflammatory rupture. We conducted a literature review to investigate the pathogenesis, distribution of patterns of presentation, and the associated prognoses in patients with VSD following blunt chest trauma. We found that traumatic VSDs diagnosed within 48 hours were more likely to be severe, require emergency surgery and were associated with a higher mortality. Children with traumatic VSDs had an increased mortality risk. Smaller lesions may be managed conservatively but should be followed up to detect late complications. In both groups elective repair was associated with a good outcome.

  11. Isolated perforation of a duodenal diverticulum following blunt abdominal trauma

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    Metcalfe Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Only 10% of duodenal diverticula are symptomatic. We present the case of a man who fell from a height of 6 ft, landing on his abdomen and presenting 4 h later with severe back pain and a rigid abdomen. At laparotomy, a perforated retroperitoneal duodenal diverticulum was found and repaired with an omental patch. No other injury was noted. Not only is this perforation unusual, but the absence of other injuries sustained during this minor blunt trauma makes this case unique. This case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion when managing patients with back or abdominal pain following minor trauma.

  12. [Airway injuries due to blunt chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Kan; Hamatake, D; Yoshida, Y; Nakajima, H; Shirakusa, T; Yamasaki, S

    2006-10-01

    Although the incidence of blunt chest trauma is very high, the mediastinal tracheobronchial injuries are quite rare. The airway injuries are thought to be one of the most urgent clinical conditions in thoracic surgery, and we are requested to make not only a rapid and sharp diagnosis but also an appropriate treatment plan considering combined injuries. We present 9 cases of tracheobronchial injuries due to blunt chest trauma in recent years. The average age of these patients is 26.1 years, and they are consisted of 6 male and 3 female. The cause of trauma is traffic accident in 7, and occupational crane accident in 2. Bronchoplasty were done in 5 cases (right main bronchus in 2, left main bronchus in 1, trunks intermediate bronchus in 1, and the spur between middle and lower lobe in 1), membranous-tracheoplasty with right pneumonectomy in 1, left pneumonectomy in 1, conservative treatment in 2. Postoperative mortality is occurred in 1 case who was suffering from multiple injuries including severe head injury and contralateral lung contusion. Tracheobronchial plasties should be chosen if possible to preserve lung function for the patient suffering from airway injuries.

  13. Laparoscopic Splenectomy in Hemodynamically Stable Blunt Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gregory S; Chance, Elisha A; Hileman, Barbara M; Emerick, Eric S; Gianetti, Emily A

    2017-01-01

    No criteria define indications for laparoscopic splenectomy in trauma. This investigation compared characteristics of trauma patients and outcomes between laparoscopic and open splenectomies. Patients were identified retrospectively by using ICD-9 codes. Included patients were 18 or older, with a blunt splenic injury from January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2014, and required splenectomy. Excluded patients had penetrating trauma, successful nonoperative management, or successful embolization. Variables included demographics, presenting characteristics, injury severity scores, abdominal abbreviated injury scores, splenic injury grade, surgical indication and approach (open or laparoscopic), surgery length, intra-operative blood loss, transfusions, length of stay, complications, mortality, and discharge disposition. Forty-one patients underwent open splenectomy, and 11 underwent laparoscopic splenectomy. The mean age was 48.7 years, and men comprised the sample majority (36/52). The groups were well matched for age, abdominal injury scores, and admission vital signs. The open group had a significantly lower level of consciousness and more acidosis compared with the laparoscopic group. Most laparoscopic splenectomies were performed after failed nonoperative management or embolization. The indications for open splenectomy were a positive focused assessment with sonography for trauma and computed tomography results. Laparoscopic patients had significantly longer times between presentation and surgery and longer operations, but had significantly less blood loss and fewer transfusions compared with the open group. There were no differences in mortality, length of stay, complications, or discharge dispositions. Laparoscopic splenectomy is useful in patients with blunt trauma in whom conservative management produced no improvement and who do not have other injuries to preclude laparoscopy.

  14. Tracheoesophageal fistula after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W J; Doyle, S E; Aprahamian, C

    1995-05-01

    Tracheoesophageal fistula is a very rare but potentially life-threatening complication of blunt chest trauma. Prior reviews have revealed that the victims were all young men involved in deceleration or crush injuries. Of those involved in motor vehicle accidents, most were thrown against the steering wheel. Herein, we review the world literature on this injury and include our own report of 1 of the few cases of traumatic tracheoesophageal fistula involving a female victim. In this case, the victim was an unrestrained driver thrown against an air bag.

  15. Blunt Ocular Trauma Associated with Paintball Gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Özpınar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old male patient presented to our hospital with a blunt paintball trauma to his left eye. The patient had corneal edema, traumatic cataract, traumatic mydriasis, and secondary glaucoma in his left eye. After corneal edema resolved, cataract surgery was performed. Because of uncontrolled intraocular pressure despite antiglaucoma medications, an Ahmed glaucoma valve was implanted. In the postoperative period, the patient’s visual acuity was 1/10. Paintball-related ocular injuries can be severe and visually devastating. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 135-7

  16. [Tricuspidal valve rupture after blunt chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Wojciech; Nestorowicz, Andrzej; Wośko, Jarosław; Zadora, Przemysław; Tomaszewski, Adrzej; Jurko, Cezary

    2011-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is frequently associated with cardiac contusion and structural damage, most cases only being recognized after death. We report a case of multiple organ trauma, where cardiac failure, caused by tricuspid valve rupture, was markedly delayed. A 21 yr old man was admitted to hospital after a car accident. He was suffering from cerebral contusion and oedema, pulmonary contusion, and a left pneumothorax. He also had multiple fractures of the facial bones, orbit, L4 vertebra and left tibia. He was tracheotomised, and a subdural sensor was inserted for continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure. He was sedated and ventilated for two weeks. On the 12th day, his jaw was reconstructed, and immediately after surgery, mild signs of cardiac failure were observed, which were attributed to cardiac contusion. Two weeks after admission, the patient was weaned from the ventilator, and three days later, his facial bones were reconstructed. Four days later, the signs of cardiac failure reappeared. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed rupture of a head of papillary muscle, with 4th degree tricuspid insufficiency and enlargement of the right ventricle. The ruptured muscle was reconstructed under extracorporeal circulation, and the patient made a satisfactory recovery. Acute tricuspid valve insufficiency, albeit rare, may occur in patients with blunt chest trauma. Sedation and lack of physical activity may delay the definite diagnosis, especially when only transthoracic echocardiography is used. Cardiac arrhythmias, diastolic murmur, or signs of congestive cardiac failure in a chest trauma patient may all suggest some structural damage; therefore, transoesophageal echocardiography should be performed as early as possible in such situations.

  17. Pediatric blunt splenic trauma: a comprehensive review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Karen N.; Werder, Gabriel M.; Callaghan, Rachel M.; Jafri, Zafar H. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Sullivan, Ashley N. [St. George' s University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies (Grenada); Bloom, David A. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Abdominal trauma is a leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age. The spleen is the most common organ injured following blunt abdominal trauma. Pediatric trauma patients present unique clinical challenges as compared to adults, including different mechanisms of injury, physiologic responses, and indications for operative versus nonoperative management. Splenic salvage techniques and nonoperative approaches are preferred to splenectomy in order to decrease perioperative risks, transfusion needs, duration/cost of hospitalization, and risk of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection. Early and accurate detection of splenic injury is critical in both adults and children; however, while imaging findings guide management in adults, hemodynamic stability is the primary determinant in pediatric patients. After initial diagnosis, the primary role of imaging in pediatric patients is to determine the level and duration of care. We present a comprehensive literature review regarding the mechanism of injury, imaging, management, and complications of traumatic splenic injury in pediatric patients. Multiple patients are presented with an emphasis on the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma organ injury grading system. Clinical practice guidelines from the American Pediatric Surgical Association are discussed and compared with our experience at a large community hospital, with recommendations for future practice guidelines. (orig.)

  18. VALIDITY OF PARACENTESIS IN DIAGNOSING BLUNT TRAUMA ABDOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Bin Abdul Majeed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Blunt abdominal trauma is a common case that comes to an emergency department and it is the most easily missed diagnosis resulting in catastrophic consequences. Delay in diagnosing a case is due to the nonspecific character of the symptoms with which it presents. Clinical signs that could be elicited in blunt trauma abdomen are equally nonspecific. Thus, to avoid delay and save the life of the patient, a doctor has to depend on various investigations to rule out blunt trauma abdomen. The modalities which help include paracentesis, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma (FAST and ContrastEnhanced Computed Tomography (CECT. To choose the right investigation for the right patient helps in saving precious lives. Validity of each investigation, availability, condition of the patient are the main points to look into before deciding on the right investigative modality. Paracentesis is the simplest investigation that could be done in emergency department and also at the site of accident to triage the patient. Paracentesis has low sensitivity to detect blunt trauma. FAST is a better investigation with higher validity rates than paracentesis. This study aims to validate paracentesis, which is the simplest and commonest investigation used to identify blunt abdominal trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, 106 patients who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were followed up by detailed history, clinical examination, paracentesis and FAST to identify blunt abdominal trauma and then compared with a gold standard investigation, which was assigned as CECT for haemodynamically stable patients and laparotomy for haemodynamically unstable patients. Commonest organs injured in blunt trauma and their management was noted. Patients were followed up till discharge or death. Subsequently, the data were compiled using excel sheet and evaluated using tables and charts. RESULTS Paracentesis is found to have a

  19. Aortic bifurcation tear following blunt trauma in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomo Yellinek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the abdominal aorta from blunt trauma is rare and aortic biforcation tear is extremely rare. We will present the management of a 2 year old boy who suffered blunt abdominal trauma and was operated in urgent fashion in our institution.

  20. Aortic bifurcation tear following blunt trauma in childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Yellinek, Shlomo; Gimelrich, Dimitri; Merin, Ofer; Reissman, Petachia; Arkovitz, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the abdominal aorta from blunt trauma is rare and aortic biforcation tear is extremely rare. We will present the management of a 2 year old boy who suffered blunt abdominal trauma and was operated in urgent fashion in our institution.

  1. Blunt abdominal trauma in Calabar | Asuquo | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the pattern and management outcome of blunt abdominal trauma in order to proffers solutions for its prevention and improved outcome. There were 55 cases of blunt abdominal trauma. The male: female ratio was 2.9:1 except in the first decade of the life with equal ratio. The age range ...

  2. Rupture of the left atrial roof due to blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Sam Youn; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2013-11-01

    Cardiac rupture after blunt trauma is rare and associated with high mortality. The anatomic pattern of blunt cardiac rupture has been demonstrated with the right cardiac chambers more frequently affected than the left. Furthermore, left atrial injury is usually restricted to the atrial appendage and the pulmonary vein-atrial junction. Herein, we report the first case of a 61-year old man with a rupture of the left atrial roof after blunt trauma with minimal thoracic injury.

  3. Rupture of the left atrial roof due to blunt trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Sam Youn; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac rupture after blunt trauma is rare and associated with high mortality. The anatomic pattern of blunt cardiac rupture has been demonstrated with the right cardiac chambers more frequently affected than the left. Furthermore, left atrial injury is usually restricted to the atrial appendage and the pulmonary vein–atrial junction. Herein, we report the first case of a 61-year old man with a rupture of the left atrial roof after blunt trauma with minimal thoracic injury.

  4. Coronary artery rupture in blunt thoracic trauma: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Hmeidan, Jareer Heider; Arrowaili, Arief Ismael; Yousef, Raid Said; Alasmari, Sami; Kassim, Yasser M; Aldakhil Allah, Hamad Hamad; Aljenaidel, Abdullah Mohammed; Alabdulqader, Abdullah Abdulmohsen; Alrashed, Muath Hamad; Alkhinjar, Mulfi Ibrahim; Al-Shammari, Nawwaf Rahi

    2016-08-02

    Blunt thoracic trauma can rarely result in coronary artery injury. Blunt trauma can result in occlusion of any of the coronary arteries or can lead to its rupture and bleeding. Traumatic coronary artery occlusion can lead to myocardial infarction, while its rupture and bleeding can result in hemopericardium and cardiac tamponade, and can be rapidly fatal. Survival after coronary artery rupture in blunt thoracic trauma is exceedingly rare. We present a case of a young male who sustained a blunt thoracic trauma in a motor vehicle collision, that resulted in rupture of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery and subsequent cardiac tamponade. Prompt surgical intervention with pericardiotomy and ligation of the artery has resulted in survival of the patient. In cases of traumatic coronary artery rupture, early surgical intervention is crucial to avoid mortality. Ligation of the injured coronary is a viable option in selected cases, and can be the most expeditious option in patients in extremis.

  5. Diagnosing Myocardial Contusion after Blunt Chest Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alborzi, Zahra; Zangouri, Vahid; Paydar, Shahram; Ghahramani, Zahra; Shafa, Masih; Ziaeian, Bizhan; Radpey, Mohammad Reza; Amirian, Armin; Khodaei, Shahin

    2016-04-13

    A myocardial contusion refers to a bruise of the cardiac muscle, the severity of which can vary depending on the severity of the injury and when the injury occurs. It is a major cause of rapid death which happens after blunt chest trauma and should be suspected at triage in the emergency department. We demonstrated that suspected myocardial contusion patients who have normal electrocardiograms (ECGs) and biomarker tests can be safely discharged. However, if the test results are abnormal, the next steps should be echocardiography and more advanced measures. Diagnosing myocardial contusion is very difficult because of its nonspecific symptoms. If a myocardial contusion happens, cardiogenic shock or arrhythmia must be anticipated, and the patient must be carefully monitored.

  6. Diagnosing Myocardial Contusion after Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alborzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A myocardial contusion refers to a bruise of the cardiac muscle, the severity of which can vary depending on the severity of the injury and when the injury occurs. It is a major cause of rapid death which happens after blunt chest trauma and should be suspected at triage in the emergency department. We demonstrated that suspected myocardial contusion patients who have normal electrocardiograms (ECGs and biomarker tests can be safely discharged. However, if the test results are abnormal, the next steps should be echocardiography and more advanced measures. Diagnosing myocardial contusion is very difficult because of its nonspecific symptoms. If a myocardial contusion happens, cardiogenic shock or arrhythmia must be anticipated, and the patient must be carefully monitored.

  7. Duodenal perforation as result of blunt abdominal trauma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartholt, Klaas Albert; Dekker, Jan Willem T

    2015-12-23

    Blunt abdominal trauma may cause severe intra-abdominal injuries, while clinical findings could be mild or absent directly after the trauma. The absence of clinical findings could mislead physicians into underestimating the severity of the injury at the primary survey, and inevitably leads to a delay in the diagnosis. The Blunt Abdominal Trauma in Children (BATiC) score may help to identify children who are at a high risk for intra-abdominal injuries in an early stage and requires additional tests directly. A case of a 10-year-old girl with a duodenal perforation after a blunt abdominal trauma is presented. A delay in diagnosis may lead to an increased morbidity and mortality rate. A low admission threshold for children with abdominal pain after a blunt trauma is recommended. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Complete heart block and asystole following blunt cardiac trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Morsy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac contusion is a well-recognized complication of blunt chest trauma. Various conduction system disorders have been reported in association with this condition, the most common being right bundle branch block. Complete heart block (CHB is seen rarely. Most cases of CHB are transient. We present the case of an 80-year-old woman who developed CHB and asystole following blunt cardiac trauma. Malignant cardiac arrhythmias such as CHB can be associated with blunt cardiac trauma. In most cases, CHB is transient resolving in days to weeks. In rare cases, however, CHB leads to asystole. Close monitoring and prompt intervention is thus required.

  9. [Management of blunt abdominal trauma in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, A; Guye, E; Diraduryan, N; Tardieu, D; Varlet, F

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiological and therapeutic management of blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) in children, with retrospective data. During 6 years (Nov 1995-Oct 2001), 92 children were hospitalised for BAT (mean age 9.5 years; 61.9% boys). Falls (45.6%) and motor vehicle accidents (43.5%) were the most frequent causes. The initial management included abdominal plain film X-ray and ultrasonography, and sometimes computed tomography (CT). The non-operative treatment was used, unless the patient was hemodynamically unstable or had hollow visceral injury, diaphragmatic rupture or renal artery rupture. Among 92 BAT, 52 were minor traumas and 40 were associated with one or several abdominal injuries. The sensitivity of ultrasonography to find hemoperitoneum and/or abdominal injuries was 80.3%, but the initial diagnosis of such lesions was accurate in 21 cases (52.5%) and delayed in 19 cases (47.5%), ranging from 1 to 7 days. In the delayed cases, the diagnosis was possible in nine cases with ultrasonography, in five cases with CT, but also with transaminase, amylase or lipase assays in two cases, and surgery in three cases. Twenty-nine children had a non-operative treatment and stayed in hospital about 12 days on average. Three children had surgery in emergency (two bowel perforations and one splenic rupture) and eight with delay (four renal ruptures, one associated splenic nodes, one pancreatic pseudocyst and one duodenal perforation). Only seven children (17.5%) required blood transfusion and no death occurred. In a trauma centre, the management of abdominal injuries is possible with ultrasonography and its sensitivity is correct without increasing of morbidity and mortality. But, if in doubt, a CT must be performed because its sensitivity is better. Most of the time, the children can benefit from non-operative treatment.

  10. [Malignant glaucoma following blunt trauma of the eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, T.; Klevering, B.J.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Ciliary block glaucoma most commonly occurs after intraocular surgery. We report a case of malignant glaucoma following blunt trauma of the eye with no previous surgery or laser. PATIENT: A 54-year-old female suffered from acute elevation of intraocular pressure on her right eye after blunt

  11. Blunt chest trauma: bony injury in the thorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreik, Nasri H; Francis, Irene; Ray, Arun; Rogers, Benedict A; Ricketts, David M

    2016-02-01

    The management of blunt chest trauma is an evolving concept with no clear current guidelines. This article explores the bony injuries associated with this, focusing on rib fractures and flail segments and the themes around investigation and best management.

  12. ALGORITHM OF MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH SUSPECTED BLUNT CARDIAC TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Gilarevsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Contemporary algorithm of diagnostic examination of patients with suspected blunt cardiac trauma is presented. General aspects of monitoring and treatment of such patients are also discussed. 

  13. Unrecognized blunt tracheal trauma with massive pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Shetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt neck trauma with an associated laryngotracheal injury is rare. We report a patient with blunt neck trauma who came to the emergency room and was sent to ward without realizing the seriousness of the situation. He presented later with respiratory distress and an anesthesiologist was called in for emergency airway management. Airway management in such a situation is described in this report.

  14. Does Helicopter Emergency Care Service Improve Blunt Trauma Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    NUMBERS Does Helicopter Emergency Care Service Improve Blunt Trauma Mortality 6. AUTHOR(S) Kenneth Duane Oefinger, Major 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...8217 = ’:" ’ _’ -. " 9 DOES HELICOPTER EMERGENCY CARE SE,’RV-E . IMPROVE BLUNT TRAUMA MORTALITY BY Major Kenneth Duane Oefina, USAF NC 4991 38 ,-ages Masters of...helicopter should be dispatched. This would allow for the monitoring of effective utilization of the hospital service. DOES HELICOPTER EMERGENCY CARE SERVICE

  15. Transient electrocardiographic abnormalities following blunt chest trauma in a child

    OpenAIRE

    Udink ten Cate, Floris; Heerde, van, Marc; Rammeloo, Lukas; Hruda, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Blunt cardiac injury may occur in patients after suffering nonpenetrating trauma of the chest. It encompasses a wide spectrum of cardiac injury with varied severity and clinical presentation. Electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently encountered. This article presents a case of a child who presented with complete right bundle branch block on the initial ECG at the emergency department. She suffered blunt chest trauma during a horseback riding accident. She was admitted for cardiac mon...

  16. Ascending aortic injuries following blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiumei; Hong, Jenny; Lowery, Robert; Goldstein, Steven; Wang, Zuyue; Lindsay, Joseph; Hill, Peter C; Corso, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    The diagnosis and the management of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries have undergone significant changes due to new technology and improved prehospital care. Most of the discussions have focused on descending aortic injuries. In this review, we discuss the recent management of ascending aortic injuries. We found 5 cohort studies on traumatic aortic injuries and 11 case reports describing ascending aortic injuries between 1998 to the present through Medline research. Among case reports, 78.9% of cases were caused by motor vehicle accidents (MVA). 42.1% of patients underwent emergent open repair and the operative mortality was 12.5%. 36.8% underwent delayed repair. Associated injuries occurred in 84.2% of patients. Aortic valve injury was concurrent in 26.3% of patients. The incidence of ascending aortic injury ranged 1.9-20% in cohort studies. Traumatic injuries to the ascending aorta are relatively uncommon among survivors following blunt trauma. Aortography has been replaced by computed tomography and echocardiography as a diagnostic tool. Open repair, either emergent or delayed, remains the treatment of choice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Blunt abdominal trauma and organ damage and its prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babk Abri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trauma is the first cause of death in the young population and imposes large costs on the health system. Due to high rates of trauma and its associated mortality in developing countries, it seems to be necessary to study epidemiological and demographic characteristics of the damage caused by blunt abdominal trauma and common organs involved and the prognosis. Methods: All patients with blunt trauma of the abdomen who referred to Imam Reza Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, from March 2012 up to March 2014 were enrolled, the data were collected by a questionnaire for each patient separately; then all data was analyzed by SPSS. Results: From March 2012 to March 2014, 332 patients with blunt abdominal trauma came to the emergency department, mean age was 34.15 ± 1.6 years and 63.9% of them were men. In 290 cases (83.3% there was not any damage to any organ. The most common injured organs were spleen and liver, equally 10 cases (3.0%. Kidney (2.4% bladder (1.8% and intestine (1.2% were also involved. In this study, the most common cause of blunt abdominal trauma was a car crash. Conclusion: According to this study, men consisted 63.9% cases of blunt abdominal trauma and the mean age of patients was 34.15 ± 1.6 years. The most common cause of blunt abdominal trauma was car crash. In this study, 87.3% cases did not have any intra-abdominal organ damage. Among patients with intra-abdominal organ damage, spleen and liver were most commonly involved with equal incidence. About 79.5% of all patients with blunt abdominal trauma were discharged without complication and morbidity.

  18. Left atrial rupture due to blunt thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, İlker; İnce, İlker; Aslan, Cemal; Çeber, Mehmet; Kaya, İlker

    2015-07-01

    Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is rare and associated with high mortality. The most popular theory of cardiac rupture after blunt thoracic trauma is rapid deceleration with disruption of the atria from their connections to the vena cava and pulmonary veins. In cases with both massive hemothorax and hemopericardium, injury can usually originate from the heart and/or major vessels. Surgical approach through the median sternotomy can provide convenience to repair the defect. In this article, successful treatment with median sternotomy of a 33-year-old male case with a rupture of the left atrium after blunt thoracic trauma was reported.

  19. Management of diaphragmatic rupture from blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, K K; Yan, Z Y; Vijayan, A; Chiu, M T

    2009-12-01

    Diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture is difficult, and delays could result in a catastrophic outcome. We reviewed our institution's management of patients with diaphragmatic rupture after blunt trauma. All patients in this study were treated at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, from March 2002 to October 2008. Patients with penetrating injuries were excluded. The parameters included age, mechanism of injury, haemodynamic status at admission, Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score, injury severity score (ISS), imaging studies, location of diaphragmatic injuries, associated injuries and outcome. 14 patients with a median age of 38 years formed the study group. Vehicular-related incidents accounted for 71.4 percent of the injuries. The median GCS score on admission was 14 (range 3-15), while the median systolic blood pressure and heart rate were 94 (range 50-164) mmHg and 110 (range 76-140) beats per minute, respectively. The median ISS was 41 (range 14-66). All had chest radiographs performed in the emergency department, six (42.9 percent) had computed tomography performed before surgery, while the remaining eight (57.1 percent) were sent straight to the operating theatre from the emergency department. There were five (35.7 percent) right-sided and nine (64.3 percent) left-sided diaphragmatic ruptures. The mortality rate was 35.7 percent. Some of the associated injuries included eight (57.1 percent) splenic lacerations, five (35.7 percent) haemothorax and lung injuries, four (28.6 percent) bone fractures and three (21.4 percent) liver lacerations. 12 (85.7 percent) patients underwent repair of the diaphragmatic rupture using interrupted polypropylene suture, while the remaining two (14.3 percent) were too haemodynamically unstable to undergo definitive treatment. Advanced age, haemodynamic instability and raised ISS were associated with mortality. An accurate diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture in trauma patients is difficult, and a thorough examination of both the

  20. Partial tearing of the interventricular septum after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ruiz, Nilson; Ramírez Gil, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac trauma after blunt chest trauma is a rare complication of patients arriving alive to an emergency department. We here present the case of patient who had a partial rupture of the interventricular septum after having had a blunt chest trauma in a traffic accident. As there was no ventricular septal defect, conservative management was deemed appropriate. At 3-year follow-up, the patient was free of right heart failure symptoms suggestive of the septal defect progression. Copyright © 2015 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. A Comprehensive Investigation of Comorbidities, Mechanisms, Injury Patterns, and Outcomes in Geriatric Blunt Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carlos V R; Rix, Kevin; Klein, Amanda L; Ford, Brent; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Aydelotte, Jayson; Coopwood, Ben; Ali, Sadia

    2016-11-01

    The geriatric population is growing and trauma providers are often tasked with caring for injuries in the elderly. There is limited information regarding injury patterns in geriatric trauma patients stratified by mechanism of injury. This study intends to investigate the comorbidities, mechanisms, injury patterns, and outcomes in geriatric blunt trauma patients. A retrospective study of the 2012 National Trauma Databank was performed. Adult blunt trauma patients were identified; geriatric (>/=65) patients were compared with younger (patients regarding admission demographics and vital signs, mechanism and severity of injury, and comorbidities. The primary outcome was injuries sustained and secondary outcomes included mortality, length of stay in the intensive care unit and hospital, and ventilator days. There were 589,830 blunt trauma patients who met the inclusion criteria, including 183,209 (31%) geriatric and 406,621 (69%) nongeriatric patients. Falls were more common in geriatric patients (79 vs 29%, P Geriatric patients less often had an Injury Severity Score >/=16 (18 vs 20%, P /=3 (24 vs 18%, P /=3 (24% vs 8%, P geriatric trauma patients. Geriatric patients overall present with a lower Injury Severity Score, but more often sustain severe injuries to the head and lower extremities. Injury patterns vary significantly between older and younger patients when stratified by mechanism. Mortality is significantly higher for geriatric trauma patients and older age is independently associated with mortality across all mechanisms.

  2. Bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaselli, Francesco; Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Firetto, Cristina; D'Elia, Domenico; Squitieri, Nevada Cioffi; Biondetti, Pietro Raimondo; Danza, Francesco Maria; Scaglione, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The bowel and the mesentery represent the third most frequently involved structures in blunt abdominal trauma after the liver and the spleen. Clinical assessment alone in patients with suspected intestinal and/or mesenteric injury from blunt abdominal trauma is associated with unacceptable diagnostic delays. Multi-detector computed tomography, thanks to its high spatial, time and contrast resolutions, allows a prompt identification and proper classification of such conditions. The radiologist, in fact, is asked not only to identify the signs of trauma but also to provide an indication of their clinical significance, suggesting the chance of conservative treatment in the cases of mild and moderate, non-complicated or self-limiting injuries and focusing on life-threatening conditions which may benefit from immediate surgical or interventional procedures. Specific and non-specific CT signs of bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma are reviewed in this paper.

  3. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hong Il [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  4. Severe blunt thoracic trauma: differences between adults and children in a level I trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, D L; den Hollander, D; Laing, G L; Rodseth, R N; Muckart, D J J

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death in the developing world. Blunt thoracic trauma represents a major burden of disease in both adults and children. Few studies have investigated the differences between these two patient groups. To compare mechanism of injury, presentation, management and outcome in children and adults with blunt thoracic trauma. Patients were identified from the database of the trauma intensive care unit at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, Durban, South Africa. Demographics and relevant data were extracted from a pre-existing database. Of 415 patients admitted to the unit, 331 (79.7%) were adults and 84 (20.2%) children aged injury severity score (ISS) was similar for both age groups (32 v. 34; p = 0.812). Adults had a higher lactate level at presentation (3.94 v. 2.60 mmol/L; p = 0.001). Of the children, 96.4% were injured in motor vehicle collisions, 75.0% as pedestrians. Compared with adults, children had significantly fewer rib fractures (20.2% v. 42.0%; p blunt cardiac injuries (BCIs) (9.5% v. 23.6%; p = 0.004), but sustained more lung contusions (79.8% v. 65.6%; p = 0.013). Mortality in children was significantly lower than in adults (16.7% v. 27.8%; p = 0.037). Thoracic injuries in children are the result of pedestrian collisions more often than in adults. They suffer fewer rib fractures and BCIs, but more lung contusions. Despite similar ISSs, children have significantly lower mortality than adults. More effort needs to be concentrated on child safety and preventing pedestrian injury.

  5. Isolated gallbladder rupture following blunt abdominal trauma | Gali ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gallbladder is a relatively well‑protected organ; consequently its rupture following blunt abdominal injury is rare and usually associated with other visceral injuries. Isolated gallbladder rupture is extremely rare. We report a healthy Nigerian adult male who sustained isolated gallbladder rupture following blunt abdominal ...

  6. [Penetrating cardiac injury in blunt trauma: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereli, Yüksel; Öncel, Murat

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac injuries may rarely be observed due to blunt thoracic traumas. Cardiac injury often creates a life-threatening condition requiring urgent surgical intervention, and follow-up of these patients should be carefully carried out in the perioperative period. These injuries depend on various factors including clinical presentation, type of injury, the time that passes until the patient reaches the hospital, bleeding, cardiac tamponade, or additional injuries. This article aimed to report a case who suffered penetrating cardiac injury in blunt thoracic trauma. Evaluated in the emergency department due to a motor vehicle accident, the 61-year-old male patient's chest x-ray revealed pulmonary contusion, rib fractures and cardiac tamponade. The patient was operated emergently. Right atrial injury was observed in the operation. The cardiac injury was repaired with primary suture technique. Cardiac injury in patients with blunt thoracic trauma is likely to be observed. In these patients, careful physical examination, early diagnosis, and treatment are very important.

  7. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Palas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  8. Are routine pelvic radiographs in major pediatric blunt trauma necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagisetty, Jyothi [Memorial Hermann Medical Center, Emergency Medicine Department, Houston, TX (United States); Slovis, Thomas [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Pediatric Imaging, Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States); Thomas, Ronald [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Detroit, MI (United States); Knazik, Stephen; Stankovic, Curt [Wayne State University of Medicine, Division of Emergency Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Screening pelvic radiographs to rule out pelvic fractures are routinely used for the initial evaluation of pediatric blunt trauma. Recently, the utility of routine pelvic radiographs in certain subsets of patients with blunt trauma has been questioned. There is a growing amount of evidence that shows the clinical exam is reliable enough to obviate the need for routine screening pelvic radiographs in children. To identify variables that help predict the presence or absence of pelvic fractures in pediatric blunt trauma. We conducted a retrospective study from January 2005 to January 2010 using the trauma registry at a level 1 pediatric trauma center. We analyzed all level 1 and level 2 trauma victims, evaluating history, exam and mechanism of injury for association with the presence or absence of a pelvic fracture. Of 553 level 1 and 2 trauma patients who presented during the study period, 504 were included in the study. Most of these children, 486/504 (96.4%), showed no evidence of a pelvic fracture while 18/504 (3.6%) had a pelvic fracture. No factors were found to be predictive of a pelvic fracture. However, we developed a pelvic fracture screening tool that accurately rules out the presence of a pelvic fracture P = 0.008, NPV 99, sensitivity 96, 8.98 (1.52-52.8). This screening tool combines eight high-risk clinical findings (pelvic tenderness, laceration, ecchymosis, abrasion, GCS <14, positive urinalysis, abdominal pain/tenderness, femur fracture) and five high-risk mechanisms of injury (unrestrained motor vehicle collision [MVC], MVC with ejection, MVC rollover, auto vs. pedestrian, auto vs. bicycle). Pelvic fractures in pediatric major blunt trauma can reliably be ruled out by using our pelvic trauma screening tool. Although no findings accurately identified the presence of a pelvic fracture, the screening tool accurately identified the absence of a fracture, suggesting that pelvic radiographs are not warranted in this subset of patients. (orig.)

  9. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; de Moya, Marc A.; Santos, Antonio; Asrani, Ashwin V.; Avery, Laura L.; Novelline, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI) suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI) at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG) and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an eleva...

  10. Blunt adrenal gland trauma in the pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Roupakias

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective review of the literature was performed to determine the natural history, prevalence, prognosis and management of adrenal injury associated with blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric population. Blunt adrenal injury in children is uncommon, rarely isolated, and typically present as part of a multi organ trauma. Adrenal hemorrhage is being diagnosed more frequently since the emergence of computed tomography in modern emergency rooms. Obstetric birth trauma during vaginal delivery of a macrosomic fetus may result in neonatal adrenal hemorrhage. In children appear to be an incidental finding that resolves on follow-up imaging. Most of these injuries are self-limited and do not require intervention. The differential diagnosis of an adrenal neoplasm, especially in children with an isolated adrenal hemorrhage, must be considered. The presence of adrenal hemorrhage in the absence of a trauma history should alert to the possibility of pediatric inflicted injury.

  11. Thyroid gland rupture after blunt neck trauma: A case report and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana-Garza, Sebastian; Juarez-Parra, Marco; Monterrubio-Rodríguez, Jeronimo; Cedillo-Alemán, Enrique; Orozco-Agüet, David; Zamudio-Vázquez, Zaire; Garza-Jasso, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Soft tissue injuries are relatively common after blunt neck trauma, because of its complex anatomy, many vital structures can be compromised. Isolated trauma to the thyroid is highly uncommon and there are few cases reported in the literature. Presentation of case A 19 year-old female patient with no known pathologies who sustained direct blunt trauma to the right frontal half of the neck after falling down from a stair case. She arrived at the ER with moderate neck swelling and pain. There were no visible hematomas and no respiratory compromise was noted. Contrast enhanced CT-scan showed rupture and hematoma of the right thyroid lobe; she underwent surgical exploration with hemi thyroidectomy and recovered uneventfully. Discussion Despite soft tissue injuries are relatively common after blunt neck trauma, isolated thyroid gland injury is extremely rare and is present in about 1–2% of the cases and in most of the cases there is an underlining pathology within the gland. Most patients arrived at the emergency room hemodynamically stable, presenting neck swelling, pain, respiratory distress, dysphagia and hoarseness. Diagnosis strategy should be focused to rule out respiratory or vascular compromise. Surgical exploration remains the most common treatment strategy. Conclusions Although the rarity of this condition, physicians should take in mind the possibility of thyroid injury after blunt neck trauma. Early detection and prompt treatment, can reduce life threatening complications. Management should be individualized to patient’s characteristics and surgeon’s experience. PMID:26001363

  12. The role of non-operative management (NOM) in blunt hepatic trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ayman Zaki Azzam

    2013-01-10

    Jan 10, 2013 ... Abstract Background: NOM in blunt hepatic trauma is the preferred treatment in otherwise sta- ble patients. Aim: To evaluate the role of NOM in blunt hepatic trauma, avoiding unnecessary surgery. Methods and patients: Forty-four patients who presented with blunt hepatic trauma were admitted.

  13. The role of non-operative management (NOM) in blunt hepatic trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: NOM in blunt hepatic trauma is the preferred treatment in otherwise stable patients. Aim: To evaluate the role of NOM in blunt hepatic trauma, avoiding unnecessary surgery. Methods and patients: Forty-four patients who presented with blunt hepatic trauma were admitted to the Emergency Unit. The patients ...

  14. Bronchial fracture following blunt chest trauma | Hitchcock | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Between 1848 and 1948 only 61 cases were reported and another 94 cases were reported in the following 10 years.' Hoed and Sloan' in 1959, in a comprehensive review of the world literature. found only 18 reports of traumatic tracheal rupture. Nevertheless, fractures of bronchi following blunt chest trauma are still rare ...

  15. Headache in traumatic brain injuries from blunt head trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Chelse, Ana B.; Epstein, Leon G.

    2015-01-01

    Investigators from New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital examined whether having an isolated headache following minor blunt head trauma was suggestive of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among a large cohort of children 2-18 years of age.

  16. Gastrointestinal injuries from blunt abdominal trauma in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The small intestine was involved in 11 patients, colon six, stomach five, duodenum one and rectum one. Seven (35%) ... Conclusion: Gastrointestinal injury from blunt abdominal trauma in children, though uncommon, carries a high mortality, usually from associated intraabdominal or extraabdominal injuries. East African ...

  17. Isolated gallbladder perforation following blunt abdominal trauma: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-05-12

    May 12, 2012 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Jul-Sep 2013 • Vol 16 • Issue 3. Case Report. Abstract. This is a case of a 21-year-old man who presented with history of abdominal pain following blunt abdominal trauma. Although the initial ultrasound scan showed mild free peritoneal fluid, the patient was managed ...

  18. incomplete uterine rupture following blunt trauma to the

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Blunt abdominal injury, incomplete uterine rupture, shock and active resuscitation. INTR()I)UC'l'ION ... The major causes of maternal trauma are vehicular .... The management of the condition, irrespective of the cause, is emergency exploratory laparotomy after adequate resuscitation, as was done in this patient3.

  19. Multidetector CT Findings of Bowel Transection in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, H.S.; Woo, J.Y.; Hong, H.S.; Park, M.H.; Ha, H.I.; Yang, I.; Lee, Y.; Jung, A.Y.; Hwang, J.Y.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in

  20. Blunt abdominal trauma: The role of focused abdominal sonography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ultrasound in early diagnosis of intra-abdominal injury following blunt abdominal trauma and follow up in patients with intraabdominal injury for detecting late complications. Materials and methods: 120 patients who presented to the emergency room were evaluated ...

  1. Blunt abdominal trauma: The role of focused abdominal sonography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samer Malak Boutros

    2015-02-28

    Feb 28, 2015 ... Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ultrasound in early diagnosis of intra-abdominal injury following blunt abdominal trauma and follow up in patients with intra- abdominal injury for detecting late complications. Materials and methods: 120 patients who presented to the ...

  2. Avulsion of the right main bronchus due to blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majdi Ibrahim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tracheobronchial disruption is an uncommon injury usually associated with severe blunt thoracic trauma. It rarely occurs in isolation. We report a case of isolated avulsion of the right main bronchus occurring after a high-speed car collision with severe head injury. Management of this condition is briefly discussed.

  3. Transient electrocardiographic abnormalities following blunt chest trauma in a child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Udink ten Cate, Floris; Heerde, van Marc; Rammeloo, Lukas; Hruda, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Blunt cardiac injury may occur in patients after suffering nonpenetrating trauma of the chest. It encompasses a wide spectrum of cardiac injury with varied severity and clinical presentation. Electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently encountered. This article presents a case of a child

  4. Protocol compliance and time management in blunt trauma resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanjersberg, W R; Bergs, E A; Mushkudiani, N; Klimek, M; Schipper, I B

    2009-01-01

    To study advanced trauma life support (ATLS) protocol adherence prospectively in trauma resuscitation and to analyse time management of daily multidisciplinary trauma resuscitation at a level 1 trauma centre, for both moderately and severely injured patients. All victims of severe blunt trauma were consecutively included. Patients with a revised trauma score (RTS) of 12 were resuscitated by a "minor trauma" team and patients with an RTS of less than 12 were resuscitated by a "severe trauma" team. Digital video recordings were used to analyse protocol compliance and time management during initial assessment. From 1 May to 1 September 2003, 193 resuscitations were included. The "minor trauma" team assessed 119 patients, with a mean injury severity score (ISS) of 7 (range 1-45). Overall protocol compliance was 42%, ranging from 0% for thoracic percussion to 93% for thoracic auscultation. The median resuscitation time was 45.9 minutes (range 39.7-55.9). The "severe team" assessed 74 patients, with a mean ISS of 22 (range 1-59). Overall protocol compliance was 53%, ranging from 4% for thoracic percussion to 95% for thoracic auscultation. Resuscitation took 34.8 minutes median (range 21.6-44.1). Results showed the current trauma resuscitation to be ATLS-like, with sometimes very low protocol compliance rates. Timing of secondary survey and radiology and thus time efficiency remains a challenge in all trauma patients. To assess the effect of trauma resuscitation protocols on outcome, protocol adherence needs to be improved.

  5. Optic Nerve Avulsion after Blunt Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Halil Karabulut

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve avulsion is an uncommon presentation of ocular trauma with a poor prognosis. It can be seen as complete or partial form due to the form of trauma. We assessed the complete optic nerve avulsion in a 16-year-old female patient complaining of loss of vision in her left eye after a traffic accident. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 249-51

  6. CT of blunt pancreatic trauma-A pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur [Diagnostic Radiology, National University Hospital, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119074 (Singapore)], E-mail: dnrskv@nus.edu.sg; Wan, John Mun Chin [Diagnostic Radiology, National University Hospital, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119074 (Singapore)

    2008-08-15

    Blunt trauma to pancreas is uncommon and clinical features are often non-specific and unreliable leading to possible delays in diagnosis and therefore increased morbidity. CT has been established as the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis of abdominal solid-organ injury in the blunt trauma patient. The introduction of multidetector-row CT allows for high resolution scans and multiplanar reformations that improve diagnosis. Detection of pancreatic injuries on CT requires knowledge of the subtle changes produced by pancreatic injury. The CT appearance of pancreatic injury ranges from a normal initial appearance of the pancreas to active pancreatic bleeding. Knowledge of CT signs of pancreatic trauma and a high index of suspicion is required in diagnosing pancreatic injury.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of secondary ultrasound exam in blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabzadeh Kanafi, Alireza; Giti, Masoumeh; Gharavi, Mohammad Hossein; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Pourghorban, Ramin; Shekarchi, Babak

    2014-08-01

    In stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, accurate diagnosis of visceral injuries is crucial. To determine whether repeating ultrasound exam will increase the sensitivity of focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) through revealing additional free intraperitoneal fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. We performed a prospective observational study by performing primary and secondary ultrasound exams in blunt abdominal trauma patients. All ultrasound exams were performed by four radiology residents who had the experience of more than 400 FAST exams. Five routine intraperitoneal spaces as well as the interloop space were examined by ultrasound in order to find free fluid. All patients who expired or were transferred to the operating room before the second exam were excluded from the study. All positive ultrasound results were compared with intra-operative and computed tomography (CT) findings and/or the clinical status of the patients. Primary ultrasound was performed in 372 patients; 61 of them did not undergo secondary ultrasound exam; thus, were excluded from the study.Three hundred eleven patients underwent both primary and secondary ultrasound exams. One hundred and two of all patients were evaluated by contrast enhanced CT scan and 31 underwent laparotomy. The sensitivity of ultrasound exam in detecting intraperitoneal fluid significantly increased from 70.7% for the primary exam to 92.7% for the secondary exam. Examining the interloop space significantly improved the sensitivity of ultrasonography in both primary (from 36.6% to 70.7%) and secondary (from 65.9% to 92.7%) exams. Performing a secondary ultrasound exam in stable blunt abdominal trauma patients and adding interloop space scan to the routine FAST exam significantly increases the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting intraperitoneal free fluid.

  8. Vascular injuries after blunt chest trauma: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, James V; Byrne, Christopher; Scalea, Thomas M; Griffith, Bartley P; Neschis, David G

    2009-09-14

    Although relatively rare, blunt injury to thoracic great vessels is the second most common cause of trauma related death after head injury. Over the last twenty years, the paradigm for management of these devastating injuries has changed drastically. The goal of this review is to update the reader on current concepts of diagnosis and management of blunt thoracic vascular trauma. A review of the medical literature was performed to obtain articles pertaining to both blunt injuries of the thoracic aorta and of the non-aortic great vessels in the chest. Articles were chosen based on authors' preference and clinical expertise. Blunt thoracic vascular injury remains highly lethal, with most victims dying prior to reaching a hospital. Those arriving in extremis require immediate intervention, which may include treatment of other associated life threatening injuries. More stable injuries can often be medically temporized in order to optimize definitive management. Endovascular techniques are being employed with increasing frequency and can often significantly simplify management in otherwise very complex patient scenarios.

  9. Vascular injuries after blunt chest trauma: diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffith Bartley P

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although relatively rare, blunt injury to thoracic great vessels is the second most common cause of trauma related death after head injury. Over the last twenty years, the paradigm for management of these devastating injuries has changed drastically. The goal of this review is to update the reader on current concepts of diagnosis and management of blunt thoracic vascular trauma. Methods A review of the medical literature was performed to obtain articles pertaining to both blunt injuries of the thoracic aorta and of the non-aortic great vessels in the chest. Articles were chosen based on authors' preference and clinical expertise. Discussion Blunt thoracic vascular injury remains highly lethal, with most victims dying prior to reaching a hospital. Those arriving in extremis require immediate intervention, which may include treatment of other associated life threatening injuries. More stable injuries can often be medically temporized in order to optimize definitive management. Endovascular techniques are being employed with increasing frequency and can often significantly simplify management in otherwise very complex patient scenarios.

  10. Conservative therapy for missed esophageal perforation after blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C E; Splittgerber, F; Ledgerwood, A M

    1986-11-01

    An 80-year-old man was treated, non-operatively, for a distal esophageal perforation, diagnosed nine days after blunt thoracic trauma. Emergency department diagnosis was impeded by absence of mediastinal air; right chest-wall emphysema was thought to result from associated rib fractures. Conservative therapy consisting of nasogastric suction, intravenous antibiotics, right-chest tube drainage of a large communicating empyema cavity, temporary nasotracheal intubation with ventilatory support, total parenteral nutrition, and, finally, nasoduodenal intubation for elemental feeding were employed. This mode of therapy may be best in comparable elderly patients with esophageal perforation that is overlooked during the initial 24 hours after injury. Possibly, routine barium swallow in all patients with chest-wall emphysema and rib fractures would circumvent missed esophageal rupture after blunt trauma.

  11. Bronchial and cardiac ruptures due to blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misao, Takahiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Aoe, Motoi; Iga, Norichika; Furukawa, Masashi; Suezawa, Takanori; Tago, Mamoru

    2011-03-01

    Tracheobronchial and cardiac injuries following blunt thoracic trauma are uncommon but can be life-threatening. We report a case in which the patient with bronchial and right atrial ruptures due to blunt trauma survived after emergent repairs. An 18-year-old female driver was transported to our hospital after a traffic accident and was hemodynamically stable on arrival. Chest computed tomography revealed cervicomediastinal emphysema and hemopericardium, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy showed a tear in the right main bronchus. She was intubated with a double-lumen endotracheal tube guided by bronchoscopy. A median sternotomy was undertaken, and a laceration of the right atrium was oversewn without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. After that, right-sided thoracotomy was performed. The tear in the membranous portion of the right main bronchus was repaired with interrupted sutures, and the suture lines were wrapped with a pedicled flap of intercostal muscle.

  12. Blunt Facial Trauma Causing Isolated Optic Nerve Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Parab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic optic neuropathy is an uncommon, yet serious, result of facial trauma. The authors present a novel case of a 59-year-old gentleman who presented with an isolated blunt traumatic left optic nerve hematoma causing vision loss. There were no other injuries or fractures to report. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of this rare injury and reviews the current literature and management of traumatic optic neuropathy.

  13. Penetrating cardiac injuries in blunt chest wall trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Menezes, Ritesh G; Sirohi, Parmendra

    2012-08-01

    The present photocase illustrates the possible mechanism of direct cardiac injuries from broken sharp jagged fractured ends of ribs in blunt force trauma to the chest in run over traffic mishaps. We propose that the projecting fractured ends of the ribs penetrate the underlying thoracic organs due to the transient phenomenon of deformation of chest cavity under pressure in run over traffic mishaps. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. Mothers’ Unresolved Trauma Blunts Amygdala Response to Infant Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sohye; Fonagy, Peter; Allen, Jon; Strathearn, Lane

    2014-01-01

    While the neurobiology of post-traumatic stress disorder has been extensively researched, much less attention has been paid to the neural mechanisms underlying more covert but pervasive types of trauma (e.g., those involving disrupted relationships and insecure attachment). Here, we report on a neurobiological study documenting that mothers’ attachment-related trauma, when unresolved, undermines her optimal brain response to her infant’s distress. We examined the amygdala blood oxygenation level-dependent response in 42 first-time mothers as they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning, viewing happy and sad face images of their own infant, along with those of a matched unknown infant. Whereas mothers with no trauma demonstrated greater amygdala responses to the sad faces of their own infant as compared to their happy faces, mothers who were classified as having unresolved trauma in the Adult Attachment Interview (Dynamic Maturational Model) displayed blunted amygdala responses when cued by their own infants’ sadness as compared to happiness. Unknown infant faces did not elicit differential amygdala responses between the mother groups. The blunting of the amygdala response in traumatized mothers is discussed as a neural indication of mothers’ possible disengagement from infant distress, which may be part of a process linking maternal unresolved trauma and disrupted maternal caregiving. PMID:24635646

  15. Upper abdominal visceral injury resulting from blunt trauma to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients who sustained severe blunt injury to the pelvis without external injury to the upper abdomen or lower chest, yet who were found to have a ruptured solid upper abdominal viscus, are reported. The first patient on delayed arrival revealed clinical features suggestive of intra-abdominal bleeding and was found to ...

  16. Routine Chest Computed Tomography and Patient Outcome in Blunt Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi, Nushin; Davoodabadi, Abdol Hossein; Atoof, Fatemeh; Razi, Seyed Ebrahim; Behnampour, Mehdi; Talari, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Computerized Tomography (CT) scan is gaining more importance in the initial evaluation of patients with multiple trauma, but its effect on the outcome is still unclear. Until now, no prospective randomized trial has been performed to define the role of routine chest CT in patients with blunt trauma. Objectives: In view of the considerable radiation exposure and the high costs of CT scan, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of performing the routine chest CT on the outcome as well as complications in patients with blunt trauma. Patients and Methods: After approval by the ethics board committee, 100 hemodynamically stable patients with high-energy blunt trauma were randomly divided into two groups. For group one (control group), only chest X-ray was requested and further diagnostic work-up was performed by the decision of the trauma team. For group two, a chest X-ray was ordered followed by a chest CT, even if the chest X-ray was normal. Injury severity, total hospitalization time, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission time, duration of mechanical ventilation and complications were recorded. Data were evaluated using t-test, Man-Whitney and chi-squared test. Results: No significant differences were found regarding the demographic data such as age, injury severity and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Thirty-eight percent additional findings were seen in chest CT in 26% of the patients of the group undergoing routine chest CT, leading to 8% change in management. The mean of in-hospital stay showed no significant difference in both groups with a P value of 0.098. In addition, the mean ICU stay and ventilation time revealed no significant differences (P values = 0.102 and 0.576, respectively). Mortality rate and complications were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Performing the routine chest CT in high-energy blunt trauma patients (with a mean injury severity of 9), although leading to the diagnosis of some occult injuries, has no impact on the outcome

  17. Imaging of blunt chest trauma; Bildgebung des stumpfen Thoraxtraumas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosch, H. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Negrin, L. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Wien (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [German] Stumpfe Thoraxtraumen gehen mit einer hohen Morbiditaet und Mortalitaet einher. Daher sollten Patienten mit Verdacht auf ein stumpfes Thoraxtrauma rasch radiologisch untersucht werden, damit die entsprechenden therapeutischen Schritte zeitgerecht eingeleitet werden koennen. Zur Abklaerung von Patienten nach einem stumpfen Thoraxtrauma sind seit Jahren das konventionelle Lungenroentgen und die Computertomographie bewaehrte Verfahren. In den letzten Jahren hat die fokussierte Ultraschalluntersuchung (eFAST, Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma) von schwerverletzten Patienten vermehrt an Bedeutung gewonnen. Durch eine eFAST-Untersuchung kann in der Akutphase rasch geklaert werden, ob bei dem Patienten ein therapiebeduerftiger Pneumothorax, Haematoperikard oder Haematothorax vorliegen. Auch das Lungenroentgen wird zur Diagnose eines Pneumothorax oder Haematothorax eingesetzt, wenngleich seine Sensitivitaet deutlich eingeschraenkt ist. Die CT ist das diagnostische Verfahren der Wahl, um v. a. Patienten mit einem schweren Thoraxtrauma abzuklaeren. (orig.)

  18. Lessons from a large trauma center: impact of blunt chest trauma in polytrauma patients-still a relevant problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysou, Konstantina; Halat, Gabriel; Hoksch, Beatrix; Schmid, Ralph A; Kocher, Gregor J

    2017-04-20

    Thoracic trauma is the third most common cause of death after abdominal injury and head trauma in polytrauma patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate epidemiological data, treatment and outcome of polytrauma patients with blunt chest trauma in order to help improve management, prevent complications and decrease polytrauma patients' mortality. In this retrospective study we included all polytrauma patients with blunt chest trauma admitted to our tertiary care center emergency department for a 2-year period, from June 2012 until May 2014. Data collection included details of treatment and outcome. Patients with chest trauma and Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥18 and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) >2 in more than one body region were included. A total of 110 polytrauma patients with blunt chest injury were evaluated. 82 of them were males and median age was 48.5 years. Car accidents, falls from a height and motorbike accidents were the most common causes (>75%) for blunt chest trauma. Rib fractures, pneumothorax and pulmonary contusion were the most common chest injuries. Most patients (64.5%) sustained a serious chest injury (AISthorax 3), 19.1% a severe chest injury (AISthorax 4) and 15.5% a moderate chest injury (AISthorax 2). 90% of patients with blunt chest trauma were treated conservatively. Chest tube insertion was indicated in 54.5% of patients. The need for chest tube was significantly higher among the AISthorax 4 group in comparison to the AIS groups 3 and 2 (p chest trauma did not correlate with ICU length of stay, intubation days, complications or mortality. Although 84.5% of patients suffered from serious or even severe chest injury, neither in the conservative nor in the surgically treated group a significant impact of injury severity on ICU stay, intubation days, complications or mortality was observed. AISthorax was only related to the rate of chest tube insertions and ICU admission. Management with early chest tube insertion when

  19. Blunt trauma as a suspected cause of delayed constrictive pericarditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabia Francisco A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Constrictive pericarditis is a heterogeneous disease with many causes. Traumatic hemopericardium is an uncommon initiating cause. We report the case of a man developing constrictive pericarditis after blunt chest trauma, in order to highlight an approach to diagnosing the condition and to raise awareness of the possibility of this condition developing after blunt trauma. Case presentation A 72-year-old Caucasian man presented initially to our outpatient clinic with a one-year history of progressively worsening dyspnea, and recent onset of edema of the legs. He was later taken to the emergency department and admitted to hospital. He had previously received unsuccessful treatment from his local primary physicians for suspected respiratory disorder and cellulitis of his legs. Echocardiography showed evidence of pericardial constriction, and computed tomography revealed nodular, lobulated thickening of the pericardium and pleura bilaterally. Interventional biopsies were taken, but gave inconclusive results. Thus, as pericarditis and/or advanced malignancy were suspected, diagnostic video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was performed to take biopsies from the abnormal lung and pericardial tissue. Examination of these supported the diagnosis of pericarditis, as acute and chronic inflammation and fibrous thickening were found, with no evidence of malignancy. Our patient underwent cardiac catheterization, which revealed three-vessel coronary artery disease. Emergency total pericardiectomy and coronary bypass were performed. Having excluded other common initiating factors, we considered that a blunt trauma that our patient had previously sustained to his chest was the potential cause of the constrictive pericarditis. Conclusion This was an interesting case of blunt chest trauma followed by progressive pericardial and pleural thickening. Subsequent development of chronic constrictive pericarditis occurred, requiring treatment by

  20. Delayed presentation of a sigmoid colon injury following blunt abdominal trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertugrul Gokhan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The low incidence of colon injury due to blunt abdominal trauma and the lack of a definitive diagnostic method for the same can lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment, subsequently resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman with sigmoid colon injury was admitted to our emergency department after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma. Her physical examination findings and laboratory results led to a decision to perform a laparotomy; exploration revealed a sigmoid colon injury that was treated by sigmoid loop colostomy. Conclusions Surgical abdominal exploration revealed gross fecal contamination and a perforation site. Intra-abdominal irrigation and a sigmoid loop colostomy were performed. Our patient was discharged on post-operative day six without any problems. Closure of the sigmoid loop colostomy was performed three months after the initial surgery.

  1. Prior blunt chest trauma may be a cause of single vessel coronary disease; hypothesis and review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Nielsen, PE; Sleight, P

    2006-01-01

    Prompted by a case where a patient (with no risk factors, and single vessel disease) developed angina pectoris after previous blunt chest trauma, we searched Medline for blunt chest trauma and myocardial ischaemia. We found 77 cases describing AMI after blunt chest trauma, but only one reporting...... angina pectoris. We focused on the age and sex distribution, type of trauma, the angiography findings and the time interval between the trauma and the angiography. The age distribution was atypical, compared to AMI in general; 82% of the patients with AMI after blunt chest trauma were less than 45 years......, which strongly suggested a causal relation between the trauma and subsequent occlusion. AMI should therefore be considered in patients suffering from chest pain after blunt chest trauma. Because traumatic AMI might often be the result of an intimal tear or dissection, thrombolytic therapy might worsen...

  2. Distal thoracic oesophageal perforation secondary to blunt trauma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandon Ruchi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic perforation of the distal oesophagus due to blunt trauma is a very rare condition and is still associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. This is further exacerbated by delayed diagnosis and management as symptoms and signs are often masked by or ascribed to more common blunt thoracic injuries. Case report We present a case of a distal oesophageal perforation, secondary to a fall from a third storey window, which was masked by concomitant thoracic injuries and missed on both computed tomography imaging and laparotomy. The delay in his diagnosis significantly worsened the patient's recovery by allowing the development of an overwhelming chest sepsis that contributed to his death. Conclusion Early identification of an intrathoracic oesophageal perforation requires deliberate consideration and is essential to ensure a favorable outcome. Treatment should be individualised taking into account the nature of the oesophageal defect, time elapsed from injury and the patient's general condition.

  3. Rib fractures in blunt chest trauma - associated thoracic injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iv. Dimitrov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE. The aim of our retrospective study was to analyze the patterns of associated thoracic injuries in patients underwent blunt chest trauma and rib fractures. METHODS. The study included 212 patients with rib fractures due to blunt thoracic trauma. The mechanism of trauma, the type of rib fracture and the type of associated injuries were analyzed. RESULTS. The patients were divided in two groups according to the number of fractured ribs-group I included the patients with up to two fractured ribs (72 patients-33,9%, and group II – with ≥3 fractured ribs (140 patients-66,1%. Associated chest injuries were present in 36 of the patients from group I (50%, and in 133 patients from group II (95%. Pulmonary contusion was the most common intrathoracicinjurie-65,6% of the cases. The mean hospital stay was 8, 7 days. The lethality rate was 16,9% -all of them due to the associated chest injuries. CONCLUSIONS. The mortality related to rib fractures is affected by the associated thoracic injuries, the advanced age, and the number of fractured ribs.

  4. Behind armour blunt trauma--an emerging problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, L

    2001-02-01

    Behind Armour Blunt Trauma (BABT) is the non-penetrating injury resulting from the rapid deformation of armours covering the body. The deformation of the surface of an armour in contact with the body wall arises from the impact of a bullet or other projectile on its front face. The deformation is part of the retardation and energy absorbing process that captures the projectile. In extreme circumstances, the BABT may result in death, even though the projectile has not perforated the armour. An escalation of the available energy of bullets and the desire of armour designers to minimise the weight and bulk of personal armour systems will increase the risk of BABT in military and security forces personnel. In order to develop materials that can be interposed between the armour and the body wall to attenuate the transfer of energy into the body, it is essential that the mechanism of BABT is known. There is a great deal of activity within UK and NATO to unravel the interactions; the mechanism is likely to be a combination of stress (pressure) waves generated by the rapid initial motion of the rear of the armour, and shear deformation to viscera produced by gross deflection of the body wall. Physical and computer model systems are under development to characterise the biophysical processes and provide performance targets for materials to be placed between armours and the body wall in order to attenuate the injuries (trauma attenuating backings-TABs). The patho-physiological consequences of BABT are being clarified by research, but the injuries will have some of the features of blunt chest trauma observed in road traffic accidents and other forms of civilian blunt impact injury. The injuries also have characteristics of primary blast injury. An overview diagnosis and treatment is described.

  5. Headache in traumatic brain injuries from blunt head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Hoyle, John; Atabaki, Shireen; Tunik, Michael G; Lichenstein, Richard; Miskin, Michelle; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    To determine the risk of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in children with headaches after minor blunt head trauma, particularly when the headaches occur without other findings suggestive of TBIs (ie, isolated headaches). This was a secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of children 2 to 18 years with minor blunt head trauma (ie, Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 14-15). Clinicians assessed the history and characteristics of headaches at the time of initial evaluation, and documented findings onto case report forms. Our outcome measures were (1) clinically important TBI (ciTBI) and (2) TBI visible on computed tomography (CT). Of 27 495 eligible patients, 12 675 (46.1%) had headaches. Of the 12 567 patients who had complete data, 2462 (19.6%) had isolated headaches. ciTBIs occurred in 0 of 2462 patients (0%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0%-0.1%) in the isolated headache group versus 162 of 10 105 patients (1.6%; 95% CI: 1.4%-1.9%) in the nonisolated headache group (risk difference, 1.6%; 95% CI: 1.3%-1.9%). TBIs on CT occurred in 3 of 456 patients (0.7%; 95% CI: 0.1%-1.9%) in the isolated headache group versus 271 of 6089 patients (4.5%; 95% CI: 3.9%-5.0%) in the nonisolated headache group (risk difference, 3.8%; 95% CI: 2.3%-4.5%). We found no significant independent associations between the risk of ciTBI or TBI on CT with either headache severity or location. ciTBIs are rare and TBIs on CT are very uncommon in children with minor blunt head trauma when headaches are their only sign or symptom. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

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    Rathachai Kaewlai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4 in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7, eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P<0.001.

  7. A comparison study of pelvic fractures and associated abdominal injuries between pediatric and adult blunt trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaid, Forat; Peleg, Kobi; Alfici, Ricardo; Olsha, Oded; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2017-03-01

    Pelvic fractures are a marker of severe injury, mandating a thorough investigation for the presence of associated injuries. Anatomical and physiological differences between adults and children may lead to a different impact of pelvic fractures on these populations. The purpose of this study is to compare pelvic fractures between pediatric and adult blunt trauma victims, mainly regarding their severity and associated intraabdominal injuries. A retrospective study involving blunt trauma patients suffering pelvic fractures, according to the records of the Israeli National Trauma Registry. Patients included children, aged 0-14years, and adults between 15 and 64years. The presence and severity of associated injuries were assessed. Overall, 7621 patients aged 0-64years were identified with pelvic fractures following blunt trauma. The incidence of pelvic fractures in children was (0.8%), as compared to 4.3% in adults, p 25. Adults sustained significantly more moderate to severe pelvic fractures (AIS≥3) than children (26.7% vs. 17.4%, ptrauma are more likely to sustain pelvic fractures, and these are generally more severe fractures, as compared to children suffering from blunt trauma. Nonetheless, mortality rates were found similar in both groups. The only associated injury with statistically significant difference in incidence among the two groups was rectal injury. In adults, but not in children, higher grade pelvic fractures correlated with more severe concomitant splenic or hepatic injuries. The level of evidence for this study is III (3). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A large ventricular septal defect complicating resuscitation after blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry D I De′Ath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A young adult pedestrian was admitted to hospital after being hit by a car. On arrival to the Accident and Emergency Department, the patient was tachycardic, hypotensive, hypoxic, and acidotic with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 3. Despite initial interventions, the patient remained persistently hypotensive. An echocardiogram demonstrated a traumatic ventricular septal defect (VSD with right ventricular strain and increased pulmonary artery pressure. Following a period of stabilization, open cardiothoracic surgery was performed and revealed an aneurysmal septum with a single large defect. This was repaired with a bovine patch, resulting in normalization of right ventricular function. This case provides a vivid depiction of a large VSD in a patient following blunt chest trauma with hemodynamic compromise. In all thoracic trauma patients, and particularly those poorly responsive to resuscitation, VSDs should be considered. Relevant investigations and management strategies are discussed.

  9. Thyroid gland rupture caused by blunt trauma to the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hirotaka; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2016-02-19

    Thyroid rupture following blunt trauma is extremely rare, and neck pain without swelling may be the only presenting symptom. However, hemorrhage and hematoma subsequently causes severe tracheal compression and respiratory distress. A 71-year-old Japanese woman visited our emergency room with a complaint of increasing right-sided neck pain at the thyroid cartilage level after she tripped and accidentally hit her neck against a pole 3 h back. On admission, her vital signs were stable. There was no swelling or subcutaneous emphysema. Laryngeal endoscopy revealed mild laryngeal edema, although there was no impairment in vocal fold mobility on either side. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed rupture of the right lobe of the thyroid gland accompanied by a large hematoma extending from the neck to the mediastinum. Under general anesthesia, the right lobe was resected and the hematoma was evacuated. Only a few isolated cases of thyroid rupture caused by blunt neck trauma have been reported in patients with normal thyroid glands and neck pain without swelling may be the only presenting symptom. When suspected, CT should be performed to confirm the diagnosis determine the optimal treatment.

  10. Blunt cardiac trauma: lessons learned from the medical examiner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro G R; Georgiou, Chrysanthos; Inaba, Kenji; Dubose, Joseph; Plurad, David; Chan, Linda S; Toms, Carla; Noguchi, Thomas T; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze autopsy findings after blunt traumatic deaths to identify the incidence of cardiac injuries and describe the patterns of associated injuries. All autopsies performed by the Los Angeles County Forensic Medicine Division for blunt traumatic deaths in 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Only cases that underwent a full autopsy including internal examination were included in the analysis. The study population was divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of a cardiac injury and compared for differences in baseline characteristics and types of associated injuries. Of the 881 fatal victims of blunt trauma received by the Los Angeles County Forensic Medicine Division, 304 (35%) underwent a full autopsy with internal examination and were included in the analysis. The mean age was 43 years +/- 21 years, patients were more often men (71%) and were intoxicated in 39% of the cases. The most common mechanism was motor vehicle collision (50%), followed by pedestrian struck by auto (37%), and 32% had a cardiac injury. Death at the scene was significantly more common in patients with a cardiac injury (78% vs. 65%, p = 0.02). The right chambers were the most frequently injured (30%, right atrium; 27%, right ventricle). Among the 96 patients with cardiac injuries, 64% had transmural rupture. Multiple chambers were ruptured in 26%, the right atrium in 25%, and the right ventricle in 20% of these patients. Patients with cardiac injuries were significantly more likely to have other associated injuries: thoracic aorta (47% vs. 27%, p = 0.001), hemothorax (81% vs. 59%, p injury (77% vs. 48%, p cardiac injury. Of the 96 patients with a cardiac injury, 78% died at the scene of the crash and 22% died en route or at the hospital. Cardiac injury is a common autopsy finding after blunt traumatic fatalities, with the majority of deaths occurring at the scene. Patients with cardiac injuries are at significantly increased risk for

  11. Predictors of "occult" intra-abdominal injuries in blunt trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, José Gustavo; Malpaga, Juliano Mangini Dias; Olliari, Camilla Bilac; Perlingeiro, Jacqueline A G; Soldá, Silvia C; Assef, José Cesar

    2015-01-01

    to assess predictors of intra-abdominal injuries in blunt trauma patients admitted without abdominal pain or abnormalities on the abdomen physical examination. We conducted a retrospective analysis of trauma registry data, including adult blunt trauma patients admitted from 2008 to 2010 who sustained no abdominal pain or abnormalities on physical examination of the abdomen at admission and were submitted to computed tomography of the abdomen and/or exploratory laparotomy. Patients were assigned into: Group 1 (with intra-abdominal injuries) or Group 2 (without intra-abdominal injuries). Variables were compared between groups to identify those significantly associated with the presence of intra-abdominal injuries, adopting ptrauma mechanism (ptrauma mechanism (p=0.008 - OR 2.85; 95%CI 1.13-6.22) and abnormal neurological physical exam at admission (p=0.015 - OR 0.44; 95%CI 0.22-0.85). Intra-abdominal injuries were predominantly associated with trauma mechanism and presence of chest injuries.

  12. Blunt abdominal aortic injury: a Western Trauma Association multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhub, Sherene; Starnes, Benjamin W; Brenner, Megan L; Biffl, Walter L; Azizzadeh, Ali; Inaba, Kenji; Skiada, Dimitra; Zarzaur, Ben; Nawaf, Cayce; Eriksson, Evert A; Fakhry, Samir M; Paul, Jasmeet S; Kaups, Krista L; Ciesla, David J; Todd, S Rob; Seamon, Mark J; Capano-Wehrle, Lisa M; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2014-12-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is a rare injury. The objective of the current study was to examine the presentation and management of BAAI at a multi-institutional level. The Western Trauma Association Multi-Center Trials conducted a study of BAAI from 1996 to 2011. Data collected included demographics, injury mechanism, associated injuries, interventions, and complications. Of 392,315 blunt trauma patients, 113 (0.03%) presented with BAAI at 12 major trauma centers (67% male; median age, 38 years; range, 6-88; median Injury Severity Score [ISS], 34; range, 16-75). The leading cause of injury was motor vehicle collisions (60%). Hypotension was documented in 47% of the cases. The most commonly associated injuries were spine fractures (44%) and pneumothorax/hemothorax (42%). Solid organ, small bowel, and large bowel injuries occurred in 38%, 35%, and 28% respectively. BAAI presented as free aortic rupture (32%), pseudoaneurysm (16%), and injuries without aortic external contour abnormality on computed tomography such as large intimal flaps (34%) or intimal tears (18%). Open and endovascular repairs were undertaken as first-choice therapy in 43% and 15% of cases, respectively. Choice of management varied by type of BAAI: 89% of intimal tears were managed nonoperatively, and 96% of aortic ruptures were treated with open repair. Overall mortality was 39%, the majority (68%) occurring in the first 24 hours because of hemorrhage or cardiac arrest. The highest mortality was associated with Zone II aortic ruptures (92%). Follow-up was documented in 38% of live discharges. This is the largest BAAI series reported to date. BAAI presents as a spectrum of injury ranging from minimal aortic injury to aortic rupture. Nonoperative management is successful in uncomplicated cases without external aortic contour abnormality on computed tomography. Highest mortality occurred in free aortic ruptures, suggesting that alternative measures of early noncompressible torso hemorrhage

  13. Concomitant hollow viscus injuries in patients with blunt hepatic and splenic injuries: an analysis of a National Trauma Registry database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaid, Forat; Peleg, Kobi; Alfici, Ricardo; Matter, Ibrahim; Olsha, Oded; Ashkenazi, Itamar; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2014-09-01

    Non-operative management has become the standard approach for treating stable patients sustaining blunt hepatic or splenic injuries in the absence of other indications for laparotomy. The liberal use of computed tomography (CT) has reduced the rate of unnecessary immediate laparotomies; however, due to its limited sensitivity in the diagnosis of hollow viscus injuries (HVI), this may be at the expense of a rise in the incidence of missed HVI. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of concomitant HVI in blunt trauma patients diagnosed with hepatic and/or splenic injuries, and to evaluate whether a correlation exists between this incidence and the severity of hepatic or splenic injuries. A retrospective cohort study involving blunt trauma patients with splenic and/or liver injuries, between the years 1998 and 2012 registered in the Israel National Trauma Registry. The association between the presence and severity of splenic and/or liver injuries and the incidence of HVI was examined. Of the 57,130 trauma victims identified as suffering from blunt torso injuries, 2335 (4%) sustained hepatic injuries without splenic injuries (H group), 3127 (5.4%) had splenic injuries without hepatic injuries (S group), and 564 (1%) suffered from both hepatic and splenic injuries (H+S group). Overall, 957 patients sustained 1063 HVI. The incidence of HVI among blunt torso trauma victims who sustained neither splenic nor hepatic injuries was 1.5% which is significantly lower than in the S (3.1%), H (3.1%), and H+S (6.7%) groups. In the S group, there was a clear correlation between the severity of the splenic injury and the incidence of HVI. This correlation was not found in the H group. The presence of blunt splenic and/or hepatic injuries predicts a higher incidence of HVI, especially if combined. While in blunt splenic injury patients there is a clear correlation between the incidence of HVI and the severity of splenic injury, such a correlation does not exist in patients

  14. Transanal evisceration of bowel loops due to blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quraishi Abdul Haque

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of a five-year-old boy who sustained closed abdominal trauma with rectal tear and evisceration of ileum and sigmoid colon per anum, is presented. He was managed successfully with resection anastomosis of ileum and sigmoid colostomy, which was closed subsequently. The relevant literature is also reviewed.

  15. Extremity compartment syndrome following blunt trauma: a level I trauma center's 5-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchelli, Daniel; Divaris, Nicholas; McCormack, Jane E; Huang, Emily C; Chaudhary, Neeta D; Vosswinkel, James A; Jawa, Randeep S

    2017-09-01

    Extremity compartment syndrome is a recognized complication of trauma. We evaluated its prevalence and outcomes at a suburban level 1 trauma center. The trauma registry was reviewed for all blunt trauma patients aged ≥18 years, admitted between 2010 and 2014. Chart review of patients with extremity compartment syndrome was performed. Of 6180 adult blunt trauma admissions, 83 patients developed 86 extremity compartment syndromes; two patients had compartment syndromes on multiple locations. Their (n = 83) median age was 44 years (interquartile range: 31.5-55.5). The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle/motor cycle accident (45.8%) followed by a fall (21.7%). The median injury severity score was 9 (interquartile range: 5-17); 65.1% had extremity abbreviate injury score ≥3. Notably, 15 compartment syndromes did not have an underlying fracture. Among patients with fractures, the most commonly injured bone was the tibia, with tibial plateau followed by tibial diaphyseal fractures being the most frequent locations. Fasciotomies were performed, in order of frequency, in the leg (n = 53), forearm (n = 15), thigh (n = 9), foot (n = 5), followed by multiple or other locations. Extremity compartment syndrome was a relatively uncommon finding. It occurred in all extremity locations, with or without an associated underlying fracture, and from a variety of mechanisms. Vigilance is warranted in evaluating the compartments of patients with extremity injuries following blunt trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sternal fractures and delayed cardiac tamponade due to a severe blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huai-min; Chen, Qiu-lin; Zhang, Er-yong; Hu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Sternal fractures caused by blunt chest trauma are associated with an increased incidence of cardiac injury. Reports of the incidence of cardiac injury associated with sternal fracture range from 18% to 62%. Delayed cardiac tamponade is a rare phenomenon that appears days or weeks after injury. Moreover, after nonpenetrating chest trauma, cardiac tamponade is very rare and occurs in less than 1 of 1000. This case describes a patient who had delayed cardiac tamponade 17 days after a severe blunt chest trauma.

  17. Non-operative versus operative treatment for blunt pancreatic trauma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Michael V; Wettergren, André; Hillingsø, Jens Georg

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic trauma in children is a serious condition with high morbidity. Blunt traumatic pancreatic lesions in children can be treated non-operatively or operatively. For less severe, grade I and II, blunt pancreatic trauma a non-operative or conservative approach is usually employed....... Currently, the optimal treatment, of whether to perform operative or non-operative treatment of severe, grade III to V, blunt pancreatic injury in children is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of operative versus non-operative treatment of blunt pancreatic trauma in children. SEARCH...... proceeding abstracts and clinical trials registries. We conducted the search on the 21 June 2013. SELECTION CRITERIA: We planned to select all randomised clinical trials investigating non-operative versus operative treatment of blunt pancreatic trauma in children, irrespective of blinding, publication status...

  18. Cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation after blunt chest trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2017-06-17

    Cardiac tamponade due to aortic injury after blunt trauma is a rare and potentially fatal injury. Most aortic injuries caused by blunt trauma present as aortic dissection or rupture of the aortic isthmus. Several cases of delayed aortic injury have been reported. However, all of these injuries were observed in the descending aorta because they had been caused by a posterior rib fracture. We report the first case of cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation 2 weeks after blunt trauma. The patient was an 81-year-old man. In cases of blunt chest trauma, delayed ascending aortic injury causing cardiac tamponade is possible associated with various causes such as direct injury by fractured rib or delayed aortic perforation of initial blunt injury.

  19. The Effect of Sarcopenia on Outcomes in Geriatric Blunt Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahdi; Bridgham, Kelly; Jaap, Kathryn; Erwin, Ryan; Widom, Kenneth; Rapp, Megan; Leonard, Diane; Baro, Susan; Dove, James; Hunsinger, Marie; Blansfield, Joseph; Shabahang, Mohsen; Torres, Denise; Wild, Jeffrey

    2017-11-01

    Elderly patients are at a higher risk of morbidity and mortality after trauma, which is reflected through higher frailty indices. Data collection using existing frailty indices is often not possible because of brain injury, dementia, or inability to communicate with the patient. Sarcopenia is a reliable objective measure for frailty that can be readily assessed in CT imaging. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of sarcopenia on the outcomes of geriatric blunt trauma patients. Left psoas area (LPA) was measured at the level of the third lumbar vertebra on the axial CT images. LPA was normalized for height (LPA mm2/m2) and after stratification by gender, sarcopenia was defined as LPA measurements in the lowest quartile. A total of 1175 patients consisting of 597 males and 578 females were studied. LPAs below 242.6 mm2/m2 in males and below 187.8 mm2/m2 in females were considered to be sarcopenic. We found sarcopenia in 149 males and 145 females. In multivariate analysis, sarcopenia was associated with a higher risk of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR]: 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-2.56) and a higher risk of discharge to less favorable destinations (OR: 1.42, 95% CI: 1.05-1.97). Lastly, sarcopenic patients had an increased risk of prolonged hospitalization (hazard ratio: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.04-1.40).

  20. Conservative Management of Azygous Vein Rupture in Blunt Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cian McDermott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of successful conservative management of acute traumatic rupture of the azygous vein. A 48-year-old male was involved in a motor vehicle collision. Primary survey revealed acute right intrathoracic haemorrhage. He remained haemodynamically stable with rapid infusion of warmed crystalloid solution and blood. Computed tomographic imaging showed a contained haematoma of the azygous vein. The patient was managed conservatively in the intensive care. Azygous vein laceration resulting from blunt thoracic trauma is a rare condition that carries a universally poor prognosis unless the appropriate treatment is instituted. Clinical features include acute hypovolaemic shock, widened mediastinum on chest radiograph, and a right-sided haemothorax. Haemodynamic collapse necessitates immediate resuscitative thoracotomy. Interest in this injury stems from the severity of the clinical condition, difficulty in diagnosis, the onset of a rapidly deteriorating clinical course all of which can be promptly reversed by timely and appropriate treatment. Although it is a rare cause of intramediastinal haemorrhage, it is proposed that a ruptured azygous vein should be considered in every trauma case causing a right-sided haemothorax or widened mediastinum. All cases described in the literature to date involved operative management. We present a case of successful conservative management of this condition.

  1. Right Atrium Laceration with Pericardial Tamponade: A Rare Presentation of Blunt Cardiac Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Hoseinikhah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac laceration from blunt thoracic trauma is not a common presentation. The rate of mortality due to this injury is very high since it is not diagnosed and treated immediately. In this study, we present the case of a 65-year-old man with blunt cardiac trauma, causing right atrial rupture and pericardial tamponade. Successful management of this patient was firstly done with initial pericardiocentesis. Then, the patient was immediately transferred to the operating room for tamponade relief and cardiac wall repair. We recommend that cardiac surgeon have  an important suspicious for cardiac involvement in Blunt chest wall trauma

  2. Blunt trauma induced splenic blushes are not created equal

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    Burlew Clay

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, evidence of contrast extravasation on computed tomography (CT scan is regarded as an indication for intervention in splenic injuries. In our experience, patients transferred from other institutions for angioembolization have often resolved the blush upon repeat imaging at our hospital. We hypothesized that not all splenic blushes require intervention. Methods During a 10-year period, we reviewed all patients transferred with blunt splenic injuries and contrast extravasation on initial postinjury CT scan. Results During the study period, 241 patients were referred for splenic injuries, of whom 16 had a contrast blush on initial CT imaging (88% men, mean age 35 ± 5, mean ISS 26 ± 3. Eight (50% patients were managed without angioembolization or operation. Comparing patients with and without intervention, there was a significant difference in admission heart rate (106 ± 9 vs 83 ± 6 and decline in hematocrit following transfer (5.3 ± 2.0 vs 1.0 ± 0.3, but not in injury grade (3.9 ± 0.2 vs 3.5 ± 0.3, systolic blood pressure (125 ± 10 vs 115 ± 6, or age (38.5 ± 8.2 vs 30.9 ± 4.7. Of the 8 observed patients, 3 underwent repeat imaging immediately upon arrival with resolution of the blush. In the intervention group, 4 patients had ongoing extravasation on repeat imaging, 2 patients underwent empiric embolization, and 2 patients underwent splenectomy for physiologic indications. Conclusions For blunt splenic trauma, evidence of contrast extravasation on initial CT imaging is not an absolute indication for intervention. A period of observation with repeat imaging could avoid costly, invasive interventions and their associated sequelae.

  3. Predictors of abnormal chest CT after blunt trauma: a critical appraisal of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Kool, D.R.; Dekker, H.M.; Deunk, J.; Jager, G.J.; Kuijk, C. van; Edwards, M.J.R.; Blickman, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify and to evaluate predictors that determine whether chest computed tomography (CT) is likely to reveal relevant injuries in adult blunt trauma patients. METHODS: After a comprehensive literature search for original studies on blunt chest injury diagnosis, two independent observers

  4. Traumatic Aniridia Following a Blunt Ocular Trauma in a Pseudophakic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Gencer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt ocular traumas cause serious ocular problems in the anterior and posterior segments of the eye and even may result in globe perforation. In the literature, some cases have been reported with aniridia by traumatic iris expulsion and preserved intraocular lens after blunt trauma in pseudophakic eyes that had undergone cataract surgery with phacoemulsification. In this case, phacoemulsification was performed four months before a blunt trauma to the same eye, intraocular lens remained centralized although traumatic aniridia and partial zonulolysis occurred. This is the first case of traumatic aniridia in a pseudophakic eye in our country, and we aimed to present the possibility of relative protective effects of small cataract incisions after blunt trauma. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 80-2

  5. Is a pelvic fracture a predictor for thoracolumbar spine fractures after blunt trauma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, M.H.; Deunk, J.; Brink, M.; Dekker, H.M.; Kool, D.R.; Vugt, A.B. van; Edwards, M.J.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Discussion still remains which polytraumatized patients require radiologic thoracolumbar spine (TL spine) screening. The purpose of this study is to determine whether pelvic fractures are associated with TL spine fractures after a blunt trauma. Additionally, the sensitivity of

  6. Early detection of myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma by computed tomography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thung-Lip; Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Shih, Chen-Hsiang; Liang, Huai-Wen; Tsai, Hsing-Shan; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Hsu, Kwan-Lih

    2017-02-10

    Blunt cardiac trauma encompasses a wide range of clinical entities, including myocardial contusion, cardiac rupture, valve avulsion, pericardial injuries, arrhythmia, and even myocardial infarction. Acute myocardial infarction due to coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma is rare and may be life threatening. Differential diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction from cardiac contusion at this setting is not easy. Here we demonstrated a case of blunt chest trauma, with computed tomography detected myocardium enhancement defect early at emergency department. Under the impression of acute myocardial infarction, emergent coronary angiography revealed left anterior descending artery occlusion. Revascularization was performed and coronary artery dissection was found after thrombus aspiration. Finally, the patient survived after coronary stenting. Perfusion defects of myocardium enhancement on CT after blunt chest trauma can be very helpful to suggest myocardial infarction and facilitate the decision making of emergent procedure. This valuable sign should not be missed during the initial interpretation.

  7. Frequency of myocardial injury after blunt chest trauma as evaluated by radionuclide angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.; Driedger, A.A.; Holliday, R.L.; Cheung, H.W.; Sibbald, W.J.

    1983-11-01

    Seventy-seven patients who had sustained multisystem trauma, including severe blunt chest injury, were prospectively evaluated to assess the frequency of associated traumatic myocardial injury. Traumatic injury to either the right or left ventricle was defined by the presence of discrete abnormalities of wall motion on electrocardiographically gated cardiac scintigraphy in patients without a clinical history of heart disease. Forty-two patients (55%) (Group 1) had focal abnormalities of wall motion; 27 involved the right ventricle, 7 the left ventricle, 7 were biventricular, and 1 involved only the septum. Both the right and left ventricular ejection fractions were significantly lower (31 +/- 11% and 47 +/- 14%, respectively) than those in the 35 traumatized patients without wall motion abnormalities on scintigraphy (Group 2) (49 +/- 8% and 58 +/- 11%, respectively). Repeat scintigraphic examination in 32 Group 1 patients at a time remote from initial injury showed improvement or resolution of previously defined focal wall motion abnormalities in 27 of 32 patients (84%). The electrocardiogram and serum enzyme tests were insensitive indexes of traumatic myocardial injury when defined by the scintigraphic abnormalities. Thus, severe blunt chest trauma results in a higher frequency of traumatic myocardial injury than heretofore recognized, and frequently involves the anteriorly situated right ventricle.

  8. The Houdini effect--an unusual case of blunt abdominal trauma resulting in perforative appendicitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Kelly, F

    2012-03-01

    We present a unique case of perforative appendicitis that occurred in an adult following blunt abdominal trauma. This case represents the first such reported case from Ireland. It also represents a modern practical example of Laplace\\'s theory of the effect of increased pressure on colonic wall tension leading to localized perforation, and serves to highlight not only the importance in preoperative imaging for blunt abdominal trauma, but also the importance of considering appendiceal perforation.

  9. Cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation after blunt chest trauma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiac tamponade due to aortic injury after blunt trauma is a rare and potentially fatal injury. Most aortic injuries caused by blunt trauma present as aortic dissection or rupture of the aortic isthmus. Several cases of delayed aortic injury have been reported. However, all of these injuries were observed in the descending aorta because they had been caused by a posterior rib fracture. Case presentation We report the first case of cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascendi...

  10. Asymptomatic diaphragmatic rupture with retroperitoneal opening as a result of blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narci Adnan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt traumas of the abdomen and thorax are important clinical problems in pediatric ages. Severity of trauma may not always be compatible with the patients′ clinical situation. A 2-year-old male child was admitted to our emergency clinic as a result of tractor crash accident. Physical examination of the child was normal. The abdominal and thoracic ultrasonography (USG examination performed in the emergency clinic was normal. In thoracic computed tomography (CT scan of the patient, there was irregularity of the right diaphragmatic contour that was described as micro perforation-rupture (the free air was just in the perihepatic and retroperitoneal area, which was not passing through the abdomen. The patient was followed-up for 1 week in the hospital with a diagnosis of retroperitoneal diaphragmatic rupture. It is not appropriate to decide the severity of trauma in childhood on the basis of clinical findings. Although severe trauma and sustaining radiological examinations, the patients′ clinical pictures may be surprisingly normal, as in our patient. In such cases, there may not be any clinical symptom. CT scan examination must be preferred to USG for both primary diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. According to the current literature, there is no reported case with retroperitoneal rupture of the diaphragm.

  11. Perioperative management of tracheobronchial injury following blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvekar, Nilesh M; Deshpande, Sharmila S; Nadkarni, Anand; Kanitkar, Shreedhar

    2013-01-01

    We describe tracheobronchial injury (TBI) in a 17-year-old teenager following blunt trauma resulting from a road traffic accident. The patient presented to a peripheral hospital with swelling over the neck and face associated with bilateral pneumothorax for which bilateral intercostal drains were inserted and the patient was transferred to our institute. Fiber-optic videobronchoscopy (FOB) was performed, the trachea and bronchi were visualized, and the site and extent of injury was assessed. Spontaneous respiration was maintained till assessment of the airway. Then the patient was anesthetized with propofol and paralyzed using succinylcholine and a double-lumen endobronchial tube was inserted; thereafter, the adequacy of controlled manual ventilation and air-leak through intercostal drains was assessed and the patient was transferred to operating room (OR) for repair of the airway injury. The OR was kept ready during FOB to manage any catastrophe. This case describes the need for proper preparation and communication between health care team members to manage all possible scenarios of traumatic TBI.

  12. Perioperative management of tracheobronchial injury following blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh M Juvekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe tracheobronchial injury (TBI in a 17-year-old teenager following blunt trauma resulting from a road traffic accident. The patient presented to a peripheral hospital with swelling over the neck and face associated with bilateral pneumothorax for which bilateral intercostal drains were inserted and the patient was transferred to our institute. Fiber-optic videobronchoscopy (FOB was performed, the trachea and bronchi were visualized, and the site and extent of injury was assessed. Spontaneous respiration was maintained till assessment of the airway. Then the patient was anesthetized with propofol and paralyzed using succinylcholine and a double-lumen endobronchial tube was inserted; thereafter, the adequacy of controlled manual ventilation and air-leak through intercostal drains was assessed and the patient was transferred to operating room (OR for repair of the airway injury. The OR was kept ready during FOB to manage any catastrophe. This case describes the need for proper preparation and communication between health care team members to manage all possible scenarios of traumatic TBI.

  13. Peri-cardiac arrest following blunt bicycle handlebar trauma to the iliac vessels: management of a rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Emma L; Chandrasekar, Ramasubramanyan

    2012-12-01

    Iliac vessel disruption following blunt trauma is an unusual presentation, particularly in the absence of an orthopaedic injury. We present the unique case of a 14-year-old boy who sustained a blunt bicycle handlebar impalement that resulted in complete transection of the external iliac artery and laceration of the external iliac vein, without a skeletal fracture. The patient deteriorated rapidly, entering hypovolaemic shock and peri-cardiac arrest at anaesthetic induction. Once haemodynamic stability was achieved, the lacerated external iliac vein was used to form an interposition graft to repair the external iliac artery. The rare occurrence and lack of familiarity with this injury, combined with the potential for fatal exsanguination if not swiftly diagnosed makes this case crucial to highlight. Blunt bicycle handlebar injury should carry a high suspicion of severe vascular compromise. If diagnosed this should be rapidly managed with aggressive resuscitation and revascularisation.

  14. Role of clinical suspicion in pediatric blunt trauma patients with severe mechanisms of injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carolinna M; Cunningham, Sandra J

    2018-01-01

    In adult patients with blunt trauma, severe mechanism of injury leads to routine pan-computed tomography (CT). Due to concerns about the risk of radiation, we sought to determine whether clinical suspicion could identify children requiring radiographic imaging. A prospective study was conducted in a pediatric emergency department of a Level 1 trauma center. Patients ≤14years presenting with blunt trauma due to predefined severe mechanisms were eligible. Physicians recorded their suspicions for clinically significant injury (CSI). Imaging was obtained at the physician's discretion. CSI was defined as injury requiring intervention or hospital admission ≥24h. Both admitted and discharged patients were contacted ≥2weeks after presentation to document undetected injuries. 837 patients were eligible; 753 were enrolled. 159 patients were excluded because the mechanism did not meet severity criteria. Follow-up was completed for 529/594 remaining patients. Physicians were suspicious of all injuries in 71/75 patients with CSI and had no suspicions in 382/454 without CSI. The 75 injured patients had 153 CSIs; positive suspicion of CSI was recorded for 149 injuries. The four patients who sustained unsuspected injuries had multiple other suspected injuries. Of the 594 patients, 42 received focused CT and 14 underwent pan-CT. No patient had previously undetected injuries on follow-up. In our study, clinical suspicion was able to identify children with CSI. If further studies support our findings, using clinical suspicion rather than mechanism alone to guide radiographic imaging may avoid unnecessary radiation exposure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Should blunt segmental vascular renal injuries be considered an American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Grade 4 renal injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaeb, Bahaa; Figler, Brad; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B

    2014-02-01

    Renal segmental vascular injury (SVI) following blunt abdominal trauma is not part of the original American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) renal injury grading system. Recent recommendations support classifying SVI as an AAST Grade 4 (G4) injury. Our primary aim was to compare outcomes following blunt renal SVI and blunt renal collecting system lacerations (CSLs). We hypothesize that renal SVI fare well with conservative management alone and should be relegated a less severe renal AAST grade. We retrospectively identified patients with SVI and G4 CSL admitted to a Level 1 trauma center between 2003 and 2010. Penetrating trauma was excluded. Need for surgical intervention, length of stay, kidney salvage (>25% renal preservation on renography 6-12 weeks after injury), and delayed complication rates were compared between the SVI and CSL injuries. Statistical analysis used χ, Fisher's exact, and t tests. A total of 56 patients with SVI and 88 patients with G4 CSL sustained blunt trauma. Age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and length of stay were similar for the two groups. Five patients in each group died of concomitant, nonrenal injuries. In the G4 CSL group, 15 patients underwent major interventions, and 32 patients underwent minor interventions. Only one patient in the SVI group underwent a major intervention. The renal salvage rate was 85.7% following SVI versus 62.5% following CSL (p = 0.107). Overall, surgical interventions are significantly lower among the SVI cohort than the G4 CSL cohort. Further analysis using a larger cohort of patients is recommended before revising the current renal grading system. Adding SVI as a G4 injury could potentially increase the heterogeneity of G4 injuries and decrease the ability of the AAST renal injury grading system to predict outcomes, such as nephrectomy rate. Epidemiologic study, level IV.

  16. Bilateral ureteropelvic disruption following blunt abdominal trauma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Hiroko

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ureteral injury occurs in less than 1% of blunt abdominal trauma cases, partly because the ureters are relatively well protected in the retroperitoneum. Bilateral ureteral injury is extremely rare, with only 10 previously reported cases. Diagnosis may be delayed if ureteric injury is not suspected, and delay of 36 hours or longer has been observed in more than 50% of patients with ureteric injury following abdominal trauma, leading to increased morbidity. Case presentation A 29-year-old man was involved in a highway motor vehicle collision and was ejected from the front passenger seat even though wearing a seatbelt. He was in a preshock state at the scene of the accident. An intravenous line and left thoracic drain were inserted, and he was transported to our hospital by helicopter. Whole-body, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT scan showed left diaphragmatic disruption, splenic injury, and a grade I injury to the left kidney with a retroperitoneal haematoma. He underwent emergency laparotomy. The left diaphragmatic and splenic injuries were repaired. Although a retroperitoneal haematoma was observed, his renal injury was treated conservatively because the haematoma was not expanding. In the intensive care unit, the patient's haemodynamic state was stable, but there was no urinary output for 9 hours after surgery. Anuresis prompted a review of the abdominal x-ray which had been performed after the contrast-enhanced CT. Leakage of contrast material from the ureteropelvic junctions was detected, and review of the repeat CT scan revealed contrast retention in the perirenal retroperitoneum bilaterally. He underwent cystoscopy and bilateral retrograde pyelography, which showed bilateral complete ureteral disruption, preventing placement of ureteral stents. Diagnostic laparotomy revealed complete disruption of the ureteropelvic junctions bilaterally. Double-J ureteral stents were placed bilaterally and ureteropelvic

  17. Scapular Fractures in Blunt Chest Trauma – Self-Experience Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabet A. Al-Sadek

    2016-11-01

    CONCLUSIONS:The study confirms the role of scapular fractures as a marker for the severity of the chest trauma (based on the number of associated thoracic injuries, but doesn’t present scapular fractures as an indicator for high mortality in blunt chest trauma patients.

  18. FAST as a predictor of clinical outcome in blunt abdominal trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Peer-reviewed literature demonstrates increasing support for the use of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) in the setting of blunt trauma, one study demonstrating the sensitivity and specificity of FAST for the detection of free fluid to be 0.64 - 0.98 and 0.86 - 1.00, respectively, compared with ...

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of a step-up imaging strategy in pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schuppen, J.; Olthof, D. C.; Wilde, J. C. H.; Beenen, L. F. M.; van Rijn, R. R.; Goslings, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is an important but often unrecognized cause of death in children. Imaging plays a vital role in the early detection of abdominal trauma. The exact role of imaging in the management of BAT in children is still under research. The aim of this study was to assess

  20. An analysis of risk-taking behavior among adolescent blunt trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, David S; Draus, John M; Santos, Ariel P; Franklin, Glen A

    2009-05-01

    The impact of risk-taking behavior among adolescent blunt trauma patients is not fully appreciated. This study examined the relationship between adolescent risk-taking behaviors, the resultant injury severity, and outcome for blunt trauma. Between January 2000 and December 2005, data were collected on adolescent blunt trauma patients (12-18 years) admitted to either a Level I adult trauma center or large urban pediatric hospital. Five groups of risk-taking behavior were examined: ATV riders, drug and alcohol users, unhelmeted motorcyclists, unhelmeted extreme sports participants and unrestrained motor vehicle occupants. Demographic data, mechanism of injury, injury severity, hospital course and outcomes were evaluated for each group. A total of 2030 adolescents were admitted following blunt trauma; 723 adolescents (36%) were engaged in risk-taking behavior at the time of their injury. Most patients were male (68%). Unrestrained MVA occupants were the most frequently encountered risk takers (37%); among this subset, most were unrestrained passengers (74%). Head injuries were frequent (22%) among risk takers. When compared to non-risk-takers, there were no significant age, race, gender, or ISS differences. However, a significantly higher number of positive head CT scans were found among risk-taking adolescents (22%, p Risk-taking behavior is prevalent among adolescent blunt trauma patients. Improved injury prevention strategies are needed to discourage these behaviors during adolescence.

  1. Specific Radiological Findings of Traumatic Gastrointestinal Tract Injuries in Patients With Blunt Chest and Abdominal Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokabi, Nima; Harmouche, Elie; Xing, Minzhi; Shuaib, Waqas; Mittal, Pardeep K; Wilson, Kenneth; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal hollow viscus injury after blunt chest and abdominal trauma is uncommon and complicates 0.6%-1.2% of all cases of trauma. Early recognition of such injuries significantly decreases morbidity and mortality. Since physical examination is not accurate in detecting such injuries, contrast-enhanced computed tomography has been the mainstay for diagnosis in many emergency departments. This pictorial essay aims to review the incidence, mechanisms, and signs of gastrointestinal hollow viscus injuries in the setting of blunt chest and abdominal trauma. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Total Pancreatic Fracture Due to Blunt Trauma: Report of a Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Gulpinar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of pancreatic fracture due to blunt trauma was presented. The patient was 70 year old male who had a motor vehicle collision and was suspected a pancreatic trauma due his examinations with ultrasound and computerized tomography. The diagnosis of splenic injury and pancreas body total fracture in the point where the portal vein crosses the pancreatic body was made with the help of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. He was taken to emergency surgery where a splenectomy and a distal pancreatectomy were performed. We represented this infrequent case of pancreatic fracture and its complications after blunt abdominal trauma and discuss the diagnostic and management practices.

  3. Secondary left ventricular injury with haemopericardium caused by a rib fracture after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsekhar Ganti

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trauma is the third most common cause of death in the West. In the US, approximately 90,000 deaths annually are traumatic in nature and over 75% of casualties from blunt trauma are due to chest injuries. Cardiac injuries from rib fractures following blunt trauma are extremely rare. We report the unusual case of a patient who fell from a height and presented with haemopericardium and haemothorax as a result of left ventricular and lingular lacerations and was sucessfully operated upon.

  4. The blunt liver trauma: Review of current diagnostic and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doklestic Krstina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The liver is one of the most commonly injured organs in blunt abdominal trauma. Major liver trauma in polytraumatic patients accounts for significant morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic options for blunt hepatic trauma include both non-operative and operative management. Hemodynamic status, not the grade of the injury, should dictate the management. CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis is a standard diagnostic modality in hemodynamically stable trauma patients. Recent advancements in imaging studies and enhanced critical care strategies have shifted the paradigm for the management of liver injuries. Nonoperative management of both low- and high-grade injuries can be successful in hemodynamically stable patients. Direct suture of bleeding vessels, vascular isolation of the liver, and damage control surgery have improved outcomes in the hemodynamically unstable patients. We have reviewed current position in the treatment of blunt hepatic trau

  5. Management of blunt tracheal trauma in children: a case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Elisabeth L; Geraerts, Saskia D; Brackel, Hein J

    2007-06-01

    Blunt tracheal trauma seldom develops in children because of their anatomy and the mobility of the cartilage. It has the potential to be overlooked, either because of the severity of concomitant injuries or because of the unfamiliarity of paediatricians with this type of injury. However, tracheal injury might be lethal due to airway compromise. Early bronchoscopy may be necessary to anticipate complications and prevent permanent dysfunction. We present a retrospective, double-institution case series over a 5-year period, describing five children, aged 3 to 14 years, with tracheal injury after blunt cervical trauma. All patients showed emphysema with pneumomediastinum. After explorative bronchoscopy, all patients were successfully treated with antibiotics and/or supportive ventilation. In summary, minimal lesions due to blunt tracheal trauma could be treated conservatively in children. Since the external signs of tracheal injury are not indicative of the extent of the trauma, a high index of suspicion is warranted in these patients.

  6. Computational Analysis Supports an Early, Type 17 Cell-Associated Divergence of Blunt Trauma Survival and Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Andrew; Namas, Rami A.; Ramadan, Mostafa; Mi, Qi; Almahmoud, Khalid; Abdul-Malak, Othman; Azhar, Nabil; Zaaqoq, Akram; Namas, Rajaie; Barclay, Derek A.; Yin, Jinling; Sperry, Jason; Peitzman, Andrew; Zamora, Ruben; Simmons, Richard L.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Objective Blunt trauma patients may present with similar demographics and injury severity, yet differ with regard to survival. We hypothesized that this divergence was due to different trajectories of systemic inflammation, and utilized computational analyses to define these differences. Design, Setting, and Patients From a cohort of 493 victims of blunt trauma, we conducted a pairwise, retrospective, case-control study of patients who survived over 24h but ultimately died (non-survivors; n=19) and patients who, following ICU admission, went on to be discharged (survivors; n=19). Data on systemic inflammatory mediators assessed within the first 24h and over 7d were analyzed with computational modeling to infer dynamic networks of inflammation. A mouse model of trauma/hemorrhage was used to verify hypotheses derived from the clinical study. Interventions None in patients. Neutralizing anti-IL-17A antibody in mice. Measurements and Main Results Network density among inflammatory mediators in non-survivors increased in parallel with organ dysfunction scores over 7d, suggesting the presence of early, self-sustaining, pathological inflammation involving HMGB1, IL-23, and the Th17 pathway. Survivors demonstrated a pattern commensurate with a self-resolving, predominantly lymphoid response, including higher levels of the reparative cytokine IL-22. Mice subjected to trauma/hemorrhage exhibited reduced organ damage when treated with anti-IL-17A. Conclusions Variable type 17 immune responses are hallmarks of organ damage, survival, and mortality following blunt trauma, and suggest a lymphoid cell-based switch from self-resolving to self-sustaining inflammation. PMID:27513538

  7. Protocol compliance and time management in blunt trauma resuscitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, W.R.; Bergs, E.A.; Mushkudiani, N.; Klimek, M.; Schipper, I.B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study advanced trauma life support (ATLS) protocol adherence prospectively in trauma resuscitation and to analyse time management of daily multidisciplinary trauma resuscitation at a level 1 trauma centre, for both moderately and severely injured patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All

  8. [Diagnosis and therapy of diaphragmatic rupture after blunt thoracic and abdominal trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, G; Mappes, H J; Kohlberger, E; Baumgartner, U; Farthmann, E H

    1996-01-01

    Diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture is often missed after blunt thoracic and abdominal injuries because diaphragmatic injury does not play an important role beside severe injuries of intrabdominal and/or thoracic organs. Between 1976 and 1993, 141 patients were treated for traumatic injury of the diaphragm. In 42 patients with penetrating injuries following stab or shot wounds diaphragmatic lesions were diagnosed by the emergent surgical therapy. 99 had diaphragmatic tears from blunt thoracic or abdominal trauma by accidents. 14 of 99 patients sustained isolated diaphragmatic rupture, in 85 the rupture was combined with other injuries, 24 had fractures of the pelvic ring. Preoperatively the following diagnostic procedures were performed: chest radiograph in 99 patients, abdomen radiograph in 75, contrast radiographs in 34, angiography in 9, sonography in 74 and computed tomography in 48. Sensitivity and specificity of these diagnostic methods depend on the dimension of intrathoracic prolaps of abdominal organs. The sensitivity of contrast radiographs ranged from 72-78%. With the additional experience of ultrasonography since 1985 the sensitivity came up to 82%. In 11 patients additional diaphragmatic rupture was diagnosed by laparotomy indicated by liver and/or splenic rupture. Therapy of diaphragmatic injury was performed in 83 patients within 4 days, in 9 within 4 months and in 7 later than one year. For diaphragmatic repair 87 patients underwent laparotomy and 12 thoracotomy. Local complications were found in 13 patients (13.1%). 19 patients (19.2%) died postoperatively due to accompanying injuries.

  9. Utility of MRI for cervical spine clearance in blunt trauma patients after a negative CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Ajay; Durand, David; Wu, Xiao; Geng, Bertie; Abbed, Khalid; Nunez, Diego B; Sanelli, Pina

    2018-02-15

    To determine the utility of cervical spine MRI in blunt trauma evaluation for instability after a negative non-contrast cervical spine CT. A review of medical records identified all adult patients with blunt trauma who underwent CT cervical spine followed by MRI within 48 h over a 33-month period. Utility of subsequent MRI was assessed in terms of findings and impact on outcome. A total of 1,271 patients with blunt cervical spine trauma underwent both cervical spine CT and MRI within 48 h; 1,080 patients were included in the study analysis. Sixty-six percent of patients with a CT cervical spine study had a negative study. Of these, the subsequent cervical spine MRI had positive findings in 20.9%; 92.6% had stable ligamentous or osseous injuries, 6.0% had unstable injuries and 1.3% had potentially unstable injuries. For unstable injury, the NPV for CT was 98.5%. In all 712 patients undergoing both CT and MRI, only 1.5% had unstable injuries, and only 0.42% had significant change in management. MRI for blunt trauma evaluation remains not infrequent at our institution. MRI may have utility only in certain patients with persistent abnormal neurological examination. • MRI has limited utility after negative cervical CT in blunt trauma. • MRI is frequently positive for non-specific soft-tissue injury. • Unstable injury missed on CT is infrequent.

  10. Isolated tear in left atrial appendage due to blunt trauma chest: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Salooja, Manpreet S.; Singla, Manender; Srivastava, Anupam; Mukherjee, Kishore C.

    2013-01-01

    Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is associated with a high mortality rate. Motor vehicle accidents account for most cardiac ruptures, but crush injury is relatively rare. We describe a case of a 72-year-old man who had the left atrial appendage ruptured through blunt trauma due to a fall from scooter. Simple suture repair of the atrial appendage was achieved after clamping the base of the left atrium to control the bleeding. He recovered without complication. Traumatic injury to left atrial ap...

  11. Cost-effectiveness of the Cardiac Component of the Focused Assessment of Sonography in Trauma Examination in Blunt Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M Kennedy; Omer, Talib; Moore, Chris L; Taylor, R Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Blunt cardiac injury severe enough to require surgical intervention (sBCI) is an exceedingly rare event occurring in approximately 1 out of every 1600 trauma patients. While performing the cardiac component of the Focused Assessment of Sonography in Trauma (cFAST) exam is effective in penetrating trauma, it is unclear whether it is of value in blunt trauma given the low prevalence of sBCI, the imperfect test characteristics of the FAST exam, and the rate of incidental pericardial effusion. The objective was to determine through decision analysis whether performing the cFAST exam is cost-effective in the evaluation of hypotensive and normotensive blunt trauma patients. We created two decision analytic models using commercially available software (TreeAgePro2011) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the cFAST in hypotensive (systolic blood pressure blunt trauma patients. Clinical probabilities were obtained from published data. Costs were estimated from Medicare reimbursement and charge data. The willingness-to-pay threshold was $50,000/quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Sensitivity analyses were performed over plausible ranges using available literature. In hypotensive patients, for the base case scenario of a 34-year-old with blunt trauma, the cFAST strategy had a cost of $42,882.70 and an effectiveness of 25.3597 QALYs, whereas the no cFAST strategy had a cost of $42,753.52 and an effectiveness of 25.3532 QALYs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $19,918/QALY. For normotensive patients the cFAST strategy had a cost of $18,331.03 and an effectiveness of 23.2817 QALYs, whereas the no cFAST strategy had a cost of $18,207.58 and an effectiveness of 23.2814 QALYs. The ICER was $465,867/QALY. In the sensitivity analyses, age, probability of death from sBCI with prompt treatment, and probability of sBCI were the main drivers of variability in the model outcomes. The cFAST for blunt trauma is cost-effective for hypotensive but not for normotensive

  12. Iliac Artery and Vein Injury Without Pelvic Fracture Due To Blunt Trauma: A Rare Case

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    Mustafa Cuneyt Cicek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Iliac vascular injuries have high morbidity and mortality rates. Penetrant abdominal and pelvic vascular injuries are more common compared to blunt traumas. Pelvic vascular injuries associated with blunt trauma are quite likely to occur in accompaniment with pelvic fracture. A 23 year old male patient was admitted to the emergency room due to a motorcycle accident. Shock picture was prevalent in the patient. Shaft fracture was present in left femur and flow was not detected in arterial and venous colour Doppler ultrasonography. Patient underwent emergency surgery. Left main iliac artery and vein were normal, however, external iliac vein was lacerated in two spots, and blood vessel wall integrity was damaged in one part of left external iliac artery. Clinical presentation and traumatic retroperitoneal hematoma management of iliac artery and venous injuries due to blunt trauma without pelvic fracture are discussed in the presented case.

  13. Assessment of internal mammary artery injury after blunt chest trauma: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-ming; Lv, Jin; Ma, Kai; Yan, Jing

    2014-10-01

    The occurrence, bleeding, and treatment of internal mammary artery (IMA) injury after blunt chest trauma have not been well described in the literature. We reviewed articles published from July 1977 to February 2014 describing IMA injury after blunt chest trauma in 49 patients. There was a predominant incidence in males and on the left side. Blunt trauma to the IMA can cause anterior mediastinal hematoma, hemothorax, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula, and extra-pleural hematoma. Of the 49 patients studied, 20 underwent embolization, 22 underwent surgical operation, 4 were managed by clinical observation, and 3 had undescribed treatment. Different parts and extents of IMA injury, adjacent vein injury, as well as the integrity of the pleura determined differences in bleeding modality. Prompt diagnosis, complete hemostasis, aggressive resuscitation, and multidisciplinary teams are recommended for patients with IMA injury.

  14. Diagnosis and management of testicular rupture after blunt scrotal trauma: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao; Yang, Jin-Rui; Huang, Yu-Meng; Wang, Long; Liu, Long-Fei; Wei, Yong-Bao; Huang, Liang; Zhu, Quan; Zeng, Ming-Qiang; Tang, Zheng-Yan

    2016-12-01

    Testicular rupture, one of the most common complications in blunt scrotal trauma, is the rupture of tunica albuginea and extrusion of seminiferous tubules. Testicular rupture is more inclined to young men, and injury mechanisms are associated with sports and motor accidents. After history taking and essential physical examination, scrotal ultrasound is the first-line auxiliary examination. MRI is also one of the vital complementary examinations to evaluate testicular rupture after blunt scrotal trauma. Surgical exploration and repair may be necessary when the diagnosis of testicular rupture is definite or suspicious. Postoperative follow-up is to monitor the relief of local symptoms and changes of testicular functions. This review sums up the literatures about testicular rupture after blunt scrotal trauma in recent 16 years and also refers some new advantages and perspectives on diagnosis and management of testicular rupture.

  15. Traumatic Abdominal Wall Hernia After a Blunt Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Dumlu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is a rare result of blunt abdominal traumas in adults. Altough the detection of the injuries of the abdominal organs is the priority in blunt traumas, abdominal wall defect may also occur in these patients. These hernias can go undetected due to preservation of the skin overlying the hernia defect. Traumatic abdominal wall hernias can have high morbidity and mortality rates due to incarceration and perforation of tubular hollow organs, especially if there is any delay. The possibility of traumatic hernia should always be considered in cases with serious blunt trauma. Computed Tomography (CT scan examinations should be performed routinely due to their high diagnostic value if trumatic hernia is suspected. In this report, a traumatic abdominal wall hernia patient who was treated by surgery has been presented with the review of the current literature.

  16. Agent–host–environment model of blunt abdominal trauma in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % of mortality is related to trauma. Abdominal injuries account for approximately 10% of trauma deaths in childhood. Child injury has great effects on communities and countries. The agent–host– environment model has been used to describe ...

  17. Definition of hemodynamic stability in blunt trauma patients: a systematic review and assessment amongst Dutch trauma team members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loggers, S A I; Koedam, T W A; Giannakopoulos, G F; Vandewalle, E; Erwteman, M; Zuidema, W P

    2017-12-01

    Trauma is a great contributor to mortality worldwide. One of the challenges in trauma care is early identification and management of bleeding. The circulatory status of blunt trauma patients in the emergency room is evaluated using hemodynamic (HD) parameters. However, there is no consensus on which parameters to use. In this study, we evaluate the used terms and definitions in the literature for HD stability and compare those to the opinion of Dutch trauma team members. A systematic review was performed to collect the definitions used for HD stability. Studies describing the assessment and/or treatment of blunt trauma patients in the emergency room were included. In addition, an online survey was conducted amongst Dutch trauma team members. Out of a total of 222, 67 articles were found to be eligible for inclusion. HD stability was defined in 70% of these articles. The most used parameters were systolic blood pressure and heart rate. Besides the variety of parameters, a broad range of corresponding cut-off points is noted. Despite some common ground, high inter- and intra-variability is seen for the physicians that are part of the Dutch trauma teams. All authors acknowledge HD stability as the most important factor in the assessment and management of blunt trauma patients. There is, however, no consensus in the literature as well as none-to-fair consensus amongst Dutch trauma team members in the definition of HD stability. A trauma team ready to co-operate with consensus-based opinions together with a valid scoring system is in our opinion the best method to assess and treat seriously injured trauma patients.

  18. Studying morbidity and predicting mortality in patients with blunt chest trauma using a novel clinical score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshini Manay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A departmental audit in March 2015 revealed significant mortality rate of 40% in blunt chest trauma patients (much greater than the global 25%. A study was thus planned to study morbidity and predictors of mortality in blunt chest trauma patients admitted to our hospital. Methods: This study was a prospective observational study of 139 patients with a history of blunt chest trauma between June 2015 and November 2015 after the Institutional Ethics Committee approval in April 2015. The sample size was calculated from the prevalence rate in our institute from the past medical records. Results: The morbidity factors following blunt chest injuries apart from pain were need for Intensive Care Unit stay, mechanical ventilation, and pneumonia/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Significant predictors of mortality in our study were SpO2 16, and need for mechanical ventilation. By calculating the likelihood ratios of each respiratory sign, a clinical score was devised. Conclusion: The modifiable factors affecting morbidity and mortality were identified. Mild to moderate chest injury due to blunt trauma is difficult to diagnose. The restoration of respiratory physiology has not only significant implications on recovery from chest injury but also all other injuries. It is our sincere hope that the score we have formulated will help reduce mortality and morbidity after further trials.

  19. Transitory electrocardiographic abnormalities following blunt cardiac trauma: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Valle-Alonso

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt cardiac trauma (BCT includes a number of diseases ranging from clinically silent arrhythmias to lethal cardiac wall rupture. The most common form is “cardiac contusion”, which is currently under debate. The absence of a clear definition and the lack of diagnostic tests of choice make diagnosing cardiac contusion difficult. We present the case report of a healthy young patient who went to the emergency department with electrocardiogram changes following blunt chest trauma, and review the current literature on the subject.

  20. Pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma: an analysis of 110 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objective. Injuries to the pancreas are uncommon, but may result in considerable morbidity and mortality. This study evaluated the management of blunt pancreatic injuries using a previously defined protocol to determine which factors predicted morbidity and mortality. Methods. The study design was a ...

  1. Evaluation of leadership skills during the simulation education course for the initial management of blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Eric; Brautigam, Robert T; Smola, Jacqueline; Burns, Karyl J

    2012-04-01

    Leadership skills of senior residents, trauma fellows, and a nurse practitioner were assessed during simulation training for the initial management of blunt trauma. This was a pilot, observational study, that in addition to skill development and assessment also sought to determine the need for a dedicated leadership training course for surgical residents. The study evaluated the leadership skills and adherence to Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines of the team leaders during simulation training. The team leaders' performances on criteria regarding prearrival planning, critical actions based on ATLS, injury identification, patient management, and communication were evaluated for each of five blunt-trauma scenarios. Although there was a statistically significant increase in leadership skills for performing ATLS critical actions, P skills for team leadership willbe a worthwhile endeavor at our institution.

  2. Emergency management of blunt chest trauma in children: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzé, Denis R; Pauzé, Daniel K

    2013-11-01

    Pediatric trauma is commonly encountered in the emergency department, and trauma to the head, chest, and abdomen may be a source of significant morbidity and mortality. As children have unique thoracic anatomical and physiological properties, they may present with diagnostic challenges that the emergency clinician must be aware of. This review examines the effects of blunt trauma to the pediatric chest, as well as its relevant etiologies and associated mortality. Diagnostic and treatment options for commonly encountered injuries such as pulmonary contusions, rib fractures, and pneumothoraces are examined. Additionally, this review discusses rarely encountered--yet highly lethal--chest wall injuries such as blunt cardiac injuries, commotio cordis, nonaccidental trauma, and aortic injuries.

  3. EndoVascular and Hybrid Trauma Management (EVTM) for Blunt Innominate Artery Injury with Ongoing Extravasation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilos, Linda, E-mail: linda.bilos@regionorebrolan.se; Pirouzram, Artai; Toivola, Asko; Vidlund, Mårten; Cha, Soon Ok; Hörer, Tal [Örebro University Hospital and Örebro University, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health (Sweden)

    2017-01-15

    Innominate artery (IA) traumatic injuries are rare but life-threatening, with high mortality and morbidity. Open surgical repair is the treatment of choice but is technically demanding. We describe a case of blunt trauma to the IA with ongoing bleeding, treated successfully by combined (hybrid) endovascular and open surgery. The case demonstrates the immediate usage of modern endovascular and surgical tools as part of endovascular and hybrid trauma management.

  4. Intrathoracic Kidney after Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Halis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal trauma is responsible for most genitourinary injuries. The incidence of renal artery injury and intrathoracic kidney is quite low in patients who present with blunt trauma experiencing damage. There are four defined etiologies for intrathoracic kidney, which include real intrathoracic ectopic kidney, eventration of the diaphragm, congenital diaphragmatic herniation, and traumatic diaphragmatic rupture. The traumatic intrathoracic kidney is an extremely rare case. We presented intrathoracic kidney case after traumatic posterior diaphragmatic rupture.

  5. Nonsurgical pneumoperitoneum in a dog secondary to blunt force trauma to the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Stacy L; Whelan, Megan F; Basseches, Jessica

    2011-10-01

    To describe the medical management of pneumoperitoneum without surgical intervention in a dog that sustained blunt force trauma to the thorax. To review the mechanisms of how a thoracic injury (ie, extra-abdominal source) can lead to pneumoperitoneum. A 4-month-old Shih Tzu puppy was attacked by a larger dog and sustained various injuries including a pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and a pneumoperitoneum. The dog presented minimally responsive and in respiratory distress secondary to pulmonary contusions and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. No penetrating wounds to the abdomen or thorax were identified. As no immediate surgical lesion was identified the dog was treated conservatively without the need for surgical intervention. The dog was successfully managed and discharged after a few days of supportive care with oxygen therapy. Before discharge, repeat radiographs revealed complete resolution of the pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and pneumoperitoneum. Cases of nonsurgical pneumoperitoneum have rarely been reported in the veterinary literature. A thoracic source of pneumoperitoneum should be considered when the suspicion of a ruptured viscus is low based on diagnostic procedures (eg, ultrasound, computed tomography, and diagnostic peritoneal lavage), in addition to physical examination (eg, lack of fever and absence of abdominal pain) and laboratory findings (eg, absence of inflammatory leukogram). © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2011.

  6. Acute appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma. Coincidence or causality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iván Latorre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is a common disease in clinical practice; some well-defined causes include luminal obstruction by fecoliths, lymphoid hyperplasia, foreign bodies and intestinal parasites. Closed abdominal trauma has been associated as an etiological factor, although, their causal relationship is still unclear. This paper presents the case of a patient with appendicitis after a closed abdominal trauma.

  7. Blunt chest trauma in a non-specialist centre: Right treatment, right place?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Lesley; Jayathissa, Sisira

    2016-12-01

    To compare patient characteristics, management and outcomes for patients admitted with isolated blunt chest trauma, managed by medical or surgical teams. We reviewed adult patients admitted with blunt chest trauma between 1 September 2006 and 31 August 2011 to a secondary hospital in New Zealand. Inclusion criteria were: blunt chest trauma, with at least one radiologically demonstrated rib fracture. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality, and secondary outcomes were development of pneumonia, and use of analgesia. Seventy-two patients were included. Thirty-three patients were managed by medical teams and 39 by surgical teams. In-hospital mortality was greater amongst medical patients 5/33 (15%) versus surgical 0/39 (0%); P = 0.012. Pneumonia occurred in 15/33 (45%); medical patients versus surgical 2/39 (5%), P trauma fall compared to surgically managed patients (28/33 [85%] vs 9/39 [27%]; P chest trauma, those managed by medical teams were older, had more comorbidities and were more likely to have become injured with a low trauma fall than those managed by surgical teams. They had less access to analgesic options, developed pneumonia more often and had higher mortality. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. Prognostic Analysis of Patients with Blunt Chest Trauma Admitted to an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hui Wang

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Blunt chest trauma was usually associated with injuries of other organ systems, especially of the abdomen and head. Besides a decreased PaO2/FIO2, a lower GCS and a presence of shock were also independent prognostic predictors of mortality for these patients admitted to the ICU.

  9. Criteria for the selective use of chest computed tomography in blunt trauma patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Deunk, J.; Dekker, H.M.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Kool, D.R.; Vugt, A.B. van; Kuijk, C. van; Blickman, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to derive parameters that predict which high-energy blunt trauma patients should undergo computed tomography (CT) for detection of chest injury. METHODS: This observational study prospectively included consecutive patients (>or=16 years old) who underwent

  10. Predictors of successful non-operative management of grade III & IV blunt pancreatic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman B Koganti

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Non-operative measures should be attempted in a select group of grade III&IV blunt pancreatic trauma. In hemodynamically stable patients with a controlled leak walled off as a pseudocyst without associated organ injuries and pancreatic necrosis, NOM has a higher success rate.

  11. Successful Kidney and Lung Transplantation From a Deceased Donor With Blunt Abdominal Trauma and Intestinal Perforation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Smaalen, Tim C.; Krikke, Christina; Haveman, Jan Willem; van Heurn, L. W. Ernest

    2016-01-01

    The number of organ donors is limited by many contraindications for donation and poor quality of potential organ donors. Abdominal infection is a generally accepted contraindication for donation of abdominal organs. We present a 43-year-old man with lethal brain injury, blunt abdominal trauma, and

  12. Blunt intraabdominal arterial injury in pediatric trauma patients: injury distribution and markers of outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamner, Chad E; Groner, Jonathon I; Caniano, Donna A; Hayes, John R; Kenney, Brian D

    2008-05-01

    The epidemiology of pediatric blunt intraabdominal arterial injury is ill defined. We analyzed a multiinstitutional trauma database to better define injury patterns and predictors of outcome. The American College of Surgeons National Trauma Database was evaluated for all patients younger than 16 years with blunt intraabdominal arterial injury from 2000 to 2004. Injury distribution, operative treatment, and variables associated with mortality were considered. One hundred twelve intraabdominal arterial injuries were identified in 103 pediatric blunt trauma patients. Single arterial injury (92.2%) occurred most frequently: renal (36.9%), mesenteric (24.3%), and iliac (23.3%). Associated injuries were present in 96.1% of patients (abdominal visceral, 75.7%; major extraabdominal skeletal/visceral, 77.7%). Arterial control was obtained operatively (n = 46, 44.7%) or by endovascular means (n = 6, 5.8%) in 52 patients. Overall mortality was 15.5%. Increased mortality was associated with multiple arterial injuries (P = .049), intraabdominal venous injury (P = .011), head injury (P = .05), Glasgow Coma Score less than 8 (P cardiac arrest (P Trauma Score [P Injury Severity Score [P = .001], and TRISS [P = .002]). Blunt intraabdominal arterial injury in children usually affects a single vessel. Associated injuries appear to be nearly universal. The high mortality rate is influenced by serious associated injuries and is reflected by overall injury severity scores.

  13. Fatal Necrotizing Fasciitis in a Child following a Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohel Ocaña

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious soft tissue infection rarely occurring in children after blunt trauma. Due to its high morbidity and mortality rates, a high index of suspicion is necessary for prompt diagnosis and treatment. We describe a 6-year-old Costa Rican girl who died secondary to multiple complications following a posttraumatic necrotizing fasciitis.

  14. Fatal Necrotizing Fasciitis in a Child following a Blunt Chest Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Yohel Ocaña; Rolando Ulloa-Gutierrez; Adriana Yock-Corrales

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious soft tissue infection rarely occurring in children after blunt trauma. Due to its high morbidity and mortality rates, a high index of suspicion is necessary for prompt diagnosis and treatment. We describe a 6-year-old Costa Rican girl who died secondary to multiple complications following a posttraumatic necrotizing fasciitis.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of emergency-performed focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt abdominal trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri, Hamed Basir; Zare, Morteza; Bazrafshan, Azam; Modirian, Ehsan; Farahmand, Shervin; Abazarian, Niloofar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intra-abdominal hemorrhage due to blunt abdominal trauma is a major cause of trauma-related mortality. Therefore, any action taken for facilitating the diagnosis of intra-abdominal hemorrhage could save the lives of patients more effectively. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) performed by emergency physicians. Methods In this cross-sectional study from February 2011 to January 2012 at 7th Tir Hospital in Tehran (Iran), 120 patients with abdominal blunt trauma were chosen and evaluated for abdominal fluid. FAST sonography was performed for all the subjects by emergency residents and radiologists while they were blind to the other tests. Abdominal CTs, which is the gold standard, were done for all of the cases. SPSS 20.0 was used to analyze the results. Results During the study, 120 patients with abdominal blunt trauma were evaluated; the mean age of the patients was 33.0 ± 16.6 and the gender ratio was 3/1 (M/F). The results of FAST sonography by emergency physicians showed free fluid in the abdomen or pelvic spaces in 33 patients (27.5%), but this was not observed by the results of CT scans of six patients; sensitivity and specificity were 93.1 and 93.4%, respectively. As for tests performed by radiology residents, sensitivity was a bit higher (96.5%) with lower specificity (92.3%). Conclusion The results suggested that emergency physicians can use ultrasonography as a safe and reliable method in evaluating blunt abdominal trauma. PMID:27790349

  16. CT findings in children with blunt trauma in the spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiguchi, Hiroyasu; Shimizu, Toshihisa; Ohmura, Makoto; Kawai, Naoki; Tauchi, Hayato; Hayakawa, Masao; Nishio, Yoshinori (Kyoto Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)); Watanabe, Shinsuke

    1991-09-01

    We evaluated CT findings in 19 children with blunt injuries in the spleen. CT demonstrated laceration of the spleen in 7 children, rupture of the spleen in 7, and splenic hematoma in 5. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in 3 children, of whom 1 was treated by arterial embolization. Laparotomy was performed in 3 children (15.8%) other than the 3 showing contrast medium leakage; hemostasis by compression was performed in 1 with laceration, and splenectomy in 2 with rupture. Late splenic rupture or abscess did not occur in any child. One child (5.3%) died of complicating injuries. Many of children with blunt splenic injuries can be successfully treated with conservative treatment, and CT scanning is useful for evaluating the degree of splenic injuries and complicating injuries. (author).

  17. Blunt cardiac injury due to trauma associated with snowboarding: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Fuminori; Okada, Hideshi; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kodai; Yoshida, Takahiro; Mizuno, Yosuke; Okamoto, Haruka; Kitagawa, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Taku; Nakano, Shiho; Nachi, Sho; Doi, Tomoaki; Kumada, Keisuke; Yoshida, Shozo; Ishida, Narihiro; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Toyoda, Izumi; Doi, Kiyoshi; Ogura, Shinji

    2017-03-25

    Cardiac trauma is associated with a much higher mortality rate than injuries to other organ systems, even though cardiac trauma is identified in less than 10% of all trauma admissions. Here we report blunt trauma of the left atrium due to snowboarding trauma. A 45-year-old Asian man collided with a tree while he was snowboarding and drinking. He lost consciousness temporarily. An air ambulance was requested and he was transported to an advanced critical care center. On arrival, a pericardial effusion was detected by a focused assessment with sonography for trauma. His presenting electrocardiogram revealed normal sinus rhythm and complete right bundle branch block. Laboratory findings included a white blood cell count of 13.5 × 10 3 /μl, serum creatine kinase level of 459 IU/l, and creatine kinase-myocardial band level of 185 IU/l. Enhanced computed tomography showed a large pericardial effusion and bleeding from his left adrenal gland. There were no pelvic fractures. A diagnosis of cardiac tamponade due to blunt cardiac injury and left adrenal injury due to blunt trauma was made. Subsequently, emergency thoracic surgery and transcatheter arterial embolization of his left adrenal artery were performed simultaneously. A laceration of the left atrial appendage in the lateral wall of his left ventricle was detected intraoperatively and repaired. His postoperative course progressed favorably, although a pericardial effusion was still detected on chest computed tomography on hospital day 35. His electrocardiogram showed normal sinus rhythm and the complete right bundle branch block pattern changed to a narrow QRS wave pattern. He was discharged on hospital day 40. The present case report illustrates two points: (1) severe injuries resulted from snowboarding, and (2) complete right bundle branch block was caused by blunt cardiac injury. The present report showed blunt trauma of the left atrium with complete right bundle branch block as an electrocardiogram change

  18. Evaluation of gastrointestinal injury in blunt abdominal trauma "FAST is not reliable": the role of repeated ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Afshin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the diagnostic Accuracy of Focused Assessment Sonography for Trauma (FAST and repeated FAST in the patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Methods In this retrospective study we collected the data of all patients from September 2007 to July 2011 with gastrointestinal injury. The intraoperative outcome was compared with FAST technique and the repeated or delayed sonography. Results A total number of 1550 patients with blunt abdominal trauma underwent FAST in a period of 4 years in our hospital. Eighty-eight (5.67% patients were found to have gastrointestinal injury after exploratory laparotomy. Fifty-five (62.5% patients had isolated gastrointestinal injury and 33 (37.5% patients had concomitant injury to the other solid organs. In those with isolated gastrointestinal injury, the sensitivity of FAST was 38.5%. Repeated ultrsonography was performed in 34 patients with false negative initial FAST after 12-24 hours. The sensitivity of repeated ultrasonography in negative initial FAST patients in detection of gastrointestinal injury was 85.2% (95% CI, 68.1%, and 94.4%. Conclusion Repeated sonography after 12 to 24 hours in patients with negative initial FAST but sustain abdominal symptom can facilitated a diagnosis of GI tract injury and can be as effective method instead of Computed tomography in developing country.

  19. Blunt abdominal trauma with handlebar injury: A rare cause of traumatic amputation of the appendix associated with acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Jensen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe traumatic appendicitis in a 7-year-old boy who presented after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma to his right lower abdomen secondary to bicycle handlebar injury. With diffuse abdominal pain following injury, he was admitted for observation. Computed axial tomography (CT obtained at an outside hospital demonstrated moderate stranding of the abdomen in the right lower quadrant. The CT was non-contrasted and therefore significant appendiceal distention could not be confirmed. However, there was a calcified structure in the right pelvis with trace amount of free fluid. Patient was observed with conservative management and over the course of 15 h his abdominal pain continued to intensify. With his worsening symptoms, we elected to take him for diagnostic laparoscopy. In the operating room we found an inflamed traumatically amputated appendix with the mesoappendix intact. We therefore proceeded with laparoscopic appendectomy. Pathology demonstrated acute appendicitis with fecalith. It was unclear as to whether the patient's appendicitis and perforation were secondary to fecalith obstruction, his blunt abdominal trauma or if they concurrently caused his appendicitis. Acute appendicitis is a common acute surgical condition in the pediatric population and continues to be a rare and unique cause of operative intervention in the trauma population.

  20. FAST as a predictor of clinical outcome in blunt abdominal trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Terry, Benjamin M.; David Blehar; Romolo Gaspari; Arthur Thomas Maydell; Fourie Abraham Bezuidenhout; Savvas Andronikou

    2011-01-01

    Background. Peer-reviewed literature demonstrates increasing support for the use of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) in the setting of blunt trauma, one study demonstrating the sensitivity and specificity of FAST for the detection of free fluid to be 0.64 - 0.98 and 0.86 - 1.00, respectively, compared with abdominal CT. Utilising ultrasound in trauma triage increases efficiency and cost-effectiveness and reduces reliance on CT, compared with using CT alone. There is little eviden...

  1. Isolated epididymal injury after blunt scrotal trauma from high velocity paintball round.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Robert; Hoag, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Isolated epididymal injury without associated underlying scrotal or testicular injury in the setting of blunt trauma is exceedingly rare. We present a case of an isolated epididymal injury incurred after scrotal trauma from a high velocity paintball round. Ultrasound demonstrated an enlarged, hypoechoic left epididymis with no evidence of underlying testicular injury. This case highlights the importance of obtaining imaging to evaluate for signs of testicular rupture, potentially obviating the need for surgery. It also reinforces the need for appropriate protective gear when participating in activities with potential for high velocity scrotal trauma.

  2. Concomitant aortic valve and internal mammary artery injuries in blunt chest trauma: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, Chi-Hsun; Wang, Yu-Chun; Chung, Ping-Kuei; Chen, Ray-Jade

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of concomitant injury to the aortic valve and internal mammary artery (IMA) from nonpenetrating chest trauma. To our knowledge, this is the first such case to be reported. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) following diagnostic angiography offers an effective and minimally invasive treatment for traumatic IMA injuries. Because there might be an asymptomatic interval after traumatic aortic valve injuries, serial physical examinations and repeated echocardiography should be mandatory for patients with de novo heart failure after blunt chest trauma. Transesophageal echocardiography can provide a clearer image of cardiac injuries than transthoracic echocardiography, particularly if there is extensive anterior mediastinal hematoma resulting from IMA trauma.

  3. False negative pericardial Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma examination following cardiac rupture from blunt thoracic trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Laura; Almadani, Ammar; Ball, Chad G

    2015-07-15

    The Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma examination is an invaluable tool in the initial assessment of any injured patient. Although highly sensitive and accurate for identifying hemoperitoneum, occasional false negative results do occur in select scenarios. We present a previously unreported case of survival following blunt cardiac rupture with associated negative pericardial window due to a concurrent pericardial wall laceration. A healthy 46-year-old white woman presented to our level 1 trauma center with hemodynamic instability following a motor vehicle collision. Although her abdominal Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma windows were positive for fluid, her pericardial window was negative. After immediate transfer to the operating room in the setting of persistent instability, a subsequent thoracotomy identified a blunt cardiac rupture that was draining into the ipsilateral pleural space via an adjacent tear in the pericardium. The cardiac injury was controlled with digital pressure, resuscitation completed, and then repaired using standard cardiorrhaphy techniques. Following repair of her injuries (left ventricle, left atrial appendage, and liver), her postoperative course was uneventful. Evaluation of the pericardial space using Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma is an important component in the initial assessment of the severely injured patient. Even in cases of blunt mechanisms however, clinicians must be wary of occasional false negative pericardial ultrasound evaluations secondary to a concomitant pericardial laceration and subsequent decompression of hemorrhage from the cardiac rupture into the ipsilateral pleural space.

  4. The effect of resuscitation strategy on the longitudinal immuno-inflammatory response to blunt trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Alexander; Nordestgaard, Ask Tybjærg; Kirial, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Resuscitation strategies following blunt trauma have been linked to immuno-inflammatory complications leading to systemic inflammatory syndrome (SIRS), sepsis and multiple organ failure (MOF). The effect of resuscitation strategy on longitudinal inflammation marker trajectories is......, however, unknown. We hypothesized that the effect of resuscitation strategy extends beyond the trauma-related coagulopathy, perhaps affecting the longitudinal immuno-inflammatory response to injury. METHODS: We analyzed data prospectively collected for the Inflammation and Host Response to Injury (Glue...... Grant) study. Blood sampling for inflammation marker analyses from blunt trauma patients was done on admission days 0, 1, 4, 7, 14, 21 and 28 where applicable. Total volume transfused of packed red blood cells (PRBC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), platelets (PLT), and crystalloids during the initial 48h...

  5. Ureteral rupture after blunt abdominal trauma in a child with unknown horseshoe kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Mariotto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available More than 90% of renal injuries in children result from blunt abdominal trauma. A 10-year-old female had a blunt abdominal trauma with macro-hematuria. The computed tomography scan revealed the presence of a horseshoe kidney and a 3rd grade renal lesion and contrast leakage from the right ureter. The ureteral rupture was confirmed by cystoscopy and ascendant pyelography and than a double J-stent was implanted. The stent was removed one month later. Non-surgical management has become the standard of care for both ureteral and renal lesions in children. Non-surgical treatment is a safe procedure for renal trauma with ureteral rupture in children.

  6. Fracture pattern interpretation in the skull: differentiating blunt force from ballistics trauma using concentric fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Gina O

    2005-11-01

    There have been several anthropological studies on trauma analysis in recent literature, but few studies have focused on the differences between the three mechanisms of trauma (sharp force trauma, blunt force trauma and ballistics trauma). The hypothesis of this study is that blunt force and ballistics fracture patterns in the skull can be differentiated using concentric fractures. Two-hundred and eleven injuries from skulls exhibiting concentric fractures were examined to determine if the mechanism of trauma could be determined by beveling direction. Fractures occurring in buttressed and non-buttressed regions were examined separately. Contingency tables and Pearson's Chi-Square were used to evaluate the relationship between the two variables (the mechanism of trauma and the direction of beveling), while Pearson's r correlation was used to determine the strength of the relationship. Contingency tables and Chi-square tests among the entire sample, the buttressed areas, and the non-buttressed areas led to the null hypothesis (no relationship) to be rejected. Pearson's r correlation indicated that the relationship between the variables studied is greater than chance allocation.

  7. Alveolar macrophage phagocytosis is enhanced after blunt chest trauma and alters the posttraumatic mediator release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Daniel H; Palmer, Annette; Niesler, Ulrike; Fröba, Janine S; Heidemann, Vera; Rittlinger, Anne; Braumüller, Sonja T; Zhou, Shaoxia; Gebhard, Florian; Knöferl, Markus W

    2011-12-01

    Blunt chest trauma is known to induce a pulmonary invasion of short-lived polymorphonuclear neutrophils and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial type 2 (AT2) cells. Apoptotic cells are removed by alveolar macrophages (AMΦ). We hypothesized that chest trauma alters the phagocytic response of AMΦ as well as the mediator release of AMΦ during phagocytosis. To study this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to blunt chest trauma. Phagocytosis assays were performed in AMΦ isolated 2 or 24 h after trauma with apoptotic cells or opsonized beads. Phagocytosis of apoptotic AT2 cells by unstimulated AMΦ was significantly increased 2 h after trauma. At 24 h, AMΦ from traumatized animals, stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, ingested significantly more apoptotic polymorphonuclear neutrophils than AMΦ from sham animals. Alveolar macrophages after trauma released significantly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 when they incorporated latex beads, but significantly lower levels of interleukin 1β and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α when they ingested apoptotic cells. In vivo, phagocytosis of intratracheally instilled latex beads was decreased in traumatized rats. The bronchoalveolar lavage concentrations of the phagocytosis-supporting surfactant proteins A and D after blunt chest trauma were slightly decreased, whereas surfactant protein D mRNA expression in AT2 cells was significantly increased after 2 h. These findings indicate that chest trauma augments the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by AMΦ. Phagocytosis of opsonized beads enhances and ingestion of apoptotic cells downregulates the immunologic response following lung contusion. Our data emphasize the important role of phagocytosis during posttraumatic inflammation after lung contusion.

  8. Spinal cord injury and its association with blunt head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva WS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wellingson S Paiva, Arthur MP Oliveira, Almir F Andrade, Robson LO Amorim, Leonardo JO Lourenço, Manoel J TeixeiraDivision of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Severe and moderate head injury can cause misdiagnosis of a spinal cord injury, leading to devastating long-term consequences. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors involving spine trauma and moderate-to-severe brain injury.Methods: A prospective study involving 1617 patients admitted in the emergency unit was carried out. Of these patients, 180 with moderate or severe head injury were enrolled. All patients were submitted to three-view spine series X-ray and thin cut axial CT scans for spine trauma investigations.Results: 112 male patients and 78 female patients, whose ages ranged from 11 to 76 years (mean age, 34 years. The most common causes of brain trauma were pedestrians struck by motor vehicles (31.1%, car crashes (27.7%, and falls (25%. Systemic lesions were present in 80 (44.4% patients and the most common were fractures, and lung and spleen injuries. 52.8% had severe and 47.2% moderate head trauma. Fourteen patients (7.8% suffered spinal cord injury (12 in cervical spine, one in lumbar, and one thoracic spine. In elderly patients, the presence of associated lesions and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS < 9 were statistically significant as risk factors (P < 0.05 for spine injury.Conclusion: Spinal cord injury related to moderate and severe brain trauma usually affects the cervical spine. The incidence of spinal lesions and GCS < 9 points were related to greater incidence of spinal cord injury.Keywords: head injury, spine trauma, risk factors

  9. Dissection of the left main coronary artery after blunt thoracic trauma: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beilman Greg

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Blunt chest trauma is commonly encountered by surgeons and is rarely associated with cardiac injuries. The incidence of cardiac injury is rare but can be rapidly fatal, requiring prompt recognition and treatment. We review the case of a 37 year-old male who was involved in a head-on motor vehicle collision at highway speed and was found to have an isolated left main coronary artery dissection. We then review the supporting literature for evaluation of blunt cardiac injuries and the treatment options for traumatic coronary dissection.

  10. Cardiac injuries caused by blunt trauma: an autopsy based assessment of the injury pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Arzu Akcay; Karayel, Ferah Anik; Akyildiz, Elif; Pakis, Isil; Uzun, Ibrahim; Gurpinar, Kagan; Atilmis, Umit; Kir, Ziya

    2010-01-01

    Nonpenetrating chest trauma with injury to the heart and aorta has become increasingly common, particularly as a result of rapid deceleration in high-speed vehicular accidents, over the past 2-3 decades. The high mortality rate of cardiac injuries and possible late onset complications make blunt cardiac injuries an important challenging point for legal medicine. One hundred and ninety cases with blunt cardiac injuries in a period of 3 years were analyzed retrospectively in terms of patterns of cardiac injury, survival times, and demographic profiles of the cases in this study.

  11. Mothers' unresolved trauma blunts amygdala response to infant distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the neurobiology of post-traumatic stress disorder has been extensively researched, much less attention has been paid to the neural mechanisms underlying more covert but pervasive types of trauma (e.g., those involving disrupted relationships and insecure attachment). Here, we report on a neur...

  12. AAST grade III pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grade III pancreatic injury (complete transection of the distal body of the pancreas) (Fig. 1a). A localised fluid collection was identified in the lesser sac. The patient proceeded to theatre and underwent exploratory laparotomy. The radiological diagnosis was confirmed intra- operatively (Fig.

  13. Blunt abdominal trauma: changing patterns in diagnostic and treatment strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vlies, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    Een stomp trauma van de buik (door bijvoorbeeld een auto-ongeluk, een val van grote hoogte, een stuur in de buik) is de meest voorkomende oorzaak van buikletsel in Nederland. Cees van der Vlies keek naar de diagnostiek en behandeling van patiënten. Een CT-scan is de gouden standaard om stomp

  14. Does increased prehospital time lead to a "trial of life" effect for patients with blunt trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Thomas W; Vogt, Kelly; Hameed, S Morad; Parry, Neil; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Grondin, Sean C; Dixon, Elijah; McKee, Jessica; Ball, Chad G

    2017-08-01

    Variance in prehospital time among severely injured blunt trauma patients is dependent upon numerous factors. Effects on subsequent mortality and trauma team activation (TTA) rates are also unclear. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between prehospital time and mortality at level I trauma referral centers amongst critically blunt injured patients. This multiinstitutional study from three geographically distinct level I trauma centers analyzed all severely blunt injured patients (Injury Severity Score [ISS] ≥12). The relationship between prehospital time and survival was evaluated. Secondary outcomes included the association between prehospital time and TTA. Standard statistical methodology was used (P prehospital time interval increased, overall mortality decreased (0-30 min = 24.1%; 31-60 min = 14.7%; 61-90 min = 10.3%; 91-120 min = 10.4%; 121-150 min = 10.2%; P prehospital times have a substantially lower risk of subsequent mortality. This concept should contribute to decision-making with regard to TTA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Rare Case of Large Bowel Injury due to Direct Blunt Trauma to a Preexisting Femoral Hernia

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    C. Tinner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an 85-year-old man with a known asymptomatic left femoral hernia who was admitted to the emergency ward a few hours after falling from a bicycle and suffering from blunt trauma of the handlebar to the left inguinal region. The clinical findings and a computed tomography (CT scan detecting free air in the femoral hernia sac suggested bowel perforation. Emergency laparotomy 6 hours after the incident confirmed a tear of the sigmoid colon accompanied by free blood and faeces in the left inguinal region of the abdomen. A segmental sigmoid resection and a primary end-to-end colorectal anastomosis were performed. The postoperative course was complicated by delayed oral feeding, a local infection, and a partial left testicle necrosis that led to secondary resection. The patient was discharged after 32 days of in-hospital care. Three months post trauma, we recorded a restitutio ad integrum. The case exemplifies that blunt trauma to preexisting femoral hernias may cause potentially lethal bowel perforation and that the time interval between time of injury and surgical treatment may be a prognostic factor. CT scans seem most suitable for ruling out bowel perforation. The scarce literature for blunt trauma to hernias is reviewed.

  16. Extremity injuries as predictors of emergency care resource needs among blunt trauma patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Shinji; Matsuoka, Tetsuya; Ueno, Masato; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Ichikawa, Masao; Yokota, Junichiro

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to exhaustively examine associations between prehospital variables and emergency care resource needs among blunt trauma patients. The study included blunt trauma patients aged 15 years or older who were admitted to a tertiary care medical center in Osaka, Japan, from January 2005 to December 2009. The primary end point was a composite measure of overall emergency care resource needs. Predictive variables were easily detectable upper and lower extremity injuries. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify associations between the predictive variables and the end point; this model included other covariates known to be associated with emergency care resource needs (demographic characteristics, mechanism of injury, and physiological parameters). Of 982 blunt trauma patients, 81 died, and 573 required overall emergency care resources. Upper extremity injury (odds ratio [OR], 2.60) and lower extremity injury (OR, 4.50) were significantly associated with overall emergency care resource needs after controlling for other covariates. The results of this study suggest that easily detectable extremity injuries may be useful predictors of the emergency care resource needs of trauma patients. Further studies are needed to validate the predictive values of these injuries and to determine ways to use information about extremity injuries to improve triage decisions.

  17. Delayed Surgery in a Complex Trauma Patient with Aortic Rupture, Blunt Head Trauma and Liver Laceration: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Lin Lin

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Aortic rupture is a critical condition in trauma patients. Most patients are killed at the scene of the accident. A patient who survives long enough to reach hospital also has a high risk of rupture during management. We report a patient who was transferred from a municipal hospital with the emergency complex of blunt head trauma and chest and abdominal contusion. Chest computed tomography scan revealed aortic rupture. Liver laceration with hemodynamic stability and brain concussion were also diagnosed in the emergency room. She was admitted to the trauma intensive care unit without emergency surgery. She received aorta repair after 5 days of observation. After the operation, the patient recovered very well. Delayed surgery for aortic rupture as a treatment choice may be of benefit in selected complex trauma cases.

  18. Severity and treatment of "occult" intra-abdominal injuries in blunt trauma victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, José G; Oliari, Camilla B; Malpaga, Juliano M D; Perlingeiro, Jacqueline A G; Soldá, Silvia C; Assef, José C

    2016-01-01

    to assess the severity and treatment of "occult" intra-abdominal injuries in blunt trauma victims. Retrospective analysis of charts and trauma register data of adult blunt trauma victims, admitted without abdominal pain or alterations in the abdominal physical examination, but were subsequently diagnosed with intra-abdominal injuries, in a period of 2 years. The severity was stratified according to RTS, AIS, OIS and ISS. The specific treatment for abdominal injuries and the complications related to them were assessed. Intra-abdominal injuries were diagnosed in 220 (3.8%) out of the 5785 blunt trauma victims and 76 (34.5%) met the inclusion criteria. The RTS and ISS median (lower quartile, upper quartile) were 7.84 (6.05, 7.84) and 25 (16, 34). Sixty seven percent had a GCS≥13 on admission. Injuries were identified in the spleen (34), liver (33), kidneys (9), intestines (4), diaphragm (3), bladder (3) and iliac vessels (1). Abdominal injuries scored AIS≥3 in 67% of patients. Twenty-one patients (28%) underwent laparotomy, 5 of which were nontherapeutic. The surgical procedures performed were splenectomy (8), suturing of the diaphragm (3), intestines (3), bladder (2), kidneys (1), enterectomy/anastomosis (1), ligation of the common iliac vein (1), and revascularization of the common iliac artery (1). Angiography and embolization of liver and/or spleen injuries were performed in 3 cases. Three patients developed abdominal complications, all of which were operatively treated. There were no deaths directly related to the abdominal injuries. Severe "occult" intra-abdominal injuries, requiring specific treatment, may be present in adult blunt trauma patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Intravenous hemostatic nanoparticles increase survival following blunt trauma injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall, Andrew J; Atkins, Kristyn T; Groynom, Rebecca E; Varley, Matthew E; Everhart, Lydia M; Lashof-Sullivan, Margaret M; Martyn-Dow, Blaine; Butler, Robert S; Ustin, Jeffrey S; Lavik, Erin B

    2012-11-12

    Trauma is the leading cause of death for people ages 1-44, with blood loss comprising 60-70% of mortality in the absence of lethal CNS or cardiac injury. Immediate intervention is critical to improving chances of survival. While there are several products to control bleeding for external and compressible wounds, including pressure dressings, tourniquets, or topical materials (e.g., QuikClot, HemCon), there are no products that can be administered in the field for internal bleeding. There is a tremendous unmet need for a hemostatic agent to address internal bleeding in the field. We have developed hemostatic nanoparticles (GRGDS-NPs) that reduce bleeding times by ~50% in a rat femoral artery injury model. Here, we investigated their impact on survival following administration in a lethal liver resection injury in rats. Administration of these hemostatic nanoparticles reduced blood loss following the liver injury and dramatically and significantly increased 1 h survival from 40 and 47% in controls (inactive nanoparticles and saline, respectively) to 80%. Furthermore, we saw no complications following administration of these nanoparticles. We further characterized the nanoparticles' effect on clotting time (CT) and maximum clot firmness (MCF) using rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM), a clinical measurement of whole-blood coagulation. Clotting time is significantly reduced, with no change in MCF. Administration of these hemostatic nanoparticles after massive trauma may help staunch bleeding and improve survival in the critical window following injury, and this could fundamentally change trauma care.

  20. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Wolbrom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma.

  1. Isolated Avulsion of the Common Hepatic Duct from Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor W. Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated extrahepatic biliary tract injury following blunt abdominal trauma is rare. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms remain obscure, but include shear and/or compression forces on the biliary system. Associated morbidity rates are high and largely the result of delays in diagnosis. Imaging modalities commonly employed for diagnosis include ultrasonography, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and magnetic resonance imaging. Percutaneous and endoscopic techniques have been used both for diagnosis and treatment. Treatment options are dictated by the stability of the patient and the extent of bile duct and concomitant injuries. In this paper, we discuss a case of isolated avulsion of the hepatic duct confluence following blunt trauma that was successfully managed with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. To our knowledge, this specific injury pattern has not been previously reported.

  2. Experimental blunt chest trauma-induced myocardial inflammation and alteration of gap-junction protein connexin 43.

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    Miriam Kalbitz

    Full Text Available Severe blunt chest trauma in humans is associated with high mortality rates. Whereas lung tissue damage and lung inflammation after blunt chest trauma have extensively been investigated, the traumatic and posttraumatic effects on the heart remain poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to define cardiac injury patterns in an experimental blunt chest trauma model in rats.Experimental blunt chest trauma was induced by a blast wave in rats, with subsequent analysis of its effects on the heart. The animals were subjected either to a sham or trauma procedure. Systemic markers for cardiac injury were determined after 24 h and 5 days. Postmortem analysis of heart tissue addressed structural injury and inflammation 24 h and 5 days after trauma.Plasma levels of extracellular histones were elevated 24 h and 5 days after blunt chest trauma compared to sham-treated animals. In the heart, up-regulation of interleukin-1β 24 h after trauma and increased myeloperoxidase activity 24 h and 5 days after trauma were accompanied by reduced complement C5a receptor-1 expression 24 h after trauma. Histological analysis revealed extravasation of erythrocytes and immunohistochemical analysis alteration of the pattern of the gap-junction protein connexin 43. Furthermore, a slight reduction of α-actinin and desmin expression in cardiac tissue was found after trauma together with a minor increase in sarcoplasmatic/endoplasmatic reticlulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA expression.The clinically highly relevant rat model of blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma is associated with cardiac inflammation and structural alterations in cardiac tissue.

  3. Experimental blunt chest trauma-induced myocardial inflammation and alteration of gap-junction protein connexin 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbitz, Miriam; Amann, Elisa Maria; Bosch, Belinda; Palmer, Annette; Schultze, Anke; Pressmar, Jochen; Weber, Birte; Wepler, Martin; Gebhard, Florian; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Brenner, Rolf; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Severe blunt chest trauma in humans is associated with high mortality rates. Whereas lung tissue damage and lung inflammation after blunt chest trauma have extensively been investigated, the traumatic and posttraumatic effects on the heart remain poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to define cardiac injury patterns in an experimental blunt chest trauma model in rats. Experimental blunt chest trauma was induced by a blast wave in rats, with subsequent analysis of its effects on the heart. The animals were subjected either to a sham or trauma procedure. Systemic markers for cardiac injury were determined after 24 h and 5 days. Postmortem analysis of heart tissue addressed structural injury and inflammation 24 h and 5 days after trauma. Plasma levels of extracellular histones were elevated 24 h and 5 days after blunt chest trauma compared to sham-treated animals. In the heart, up-regulation of interleukin-1β 24 h after trauma and increased myeloperoxidase activity 24 h and 5 days after trauma were accompanied by reduced complement C5a receptor-1 expression 24 h after trauma. Histological analysis revealed extravasation of erythrocytes and immunohistochemical analysis alteration of the pattern of the gap-junction protein connexin 43. Furthermore, a slight reduction of α-actinin and desmin expression in cardiac tissue was found after trauma together with a minor increase in sarcoplasmatic/endoplasmatic reticlulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA) expression. The clinically highly relevant rat model of blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma is associated with cardiac inflammation and structural alterations in cardiac tissue.

  4. Delayed Presentations of Blunt Mesenteric and Intestinal Trauma in the Wake of Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yair, Edden; Miklosh, Bala; Orit, Pappo; Avraham, Rivkind; Gidon, Almogy

    2008-06-01

    To analyze the presentation and timing of blunt mesenteric and intestinal trauma requiring surgical intervention. The Hadassah-Hebrew University trauma registry was scanned for patients who required surgery following blunt mesenteric and/or bowel trauma. Demographic data, mechanism of injury, time to diagnosis and pathology reports were recorded. A literature search was also performed. The majority of patients were injured in motor vehicle accidents (26/30, 86.7%). Patients were divided into three groups. Seventeen patients diagnosed within 4 h of admission were defined as the immediate group. Indication for surgery was hemodynamic instability and/or peritonitis. The most commonly injured region was the terminal ileum (10/17 patients, 59%). The second group (n = 4) had surgery within 2 weeks of injury (early group). These patients presented initially with hemodynamic instability. The operative findings were consistent with a low-flow state of the terminal ileum and cecum. The third group (n = 9) consisted of patients who were operated later than 2 weeks from the date of injury (late group). These patients presented with prolonged abdominal symptoms, chiefly partial small bowel obstruction. Operative findings were bowel strictures, most commonly of the terminal ileum (7/9 patients, 77.8%). Acceleration-deceleration abdominal injury affects the terminal ileum more commonly. We propose that the ensuing clinical picture depends on the level of energy transmitted: high-energy trauma leads to extensive mesenteric and bowel tears and is diagnosed immediately. Low-energy trauma may lead to chronic ischemia, fibrosis and stricture-formation. The right colon appears to be more vulnerable to lowflow states following blunt trauma.

  5. Predictive factors of operative or nonoperative management of blunt hepatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markogiannakis, H; Sanidas, E; Michalakis, I; Manouras, A; Melissas, J; Tsiftsis, D

    2008-06-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) has revolutionized the care of blunt hepatic trauma patients. The aim of the present study was to identify and evaluate the predictors of NOM of these patients. The Trauma Registry data of 55 consecutive adult patients admitted with blunt hepatic trauma over a 4-year period was reviewed. Patients were divided into immediately operated (OP-group) and selected for NOM (NOM-group). Factors analyzed were: demographics, injury mechanism, initial vital signs, liver injury grade, concomitant injuries, and total injury severity scoring systems. Concomitant abdominal trauma, high Injury Severity Score (ISS), low International Classification of Diseases 9(th) revision Injury Severity Score (ICISS), and low probability of survival (Ps) were predictors for operative management. Compared to NOM-patients (66%, N=36), OP-patients (34%, N=19) suffered more frequently concomitant abdominal injuries (84.2% vs 47.2%, P=0.004) and were more severely totally injured as expressed by higher ISS (25 vs 20, P=0.01), lower ICISS (0.51 vs 0.74, P=0.003), and lower Ps (0.81 vs 0.98, P=0.005). NOM resulted in lower intensive care unit admission and mortality rates (47.2% vs 78.9%, P=0.002 and 2.7% vs 15.8%, P=0.03, respectively). NOM-success rate was 92%. NOM of blunt hepatic trauma is safe and efficient. Concomitant abdominal trauma, ISS, ICISS, and Ps are predictors for operative or nonoperative management.

  6. Pseudoaneurysm of the breast after blunt trauma: successful treatment with ultrasound-guided compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hadidy, Azmy M; Al Najar, Mahasen S; Farah, Ghassan R; Tarawneh, Emad S

    2008-09-01

    We present a case of breast pseudoaneurysm following a blunt trauma in a 58-year-old woman. Few cases of breast pseudoaneurysm have been reported in the literature, and most of these are related to previous interventional procedures. Pseudoaneurysm was suspected on real-time sonography and confirmed with color Doppler and spectral wave analysis, which revealed a characteristic to-and-fro pattern. Unlike previously reported cases, treatmentwith ultrasound-guided compression was successful. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Inferior subconjunctival dislocation of posterior chamber intraocular lens after blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic subconjunctival dislocation of the posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL is a rare and emergency condition. Here, we report an interesting variation of rare case of inferior subconjuctival dislocation of PCIOL in a 75-year-old female patient following blunt trauma to her right eye with cow's head. All the previous literature with subconjuctival dislocation of PCIOL has reported the superior dislocation of intraocular lens. Inferior subconjunctival dislocation has never been reported in previous literature.

  8. Blunt cardiac injury in critically ill trauma patients: a single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, D L; Laing, G L; Rodseth, R N; Ryan, L; Hardcastle, T C; Muckart, D J J

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the incidence and outcomes of blunt cardiac injury (BCI) in a single trauma intensive care unit (TICU), together with the spectrum of thoracic injuries and cardiac abnormalities seen in BCI. We performed a retrospective observational study of 169 patients with blunt thoracic trauma admitted from January 2010 to April 2013. BCI was diagnosed using an elevated serum troponin in the presence of either clinical, ECG or transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) abnormalities in keeping with BCI. The mechanism of injury, associated thoracic injuries and TTE findings in these patients are reported. The incidence of BCI among patients with blunt thoracic trauma was 50% (n=84). BCI patients had higher injury severity scores (ISS) (median 37 [IQR 29-47]; p=0.001) and higher admission serum lactate levels (median 3.55 [IQR 2.4-6.2], p=0.008). In patients with BCI, the median serum TnI level was 2823ng/L (IQR 1353-6833), with the highest measurement of 64950ng/L. TTEs were performed on 38 (45%) patients with BCI, of whom 30 (79%) had abnormalities. Patients with BCI had a higher mortality (32% vs. 16%; p=0.028) and trended towards a longer length of stay (17.0 days [standard deviation (SD) 13.5] vs. 13.6 days [SD 12.0]; p=0.084). BCI was associated with an increased mortality and a trend towards a longer length of stay in this study. It is a clinically relevant diagnosis which requires a high index of suspicion. Screening of high risk patients with significant blunt thoracic trauma for BCI with serum troponins should be routine practise. Patients diagnosed with BCI should undergo more advanced imaging such as TTE or TOE to exclude significant cardiac structural injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Right ventricular perforation by a rib fragment following blunt thoracic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pometlová, J; Pleva, L; Sír, M; Gloger, J; Chmelová, J

    2011-11-01

    Blunt chest trauma produces a variety of injuries. Penetrating cardiac injuries from rib fractures are extremely rare. We report the unusual case of a patient with multiple rib fractures and penetrating cardiac injury from dislocated segment of fractured VIII left rib. We did find eight patients reported in the literature having penetrating cardiac injuries from rib fractures. The clinical finding and the diagnosis of this injuries are discussed.

  10. Cardiac changes after simulated behind armor blunt trauma or impact of nonlethal kinetic projectile ammunition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Sebastian N; Arborelius, Ulf P; Gryth, Dan; Sonden, Anders; Gustavsson, Jenny; Wangyal, Tashi; Svensson, Leif; Rocksén, David

    2011-11-01

    Cardiac-related injuries caused by blunt chest trauma remain a severe problem. The aim of this study was to investigate pathophysiological changes in the heart that might arise after behind armor blunt trauma or impacts of nonlethal projectiles. Sixteen pigs were shot directly at the sternum with "Sponge Round eXact I Mpact" (nonlethal ammunition; diameter 40 mm and weight 28 g) or hard-plastic ammunition (diameter 65 mm and weight 58 g) to simulate behind armor blunt trauma. To evaluate the influence of the shot location, seven additional pigs where exposed to an oblique heart shot. Physiologic parameters, electrocardiography, echocardiogram, the biochemical marker troponin I (TnI), and myocardial injuries were analyzed. Nonlethal kinetic projectiles (101-108 m/s; 143-163 J) did not cause significant pathophysiological changes. Five of 18 pigs shot with 65-mm plastic projectiles (99-133 m/s; 284-513 J) to the front or side of the thorax died directly after the shot. No major physiologic changes could be observed in surviving animals. Animals shot with an oblique heart shot (99-106 m/s; 284-326 J) demonstrated a small, but significant decrease in saturation. Energy levels over 300 J caused increased TnI and myocardial damages in most of the pigs. This study indicates that nonlethal kinetic projectiles "eXact iMpact" does not cause heart-related damage under the examined conditions. On impact, sudden heart arrest may occur independently from the cardiac's electrical cycle. The cardiac enzyme, TnI, can be used as a reliable diagnostic marker to detect heart tissue damages after blunt chest trauma.

  11. Selective common and uncommon imaging manifestations of blunt nonaortic chest trauma: when time is of the essence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altoos, Rola; Carr, Robert; Chung, Jonathan; Stern, Eric; Nevrekar, Dipti

    2015-01-01

    This is a pictorial essay in which we review and illustrate a variety of thoracic injuries related to blunt trauma. Non-aortic blunt thoracic trauma can be divided anatomically into injuries of the chest wall, lungs, pleura, mediastinum, and diaphragm. Some injuries involve more than one anatomic compartment, and multiple injuries commonly coexist. This article provides common imaging findings and discussion of both common and uncommon but critical thoracic injuries encountered. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Mitral Perivalvular Leak after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Rare Cause of Severe Subacute Mitral Regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Nicola; Facciorusso, Antonio; Vigna, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Blunt chest trauma is a very rare cause of valve disorder. Moreover, mitral valve involvement is less frequent than is aortic or tricuspid valve involvement, and the clinical course is usually acute. In the present report, we describe the case of a 49-year-old man with a perivalvular mitral injury that became clinically manifest one year after a violent, nonpenetrating chest injury. This case is atypical in regard to the valve involved (isolated mitral damage), the injury type (perivalvular leak in the absence of subvalvular abnormalities), and the clinical course (interval of one year between trauma and symptoms).

  13. Comparison of PECARN and CATCH clinical decision rules in children with minor blunt head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozan, Ö; Aksel, G; Kahraman, H A; Giritli, Ö; Eroğlu, S E

    2017-10-25

    Computerized brain tomography (CBT) imaging plays a key role in the management of patients with head trauma, and there is an indication for CBT in moderate and severe injuries. However, it is difficult to determine an indication for CBT in patients with minor head trauma. The primary aim of this study is to compare the efficiency of the most commonly used clinical decision rules: the guidelines of the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN), and those of the Canadian Assessment of Tomography for Childhood Head Injury (CATCH). The study, which was designed as a prospective cohort study, sought to determine the appropriate CBT indications for children younger than 18 years who were referred to the emergency department with minor blunt head trauma. The effectiveness of PECARN and CATCH clinical decision rules, which are recommended by literature to be applied in order to diagnose severely injured patients and minimize inappropriate CBT requests, was investigated. All patients included in this study were younger than 18 years of age, were admitted to the study with an isolated blunt head trauma, had a GCS of > 13, and had parental permission to participate in the study. Patients ages 18 and older, those with penetrating head trauma or trauma to other systems, those with GCS ≤ 13, those with incomplete data, and those whose parents did not agree to participate in the study, were excluded. A total of 256 patients were included in the study. PECARN and CATCH rules were both shown to be statistically significant in detecting the presence of pathology (p CBT for children with minor blunt head trauma, PECARN proved to be more useful for emergency services because of its higher sensitivity. The authors suggest that conducting a CBT scan based on clinical decision rules may be a suitable approach for early detection of the presence of intracranial acute pathologies in young children with minor blunt head trauma, especially if the GCS score is <

  14. Histone deactylase gene expression profiles are associated with outcomes in blunt trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, such as valproic acid, increases survival in animal models of trauma and sepsis. Valproic acid is a pan-inhibitor that blocks most of the known HDAC isoforms. Targeting individual HDAC isoforms may increase survival and reduce...... complications, but little is known of the natural history of HDAC gene expression following trauma. We hypothesized that distinct HDAC isoform gene expression patterns would be associated with differences in outcomes following trauma. METHODS: Twenty-eight-day longitudinal HDAC leukocyte gene expression...... profiles in 172 blunt trauma patients were extracted from the Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury (Glue Grant) data set. Outcome was classified as complicated (death or no recovery by Day 28, n = 51) or uncomplicated (n = 121). Mixed modeling was used to compare the HDAC expression trajectories...

  15. Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia: A Rare Cause of Cardiac Arrest Following Blunt Chest Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyilmaz, Isa; Ozyilmaz, Sinem; Ergul, Yakup; Akdeniz, Celal; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2015-07-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an electrophysiological disorder of a physically normal heart that occurs in children when the body is subjected to intense emotional or physical stress that causes adrenergic discharge. This troubling disease can be sporadic (spontaneous) or familial (genetic/inherited). Unfortunately, its associated ventricular tachycardia may cause sudden death, so early diagnosis of CPVT is very important. Treatment modalities include medical treatment, implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator, or surgical sympatectomy; but the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) should be the first choice in patients with a history of cardiac arrest. We herein present the case of a patient diagnosed with CPVT after a successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation triggered by blunt chest trauma. We implanted an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and started oral B-blocker treatment. During the course of follow-up, flecainide was added to his treatment depending on the patient's status regarding recurrent ICD shock. The patient has now continued follow-up without recurrent ICD shock since flecainide treatment was initiated. In conclusion, in patients with syncope and sudden cardiac arrest secondary to physical stress or blunt chest trauma, CPVT should be considered and an implantable cardioverter defibrillator must be implanted. Additionally, flecainide theraphy should be considered to decrease recurrent ICD shock. Blunt chest trauma; Cardiac arrest; CPVT.

  16. Acute radiographic workup of blunt temporal bone trauma: maxillofacial versus temporal bone CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempewolf, Ryan; Gubbels, Sam; Hansen, Marlan R

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the radiographic workup of blunt temporal bone trauma and determine the utility of maxillofacial computed tomography (CT) versus temporal bone CT in identifying carotid canal fractures. Retrospective review. The charts of 227 patients evaluated at a level I trauma center receiving a temporal bone CT for blunt head trauma within 48 hours of admission were reviewed. Acute evaluation findings and complications were noted. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive (NPV) value were calculated for maxillofacial CT's ability to identify carotid canal fractures compared to temporal bone CT. One hundred forty fractures were found. Physical exam findings of blood in the external auditory canal as the sole finding, and blood in the external auditory canal with associated hemotympanum were significantly associated with absence and presence of fracture respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of maxillofacial CT for identifying carotid canal fractures, when compared to temporal bone CT, were 90.3% and 94.4% respectively (NPV > 95%). Only 6% of all patients either did have or should have had their management changed based on the temporal bone CT findings. All of these changes were regarding further workup for blunt carotid artery injury. A combination of helical computed tomography and physical exam findings can allow for judicious use of temporal bone CTs when no maxillofacial CT is indicated. Temporal bone CTs rarely change acute management. But when they do, it is in regard to the need for further workup of possible vascular injury. Lastly, maxillofacial CTs are adequate for identifying carotid canal fractures.

  17. Negative predictive value of cardiac troponin for predicting adverse cardiac events following blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, Cameron S; deShazo, Matthew; Geraci, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac-specific troponins (Tns) are sensitive and specific markers of myocardial injury that have been shown to be predictive of outcomes in many cardiac and noncardiac conditions. We sought to determine whether normal cardiac Tn concentrations obtained during the first 24 hours following blunt chest trauma would predict good cardiac outcomes. A PubMed/MEDLINE search was performed to identify prospective studies in patients with blunt chest trauma in which serial cardiac TnT or TnI values were measured within 24 hours of admission and clinical outcomes assessed. Ten studies qualified for review. Studies that used the lower reference limit of Tn as the cutoff for cardiac injury showed 100% negative predictive value (NPV) for developing cardiac complications, whereas studies using higher Tn cutoffs showed wider variation in NPV (50%-98%). Cardiac Tn measured within 24 hours using the lower reference limit (LRL) as the cutoff appears to have excellent NPV for clinically significant adverse cardiac events. This could allow for early discharge after a 24-hour observation period in otherwise uncomplicated blunt chest trauma patients and avoid the need for more expensive cardiac imaging and additional resource utilization.

  18. The role of delayed head CT in evaluation of elderly blunt head trauma victims taking antithrombotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantling, D; Fischer, C; Gruner, R; Teichman, A; McCracken, B; Eakins, J

    2017-12-01

    Increasing active longevity has created an increasing surge of elderly trauma patients. The majority of these patients suffer blunt trauma and many are taking antithrombotic agents. The literature is mixed regarding the utility of routine repeat head CT in patients taking antithrombotic medications with a GCS of 15 and initial negative head CT. We hypothesized that scheduled delayed CT head 12 h after admission (D-CTH) in elderly blunt trauma victims would not identify clinically significant new hemorrhages or change management. A retrospective chart review using our institutional trauma registry of patients ≥65 years sustaining blunt head injuries from 2010 to 2012 was performed. By hospital protocol, all such patients on antithrombotic therapy receive a routine D-CTH. All of these patients were included. Demographics, injuries, medications, laboratory values, LOS, mental status, and management were analyzed. Of the 234 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 8 initially were identified as having D-ICH. Upon further review, five patients had the same findings on both initial and delayed CT scans and one patient was determined to actually have had a hemorrhage stroke. Ultimately, only two patients (0.85%, 95% CI 0.1-3.1%) had new ICH discovered on D-CTH. None of the patients on warfarin demonstrated any new injury on D-CTH (95% CI ≤ 4.6%). Only one patient taking aspirin as a sole agent had a delayed injury on D-CTH (1.1%, 95% CI 0-4.2%). The remaining patient was taking a combination of aspirin and clopidogrel representing 2.2% of 45 patients on combination therapy (95% CI 0.1-11.8%). Only two patients taking a direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) met inclusion criteria and neither endured a bleed (95% CI ≤ 77.6%). Further analysis revealed no cases with clinical changes or surgical intervention for new ICH on delayed imaging. No inference could be made to predict which patients would suffer D-ICH. D-CTH in elderly trauma patients taking antithrombotic

  19. The BIG Score and Prediction of Mortality in Pediatric Blunt Trauma.

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    Davis, Adrienne L; Wales, Paul W; Malik, Tahira; Stephens, Derek; Razik, Fathima; Schuh, Suzanne

    2015-09-01

    To examine the association between in-hospital mortality and the BIG (composed of the base deficit [B], International normalized ratio [I], Glasgow Coma Scale [G]) score measured on arrival to the emergency department in pediatric blunt trauma patients, adjusted for pre-hospital intubation, volume administration, and presence of hypotension and head injury. We also examined the association between the BIG score and mortality in patients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). A retrospective 2001-2012 trauma database review of patients with blunt trauma ≤ 17 years old with an Injury Severity score ≥ 12. Charts were reviewed for in-hospital mortality, components of the BIG score upon arrival to the emergency department, prehospital intubation, crystalloids ≥ 20 mL/kg, presence of hypotension, head injury, and disposition. 50/621 (8%) of the study patients died. Independent mortality predictors were the BIG score (OR 11, 95% CI 6-25), prior fluid bolus (OR 3, 95% CI 1.3-9), and prior intubation (OR 8, 95% CI 2-40). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.95 (CI 0.93-0.98), with the optimal BIG cutoff of 16. With BIG BIG ≥ 16, (P BIG score remained predictive of mortality (OR 14.3, 95% CI 7.3-32, P BIG score accurately predicts mortality in a population of North American pediatric patients with blunt trauma independent of pre-hospital interventions, presence of head injury, and hypotension, and identifies children with a high probability of survival (BIG BIG score is also associated with mortality in pediatric patients with trauma requiring admission to the ICU. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The development of simple survival prediction models for blunt trauma victims treated at Asian emergency centers.

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    Kimura, Akio; Nakahara, Shinji; Chadbunchachai, Witaya

    2012-02-02

    For real-time assessment of the probability of survival (Ps) of blunt trauma victims at emergency centers, this study aimed to establish regression models for estimating Ps using simplified coefficients. The data of 10,210 blunt trauma patients not missing both the binary outcome data about survival and the data necessary for Ps calculation by The Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) method were extracted from the Japan Trauma Data Bank (2004-2007) and analyzed. Half (5,113) of the data was allocated to a derivation data set, with the other half (5,097) allocated to a validation data set. The data of 6,407 blunt trauma victims from the trauma registry of Khon Kaen Regional Hospital in Thailand were analyzed for validation. The logistic regression models included age, the Injury Severity Score (ISS), the Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS), systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate (RR), and their coded values (cAGE, 0-1; cISS, 0-4; cSBP, 0-4; cGCS, 0-4; cRR, 0-4) as predictor variables. The coefficients were simplified by rounding off after the decimal point or choosing 0.5 if the coefficients varied across 0.5. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROCC) was calculated for each model to measure discriminant ability. A group of formulas (log (Ps/1-Ps) = logit (Ps) = -9 + cISS - cAGE + cSBP + cGCS + cRR/2, where -9 becomes -7 if the predictor variable of cRR or cISS is missing) was developed. Using these formulas, the AUROCCs were between 0.950 and 0.964. When these models were applied to the Khon Kean data, their AUROCCs were greater than 0.91. These equations allow physicians to perform real-time assessments of survival by easy mental calculations at Asian emergency centers, which are overcrowded with blunt injury victims of traffic accidents. © 2012 Kimura et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. The development of simple survival prediction models for blunt trauma victims treated at Asian emergency centers

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    Kimura Akio

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For real-time assessment of the probability of survival (Ps of blunt trauma victims at emergency centers, this study aimed to establish regression models for estimating Ps using simplified coefficients. Methods The data of 10,210 blunt trauma patients not missing both the binary outcome data about survival and the data necessary for Ps calculation by The Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS method were extracted from the Japan Trauma Data Bank (2004-2007 and analyzed. Half (5,113 of the data was allocated to a derivation data set, with the other half (5,097 allocated to a validation data set. The data of 6,407 blunt trauma victims from the trauma registry of Khon Kaen Regional Hospital in Thailand were analyzed for validation. The logistic regression models included age, the Injury Severity Score (ISS, the Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS, systolic blood pressure (SBP, respiratory rate (RR, and their coded values (cAGE, 0-1; cISS, 0-4; cSBP, 0-4; cGCS, 0-4; cRR, 0-4 as predictor variables. The coefficients were simplified by rounding off after the decimal point or choosing 0.5 if the coefficients varied across 0.5. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROCC was calculated for each model to measure discriminant ability. Results A group of formulas (log (Ps/1-Ps = logit (Ps = -9 + cISS - cAGE + cSBP + cGCS + cRR/2, where -9 becomes -7 if the predictor variable of cRR or cISS is missing was developed. Using these formulas, the AUROCCs were between 0.950 and 0.964. When these models were applied to the Khon Kean data, their AUROCCs were greater than 0.91. Conclusion: These equations allow physicians to perform real-time assessments of survival by easy mental calculations at Asian emergency centers, which are overcrowded with blunt injury victims of traffic accidents.

  2. Analysis of Blunt Trauma-Related Optic Nerve Head Changes

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    Cem Özgönül

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To investigate the clinical and laboratory features of patients with traumatic optic disk pallor. Ma te ri al and Met hod: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 45 patients (47 eyes, who were diagnosed with traumatic optic disc pallor in our clinic between 2005-2010. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, biomicroscopic and fundoscopic findings were recorded. Analysis of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL and macular thickness maps, computerized visual field tests and visual evoked potentials (VEP were evaluated. We compared the data of pathologic eyes with the data of healthy eyes. Re sults: The mean age was 22.3±3.8 (20-37 years. Twenty (44.4% patients had traffic accident history, 9 (20% - object trauma, 8 (17.8% experienced work accident, and 8 (17.8% had home accident history. BCVA was at the level of 20/40 (0.5 and above in seven eyes, between 20/200 (0.1 and 20/50 (0.4 in 20 eyes, counting fingers in 15 eyes, hand motion and light perception in three eyes, and no light perception in two eyes. There was thinning of RNFL in pathologic eyes at all quadrants (p<0.05. Dis cus si on: Traumatic optic disc pallor is associated with permanent loss of visual acuity and visual field. Relative afferent pupillary defect, prolonged VEP latency, and low amplitudes are useful for the evaluation of the cases. RNFL and macular thickness map analysis are important methods to evaluate the damage objectively. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 103-6

  3. The Role of Troponin in Blunt Cardiac Injury After Multiple Trauma in Humans.

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    Kalbitz, Miriam; Pressmar, Jochen; Stecher, Johanna; Weber, Birte; Weiss, Manfred; Schwarz, Stephan; Miltner, Erich; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of cardiac injury in immediate fatalities after blunt trauma remains underestimated, and reliable diagnostic strategies are still missing. Furthermore, clinical data concerning heart-specific troponin serum levels, injury severity score (ISS), catecholamine treatment and survival of patients on admission to the hospital have rarely been interrelated so far. Therefore, the object of the present study was to identify predictive parameters for mortality in the context of blunt cardiac injury. This retrospective observational study included 173 severely injured patients with an ISS ≥25 admitted to the University Hospital of Ulm, a level 1 trauma center, during 2009-2013 . Furthermore, 83 blunt trauma victims who died before hospital admission were subjected to postmortem examination at the Institute of Legal Medicine, University of Ulm, during 2009-2014. ISS, cardiac injury and associated thoracic injuries were determined in both groups. Furthermore, in the hospitalized patients, serum troponin and IL-6 levels were measured. Macroscopic heart injury was observed in 18 % of the patients who died at the scene and only in 1 % of the patients admitted to the hospital, indicating that macroscopic heart injury is associated with an immediate life-threatening condition. Troponin levels were elevated in 43 % of the patients after admission to the hospital. Moreover, troponin serum concentrations were significantly higher in patients treated with norepinephrine (26.4 ± 4 ng/l) and in non-survivors (84.9 ± 22.8 ng/l) compared to patients without catecholamines and survivors, respectively. Macroscopic heart injury was 20 times more frequent in non-survivors than in survivors. Serum troponin levels correlated with mortality after multiple injury and therefore may represent a valuable prognostic marker in trauma patients.

  4. Predictors of abnormal chest CT after blunt trauma: a critical appraisal of the literature

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    Brink, M. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.Brink@rad.umcn.nl; Kool, D.R.; Dekker, H.M.; Deunk, J.; Jager, G.J.; Kuijk, C. van; Edwards, M.J.R.; Blickman, J.G. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (Netherlands)

    2009-03-15

    Aim: To identify and to evaluate predictors that determine whether chest computed tomography (CT) is likely to reveal relevant injuries in adult blunt trauma patients. Methods: After a comprehensive literature search for original studies on blunt chest injury diagnosis, two independent observers included studies on the accuracy of parameters derived from history, physical examination, or diagnostic imaging that might predict injuries at (multidetector row) CT in adults and that allowed construction of 2 x 2 contingency tables. For each article, methodological quality was scored and relevant predictors for injuries at CT were extracted. For each predictor, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) including 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results: Of 147 articles initially identified, the observers included 10 original studies in consensus. Abnormalities at physical examination (abnormal respiratory effort, need for assisted ventilation, reduced airentry, coma, chest wall tenderness) and pelvic fractures were significant predictors (DOR: 2.1-6.7). The presence of any injuries at conventional radiography of the chest (eight articles) was a more powerful significant predictor (DOR: 2.2-37). Abnormal chest ultrasonography (four articles) was the most accurate predictor for chest injury at CT (DOR: 491-infinite). Conclusion: The current literature indicates that in blunt trauma patients with abnormal physical examination, abnormal conventional radiography, or abnormal ultrasonography of the chest, CT was likely to reveal relevant chest injuries. However, there was no strong evidence to suggest that CT could be omitted in patients without these criteria, or whether these findings are beneficial for patients.

  5. Diagnosis of an Inguinal Hernia after a Blunt Inguinal Trauma with an Intestinal Perforation

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    Farès Moustafa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Inguinal hernias are very common in men. A clinical exam can do the diagnosis easily. But bowel perforation inside an inguinal hernia caused by a directly blunt trauma is rare and can have important consequences. Up to now, there have been a few case reports that described blunt injury to the inguinal area causing traumatic perforation of the bowel in the inguinal hernia. Case Report. We present a case of a 45-year-old Eastern European man with a small perforation of ileal bowels and a peritonitis after direct blunt trauma to the inguinal hernia region, with no inguinal hernia known by the patient, and show how the diagnosis can be difficult. Conclusion. This case shows that external forces, that may seem too trivial to cause intraperitoneal injury, can cause significant injury when applied to a patient with a hernia and shows how a careful examination, with the help of an abdominal CT scan, is important even if the patient do not seem to have an inguinal hernia.

  6. A successful treatment for concomitant injury of the coronary artery and tricuspid valve after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Chizuo; Motohashi, Shinya; Takahashi, Yoshiki; Nakazawa, Satoshi; Kanazawa, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    A 63-year-old woman involved in an automobile accident was brought to our hospital with thoracic injury sustained by the impact of her vehicle's steering wheel. Cardiac auscultation revealed a grade III/VI systolic murmur and the electrocardiogram showed ST elevation in leads 2, 3 and aVF. A 2D echocardiogram revealed severe tricuspid regurgitation and a hypokinetic right ventricle. Coronary angiography revealed dissection of the proximal right coronary artery (RCA) with 90 % stenosis. Urgent CABG for the RCA and tricuspid valvuloplasty were performed, as the anterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve had prolapsed as a result of chordal rupture. Blunt thoracic trauma causing both tricuspid insufficiency and coronary artery dissection is a very rare and life-threatening situation. Prompt diagnosis and timely surgery enabled us to save this patient's life.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of a step-up imaging strategy in pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma

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    Schuppen, J. van [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olthof, D.C. [Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wilde, J.C.H. [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Emma' s Children Hospital/Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beenen, L.F.M.; Rijn, R.R. van [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goslings, J.C., E-mail: j.c.goslings@amc.nl [Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-01-15

    Introduction: Blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is an important but often unrecognized cause of death in children. Imaging plays a vital role in the early detection of abdominal trauma. The exact role of imaging in the management of BAT in children is still under research. The aim of this study was to assess diagnostic accuracy of a step-up imaging strategy, where the decision to observe or to perform an intervention depends on the vital parameters of the patient, in combination with the presence or absence of free fluid at Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) and the findings on CT (performed selectively), for pediatric patients presenting to the ED with a blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: Consecutive patients aged ≤16 years admitted between January 2008 and December 2012 to a Dutch level 1 trauma centre were included in this retrospective study. Sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV) and the negative likelihood ratio (LR−) of the imaging strategy were calculated. Results: The cohort consisted of 122 patients; 66 (54%) patients were discharged home after primary survey, 51 (41%) patients were admitted and observed, 3 (2%) patients underwent transarterial embolization and 2 (2%) patients underwent surgery. Treatment failed in 1 patient, initially selected for observation. The sensitivity of the imaging strategy was 0.833 (0.446–0.990). The NPV and LR− were 0.991 (0.963–1.000) and 0.167 (0.028–0.997), respectively. Conclusion: The step-up imaging strategy that is applied in our academic level 1 trauma centre has a high sensitivity and a high negative predictive value. No clinically relevant injuries were missed without doing unnecessary harm, e.g. radiation or an intervention.

  8. Occult pneumothorax in Chinese patients with significant blunt chest trauma: incidence and management.

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    Lee, Ka L; Graham, Colin A; Yeung, Janice H H; Ahuja, Anil T; Rainer, Timothy H

    2010-05-01

    Occult pneumothorax (OP) is a pneumothorax not visualised on a supine chest X-ray (CXR) but detected on computed tomography (CT) scanning. With increasing CT use for trauma, more OP may be detected. Management of OP remains controversial, especially for patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. This study aimed to identify the incidence of OP using thoracic CT as the gold standard and describe its management amongst Hong Kong Chinese trauma patients. Analysis of prospectively collected trauma registry data. Consecutive significantly injured trauma patients admitted through the emergency department (ED) suffering from blunt chest trauma who underwent thoracic computed tomography (TCT) between in calendar years 2007 and 2008 were included. An OP was defined as the identification (by a specialist radiologist) of a pneumothorax on TCT that had not been previously detected on supine CXR. 119 significantly injured patients were included. 56 patients had a pneumothorax on CXR and a further 36 patients had at least one OP [OP incidence 30% (36/119)]. Bilateral OP was present in 8/36 patients, so total OP numbers were 44. Tube thoracostomy was performed for 8/44 OP, all were mechanically ventilated in the ED. The remaining 36 OP were managed expectantly. No patients in the expectant group had pneumothorax progression, even though 8 patients required subsequent ventilation in the operating room for extrathoracic surgery. The incidence of OP (seen on TCT) in Chinese patients in Hong Kong after blunt chest trauma is higher than that typically reported in Caucasians. Most OP were managed expectantly without significant complications; no pneumothorax progressed even though some patients were mechanically ventilated. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Seatbelt sign in a case of blunt abdominal trauma; what lies beneath it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vailas, Michail G; Moris, Demetrios; Orfanos, Stamatios; Vergadis, Chrysovalantis; Papalampros, Alexandros

    2015-10-30

    The reported incidence of hollow viscus injuries (HVI) in blunt trauma patients is approximately 1%. The most common site of injury to the intestine in blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is the small bowel followed by colon, with mesenteric injuries occurring three times more commonly than bowel injuries. Isolated colon injury is a rarely encountered condition. Clinical assessment alone in patients with suspected intestinal or mesenteric injury after blunt trauma is associated with unacceptable diagnostic delays. This is a case of a 31-year-old man, admitted to the emergency department after being the restrained driver, involved in a car accident. After initial resuscitation, focused assessment with sonography for trauma examination (FAST) was performed revealing a subhepatic mass, suspicious for intraperitoneal hematoma. A computed tomography scan (CT) that followed showed a hematoma of the mesocolon of the ascending colon with active extravasation of intravenous contrast material. An exploratory laparotomy was performed, hemoperitomeum was evacuated, and a subserosal hematoma of the cecum and ascending colon with areas of totally disrupted serosal wall was found. Hematoma of the adjacent mesocolon expanding to the root of mesenteric vessels was also noted. A right hemicolectomy along with primary ileocolonic anastomosis was performed. Patient's recovery progressed uneventfully. Identifying an isolated traumatic injury to the bowel or mesentery after BAT can be a clinical challenge because of its subtle and nonspecific clinical findings; meeting that challenge may eventually lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment with subsequent increase in associated morbidity and mortality. Isolated colon injury is a rare finding after blunt trauma and usually accompanied by other intra-abdominal organ injuries. Abdominal 'seatbelt' sign, ecchymosis of the abdominal wall, increasing abdominal pain and distension are all associated with HVI. However, the accuracy of these findings

  10. Accuracy of physical and ultrasonographic examinations by emergency physicians for the early diagnosis of intraabdominal haemorrhage in blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyuncu, S; Cete, Y; Bozan, H; Kartal, M; Akyol, A J

    2007-05-01

    To determine the accuracy of physical examination and ultrasonographic evaluation performed by emergency physicians in cases of blunt abdominal trauma for the early diagnosis of intraabdominal haemorrhage. In this clinical prospective study, trauma patients were evaluated with four-quadrant ultrasonography by emergency physicians after initial stabilisation and physical examination. Diagnoses based on demographic data, physical examination and emergency physician's ultrasonography were compared with the subsequent clinical course. A total of 442 patients participated in the study. The sensitivity and specificity of emergency physician's ultrasonographic examination to detect intraabdominal haemorrhage were 86 and 99%, respectively. Pre-test sensitivity and specificity of physical examination to detect intraabdominal haemorrhage were 39 and 90%, respectively. Physical examination was not a reliable method to detect intraabdominal haemorrhage in cases of blunt abdominal trauma. In contrast, abdominal ultrasonography performed by emergency physicians was a reliable diagnostic tool. Emergency physicians should be familiar with abdominal ultrasonographic examination, which should be routine in cases of blunt abdominal trauma.

  11. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocysts after blunt chest trauma: Prevalence, mechanisms of injury, and computed tomography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Jin; Jeon, Yang Bin; Ma, Dae Sung; Lee, Jung Nam; Chung, Min

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst (TPP) is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma and closely related with severe injury. However, it has been poorly documented. We present a retrospective review of TPP cases treated at our hospital. The medical records and chest computed tomography scans of patients with TPP treated from January 2010 to December 2013 were retrospectively studied. A total of 978 patients underwent chest computed tomography for blunt chest trauma during the study period, and 81 (8.3%) had a total of 150 TPPs. The most common mechanism of injury was being struck by a motorized vehicle (n = 25, 30.9%). The mean (SD) Injury Severity Score (ISS) of the 81 patients was 33.2 (11.4). The prevalence of TPP was higher in younger patients (p = 0.011), but the total number of fractured ribs was significantly lower (p = 0.001). In a subgroup analysis performed according to pseudocyst location, the intraparenchymal group had more severe injuries than the subpleural group (ISS, 23.3 vs. 32.4, p chest Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score, 3.4 vs. 4.0, p chest trauma was 8.3% and was higher in those struck by a vehicle and younger patients. Intraparenchymal pseudocyst was found to be related to more severe injuries. TPP was a self-limiting condition that does not require specific treatment. Prognostic/epidemiologic study, level IV.

  12. Criteria for the selective use of chest computed tomography in blunt trauma patients

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    Brink, Monique; Dekker, Helena M.; Kool, Digna R.; Blickman, Johan G. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Deunk, Jaap; Edwards, Michael J.R. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vugt, Arie B. van [Radboud University Nijmegen, Medical Centre Nijmegen, Department of Emergency Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kuijk, Cornelis van [VU (Vrije Universiteit) University, Medical Center Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to derive parameters that predict which high-energy blunt trauma patients should undergo computed tomography (CT) for detection of chest injury. This observational study prospectively included consecutive patients ({>=}16 years old) who underwent multidetector CT of the chest after a high-energy mechanism of blunt trauma in one trauma centre. We included 1,047 patients (median age, 37; 70% male), of whom 508 had chest injuries identified by CT. Using logistic regression, we identified nine predictors of chest injury presence on CT (age {>=}55 years, abnormal chest physical examination, altered sensorium, abnormal thoracic spine physical examination, abnormal chest conventional radiography (CR), abnormal thoracic spine CR, abnormal pelvic CR or abdominal ultrasound, base excess <-3 mmol/l and haemoglobin <6 mmol/l). Of 855 patients with {>=}1 positive predictors, 484 had injury on CT (95% of all 508 patients with injury). Of all 192 patients with no positive predictor, 24 (13%) had chest injury, of whom 4 (2%) had injuries that were considered clinically relevant. Omission of CT in patients without any positive predictor could reduce imaging frequency by 18%, while most clinically relevant chest injuries remain adequately detected. (orig.)

  13. Occult pneumothoraces in Chinese patients with significant blunt chest trauma: radiological classification and proposed clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ryan K L; Graham, Colin A; Yeung, Janice H H; Ahuja, Anil T; Rainer, Timothy H

    2012-12-01

    An occult pneumothorax (OP) is a pneumothorax not seen on a supine chest X-ray (CXR) but detected on abdominal or thoracic computed tomography (CT) scanning. With the increasing use of CT in the management of significantly injured trauma patients, more OPs are being detected. The aim of this study was to classify OPs diagnosed on thoracic CT (TCT) and correlate them with their clinical significance. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected trauma registry data. Total 36 (N=36) consecutive significantly injured trauma patients admitted through the emergency department (ED) who sustained blunt chest trauma and underwent TCT between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2008 were included. OP was defined as the identification (by a consultant radiologist) of a pneumothorax on TCT that had not been detected on supine CXR. OPs were classified by laterality (unilateral/bilateral) and location (apical, basal, non apical/basal). The size of pneumothoraces, severity of injury [including number of associated thoracic injuries and injury severity score (ISS)], length of hospital stay and mortality were compared between groups. The need for tube thoracostomy and clinical outcome were also analysed. Patients with bilateral OPs (N=8) had significantly more associated thoracic injuries (median: 2 vs. 1, p=0.01), higher ISS (median: 35 vs. 23, p=0.02) and longer hospital stay (median: 20 days vs. 11 days, p=0.01) than those with a unilateral OP (N=28). Basal OPs (N=7) were significantly larger than apical (N=10) and non-apical/basal Ops (N=11). Basal OPs were associated with significantly more associated thoracic injuries (median: 2 vs. 1, p=0.01), higher ISS (median: 35 vs. 25, p=0.04) and longer hospital stays (median: 23 days vs. 17 days, p=0.02) than apical Ops, which had higher ISS (median: 35 vs. 25, p=0.04) and longer hospital stays (median: 23 days vs. 15 days, p=0.02) than non-apical/basal OPs. Non-apical/basal OPs were associated with more related injuries (median: 2

  14. Cervical spine clearance in adults following blunt trauma: a national survey across major trauma centres in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilvers, G; Porter, K; Choudhary, S

    2017-12-08

    To assess current practice in cervical spine clearance across major trauma centres in England and review current guidelines. An electronic survey was sent to lead trauma clinicians at 22 major trauma centres in England. This assessed the clinical decision tools used, the choice of initial imaging technique, and the methods used to clear the cervical spine in alert and obtunded patients without focal neurology, and where initial imaging was normal. British Orthopaedic Association Standards for Trauma (BOAST) 2 and Eastern Association for Surgery for Trauma (EAST) guidelines were used as standards. Eighteen out of the 22 (82%) centres responded by completing the survey. Most (71%) centres used the Canadian C-Spine Rule for clearing the cervical spine clinically. Seventy-two percent of centres preferred computed tomography (CT) as the first-line imaging technique, the choice based on age of patient and mechanism of injury. If the initial CT imaging was normal, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 52% of centres to clear the cervical spine, with half of these centres stating that they would discuss further imaging with a radiologist first. The practice across centres was highly variable for the obtunded patient, with most centres preferring continuing immobilisation or MRI to clear the cervical spine, with a small minority removing spinal precautions when a high-quality multidetector CT was normal. Multidetector CT is the preferred initial imaging technique across most major trauma centres in England when blunt cervical spine trauma is suspected. There is widespread reliance on MRI to clear the cervical spine in both alert and obtunded patients, if initial CT imaging is normal and there is no focal neurology on clinical assessment. This calls for greater awareness of the reliability of a high-quality normal multidetector CT examination in clearing the cervical spine in the absence of focal neurology. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  15. The presence of nonthoracic distracting injuries does not affect the initial clinical examination of the cervical spine in evaluable blunt trauma patients: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Agathoklis; Plurad, David; Barmparas, Galinos; Inaba, Kenji; Lam, Lydia; Bukur, Marko; Branco, Bernardino C; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2011-09-01

    A distracting injury mandates cervical spine (c-spine) imaging in the evaluable blunt trauma patient who demonstrates no pain or tenderness over the c-spine. The purpose of this study was to examine which distracting injuries can negatively affect the sensitivity of the standard clinical examination of the c-spine. This is a prospective observational study conducted at a Level I Trauma Center from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009. After institutional review board approval, all evaluable (Glasgow Coma Scale score ≥13) blunt trauma patients older than 16 years sustaining a c-spine injury were enrolled. A distracting injury was defined as any immediately evident bony or soft tissue injury or a complaint of non-c-spine pain whether or not an actual injury was subsequently diagnosed. Information regarding the initial clinical examination and the presence of a distracting injury was collected from the senior resident or attending trauma surgeon involved in the initial management. During the study period, 101 evaluable patients sustained a c-spine injury. Distracting injuries were present in 88 patients (87.1%). The most common was rib fracture (21.6%), followed by lower extremity fracture (20.5%) and upper extremity fracture (12.5%). Only four (4.0%) patients had no pain or tenderness on the initial examination of the c-spine. All four patients had bruising and tenderness to the upper anterior chest. None of these four patients developed neurologic sequelae or required a surgical stabilization or immobilization. C-spine imaging may not be required in the evaluable blunt trauma patient despite distracting injuries in any body regions that do not involve the upper chest. Further definition of distracting injuries is mandated to avoid unnecessary utilization of resources and to reduce the imaging burden associated with the evaluation of the c-spine.

  16. Quantitative analysis of brain microstructure following mild blunt and blast trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begonia, M T; Prabhu, R; Liao, J; Whittington, W R; Claude, A; Willeford, B; Wardlaw, J; Wu, R; Zhang, S; Williams, L N

    2014-11-28

    We induced mild blunt and blast injuries in rats using a custom-built device and utilized in-house diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) software to reconstruct 3-D fiber tracts in brains before and after injury (1, 4, and 7 days). DTI measures such as fiber count, fiber length, and fractional anisotropy (FA) were selected to characterize axonal integrity. In-house image analysis software also showed changes in parameters including the area fraction (AF) and nearest neighbor distance (NND), which corresponded to variations in the microstructure of Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) brain sections. Both blunt and blast injuries produced lower fiber counts, but neither injury case significantly changed the fiber length. Compared to controls, blunt injury produced a lower FA, which may correspond to an early onset of diffuse axonal injury (DAI). However, blast injury generated a higher FA compared to controls. This increase in FA has been linked previously to various phenomena including edema, neuroplasticity, and even recovery. Subsequent image analysis revealed that both blunt and blast injuries produced a significantly higher AF and significantly lower NND, which correlated to voids formed by the reduced fluid retention within injured axons. In conclusion, DTI can detect subtle pathophysiological changes in axonal fiber structure after mild blunt and blast trauma. Our injury model and DTI method provide a practical basis for studying mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in a controllable manner and for tracking injury progression. Knowledge gained from our approach could lead to enhanced mTBI diagnoses, biofidelic constitutive brain models, and specialized pharmaceutical treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. FAST as a predictor of clinical outcome in blunt abdominal trauma

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    Benjamin M Terry

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Peer-reviewed literature demonstrates increasing support for the use of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST in the setting of blunt trauma, one study demonstrating the sensitivity and specificity of FAST for the detection of free fluid to be 0.64 - 0.98 and 0.86 - 1.00, respectively, compared with abdominal CT. Utilising ultrasound in trauma triage increases efficiency and cost-effectiveness and reduces reliance on CT, compared with using CT alone. There is little evidence to support relying solely on a negative FAST and physical examination for patient management. Method. A retrospective descriptive study of 172 adult patients who received FAST for the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma between 22 July 2007 and 21 January 2008 at Tygerberg Hospital was performed. Ultrasound findings were correlated with CT scan findings, operative findings if managed surgically, clinical outcomes whether managed surgically or conservatively, as well as postmortem findings in deceased patients. Results. FAST was negative in 147 (85.5% patients. Twenty-four (16.3% of these patients died from all-cause mortality, none of which was due to intra-abdominal injury. Seven patients with negative FAST underwent CT scan owing to change in clinical course, and 3 patients with negative FAST underwent laparotomy owing to change in clinical course, with positive findings in 2 patients – a bowel injury requiring resection (not seen on CT and a diaphragmatic rupture seen on CXR. A negative FAST was shown to be an excellent predictor for the absence of significant intra-abdominal trauma. The mortality rate among 25 FAST positive patients was 24% (N=6. Only one of these patients (with a splenic rupture was suspected to have died from abdominal pathology.

  18. [Surgical treatment of blunt liver trauma, indications for surgery and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Uribe, Carlos H; López, Carolina Arenas; Cote, Juan Camilo Correa; Franco, Sebastián Tobón; Saldarriaga, Maria Fernanda; Mosquera, Jackson; Villegas Lanau, María I

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the most frequently injured organ in blunt abdominal trauma. Patients that are hemodynamically unstable must undergo inmmediate surgical treatment. There are 2 surgical approaches for these patients; Anatomical Liver resection or non-anatomic liver resection. Around 80-90% of patients are candidates for non-operative management. -Several risk factors have been studied to select the patients most suited for a non operative management. We performed a retrospective study based on a prospective database. We searched for risk factors related to immediate surgical management and failed non-operative management. We also described the surgical procedures that were undertaken in this cohort of patients and their outcomes and complications. During the study period 117 patients presented with blunt liver trauma. 19 patients (16.2%) required a laparotomy during the initial 24h after their admission. There were 11 deaths (58%) amongst these patients. Peri-hepatic packing and suturing were the most common procedures performed. A RTS Score20 (RR 2,5 IC 95%: 1.0-6.7), and associated intra-abdominal injuries (RR: 2.95; IC 95%: 1.25-6.92) were risk factors for immediate surgery. In 98 (83.7%) patients a non-operative management was performed. 7 patients had a failed non-operative management. The need for immediate surgical management is related to the presence of associated intra-abdominal injuries, and the ISS and RTS scores. In this series the most frequently performed procedure for blunt liver trauma was peri-hepatic packing. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Blunt vertebral vascular injury in trauma patients: ATLS®recommendations and review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafafy, Roozbeh; Suresh, Sukrit; Afolayan, John O; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Panchmatia, Jaykar R

    2017-06-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) encompasses two distinct clinical entities: traumatic carotid artery injury (TCAI) and traumatic vertebral artery injury (TVAI). The latter is the focus of our review. These are potentially devastating injuries which pose a diagnostic challenge in the acute trauma setting. There is still debate regarding the optimal screening criteria, diagnostic imaging modality and treatment methods. In 2012 the American College of Surgeons proposed criteria for investigating patients with suspected TVAI and subsequent treatment methods, caveated with the statement that evidence is limited and still evolving. Here we review the historical evidence and recent literature relating to these recommendations.

  20. 74 Year-Old-Man With Pneumopericardium Due to Blunt Chest Trauma: Case Report

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    Alper Avcı

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumopericardium is the presence of air in the pericardial space. It may be seen in the context with severe blunt chest trauma. Usually, pneumopericardium is self-limiting and requiring no specific therapy. However, a continuous monitoring of the electrocardiography and the blood pressure is necessary at an intermediate care unit. We report a 74 year-old-man had been presented with Pneumopericardium, after a car striking. He had bilateral pneumohematothoraces, pneumomediastinum and bilateral multiple rib fractures. Pneumopericardium was diasappeared without surgical management like written in english literature. Frequent cardiac and vital signs monitoring and general support treatment were successful in our treatment.

  1. Imaging of unilateral adrenal hemorrhages in patients after blunt abdominal trauma: Report of two cases

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    Asli Tanrivermis Sayit

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal hemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma is extremely rare. Most of the lesions are unilateral and right sided. Although often asymptomatic, life-threatening adrenal insufficiency may develop in the bilateral adrenal gland hemorrhage. Isolated adrenal injuries are very rare. They are often associated with other organ injuries. The mortality rates of patients range from 7% to 32%. In this report, we present the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of unilateral adrenal hemorrhages in two patients with a history of fall from a height.

  2. Coronary artery dissection and acute myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma

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    Tønnessen Theis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Blunt chest trauma might lead to cardiac injury ranging from simple arrhythmias to lethal conditions such as cardiac rupture. We experienced a case of initially overlooked traumatic coronary artery dissection which resulted in acute myocardial infarction (AMI. A high degree of suspicion is needed to diagnose this condition. Based on our case, we will give an overview of relevant literature on this topic. ECG, echocardiography, coronary angiography and cardiac enzymes are valuable tools in diagnosing this rare condition. The time span from coronary artery occlusion to revascularisation must be short if AMI is to be avoided.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of tetracyclines on blunt head trauma: An experimental study on rats

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    Ozhan Merzuk Uckun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevention of primary damage caused by head trauma may be avoided with protective measures and techniques which is a public health concern. Experimental and clinical studies about treatment of head trauma were all centered to prevent secondary damage caused by physiopathological changes following primary injury. Neuroprotective features of tetracyclines were the focus of several experimental studies in the last decade. In the present study we aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of tetracycline in an experimental model of blunt brain injury in rats. Materials and Methods: 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four experimental groups (n = 8. Head trauma was not performed in control group (group 1, craniectomy only. In the second group, head trauma and craniectomy were performed. Intraperitoneal saline was used in addition to trauma and craniectomy for treatment in group 3 whereas intraperitoneal tetracycline and saline were used for treatment in group 4. Results: When histological examinations performed by transmission electron microscopy were evaluated, injury at ultrastructural level was demonstrated to be less pronounced in tetracycline group with decreased lipid peroxidation levels. Conclusion: In accordance with these findings, we conclude that systemic tetracycline administration is effective in reduction of secondary brain damage and brain edema and thus it may be considered as a therapeutic option.

  4. Trauma ocular contuso y afecciones de vítreo-retina Blunt ocular trauma and vitreous and retinal disorders

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    Roberto Alejandro Guerra García

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se consultó la bibliografía actualizada para ofrecer una orientación práctica sobre el manejo de las afecciones vítreorretinales más frecuentes provocadas por los traumas oculares contusos. Estos se encuentran presentes en 31 % de los casos y presentan como complicación seria más frecuente el desprendimiento de retina en 44 %. Se explicó la importancia de la creación de un registro nacional de trauma como herramienta inicial para la prevención de esta enfermedad. Finalmente se expuso algunas consideraciones y un flujograma orientador para el manejo de esta urgencia.Current papers were reviewed to provide practical managing guidelines in most frequent vitreous and retinal disorders infringed by blunt ocular trauma. They are present in 31 % of traumas, with retinal detachment in 44 % of cases as the most frequent serious complication. The importance of the creation of a national eye injury registry as an initial tool to prevent this disease was explained. Finally, some considerations and a guiding flowchart for the management of this visual problem were included.

  5. Some observations relating to behind-body armour blunt trauma effects caused by ballistic impact.

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    Lidén, E; Berlin, R; Janzon, B; Schantz, B; Seeman, T

    1988-01-01

    Live, anesthetised pigs were used to assess behind-armour blunt trauma effects. The thoraco-abdominal body region was covered with varying thicknesses of Kevlar fabric packets. This soft body armour was applied, either in direct contact with the thoracic wall of the animals, or with different plastic foam sheets, so-called trauma packs, between the armour and the skin. The live animals were surgically evaluated, and then sacrificed. Blocks of soft soap were subjected to equal tests and the behind-armour indentations were measured. The results indicate that serious injury to the body armour-protected chest may be caused by the impact of nonpenetrating bullets and shotgun pellets. Severe pulmonary contusions and lacerations were found when the energy transferred through the body armour was estimated to be high.

  6. Simultaneous "traumatic Gerbode" and aortic rupture due to blunt chest trauma

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    Hector Anninos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gerbode defect is characterized by a perimembranous ventricular septal defect between the left ventricle and the right atrium. This intracardiac shunt is a congenital defect but may be iatrogenic after valve surgery or atrioventricular node ablation, may be the result of endocarditis or may be traumatic. It is really rarely encountered as sequelae of non-penetrating heart trauma, and their clinical manifestations may often be unrecognized in the multi-injured patient. However, they are serious complications, and their diagnostic approach is not always feasible. We hereby present a case of a young man with the left ventricle to the right atrium communication after blunt thoracic trauma due to a car accident and concomitant rupture of the thoracic aorta. We present also the case and the ways of treatment according to the international bibliography.

  7. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial infarction after blunt chest trauma: a heartbreaking soccer-shot

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    Fogarassy Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac injury occasionally occurs as a result of blunt chest trauma. Most cardiac complications in chest trauma are due to myocardial contusion rather than direct damage to the coronary arteries. However, traumatic coronary injury has been reported, and a variety of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed. We present a 26 year old patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome as a consequence of a soccer-shot impact to the chest. CMR showed apical inferior infarction, as well as multiple small septal lesions which were presumed to have resulted from embolization. The culprit lesion was a proximal 75% LAD stenosis with a prominent plaque-rupture and thrombus-formation, and the distal LAD was occluded by thromboembolic material.

  8. Simultaneous "traumatic Gerbode" and aortic rupture due to blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anninos, Hector; Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis; Politis, Panagiotis; Gounopoulos, Pantelis; Koroneos, Apostolos; Charitos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The Gerbode defect is characterized by a perimembranous ventricular septal defect between the left ventricle and the right atrium. This intracardiac shunt is a congenital defect but may be iatrogenic after valve surgery or atrioventricular node ablation, may be the result of endocarditis or may be traumatic. It is really rarely encountered as sequelae of non-penetrating heart trauma, and their clinical manifestations may often be unrecognized in the multi-injured patient. However, they are serious complications, and their diagnostic approach is not always feasible. We hereby present a case of a young man with the left ventricle to the right atrium communication after blunt thoracic trauma due to a car accident and concomitant rupture of the thoracic aorta. We present also the case and the ways of treatment according to the international bibliography.

  9. Primary Chest Wall Abscess Mimicking a Breast Tumor That Occurred after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

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    Yusuke Yamaoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary chest wall abscess occurring after blunt chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with a swelling in her left breast. The patient had experienced blunt chest trauma 2 months back. Needle aspiration revealed pus formation in the patient’s chest. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the lower region of the left mammary gland, with thickening of the parietal pleura and skin and fracture of the fifth rib under the abscess. Following antibiotic administration and irrigation of the affected region, surgical debridement was performed. During surgery, we found that the pectoralis major muscle at the level of the fifth rib was markedly damaged, although the necrotic tissue did not contact the mammary gland. We diagnosed the lesion as a chest wall abscess that occurred in response to blunt chest trauma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no recurrence for six months after surgery.

  10. Blunt chest trauma--an audit of injuries diagnosed by the MDCT examination.

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    Turkalj, Ivan; Petrović, Kosta; Stojanović, Sanja; Petrović, Djordje; Brakus, Alma; Ristić, Jelena

    2014-02-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) characterised by speed and precision is increasingly accessible in emergency wards. The aim of our study was to determine the most common injuries to the chest region, as well as type associated extrathoracic injuries, and the treatment outcome. This prospective study included 61 patients with blunt trauma who were submitted to computed tomography (CT) of the thorax. The number of injuries was evaluated by organs and organ systems of the chest. The cause of the injury, the length and the outcome of the treatment, and the presence of injuries in other regions were assessed. Chest injuries were associated with injuries to other regions in 80.3% cases, predominantly injuries to extremities or pelvic bones in 54.1% cases, followed by head injuries in 39.3% patients. Associated thoracic injuries were present in 90.9% of patients with lethal outcome. Lung parenchymal lesions, pleural effusions and rib fractures were the most common injuries affecting 77.1%, 65.6% and 63.9% of the cases, respectively. Blunt chest trauma is a significant problem affecting predominantly males in their forties and it is usually caused by a motor vehicle accident. In case of pneumomediastinum or mediastinal haematoma, the use of 3D reconstructions is advised for diagnosing possible tracheobronchial ruptures and thoracic aorta injuries. Increased resolution of CT scanners yielded a large number of findings that are occult on radiography, especially in the event of lung parenchymal and pleural injuries. However, none imaging modality can replace surgical judgement.

  11. Tracheal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma: radiological and clinical features

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    Kunisch-Hoppe, M.; Rauber, K.; Rau, W.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Justus Liebig Univ., Giessen (Germany); Hoppe, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Popella, C. [Dept. of ENT, Justus Liebig University, Giessen (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiomorphologic and clinical features of tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma. From 1992 until 1998 the radiomorphologic and clinical key findings of all consecutive tracheal ruptures were retrospectively analyzed. The study included ten patients (7 men and 3 women; mean age 35 years); all had pneumothoraces which were persistent despite suction drainage. Seven patients developed a pneumomediastinum as well as a subcutaneous emphysema on conventional chest X-rays. In five patients, one major hint leading to the diagnosis was a cervical emphysema, discovered on the lateral cervical spine view. Contrast-media-enhanced thoracic CT was obtained in all ten cases and showed additional injuries (atelectasis n = 5; lung contusion n = 4; lung laceration n = 2; hematothorax n = 2 and hematomediastinum n = 4). The definite diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made by bronchoscopy, which was obtained in all patients. Tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma occurs rarely. Key findings were all provided by conventional chest X-ray. Tracheal rupture is suspected in front of a pneumothorax, a pneumomediastinum, or a subcutaneous emphysema on lateral cervical spine and chest films. Routine thoracic CT could also demonstrate these findings but could not confirm the definite diagnosis of an tracheal rupture except in one case; in the other 9 cases this was done by bronchoscopy. Thus, bronchoscopy should be mandatory in all suspicious cases of tracheal rupture and remains the gold standard. (orig.)

  12. An unusual complication of blunt ocular trauma: A horseshoe-shaped macular tear with spontaneous closure

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    Umut Karaca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of horseshoe-shaped macular tear after blunt trauma with the course of the tear and the relevant findings obtained by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT is described. A 21-year-old man who had suffered blunt trauma 5 days previously visited our clinic complaining of vision loss in his left eye. Ophthalmic examination and SD-OCT images revealed a horseshoe-shaped macular tear. A month later at the second visit, the macular tear was found to have spontaneously closed. There have been many cases reported previously of the spontaneous closure of traumatic macular holes. A horseshoe-shaped macular tear is an atypical clinical presentation. However, the mechanism of spontaneous closure is hypothetically as same as that for a macular hole. High-resolution images and three-dimensional maps taken with SD-OCT can provide more details on macular diseases and are more useful than time-domain OCT images.

  13. An unusual complication of blunt ocular trauma: A horseshoe-shaped macular tear with spontaneous closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Umut; Durukan, Hakan A; Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Erdurman, Cuneyt; Hurmeric, Volkan

    2014-01-01

    A case of horseshoe-shaped macular tear after blunt trauma with the course of the tear and the relevant findings obtained by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is described. A 21-year-old man who had suffered blunt trauma 5 days previously visited our clinic complaining of vision loss in his left eye. Ophthalmic examination and SD-OCT images revealed a horseshoe-shaped macular tear. A month later at the second visit, the macular tear was found to have spontaneously closed. There have been many cases reported previously of the spontaneous closure of traumatic macular holes. A horseshoe-shaped macular tear is an atypical clinical presentation. However, the mechanism of spontaneous closure is hypothetically as same as that for a macular hole. High-resolution images and three-dimensional maps taken with SD-OCT can provide more details on macular diseases and are more useful than time-domain OCT images. PMID:24817754

  14. Fatal right coronary artery rupture following blunt chest trauma: detection by postmortem selective coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-05-01

    Coronary artery injury is a rare complication following blunt chest trauma (BCT), and can be fatal. Here we report findings on postmortem selective coronary angiography of right coronary artery rupture after an assault involving blunt trauma to the chest. A woman in her 60s died after her son stomped on her chest. There were no appreciable signs of injury on external examination, and cause of death could not be determined by postmortem computed tomography (PMCT). Internal findings indicated that an external force had been applied to the anterior chest, as evidenced by subcutaneous hemorrhage and pericardial and cardiac contusions. Postmortem coronary angiography revealed irregularity of the intima and of the fat tissue surrounding the proximal part of the right coronary artery associated with a local filling defect. Histopathological examination suggested coronary rupture with dissection of the tunica media and compression of the lumen cavity. The key points in the present case are that no fatal injuries could be determined on external examination, and the heart and coronary artery injuries were not evident on PMCT. Criminality might be overlooked in such cases, as external investigation at the crime scene would be inadequate and could result in a facile diagnosis of cause of death. This is the first report of coronary artery rupture with dissection that was detected by CT coronary angiography, and provides helpful findings for reaching an appropriate decision both forensically and clinically.

  15. Surgical repair of right atrial wall rupture after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telich-Tarriba, Jose E; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Reardon, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Right atrial wall rupture after blunt chest trauma is a catastrophic event associated with high mortality rates. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who was ejected 40 feet during a motor vehicle accident. Upon presentation, she was awake and alert, with a systolic blood pressure of 100 mmHg. Chest computed tomography disclosed a large pericardial effusion; transthoracic echocardiography confirmed this finding and also found right ventricular diastolic collapse. A diagnosis of cardiac tamponade with probable cardiac injury was made; the patient was taken to the operating room, where median sternotomy revealed a 1-cm laceration of the right atrial appendage. This lesion was directly repaired with 4-0 polypropylene suture. Her postoperative course was uneventful, and she continued to recover from injuries to the musculoskeletal system. This case highlights the need for a high degree of suspicion of cardiac injuries after blunt chest trauma. An algorithm is proposed for rapid recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of these lesions.

  16. Giant inframuscular lipoma disclosed 14 years after a blunt trauma: A case report

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    Nigri Giuseppe

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lipoma is the most frequent benign tumor of the soft tissue. This lesion is often asymptomatic except in cases of enormous masses compressing nervous-vascular structures. Although the diagnosis is mostly clinical, imaging tools are useful to confirm the adipose nature of the lesion and to define its anatomic border. Sometimes, lipomas may be the result of a previous trauma, such as in this patient. Case presentation A 45-year-old man presented at our institution with a giant hard firm mass in the upper external quadrant of the right buttock disclosed after a weight loss diet. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed a giant adipose mass developed beneath the large gluteal muscle and among the fibers of the medium and small gluteal muscles. When questioned on his medical history, the patient reported a blunt trauma of the lower back 14 years earlier. He underwent surgery and histological examination confirmed a giant lipoma. Conclusion Lipomas might result from a previous trauma. It is hypothesized that the trigger mechanism is activated by cytokine and growth factors released after the trauma. We herein present an exceptional case of a giant post-traumatic lipoma which caused a painful compression on the right sciatic nerve.

  17. Diaphragmatic rupture with right colon and small intestine herniation after blunt trauma: a case report

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    Muroni Mirko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are an unusual presentation of trauma, and are observed in about 10% of diaphragmatic injuries. The diagnosis is often missed because of non-specific clinical signs, and the absence of additional intra-abdominal and thoracic injuries. Case presentation We report a case of a 59-year-old Italian man hospitalized for abdominal pain and vomiting. His medical history included a blunt trauma seven years previously. A chest X-ray showed right diaphragm elevation, and computed tomography revealed that the greater omentum, a portion of the colon and the small intestine had been transposed in the hemithorax through a diaphragm rupture. The patient underwent laparotomy, at which time the colon and small intestine were reduced back into the abdomen and the diaphragm was repaired. Conclusions This was a unusual case of traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Diaphragmatic ruptures may be revealed many years after the initial trauma. The suspicion of diaphragmatic rupture in a patient with multiple traumas contributes to early diagnosis. Surgical repair remains the only curative treatment for diaphragmatic hernias. Prosthetic patches may be a good solution when the diaphragmatic defect is severe and too large for primary closure, whereas primary repair remains the gold standard for the closure of small to moderate sized diaphragmatic defects.

  18. A case study involving a blunt abdominal trauma leading to disruption of the aortic bifurcation in an infant

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    Seleno Glauber de Jesus-Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of aortic disruption secondary to blunt abdominal trauma is rarely reported in the pediatric population. In general, most of the cases described are the result of motor vehicle accidents. We report on the treatment and outcomes of a 5-year-old child with aortic bifurcation disruption secondary to an unusual case of blunt abdominal trauma who was admitted to the emergency room in hypovolemic shock and subjected to immediate exploratory laparotomy and vascular repair. The mechanical forces involved in aortic disruption and the management options for repair and treatment of this injury will be discussed.

  19. Evaluating clinical abdominal scoring system in predict- ing the necessity of laparotomy in blunt abdominal trauma

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    Erfantalab-Avini Peyman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objectives: Trauma is among the lead- ing causes of death. Medical management of blunt abdomi- nal trauma (BAT relies on judging patients for whom lap- arotomy is mandatory. This study aimed to determine BAT patients’ signs, as well as paraclinical data, and to clarify the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of clinical abdominal scoring system (CASS, a new scoring system based on clinical signs, in predicting whether a BAT patient needs laparotomy or not. Methods: Totally 400 patients suspected of BAT that arrived at the emergency department of two university hos- pitals in Tehran from March 20, 2007 to March 19, 2009 were included in this study. They were evaluated for age, sex, type of trauma, systolic blood pressure, Glasgow coma scale (GCS, pulse rate, time of presentation after trauma, abdomi- nal clinical findings, respiratory rate, temperature, hemoglo- bin (Hb concentration, focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST and CASS. Results: Our measurements showed that CASS had an accuracy of 94%, sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 88%, positive predictive value of 90% and negative predictive value of 100% in determining the necessity of laparotomy in BAT patients. Moreover, in our analysis, systolic blood pressure, GCS, pulse rate, Hb concentration, time of presen- tation after trauma, abdominal clinical findings and FAST were also shown to be helpful in confirming the need for laparotomy (P<0.05. Conclusion: CASS is a promising scoring system in rapid detection of the need for laparotomy as well as in minimizing auxiliary expense for further evaluation in BAT patients, thus to promote the cost-benefit ratio and accu- racy of diagnosis. Key words: Abdominal injuries; Laparotomy; Patients; Wounds, nonpenetrating

  20. Outcomes of patients with blunt chest trauma encountered at emergency department and possible risk factors affecting mortality

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    Yuan-Ming Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blunt chest trauma is associated with a high risk of mortality. Respiratory complications may necessitate prolonged ventilation and result in death. The present study aimed to investigate possible signs of trauma and the prognosis of trauma patients with thoracic injuries and identify risk factors for mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of trauma patients with blunt chest injuries who underwent thoracic computed tomography on arrival in the emergency department (January 2010–December 2013. Patients with brain injuries were excluded from the study. The prognostic values of age, sex, trauma type, injury severity score, revised trauma score (RTS, ventilator requirement, days in Intensive Care Unit (ICU, associated thoracic injury, and laboratory examinations (including arterial blood gas [ABG] were evaluated. Results: Fifteen of 30 analyzed patients died during their ICU stays; accordingly, we classified patients as survivors and nonsurvivors. These groups differed significantly regarding the RTS (P = 0.002, mechanical ventilation requirement (P = 0.007, total stay length (P = 0.009, and the presence of hemothorax (P = 0.030. However, no significant differences in the pneumothorax, rib fractures, and blood tests (including ABG analysis were observed between the groups. Conclusion: Among hospitalized trauma patients with blunt thoracic injuries, RTS, mechanical ventilation requirement, and hemothorax were identified as risk factors for mortality. Patients with hemothorax should receive multidisciplinary care and be monitored closely to improve survival.

  1. Delayed management of Grade III blunt aortic injury: Series from a Level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeds, Matthew R; Wright, Mark P; Eidt, John F; Moursi, Mohammed M; Escobar, Guillermo A; Spencer, Horace J; Ali, Ahsan T

    2016-06-01

    Blunt aortic injuries (BAIs) are traditionally treated as surgical emergencies, with the majority of repairs performed in an urgent fashion within 24 hours, irrespective of the grade of aortic injury. These patients are often underresuscitated and often have multiple other trauma issues that need to be addressed. This study reviews a single center's experience comparing urgent (24 hours) TEVAR for Grade III BAI. All patients undergoing TEVAR for BAI at a single institution between March 2004 and March 2014 were reviewed (n = 43). Patients with Grade I, II, or IV aortic injuries as well as those who were repaired with an open procedure or who lacked preoperative imaging were excluded from the analysis. Demographics, intraoperative data, postoperative survival, and complications were compared. During this period, there were 43 patients with blunt thoracic aortic injury. There were 29 patients with Grade III or higher aortic injuries. Of these 29 patients, 1 declined surgery, 2 were repaired with an open procedure, 10 underwent urgent TEVAR, and 16 had initial observation. Of these 16, 13 underwent TEVAR in a delayed fashion (median, 9 days; range, 2-91 days), and 3 died of non-aortic-related pathology. Comparing the immediate repair group versus the delayed repair group, there were no significant demographic differences. Trauma classification scores were similar, although patients in the delayed group had a higher number of nonaortic injuries. The 30-day survival was similar between the two groups (9 of 10 vs. 12 of 16), with no mortalities caused by aortic pathology in either group. Watchful waiting may be permissible in patients with Grade III BAI with other associated multisystem trauma. This allows for a repair in a more controlled environment. Therapeutic study, level V.

  2. The validity of abdominal examination in blunt trauma patients with distracting injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostas, Jack; Cason, Benton; Simmons, Jon; Frotan, Mohammed A; Brevard, Sidney B; Gonzalez, Richard P

    2015-06-01

    Many trauma care providers often disregard the abdominal clinical examination in the presence of extra-abdominal distracting injuries and mandate abdominal computed tomographic scan in these patients. Ignoring the clinical examination may incur undue expense and radiation exposure. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of abdominal clinical examination in patients with distracting injuries. During a 1-year period, all awake and alert blunt trauma patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 14 or 15 were entered into a prospective study. Abdominal clinical examination was performed and documented prospectively on all patients. Abdominal clinical examination included four-quadrant anterior abdominal palpation, flank palpation, lower thoracic palpation, pelvis examination, and palpation of the thoracolumbar spine. Following examination documentation, all patients underwent computed tomographic scan of the abdomen and pelvis with intravenous contrast. A total of 803 patients were enrolled: 451 patients had distracting injuries, and 352 patients did not. Of the 352 patients without distracting injuries, 19 (5.4%) had intra-abdominal injuries, of whom 2 (10.5%) had negative clinical examination result. Of the 451 patients with distracting injuries, 48 (10.6%) were diagnosed with intra-abdominal injury, of whom 5 (10.4%) had negative clinical examination result. All five missed injuries in patients with distracting injuries were solid organ injuries, none of which required surgical intervention or blood transfusion. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of abdominal examination for patients with distracting injuries were 90.0% and 97.0%, respectively. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of abdominal examination for surgically significant and transfusion-requiring injuries were both 100%. Distracting injuries do not seem to diminish the efficacy of clinical abdominal examination for the diagnosis of clinically significant abdominal

  3. The significance of routine thoracic computed tomography in patients with blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çorbacıoğlu, Seref Kerem; Er, Erhan; Aslan, Sahin; Seviner, Meltem; Aksel, Gökhan; Doğan, Nurettin Özgür; Güler, Sertaç; Bitir, Aysen

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the use of thoracic computed tomography (TCT) as part of nonselective computed tomography (CT) guidelines is superior to selective CT during the diagnosis of blunt chest trauma. This study was planned as a prospective cohort study, and it was conducted at the emergency department between 2013 and 2014. A total of 260 adult patients who did not meet the exclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. All patients were evaluated by an emergency physician, and their primary surveys were completed based on the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) principles. Based on the initial findings and ATLS recommendations, patients in whom thoracic CT was indicated were determined (selective CT group). Routine CTs were then performed on all patients. Thoracic injuries were found in 97 (37.3%) patients following routine TCT. In 53 (20%) patients, thoracic injuries were found by selective CT. Routine TCT was able to detect chest injury in 44 (16%) patients for whom selective TCT would not otherwise be ordered based on the EP evaluation (nonselective TCT group). Five (2%) patients in this nonselective TCT group required tube thoracostomy, while there was no additional treatment provided for thoracic injuries in the remaining 39 (15%). In conclusion, we found that the nonselective TCT method was superior to the selective TCT method in detecting thoracic injuries in patients with blunt trauma. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate that the nonselective TCT method can change the course of patient management albeit at low rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Is non-operative management safe and effective for all splenic blunt trauma? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Boselli, Carlo; Corsi, Alessia; Farinella, Eriberto; Listorti, Chiara; Trastulli, Stefano; Renzi, Claudio; Desiderio, Jacopo; Santoro, Alberto; Cagini, Lucio; Parisi, Amilcare; Redler, Adriano; Noya, Giuseppe; Fingerhut, Abe

    2013-09-03

    The goal of non-operative management (NOM) for blunt splenic trauma (BST) is to preserve the spleen. The advantages of NOM for minor splenic trauma have been extensively reported, whereas its value for the more severe splenic injuries is still debated. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the available published evidence on NOM in patients with splenic trauma and to compare it with the operative management (OM) in terms of mortality, morbidity and duration of hospital stay. For this systematic review we followed the "Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses" statement. A systematic search was performed on PubMed for studies published from January 2000 to December 2011, without language restrictions, which compared NOM vs. OM for splenic trauma injuries and which at least 10 patients with BST. We identified 21 non randomized studies: 1 Clinical Controlled Trial and 20 retrospective cohort studies analyzing a total of 16,940 patients with BST. NOM represents the gold standard treatment for minor splenic trauma and is associated with decreased mortality in severe splenic trauma (4.78% vs. 13.5% in NOM and OM, respectively), according to the literature. Of note, in BST treated operatively, concurrent injuries accounted for the higher mortality. In addition, it was not possible to determine post-treatment morbidity in major splenic trauma. The definition of hemodynamic stability varied greatly in the literature depending on the surgeon and the trauma team, representing a further bias. Moreover, data on the remaining analyzed outcomes (hospital stay, number of blood transfusions, abdominal abscesses, overwhelming post-splenectomy infection) were not reported in all included studies or were not comparable, precluding the possibility to perform a meaningful cumulative analysis and comparison. NOM of BST, preserving the spleen, is the treatment of choice for the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grades I and II

  5. Using a new evidence-based trauma protocol to improve detection and reduce costs in patients with blunt cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genrich, Ilean; OʼMara, Susan K; Sulo, Suela

    2015-01-01

    Management of blunt cardiac injury is often discussed in trauma literature due to the lack of a "gold standard" for early identification and cost-effective care. The effectiveness of an evidence-based trauma protocol was assessed by comparing patients treated with the new protocol to those managed with prior practice. The data of 80 patients prospectively managed using the new trauma protocol were compared with the medical records of 80 former patients treated according to existing practice. Implementing the new protocol improved detection of abnormal troponin I levels and resulted in cost savings. The length of time inpatients required continuous electrocardiographic monitoring decreased by 4.23 days and echocardiography use dropped by 70%. Implementation of the evidence-based trauma protocol at our facility improved the early identification of patients with blunt cardiac injury and reduced the number of laboratory and diagnostic tests.

  6. Invading of intrauterine contraceptive device into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodabadi, Abdoulhossein; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Amirbeigi, Mahdieh; Jazayeri, Hoda

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is relatively safe but still with some serious risks. Uterus perforation is rare and would be fatal. A case of Cu-7 IUCD invading into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a pelvic blunt trauma was presented. Our case showed that uterus perforation by an IUCD could induce utero-sigmoid fistula which is likely to be missed. Imaging is required when the patients with IUCD present abdominal pain, particularly with a history of trauma.

  7. Computed tomography in hemodynamically unstable severely injured blunt and penetrating trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, Carlos A; Herrera-Escobar, Juan P; Parra, Michael W; Rodriguez-Ossa, Paola A; Mejia, David A; Sanchez, Alvaro I; Badiel, Marisol; Morales, Monica; Rojas-Mirquez, Johanna C; Garcia-Garcia, Maria P; Pino, Luis F; Puyana, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic and efficient resuscitation strategies are now being implemented in severely injured hemodynamically unstable (HU) patients as blood products become readily and more immediately available in the trauma room. Our ability to maintain aggressive resuscitation schemes in HU patients allows us to complete diagnostic imaging studies before rushing patients to the operating room (OR). As the criteria for performing computed tomography (CT) scans in HU patients continue to evolve, we decided to compare the outcomes of immediate CT versus direct admission to the OR and/or angio suite in a retrospective study at a government-designated regional Level I trauma center in Cali, Colombia. During a 2-year period (2012-2013), blunt and penetrating trauma patients (≥ 15 years) with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 15 who met criteria of hemodynamic instability (systolic blood pressure [SBP] 100 beats/min and/or ≥ 4 U of packed red blood cells transfused in the trauma bay) were included. Isolated head trauma and patients who experienced a prehospital cardiac arrest were excluded. The main study outcome was mortality. We reviewed 171 patients. CT scans were performed in 80 HU patients (47%) immediately upon arrival (CT group); the remaining 91 patients (53%) went directly to the OR (63 laparotomies, 20 thoracotomies) and/or 8 (9%) to the angio suite (OA group). Of the CT group, 43 (54%) were managed nonoperatively, 37 (46%) underwent surgery (15 laparotomies, 3 thoracotomies), and 2 (5%) underwent angiography (CT OA subgroup). None of the mortalities in the CT group occurred in the CT suite or during their intrahospital transfers. There was no difference in mortality between the CT and OA groups in HU patients. CT scan was attainable in 47% of HU patients and avoided surgery in 54% of the cases. Furthermore, CT scan was helpful in deciding definitive/specific surgical management in 46% scanned HU patients who necessitated surgery after CT. Therapy

  8. Arterial Embolization in the Management of Mesenteric Bleeding Secondary to Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghelfi, Julien, E-mail: JGhelfi@chu-grenoble.fr; Frandon, Julien, E-mail: JFrandon2@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France); Barbois, Sandrine, E-mail: SBarbois@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Chirurgie Digestive et d’Urgences (France); Vendrell, Anne, E-mail: AVendrell@chu-grenoble.fr; Rodiere, Mathieu, E-mail: MRodiere@chu-grenoble.fr; Sengel, Christian, E-mail: CSengel@chu-grenoble.fr; Bricault, Ivan, E-mail: IBricault@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France); Arvieux, Catherine, E-mail: CArvieux@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Chirurgie Digestive et d’Urgences (France); Ferretti, Gilbert, E-mail: GFerretti@chu-grenoble.fr; Thony, Frédéric, E-mail: FThony@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France)

    2016-05-15

    IntroductionMesenteric bleeding is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of blunt abdominal trauma. It can induce active hemorrhage and a compressive hematoma leading to bowel ischemia. Emergency laparotomy remains the gold standard treatment. We aimed to study the effectiveness and complications of embolization in patients with post-traumatic mesenteric bleeding.Materials and MethodsThe medical records of 7 consecutive patients with active mesenteric bleeding treated by embolization in a level-one trauma center from 2007 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients presented with active mesenteric bleeding on CT scans without major signs of intestinal ischemia. We focused on technical success, clinical success, and the complications of embolization.ResultsSix endovascular procedures were successful in controlling hemorrhage but 1 patient had surgery to stop associated arterial and venous bleeding. One patient suffered from bowel ischemia, a major complication of embolization, which was confirmed by surgery. No acute renal failure was noted after angiography. For 1 patient we performed combined management as the endovascular approach allowed an easier surgical exploration.ConclusionIn mesenteric trauma with active bleeding, embolization is a valuable alternative to surgery and should be considered, taking into account the risk of bowel ischemia.

  9. Role of pelvic X-ray in blunt trauma patients -- A university hospital experience in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, Amal Ahmed; Malik, Kamran Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    To confirm the safety of the advanced trauma life support algorithm by comparing the incidence of pelvic fractures diagnosed by pelvic X-ray and computed tomography and to evaluate the need of pelvic X-ray in the management of haemodynamically stable polytrauma patients in whom computed tomography is deemed necessary. The prospective study was conducted at Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman, from January to December 2012, and comprised stable blunt trauma patients treated according to advanced trauma life support guidelines. All the patients underwent pelvic X-ray on presentation and later had computed tomography scan of abdomen and pelvis. Radiology reports were filed by the on-call radiologist prospectively. The reports were reviewed retrospectively. Data was analysed using SPSS 19. Of the 67 patients, 59(88%) were male and 8(12%) were females. The overall mean age was 32.09±12.28 years (range: 14-77 years) Pelvic X-rays showed no fracture in 62(92.5%) cases compared to 55(82.1%) scans. All cases that were positive on pelvic X-ray were detected by scan. Pelvic X-ray revealed only 4(6%) patients as having only pelvic fracture and 1(1.5%) as femoral head fracture. Computed tomography scan was able to detect 6(9%) pelvic fractures, 2(3%) femoral fractures and 4(6%) lumbar fractures. Computed tomography scan was found to be superior in detecting pelvic, femoral and lumbar fractures.

  10. Arterial Embolization in the Management of Mesenteric Bleeding Secondary to Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelfi, Julien; Frandon, Julien; Barbois, Sandrine; Vendrell, Anne; Rodiere, Mathieu; Sengel, Christian; Bricault, Ivan; Arvieux, Catherine; Ferretti, Gilbert; Thony, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Mesenteric bleeding is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of blunt abdominal trauma. It can induce active hemorrhage and a compressive hematoma leading to bowel ischemia. Emergency laparotomy remains the gold standard treatment. We aimed to study the effectiveness and complications of embolization in patients with post-traumatic mesenteric bleeding. The medical records of 7 consecutive patients with active mesenteric bleeding treated by embolization in a level-one trauma center from 2007 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients presented with active mesenteric bleeding on CT scans without major signs of intestinal ischemia. We focused on technical success, clinical success, and the complications of embolization. Six endovascular procedures were successful in controlling hemorrhage but 1 patient had surgery to stop associated arterial and venous bleeding. One patient suffered from bowel ischemia, a major complication of embolization, which was confirmed by surgery. No acute renal failure was noted after angiography. For 1 patient we performed combined management as the endovascular approach allowed an easier surgical exploration. In mesenteric trauma with active bleeding, embolization is a valuable alternative to surgery and should be considered, taking into account the risk of bowel ischemia.

  11. Predictors for the selection of patients for abdominal CT after blunt trauma: a proposal for a diagnostic algorithm.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deunk, J.; Brink, M.; Dekker, H.M.; Kool, D.R.; Blickman, J.G.; Vugt, A.B. van; Edwards, M.J.R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To select parameters that can predict which patients should receive abdominal computed tomography (CT) after high-energy blunt trauma. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Abdominal CT accurately detects injuries of the abdomen, pelvis, and lumbar spine, but has important disadvantages. More evidence

  12. External validation of the Blunt Abdominal Trauma in Children (BATiC) score : Ruling out significant abdominal injury in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Willem-Jan J.; Stoepker, Leon; Nellensteijn, David R.; Groen, Henk; El Moumni, Mostafa; Hulscher, Jan B.

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to validate the use of the Blunt Abdominal Trauma in Children (BATiC) score. The BATiC score uses only readily available laboratory parameters, ultrasound results, and results from physical examination and does therefore not carry any risk of additional

  13. Cumulative effective radiation dose received by blunt trauma patients arriving to a military level I trauma center from point of injury and interhospital transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Arnem, Kerri A; Supinski, David P; Tucker, Jonathan E; Varney, Shawn

    2016-12-01

    Trauma patients sustaining blunt injuries are exposed to multiple radiologic studies. Evidence indicates that the risk of cancer from exposure to ionizing radiation rises in direct proportion to the cumulative effective dose (CED) received. The purpose of this study is to quantify the amount of ionizing radiation accumulated when arriving directly from point of injury to San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC), a level I trauma center, compared with those transferred from other facilities. A retrospective record review was conducted from 1st January 2010 through 31st December 2012. The SAMMC trauma registry, electronic medical records, and the digital radiology imaging system were searched for possible candidates. The medical records were then analyzed for sex, age, mechanism of injury, received directly from point of injury (direct group), transfer from another medical facility (transfer group), computed tomographic scans received, dose-length product, CED of radiation, and injury severity score. A diagnostic imaging physicist then calculated the estimated CED each subject received based on the dose-length product of each computed tomographic scan. A total of 300 patients were analyzed, with 150 patients in the direct group and 150 patients in the transfer group. Both groups were similar in age and sex. Patients in the transfer group received a significantly greater CED of radiation compared with the direct group (mean, 37.6 mSv vs 28 mSv; P=.001). The radiation received in the direct group correlates with a lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of 1 in 357 compared with the transfer group with an increase in LAR to 1 in 266. Patients transferred to our facility received a 34% increase in ionizing radiation compared with patients brought directly from the injury scene. This increased dose of ionizing radiation contributes to the LAR of cancer and needs to be considered before repeating imaging studies. III. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Impact of concomitant trauma in the management of blunt splenic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Albert; Matheson, Anne-Marie; Adams, Dave

    2004-09-10

    Conservative management of isolated blunt splenic injuries has become widely accepted for haemodynamically stable patients, but may be untenable in those with multiple injuries. A retrospective review was performed to evaluate of our cumulative experience with non-operative management of splenic injuries, and to identify the risk factors for operative management. Eighty patients were identified. Demographics, mechanism of injury, injury severity score (ISS), clinical signs at presentation, utility of computed tomography scans and methods of treatment (operative management vs conservative management) were documented and statistically analysed to identify predictors for operative management. Initially, 45 patients (56%) were managed without operation, while 35 patients underwent urgent laparotomy - with 26 (74% in operative group) of these having splenectomy performed. Two patients (out of 45) failed conservative management and required delayed splenectomy, a 96% success rate for intended conservative management. Thus, overall rates of 54% non-operative management and 65% splenic conservation were achieved. The mean ISS of the operative management group (ISS=30) was higher than that of the non-operative treatment group (ISS=13, ptrauma. Risk factors for patients with blunt splenic injuries requiring operative management include ISS > or =16, hypotension, GCS trauma, there is an increasing trend towards operative management.

  15. Fatal blunt pancreatic trauma secondary to assault and battery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougé-Maillart, C; Tracqui, A; Tortel, M C; Pessaux, P; Penneau, M; Ludes, B

    2001-12-01

    The authors report on an fatal case of closed trauma of the pancreas in a context of violence. A 55-year-old man was found unconscious on the sidewalk and died a short time after being taken to the hospital. He had been hit with several punches to the face and abdomen 6 h before. The post-mortem examination showed numerous bruises over the whole body, a haemoperitoneum, a fissuration of the spleen and a massive peripancreatic haemorrhage associated with a complete dilaceration of the pancreas head. Histological examination of the pancreas revealed a massive necrosis associated with a subtotal disappearance of the acini, numerous sites of cytosteatonecrosis and a large haemorrhagic suffusion of the peripancreatic tissue. This case illustrates the possibilities of pancreatic injuries induced by blunt force aimed at the abdomen in a context of violence. Even if this occurs as an isolated injury it can result in rapid death because of the particular type of pancreatic fracture which is frequently involved. In postmortem situations, the pancreas should be systematically checked at necropsy and a histological examination should be carried out at the slightest doubt of a pancreatic lesion or suspicion of blunt force abdominal injuries.

  16. Non-Invasive Mechanic Ventilation Using in Flail Chest, Caused By Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Onat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old woman admitted our faculty emergency room with shortness of breath, and chest pain after traffic accident’s second hour. She was diagnosed as bilateral multipl rib fractures, left clavicula fracture, and left flail chest by phsical and radiological examinations. She was transfered to Chest Surgery Depatment’s intensive care unit. The patient was undergone non-invasive mask mechanic ventilation support, because of the decreasing of blood oxygen saturation and increasing of arteriel blood partial carbondioxide pressure. The treatment of non-invasive mechanic ventilation was succesfull for ventilation support. With this report, we would like to attentioned that non-invasive mechanic ventilation for blunt chest trauma patients could be used succesfully and could be used instead of endotracheal invasive mechanic ventilation.

  17. Mediastinal mature teratoma with rupture into pleural cavity due to blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Masahisa; Yoshida, Kazuo; Komatsu, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Nobutaka; Haba, Yoshiaki

    2012-03-01

    We report a rare case of mediastinal mature teratoma with rupture due to blunt trauma. A 15-year-old boy had received a strong head-butt in the left upper chest wall and was admitted with the sudden onset of left-sided severe chest pain and dyspnea. Chest computed tomography (CT) scan on admission revealed a heterogeneous mass lesion in the anterior mediastinum. The contrast-enhanced CT scans obtained 2 days after admission showed not only mediastinal mass lesion but also left pleural effusion. On the radiologic finding at 5 months later, the lesion became larger and was thought to be a typical mediastinal mature teratoma. The patient underwent extirpation of the tumor. Microscopically, the tumor was typically composed of adult-type tissues and was confirmed to be mature teratoma. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fat from contused adipose tissue may cause yellow discoloration of clothes in blunt trauma victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisenberger, D; Wuest, F; Bielefeld, L; Große Perdekamp, M; Pircher, R; Pollak, S; Thierauf-Emberger, A; Huppertz, L M

    2014-12-01

    In some fatalities from intense blunt trauma, the victims' clothes show strikingly yellow discoloration being in topographic correspondence with lacerated skin and crush damage to the underlying fatty tissue. This phenomenon is especially pronounced in light-colored textiles such as underwear made of cotton and in the absence of concomitant blood-staining. The constellation of findings seems to indicate that the fabric has been soaked with liquid body fat deriving from the contused adipose tissue. To check this hypothesis, textiles suspected to be contaminated with fat were investigated in 6 relevant cases. GC-MS-analysis proved the presence of 11 fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was similar to that of human adipose tissue with a high proportion of oleic acid (18:1). In total, the morphological and chemical findings demonstrated that the yellow discoloration of the victims' clothes was caused by fat from traumatized adipose tissue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Transient pressure wave in the behind armor blunt trauma: experimental and computational investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shaomin; Xu, Cheng; Wang, Shu; Wen, Yaoke

    2017-02-01

    In the last few decades, various researches focus on the transient pressure in the behind armor blunt trauma. This paper presented a investigation on the transient pressure in the ballistic gelatin behind a soft body armor subjected to the impacting from three ammunitions. Experimental results show that three peaks appear on the pressure-time curves without taking into account the ammunition type and the impact velocity. Furthermore, numerical models of the test were created to compare modelling results to the pressure from the pressure gauges buried in the gelatin block. The main features on the pressure-time cure were discussed to analyze the wave formation and propagation. With the verified model, the effect of the boundary was also investigated to explain the wave reflection which appeared after two peaks.

  20. Outcome of repair of bronchial injury in 10 patients with blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Reza; Afghani, Reza; Haghi, Seyed Ziaollah; Fattahi Masoum, Seyed Hossein; Sadrizadeh, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Bronchial avulsion is a serious complication of blunt chest trauma, which can be easily missed on initial presentation of a patient with multiple injuries. Missing the diagnosis may increase the risk of mortality and morbidity. We evaluated the outcome of 10 patients with bronchial injury following blunt chest trauma, who underwent bronchial anastomosis in Quaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran and Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from 2001 to 2012. There were 8 men and 2 women with a mean age of 23.1 ± 4.72 years. Associated injuries were ruled out in all cases. Demographic characteristics, anatomical location of the injury, mechanism of injury, complications of bronchial anastomosis, and one-year follow-up of the patients were studied. Eight patients had injury to the right main bronchus and 2 had injury to the left main bronchus. The time between surgery and diagnosis ranged from immediately to 6 months after injury. One death occurred in the operating room immediately after injury, due to asphyxia. The other 9 patients underwent successful anastomosis of the avulsed bronchus. There were 7 complications after repair, which were managed by a conservative approach. In one year of follow-up, one patient with residual stenosis underwent stent placement. Early diagnosis of major airway injury is an important factor in successful management and a favorable outcome. With improvements in surgical technique, regular follow-up, and effective management of complications, we can expect successful bronchial repair to save the lung, even with a late diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Blunt cerebrovascular trauma causing vertebral arteryd issection in combination with a laryngeal fracture: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krettek Christian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The diagnosis and therapy of blunt cerebrovascular injuries has become a focus since improved imaging technology allows adequate description of the injury. Although it represents a rare injury the long-term complications can be fatal but mostly prevented by adequate treatment. Case presentation A 33-year-old Caucasian man fell down a 7-meter scarp after losing control of his quad bike in a remote area. Since endotracheal intubation was unsuccessfully attempted due to the severe cervical swelling as well as oral bleeding an emergency tracheotomy was performed on scene. He was hemodynamically unstable despite fluid resuscitation and intravenous therapy with vasopressors and was transported by a helicopter to our trauma center. He had a stable fracture of the arch of the seventh cervical vertebra and fractures of the transverse processes of C5-C7 with involvement of the lateral wall of the transverse foramen. An abort of the left vertebral artery signal at the first thoracic vertebrae with massive hemorrhage as well as a laryngeal fracture was also detected. Further imaging showed retrograde filling of the left vertebral artery at C5 distal of the described abort. After stabilization and reconfirmation of intracranial perfusion during the clinical course weaning was started. At the time of discharge, he was aware and was able to move all extremities. Conclusion We report a rare case of a patient with vertebral artery dissection in combination with a laryngeal fracture after blunt trauma. Thorough diagnostic and frequent reassessments are recommended. Most patients can be managed with conservative treatment.

  2. Randomized clinical trial of ligasure™ versus conventional splenectomy for injured spleen in blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkazem, Vejdan Seyyed; Malihe, Khosravi

    2017-02-01

    Spleen is the most common organ damaged in cases of blunt abdominal trauma and splenectomy and splenorrhaphy are the main surgical procedures that are used in surgical treatment of such cases. In routine open splenectomy cases, after laparotomy, application of sutures in splenic vasculature is the most widely used procedure to cease the bleeding. This clinical trial evaluates the role and benefits of the Ligasure™ system in traumatic splenectomy without using any suture materials and compares the result with conventional method of splenectomy. After making decision for splenectomy secondary to a blunt abdominal trauma, patients in control group (39) underwent splenectomy using conventional method with silk suture ligation of splenic vasculature. In the interventional group (41) a Ligasure™ vascular sealing system was used for ligating of the splenic vein and artery. The results of operation time, volume of intra-operation bleeding and post-operative complications were compared in both groups. The mean operation times in control and interventional group were 21 and 12 min respectively (p splenectomy was 280 cc, but in the interventional group decreased significantly to 80 ml (p splenectomy not only can decrease the operation time but also can decrease the volume of bleeding during operation without any additional increase in post-operative complications. This method is recommendable in traumatic splenic injuries that require splenectomy in order to control the bleeding as opposed to use of traditional silk sutures. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Extravasation of intravenous computed tomography scan contrast in blunt abdominal and pelvic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Ivan R; Hamilton, Paul A; Garber, Adam B; Tien, Homer C; Chughtai, Talat; Rizoli, Sandro B; Tremblay, Lorraine N; Brenneman, Frederick D

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous contrast extravasation (CE) on computed tomography (CT) scan in blunt abdominal trauma is generally regarded as an indication for the need for invasive intervention (either angiography or laparotomy). More recently, improvements in CT scan technology have increased the sensitivity in detecting CE, and, thus, we postulate that not all patients with this finding require intervention. This study is a retrospective review of all patients who underwent a CT scan for blunt abdominal trauma between January 1999 and September 2003. Patterns of injury, associated injuries, management, and outcomes were examined for patients with CE. Seventy of 1,435 patients (4.8%) demonstrated CE. Mean age was 44 years and mean Injury Severity Score was 39. The location of CE was intra-abdominal in 25, pelvis/retroperitoneum in 39, and both areas in 3 patients. Six patients received supportive treatment for nonsurvivable head injury and were excluded from further analysis. Overall, 30 (47%) patients underwent immediate intervention (angiography or laparotomy) and 34 (53%) were managed nonoperatively. Of those who had initial nonoperative management, overall seven (20.5%) underwent intervention, with the remainder being managed without intervention. The success for nonoperative management was greater for those with pelvic/retroperitoneal CE (4 of 7: 57%) than for intra-abdominal extravasation (23 of 27: 85%). Although evidence of CE may suggest significant vascular injury, our data suggest that not all patients require invasive intervention. Further studies are needed to better define criteria for nonoperative management in patients with CE identified on their initial CT scan.

  4. Evaluation of Cervical Spine Clearance by Computed Tomographic Scan Alone in Intoxicated Patients With Blunt Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Lisa; Brookshire, Robert; Roche, Breanna; Johnson, Amelia; Cole, Frederic; Karmy-Jones, Riyad; Long, William; Martin, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    Current trauma guidelines dictate that the cervical spine should not be cleared in intoxicated patients, resulting in prolonged immobilization or additional imaging. Modern computed tomography (CT) technology may obviate this and allow for immediate clearance. To analyze cervical spine clearance practices and the utility of CT scans of the cervical spine in intoxicated patients with blunt trauma. We performed a prospective observational study of 1668 patients with blunt trauma aged 18 years and older who underwent cervical spine CT scans from March 2014 to March 2015 at an American College of Surgeons-verified Level I trauma center. Intoxication was determined by serum alcohol levels and urine drug screens. Physical examination and CT scan findings were evaluated for cervical spine injuries (CSI) and the incidence of missed injuries. Clinically relevant CSIs requiring cervical stabilization. The hypotheses formed prior to data collection were that cervical CT scans are sensitive and specific enough to diagnose CSIs that require stabilization and that normal CT scans are sufficient to clear CSIs in intoxicated patients. Of 1668 patients, 1103 (66.1%) were male, with a mean (SD) age of 49 (20) years and a mean (SD) Injury Severity Score of 10 (9). Vehicular (734 [44.0%]) and falls (579 [34.7%]) were the most common mechanisms for hospitalization. Intoxication was identified in 632 of 1429 of patients tested (44.2%; 425 [29.7%] by serum alcohol levels and 350 [24.5%] by urine drug screens). Half (316 [50.0%]) were admitted with cervical spine immobilization, and 38 (12%) of these were solely owing to the presence of intoxication. There were 65 abnormal CT scans (10.3%) in the intoxicated group. Among 567 normal CT scans, 4 (0.7%) had central cord syndrome found on initial physical examination, and 1 (0.2%) had a symptomatic unstable ligament injury that was misread as normal on CT scan but was abnormal on magnetic resonance imaging. The 316 patients kept in a

  5. Global aphasia without hemiparesis may be caused by blunt head trauma: An adolescent boy with transient aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Sevim; Türkdoğan, Dilşad; Hacıfazlıoğlu, Nilüfer Eldeş; Yalçın, Emek Uyur; Eksen, Zehra Yılmaz; Ekinci, Gazanfer

    2017-05-01

    Global aphasia without hemiparesis is a rare condition often associated with embolic stroke. Posttraumatic causes have not been reported, in the literature, to our knowledge. We report a 15-year old boy with transient global aphasia without hemiparesis due to blunt head trauma. In our case, clinical findings occurred 1week later following head trauma. Emergence of the symptoms after a period of the first mechanical head trauma, draws attention to the importance of secondary process in traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma: Injury mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children requiring hospitalisation at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Khalid M; Taqi, Kadhim M; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z S; Hamid, Rana S; Al-Balushi, Zainab N; Sankhla, Dilip K; Al-Qadhi, Hani A

    2016-05-01

    Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach.

  7. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma; Injury mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children requiring hospitalisation at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Bhatti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7% male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0% received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1% were injured by falls, 12 (17.1% during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7% by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%, followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%. The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7% and spleen (11.4%. The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9% with a good outcome (74.3%. The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach.

  8. Up-to-date management of patients with blunt abdominal trauma

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    Alojz Pleskovič

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last few years new approaches to the diagnosis and management of abdominal trauma were introduced, and in addition, monitoring of individual organ function in the intensive care units has become an almost daily practice. In our article we review the principles of assessment and management of injured individual abdominal organs from surgical and intensive care medicine’s point of view. Conclusions: Appropriate diagnostics and, precise and timely decision for surgery are the most important factors in the management of patients with blunt abdominal trauma. The mechanism of injury, presence of concomitant injuries, lifethreatening condition and competence of medical staff have to be taken into consideration. The most often injured organs, spleen and liver, are nowadays managed mostly non-operatively. Such an approach has resulted in an increased admission of patients to the intensive care unit, with an attempt to prevent secondary organ dysfunction and multiple-organ failure. These new treatment options have contributed to lower morbidity and mortality and improved quality of life.

  9. Predictors of Mortality and Prehospital Monitoring Limitations in Blunt Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovnik Lesjak, Vesna; Vujanović, Vitka; Pelcl, Tine; Križmarić, Miljenko

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at determining predictors of in-hospital mortality and prehospital monitoring limitations in severely injured intubated blunt trauma patients. We retrospectively reviewed patients' charts. Prehospital vital signs, Injury Severity Score (ISS), initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Revised Trauma Score (RTS), arterial blood gases, and lactate were compared in two study groups: survivors (n = 40) and nonsurvivors (n = 30). There were no significant differences in prehospital vital signs between compared groups. Nonsurvivors were older (P = 0.006), with lower initial GCS (P < 0.001) and higher ISS (P < 0.001), along with higher lactate (P < 0.001) and larger base deficit (BD; P = 0.006), whereas RTS (P = 0.001) was lower in nonsurvivors. For predicting mortality, area under the curve (AUC) was calculated: for lactate 0.82 (P < 0.001), for ISS 0.82 (P < 0.001), and for BD 0.69 (P = 0.006). Lactate level of 3.4 mmol/L or more was 82% sensitive and 75% specific for predicting in-hospital death. In a multivariate logistic regression model, ISS (P = 0.037), GCS (P = 0.033), and age (P = 0.002) were found to be independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. The AUC for regression model was 0.93 (P < 0.001). Increased levels of lactate and BD on admission indicate more severe occult hypoperfusion in nonsurvivors whereas vital signs did not differ between the groups. PMID:25710039

  10. Aniridia after blunt trauma and presumed wound dehiscence in a pseudophakic eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Wan Soo

    2016-02-01

    This was a report about a pseudophakic patient who experienced isolated total aniridia without damage to other intraocular structures following blunt trauma to the eye. This patient had a history of uneventful cataract surgery using a small clear corneal incision (CCI). This 71-year-old male presented at our clinic with glare in his left eye. He reported that he had fallen down while drunk and struck his left eye against a stone on the road 15 days earlier. He had undergone cataract surgery on his left eye nine months before the accident at another eye clinic. Slit-lamp examination showed total aniridia in his left eye, but there was no hyphema or cells in the anterior chamber. The intraocular lens in his left eye was stable, without decentration, dislocation, or zonular dehiscence and remained in an intact capsular bag. Review of the medical records from the surgical clinic at which he had undergone cataract surgery indicated no specific findings for any intraocular structure including the iris. He had previously undergone an uneventful phacoemulsification for his left eye through a 2.2 mm CCI, followed by the implantation of a single piece acrylic intraocular lens inside an intact capsular bag. This report showed that small-sized CCIs can be opened postoperatively by trauma and that this can result in isolated total aniridia without damage to other intraocular structures.

  11. Aniridia after blunt trauma and presumed wound dehiscence in a pseudophakic eye

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    Kyeong Hwan Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This was a report about a pseudophakic patient who experienced isolated total aniridia without damage to other intraocular structures following blunt trauma to the eye. This patient had a history of uneventful cataract surgery using a small clear corneal incision (CCI. This 71-year-old male presented at our clinic with glare in his left eye. He reported that he had fallen down while drunk and struck his left eye against a stone on the road 15 days earlier. He had undergone cataract surgery on his left eye nine months before the accident at another eye clinic. Slit-lamp examination showed total aniridia in his left eye, but there was no hyphema or cells in the anterior chamber. The intraocular lens in his left eye was stable, without decentration, dislocation, or zonular dehiscence and remained in an intact capsular bag. Review of the medical records from the surgical clinic at which he had undergone cataract surgery indicated no specific findings for any intraocular structure including the iris. He had previously undergone an uneventful phacoemulsification for his left eye through a 2.2 mm CCI, followed by the implantation of a single piece acrylic intraocular lens inside an intact capsular bag. This report showed that small-sized CCIs can be opened postoperatively by trauma and that this can result in isolated total aniridia without damage to other intraocular structures.

  12. Anterior Lens Capsule Rupture and Traumatic Cataract Due to Blunt Ocular Trauma

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    Nilüfer İlhan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old female was struck in the right eye with a plastic toy. Two days after the trauma, she was admitted to the eye clinic with complaining of reduced vision. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA was hand motion in the right eye. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy showed a lightly swollen traumatic cataract with rupture of the anterior lens capsule, and mild inflammation was seen in the anterior chamber. The intraocular pressure was 16 mmHg. Ultrasonography of the posterior segment of the eye was normal. The surgery was performed using simcoe cannula through a clear corneal incision followed by implantation of a foldable, acrylic, posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL. One month postoperatively, BCVA in the right eye was 20/20. Blunt ocular trauma may rarely lead to anterior capsular rupture and traumatic cataract in the young. Although this complication is rare, ophthalmic examination and surgery have to be performed meticulously. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 477-8

  13. Defining current facial fracture patterns in a quaternary institution following high-velocity blunt trauma

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    Senzwesihle C. Magagula

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the early 20th century, René Le Fort studied facial fractures resulting from blunt trauma and devised a classification system still in common use today. This classification, however, was based on low-velocity trauma. In modern practice, in a quaternary-level referral hospital, patients are often admitted following high-velocity injuries that mostly result from motor vehicle collisions.Objectives: A retrospective study to define facial bone fractures occurring subsequent to highvelocity trauma.Method: A retrospective study comprising the review of CT scans of 52 patients with highvelocity facial fractures was performed between April 2007 and March 2013. Injuries were classified using the Le Fort classification system. Deviations from the true Le Fort types, which are often depicted in the literature as occurring bilaterally and symmetrically, were documented; these included unilaterality, occurrence of several Le Fort fractures on one side of the face, occurrence of several Le Fort fractures on different levels and on different sides of the face, and occurrence of other fractures in addition to Le Fort fractures.Results: Of the 52 cases, 12 (23% had Le Fort injuries, with true Le Fort fractures occurring in only 1, and 11 deviating from the classic description. Nine patients had Le Fort fractures and additional fractures. Mandibular and zygomatic bone fractures were found to be common associations with Le Fort injuries, occurring in 58% and 33% of the cases respectively.Conclusion: Fractures occurring in modern practice often deviate from the traditional Le Fort classification. Precise recognition of these deviations and recognition of additional associated fractures is pivotal in their management, assisting the surgeon in determining the treatment plan, such as the surgical approach and the order in which to fix the various fractured components.

  14. Successful Repair of a Left Ventricular Aneurysm after Blunt Chest Trauma in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Lukács, László; Kádár, Krisztina; Lengyel, Mária; Árvay, Attila

    1988-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy sustained multiple serious injuries, including compression trauma to the chest, when he was struck by a piece of timber. Two-dimensional echocardiography and left ventricular angiography revealed a left ventricular apical aneurysm, which was successfully repaired with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. To our knowledge, this is only the 5th case in which a left ventricular aneurysm resulting from closed-chest injury in a child has been successfully treated. (Texas Heart Insti...

  15. Cardiac Rupture of the Junction of the Right Atrium and Superior Vena Cava in Blunt Thoracic Trauma

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    Chun Sung Byun

    Full Text Available Cardiac rupture following blunt thoracic trauma is rarely encountered, since it commonly causes death at the scene. With advances in critical care, blunt cardiac rupture has been successfully treated with well-organized team approach including an emergency physician, anesthesiologist, and cardiac surgeon. We encountered a patient with blunt cardiac rupture of the junction of the superior vena cava and right atrium that extended 7 cm to the right ventricular junction. The patient was successfully resuscitated after a closed thoracostomy and pericardiocentesis with fluid loading. Cardiac injury was repaired via mid-sternotomy without cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient recovered without complications and was discharged on the 7th day after surgery.

  16. Blunt trauma pancreatic duct injury managed by non-operative technique, a case study and literature review

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    A. Zala

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 15 year old boy who presented with generalised abdominal pain following a seemingly minor collision at weekend soccer. Investigation revealed a grade IV pancreatic injury that was subsequently managed with pancreatic stent insertion by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP and total parenteral nutrition (TPN prior to recommencing low fat diet 10 days post-injury. Keywords: Trauma, Blunt injury, Pancreas, Non-operative

  17. A comparison of the behind armour blunt trauma effects between ceramic faced and soft body armours caused by ballistic impact

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, E. A.; Horsfall, Ian; Watson, Celia H.

    2002-01-01

    Recently published research has characterised the behind armour blunt trauma (BABT) effects associated with high velocity ballistic impact on textile-based armour faced with a ceramic plate. Subsequently dynamic displacements, accelerations and pressures have been characterised both in Gelatine experiments and animal experiments and used to provide test methodologies. High velocity armour consists of a ceramic plate usually backed with a composite panel, which is worn over the conventional te...

  18. Virtual reality pain control during physical therapy range of motion exercises for a patient with multiple blunt force trauma injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Hunter G; Patterson, David R; Soltani, Maryam; Teeley, Aubriana; Miller, William; Sharar, Sam R

    2009-02-01

    Patients with severe blunt force trauma injuries (e.g., multiple fractures and/or internal injuries) often experience severe to excruciating pain during medical procedures. We explored the adjunctive use of immersive virtual reality (VR) to distract a patient with multiple blunt trauma injuries from his procedural pain during physical therapy. The patient was a 32-year-old male hospitalized after suffering upper and lower extremity injuries when he was hit by a semi truck as a pedestrian. While a nurse assisted the patient's passive range of motion (ROM) leg exercises over two days, the patient spent a total of 10 minutes of physical therapy with no distraction and 10 minutes in VR (within-subjects design, order randomized). Three 0 to 10 graphic-rating-scale pain scores for each of the two treatment conditions served as the primary dependent variables. The patient reported a reduction in pain when distracted with VR. "Pain unpleasantness" ratings during physical therapy dropped from "severe" (mean = 8.5) to "mild/moderate" (4.5). The patient's ROM was 1 degree less during VR on day 1, but the patient achieved 15 degrees greater ROM during VR on day 2. The present study provides preliminary evidence that immersive VR can be an effective adjunctive, nonpharmacologic pain-reduction technique for a patient with multiple blunt trauma injuries experiencing severe pain during physical therapy. The potential utility of VR analgesia for movement or exercise therapy for patients with blunt force trauma injuries should be explored in controlled studies.

  19. A meta-analysis to determine the effect of preinjury antiplatelet agents on mortality in patients with blunt head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, John Stephen; Grayson, Alan

    2013-02-01

    Anticoagulation abnormalities have been recognized for several decades as potential risk factors for increasing the risk of traumatic intracranial haemorrhage in patients with blunt head trauma. The potential increased risk of death as a consequence has not been fully evaluated. The aim of the study was to perform a meta-analysis in order to evaluate based upon the current level of evidence whether the use of pre-injury aspirin or clopidogrel increases the risk of mortality in patients with blunt head trauma. The databases Medline and EMBASE were searched via the Ovid interface. The Medline database was also searched using the PubMed interface. Case control studies or nested case control studies were identified comparing mortality rates on patients with blunt head trauma in patients on aspirin or clopidogrel against patients not on antiplatelet agents. Five studies in total were identified as suitable for the meta-analysis. Four of these studies were suitable for the aspirin meta-analysis and four for the clopidogrel meta-analysis. The common odds ratio for the aspirin meta-analysis using the Random Effects model was found to be 2.435 (95% CI: 0.637-9.314). Significant heterogeneity was present I(2) = 79.521. The common odds ratio for the clopidogrel meta-analysis using the Random Effects model was found to be 1.554 (95% CI: 0.320-7.536). Significant heterogeneity was present I(2) = 69.090. In summary, this meta-analysis showed a slight increased risk of death in patients with blunt head trauma who were taking pre-injury antiplatelet agents although the results did not reach statistical significance. In view of the small number of low level studies from which this meta-analysis is based, further work is required in this area.

  20. Predictors of Mortality and Prehospital Monitoring Limitations in Blunt Trauma Patients

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    Matej Strnad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at determining predictors of in-hospital mortality and prehospital monitoring limitations in severely injured intubated blunt trauma patients. We retrospectively reviewed patients’ charts. Prehospital vital signs, Injury Severity Score (ISS, initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Revised Trauma Score (RTS, arterial blood gases, and lactate were compared in two study groups: survivors (n=40 and nonsurvivors (n=30. There were no significant differences in prehospital vital signs between compared groups. Nonsurvivors were older (P=0.006, with lower initial GCS (P<0.001 and higher ISS (P<0.001, along with higher lactate (P<0.001 and larger base deficit (BD; P=0.006, whereas RTS (P=0.001 was lower in nonsurvivors. For predicting mortality, area under the curve (AUC was calculated: for lactate 0.82 (P<0.001, for ISS 0.82 (P<0.001, and for BD 0.69 (P=0.006. Lactate level of 3.4 mmol/L or more was 82% sensitive and 75% specific for predicting in-hospital death. In a multivariate logistic regression model, ISS (P=0.037, GCS (P=0.033, and age (P=0.002 were found to be independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. The AUC for regression model was 0.93 (P<0.001. Increased levels of lactate and BD on admission indicate more severe occult hypoperfusion in nonsurvivors whereas vital signs did not differ between the groups.

  1. Screening for blunt cardiac injury: an Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma practice management guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Keith; Velopulos, Catherine; Bilaniuk, Jaroslaw W; Collier, Bryan; Crowley, William; Kurek, Stanley; Lui, Felix; Nayduch, Donna; Sangosanya, Ayodele; Tucker, Brian; Haut, Elliott R

    2012-11-01

    Diagnosing blunt cardiac injury (BCI) can be difficult. Many patients with mechanism for BCI are admitted to the critical care setting based on associated injuries; however, debate surrounds those patients who are hemodynamically stable and do not otherwise require a higher level of care. To allow safe discharge home or admission to a nonmonitored setting, BCI should be definitively ruled out in those at risk. This Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) practice management guideline (PMG) updates the original from 1998. English-language citations were queried for BCI from March 1997 through December 2011, using the PubMed Entrez interface. Of 599 articles identified, prospective or retrospective studies examining BCI were selected. Each article was reviewed by two members of the EAST BCI PMG workgroup. Data were collated, and a consensus was obtained for the recommendations. We identified 35 institutional studies evaluating the diagnosis of adult patients with suspected BCI. This PMG has 10 total recommendations, including two Level 2 updates, two upgrades from Level 3 to Level 2, and three new recommendations. Electrocardiogram (ECG) alone is not sufficient to rule out BCI. Based on four studies showing that the addition of troponin I to ECG improved the negative predictive value to 100%, we recommend obtaining an admission ECG and troponin I from all patients in whom BCI is suspected. BCI can be ruled out only if both ECG result and troponin I level are normal, a significant change from the previous guideline. Patients with new ECG changes and/or elevated troponin I should be admitted for monitoring. Echocardiogram is not beneficial as a screening tool for BCI and should be reserved for patients with hypotension and/or arrhythmias. The presence of a sternal fracture alone does not predict BCI. Cardiac computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to differentiate acute myocardial infarction from BCI in trauma patients.

  2. Delayed Presentation of Isolated Complete Pancreatic Transection as a Result of Sport-Related Blunt Trauma to the Abdomen

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    Andrew J. Healey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blunt abdominal trauma is a rare but well-recognized cause of pancreatic transection. A delayed presentation of pancreatic fracture following sport-related blunt trauma with the coexisting diagnostic pitfalls is presented. Case Report: A 17-year-old rugby player was referred to our specialist unit after having been diagnosed with traumatic pancreatic transection, having presented 24 h after a sporting injury. Despite haemodynamic stability, at laparotomy he was found to have a diffuse mesenteric hematoma involving the large and small bowel mesentery, extending down to the sigmoid colon from the splenic flexure, and a large retroperitoneal hematoma arising from the pancreas. The pancreas was completely severed with the superior border of the distal segment remaining attached to the splenic vein that was intact. A distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation and evacuation of the retroperitoneal hematoma was performed. Discussion/Conclusion: Blunt pancreatic trauma is a serious condition. Diagnosis and treatment may often be delayed, which in turn may drastically increase morbidity and mortality. Diagnostic difficulties apply to both paraclinical and radiological diagnostic methods. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in such cases, with a multi-modality diagnostic approach and prompt surgical intervention as required.

  3. Is behind armour blunt trauma a real threat to users of body armour? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Debra J; Horsfall, I; Malbon, C

    2016-02-01

    Behind armour blunt trauma (BABT) has been defined as a non-penetrating injury caused by the rapid deformation of body armour. There has been an increasing awareness of BABT as an injury mechanism in both the military and civilian worlds; whether BABT results in serious injuries is debatable. A systematic review of the openly accessible literature was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses method to investigate those injuries classified as BABT and their severity. 50 sources were identified that included pertinent information relevant to this systematic review on BABT injuries. Typical injuries reported included skin contusion, laceration and penetration, rib fracture and contusions to lungs, kidneys, spleen and (rarely) the heart. No evidence of fatal injuries due to BABT was identified. Whether BABT can lead to life-threatening injuries when small-arms ammunition impacts body armour components designed to stop that ammunition is debatable. It should be emphasised that other data may be available in government reports that are not openly available. Further research should be considered that investigates developments in body armour, including initiatives that involve reducing burden, and how they affect BABT. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Efficacy of limited CT for nonvisualized lower cervical spine in patients with blunt trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, J. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, Univ. of California, Irvine, Medical Center, Orange, CA (United States)); Bonk, R.T. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, Univ. of California, Irvine, Medical Center, Orange, CA (United States)); Ansari, A. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, Univ. of California, Irvine, Medical Center, Orange, CA (United States)); Mesgarzadeh, M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Temple Univ., Health Sciences Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1994-07-01

    Records of 100 patients with blunt injury and nonvisualization of C7 and T1 on cross-table lateral and swimmer's views were reviewed to evaluate the usefulness of limited computed tomographic (CT) scans in ''clearing'' the lower cervical vertebrae of injury. CT was deemed necessary and performed in all of these cases because the lower cervical spine could not be evaluated clinically or with plain radiographs. Ninety-seven of these 100 patients had normal findings on CT and only three patients showed cervical spine fractures. All three had isolated and stable fractures. Two of these patients had ''clay-shoveler'' fractures at C6 and C7, respectively, and one had a single laminar fracture at C7. All three patients were conservatively treated. This study emphasizes the value of clinical correlation in the evaluation of cervical spine trauma. When deemed necessary in symptomatic patients, CT is useful to exclude skeletal injury in the lower cervical spine thus avoiding delay in the patient's workup and unnecessary hospitalization, and expediting patient discharge. Lack of pain and neurological findings in nonintoxicated, conscious, and alert patients is generally not associated with significant soft tissue or skeletal injury. (orig.)

  5. Blunt splenic injury: are early adverse events related to trauma, nonoperative management, or surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandon, Julien; Rodiere, Mathieu; Arvieux, Catherine; Vendrell, Anne; Boussat, Bastien; Sengel, Christian; Broux, Christophe; Bricault, Ivan; Ferretti, Gilbert; Thony, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to compare clinical outcomes and early adverse events of operative management (OM), nonoperative management (NOM), and NOM with splenic artery embolization (SAE) in blunt splenic injury (BSI) and identify the prognostic factors. Medical records of 136 consecutive patients with BSI admitted to a trauma center from 2005 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were separated into three groups: OM, NOM, and SAE. We focused on associated injuries and early adverse events. Multivariate analysis was performed on 23 prognostic factors to find predictors. The total survival rate was 97.1%, with four deaths all occurred in the OM group. The spleen salvage rate was 91% in NOM and SAE. At least one adverse event was observed in 32.8%, 62%, and 96% of patients in NOM, SAE, and OM groups, respectively (P events: simplified acute physiology score 2 ≥25 for almost all adverse events, age ≥50 years for acute respiratory syndrome, limb fracture for secondary bleeding, thoracic injury for pleural drainage, and at least one associated injury for pseudocyst. Adverse events were not related to the type of BSI management. Patients with BSI present worse outcome and more adverse events in OM, but this is related to the severity of injury. The main predictor of adverse events remains the severity of injury.

  6. FEASIBILITY OF THE CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT OF SPLENIC INJURIES IN BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA

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    M. M. Abakumov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. In blunt trauma, the structural features of the splenic parenchyma usually predispose to a significant intra-abdominal bleeding, so the excision of the damaged spleen is considered a main treatment technique in a majority of cases. However, a number of recent clinical studies have proved the necessity of a differentiated approach to making the treatment decisions and demonstrated the possibility of spleen salvage in certain cases.The most debatable issue is the management tactics in splenic injury associated with the formation of subcapsular hematoma. It is necessary to emphasize that the conservative treatment of such splenic injury implies a persisting risk of double-stage splenic rupture with following intra-abdominal bleeding.The Sklifosovsky Research Institute traditionally deals with injury management in all aspects and has gained a wide experience in splenic injury treatment that makes possible to demonstrate the choice of treatment tactics with regard to the splenic injury severity, and patient’s condition. A conservative management of spleen injury is reasonable only in stable patients and requires an additional use of instrumental diagnostic techniques. Morphological studies suggest that reparation processes around the splenic hematoma arise early enough and proceed, as a rule, with no signs of a purulent inflammation. 

  7. Is It safe? Nonoperative management of blunt splenic injuries in geriatric trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trust, Marc D; Teixeira, Pedro G; Brown, Lawrence H; Ali, Sadia; Coopwood, Ben; Aydelotte, Jayson D; Brown, Carlos V R

    2018-01-01

    Because of increased failure rates of nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt splenic injuries (BSI) in the geriatric population, dogma dictated that this management was unacceptable. Recently, there has been an increased use of this treatment strategy in the geriatric population. However, published data assessing the safety of NOM of BSI in this population is conflicting, and well-powered multicenter data are lacking. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) from 2014 and identified young (age Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher was the only independent risk factor associated with failure of NOM in geriatric patients (odds ratio, 2.778; confidence interval, 1.769-4.363; p Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher, Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less, and cardiac disease. However, failure of NOM was not independently associated with mortality (odds ratio, 1.429; confidence interval, 0.776-2.625; p = 0.25). Compared with younger patients, geriatric patients had a higher but comparable rate of failed NOM of BSI, and failure rates are lower than previously reported. Failure of NOM in geriatric patients is not an independent risk factor for mortality. Based on our results, NOM of BSI in geriatric patients is safe. Therapeutic, level IV.

  8. Treatment of blunt thoracic aortic injury in Germany-Assessment of the TraumaRegister DGU®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Alexander; Barbati, Mohammad E; Storck, Martin; Kotelis, Drosos; Keschenau, Paula; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Andruszkow, Hagen; Lefering, Rolf; Hildebrand, Frank; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael J; Grommes, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Using the data delivered by the German Trauma Register DGU® from 2002 till 2013, the value of different therapies of blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) in Germany was analyzed. Prospectively collected data of patients suffering from BTAI were retrospectively analyzed with focus on the different treatment modalities for grade I-IV injuries. 821 patients suffering from BTAI were identified: 51.6% (424) grade I injury, 35.4% (291) grade II or III injury and 12.9% (106) grade IV injury (77.5% men [44.94 ± 20.6 years]). The main patterns of injury were high- speed accidents and falls (78.0% [n = 640], 21.8% [n = 171] respectively). Significant differences between grade I and grade II/III as well as IV injuries could be assessed for the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a Glasgow Coma Scale score below 8 and a systolic blood pressure below 90 mmHg (p-value: injuries and cardiac arrest. Endovascular therapy became the treatment of choice for BTAI in Germany. Patients who have been treated by surgical means showed the highest survival rate, especially endovascular therapy showed a favorable low mortality rate.

  9. Skull wounds linked with blunt trauma (hammer example). A report of two depressed skull fractures--elements of biomechanical explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannoy, Yann; Becart, Anne; Colard, Thomas; Delille, Rémi; Tournel, Gilles; Hedouin, Valéry; Gosset, Didier

    2012-09-01

    The lesions of the skull following perforating traumas can create complex fractures. The blunt traumas can, according to the swiftness and the shape of the object used, create a depressed fracture. The authors describe through two clinical cases the lesional characteristic of the blunt traumas, perforating the skull using a hammer. In both cases the cranial lesions were very typical: they were geometrical, square shaped, of the same size than the tool (head and tip of the hammer). On the outer table of the skull, the edges of the wounds were sharp and regular. On the inner table, the edges of the wounds were beveled and irregular. The bony penetration in the depressed fracture results from a rupture of the outer table of the bone under tension, in periphery, by the bend of the bone to the impact (outbending) and then, from the inner table with comminuted bony fragmentation. Breeding on the fractures of the size and the shape of the blunt objects used is inconstant and differs, that it is the objects of flat surface or wide in opposition to those of small surface area. Fractures morphologies depend on one hand on these extrinsic factors and on the other hand, of intrinsic factors (structure of the bone). To identify them, we had previously conducted experimental work on cranial bone samples. The bone was submitted to a device for three-point bending. This work had shown properties of thickness and stiffness of the various areas of the vault. Our cases are consistent with these results and illustrate the variability of bone lesions according to region and mode of use of blunt weapons. Many studies have identified criteria for identification of the weapons and the assistance of digital and biomechanical models will be an invaluable contribution with this aim in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pathophysiological effects and changes in potassium, ionised calcium, glucose and haemoglobin early after severe blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocksén, David; Gryth, Dan; Druid, Henrik; Gustavsson, Jenny; Arborelius, Ulf P

    2012-05-01

    Severe lung contusion is often observed after blunt chest trauma due to traffic accidents or fall from heights, but may also occur after a non-penetrating ballistic impact against body armour. Such trauma has been designated behind armour blunt trauma (BABT). Our aim in the present study has been to evaluate pathophysiological changes and compensatory mechanisms that occur early after such severe lung contusion. Twelve pigs wearing body armour were shot with a 7.62mm assault rifle to produce a standardised pulmonary contusion. Exposed animals were compared with five control animals shot with blank ammunition. Physiological parameters and levels of potassium, glucose, haemoglobin, calcium, lactate and pH were monitored for two hours after the shot. The impact induced severe pulmonary contusion with apnoea, desaturation and hypotension in all exposed animals. Increased haemoglobin, glucose and severe hyperkalaemia were seen shortly after impact. Seven of twelve animals died due to the trauma. Dense cardiac tissue was observed during post mortem examination in six of the animals that died during the experimental course. In conclusion, this study has shown that life-threatening hyperkalaemia occurs early after severe lung contusion. Moreover, dense cardiac tissue and early increase of haemoglobin and glucose are intriguing findings that should be investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Refusal of cervical spine immobilization after blunt trauma: Implications for initial evaluation and management: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, James M; Dhillon, Navpreet K; Ko, Ara; Smith, Eric J T; Melo, Nicolas; Barmparas, Galinos; Ley, Eric J

    2017-11-15

    Rigid cervical collars are routinely placed in the pre-hospital setting after significant blunt trauma. Patients who are deemed competent by field personnel (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≥13, no major distracting injury and not grossly intoxicated) may refuse cervical collar placement. A retrospective review was conducted of all adult trauma patients presenting to a Level 1 trauma center after blunt trauma with a GCS≥13 and no distracting injury or gross intoxication from January 2014 to December 2014. Pre-hospital data was collected from emergency medical service reports and hospital data from patient charts. Cervical spine injury was identified by International Classification of Disease-9th Revision codes. Patients refusing cervical spine immobilization prior to arrival are compared to those who were compliant. A total of 629 patients met inclusion criteria. Cervical spine immobilization was refused by 28 patients, while 601 complied. There were 16 cervical spine injuries (2.5%), with 3 (10.7%) in noncompliant patients and 13 (2.2%) among those who were complaint (p = 0.03). The incidence of cervical spine injuries in patients refusing cervical collar immobilization is higher than in compliant patients. Patients arriving for initial evaluation having refused cervical collar immobilization should be treated with caution. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the criteria for angiotomography indications in the diagnosis of carotid and vertebral arterial injury associated with blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almerindo Júnior

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blunt carotid and vertebral artery injury (BCVI occur infrequently. The incidence of this type of injury is difficult to determine as many emergency room patients are neurologically asymptomatic. The statistics have not been reported in Brazil. The objectives of the current study were: To evaluate the accuracy of criteria used to recommend angiotomography in the diagnosis of cervical BCVI in 100 patients with blunt cervical trauma in the trauma services section of a Brazilian quaternary care hospital. Methods During a 30-month (2006-2008, all patients admitted to the emergency room of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo with blunt cervical trauma and potential risk of cervical vessel injury, were subjected to cervical angiotomography to diagnose BCVI. The data analyzed are presented as mean ± standard deviation, and statistical analyses included Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests, and the Mann-Whitney test. Results During the study period 2467 blunt trauma patients were admitted. In 100 patients that met the criteria for inclusion in the study, angiotomography identified 23 with BCVI, including 17 males and six females. The mean patient age was 34.81 ± 14.84 years. Car crash (49% and car-pedestrian accidents (24% were the most frequent causes of injury. Ten patients had internal carotid artery injuries, two patients had common carotid artery injuries, and 11 patients had vertebral artery injuries. Seven patients presented with Degree I arterial injuries, 10 patients presented with Degree II artery injuries, four patients presented with Degree IV artery injuries, one patient presented with a Degree V artery injury, and one patient had a carotid fistula. Seven out of the 23 patients with BCVI (30.4% presented with cervical vertebrae fractures, and 11 out of the 23 patients with BCVI (47.8% presented with facial fractures (LeFort II and III. Conclusions Although there is no consensus

  13. Does the mechanism of injury in pediatric blunt trauma patients correlate with the severity of genitourinary organ injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojuola, Bayo D; Gu, Xiao; Littlejohn, Nathan R; Sharpe, John P; Williams, Mark A; Giel, Dana W

    2014-12-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma can result in injury to genitourinary (GU) organs. Children may be more susceptible to some GU injuries due to anatomic differences compared to adults. Mechanism of injury (MOI) has been thought to relate to both the likelihood and severity of GU injury in children, although this has not definitively been proven. Our purpose was to determine if MOI has any correlation to the severity of GU injury in children treated at our institution. We reviewed records of all pediatric blunt trauma patients presenting to our institution from January 2005-December 2010 using the LeBonheur Children's Hospital Trauma Registry. All patients with GU injuries were included in this study. Data collected included demographic information, MOI, type and grade of GU injury, associated injuries, and clinical outcome. Continuous variables were tested with ANOVA and categorical variables were tested with chi-square test. Records of 5151 children with blunt trauma were reviewed; 76 patients were found to have GU organ injury. There were 47 males (61.8%) and 29 females (38.2%). Categories of MOI included motor vehicle accident, sports injury, bicycle accident, all-terrain vehicle accident (ATV), pedestrian struck accident, falls, and animal injury. MOI did not have any statistically significant association with the severity of GU organ injury (p = 0.5159). In addition, there was no association between MOI and either gender or side of injury. There was a statistically significant association between MOI and patient age (p = 0.04); older pediatric patients were more likely to experience GU injury due to sports injury and ATV accidents, where as younger patients were more likely to experience GU injury due to pedestrian struck, bicycle accidents or animal bite. Although specific MOI would seem to relate to presence and severity of injury in children, MOI alone does not correlate with the severity of GU organ injury in our pediatric trauma population. Age of pediatric

  14. Blunt splenic trauma in adults: can CT findings be used to determine the need for surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C D; Spring, P; Glättli, A; Schweizer, W

    1994-02-01

    The role of CT grading of blunt splenic injuries is still controversial. We studied the CT scans of adult patients with proved blunt splenic injuries to determine if the findings accurately reflect the extent of the injury. We were specifically interested in establishing if CT findings can be used to determine whether patients require surgery or can be managed conservatively. The CT scans of 45 patients with blunt splenic injuries were analyzed retrospectively, and the CT findings were correlated with the need for surgery. We used (1) a CT scale (I-V) for splenic parenchymal injuries that also allowed a comparison with the surgical findings in patients who underwent laparotomy, and (2) a CT-based score (1-6) that referred to both the extent of parenchymal injuries and the degree of hemoperitoneum. Early laparotomy was done in nine patients. Conservative treatment was attempted in 36 patients and was successful in 31; five patients needed delayed laparotomy after attempted conservative treatment. According to the CT scale (I-V), 25 patients had injuries of grade I or II; 20 patients were successfully treated conservatively, whereas five patients needed delayed surgery. Nineteen patients had injuries of grade III, IV, or V; eight patients underwent early laparotomy, and 11 patients were successfully treated conservatively. CT findings were false-negative in one patient who underwent early surgery for diaphragmatic rupture. A comparison of the CT findings with the intraoperative findings according to the CT scale (I-V) revealed identical parenchymal injury grades in four cases, whereas the injuries were underestimated on CT scans in four patients and overestimated on CT scans in six patients. The CT-based score (1-6) was applied to 41 patients; four patients who had peritoneal lavage before CT were excluded. Twelve patients had scores below 2.5; 10 patients were successfully treated conservatively, and two patients needed delayed surgery. Twenty-nine patients had

  15. Dual-source computed tomography may define cardiac contusion in patients with blunt chest trauma in ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emet, Mucahit; Saritemur, Murat; Altuntas, Bayram; Karaca, Leyla; Sari, Fatih Mehmet; Bilgin, Yasin; Kantarci, Mecit; Aslan, Sahin

    2015-06-01

    We report a 20-year-old woman with blunt chest trauma because of a motor vehicle injury who has traumatic asphyxia and hypotension. The diagnosis of blunt cardiac injury was put by using dual-energy computed tomography in the emergency department because other laboratory and imaging modalities were useless. After hospitalization in intensive care unit, she was treated with supportive and antiedema therapy. The patient was extubated on the fifth day and discharged on the ninth day without any sequel. Coexistence of traumatic asphyxia with blunt cardiac injury is rare. Several imaging techniques such as transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, contrast-enhanced multislice thorax computed tomography or initial electrocardiogram, and troponin I levels are used to detect the myocardial damage, but diagnostic capability is low. Dual-energy computed tomography is a promising new technology with the ability of defining blunt cardiac injuries and may have an indication in the emergency setting in patients with hemodynamic instability to rule in traumatic cardiac complications especially when electrocardiogram and transthoracic echocardiography are useless in the emergency department.

  16. Blunt trauma of bone structures of the chest: Computed tomography vs multidetector computed tomography

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    Petrović Kosta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Computerized tomography (CT, especially multidetector CT (MDCT, has had a revolutionary impact in diagnostic in traumatized patients. The aim of the study was to identify and compare the frequency of injuries to bone structures of the thorax displayed with 5-mm-thick axial CT slices and thin-slice (MDCT examination with the use of 3D reconstructions, primarily multiplanar reformations (MPR. Methods. This prospective study included 61 patients with blunt trauma submitted to CT scan of the thorax as initial assessment. The two experienced radiologists independently and separately described the findings for 5-mmthick axial CT slices (5 mm CT as in monoslice CT examination; MPR and other 3D reconstructions along with thin-slice axial sections which were available in modern MDCT technologies. After describing thin-slice examination in case of disagreement in the findings, the examiners redescribed thinslice examination together which was ultimately considered as a real, true finding. Results. No statistically significant difference in interobserver evaluation of 5 mm CT examination was recorded (p > 0.05. Evaluation of fractures of sternum with 5 mm CT and MDCT showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 in favor of better display of injury by MDCT examination. Conclusion. MDCT is a powerful diagnostic tool that can describe higher number of bone fractures of the chest in traumatized patients compared to 5 mm CT, especially in the region of sternum for which a statistical significance was obtained using MPR. Moreover, the importance of MDCT is also set by easier and more accurate determination of the level of bone injury.

  17. Blunt eye trauma: empirical histopathologic paintball impact thresholds in fresh mounted porcine eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponsel, William E; Gray, Walt; Scribbick, Frank W; Stern, Amber R; Weiss, Carl E; Groth, Sylvia L; Walker, James D

    2011-07-15

    Ballistic studies were conducted using gelatin-embedded abattoir-fresh porcine eyes suspended within clear acrylic orbits to discern the energy required to produce specific ocular injuries. Paintball impact provides a robust ballistic model for isolating and quantifying the role of direct blunt force in ocular trauma. Fifty-nine porcine orbital preparations received direct blows from 0.68 caliber (16-18 mm diameter/3.8 g) paintballs fired at impact velocities ranging from 26 to 97 meters per second (2-13.5 J). Five additional eyes not subjected to ballistic impact were also evaluated as controls. Impact energies were correlated with histopathologic damage. Minimum impact energies consistently producing damage in experimental eyes unobserved in control specimens were: 2 joules--posterior lens dislocation, zonulysis, capsular rupture, and choroidal detachment; 3.5 joules--moderate angle recession; 4 joules--anterior lens dislocation; 4.8 joules--peripapillary retinal detachment; 7 joules--severe angle recession, iridodialysis, and cyclodialysis; 7.5 joules--corneal stromal distraction; 9.3 joules--choroidal segmentation; and 10 joules--globe rupture. Impact thresholds correlating traumatic ocular pathology with impact energy followed a positive stepwise progression in severity with impact energies between 2 and 10 joules. Moderate angle recession commensurate with typical clinical traumatic glaucoma was not observed among control eyes, but occurred at relatively low impact energy of 3.5 joules among test eyes. Extensive disruption in and around the angle (iridodialysis/cyclodialysis) consistently occurred at energies >7 joules. Globe rupture required a minimum energy of 10 joules.

  18. Management and outcomes of facial paralysis from intratemporal blunt trauma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, John J; Friedland, David R; Boorsma, Keren J; Rhee, John S

    2010-01-01

    To systematically review the existing literature on outcomes and management of facial paralysis resulting from intratemporal blunt trauma. Systematic review of the literature. A systematic literature review identified twenty-eight articles meeting our inclusion criteria. Outcome variables analyzed included severity of paralysis, time of onset of paralysis, surgical or non-surgical management, steroid use, and final facial nerve function. The majority of the studies were classified as level 4 evidence as defined by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. There was marked variation in the quality of the studies with inconsistent outcome measures, diagnostic testing, and follow-up, thus ruling out a formal meta-analysis. In an exploratory pooling of data, 612 cases had sufficient follow-up and facial movement grading for some evaluation of trends. In 189 patients that were followed observationally, 66% achieved an outcome equivalent to House-Brackmann (HB) I, 25% achieving HB II-V, and two patients a HB VI score. Among 83 patients treated with steroids, 67% achieved HB I, 30% HB II-V, and no patients with HB VI. . In 340 patients treated surgically, 23% achieved HB I post-operatively, 58% were graded as HB II-V, and 9% with HB grade VI postoperatively. No patient presenting with partial paralysis had a HB VI outcome. The role of surgery versus non-surgical interventions for this clinical entity remains inconclusive. Level 4 evidence studies predominate and are further hindered by poor description of outcome measures and incomplete data reporting. Exploratory pooling of data without formal metaanalysis suggests the need to compare any intervention to the natural course of healing which overall appears to be favorable.

  19. Long-Term Survival on Medical Therapy Alone after Blunt-Trauma Aortic Regurgitation: Report of a New Case with Summary of 95 Others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugu, Toshimitsu; Murata, Mitsushige; Mahara, Keitaro; Iwanaga, Shiro; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2016-10-01

    Aortic regurgitation resulting from blunt chest trauma has been reported only 95 times, to our knowledge. The noncoronary and right coronary cusps are the cardiac structures most often injured. Although the aortic leaflets can appear to be undamaged after nonpenetrating trauma, they can have pathologic abnormalities and insufficient function. Some cases of posttraumatic aortic regurgitation progress slowly. Aortic valve replacement is the optimal treatment. We present the case of a then-62-year-old man who has lived more than 5 years after blunt-trauma aortic regurgitation. His is the only case of long-term survival on medical therapy alone among the 96 cases summarized in this report.

  20. Venous air embolism: An under-recognised entity in blunt-force trauma and the importance of radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Marna; du Toit-Prinsloo, Lorraine

    2017-04-01

    Air embolism (AE) is considered a rare event and can be either iatrogenic or traumatic. Various post-mortem methods to detect AE exist, of which radiology is preferred. The presence of air in the heart can be demonstrated using special dissection techniques where the heart is opened under water or by needle puncture from a water-filled syringe. Three cases of blunt-force head injury are presented herein, with AE being diagnosed by conventional radiography using a Lodox Statscan® full-body digital X-ray machine in all cases. This case series demonstrates that AE due to blunt-force trauma to the head and sinuses might be under-recognised in the forensic post-mortem setting. It also highlights the importance of radiology in diagnosing AE post-mortem, especially where the results of post-mortem techniques might be unsatisfactory.

  1. The effect of pre-injury anti-platelet therapy on the development of complications in isolated blunt chest wall trauma: a retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceri Battle

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The difficulties in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the Emergency Department due to the development of late complications are well recognised in the literature. Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy has been previously investigated as a risk factor for poor outcomes following traumatic head injury, but not in the blunt chest wall trauma patient cohort. The aim of this study was to investigate pre-injury anti-platelet therapy as a risk factor for the development of complications in the recovery phase following blunt chest wall trauma. METHODS: A retrospective study was completed in which the medical notes were analysed of all blunt chest wall trauma patients presenting to a large trauma centre in Wales in 2012 and 2013. Using univariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis, pre-injury platelet therapy was investigated as a risk factor for the development of complications following blunt chest wall trauma. Previously identified risk factors were included in the analysis to address the influence of confounding. RESULTS: A total of 1303 isolated blunt chest wall trauma patients presented to the ED in Morriston Hospital in 2012 and 2013 with complications recorded in 144 patients (11%. On multi-variable analysis, pre-injury anti-platelet therapy was found to be a significant risk factor for the development of complications following isolated blunt chest wall trauma (odds ratio: 16.9; 95% confidence intervals: 8.2-35.2. As in previous studies patient age, number of rib fractures, chronic lung disease and pre-injury anti-coagulant use were also found to be significant risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy is being increasingly used as a first line treatment for a number of conditions and there is a concurrent increase in trauma in the elderly population. Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy should be considered as a risk factor for the development of complications by clinicians managing

  2. Characteristics of behind armor blunt trauma produced by bullets with different structural materials: an experimental study

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    Ling-qing WANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of structural materials of bullets on behind armor blunt trauma (BABT. Methods Ten healthy male Landraces were randomly divided into two groups (5 each: 56 type 7.62-mm rifle bullet group and SS109 5.56-mm rifle bullet group. The kinetic energy of two types of bullets was adjusted to the same level (about 1880J by the way of grow downwards gunpowder. Then the animals as protected with both grade NIJ Ⅲ ceramic hard armor and grade Ⅱ police soft body armor, were shot at the left midclavicular line of fourth intercostal space (shooting distance was 25m. The damage to the animals was observed. Other 2 healthy male Landraces were selected, and biomechanical sensor was subcutaneously implanted into the soft tissue in precordium and intracalvarium to detect the pressure at the time point of bullet contact under the protection of armor, and the relationship between pressure and damage was analyzed. Results Respiration, heart rate and systolic arterial pressure of animals in two groups were all elevated after injury, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. No obvious change was found on blood oxygen saturation of both groups. Gross anatomy showed the predominant local injury was cardiac and pulmonary contusions. The area of pulmonary hemorrhage of 7.62mm group was 6.00%±3.18%, significantly higher than that of 5.56mm group (3.59%±2.11%, P<0.05. Histopathological examination revealed acute injuries of lung tissues, myocardial tissue and cerebral cortical neurons. The contents of cardiac troponin T (TnT, creatine kinase (CK and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB isoenzyme were all increased 3 hours after injury, and the rise was higher in 7.62mm group than in 5.56mm group (P<0.05. Biomechanical testing showed the pressure of precordium and intracalvarium was elevated at the moment of bullet contact, and the rise was higher in 7.62mm group than in 5.56mm group (P<0.05. Conclusions

  3. Cardiopulmonary bypass after severe blunt hepatic injury: management of multi-system blunt trauma in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Stephanie; Kavarana, Minoo; Scheurer, Mark A; Cina, Robert A

    2013-06-01

    A 16-year-old adolescent male sustained combined injuries to the tricuspid valve and liver. This injury is exceptional due to the mechanism and the circumstances in which it took place: a flying pumpkin thrown from a sport utility vehicle. An echocardiogram demonstrated a flail chordal apparatus associated with the posterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve, creating substrate for severe tricuspid regurgitation with preserved right heart function. He was treated with non-operative management for the liver injury; he remained hemodynamically stable and was discharged home. He underwent successful repair of the tricuspid valve 17 days following the initial injury necessitating systemic anticoagulation and was discharged home two days later. The patient recovered fully without residual valvular pathology or hepatic sequelae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Socio-economic outcome after blunt orthopaedic trauma: Implications on injury prevention

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    Zilkens Anna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several large studies have identified factors associated with long-term outcome after orthopaedic injuries. However, long-term social and economic implications have not been published so far. The aim of this investigation is to study the long-term socio-economic consequences of patients sustaining severe trauma. Methods Patients treated at a level one trauma center were invited for a follow-up (at least 10 years examination. There were 637 patients who responded and were examined. Inclusion criteria included injury severity score (ISS ≥ 16 points, presence of lower and upper extremity fractures, and age between 3 and 60 years. Exclusion criteria included the presence of amputations and paraplegia. The socio-economic outcome was evaluated in three age groups: group I ( 50 years. The following parameters were analyzed using a standardized questionnaire: financial losses, net income losses, pension precaution losses, need for a bank loan, and the decrease in number of friends. Results 510 patients matched all study criteria, and breakdown of groups were as follows: 140 patients in group I, 341 patients in group II, and 29 patients in group III. Financial losses were reported in all age groups (20%-44%. Younger patients (group I were associated with less income losses when compared with other groups (p Conclusions Economic consequences are reported by polytraumatized patients even ten or more years after injury. Financial losses appear to be common in patients between 19 and 50 years. In contrast, social deprivation appears to be most pronounced in the younger age groups. Early socio-economic support and measures of injury prevention should focus on these specific age groups.

  5. Agent–host–environment model of blunt abdominal trauma in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % of mortality is related to trauma. Abdominal injuries account for approximately 10% of trauma deaths in childhood. Child injury has great effects on communities and countries. The agent–host– environment model has been used to describe ...

  6. Blunt renal trauma: comparison of contrast-enhanced CT and angiographic findings and the usefulness of transcatheter arterial embolization

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    Kitase, M.; Mizutani, M.; Tomita, H.; Kono, T.; Sugie, C.; Shibamoto, Y. [Nagoya City University, Nagoya, (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Radiology

    2007-07-15

    Full text: Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of contrast-enhanced CT and the usefulness of super selective embolization therapy in the management of arterial damage in patients with severe blunt renal trauma. Patients and Methods: Nine cases of severe renal trauma were evaluated. In all cases, we compared contrast enhanced CT findings with angiographic findings, and performed transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in six of them with microcoils and gelatin sponge particles. Morphological changes in the kidney and site of infarction after TAE were evaluated on follow-up CT Chronological changes in blood biochemistry findings after injury, degree of anemia and renal function were investigated. Adverse effects or complications such as duration of hematuria, fever, abdominal pain, renovascular hypertension and abscess formation were also evaluated. Results: The CT finding of extravasation was a reliable sign of active bleeding and useful for determining the indication of TAE. In all cases, bleeding was effectively controlled with super selective embolization. There was minimal procedure-related loss of renal tissue. None of the patients developed abscess, hypertension or other complications. Conclusions: In blunt renal injury, contrast-enhanced CT was useful for diagnosing arterial hemorrhage. Arterial bleeding may produce massive hematoma and TAE was a useful treatment for such cases. By using selective TAE for a bleeding artery, it was possible to minimize renal parenchymal damage, with complications of TAE rarely seen. (author)

  7. Safe cervical spine clearance in adult obtunded blunt trauma patients on the basis of a normal multidetector CT scan--a meta-analysis and cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Mushahid; Elkhodair, Samer; Zaheer, Asif; Yousaf, Sohail

    2013-11-01

    A true gold standard to rule out a significant cervical spine injury in subset of blunt trauma patients with altered sensorium is still to be agreed upon. The objective of this study is to determine whether in obtunded adult patients with blunt trauma, a clinically significant injury to the cervical spine be ruled out on the basis of a normal multidetector cervical spine computed tomography. Comprehensive database search was conducted to include all the prospective and retrospective studies on blunt trauma patients with altered sensorium undergoing cervical spine multidetector CT scan as core imaging modality to "clear" the cervical spine. The studies used two main gold standards, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine and/or prolonged clinical follow-up. The data was extracted to report true positive, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. Meta-analysis of sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values was performed using Meta Analyst Beta 3.13 software. We also performed a retrospective investigation comparing a robust clinical follow-up and/or cervical spine MR findings in 53 obtunded blunt trauma patients, who previously had undergone a normal multidetector CT scan of the cervical spine reported by a radiologist. A total of 10 studies involving 1850 obtunded blunt trauma patients with initial cervical spine CT scan reported as normal were included in the final meta-analysis. The cumulative negative predictive value and specificity of cervical spine CT of the ten studies was 99.7% (99.4-99.9%, 95% confidence interval). The positive predictive value and sensitivity was 93.7% (84.0-97.7%, 95% confidence interval). In the retrospective review of our obtunded blunt trauma patients, none was later diagnosed to have significant cervical spine injury that required a change in clinical management. In a blunt trauma patient with altered sensorium, a normal cervical spine CT scan is conclusive to safely rule out a clinically

  8. Transfer and Non-Transfer Patients in Isolated Low-Grade Blunt Pediatric Solid Organ Injury: Implications for Regionalized Trauma Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Robert A; Lyons, Vivian H; Hagedorn, Judith C; Vavilala, Monica S; Goldin, Adam; Arbabi, Saman; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-12-28

    Regionalization of trauma care is a national priority and hospitalization for blunt abdominal trauma, that may include transfer, is common among children. The objective of this study was to determine whether there were differences in mortality, treatment, or length of stay between patients treated at or transferred to a higher level trauma center and those not transferred and admitted to a lower level trauma center. Cohort from Washington state trauma registry from 2000-2014 of patients 16 years or younger with isolated Grade I-III spleen, liver, or kidney injury. Among 54034 patients 16 years or younger, the trauma registry captured 1177 (2.2 %) patients with isolated low grade solid organ injuries; 226 (19.2%) presented to a higher level trauma center, 600 (51.0%) presented to a lower level trauma center and stayed there for care, and 351 (29.8%) were transferred to a higher level trauma center. Forty patients (3.4%) underwent an abdominal operation. Among the 950 patients evaluated initially at a lower level trauma center, the risk of surgery did not differ significantly between those who were not transferred compared to those who were (RR 2.19 95%CI 0.80-6.01). The risk of total splenectomy was no different for patients who stayed at a lower level trauma center compared to those who were transferred to a higher level trauma center (RR 0.84 95%CI 0.33-2.16). Non-transferred patients had a 0.63 (95% CI: 0.45-0.88) times lower risk of staying in the hospital for an additional day compared to patients who were transferred to a higher level trauma center. One patient died. Few pediatric patients with isolated low grade blunt solid organ injury require intervention and thus may not need to be transferred; trauma systems should revise their transfer policies. Prevention of unnecessary transfers is an opportunity for cost savings in pediatric trauma. III, Epidemiological.

  9. Neurodegeneration and Vision Loss after Mild Blunt Trauma in the C57Bl/6 and DBA/2J Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Bricker-Anthony

    Full Text Available Damage to the eye from blast exposure can occur as a result of the overpressure air-wave (primary injury, flying debris (secondary injury, blunt force trauma (tertiary injury, and/or chemical/thermal burns (quaternary injury. In this study, we investigated damage in the contralateral eye after a blast directed at the ipsilateral eye in the C57Bl/6J and DBA/2J mouse. Assessments of ocular health (gross pathology, electroretinogram recordings, optokinetic tracking, optical coherence tomography and histology were performed at 3, 7, 14 and 28 days post-trauma. Olfactory epithelium and optic nerves were also examined. Anterior pathologies were more common in the DBA/2J than in the C57Bl/6 and could be prevented with non-medicated viscous eye drops. Visual acuity decreased over time in both strains, but was more rapid and severe in the DBA/2J. Retinal cell death was present in approximately 10% of the retina at 7 and 28 days post-blast in both strains. Approximately 60% of the cell death occurred in photoreceptors. Increased oxidative stress and microglial reactivity was detected in both strains, beginning at 3 days post-injury. However, there was no sign of injury to the olfactory epithelium or optic nerve in either strain. Although our model directs an overpressure air-wave at the left eye in a restrained and otherwise protected mouse, retinal damage was detected in the contralateral eye. The lack of damage to the olfactory epithelium and optic nerve, as well as the different timing of cell death as compared to the blast-exposed eye, suggests that the injuries were due to physical contact between the contralateral eye and the housing chamber of the blast device and not propagation of the blast wave through the head. Thus we describe a model of mild blunt eye trauma.

  10. Blunt Abdominal Trauma from Motor Vehicle Collisions from 2007 to 2011: Renal Injury Probability and Severity in Children versus Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Michael P; Eswara, Jairam R; Vetter, Joel M; Nelson, Caleb P; Brandes, Steven B

    2017-03-01

    There are sparse data directly comparing the probability of renal injury in children and adults. The kidney of the child is believed to be more susceptible to blunt injury for a variety of anatomical reasons. In a large cohort we tested the hypothesis that the pediatric kidney is more susceptible to any renal injury and to higher grade injury. We queried the NTDB® (National Trauma Data Bank®) on all hospital admissions following motor vehicle collisions in a pediatric population (age less than 21 years) and a referent adult population (age 30 to 50 years). Of 111,172 children who were admitted after motor vehicle collisions 1,093 had renal injury. Of the 111,172 children admitted to the hospital following motor vehicle collisions 59,385 had abdominal trauma and 1,093 had renal injury. In a multivariate logistic model adjusting for overall ISS (Injury Severity Score), region, year, driver/passenger status, presence of restraint or an airbag, we found that children had 48% higher odds of renal injury compared to adults ages 30 to 50 years (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.32-1.66, p collisions is rare but substantially more common than in adults. The odds of high grade renal injury are approximately 50% higher in children. A greater index of suspicion and a lower threshold for renal imaging is prudent for children with blunt abdominal trauma from motor vehicle collisions. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Presacral retroperitoneal hematoma after blunt trauma presents with rectal bleeding — A case report

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    Sanne Jensen Dich

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Rectal bleed after trauma, in a patient receiving anticoagulant treatment, should raise suspicion of a penetrating hematoma, and such patients should be managed at highly specialized facilities.

  12. Delayed intracranial hemorrhage after blunt trauma: are patients on preinjury anticoagulants and prescription antiplatelet agents at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Kimberly A; Sise, C Beth; Shackford, Steven R; Sise, Michael J; Calvo, Richard Y; Sack, Daniel I; Walker, Sarah B; Schechter, Mark S

    2011-12-01

    Trauma centers are more frequently evaluating patients who are receiving anticoagulant or prescription antiplatelet (ACAP) therapy at the time of injury. Because there are reports of delayed intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) after blunt trauma in this patient group, we evaluated patients receiving ACAP with a head computed tomography (CT) on admission (CT1) followed by a routine repeat head CT (CT2) in 6 hours. We hypothesized that among patients with no traumatic findings on CT1 and a normal or unchanged interval neurologic examination, the incidence of clinically significant delayed ICH would be zero. We retrospectively reviewed adult blunt trauma patients admitted to our Level I trauma center from January 2006 to August 2009 who were receiving preinjury ACAP therapy. We reviewed medications, mechanism of injury, head CT results, and outcomes. Demographic data, injury severity scores, international normalized ratio, and neurologic examinations were recorded. We determined the incidence of delayed ICH on CT2 for patients with a negative CT1. Five hundred patients qualified for the protocol. Of these, 424 patients (85%) had a negative CT1. Among these patients, mean age was 75 years; 210 (50%) were male. Fall from standing was the most common mechanism of injury found in 357 patients (84%). Warfarin alone was taken in 68%, clopidogrel alone in 24%, and other agents in 2%. Six percent of patients were taking two agents. Mean international normalized ratio for patients on warfarin was 2.5. Among patients with a negative CT1, CT2 was obtained in 362 patients (85%) and was negative in 358 patients (99%). Four patients (1%) with a negative CT1 had a positive (n = 3) or equivocal (n = 1) CT2. All the changes on CT2 were minor and had either resolved or stabilized on third head CT. Of the four patients with positive or equivocal CT2, none had a change in neurologic examination; however, two had symptoms that could be attributed to head injury. Three were discharged home and

  13. Educational Review of Predictive Value and Findings of Computed Tomography Scan in Diagnosing Bowel and Mesenteric Injuries After Blunt Trauma: Correlation With Trauma Surgery Findings in 163 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquantini, Francesco; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Piccinini, Alice; Coniglio, Carlo; Mannone, Sergio; Biscardi, Andrea; Gordini, Giovanni; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2017-08-01

    Laparotomy can detect bowel and mesenteric injuries in 1.2%-5% of patients following blunt abdominal trauma. Delayed diagnosis in such cases is strongly related to increased risk of ongoing sepsis, with subsequent higher morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography (CT) scanning is the gold standard in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma, being accurate in the diagnosis of bowel and mesenteric injuries in case of hemodynamically stable trauma patients. Aims of the present study are to 1) review the correlation between CT signs and intraoperative findings in case of bowel and mesenteric injuries following blunt abdominal trauma, analysing the correlation between radiological features and intraoperative findings from our experience on 25 trauma patients with small bowel and mesenteric injuries (SBMI); 2) identify the diagnostic specificity of those signs found at CT with practical considerations on the following clinical management; and 3) distinguish the bowel and mesenteric injuries requiring immediate surgical intervention from those amenable to initial nonoperative management. Between January 1, 2008, and May 31, 2010, 163 patients required laparotomy following blunt abdominal trauma. Among them, 25 patients presented bowel or mesenteric injuries. Data were analysed retrospectively, correlating operative surgical reports with the preoperative CT findings. We are presenting a pictorial review of significant and frequent findings of bowel and mesenteric lesions at CT scan, confirmed intraoperatively at laparotomy. Moreover, the predictive value of CT scan for SBMI is assessed. Multidetector CT scan is the gold standard in the assessment of intra-abdominal blunt abdominal trauma for not only parenchymal organs injuries but also detecting SBMI; in the presence of specific signs it provides an accurate assessment of hollow viscus injuries, helping the trauma surgeons to choose the correct initial clinical management. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of

  14. Utility of extended FAST in blunt chest trauma: is it the time to be used in the ATLS algorithm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Yassir; Musthafa, Shameel; Hakim, Suhail Y; Nabir, Syed; Qanbar, Ahad; Mahmood, Ismail; Siddiqui, Tariq; Hussein, Wafaa A; Ali, Hazim H; Afifi, Ibrahim; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    The clinical significance of extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (EFAST) for diagnosis of pneumothorax is not well defined. To investigate the utility of EFAST in blunt chest trauma (BCT) patients. A single blinded, prospective study. All patients admitted with BCT (2011-2013). Level 1 trauma center in Qatar. Patients were screened by EFAST and results were compared to the clinical examination (CE) and chest X-ray (CXR). Chest-computed tomography (CT) scoring system was used to confirm and measure the pneumothorax. Diagnostic accuracy of diagnostic modalities of pneumothorax was measured using sensitivity, specificity, predictive values (PVs), and likelihood ratio. A total of 305 BCT patients were included with median age of 34 (18-75). Chest CT was positive for pneumothorax in 75 (24.6 %) cases; of which 11 % had bilateral pneumothorax. Chest CT confirmed the diagnosis of pneumothorax in 43, 41, and 11 % of those who were initially diagnosed by EFAST, CE, and CXR, respectively. EFAST was positive in 42 hemithoraces and its sensitivity (43 %) was higher in comparison to CXR (11 %). Positive and negative PVs of EFAST were 76 and 92 %, respectively. The frequency of missed cases by CXR was higher in comparison to EFAST and CE. The lowest median score of missed pneumothorax was observed by EFAST. EFAST can be used as an efficient triaging tool in BCT patients to rule out pneumothorax. Based on our analysis, we would recommend EFAST as an adjunct in ATLS algorithm.

  15. Trauma centers with higher rates of angiography have a lesser incidence of splenectomy in the management of blunt splenic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capecci, Louis M; Jeremitsky, Elan; Smith, R Stephen; Philp, Frances

    2015-10-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) for blunt splenic injury (BSI) is well-established. Angiography (ANGIO) has been shown to improve success rates with NOM. Protocols for NOM are not standardized and vary widely between centers. We hypothesized that trauma centers that performed ANGIO at a greater rate would demonstrate decreased rates of splenectomy compared with trauma centers that used ANGIO less frequently. A large, multicenter, statewide database (Pennsylvania Trauma Systems Foundation) from 2007 to 2011 was used to generate the study cohort of patients with BSI (age ≥ 13). The cohort was divided into 2 populations based on admission to centers with high (≥13%) or low (Splenectomy rates were then compared between the 2 groups, and multivariable logistic regression for predictors of splenectomy (failed NOM) were also performed. The overall rate of splenectomy in the entire cohort was 21.0% (1,120 of 5,333 BSI patients). The high ANGIO group had a lesser rate of splenectoy compared with the low ANGIO group (19% vs 24%; P splenectomy compared with low ANGIO centers (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% CI 0.58-0.80; P splenectomy rates compared with centers with lesser rate of ANGIO. Inclusion of angiographic protocols for NOM of BSI should be considered strongly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rupture of the left ventricle due to blunt trauma--a pediatric case study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolan, V; Stahl, C; Eysseric, H; Peoc'h, M; Barret, L

    2011-07-01

    Tamponade due to rupture of the chambers of the heart, in particular the left ventricle, after blunt thoracic trauma is described only sparsely in the literature. Most cases involve multiple thoracic trauma following motor vehicle accidents. We present the case study of a five-year old victim of a household accident, in which two concrete basins apparently fell on him. He died rapidly, despite attempted resuscitation. The autopsy showed essentially a hemorrhagic extravasation of the diaphragm and mediastinum, hemopericardium, and massive damage to the apex of the left ventricle. Pathological exam confirmed the traumatic origin of the cardiac rupture, with no underlying pathology. We will discuss the mechanisms described in the literature that result in such lesions, the mechanism which we believe most probable in this case, and the importance of background information. In our case study, lack of specific information concerning the accident prevents a definitive conclusion of the exact mechanism that caused this massive trauma particularly due to the fact that the external examination couldn't find any lesion in favor of a thoracic or abdominal traumatism. To our knowledge, in context of a household accident, such an isolated lesion causing almost immediate death has not previously been described in the literature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  17. Delayed cardiac tamponade in a patient with previous minor blunt chest trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, Jeannine A.J.M.; Wajon, Elly M.C.J.; Grandjean, Jan G; Grandjean, Jan G.; Haalebos, Max M.P.; von Birgelen, Clemens

    2009-01-01

    Hemopericardium with cardiac tamponade after non-penetrating chest trauma is a very rare but life-threatening condition. If this complication develops after an interval of several weeks following the non-penetrating chest trauma, the causal relation with the traumatic event is less evident, which

  18. Mesenteric thrombosis in patient victim of blunt abdominal trauma Trombose mesentérica em vítima de trauma abdominal fechado

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    Iwan Augusto Collaço

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mesenteric thrombosis related to trauma is an uncommon entity and has poor prognosis when associated to low perfusion and hemorrhagic shock. Usually presents a challenging diagnosis and high mortality rates, despite appropriate treatment. OBJECTIVE: To relate a case of a car accident and blunt abdominal trauma with terminal ileum and right colon necrosis. CASE REPORT: After initial procedures, complementary exams showed ribs and humerus fractures. Computerized tomography evidenced aerial distension in small bowel, gastric stasis and hidro-pneumothorax. Hypotension was observed during clinical observation followed by cardiopulmonary arrest, responding to reanimation. At surgery, it was found extensive necrosis of right colon and terminal ileum, and an ileum-transversostomy was performed with primary anastomosis. During the staying in intensive care unit, oliguria, miosis, convulsion and pulseless electric activity happened with death in three days after hospital admission. CONCLUSION: Although uncommon, mesenteric ischemia with venous thrombosis might be secondary to blunt abdominal trauma and must be considered in a bad abdominal evolution.INTRODUÇÃO: Trombose mesentérica, relacionada à trauma é entidade incomum com pobre prognóstico quando seguida de estados de baixo fluxo e choque hipovolêmico. Geralmente se apresenta com quadro de difícil diagnóstico, mortalidade elevada a despeito de tratamento adequado. OBJETIVO: Apresentar um caso de vítima de atropelamento que evoluiu com necrose de cólon direito e íleo terminal. RELATO DO CASO: Após admissão hospitalar e atendimento inicial, os exames complementares mostraram fratura de costela e úmero. Tomografia computadorizada evidenciou distensão aérea em intestino delgado associada à estase gástrica e hidropneumotórax. O paciente evoluiu com hipotensão durante o período de observação clínica, com parada cardiorespiratória, respondendo à reanimação. Levado

  19. Cervical spine collar clearance in the obtunded adult blunt trauma patient: a systematic review and practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mayur B; Humble, Stephen S; Cullinane, Daniel C; Day, Matthew A; Jawa, Randeep S; Devin, Clinton J; Delozier, Margaret S; Smith, Lou M; Smith, Miya A; Capella, Jeannette M; Long, Andrea M; Cheng, Joseph S; Leath, Taylor C; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Haut, Elliott R; Como, John J

    2015-02-01

    With the use of the framework advocated by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group, our aims were to perform a systematic review and to develop evidence-based recommendations that may be used to answer the following PICO [Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcomes] question:In the obtunded adult blunt trauma patient, should cervical collar removal be performed after a negative high-quality cervical spine (C-spine) computed tomography (CT) result alone or after a negative high-quality C-spine CT result combined with adjunct imaging, to reduce peri-clearance events, such as new neurologic change, unstable C-spine injury, stable C-spine injury, need for post-clearance imaging, false-negative CT imaging result on re-review, pressure ulcers, and time to cervical collar clearance? Our protocol was registered with the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews on August 23, 2013 (REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42013005461). Eligibility criteria consisted of adult blunt trauma patients 16 years or older, who underwent C-spine CT with axial thickness of less than 3 mm and who were obtunded using any definition.Quantitative synthesis via meta-analysis was not possible because of pre-post, partial-cohort, quasi-experimental study design limitations and the consequential incomplete diagnostic accuracy data. Of five articles with a total follow-up of 1,017 included subjects, none reported new neurologic changes (paraplegia or quadriplegia) after cervical collar removal. There is a worst-case 9% (161 of 1,718 subjects in 11 studies) cumulative literature incidence of stable injuries and a 91% negative predictive value of no injury, after coupling a negative high-quality C-spine CT result with 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging, upright x-rays, flexion-extension CT, and/or clinical follow-up. Similarly, there is a best-case 0% (0 of 1,718 subjects in 11 studies) cumulative literature incidence of unstable

  20. Isolated transverse process fractures of the subaxial cervical spine: a clinically insignificant injury or not?: a prospective, longitudinal analysis in a consecutive high-energy blunt trauma population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotanus, M.; Middendorp, J.J. van; Hosman, A.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective single cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the incidence, associated injuries, treatment outcomes and associated adverse events of isolated transverse process fractures (TPFs) of the subaxial cervical spine in a high-energy blunt trauma population. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND

  1. Troponin I, troponin T, CKMB-activity and CKMB-mass as markers for the detection of myocardial contusion in patients who experienced blunt trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaanenburg, JCJM; Klaase, JM; DeJongste, MJL; Zimmerman, KW; ten Duis, HJ

    1998-01-01

    Myocardial contusion is an infrequent, but sometimes serious complication in patients who experienced deceleration (blunt) trauma. We investigated the assessment of the new cardiac markers troponin I (cTnI) and troponin T (cTnT) in relation to the conventional CKMB-activity, the

  2. Traumatic aortic injury score (TRAINS): an easy and simple score for early detection of traumatic aortic injuries in major trauma patients with associated blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Muñiz, Javier; Asorey-Veiga, Vanesa; Adrio-Nazar, Belen; Boix, Ricardo; Lopez-Perez, José M; Pradas-Montilla, Gonzalo; Cuenca, José J

    2012-09-01

    To develop a risk score based on physical examination and chest X-ray findings to rapidly identify major trauma patients at risk of acute traumatic aortic injury (ATAI). A multicenter retrospective study was conducted with 640 major trauma patients with associated blunt chest trauma classified into ATAI (aortic injury) and NATAI (no aortic injury) groups. The score data set included 76 consecutive ATAI and 304 NATAI patients from a single center, whereas the validation data set included 52 consecutive ATAI and 208 NATAI patients from three independent institutions. Bivariate analysis identified variables potentially influencing the presentation of aortic injury. Confirmed variables by logistic regression were assigned a score according to their corresponding beta coefficient which was rounded to the closest integer value (1-4). Predictors of aortic injury included widened mediastinum, hypotension less than 90 mmHg, long bone fracture, pulmonary contusion, left scapula fracture, hemothorax, and pelvic fracture. Area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.96. In the score data set, sensitivity was 93.42 %, specificity 85.85 %, Youden's index 0.79, positive likelihood ratio 6.60, and negative likelihood ratio 0.08. In the validation data set, sensitivity was 92.31 % and specificity 85.1 %. Given the relative infrequency of traumatic aortic injury, which often leads to missed or delayed diagnosis, application of our score has the potential to draw necessary clinical attention to the possibility of aortic injury, thus providing the chance of a prompt specific diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  3. Non-operative management attempted for selective high grade blunt hepatosplenic trauma is a feasible strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Ting-Min; Cheng Tsai, Tsung; Liang, Jiun-Lung; Che Lin, Chih

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence of clinical data recently for successful outcomes of non-operative management (NOM) for blunt hepatic and spleen injuries (BHSI). However, the effectiveness of NOM for high-grade BHSI remains undefined. The aim of the present study was to review our experience with NOM in high-grade BHSI and compare results with the existing related data worldwide. Methods In this retrospectively protocol-driven study, 150 patients with grade 3–5 BHSI were enrolled during ...

  4. Early-onset septicemia due to CMY-2-producing Escherichia coli in a woman with blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Khee-Siang; Yu, Wen-Liang; Kuo, Chen-Yi; Tsai, Chi-Lun; Chuang, Yin-Ching

    2009-10-01

    Escherichia coli remains one of the most common etiologies of secondary peritonitis. CMY-2 is the most prevalent AmpC enzyme identified in nosocomial E. coli isolates causing bacteremia in Taiwan. This report is of a patient who underwent surgery for intestinal perforations due to blunt abdominal trauma and developed unexpected CMY-2-producing E. coli septicemia in the early postoperative period. The AmpC-type CMY-2 enzyme might partially contribute to the poor response to antimicrobial therapy of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid or flomoxef. Late changes in antibiotic therapy to an appropriate regimen of cefpirome based on the culture results did not result in a positive outcome and the patient died. Whether selection of an anti-AmpC regimen is appropriate as first-line treatment for traumatic abdomen-associated septicemia should be an area of further investigation in Taiwan.

  5. Facial fractures of the upper craniofacial skeleton predict mortality and occult intracranial injury after blunt trauma: an analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Justin L; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Flores, José M; Reddy, Sashank K; Mithani, Suhail K; Rodriguez, Eduardo D; Dorafshar, Amir H

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this article was to assess how regional facial fracture patterns predict mortality and occult intracranial injury after blunt trauma. Retrospective chart review was performed for blunt-mechanism craniofacial fracture patients who presented to an urban trauma center from 1998 to 2010. Fractures were confirmed by author review of computed tomographic imaging and then grouped into 1 of 5 patterns of regional involvement representing all possible permutations of facial-third injury. Mortality and the presence of occult intracranial injury, defined as those occurring in patients at low risk at presentation for head injury by Canadian CT Head Rule criteria, were evaluated. Relative risk estimates were obtained using multivariable regression. Of 4540 patients identified, 338 (7.4%) died, and 171 (8.1%) had intracranial injury despite normal Glasgow Coma Scale at presentation. Cumulative mortality reached 18.8% for isolated upper face fractures, compared with 6.9% and 4.0% for middle and lower face fractures (P < 0.001), respectively. Upper face fractures were independently associated with 4.06-, 3.46-, and 3.59-fold increased risk of death for the following fracture patterns: isolated upper, combined upper, panfacial, respectively (P < 0.001). Patients who were at low risk for head injury remained 4 to 6 times more likely to suffer an occult intracranial injury if they had involvement of the upper face. The association between facial fractures, intracranial injury, and death varies by regional involvement, with increasing insult in those with upper face fractures. Cognizance of the increased risk for intracranial injury in patients with upper face fractures may supplement existing triage tools and should increase suspicion for underlying or impending neuropathology, regardless of clinical picture at presentation.

  6. Selective chest imaging for blunt trauma patients: The national emergency X-ray utilization studies (NEXUS-chest algorithm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Robert M; Hendey, Gregory W; Mower, William R

    2017-01-01

    Chest imaging plays a prominent role in blunt trauma patient evaluation, but indiscriminate imaging is expensive, may delay care, and unnecessarily exposes patients to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. To improve diagnostic chest imaging utilization, we conducted 3 prospective multicenter studies over 12years to derive and validate decision instruments (DIs) to guide the use of chest x-ray (CXR) and chest computed tomography (CT). The first DI, NEXUS Chest x-ray, consists of seven criteria (Age >60years; rapid deceleration mechanism; chest pain; intoxication; altered mental status; distracting painful injury; and chest wall tenderness) and exhibits a sensitivity of 99.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 98.2-99.4%) and a specificity of 13.3% (95% CI, 12.6%-14.0%) for detecting clinically significant injuries. We developed two NEXUS Chest CT DIs, which are both highly reliable in detecting clinically major injuries (sensitivity of 99.2%; 95% CI 95.4-100%). Designed primarily to focus on detecting major injuries, the NEXUS Chest CT-Major DI consists of six criteria (abnormal CXR; distracting injury; chest wall tenderness; sternal tenderness; thoracic spine tenderness; and scapular tenderness) and exhibits higher specificity (37.9%; 95% CI 35.8-40.1%). Designed to reliability detect both major and minor injuries (sensitivity 95.4%; 95% CI 93.6-96.9%) with resulting lower specificity (25.5%; 95% CI 23.5-27.5%), the NEXUS CT-All rule consists of seven elements (the six NEXUS CT-Major criteria plus rapid deceleration mechanism). The purpose of this review is to synthesize the three DIs into a novel, cohesive summary algorithm with practical implementation recommendations to guide selective chest imaging in adult blunt trauma patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Developing Orthopaedic Trauma Capacity in Uganda: Considerations From the Uganda Sustainable Trauma Orthopaedic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼHara, Nathan N; OʼBrien, Peter J; Blachut, Piotr A

    2015-10-01

    Uganda, like many low-income countries, has a tremendous volume of orthopaedic trauma injuries. The Uganda Sustainable Trauma Orthopaedic Program (USTOP) is a partnership between the University of British Columbia and Makerere University that was initiated in 2007 to reduce the consequences of neglected orthopaedic trauma in Uganda. USTOP works with local collaborators to build orthopaedic trauma capacity through clinical training, skills workshops, system support, technology development, and research. USTOP has maintained a multidisciplinary approach to training, involving colleagues in anaesthesia, nursing, rehabilitation, and sterile reprocessing. Since the program's inception, the number of trained orthopaedic surgeons practicing in Uganda has more than doubled. Many of these newly trained surgeons provide clinical care in the previously underserved regional hospitals. The program has also worked with collaborators to develop several technologies aimed at reducing the cost of providing orthopaedic care without compromising quality. As orthopaedic trauma capacity in Uganda advances, USTOP strives to continually evolve and provide relevant support to colleagues in Uganda.

  8. Unusual case of life threatening subcutaneous hemorrhage in a blunt trauma patient

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    Ashraf F. Hefny

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Bleeding into the subcutaneous plane in closed degloving injury can cause severe hypovolemic shock. It is important for the clinicians managing trauma patients to be aware this serious injury.

  9. Spinal cord injury after blunt cervical spine trauma: correlation of soft-tissue damage and extension of lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Cepeda, S; Ramos, A; Castaño-León, A M; García-Fuentes, C; Lobato, R D; Gómez, P A; Lagares, A

    2014-05-01

    In patients with spinal cord injury after blunt trauma, several studies have observed a correlation between neurologic impairment and radiologic findings. Few studies have been performed to correlate spinal cord injury with ligamentous injury. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate whether ligamentous injury or disk disruption after spinal cord injury correlates with lesion length. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients diagnosed with traumatic spinal cord injury after cervical trauma between 1990-2011. Plain films, CT, and MR imaging were performed on patients and then reviewed for this study. MR imaging was performed within 96 hours after cervical trauma for all patients. Data regarding ligamentous injury, disk injury, and the extent of the spinal cord injury were collected from an adequate number of MR images. We evaluated anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and the ligamentum flavum. Length of lesion, disk disruption, and ligamentous injury association, as well as the extent of the spinal cord injury were statistically assessed by means of univariate analysis, with the use of nonparametric tests and multivariate analysis along with linear regression. There were significant differences in lesion length on T2-weighted images for anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and ligamentum flavum in the univariate analysis; however, when this was adjusted by age, level of injury, sex, and disruption of the soft tissue evaluated (disk, anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and ligamentum flavum) in a multivariable analysis, only ligamentum flavum showed a statistically significant association with lesion length. Furthermore, the number of ligaments affected had a positive correlation with the extension of the lesion. In cervical spine trauma, a specific pattern of ligamentous injury correlates with the length of the spinal cord lesion in MR imaging studies

  10. The Relationship Between Oxidative Stress, Paraoxanase and Injury Severity in Blunt Trauma Patients

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    Ýlhan Korkmaz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available      Aim: Shock index and Glascow coma scale(GCS are the parameters used for the follow-up of trauma patient’s prognosis. In case of trauma increased reactive oxygen species and oxidative stres induced increase in lipid peroxidation causes deterioration of the cell wall structure, and an increase of cell and tissue damage can be seen. We aimed to investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and paraoxonase, as an antioxidant, and prognosis of the trauma patients. Material and Method: Seventyone trauma patients who were admitted between July - September 2011 were included. Patients were classified according to GCS; Mild (61, moderate (6, and severe (3. Paraoxonase, oxidative stress index (OSI, total antioxidant capacity (TAC and total oxidative stress (TOS were compared with the shock index and the GCS. Results: We didn’t found any difference between GCS groups and paraoxonase, TAS, TOS, OSI (p> 0.05. Also there wasn’t any correlation between shock index and paraoxonase, TAC, TOS, OSI. Discussion: We make inferences that the admission levels of paraoxonase, TAC, TOS, OSI can’t be used for determination of the trauma patients prognosis.

  11. [The efficacy of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in the management of early stage of glaucoma secondary to blunt ocular trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Yu, Fen-fen; Zhong, Yi-min; Mao, Zhen; Cao, Dan; Li, Mei

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation in the early stage of glaucoma secondary to contusion injuries. A retrospective case series study. The study was made in 29 consecutive patients with glaucoma secondary to blunt trauma who were uncontrolled by multiple medications and then performed AGV implantations in less than 2 months after the trauma. The duration from injury to IOP elevation was 1 to 30 (6.10 ± 1.13) days. The time from injury to AGV implantation was 16 to 60 (40.03 ± 2.97) days. The patients were followed-up for a period of 6 to 42 (20.75 ± 1.66) months. The main outcome measures included intraocular pressure (IOP), visual acuity (VA), number of glaucomatous medications, intra- and postoperative complications. IOPs were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance, numbers of medication assessed by Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test followed by Bonferroni test, and VA comparison was performed using paired Student t-test. The absolute success rate was 86.21% and the conditional success rate was 13.79% after AGV implantation. Compared with pre-operation, the IOP was significantly(F = 124.09, P AGV implantation is safe and effective in the management of intractable secondary glaucoma at early stage of contusion injuries.

  12. Assessing Incidence and Risk Factors of Cervical Spine Injury in Blunt Trauma Patients Using the National Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andrew J; Wolfe, Luke; Tinkoff, Glenn; Duane, Therese M

    2015-09-01

    Despite the potentially devastating impact of missed cervical spine injuries (CI), there continues to be a large disparity in how institutions attempt to make the diagnosis. To better streamline the approach among institutions, understanding incidence and risk factors across the country is paramount. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of CI using the National Trauma Databank for 2008 and 2009. We performed a retrospective review of the National Trauma Databank for 2008 and 2009 comparing patients with and without CI. We then performed subset analysis separating injury by patients with and without fracture and ligamentous injury. There were a total of 591,138 patients included with a 6.2 per cent incidence of CI. Regression found that age, Injury Severity Score, alcohol intoxication, and specific mechanisms of motor vehicle crash (MVC), motorcycle crash (MCC), fall, pedestrian stuck, and bicycle were independent risk factors for overall injury (P risk factors in both groups. This information will assist in devising an algorithm for clearance that can be used nationally allowing for more consistency among trauma providers.

  13. Elevated Admission Base Deficit Is Associated with a Complex Dynamic Network of Systemic Inflammation Which Drives Clinical Trajectories in Blunt Trauma Patients

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    Othman Abdul-Malak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that elevated base deficit (BD ≥ 4 mEq/L upon admission could be associated with an altered inflammatory response, which in turn may impact differential clinical trajectories. Using clinical and biobank data from 472 blunt trauma survivors, 154 patients were identified after excluding patients who received prehospital IV fluids or had alcohol intoxication. From this subcohort, 84 patients had a BD ≥ 4 mEq/L and 70 patients with BD < 4 mEq/L. Three samples within the first 24 h were obtained from all patients and then daily up to day 7 after injury. Twenty-two cytokines and chemokines were assayed using Luminex™ and were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and dynamic network analysis (DyNA. Multiple mediators of the innate and lymphoid immune responses in the BD ≥ 4 group were elevated differentially upon admission and up to 16 h after injury. DyNA revealed a higher, sustained degree of interconnectivity of the inflammatory response in the BD ≥ 4 patients during the initial 16 h after injury. These results suggest that elevated admission BD is associated with differential immune/inflammatory pathways, which subsequently could predispose patients to follow a complicated clinical course.

  14. Blunt abdominal trauma: does the use of a second-generation sonographic contrast agent help to detect solid organ injuries?

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    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Mentha, Gilles; Vermeulen, Bernard; Buhler, Léo H; Terrier, François

    2004-11-01

    The objective of our study was to prospectively evaluate whether a second-generation sonography contrast agent (SonoVue) can improve the conspicuity of solid organ injuries (liver; spleen; or kidney, including adrenal glands) in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Two hundred ten consecutive hemodynamically stable trauma patients underwent both abdominal sonography and CT at admission. The presence of solid organ injuries and the quality of sonography examinations were recorded. Patients with false-negative sonography findings for solid organ injuries in comparison with CT results underwent control sonography. If a solid organ injury was still undetectable, contrast-enhanced sonography was performed. Findings of admission, control, and contrast-enhanced sonograms were compared with CT results for their ability to depict solid organ injuries. Contrast-enhanced sonography was also performed in patients in whom a vascular injury (pseudoaneurysm) was shown on admission or control CT. CT findings were positive for 88 solid organ injuries in 71 (34%) of the 210 patients. Admission, control, and contrast-enhanced sonograms had a detection rate for solid organ injury of 40% (35/88), 57% (50/88), and 80% (70/88), respectively. The improvement in the detection rate between control and contrast-enhanced sonography was statistically significant (p = 0.001). After exclusion of low-quality examinations, contrast-enhanced sonography still missed 18% of solid organ injuries. Five vascular liver (n = 1) and spleen (n = 4) injuries (pseudoaneurysms) were detected on CT; all were visible on contrast-enhanced sonography. Contrast-enhanced sonography misses a large percentage of solid organ injuries and cannot be recommended to replace CT in the triage of hemodynamically stable trauma patients. However, contrast-enhanced sonography could play a role in the detection of pseudoaneurysms.

  15. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI.

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    Miriam Kalbitz

    Full Text Available Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury.12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak's multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05.In lung tissue interleukin (IL-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt, whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO, protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt.In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent.

  16. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbitz, Miriam; Karbach, Michael; Braumueller, Sonja; Kellermann, Philipp; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Perl, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury. 12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak's multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05). In lung tissue interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt), whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO), protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt. In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent.

  17. Variation in treatment of blunt splenic injury in Dutch academic trauma centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Olthof; J.S.K. Luitse; P.P. de Rooij (Philippe); L.P.H. Leenen (Luke); K.W. Wendt (Klaus); F.W. Bloemers (Frank)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground The incidence of splenectomy after trauma is institutionally dependent and varies from 18% to as much as 40%. This is important because variation in management influences splenic salvage. The aim of this study was to investigate whether differences exist between Dutch level 1

  18. Sustainability of a proactive geriatric trauma consultation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Camilla L; Al Atia, Raghda; McFarlan, Amanda; Lee, Holly Y; Valiaveettil, Christina; Haas, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    Proactive geriatric trauma consultation service (GTCS) models have been associated with better delivery of geriatric care and functional outcomes. Whether such collaborative models can be improved and sustained remains uncertain. We describe the sustainability and process improvements of an inpatient GTCS. We assessed workflow using interviews and surveys to identify opportunities to optimize the referral process for the GTCS. Sustainability of the service was assessed via a prospective case series (July 2012-December 2013). Study data were derived from a review of the medical record and trauma registry database. Metrics to determine sustainability included volume of cases, staffing levels, rate of adherence to recommendations, geriatric-specific clinical outcomes, trauma quality indicators, consultation requests and discharge destination. Through process changes, we were able to ensure every eligible patient was referred for a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Compared with the implementation phase, volume of assessments increased and recommendation adherence rates were maintained. Delirium and/or dementia were the most common geriatric issue addressed. The rate of adherence to recommendations made by the GTCS team was 88.2%. Only 1.4% of patients were discharged to a nursing home. Workflow assessment is a useful means to optimize the referral process for comprehensive geriatric assessment. Sustainability of a GTCS was shown by volume, staffing and recommendation adherence.

  19. Sustainability of a proactive geriatric trauma consultation service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Camilla L.; Al Atia, Raghda; McFarlan, Amanda; Lee, Holly Y.; Valiaveettil, Christina; Haas, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background Proactive geriatric trauma consultation service (GTCS) models have been associated with better delivery of geriatric care and functional outcomes. Whether such collaborative models can be improved and sustained remains uncertain. We describe the sustainability and process improvements of an inpatient GTCS. Methods We assessed workflow using interviews and surveys to identify opportunities to optimize the referral process for the GTCS. Sustainability of the service was assessed via a prospective case series (July 2012–December 2013). Study data were derived from a review of the medical record and trauma registry database. Metrics to determine sustainability included volume of cases, staffing levels, rate of adherence to recommendations, geriatric-specific clinical outcomes, trauma quality indicators, consultation requests and discharge destination. Results Through process changes, we were able to ensure every eligible patient was referred for a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Compared with the implementation phase, volume of assessments increased and recommendation adherence rates were maintained. Delirium and/or dementia were the most common geriatric issue addressed. The rate of adherence to recommendations made by the GTCS team was 88.2%. Only 1.4% of patients were discharged to a nursing home. Conclusion Workflow assessment is a useful means to optimize the referral process for comprehensive geriatric assessment. Sustainability of a GTCS was shown by volume, staffing and recommendation adherence. PMID:27669402

  20. Comparative Effectiveness of Emergency Resuscitative Thoracotomy versus Closed Chest Compressions among Patients with Critical Blunt Trauma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kodai; Inoue, Shigeaki; Morita, Seiji; Watanabe, Nobuo; Shintani, Ayumi; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Ogura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Although emergency resuscitative thoracotomy is performed as a salvage maneuver for critical blunt trauma patients, evidence supporting superior effectiveness of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy compared to conventional closed-chest compressions remains insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate whether emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at the emergency department or in the operating room was associated with favourable outcomes after blunt trauma and to compare its effectiveness with that of closed-chest compressions. This was a retrospective nationwide cohort study. Data were obtained from the Japan Trauma Data Bank for the period between 2004 and 2012. The primary and secondary outcomes were patient survival rates 24 h and 28 d after emergency department arrival. Statistical analyses were performed using multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis. We adjusted for the effects of different hospitals by introducing random intercepts in regression analysis to account for the differential quality of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at hospitals where patients in cardiac arrest were treated. Sensitivity analyses were performed using propensity score matching. In total, 1,377 consecutive, critical blunt trauma patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department or operating room were included in the study. Of these patients, 484 (35.1%) underwent emergency resuscitative thoracotomy and 893 (64.9%) received closed-chest compressions. Compared to closed-chest compressions, emergency resuscitative thoracotomy was associated with lower survival rate 24 h after emergency department arrival (4.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P chest compressions (P chest compressions.

  1. Sharp and blunt force trauma concealment by thermal alteration in homicides: An in-vitro experiment for methodology and protocol development in forensic anthropological analysis of burnt bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macoveciuc, Ioana; Márquez-Grant, Nicholas; Horsfall, Ian; Zioupos, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Burning of human remains is one method used by perpetrators to conceal fatal trauma and expert opinions regarding the degree of skeletal evidence concealment are often disparate. This experiment aimed to reduce this incongruence in forensic anthropological interpretation of burned human remains and implicitly contribute to the development of research methodologies sufficiently robust to withstand forensic scrutiny in the courtroom. We have tested the influence of thermal alteration on pre-existing sharp and blunt trauma on twenty juvenile sheep radii in the laboratory using an automated impact testing system and an electric furnace. The testing conditions simulated a worst-case scenario where remains with pre-existing sharp or blunt trauma were exposed to burning with an intentional vehicular fire scenario in mind. All impact parameters as well as the burning conditions were based on those most commonly encountered in forensic cases and maintained constant throughout the experiment. The results have shown that signatures associated with sharp and blunt force trauma were not masked by heat exposure and highlights the potential for future standardization of fracture analysis in burned bone. Our results further emphasize the recommendation given by other experts on handling, processing and recording burned remains at the crime scene and mortuary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Delayed recurrent pericarditis complicated by pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade in a blunt trauma patient

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    Hazar H Khidir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old male suffered orthopedic fractures, blunt solid organ injury and pneumopericardium after a fall from 40 feet. With the exception of an external fixation device, he was managed non-operatively and discharged to a rehabilitation unit after 8 days. He was readmitted 4 days later with chest pain and clinical evidence of pericardititis that resolved with the initiation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. He returned to the rehabilitation hospital, but was readmitted once again for chest pain and hypotension. Echocardiogram revealed cardiac tamponade that required emergent drainage. He tolerated the procedure well and was discharged home from the hospital to continue treatment for his pericarditis. He is doing well at 3 months of follow-up.

  3. Isolated right atrial appendage (RAA rupture in blunt trauma – a case report and an anatomic study comparing RAA and right atrium (RA wall thickness

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    Jatene Fabio B

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart chambers rupture in blunt trauma is uncommon and is associated with a high mortality. The determinant factors, and the incidence of isolated heart chambers rupture remains undetermined. Isolated rupture of the right atrium appendage (RAA is very rare, with 8 cases reported in the reviewed literature. The thin wall of the RAA has been presumed to render this chamber more prone to rupture in blunt trauma. Objective To report a case of isolated RAA rupture in blunt trauma, and to compare right atrium (RA and RAA wall thickness in a necropsy study. Methods The thickness of RA and RAA wall of hearts from cadavers of fatal penetrating head trauma victims was measured. Our case of isolated RAA rupture is presented. The main findings of the 8 cases reported in the literature, and the findings of our case, were organized in a table. Result The comparison of the data showed that wall thickness of the RAA (0.53 ± 0.33 mm was significantly thinner than that of RA (1.11 ± 0.42 mm (p Comments In all these 9 cases of isolated RAA rupture, cardiac tamponade occurred, RAA rupture was diagnosed intraoperatively and sutured, and the patients survived. Main mechanisms hypothesized for heart chamber rupture include mechanical compression coincident with phases of cardiac cycle, leading to high hydrostatic pressure inside the chamber. Published series include numerous cases of RA rupture, and only a few cases of RAA rupture. Conclusion Thus, our data suggests that wall thickness is not a determinant factor for RA or RAA rupture in blunt trauma.

  4. Diffuse Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumomediastinum Secondary to a Minor Blunt Chest Trauma

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    Maximilian Andreas Storz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Full medical evaluation is paramount for all trauma patients. Minor traumas are often overlooked, as they are thought to bear low injury potential. In this case report, we describe the case of a 48-year-old man presenting to our Emergency Department with mild to moderate right-sided shoulder and scapular pain following a fall from his own height ten days previously. Clinical and paraclinical investigations (CT revealed diffuse right shoulder pain, with crepitations on palpation of the neck, right shoulder, and right lateral chest wall. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated right-sided costal fractures (ribs 7 to 9, with diffuse subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum due to laceration of the visceral and parietal pleura and the adjacent lung parenchyma. In addition, a small ipsilateral pneumothorax was found. Surprisingly, the clinical status was only minimally affected by mild to moderate pain and minor functional impairment.

  5. Developing sustainable trauma care education in Egypt: sequential trauma education program, steps to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shinawi, Mohamed; McCunn, Maureen; Sisley, Amy C; El-Setouhy, Maged; Hirshon, Jon Mark

    2015-01-01

    As one of the leading causes of death and disability in the world, human trauma and injury disproportionately affects individuals in developing countries. To meet the need for improved trauma care in Egypt, the Sequential Trauma Emergency/Education ProgramS (STEPS) course was created through the collaborative effort of U.S. and Egyptian physicians. The objective of course development was to create a high-quality, modular, adaptable, and sustainable trauma care course that could be readily adopted by a lower- or middle-income country. We describe the development, transition, and host nation sustainability of a trauma care training course between a high-income Western nation and a lower-middle-income Middle Eastern/Northern African country, including the number of physicians trained and the challenges to program development and sustainability. STEPS was developed at the University of Maryland, based in part on World Health Organization's Emergency and Trauma Care materials, and introduced to the Egyptian Ministry of Health and Population and Ain Shams University in May 2006. To date, 639 physicians from multiple specialties have taken the 4-day course through the Ministry of Health and Population or public/governmental universities. In 2008, the course transitioned completely to the leadership of Egyptian academic physicians. Multiple Egyptian medical schools and the Egyptian Emergency Medicine Board now require STEPS or its equivalent for physicians in training. Success of this collaborative educational program is demonstrated by the numbers of physicians trained, the adoption of STEPS by the Egyptian Emergency Medicine Board, and program continuance after transitioning to in-country leadership and trainers. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D reconstruction of emergency cranial computed tomography scans as a tool in clinical forensic radiology after survived blunt head trauma--report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassberger, M; Gehl, A; Püschel, K; Turk, E E

    2011-04-15

    When requested to evaluate surviving victims of blunt head trauma the forensic expert has to draw mainly on medical documentation from the time of hospital admission. In many cases these consist of written clinical records, radiographs and in some cases photographic documentation of the injuries. We report two cases of survived severe blunt head trauma where CT images, which had primarily been obtained for clinical diagnostic purposes, were used for forensic assessment. 3D reconstructions of the clinical CT-images yielded valuable information regarding the sequence, number and direction of the impacts to the head, their gross morphology and the inflicting weapon. We conclude that computed tomography and related imaging methods, along with their 3D reconstruction capabilities, provide a useful tool to approach questions in clinical forensic casework. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. What is the clinical significance of chest CT when the chest x-ray result is normal in patients with blunt trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kea, Bory; Gamarallage, Ruwan; Vairamuthu, Hemamalini; Fortman, Jonathan; Lunney, Kevin; Hendey, Gregory W; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2013-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been shown to detect more injuries than plain radiography in patients with blunt trauma, but it is unclear whether these injuries are clinically significant. This study aimed to determine the proportion of patients with normal chest x-ray (CXR) result and injury seen on CT and abnormal initial CXR result and no injury on CT and to characterize the clinical significance of injuries seen on CT as determined by a trauma expert panel. Patients with blunt trauma older than 14 years who received emergency department chest imaging as part of their evaluation at 2 urban level I trauma centers were enrolled. An expert trauma panel a priori classified thoracic injuries and subsequent interventions as major, minor, or no clinical significance. Of 3639 participants, 2848 (78.3%) had CXR alone and 791 (21.7%) had CXR and chest CT. Of 589 patients who had chest CT after a normal CXR result, 483 (82.0% [95% confidence interval [CI], 78.7-84.9%]) had normal CT results, and 106 (18.0% [95% CI, 15.1%-21.3%]) had CTs diagnosing injuries-primarily rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, and incidental pneumothorax. Twelve patients had injuries classified as clinically major (2.0% [95% CI, 1.2%-3.5%]), 78 were clinically minor (13.2% [95% CI, 10.7%-16.2%]), and 16 were clinically insignificant (2.7% (95% CI, 1.7%-4.4%]). Of 202 patients with CXRs suggesting injury, 177 (87.6% [95% CI, 82.4%-91.5%]) had chest CTs confirming injury and 25 (12.4% [95% CI, 8.5%-17.6%]) had no injury on CT. Chest CT after a normal CXR result in patients with blunt trauma detects injuries, but most do not lead to changes in patient management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin is effective for the treatment of cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma in rats

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    Demir, F. [Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University, Diyarbakır (Turkey); Güzel, A. [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Katı, C. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Karadeniz, C. [Pediatric Cardiology Services, Behçet Uz Children' s Hospital, İzmir (Turkey); Akdemir, U. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Okuyucu, A. [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Gacar, A. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Özdemir, S. [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Güvenç, T. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey)

    2014-08-01

    Cardiac contusion is a potentially fatal complication of blunt chest trauma. The effects of a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone against trauma-induced cardiac contusion were studied. Thirty-five female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups (n=7) as follows: sham, cardiac contusion with no therapy, treated with methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg on the first day, and 3 mg/kg on the following days), treated with quercetin (50 mg·kg{sup −1}·day{sup −1}), and treated with a combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin. Serum troponin I (Tn-I) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels and cardiac histopathological findings were evaluated. Tn-I and TNF-α levels were elevated after contusion (P=0.001 and P=0.001). Seven days later, Tn-I and TNF-α levels decreased in the rats treated with methylprednisolone, quercetin, and the combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin compared to the rats without therapy, but a statistical significance was found only with the combination therapy (P=0.001 and P=0.011, respectively). Histopathological degeneration and necrosis scores were statistically lower in the methylprednisolone and quercetin combination group compared to the group treated only with methylprednisolone (P=0.017 and P=0.007, respectively). However, only degeneration scores were lower in the combination therapy group compared to the group treated only with quercetin (P=0.017). Inducible nitric oxide synthase positivity scores were decreased in all treatment groups compared to the untreated groups (P=0.097, P=0.026, and P=0.004, respectively). We conclude that a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone can be used for the specific treatment of cardiac contusion.

  9. The SCRAP Rule: The derivation and internal validation of a clinical decision rule for computed tomography of the chest in blunt thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payrastre, Julien; Upadhye, Suneel; Worster, Andrew; Lin, Daren; Kahnamoui, Kamyar; Patterson, Heather; Sanaee, Layli; Clayden, Rob

    2012-11-01

    To derive and internally validate a clinical decision rule that will rule out major thoracic injury in adult blunt trauma patients, reducing the unnecessary use of chest computed tomographic (CT) scans. Data were retrospectively obtained from a chart review of all trauma patients presenting to a Canadian tertiary trauma care centre from 2005 to 2008, with those from April 2006 to March 2007 being used for the validation phase. Patients were included if they had an Injury Severity Score > 12 and chest CT at admission or a documented major thoracic injury noted in the trauma database. Patients with penetrating injury, a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score ≤ 8, paralysis, or age SCRAP). In the validation group, the same five variables had a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI 96.2-100%), a specificity of 44.7% (95% CI 39.5-44.7%), and negative likelihood ratio of 0.00 (95% CI 0.00-0.10). In major blunt trauma with a GCS score > 8, the SCRAP variables have a 100% sensitivity for major thoracic injury in this retrospective study. These findings need to be prospectively validated prior to use in a clinical setting.

  10. When Physics Meets Biology: Low and High Velocity Penetration, Blunt Trauma and Blast Injuries to the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne eYoung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of TBI in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems.

  11. Prospective validation of the shock index pediatric-adjusted (SIPA) in blunt liver and spleen trauma: An ATOMAC+ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnaus, Maria E; Notrica, David M; Langlais, Crystal S; St Peter, Shawn D; Leys, Charles M; Ostlie, Daniel J; Maxson, R Todd; Ponsky, Todd; Tuggle, David W; Eubanks, James W; Bhatia, Amina; Alder, Adam C; Greenwell, Cynthia; Garcia, Nilda M; Lawson, Karla A; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Letton, Robert W

    2017-02-01

    Age-adjusted pediatric shock index (SIPA) does not require knowledge of age-adjusted blood pressure norms, yet correlates with mortality, serious injury, and need for transfusion in trauma. No prospective studies support its validity. A multicenter prospective observational study of patients 4-16years presenting April 2013-January 2016 with blunt liver and/or spleen injury (BLSI). SIPA (maximum heart rate/minimum systolic blood pressure) thresholds of >1.22, >1.0, and >0.9 in the emergency department were used for 4-6, 7-12 and 13-16year-olds, respectively. Patients with ISS ≤15 were excluded to conform to the original paper. Discrimination outcomes were compared between SIPA and shock index (SI). Of 1008 patients, 386 met inclusion. SI was elevated in 321, and SIPA elevated in 282. The percentage of patients with elevated index (SI or SIPA) and blood transfusion within 24 hours (30% vs 34%), BLSI grade ≥3 requiring transfusion (28% vs 32%), operative intervention (14% vs 16%) and ICU admission (64% vs 67%) was higher in the SIPA group. SIPA was validated in this multi-institutional prospective study and identified a higher percentage of children requiring additional resources than SI in BLSI patients. SIPA may be useful for determining necessary resources for injured patients with BLSI. Level II prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Concomitant abducens and facial nerve palsies following blunt head trauma associated with bone fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Min-Jeong; Han, Sang-Beom; Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Moosang

    2015-07-15

    A 22-year-old man was referred for horizontal diplopia that worsened on left gaze. He had been admitted for a head trauma caused by a traffic accident. Brain CT scan showed a longitudinal fracture of the left temporal bone with extension to the left carotid canal and central skull base, including sphenoid lateral wall and roof, and left orbit medial wall non-displaced fracture. Prism cover test revealed 20 prism diopters of esotropia and abduction limitation in the left eye. Hess screening test results were compatible with left abducens nerve paralysis. Symptoms suggesting complete lower motor neuron palsy of the left facial nerve, such as unilateral facial drooping, inability to raise the eyebrow and difficulty closing the eye, were present. As there was no improvement in facial paralysis, the patient received surgical intervention using a transmastoidal approach. Three months postoperatively, prism cover test showed orthotropia, however, the facial nerve palsy persisted. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. A rare case of hepatic duct injury from blunt abdominal trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasaniya, Nahidh W.; Premaratne, Shyamal; Premaratne, Ishani D.; McNamara, J. Judson

    2013-01-01

    Background: A 25 year-old male was brought to the emergency room following an apparent suicide attempt by jumping from the fourth floor. Case Report: Patient had a large abdominal laceration in the right upper quadrant (RUQ). CT scan showed a sub-scapular hematoma of the liver. Due to the repeated episodes of hypotension, a laporotomy was performed and the left hepatic artery was ligated while the ductal injury was managed with a Roux-en-Y left hepatic jejunostomy and stent. Bile leakage was resolved post-operatively by day 5 and the patient was discharged home on day 13 after clearance from psychiatry. Conclusions: While non-iatrogenic extrahepatic biliary trauma is rare, a high degree of suspicion is essential, especially in cases like the one discussed in this report. Diagnosis can be difficult in patients undergoing observation. PMID:23826446

  14. The clinical effectiveness of permissive hypotension in blunt abdominal trauma with hemorrhagic shock but without head or spine injuries or burns: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsawadi A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abdulrahman AlsawadiColchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust, Colchester, Essex, United KingdomBackground: Trauma is a major cause of death and disability. The current trend in trauma management is the rapid administration of fluid as per the Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines, although there is no evidence to support this and even some to suggest it might be harmful. Some guidelines, protocols, and recommendations have been established for the use of permissive hypotension although there is reluctance concerning its application in blunt injuries.Objectives: The aim of this review is to determine whether there is evidence of the use of permissive hypotension in the management of hemorrhagic shock in blunt trauma patients. This review also aims to search for any reason for the reluctance to apply permissive hypotension in blunt injuries.Methods: This systematic review has followed the steps recommended in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. It is also being reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement and checklist. Database searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases and the Cochrane Library were made for eligible studies as well as journal searches. Inclusion criteria included systematic reviews that have similar primary questions to this review and randomized controlled trials where patients with blunt torso injuries and hemorrhagic shock were not excluded. Rapid or early fluid administration was compared with controlled or delayed fluid resuscitation and a significant outcome was obtained.Results: No systematic reviews attempting to answer similar questions were found. Two randomized controlled trials with mixed types of injuries in the included patients found no significant difference between the groups used in each study. Data concerning the question of this review was sought after these papers were

  15. [Blunt chest trauma: possibilities to stabilize multiple and floating ribs fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyan, A S

    2017-01-01

    To improve surgical treatment of patients with multiple and flotating ribs fractures. A comparative analysis of two groups of victims with rib fractures was carried out. 148 patients of the control group underwent conservative treatment, mechanical ventilation, skeletal traction. In 167 patients of the main group we used advanced surgical tactics based on differentiated, stepwise and combined chest stabilization including osteosynthesis of ribs and thoracoscopy. Immediate results for each type of stabilization were evaluated. The most durable respiratory support was observed in case of ventilation alone - internal pneumatic stabilization without surgical stabilization. Osteosynthesis of the ribs had the best outcomes compared with other methods. An efficacy of developed tactics was confirmed by significantly reduced morbidity, mortality, mechanical ventilation time and ICU-stay in main group. Surgical tactics in patients with multiple and flotating fractures of the ribs is determined by type of ribs and internal organs damage, combined trauma severity and conditions of medical care. Differentiated, stepwise and combined chest stabilization by using of high-tech methods of medical care (osteosynthesis, thoracoscopy) improves the outcomes in these patients.

  16. The spleen not taken: Differences in management and outcomes of blunt splenic injuries in teenagers cared for by adult and pediatric trauma teams in a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼConnor, Sean C; Doud, Andrea N; Sieren, Leah M; Miller, Preston R; Zeller, Kristen A

    2017-09-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt splenic injury, initially touted for the care of pediatric patients, has become the standard of care for stable trauma patients of all ages. In our institution, trauma patients younger than 16 years are managed by the pediatric surgery service and patients 16 years or older are managed by the adult trauma service. Angioembolization is routinely used for adults with blunt splenic injury but rarely used for pediatric patients. A retrospective chart review was performed to determine if more liberal use of angioembolization increases the success rate of NOM of blunt splenic injury in adolescents. Using our institutional trauma registry, we performed a retrospective chart review of 13- to 18-year-olds admitted with blunt splenic injury from 2007 to 2015. One hundred thirty-three patients were identified; 59 were 13- to 15-year-olds and cared for by the Pediatric Trauma service, whereas 74 were 16- to 18-year-olds and cared for by the Adult Trauma service. The cohorts were compared with respect to imaging performed, grade of injury, Injury Severity Score, presence of active extravasation or pseudoaneurysm, interventions performed, blood transfused, intensive care unit days, length of stay, complications, and 30-day mortality rates. There were no significant differences in Injury Severity Score, incidence of active extravasation or pseudoaneurysm identified on computed tomography, or grade of injury between the two cohorts. More patients underwent angioembolization in the "adult" group (p = 0.001) with no difference in the success rate of NOM (p = 0.117). The overall failure rate of NOM of high-grade injuries was only 4.1%. Failure of NOM in high-grade injuries is rare; as a result, the number needed to treat with prophylactic angioembolization would be around 37 patients, resulting in undue risk to many patients with no therapeutic benefit. No improvement in failure rate was seen with aggressive angioembolization, though a larger

  17. Blunt splenic trauma: can contrast enhanced sonography be used for the screening of delayed pseudoaneurysms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Christoph D; Arditi, Daniel; Terraz, Sylvain; Buchs, Nicolas; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Platon, Alexandra

    2013-11-01

    To assess the value of contrast-enhanced sonography (CES) for the detection of delayed post-traumatic splenic pseudo-aneurysms, usually considered an indication for angiographic embolization. Sixty-three consecutive hemodynamically stable trauma patients in whom admission CT displayed a splenic injury of grade II or higher (AAST classification), without evidence of vascular involvement, were included in the study. CES of the spleen using a second generation contrast agent was systematically performed within 48-72 h after admission, for the detection of a pooling of contrast media suggestive of pseudoaneurysm. Within 6h after contrast-enhanced sonography, all patients underwent an abdominal CT for control purposes. CES results were compared to CT findings, which were considered the reference standard. This study received approval from the institutional ethical board. CES showed a blush of contrast consistent with a pseudoaneurysm in 6 of the 63 patients. All were confirmed at subsequent control CT. Pooling of contrast was found at CT in 2 patients in whom contrast-enhanced sonography was negative. There was no false positive CES examination for the suspicion of pseudoaneurysms. When compared to CT, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CES to suggest a pseudoaneurysms, were 75% (6/8), 100% (55/55), 100% (6/6), and 96% (55/57), respectively. Our data suggest that CES may be useful for the screening of delayed traumatic splenic pseudoaneurysms: if a negative CES does not absolutely rule out a pseudoaneurysm, a positive CES warrants an angiography, without need of control CT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Blunt splenic trauma: Can contrast enhanced sonography be used for the screening of delayed pseudoaneurysms?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre, E-mail: Pierre-Alexandre.Poletti@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D.; Arditi, Daniel; Terraz, Sylvain [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Buchs, Nicolas [Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, 22 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Platon, Alexandra [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of contrast-enhanced sonography (CES) for the detection of delayed post-traumatic splenic pseudo-aneurysms, usually considered an indication for angiographic embolization. Methods: Sixty-three consecutive hemodynamically stable trauma patients in whom admission CT displayed a splenic injury of grade II or higher (AAST classification), without evidence of vascular involvement, were included in the study. CES of the spleen using a second generation contrast agent was systematically performed within 48–72 h after admission, for the detection of a pooling of contrast media suggestive of pseudoaneurysm. Within 6 h after contrast-enhanced sonography, all patients underwent an abdominal CT for control purposes. CES results were compared to CT findings, which were considered the reference standard. This study received approval from the institutional ethical board. Results: CES showed a blush of contrast consistent with a pseudoaneurysm in 6 of the 63 patients. All were confirmed at subsequent control CT. Pooling of contrast was found at CT in 2 patients in whom contrast-enhanced sonography was negative. There was no false positive CES examination for the suspicion of pseudoaneurysms. When compared to CT, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CES to suggest a pseudoaneurysms, were 75% (6/8), 100% (55/55), 100% (6/6), and 96% (55/57), respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggest that CES may be useful for the screening of delayed traumatic splenic pseudoaneurysms: if a negative CES does not absolutely rule out a pseudoaneurysm, a positive CES warrants an angiography, without need of control CT.

  19. Bilateral dissection of the internal carotid artery at the base of the skull due to blunt trauma: incidence and severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Y; Di Mauro, P; Tomachot, L; Albanese, J; Martin, C; Alliez, B; Juhan, C

    1998-11-01

    , severe permanent hemiplegia in two cases, and minimal or no sequels in two cases. Following blunt trauma, arteriography of supraaortic vessels should be performed to detect BCAD in any patient with immediate or delayed neurologic symptoms that cannot be explained by CT-scan findings. To better understand the natural course of these lesions and define the indications for surgery, we propose a three-grade classification according to arteriographic findings. If surgery is undertaken, vein grafting should be performed following resection of the carotid artery lesions.

  20. Surgical management for the first 48 h following blunt chest trauma: state of the art (excluding vascular injuries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lesquen, Henri; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Gust, Lucile; Ford, Robert Michael; Beranger, Fabien; Natale, Claudia; Bonnet, Pierre-Mathieu; D'Journo, Xavier-Benoît

    2015-03-01

    This review aims to answer the most common questions in routine surgical practice during the first 48 h of blunt chest trauma (BCT) management. Two authors identified relevant manuscripts published since January 1994 to January 2014. Using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, they focused on the surgical management of BCT, excluded both child and vascular injuries and selected 80 studies. Tension pneumothorax should be promptly diagnosed and treated by needle decompression closely followed with chest tube insertion (Grade D). All traumatic pneumothoraces are considered for chest tube insertion. However, observation is possible for selected patients with small unilateral pneumothoraces without respiratory disease or need for positive pressure ventilation (Grade C). Symptomatic traumatic haemothoraces or haemothoraces >500 ml should be treated by chest tube insertion (Grade D). Occult pneumothoraces and occult haemothoraces are managed by observation with daily chest X-rays (Grades B and C). Periprocedural antibiotics are used to prevent chest-tube-related infectious complications (Grade B). No sign of life at the initial assessment and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration >10 min are considered as contraindications of Emergency Department Thoracotomy (Grade C). Damage Control Thoracotomy is performed for either massive air leakage or refractive shock or ongoing bleeding enhanced by chest tube output >1500 ml initially or >200 ml/h for 3 h (Grade D). In the case of haemodynamically stable patients, early video-assisted thoracic surgery is performed for retained haemothoraces (Grade B). Fixation of flail chest can be considered if mechanical ventilation for 48 h is probably required (Grade B). Fixation of sternal fractures is performed for displaced fractures with overlap or comminution, intractable pain or respiratory insufficiency (Grade D). Lung herniation, traumatic diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture are life

  1. A Retrospective Observational Study Examining the Effect of Thoracic Epidural and Patient Controlled Analgesia on Short-term Outcomes in Blunt Thoracic Trauma Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Edward James; Lee, Geraldine Ann

    2016-01-01

    Effective analgesia in the early stages after any major traumatic event remains pivotal to optimal trauma management. For patients with significant thoracic injuries, this is paramount to ensure ongoing efficient respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of analgesic modes in the management of patients with a primary thoracic injury and blunt mechanism of injury. By understanding variables that influence the use of varying analgesic modes and influence the development of pulmonary complications, there should be more uniform evidence-based prescription in the future.This retrospective study considered analgesic use in patients admitted after blunt thoracic injuries at one major trauma center over a 2-year period. Pulmonary complications measured included both infective and ventilator-associated failure. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify patient and injury severity characteristics and their association with respiratory complications.A total of 401 cases were reviewed and analyzed: 159 received Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA), 32 received PCA and epidural analgesia (EA), 6 received EA alone, and 204 received interval-administered analgesia. There were no significant differences in the rates of complication when compared between analgesic modes. Patients who developed pneumonia had significantly increased number of thoracic fractures and underlying organ injury (P cardiac disease (OR 2.624, P = 0.042) and ICU length of stay (OR: 1.146, P blunt thoracic injuries. However, variables that may influence usage of different analgesic modes and high-risk groups for the development of pneumonia were identified. Further work is warranted to consider the long-term benefits of analgesia in patients post-blunt thoracic injuries.

  2. The diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography for blunt vertebral artery injury detection in trauma patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiorgas, Georgios P; Brotis, Alexandros G; Giannis, Theofanis; Rountas, Christos D; Vassiou, Katerina G; Fountas, Kostas N; Kapsalaki, Eftychia Z

    2017-09-01

    The role of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the evaluation of patients with blunt vertebral artery has not been fully established. Our aim is to define the diagnostic accuracy of MRA in comparison to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the detection of blunt vertebral artery injury in trauma patients. A computer-assisted literature search of the PubMed, Scopus, Highwire, Web of Science, and LILACS was conducted, in order to identify studies reporting on the sensitivity and specificity of MRA in comparison to DSA for the detection of blunt vertebral artery injury in trauma patients. The Database search retrieved 91 studies. Five studies fulfilled our eligibility criteria. Two authors assessed the risk of bias and applicability concerns using QUADAS-2. Two-by-two contingency tables were constructed on a per-vessel level. Heterogeneity was tested by the statistical significance of Cochran's Q, and was quantified by the Higgins's I2 metric. The pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity for blunt vertebral artery injury detection with MRA in comparison to DSA were calculated based on the bivariate model. The meta-analysis was supplemented by subgroup and sensitivity analysis, as well as analysis for publication bias. There was significant clinical heterogeneity in the targeted population, inclusion criteria, and MRA related parameters. The reporting bias and applicability concerns were moderate and low, respectively. In the overall analysis, the sensitivity ranged from 25% to 85%, while the specificity varied from 65% to 99%, across studies. According to the bivariate model, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of MRA in the evaluation of patients with blunt vertebral artery was as high as 55% (95% CI 32.1%-76.7%), and 91% (95% CI 66.3%-98.2%), respectively. Subgroup analysis in terms of MRA sequence sensitivity of phase, the contrasted MRA (75% [95% CI 43%-92%]) seemed to be superior to the TOF MRA (46% [95%CI 20%-74%]). The addition of contrast

  3. A systematic review of the need for MRI for the clearance of cervical spine injury in obtunded blunt trauma patients after normal cervical spine CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyore AO James

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clearance of cervical spine injury (CSI in the obtunded or comatose blunt trauma patient remains controversial. In patients with unreliable physical examination and no evidence of CSI on computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine (CS-MRI is the typical follow-up study. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that CS-MRI is unnecessary with negative findings on a multi-detector CT (MDCT scan. This review article systematically analyzes current literature to address the controversies surrounding clearance of CSI in obtunded blunt trauma patients. A literature search through MEDLINE database was conducted using all databases on the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI website (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov for keywords: "cervical spine injury," "obtunded," and "MRI." The search was limited to studies published within the last 10 years and with populations of patients older than 18 years old. Eleven studies were included in the analysis yielding data on 1535 patients. CS-MRI detected abnormalities in 256 patients (16.6%. The abnormalities reported on CS-MRI resulted in prolonged rigid c-collar immobilization in 74 patients (4.9%. Eleven patients (0.7% had unstable injury detected on CS-MRI alone that required surgical intervention. In the obtunded blunt trauma patient with unreliable clinical examination and a normal CT scan, there is still a role for CS-MRI in detecting clinically significant injuries when MRI resources are available. However, when a reliable clinical exam reveals intact gross motor function, CS-MRI may be unnecessary.

  4. Blunt cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jeremy S; Benitez, R Michael

    2012-11-01

    Blunt chest trauma represents a spectrum of injuries to the heart and aorta that vary markedly in character and severity. The setting, signs, and symptoms of chest trauma are often nonspecific, which represents a challenge to emergency providers. Individuals with suspected blunt chest trauma who have only mild or no symptoms, a normal electrocardiogram (ECG), and are hemodynamically stable typically have a benign course and rarely require further diagnostic testing or long periods of close observation. Individuals with pain, ECG abnormalities, or hemodynamic instability may require rapid evaluation of the heart by echocardiography and the great vessels by advanced imaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Blunt Trauma Data Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    Weapons (and other exciting protection, security and survival products). Product Brochure. 45. Roberts, Verne L. "Stun Gun" Preliminary Effects Study...1971. 57, Cruz-Jibaja, Julio C. Report Number4. Physiology of Respiration of High Elevations. DAHC 19-7I-GO001. University of Peru, Lima, Peru

  6. Models of care for traumatically injured patients at trauma centres in British Columbia: variability and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyp, Benjamin; Hassani, Kasra; Constable, Lisa; Haegert, Joseph

    2017-07-11

    Successful trauma systems employ a network of variably-resourced hospitals, staffed by experienced providers, to deliver optimal care for injured patients. The "model of care"-the manner by which inpatients are admitted and overseen, is an important determinant of patient outcomes. To describe the models of inpatient trauma care at British Columbia's (BC's) ten adult trauma centres, their sustainability, and their compatibility with accreditation guidelines. Questionnaires were distributed to the trauma medical directors at BC's ten Level I-III adult trauma centres. Follow-up semi-structured interviews clarified responses. Three different models of inpatient trauma care exist within BC. The "admitting trauma service" was a multidisciplinary team providing exclusive care for injured patients. The "on-call consultant" assisted with Emergency Department (ED) resuscitation before transferring patients to a non-trauma admitting service. The single "short-stay trauma unit" employed on-call consultants who also oversaw a 48-hour short-stay ward. Both level I trauma centres utilized the admitting trauma service model (2/2). All Level II sites employed an on-call consultant model (3/3), deviating from Level II trauma centre accreditation standards. Level III sites employed all three models in similar proportions. None of the on-call consultant sites believed their current care model was sustainable. Inadequate compensation, insufficient resources, and difficulty recruiting physicians were cited barriers to sustainability and accreditation compliance. Three distinct models of care are distributed inconsistently across BC's Level I-III trauma hospitals. Greater use of admitting trauma service and short-stay trauma unit models may improve the sustainability and accreditation compliance of our trauma system.

  7. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 1. Liver and spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1998-05-01

    Computed tomography is now widely used in the initial diagnostic workup of adult trauma victims with suspected intra-abdominal injuries. We review the role of CT in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in two parts. In the first part we discuss general aspects of performing CT in the setting of abdominal trauma and the diagnostic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage and blunt hepatic and splenic injuries. Hepatic and splenic injuries can be detected by means of CT with a high accuracy. The vast majority of hepatic injuries can be successfully managed conservatively, even when CT demonstrates parenchymal damage of more than three segments and major hemoperitoneum. Delayed complications, e. g., formation of biloma or a false aneurysm, can be readily detected on repeat CT studies, although they are quite uncommon. The outcome of conservative treatment of splenic injuries remains unpredictable because delayed splenic rupture may occur even when initial CT shows only minor parenchymal lesions and little or no intraperitoneal hemorrhage. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 64 refs.

  8. Evolving Role of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Management of Extrahepatic Hepatic Ductal Injuries due to Blunt Trauma: Diagnostic and Treatment Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil P. Jaik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Extrahepatic hepatic ductal injuries (EHDIs due to blunt abdominal trauma are rare. Given the rarity of these injuries and the insidious onset of symptoms, EHDI are commonly missed during the initial trauma evaluation, making their diagnosis difficult and frequently delayed. Diagnostic modalities useful in the setting of EHDI include computed tomography (CT, abdominal ultrasonography (AUS, nuclear imaging (HIDA scan, and cholangiography. Traditional options in management of EHDI include primary ductal repair with or without a T-tube, biliary-enteric anastomosis, ductal ligation, stenting, and drainage. Simple drainage and biliary decompression is often the most appropriate treatment in unstable patients. More recently, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP allowed for diagnosis and potential treatment of these injuries via stenting and/or papillotomy. Our review of 53 cases of EHDI reported in the English-language literature has focused on the evolving role of ERCP in diagnosis and treatment of these injuries. Diagnostic and treatment algorithms incorporating ERCP have been designed to help systematize and simplify the management of EHDI. An illustrative case is reported of blunt traumatic injury involving both the extrahepatic portion of the left hepatic duct and its confluence with the right hepatic duct. This injury was successfully diagnosed and treated using ERCP.

  9. Experimental blunt chest trauma--cardiorespiratory effects of different mechanical ventilation strategies with high positive end-expiratory pressure: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Dierk; Carvalho, Nadja C; Katscher, Sebastian; Mende, Ludger; Reske, Alexander P; Spieth, Peter M; Carvalho, Alysson R; Beda, Alessandro; Lachmann, Burkhard; Amato, Marcelo B P; Wrigge, Hermann; Reske, Andreas W

    2016-01-12

    Uncertainty persists regarding the optimal ventilatory strategy in trauma patients developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This work aims to assess the effects of two mechanical ventilation strategies with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in experimental ARDS following blunt chest trauma. Twenty-six juvenile pigs were anesthetized, tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated. A contusion was applied to the right chest using a bolt-shot device. Ninety minutes after contusion, animals were randomized to two different ventilation modes, applied for 24 h: Twelve pigs received conventional pressure-controlled ventilation with moderately low tidal volumes (VT, 8 ml/kg) and empirically chosen high external PEEP (16 cmH2O) and are referred to as the HP-CMV-group. The other group (n = 14) underwent high-frequency inverse-ratio pressure-controlled ventilation (HFPPV) involving respiratory rate of 65 breaths · min(-1), inspiratory-to-expiratory-ratio 2:1, development of intrinsic PEEP and recruitment maneuvers, compatible with the rationale of the Open Lung Concept. Hemodynamics, gas exchange and respiratory mechanics were monitored during 24 h. Computed tomography and histology were analyzed in subgroups. Comparing changes which occurred from randomization (90 min after chest trauma) over the 24-h treatment period, groups differed statistically significantly (all P values for group effect ventilation improved respiratory function and fulfilled relevant ventilation endpoints for trauma patients, i.e. restoration of oxygenation and lung aeration while avoiding hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis.

  10. Comparative Effectiveness of Emergency Resuscitative Thoracotomy versus Closed Chest Compressions among Patients with Critical Blunt Trauma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodai Suzuki

    Full Text Available Although emergency resuscitative thoracotomy is performed as a salvage maneuver for critical blunt trauma patients, evidence supporting superior effectiveness of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy compared to conventional closed-chest compressions remains insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate whether emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at the emergency department or in the operating room was associated with favourable outcomes after blunt trauma and to compare its effectiveness with that of closed-chest compressions.This was a retrospective nationwide cohort study. Data were obtained from the Japan Trauma Data Bank for the period between 2004 and 2012. The primary and secondary outcomes were patient survival rates 24 h and 28 d after emergency department arrival. Statistical analyses were performed using multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis. We adjusted for the effects of different hospitals by introducing random intercepts in regression analysis to account for the differential quality of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at hospitals where patients in cardiac arrest were treated. Sensitivity analyses were performed using propensity score matching.In total, 1,377 consecutive, critical blunt trauma patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department or operating room were included in the study. Of these patients, 484 (35.1% underwent emergency resuscitative thoracotomy and 893 (64.9% received closed-chest compressions. Compared to closed-chest compressions, emergency resuscitative thoracotomy was associated with lower survival rate 24 h after emergency department arrival (4.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P < 0.001 and 28 d after arrival (1.2% vs. 6.0%, respectively, P < 0.001. Multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis with and without a propensity score-matched dataset revealed that the odds ratio for an unfavorable survival rate after 24 h was lower for

  11. Saint Louis Center for Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills: A Collaborative Air Force-Civilian Trauma Skills Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) June 2014 – December 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Saint Louis Center for Sustainment of Trauma and...Readiness Skills: A Collaborative Air Force-Civilian Trauma Skills Training Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...in support of these campaigns have had to maintain a high degree of clinical skill to effectively render care to wounded combatants, a necessity

  12. The Use of CT Scan in Hemodynamically Stable Children with Blunt Abdominal Trauma : Look before You Leap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nellensteijn, David R.; Greuter, Marcel J.; el Moumni, Moustafa; Hulscher, Jan B.

    We set out to determine the diagnostic value of computed tomographic (CT) scans in relation to the radiation dose, tumor incidence, and tumor mortality by radiation for hemodynamically stable pediatric patients with blunt abdominal injury. We focused on the changes in management because of new

  13. Association between the seat belt sign and intra-abdominal injuries in children with blunt torso trauma in motor vehicle collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgialli, Dominic A; Ellison, Angela M; Ehrlich, Peter; Bonsu, Bema; Menaker, Jay; Wisner, David H; Atabaki, Shireen; Olsen, Cody S; Sokolove, Peter E; Lillis, Kathy; Kuppermann, Nathan; Holmes, James F

    2014-11-01

    The objective was to determine the association between the abdominal seat belt sign and intra-abdominal injuries (IAIs) in children presenting to emergency departments with blunt torso trauma after motor vehicle collisions (MVCs). This was a planned subgroup analysis of prospective data from a multicenter cohort study of children with blunt torso trauma after MVCs. Patient history and physical examination findings were documented before abdominal computed tomography (CT) or laparotomy. Seat belt sign was defined as a continuous area of erythema, ecchymosis, or abrasion across the abdomen secondary to a seat belt restraint. The relative risk (RR) of IAI with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was calculated for children with seat belt signs compared to those without. The risk of IAI in those patients with seat belt sign who were without abdominal pain or tenderness, and with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 14 or 15, was also calculated. A total of 3,740 children with seat belt sign documentation after blunt torso trauma in MVCs were enrolled; 585 (16%) had seat belt signs. Among the 1,864 children undergoing definitive abdominal testing (CT, laparotomy/laparoscopy, or autopsy), IAIs were more common in patients with seat belt signs than those without (19% vs. 12%; RR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.3 to 2.1). This difference was primarily due to a greater risk of gastrointestinal injuries (hollow viscous or associated mesentery) in those with seat belt signs (11% vs. 1%; RR = 9.4, 95% CI = 5.4 to 16.4). IAI was diagnosed in 11 of 194 patients (5.7%; 95% CI = 2.9% to 9.9%) with seat belt signs who did not have initial complaints of abdominal pain or tenderness and had GCS scores of 14 or 15. Patients with seat belt signs after MVCs are at greater risk of IAI than those without seat belt signs, predominately due to gastrointestinal injuries. Although IAIs are less common in alert patients with seat belt signs who do not have initial complaints of abdominal pain or tenderness, the

  14. Derivation and validation of two decision instruments for selective chest CT in blunt trauma: a multicenter prospective observational study (NEXUS Chest CT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Robert M; Langdorf, Mark I; Nishijima, Daniel; Baumann, Brigitte M; Hendey, Gregory W; Medak, Anthony J; Raja, Ali S; Allen, Isabel E; Mower, William R

    2015-10-01

    Unnecessary diagnostic imaging leads to higher costs, longer emergency department stays, and increased patient exposure to ionizing radiation. We sought to prospectively derive and validate two decision instruments (DIs) for selective chest computed tomography (CT) in adult blunt trauma patients. From September 2011 to May 2014, we prospectively enrolled blunt trauma patients over 14 y of age presenting to eight US, urban level 1 trauma centers in this observational study. During the derivation phase, physicians recorded the presence or absence of 14 clinical criteria before viewing chest imaging results. We determined injury outcomes by CT radiology readings and categorized injuries as major or minor according to an expert-panel-derived clinical classification scheme. We then employed recursive partitioning to derive two DIs: Chest CT-All maximized sensitivity for all injuries, and Chest CT-Major maximized sensitivity for only major thoracic injuries (while increasing specificity). In the validation phase, we employed similar methodology to prospectively test the performance of both DIs. We enrolled 11,477 patients-6,002 patients in the derivation phase and 5,475 patients in the validation phase. The derived Chest CT-All DI consisted of (1) abnormal chest X-ray, (2) rapid deceleration mechanism, (3) distracting injury, (4) chest wall tenderness, (5) sternal tenderness, (6) thoracic spine tenderness, and (7) scapular tenderness. The Chest CT-Major DI had the same criteria without rapid deceleration mechanism. In the validation phase, Chest CT-All had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%-100%), a specificity of 20.8% (95% CI 19.2%-22.4%), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.8% (95% CI 98.9%-100%) for major injury, and a sensitivity of 95.4% (95% CI 93.6%-96.9%), a specificity of 25.5% (95% CI 23.5%-27.5%), and a NPV of 93.9% (95% CI 91.5%-95.8%) for either major or minor injury. Chest CT-Major had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%-100%), a specificity of

  15. Inefficacy of standard vital signs for predicting mortality and the need for prehospital life-saving interventions in blunt trauma patients transported via helicopter: A repeated call for new measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nehemiah T; Holcomb, John B; Wade, Charles E; Salinas, Jose

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of traditional vital signs for predicting mortality and the need for prehospital lifesaving interventions (LSIs) in blunt trauma patients requiring helicopter transport to a Level I trauma center. Our hypothesis was that standard vital signs are not sufficient for identifying or determining treatment for those patients most at risk. This study involved prehospital trauma patients suffering from blunt trauma (motor vehicle/cycle collision) and transported from the point of injury via helicopter. Means and standard deviations for vital signs and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores were obtained for non-LSI versus LSI and survivor versus nonsurvivor patient groups and then compared using Wilcoxon statistical tests. Variables with statistically significant differences between patient groups were then used to develop multivariate logistic regression models for predicting mortality and/or the need for prehospital LSIs. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were also obtained to compare these models. A final cohort of 195 patients was included in the analysis. Thirty (15%) patients received a total of 39 prehospital LSIs. Of these, 12 (40%) died. In total, 33 (17%) patients died. Of these, 21 (74%) did not receive prehospital LSIs. Model variables were field heart rate, lowest systolic blood pressure, shock index, pulse pressure, and GCS components. Using vital signs alone, ROC curves demonstrated poor prediction of LSI needs, mortality, and nonsurvivors who did not receive LSIs (area under the curve [AUC], AUCs: 0.72, 0.65, and 0.61). When using both vital signs and GCS, ROC curves still demonstrated poor prediction of nonsurvivors overall and nonsurvivors who did not receive LSIs (AUCs: 0.67, 0.74). The major implication of this study was that traditional vital signs cannot identify or determine treatment for many prehospital blunt trauma patients who are at great risk. This study reiterated the need for new

  16. Value of CT to predict surgically important bowel and/or mesenteric injury in blunt trauma: performance of a preliminary scoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faget, Claire; Taourel, Patrice; Ruyer, Alban; Alili, Chakib; Millet, Ingrid [CHU Lapeyronie, Department of Medical Imaging, Montpellier (France); Charbit, Jonathan [CHU Lapeyronie, Department of Intensive Care and Anesthesiology, Montpellier (France); Molinari, Nicolas [UMR 729 MISTEA, CHU Montpellier, Department of Medical Information and Statistics, Montpellier (France)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the performance of a computed tomography (CT) diagnostic score to predict surgical treatment for blunt bowel and/or mesentery injury (BBMI) in consecutive abdominal trauma. This was a retrospective observational study of 805 consecutive abdominal traumas with 556 patients included and screened by an abdominal radiologist blinded to the patient outcome, to evaluate numerous CT findings and calculate their diagnostic performances. These CT findings were compared using univariate and multivariate analysis between patients who had a laparotomy-confirmed BBMI requiring surgical repair, and those without BBMI requiring surgery. A CT score was obtained with an internal bootstrap validation. Fifty-six patients (10.1 %) had BBMI requiring surgery. Nine CT signs were independently associated with BBMI requiring surgery and were used to develop a CT diagnostic score. The AUC of our model was 0.98 (95 % CI 0.96-100), with a ≥5 cut-off. Its diagnostic performance was determined by internal validation: sensitivity 91.1-100 %, specificity 85.7-97.6 %, positive predictive value 41.4-82.3 % and negative predictive value 98.9-100 %. Bowel wall discontinuity and mesenteric pneumoperitoneum had the strongest association with BBMI requiring surgery (OR = 128.9 and 140.5, respectively). We developed a reliable CT scoring system which is easy to implement and highly predictive of BBMI requiring surgery. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of the C-MAC video laryngoscope to the Macintosh laryngoscope for intubation of blunt trauma patients in the ED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Goksu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We aimed to compare the performance of the C-MAC video laryngoscope (C-MAC to the Macintosh laryngoscope for intubation of blunt trauma patients in the ED. Material and methods: This was a prospective randomized study. The primary outcome measure is overall successful intubation. Secondary outcome measures are first attempt successful intubation, Cormack–Lehane (CL grade, and indicators of the reasons for unsuccessful intubation at the first attempt with each device. Adult patients who suffered from blunt trauma and required intubation were randomized to video laryngoscopy with C-MAC device or direct laryngoscopy (DL. Results: During a 17-month period, a total of 150 trauma intubations were performed using a C-MAC and DL. Baseline characteristics of patients were similar between the C-MAC and DL group. Overall success for the C-MAC was 69/75 (92%, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.96 while for the DL it was 72/75 (96%, 95% CI 0.88 to 0.98. First attempt success for the C-MAC was 47/75 (62.7%, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.72 while for the DL it was 44/75 patients (58.7%, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.69. The mean time to achieve successful intubation was 33.4 ± 2.5 s for the C-MAC versus 42.4 ± 5.1 s for the DL (p = 0.93. There was a statistically significant difference between the DL and C-MAC in terms of visualizing the glottic opening and esophageal intubation in favor of the C-MAC (p = 0.002 and p = 0.013 respectively. Discussion and conclusion: The overall success rates were similar. The C-MAC demonstrated improved glottic view and decrease in esophageal intubation rate. Keywords: Airway management, Emergency medicine, Video laryngoscope

  18. To nearly come full circle: Nonoperative management of high-grade IV-V blunt splenic trauma is safe using a protocol with routine angioembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Indermeet S; Tepas, Joseph J; Siragusa, Daniel; Loper, Todd; Kerwin, Andrew; Frykberg, Eric R

    2017-04-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) of hemodynamically stable high-grade (IV-V) blunt splenic trauma remains controversial given the high failure rates (19%) that persist despite angioembolization (AE) protocols. The NOM protocol was modified in 2011 to include mandatory AE of all grade (IV-V) injuries without contrast blush (CB) along with selective AE of grade (I-V) with CB. The purpose of this study was to determine if this new AE (NAE) protocol significantly lowered the failure rates for grade (IV-V) injuries allowing for safe observation without surgery and if the exclusion of grade III injuries allowed for the prevention of unnecessary angiograms without affecting the overall failure rates. The records of patients with blunt splenic trauma from January 2000 to October 2014 at a Level I trauma center were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups and failure of NOM (FNOM) rates compared: NAE protocol (2011-2014) with mandatory AE for all grade (IV-V) injuries without CB and selective AE for grade (I-V) with CB versus old AE (OAE) protocol (2000-2010) with selective AE for grade (I-V) with CB. Seven hundred twelve patients underwent NOM with 522 (73%) in the OAE group and 190 (27%) in the NAE group. Evolving from the OAE to the NAE strategy resulted in a significantly lower FNOM rate for the overall group (grade I-V) (OAE vs. NAE, 4% to 1%, p = 0.04) and the grade (IV-V) group (OAE vs. NAE, 19% vs. 3%, p = 0.01). Angiograms were avoided in 113 grade (I-III) injuries with no CB; these patients had NOM with observation alone and none failed. A protocol using mandatory AE of all high-grade (IV-V) injuries without CB and selective AE of grade (I-V) with CB may provide for optimum salvage with safe NOM of the high-grade injuries (IV-V) and limited unnecessary angiograms. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  19. Duodenal Transection without Pancreatic Injury following Blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the inventions of faster cars and even more faster motorbikes there is a worldwide increase in road traffic accidents, which has increased the incidence of blunt abdominal trauma but still duodenal injury following a blunt abdominal trauma is uncommon and can pose a formidable challenge to the surgeon and failure to ...

  20. Correlation of operative and pathological injury grade with computed tomographic grade in the failed nonoperative management of blunt splenic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J A; Roiter, C; Alzuhaili, A

    2012-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the standard for grading blunt splenic injuries, but the true accuracy, especially for grade IV or V injuries as compared to pathological findings, is unknown. A retrospective study from 2005 to 2011 was undertaken. There were 214 adults admitted with blunt splenic injury and 170 (79%) were managed nonoperatively. The remaining 44 patients (21%) required surgical intervention. There was a significant difference in the Injury Severity Score (ISS) between those who did and those who did not require splenectomy: median 31 (interquartile [IQ] range 11-51) versus 22 (IQ range 9-35, p = 0.0002). Ten patients presented in shock, had a positive ultrasound, and went to surgery. The remaining 34 had CT scans prior to surgery. Twenty-five (73%) had injury grades IV or V. The CT scan correctly graded the injury in 14 (41%) and was incorrect in 20 (59%). The assigned grade by the CT scan underestimated the true injury grade by one grade in six cases (30%), by two or more grades in nine (45%), and the CT images were obscured by blood and deemed "ungradeable" in five (25%). The CT scan was more accurate for grades I and II (100%) than for grades III-V (25-43%). The reasons for inaccuracy were either inability to visualize that the laceration involved the hilar vessels or excessive perisplenic blood which obscured the injury and/or the hilum. CT for splenic injury is accurate for grades I and II, but underestimates the true extent of injury for grades III-V. The reasons for the lack of correlation are the inability to determine hilar involvement and excessive perisplenic blood obscuring the injury. Patients with these image characteristics by CT scan should undergo splenectomy earlier if there are any signs of hemodynamic instability.

  1. Value of ultrasound in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma;O valor da ultra-sonografia na avaliacao do traumatismo abdominal fechado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayanthi, Shri Krishna

    2008-07-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in an age group including from teenagers to young adults, in a male dominant proportion, resulting in great economic and social impact. Within the complex of trauma, blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is frequent event and presents difficulty in the evaluation and management since the clinical examination shows low sensitivity and specificity. The detection of hemo peritoneum is one of the methods of evaluation of possible indirect intra-abdominal injuries, initially using direct diagnostic abdominal paracentesis and posteriorly the diagnostic peritoneal lavage, that despite the effectiveness, have drawbacks such as invasiveness and the inability of hemo peritoneum quantification and the lesion staging, resulting in non-therapeutic laparotomies. Imaging methods provide useful information in the investigation of abdominal injuries, such as conventional and contrast radiology, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), which is the best effective method, but has its own drawbacks, such as cost, accessibility, use of ionizing radiation and contrast media and the displacement of the patient to the machine. US presents itself as an alternative in the initial evaluation of these patients as noninvasive method, with lack of harmfulness, low cost, fast answer and portability. Nevertheless, this method also has its limitations, as in cases of abdominal injuries without free fluid. This study was conducted in order to establish the performance of the US in this setting, allowing to rationalise the use of CT. For this purpose we studied 163 patients treated in the ER of HC/FMUSP, with the completion of consecutive US and CT. The population fits the usual profile of trauma victims, with 83% male, 56% in the age group between 20 and 39 years and in 73% of cases victims of traffic accidents. They were brought to the service in an average time of 51 minutes, mainly stable and with satisfactory level of consciousness. US took on

  2. Co-existence of Posttraumatic Empyema Thoracis and Lung Abscess in a Child After Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hung Kuo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic empyema is a rare complication of trauma with an incidence of 1.6–2.4% in trauma patients. However, it is rarely reported in children. We report the case of a 15-year-old boy who was involved in a traffic accident and diagnosed with a pulmonary contusion at a local hospital. Fourteen days after the accident, posttraumatic empyema thoracis and lung abscess developed with clinical presentations of fever, productive cough and right chest pain. He was successfully treated with computed tomography-guided catheter drainage and intravenous cefotaxime. We emphasize that posttraumatic empyema thoracis and lung abscess are very rare in children, and careful follow-up for posttraumatic lung contusion is essential. Image-guided catheter drainage can be an adjunctive tool for treating selected patients, although most complicated cases of post-traumatic empyema thoracis require decortication therapy.

  3. Haemobilia following blunt liver injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corresponding author: G L Laing (grantandjulia@gmail.com). Blunt liver trauma is commonly managed by non-operative measures. We report a case of an American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grade III liver injury and its complications, successfully managed by a combination of minimally invasive interventions.

  4. Spontaneous obliteration of right ventricular pseudoaneurysm after blunt chest trauma: Diagnosis and follow-up with multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Kyung; Kang, Mi Jin; Kim, Jae Hyung [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Right ventricular (RV) pseudoaneurysm caused by trauma is very rare. We report a case of RV pseudoaneurysm which resolved without surgical treatment in a patient who survived a falling accident. Echocardiography failed to identify the pseudoaneurysm. Electrocardiography-gated CT showed a 17-mm-sized saccular pseusoaneurysm arsing from the RV outflow tract with a narrow neck. Follow-up CT after two months showed spontaneous obliteration of the lesion.

  5. Melatonin therapy for blunt trauma and strenuous exercise: A mechanism involving cytokines, NFκB, Akt, MAFBXand MURF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarman, Gerald J; Reiter, Russel J

    2018-01-09

    Muscle injury occurs due to trauma, strenuous exercise or sports activities; most people affected are athletes. Ineffectively treated muscle injury can negatively affect sports careers and quality of life after retirement from sports. Reports have indicated that the current therapeutic management of muscle injury, particularly anti-inflammatory drugs, are not necessarily effective. Therefore, better therapies are required. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated melatonin's potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions against muscle pathology in sarcopenia or atrophy in systemic disease. However, the underlying mechanisms for the protective effect of melatonin in the context of trauma/strenuous exercise are multifactorial and not well described. This paper reviews data on melatonin's impact on muscle injury and findings that points toward the mechanisms through which melatonin achieves muscle protection. The general concept described in this review is that melatonin inhibits NFκB, reduces cytokine expression, increases Akt that downregulates the ratio of MAF BX and MURF-1 in order to limit the extent of muscle injury and promote muscle recovery post-injury. The work discussed in this review supports the notion that melatonin may be considered a possible therapy against trauma/sports related muscle injury. Inclusion of melatonin as a therapy in sports medicine could therefore provide a better treatment option for injured athletes and sports individuals.

  6. Patients with blunt head trauma on anticoagulation and antiplatelet medications: can they be safely discharged after a normal initial cranial computed tomography scan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docimo, Salvatore; Demin, Aleksandr; Vinces, Fausto

    2014-06-01

    The literature reports delayed intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) after blunt trauma in patients taking preinjury anticoagulant and antiplatelet (AC/AP) medications. We sought to evaluate the incidence of delayed ICH at our institution and hypothesize that patients taking AC/AP medications who are found to have a negative first computed tomography (CT) scan will not require a second CT scan. A total of 303 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Age, gender, mechanism of injury, international normalized ratio (INR), initial and secondary cranial CT findings, and outcomes were recorded. One hundred sixty-eight (55.4%) were found to be taking AP/AC medications. Ninety-six (57%) were male and 72 (43%) female. Aspirin use was 42.8 per cent (72 of 168), clopidogrel next (39 of 168 [23.0%]), and warfarin least (18 of 168 [10.7%]). One hundred sixty-six (98.8%) presented with significant findings on the first CT scan. Fourteen (87.5%) of the 16 patients with an INR 2.0 or higher presented with an ICH on the first CT. Ninety percent of patients with an INR 1.5 or higher presented with positive findings on the first CT scan. One hundred per cent of patients with an INR 3.0 or higher presented with an ICH on the first CT scan. The incidence of a delayed ICH was two of 168 (1.19%). Of those two patients with a delayed ICH, 100 per cent were taking warfarin and had an INR greater than 2.0. The incidence of delayed ICH was 1.19 per cent. The protocol requiring a second CT scan for all patients on AC/AP medications after a negative first CT scan should be questioned. For patients with blunt head trauma taking warfarin or a warfarin-aspirin combination, a repeat cranial CT scan after a negative initial CT is acceptable. For patients taking clopidogrel, a period of observation may be warranted.

  7. ACCURACY OF PREDICTIVE FACTORS AND FOCUSED ASSESSMENT WITH SONOGRAPHY FOR TRAUMA (FAST IN MANAGEMENT OF ADULT BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA AND ITS OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Elbaih

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Abdominal trauma is a major public health problem for all nations and all socioeconomic strata. Methods:The studyincluded adult patientsattending emergency department in Suez Canal University Hospital,Data was collected in pre-organized data sheet by the researcher. Then, the patients were followed up and recorded till they reached one of these final outcomesLater on, the actual outcome of the patient was compared to the predictors and FAST results, then sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated. Results:Seventy five patients were eligible, of which ten patients had a FAST-positive result, and seven patients underwent a therapeutic laparotomy. In multivariate analysis,the factors correlating with a therapeutic laparotomy were pulse (>100beat/minute, respiratory rate (>29 cycle /minute, O2 saturation, abdominal gardening by examination and a FAST-positive result (sensitivity 80%, Specificity 100%, accuracy 97%, positive predictive value 100% and negative predictive value 97.3% ,were pulse as the most sensitive predictor (99% followed by respiratory rate (98% while the most specific predictors were pulse (97.1%. Conclusions:The management of trauma patients depends upon their clinical status, imaging findings, and the resources and expertise available. Rapid recognition of key abnormalities on FAST and abdominal CT can help select trauma patients for the most appropriate treatment: surgery, interventional radiology or conservative management. Physical examination alone is not sufficient to determine the need for emergent interventions.

  8. A comparative study of cranial, blunt trauma fractures as seen at medicolegal autopsy and by Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Computed Tomography (CT) has become a widely used supplement to medico legal autopsies at several forensic institutes. Amongst other things, it has proven to be very valuable in visualising fractures of the cranium. Also CT scan data are being used to create head models for biomechanical trauma analysis by Finite Element Analysis. If CT scan data are to be used for creating individual head models for retrograde trauma analysis in the future we need to ascertain how well cranial fractures are captured by CT scan. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic agreement between CT and autopsy regarding cranial fractures and especially the precision with which cranial fractures are recorded. Methods The autopsy fracture diagnosis was compared to the diagnosis of two CT readings (reconstructed with Multiplanar and Maximum Intensity Projection reconstructions) by registering the fractures on schematic drawings. The extent of the fractures was quantified by merging 3-dimensional datasets from both the autopsy as input by 3D digitizer tracing and CT scan. Results The results showed a good diagnostic agreement regarding fractures localised in the posterior fossa, while the fracture diagnosis in the medial and anterior fossa was difficult at the first CT scan reading. The fracture diagnosis improved during the second CT scan reading. Thus using two different CT reconstructions improved diagnosis in the medial fossa and at the impact points in the cranial vault. However, fracture diagnosis in the anterior and medial fossa and of hairline fractures in general still remained difficult. Conclusion The study showed that the forensically important fracture systems to a large extent were diagnosed on CT images using Multiplanar and Maximum Intensity Projection reconstructions. Difficulties remained in the minute diagnosis of hairline fractures. These inconsistencies need to be resolved in order to use CT scan data of victims for individual head modelling and

  9. Proximal Versus Distal Splenic Artery Embolisation for Blunt Splenic Trauma: What is the Impact on Splenic Immune Function?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, P. T., E-mail: pfoley@doctors.org.uk [The Canberra Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (Australia); Kavnoudias, H., E-mail: h.kavnoudias@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Radiology Department (Australia); Cameron, P. U., E-mail: paul.cameron@unimelb.edu.au [The Alfred Hospital, Infectious Diseases Unit (Australia); Czarnecki, C., E-mail: caroline.czarnecki@gmail.com [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Radiology Department (Australia); Paul, E., E-mail: eldho.paul@monash.edu [Monash University, Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Alfred Hospital (Australia); Lyon, S. M., E-mail: lyonsey@optusnet.com.au [Melbourne Endovascular (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo compare the impact of proximal or distal splenic artery embolisation versus that of splenectomy on splenic immune function as measured by IgM memory B cell levels.Materials and MethodsPatients with splenic trauma who were treated by splenic artery embolisation (SAE) were enrolled. After 6 months splenic volume was assessed by CT, and IgM memory B cells in peripheral blood were measured and compared to a local normal reference population and to a post-splenectomy population.ResultsOf the 71 patients who underwent embolisation, 38 underwent proximal embolisation, 11 underwent distal embolisation, 22 patients were excluded, 1 had both proximal and distal embolisation, 5 did not survive and 16 did not return for evaluation. There was a significant difference between splenectomy and proximal or distal embolisation and a trend towards greater preservation of IgM memory B cell number in those with distal embolisation—a difference that could not be attributed to differences in age, grade of injury or residual splenic volume.ConclusionIgM memory B cell levels are significantly higher in those treated with SAE compared to splenectomy. Our data provide evidence that splenic embolisation should reduce immunological complications of spleen trauma and suggest that distal embolisation may maintain better function.

  10. Prehospital transportation decisions for patients sustaining major trauma in road traffic crashes in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candefjord, Stefan; Buendia, Ruben; Caragounis, Eva-Corina; Sjöqvist, Bengt Arne; Fagerlind, Helen

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the proportion and characteristics of patients sustaining major trauma in road traffic crashes (RTCs) who could benefit from direct transportation to a trauma center (TC). Currently, there is no national classification of TC in Sweden. In this study, 7 university hospitals (UHs) in Sweden were selected to represent a TC level I or level II. These UHs have similar capabilities as the definition for level I and level II TC in the United States. Major trauma was defined as Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. A total of 117,730 patients who were transported by road or air ambulance were selected from the Swedish TRaffic Accident Data Acquisition (STRADA) database between 2007 to 2014. An analysis of the patient characteristics sustaining major trauma in comparison with patients sustaining minor trauma (ISS car, truck, or bus and to be involved in a crash in a rural location. Our results show that the majority of RTC major trauma patients are transported to a non-TC. This may cause unnecessary morbidity and mortality. These findings can guide the development of improved prehospital treatment guidelines, protocols and decision support systems.

  11. Blunt traumatic diaphragmatic rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Nogueira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury of the diaphragm ranges from 0.6 to 1.2% and rise up to 5%among patients who were victims of blunt trauma and underwent laparotomy.Clinical suspicion associated with radiological assessment contributes to earlydiagnosis. Isolated diaphragmatic injury has a good prognosis. Generallyworse outcomes are associated with other trauma injuries. Bilateral andright diaphragmatic lesions have worse prognosis. Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT scan of the chest and abdomen provides better diagnosticaccuracy using the possibility of image multiplanar reconstruction. Surgicalrepair via laparotomy and/ or thoracotomy in the acute phase of the injury hasa better outcome and avoids chronic complications of diaphragmatic hernia.The authors present the case of a young male patient, victim of blunt abdominaltrauma due to motor vehicle accident with rupture of the diaphragm, spleenand kidney injuries. The diagnosis was made by computed tomography of thethorax and abdomen and was confirmed during laparotomy.

  12. Prevalence and Clinical Import of Thoracic Injury Identified by Chest Computed Tomography but Not Chest Radiography in Blunt Trauma: Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdorf, Mark I; Medak, Anthony J; Hendey, Gregory W; Nishijima, Daniel K; Mower, William R; Raja, Ali S; Baumann, Brigitte M; Anglin, Deirdre R; Anderson, Craig L; Lotfipour, Shahram; Reed, Karin E; Zuabi, Nadia; Khan, Nooreen A; Bithell, Chelsey A; Rowther, Armaan A; Villar, Julian; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2015-12-01

    patients with occult injury (of 1,454, 13.9%) had major interventions, 343 of 1,454 (23.6%) had minor interventions, and 909 (62.5%) had no intervention. Patients with occult injury included 514 with pulmonary contusions (of 682 total, 75.4% occult), 405 with pneumothorax (of 597 total, 67.8% occult), 184 with hemothorax (of 230 total, 80.0% occult), those with greater than 2 rib fractures (n=672/1,120, 60.0% occult) or sternal fracture (n=269/281, 95.7% occult), 12 with great vessel injury (of 18 total, 66.7% occult), 5 with diaphragm injury (of 6, 83.3% occult), and 537 with multiple occult injuries. Interventions for patients with occult injury included mechanical ventilation for 31 of 514 patients with pulmonary contusion (6.0%), chest tube for 118 of 405 patients with pneumothorax (29.1%), and 75 of 184 patients with hemothorax (40.8%). Inpatient pain control or observation greater than 24 hours was conducted for 183 of 672 patients with rib fractures (27.2%) and 79 of 269 with sternal fractures (29.4%). Three of 12 (25%) patients with occult great vessel injuries had surgery. Repeated imaging was conducted for 50.6% of patients with occult injury (88.1% chest radiography, 11.9% chest CT, 7.5% both). For patients with occult injury, 90.9% (1,321/1,454) were admitted, with 9.1% observed in the ED for median 6.9 hours. Forty-four percent of observed patients were then admitted (4.0% of patients with occult injury). In a more seriously injured subset of patients with blunt trauma who had both chest radiography and chest CT, occult injuries were found by chest CT in 71% of those with thoracic injuries and one fourth of all those with blunt chest trauma. More than one third of occult injury had intervention (37.5%). Chest tubes composed 76.2% of occult injury major interventions, with observation or inpatient pain control greater than 24 hours in 32.4% of occult fractures. Only 1 in 20 patients with occult injury was discharged home from the ED. For these patients with

  13. Mesenteric thrombosis in patient victim of blunt abdominal trauma with fatal outcome Trombose mesentérica em vítima de trauma abdominal fechado com desfecho fatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Augusto Collaço

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenteric thrombosis related to trauma is an uncommon entity and has poor prognosis when have low flow and hemorrhagic shock. It usually presents with a challenging diagnosis and high mortality rates, despite appropriate treatment. CASE REPORT: Patient with blunt trauma was admitted and initial treatment, complementary exams showed ribs and humerus fractures. Computerized tomography showed aerial distension in small bowels along with gastric stasis and hidropneumothorax. The patient had hypotension during clinical observation and cardiopulmonary arrest, responding to reanimation. Taken to surgery for damage control, it was found extensive necrosis of right colon, which was excised and performed primary anastomosis. He was admitted in the intensive care unit, evolving with oliguria, miosis, convulsion, and pulseless electric activity, dying three days after hospital admission. CONCLUSION: Although uncommon, mesenteric ischemia with venous thrombosis might be secondary to systemic hypotension, frequently followed by fatal outcomes.INTRODUÇÃO: Trombose mesentérica, relacionada a trauma é entidade incomum, com pobre prognóstico quando seguida de estados de baixo fluxo e choque hipovolêmico. Geralmente apresenta-se com quadro de difícil diagnóstico, cuja mortalidade é elevada a despeito de tratamento adequado. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente submetido a trauma, após admissão hospitalar e atendimento inicial, exames radiológicos demonstraram fratura de costela e úmero. Tomografia computadorizada evidenciou distensão aérea em intestino delgado associada à estase gástrica e hidropneumotórax. O paciente evoluiu com hipotensão durante o período de observação clínica e parada cardiorrespiratória que respondeu à reanimação. Levado para operação para controle de danos, encontrou-se extensa necrose de cólon ascendente. Realizou-se hemicolectomia direita com íleotransversostomia. Levado à unidade de terapia intensiva

  14. The Sentinel Clot Sign: a Useful CT Finding for the Evaluation of Intraperitoneal Bladder Rupture Following Blunt Trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Chung, Tae Woong; Yoon, Woong; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kang, Taek Won; Shin, Hee Young [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    To evaluate the frequency and relevance of the 'sentinel clot' sign on CT for patients with traumatic intraperitoneal bladder rupture in a retrospective study. During a recent 42-month period, 74 consecutive trauma patients (45 men, 29 women; age range, 12 84 years; mean age, 50.8 years) with gross hematuria were examined by the use of intravenous contrast enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis, followed by retrograde cystography. Contrast-enhanced CT scanning was performed by using a helical CT scanner. CT images were retrospectively reviewed in consensus by two radiologists. The CT findings including the sentinel clot sign, pelvic fracture, traumatic injury to other abdominal viscera, and the degree of intraperitoneal free fluid were assessed and statistically analyzed using the two-tailed x{sup 2} test. Twenty of the 74 patients had intraperitoneal bladder rupture. The sentinel clot sign was seen for 16 patients (80%) with intraperitoneal bladder rupture and for four patients (7%) without intraperitoneal bladder rupture (p < 0.001). Pelvic fracture was noted in five patients (25%) with intraperitoneal bladder rupture and in 39 patients (72%) without intraperitoneal bladder rupture (p < 0.001). Intraperitoneal free fluid was found in all patients (100%) with intraperitoneal bladder rupture, irrespective of an associated intraabdominal visceral injury, whereas 19 (35%) of the 54 patients without intraperitoneal bladder rupture had intraperitoneal free fluid (p < 0.001). Detection and localization of the sentinel clot sign abutting on the bladder dome may improve the accuracy of CT in the diagnosis of traumatic intraperitoneal bladder rupture, especially when the patients present with gross hematuria.

  15. Management of cirrhotic patients with blunt abdominal trauma: analysis of risk factor of postoperative death with the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Being-Chuan; Fang, Jen-Feng; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Hsu, Yu-Pao

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to analyse the risk factors of mortality in cirrhotic patients with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) underwent laparotomy and the value of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score to predict postoperative death is determined. From July 1993 to June 2005, 34 cirrhotic patients with BAT were reviewed. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation (SD), frequency (percentage), or Pearson correlation coefficient. Predictors were compared by uni- and multiple logistic regression analysis and results were considered statistically significant if Poperating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Of the 34 patients (27 men, 7 women; mean age, 49 years), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 4 to 43 (mean: 14). Of the 34 patients, 12 were treated with nonoperative management (NOM) initially and 4 succeeded and 30 patients (88.2%) eventually required laparotomy. Of the 30 operative patients, 7 died of haemorrhagic shock and the other 6 died of multiple organ failure with a 43.3% mortality rate. Of the 17 survivors after laparotomy, 4 developed intra-abdominal complication, and 3 developed extra-abdominal complication with a 41.2% morbidity rate. On univariate analysis, the significant predictors of surgical mortality were shock at emergency department, damage control laparotomy, ISS and MELD score. On multiple logistic regression analysis, the significant predictors of operative mortality were shock at ED (P=0.021) and MELD score (P=0.012). Analysis by ROC curve identified cirrhotic patients with a MELD score equal to or above 17 as the best cut-off value for predicting postoperative death. Liver cirrhosis with BAT has a high operative rate, low salvage rate of NOM, high surgical mortality and morbidity rate. The MELD score can accurately predict postoperative death and a MELD score equal to or above 17 of our data is at high risk of postoperative death. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Management of blunt splenic injury in a UK major trauma centre and predicting the failure of non-operative management: a retrospective, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stella R; Morris, Louise; Spreadborough, Stephen; Al-Obaydi, Waleed; D'Auria, Marta; White, Hilary; Brooks, Adam J

    2017-06-09

    To review the management of patients >16 years with blunt splenic injury in a single, UK, major trauma centre and identify whether the following are associated with success or failure of non-operative management with selective use of arterial embolization (NOM ± AE): age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), head injury, haemodynamic instability, massive transfusion, radiological hard signs [contrast extravasation or pseudoaneurysm on the initial computed tomography (CT) scan], grade, and presence of intraparenchymal haematoma or splenic laceration. Retrospective, cross-sectional study undertaken between April 2012 and October 2015. Paediatric patients, penetrating splenic trauma, and iatrogenic injuries were excluded. Follow-up was for at least 30 days. 154 patients were included. Median age was 38 years, 77.3% were male, and median ISS was 22. 14/87 (16.1%) patients re-bled following NOM in a median of 2.3 days (IQR 0.8-3.6 days). 8/28 (28.6%) patients re-bled following AE in a median of 2.0 days (IQR 1.3-3.7 days). Grade III-V injuries are a significant predictor of the failure of NOM ± AE (OR 15.6, 95% CI 3.1-78.9, p = 0.001). No grade I injuries and only 3.3% grade II injuries re-bled following NOM ± AE. Age ≥55 years, ISS, radiological hard signs, and haemodynamic instability are not significant predictors of the failure of NOM ± AE, but an intraparenchymal or subcapsular haematoma increases the likelihood of failure 11-fold (OR 10.9, 95% CI 2.2-55.1, p = 0.004). Higher grade injuries (III-V) and intraparenchymal or subcapsular haematomas are associated with a higher failure rate of NOM ± AE and should be managed more aggressively. Grade I and II injuries can be discharged after 24 h with appropriate advice.

  17. Validation of the age-adjusted shock index using pediatric trauma quality improvement program data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Andrew; Coleman, Alan; Shi, Junxin; Wheeler, Krista; Xiang, Henry; Acker, Shannon; Bensard, Denis; Kenney, Brian

    2017-10-12

    In adults, shock index (SI; heart rate/systolic blood pressure) >0.9 predicts injury severity and trauma outcomes. However, age-adjusted shock index (SIPA) out-performs SI in blunt trauma patients 4-16years old. We sought to confirm these findings and expand this tool to include penetrating trauma and children aged 1-4years. We developed cutoff values for patients 1-3years old using age-based vital signs and queried the 2014 Pediatric Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) database for patients aged 1-16years sustaining blunt or penetrating trauma. Outcomes measured included injury severity, transfusion within 24h, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS), and mortality. SI and SIPA were compared using Student's t-test and chi-square tests. We identified 22,344 blunt and 613 penetrating trauma patients. SI was elevated in 41.3% and 40.0% of these groups, respectively, whereas SIPA was elevated in 15.6% and 19.4% of patients. SIPA was a significantly better predictor of transfusion needs, injury severity, ICU admission, ventilator use, and mortality for both blunt and penetrating trauma. SIPA identifies severe injury and predicts transfusion needs and mortality more effectively than SI for both blunt and penetrating pediatric trauma. Further investigation should evaluate its use as a triage tool. Prognosis Study. II. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Horner's syndrome after blunt cervical and chest trauma: case report Síndrome de Horner após trauma cérvico-torácico fechado: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellingson Silva Paiva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Horner‘s syndrome is the triad of miosis, ptosis, and anhidrosis, resulting from disruption of the sympathetic pathways. This article describes an uncommon case of Horner‘s syndrome in a 22-year-old man after blunt trauma to the neck and chest without carotid artery dissection. The patient was brought to the emergency service after motorcycle fall. Neurologic examination revealed a patient presenting the score 15 at Glasgow Coma Scale. The left eyelid was 1-2 mm lower than the right. Carotid Doppler and angiotomography were undertaken and revealed no abnormalities of the carotid artery. CT disclosed a mediastinal hematoma extending to the left apex, compressing the left sympathetic chain. The understanding of this clinical entity may help the surgeon to make a better differential diagnosis in trauma patients in whom prompt diagnosis is critical to stablish the correct treatment.A síndrome de Horner compreende a tríade de miose, ptose e anidrose, resultado de lesão em algum ponto das vias simpáticas. O referido estudo apresenta um caso da referida síndrome em um jovem de 22 anos vitima de queda de moto, com escoriações no tórax e no pescoço, sem dissecção carotídea. Ao exame neurológico, encontrava-se com 15 pontos na Escala de Coma de Glasgow, com miose à esquerda e ptose palpebral ipsilateral. Realizado Doppler de carótidas e angiotomografia dos vasos cérvico-cranianos não sendo evidenciadas anormalidades. A tomografia de tórax mostrou um hematoma no ápice pulmonar esquerdo, comprimindo a cadeia simpática ipsilateral. O conhecimento desta entidade clínica pode ajudar o cirurgião a fazer um diagnóstico diferencial adequado nos pacientes vítimas de traumas, nos quais o diagnóstico correto e eficaz pode ser fundamental para a definição da conduta a ser tomada.

  19. GASTROINTESTINAL INJURIES FROM BLUNT ABDOMINAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-04-04

    Apr 4, 2004 ... ileus, urinary tract infection and chest infection, respectively postoperatively. Mortality was 28%, all of who had associated intraabdominal or extraabdominal injuries. Conclusion: Gastrointestinal injury from blunt abdominal trauma in children, though uncommon, carries a high mortality, usually from ...

  20. GASTROINTESTINAL INJURIES FROM BLUNT ABDOMINAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-04-04

    Apr 4, 2004 ... E. A. Ameh, MBBS, FWACS, Senior Lecturer and Consultant Paediatric Surgeon and P. T. Nmadu, MBBS, FMCS (Nig), FWACS, Professor of Paediatric .... injuries were treated accordingly. Table 1. Age and Sex of 21 children with gastrointestinal injuries from blunt abdominal trauma. Age (years). Sex.

  1. Is routine thromboprophylaxis justified among Indian patients sustaining major orthopedic trauma? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh K Sen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE is one of the most common preventable cause of morbidity and mortality after trauma. Though most of the western countries have their guidelines for thromboprophylaxis in these patients, India still does not have these. The increasing detection of VTE among Indian population, lack of awareness, underestimation of the risk, and fear of bleeding complications after chemical prophylaxis have made deep vein thrombosis (DVT a serious problem, hence a standard guideline for thromboprophylaxis after trauma is essential. The present review article discusses the incidence of DVT and role of thromboprophylaxis in Indian patients who have sustained major orthopedic trauma. A thorough search of ′PubMed′ and ′Google Scholar′ revealed 10 studies regarding venous thromboembolism in Indian patients after major orthopedic trauma surgery (hip or proximal femur fracture and spine injury. Most of these studies have evaluated venous thromboembolism in patients of arthroplasty and trauma. The incidence, risk factors, diagnosis and management of VTE in the subgroup of trauma patients (1049 patients were separately evaluated after segregating them from the arthroplasty patients. Except two studies, which were based on spinal injury, all other studies recommended screening/ thromboprophylaxis in posttraumatic conditions in the Indian population. Color Doppler was used as common diagnostic or screening tool in most of the studies (eight studies, 722 patients. The incidence of VTE among thromboprophylaxis-receiving group was found to be 8% (10/125, whereas it was much higher (14.49%, 40/276 in patients not receiving any form of prophylaxis. Indian patients have definite risk of venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic trauma (except spinal injury, and thromboprophylaxis either by chemical or mechanical methods seems to be justified in them.

  2. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    purpose of this audit was to test this theory, using data from the Trauma Unit at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town. The Trauma Unit at Groote Schuur Hospital ..... significant in predicting both crash incidence and severity.17. Study Limitations. This study gives insight into when busy times are expected and what types of ...

  3. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as an indicator of EMS performance. Postoperative complications were graded according to Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications. Results: A total of 118 patients were admitted to the trauma surgery ward following abdominal trauma. The mechanism was penetrating 101 (85.6%) [stab wounds in 67 (56.8%) ...

  4. One-year follow-up and convalescence evaluated by nuclear medicine studies and 24-hour holter electrocardiogram in 11 patients with myocardial injury due to a blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino, Mari; Yoshioka, Koichiro; Morita, Seiji; Iizuka, Shinichi; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Rie; Aoki, Hiromichi; Aizawa, Toru; Ikari, Yuji; Nasu, Seiji; Hatakeyama, Kenji; Iino, Misako; Kodama, Itsuo; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Tanabe, Teruhisa

    2009-05-01

    There are few reports on long-term convalescence with regard to cardiac injury caused by blunt chest trauma. Nuclear medicine study of the heart (NMSH) in the early stages of injury is reportedly superior to detect the correlation between injury and fatal arrhythmia. Therefore, we prospectively performed NMSH and Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) in the early and chronic stages for a cardiac injury patient, and we longitudinally examined the recovery process and the occurrence of fatal arrhythmia. A total of 202 patients with blunt chest trauma were admitted to our hospital between April 2006 and January 2007. Of 65 patients who were diagnosed with cardiac injury by ECG, a myocardial enzyme, or cardiac ultrasonography, 11 were enrolled in this study because they agreed to outpatient visiting for regular examinations for 1 year. NMSH showed positive findings in 6 of the 11 patients in the acute period of cardiac damage without complete recovery. Among the six patients in whom NMSH showed positive findings, Holter ECG indicated an abnormal finding in two patients in the acute period and in four patients in the chronic period, and detected one patient with a nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the chronic period. Cardiac injuries may exacerbate cardiac functions and lead to fatal arrhythmia during the chronic period. Therefore, evaluating recovery for at least 12 months after myocardial damage is necessary to prevent sudden cardiac death.

  5. Hubungan Antara Penilaian Skor Trauma dan Kematian Pada Trauma Toraks di RSUP H. Adam Malik Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, M Zuhri Nanda Rizki

    2016-01-01

    117102007 Background: Thorax trauma is trauma to the of the thoracic cavity. Traumatic thoracic can be blunt and penetrating trauma. Blunt thoracic trauma could potentially pose a threat to respiratory and cardiac circulation. (Mefire, 2009). The risk factors most important to the death of thoracic trauma include a preliminary assessment score trauma, include the Injury Severity Score (ISS), tinggiSkala Glasgow Coma (SKG) is low, Revised Trauma Score (RTS) and the Trauma Injury Severity Sc...

  6. Blunt traumatic left atrial appendage rupture and cardiac herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhan, Nguyen Huu; Anh, Pham Tho Tuan; Trung, Tran Minh; Pezzella, A Thomas

    2014-06-01

    A 42-year-old man sustained blunt thoracic trauma after a motor vehicle accident. He underwent an urgent operation. Operative findings included a large hematoma, a 4-cm tear in the left atrial appendage, and a long pleuropericardial rupture along the right phrenic nerve. We repaired the left atrial appendage without cardiopulmonary bypass, and closed the pericardial defect primarily. The patient recovered fully and was discharged on the 6th postoperative day. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. TRIAGE OF PATIENTS TO ANGIOGRAPHY FOR DETECTION OF AORTIC RUPTURE AFTER BLUNT CHEST TRAUMA - COST-EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSIS OF USING CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUNINK, MGM; BOS, JJ

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of dynamic chest CT, compared with plain chest radiography and immediate angiography, in deciding when angiography should be performed in hemodynamically stable patients with suspected aortic rupture after blunt chest

  8. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Al Thani, Hassan; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI) are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  9. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Menyar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  10. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... Introduction. Nonoperative management strategies have been suggested for the management of flail chest since the 1950s and most trauma surgeons still follow this approach today.1-4 However, follow-up studies on patients with rib fractures which have been managed nonoperatively have demostrated a ...

  11. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    key trauma procedures following successful completion of ATLS.10 However, it was noted that only 15% of all JDs had completed the ATLS course at the time of study.10 There is currently no literature focusing specifically on reasons for such low completion rate in our developing world setting. The aims of this study were to ...

  12. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  13. ABDOMINAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most common cause of abdominal trauma is blunt trauma, gunshot wounds and stab wounds are rare. Most commonly injured organs in abdominal cavity are the spleen and the liver.Conclusions. Early diagnosis is very important and include precise phisical examination and all available diagnostic methods. The final decission about the method of treatmet depends on patients clinical condition, surgeon’s experience and other local conditions.

  14. Blunt cardiac rupture in a toddler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peep Talving

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Blunt cardiac rupture is typically a fatal injury with overall mortality exceeding 90%. Most of the patients never reach the hospital alive. In pediatric patients, only 0.03% of cases following blunt trauma admissions have a cardiac injury. This report presents a rare survivor of 16-months old toddler injured in a domestic accident suffering a right atrial rupture repaired through a median sternotomy. To the best of our knowledge this is the youngest case reported in the literature.

  15. Interpersonal early-life trauma alters amygdala connectivity and sustained attention performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortenbaugh, Francesca C; Corbo, Vincent; Poole, Victoria; McGlinchey, Regina; Milberg, William; Salat, David; DeGutis, Joseph; Esterman, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Interpersonal early life trauma (I-ELT) is associated with a myriad of functional impairments in adulthood, increased risk of drug addiction, and neuropsychiatric disorders. While deficits in emotional regulation and amygdala functioning are well characterized, deficits in general cognitive functioning have also been documented. However, the neural underpinnings of cognitive dysfunction in adults with a history of I-ELT and the potential relationship between amygdala-based functional connectivity and behavioral performance are currently poorly understood. This study examined how I-ELT affects the cognitive and neural mechanisms supporting sustained attention. A total of 66 Veterans (18 with and 48 without a history of I-ELT) completed a nonemotional sustained attention task during functional MRI. The individuals with I-ELT showed significant impairments in sustained attention (i.e., higher error rates, greater response variability). This cohort exhibited increased amygdala functional connectivity with the prefrontal cortex and decreased functional connectivity with the parahippocampal gyrus when compared to those without I-ELT. These connections were significantly correlated with individual differences in sustained attention performance. Notably, classification analyses revealed that the pattern of amygdala connectivity across the whole brain was able to classify I-ELT status with 70% accuracy. These results provide evidence of a lasting negative impact for those with a history of I-ELT on sustained attention ability. They also highlight a critical role for amygdala functioning in cognitive control and sustained attention for those with a history of I-ELT, which may underlie the observed attention deficits in clinical assessments and cognitive tests involving both emotional and nonemotional stimuli.

  16. Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain and spine injury (TBI/TSI) is a leading cause of death and lifelong disability in children. The biomechanical properties of the child's brain, skull, and spine, the size of the child, the age-specific activity pattern, and variance in trauma mechanisms result in a wide range of age-specific traumas and patterns of brain and spine injuries. A detailed knowledge about the various types of primary and secondary pediatric head and spine injuries is essential to better identify and understand pediatric TBI/TSI, which enhances sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, will guide therapy, and may give important information about the prognosis. The purposes of this chapter are to: (1) discuss the unique epidemiology, mechanisms, and characteristics of TBI/TSI in children; (2) review the anatomic and functional imaging techniques that can be used to study common and rare pediatric TBI/TSI and their complications; (3) comprehensively review frequent primary and secondary brain injuries; and (4) to give a short overview of two special types of pediatric TBI/TSI: birth-related and nonaccidental injuries. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. TRAUMA '

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    who may sustain injury to the wrists, forearm and pelvis or fracture of the ribs from the steering wheel. The driver and other front seat passenger can have lacerations on the face from hitting the windscreen, characteristic bruises and lacerations to the knees and skin from the dashboard or cervical spine injury through ...

  18. Injuries sustained during contact with law enforcement: An analysis from US trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Morgan; Inaba, Kenji; Cho, Jayun; Tatum, James M; Barmparas, Galinos; Strumwasser, Aaron; Grabo, Daniel; Bir, Cynthia; Eastman, Alexander; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-12-01

    Injuries sustained by civilians from interaction with police are a polarizing contemporary sociopolitical issue. Few comprehensive studies have been published using national hospital-based data. The aim of this study was to examine the epidemiology of these injuries to better understand this mechanism of injury. Patients entered into the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) (January 2007 to December 2012) with E-codes E970.0 to E976.0 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification), identifying injuries associated with law enforcement in the course of legal action, were enrolled. Patients' demographics, injury characteristics, procedures, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. Patients injured by other civilians (E960.0-E968.0) were used for comparison. Of 4,146,428 patients in the NTDB, 7,203 (0.17%) were injured during interaction with police. The numbers of patients in consecutive study years were 858, 1,103, 1,148, 1,274, 1,316, and 1,504. The incidence of these injuries was stable over time (0.17-0.18%) (p = 0.129). Patients had a median age of 31 years (range, 0-108), and 94.3% were male. Median injury severity score was 9 (interquartile range [IQR], 4-17). The most common mechanism of injury was gunshot wound (44%).Patients were white, 43%; black, 30%; Hispanic, 17%; Asian, 1%; and Other, 9%. As a proportion of the total race-specific NTDB trauma population, there was an average of 1.13 white patients, 2.71 Hispanic patients, and 3.83 black patients per 1,000. Mechanism, injury severity score, and outcomes did not vary by race. Compared to patients injured by civilians, patients injured by police are more likely to be white (43% vs 25%, p wounds (44% vs 32%, p trauma centers across the United States, the rate of injuries sustained during interactions with police has been stable over time. Gunshot wounds are the most common mechanism of injury. Proportionally, black patients are the most frequently injured race. When compared

  19. Indicadores clínicos e pré-hospitalares de sobrevivência no trauma fechado: uma análise multivariada Indicadores clínicos y prehospitalarios de supervivencia al trauma cerrado: un análisis multivariado Clinical and prehospital survival indicators in blunt trauma: a multivariate analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Aparecida Amaro Malvestio

    2010-06-01

    protector en todos los períodos. Los resultados sugieren que la magnitud de la hipoxemia y la inestabilidad hemodinámica debida a la hemorragia influyeron de manera significativa en la muerte temprana y tardía en este grupo de víctimas.The aim of the study was to identify the clinical and prehospital indicators associated to the survival of blunt trauma victims. The Kaplan Meier survival analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model were used to analyze the association of 33 variables to early and late death, proposing multivariate models. The final models until 48 hours post-trauma showed high rates of risk promoted by abdominal injuries, Injury Severity Score > 25, advanced respiratory procedures and prehospital chest compressions. In the model up to 7 days, a systolic blood pressure in accident site lower than 75mmHg was associated with increased risk of death, and if absent it was associated with higher risk of death after 7 days. The prehospital volume replacement showed a protective effect in all periods. Results suggest that the magnitude of hypoxemia and hemodynamic instability due to bleeding had a significant influence on early and late death in this group of victims.

  20. Complete biliary avulsion from blunt compression injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkovitz, M S; Liang, H; Pachter, H L; Alexander, P; Newman, R M; Gittes, G K

    1999-10-01

    The liver is the solid organ most commonly injured as a result of blunt abdominal trauma. Complete avulsion of the common hepatic duct is a rare and devastating type of hepatobiliary trauma. Here the authors report the case of a 7-year-old child who had complete biliary disruption as a result of an abdominal crush injury that was not diagnosed correctly preoperatively. The intraoperative diagnosis and treatment of this injury is discussed.

  1. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 2: Gastrointestinal tract and retroperitoneal organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Schmidlin, F. [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    1998-06-02

    Computed tomography plays an important role in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in adults. Current standard examination techniques enable detection of the majority of perforating or devascularizing bowel injuries, although diagnostic findings are often subtle and meticulous inspection is required. Computed tomography may demonstrate pancreatic contusions and lacerations and help in distinguishing minor traumatic lesions without involvement of the pancreatic duct (organ injury scale, grades I and II) from deep lacerations with ductal involvement (grades III and V). Computed tomography enables distinguishing renal contusions and minor cortical lacerations that can usually be managed conservatively (injuries of grades I-III) from corticomedullary lacerations and injuries of the major renal vessels (grades IV and V) that have a less favorable prognosis and more commonly require surgical repair. In addition, CT is well suited for the detection of active renal hemorrhage and guidance of transcatheter embolization treatment and delineation of preexisting benign or malignant pathologies that may predispose to posttraumatic hemorrhage. The radiologist`s awareness of the diagnostic CT findings of abdominal visceral injuries as well as their clinical and surgical implications are important prerequisites for optimal patient management. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 56 refs.

  2. Duodenal Transection without Pancreatic Injury following Blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    accident due to head on collision between a bus and truck. Patient was admitted at a nearby hospital and ... abdominal trauma is uncommon and can pose a formidable challenge to the surgeon and failure to manage it ... Injury to the duodenum following a blunt force can occur either by crushing the duodenum against the ...

  3. Análise comparativa entre as lesões encontradas em motociclistas envolvidos em acidentes de trânsito e vítimas de outros mecanismos de trauma fechado Comparative analysis of injuries observed in motorcycle riders involved in traffic accidents and victims of other blunt trauma mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gustavo Parreira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar uma análise comparativa entre as lesões encontradas em motociclistas envolvidos em acidentes de trânsito e vítimas de outros mecanismos de trauma fechado. MÉTODOS: Análise dos protocolos (colhidos prospectivamente dos traumatizados com idade superior a 13 anos, admitidos de 10/06/2008 a 01/09/2009, vítimas de trauma fechado. Foram coletadas informações sobre mecanismo de trauma, dados vitais à admissão, exames complementares, lesões e tratamento. A estratificação da gravidade do trauma e das lesões foi realizada pelo cálculo dos índices de trauma: RTS, escala de coma de Glasgow (ECG, AIS, ISS e TRISS. Comparamos as variáveis entre os motociclistas (grupo A e os demais (grupo B. Consideramos graves as lesões com AIS > 3. Para a análise estatística, utilizamos os testes t de Student, Mann Whitney, qui-quadrado e Fisher, considerando p OBJECTIVE: To conduct a comparative analysis of the lesions found among motorcycle riders involved in traffic accidents and victims of other mechanisms of blunt trauma. METHODS: Analysis of data prospectively collected on protocols for trauma patients older than 13 years, admitted from 06/10/2008 to 09/01/2009, victims of blunt trauma. Data collected included trauma mechanism, vital signs at admission, laboratory tests, injuries, and treatment.Stratification of trauma and lesion severity was performed by calculating the trauma index: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Revised Trauma Score (RTS, Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS, Injury Severity Score (ISS and TRISS. We compared the variables between motorcycle riders (group A and the others (group B. Severe injuries were considered when AIS > 3. For statistical analysis, we used Student's t, Mann Whitney, chi-square and Fisher's test, with p < 0.05 considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The study included 3,783 blunt trauma victims, aged 14 to 99 years, of which 76.0% were males. The most frequent trauma mechanisms were accidents

  4. Dual-phase CT for the assessment of acute vascular injuries in high-energy blunt trauma: the imaging findings and management implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobellis, Francesca; Ierardi, Anna M; Mazzei, Maria A; Magenta Biasina, Alberto; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Nicola, Refky; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Acute vascular injuries are the second most common cause of fatalities in patients with multiple traumatic injuries; thus, prompt identification and management is essential for patient survival. Over the past few years, multidetector CT (MDCT) using dual-phase scanning protocol has become the imaging modality of choice in high-energy deceleration traumas. The objective of this article was to review the role of dual-phase MDCT in the identification and management of acute vascular injuries, particularly in the chest and abdomen following multiple traumatic injuries. In addition, this article will provide examples of MDCT features of acute vascular injuries with correlative surgical and interventional findings.

  5. Correção de aneurisma do tronco braquiocefálico, 10 anos após traumatismo torácico fechado Correction of an innominate artery aneurysm, 10 years after a blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Almeida Lopes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aneurismas do tronco braquiocefálico são extremamente raros. Os autores apresentam o caso clínico de um doente de 22 anos de idade, com antecedente de atropelamento de alta energia há cerca de 10 anos por motociclo, com traumatismo toraco-abdominal anterior, em quem foi acidentalmente descoberto um aneurisma do tronco braquiocefálico com 52mm. Para a exclusão do referido aneurisma o doente foi submetido com sucesso à construção de um bypass aorta ascendente-carotídio-subclávio com prótese bifurcada de Dacron® (14x7mm, com abordagem por esternotomia mediana, cervical e supra-clavicular. É feita uma revisão da literatura, sendo descritas e discutidas as características clínicas, o tratamento cirúrgico e o mecanismo de traumatismo torácico sobre o tronco braquiocefálico.Innominate artery aneurysms are extremely rare. The authors present a case report of a 22-year-old patient, in whom was accidently discovered an innominate artery aneurysm of 52 mm, 10 years after a blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma caused by a high energy running over by a motorcycle. For the exclusion of the aneurysm, the patient was successfully submitted to the construction of an ascending aorta-carotid-subclavian bypass with bifurcated Dacron® graft (14x7mm, by means of a median sternotomy, right cervical and supra-clavicular approaches. Review of the literature, clinical features, surgical treatment and chest trauma mechanisms over the innominate artery are described and discussed.

  6. Efficacy of Blunt Force Trauma, a Novel Mechanical Cervical Dislocation Device, and a Non-Penetrating Captive Bolt Device for On-Farm Euthanasia of Pre-Weaned Kits, Growers, and Adult Commercial Meat Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Walsh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The commercial meat rabbit industry is without validated on-farm euthanasia methods, potentially resulting in inadequate euthanasia protocols. We evaluated blunt force trauma (BFT, a mechanical cervical dislocation device (MCD, and a non-penetrating captive bolt device (NPCB for euthanasia of pre-weaned kits, growers, and adult rabbits. Trials were conducted on three commercial meat rabbit farms using 170 cull rabbits. Insensibility was assessed by evaluating absence of brainstem and spinal reflexes, rhythmic breathing, and vocalizations. Survey radiographs on a subsample of rabbits (n = 12 confirmed tissue damage prior to gross dissection and microscopic evaluation. All 63 rabbits euthanized by the NPCB device were rendered immediately and irreversibly insensible. The MCD device was effective in 46 of 49 (94% rabbits. Method failure was highest for BFT with euthanasia failures in 13 of 58 (22% rabbits. Microscopically, brain sections from rabbits killed with the NPCB device had significantly more damage than those from rabbits killed with BFT (p = 0.001. We conclude that BFT is neither consistently humane nor effective as a euthanasia method. MCD is an accurate and reliable euthanasia method generally causing clean dislocation and immediate and irreversible insensibility, and the NPCB device was 100% effective and reliable in rabbits >150 g.

  7. [Trauma during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenga, J; van der Schoot, J T; Keeman, J N

    1999-05-29

    Mortality due to trauma in pregnancy is not very common in the Netherlands. More often a pregnant woman presents herself for examination after trauma. Blunt trauma is more common in the third trimester. Minor trauma also needs good care, with special attention for solutio placentae. Maternal mortality after penetrating trauma is low because of the protection of vital organs by the uterus. With good treatment the mortality in pregnant trauma patients will not be higher than in nonpregnant patients. A rapid and effective resuscitation of the mother will give the foetus the best chance of survival.

  8. A CLINICAL STUDY ON BLUNT INJURY ABDOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kishore Babu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Abdominal trauma continues to account for a large number of trauma-related injuries and deaths. Motor vehicle accidents and urban violence, respectively, are the leading causes of blunt and penetrating trauma to this area of the body. Unnecessary deaths and complications can be minimized by improved resuscitation, evaluation and treatment. The new techniques and diagnostic tools available are important in the management of abdominal trauma. These improved methods, however, still depend on experience and clinical judgment for application and determination of the best care for the injured patient. The aim of the study is to 1. Analyse the incidence, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, indications for laparotomy, therapeutic methods and morbidity & mortality rates. 2. To study nature of blunt abdominal trauma. 3. To assess patient for surgical intervention and to avoid negative laparotomy. 4. To assess morbidity rate in different organs injury. 5. To evaluate modalities of treatment, complications and prognosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study is a prospective study on 97 patients with Blunt injuries to the abdomen admitted in S.V.R.R.G.G. Hospital, Tirupati during October 2013-15. Inclusion Criteria Patients > 13 years, with Blunt injury to abdomen either by RTA, fall, object contact, assault giving written informed consent. Exclusion Criteria Patients <13 yrs. Blunt injuries due to blasts, patients with severe cardiothoracic and head injuries who are hemodynamically unstable. CONCLUSION Blunt Trauma to abdomen is on rise due to excessive use of motor vehicles. It poses a therapeutic and diagnostic dilemma for the attending surgeon due to wide range of clinical manifestations ranging from no early physical findings to progression to shock. So, the Trauma surgeon should rely on his physical findings in association with use of modalities like x-ray abdomen, USG abdomen and abdominal paracentesis. Hollow viscus perforations are

  9. Geriatric Trauma: A Radiologist's Guide to Imaging Trauma Patients Aged 65 Years and Older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadro, Claudia T; Sandstrom, Claire K; Verma, Nupur; Gunn, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    Radiologists play an important role in evaluation of geriatric trauma patients. Geriatric patients have injury patterns that differ markedly from those seen in younger adults and are susceptible to serious injury from minor trauma. The spectrum of trauma in geriatric patients includes head and spine injury, chest and rib trauma, blunt abdominal injury, pelvic fractures, and extremity fractures. Clinical evaluation of geriatric trauma patients is difficult because of overall frailty, comorbid illness, and medication effects. Specific attention should be focused on the effects of medications in this population, including anticoagulants, steroids, and bisphosphonates. Radiologists should use age-appropriate algorithms for radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging of geriatric trauma patients and follow guidelines for intravenous contrast agent administration in elderly patients with impaired renal function. Because there is less concern about risk for cancer with use of ionizing radiation in this age group, CT is the primary imaging modality used in the setting of geriatric trauma. Clinical examples are provided from the authors' experience at a trauma center where geriatric patients who have sustained major and minor injuries are treated daily. ©RSNA, 2015.

  10. MR imaging for blunt pancreatic injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Lin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Zhang Xiaoming, E-mail: cjr.zhxm@vip.163.co [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Xu Xiaoxue; Tang Wei; Xiao Bo; Zeng Nanlin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Objective: To study the MR imaging features of blunt pancreatic injury. Materials and methods: Nine patients with pancreatic injury related to blunt abdominal trauma confirmed by surgery performed MR imaging. Two abdominal radiologists conducted a review of the MR images to assess pancreatic parenchymal and pancreatic duct injury, and associated complications. Result: Diagnostic quality MR images were obtained in each of the nine patients. In the nine patients, pancreatic fracture, laceration and contusion were depicted on MR imaging in five, one and three patients, respectively. There were six patients with pancreatic duct disruption, eight patients with peripancreatic fluid collections, and four patients with peripancreatic pseudocyst or hematoma, respectively. All of the MR imaging findings was corresponded to surgical findings. Conclusion: MR imaging is an effective method to detect blunt pancreatic injury and may provide information to guide management decisions.

  11. Levosimendan no tratamento da contusão miocárdica grave pós-trauma torácico fechado: relato de caso = Levosimendan treatment for severe myocardial contusion after blunt chest trauma: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Benincasa, Cristian Chassot

    2007-01-01

    Introdução: a contusão miocárdica é causada usualmente por trauma torácico fechado, principalmente em pacientes com história de acidente de carro ou moto. Os pacientes com manifestações clínicas graves devem manejados com intubação, reposição volêmica, vasopressor e inotrópicos. O levosimendan é uma nova droga com ação inodilatadora, que age sensibilizando os canais de cálcio. O objetivo deste relato é documentar o tratamento de um caso de choque cardiogênico secundário a contusão miocárdica,...

  12. Should we perform a FAST exam in haemodynamically stable patients presenting after blunt abdominal injury : A retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammers, D.; El Moumni, M.; Hoogland, I. I.; Veeger, N.; ter Avest, E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Focussed Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) is a bedside ultrasonography technique used to detect free intraperitoneal fluid in patients presenting with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) in the emergency department. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study we investigated the

  13. ATLS adherence in the transfer of rural trauma patients to a level I facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrum, Marta L; McKee, Jessica; Lai, Michael; Staples, John; Switzer, Noah; Widder, Sandy L

    2013-09-01

    Injury sustained in rural areas has been shown to carry higher mortality rates than trauma in urban settings. This disparity is partially attributed to increased distance from definitive care and underscores the importance of proper primary trauma management prior to transfer to a trauma facility. The purpose of this study was to assess Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guideline adherence in the management of adult trauma patients transferred from rural hospitals to a level I facility. We performed a retrospective analysis of all adult major trauma patients transferred ≥50km from an outlying hospital to a level I trauma centre from 2007 through 2009. Transfer practices were evaluated using ATLS guidelines. 646 patients were analyzed. Mean age was 40.5years and 94% sustained blunt injuries with a median Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 22. Median transport distance was 253km. Among all patients, there were notable deficiencies (ATLS recommended interventions, including patient rewarming (8% adherence), chest tube insertion (53%), adequate IV access (53%), and motor/sensory exam (72%). Patients with higher ISS scores, and those transferred by air were more likely to receive ATLS recommended interventions. Key aspects of ATLS resuscitation guidelines are frequently missed during transfer of trauma patients from the periphery to level I trauma centres. Comprehensive quality improvement initiatives, including targeted education, telemedicine and trauma team training programmes could improve quality of care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of radiographically confirmed blunt-mechanism facial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundinger, Gerhard S; Dorafshar, Amir H; Gilson, Marta M; Mithani, Suhail K; Kelamis, Joseph A; Christy, Michael R; Manson, Paul N; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2014-01-01

    Facial fractures resulting from blunt-mechanism trauma, although common, have been infrequently evaluated in large studies that do not include confirmation of fractures based on author review of available patient radiographic studies. An 8-year review (1998-2006) of the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Registry was performed with institutional review board approval. Patients diagnosed with blunt-mechanism facial fractures were identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes and their facial fractures confirmed by author review of computed tomographic scans. Individual fractures were classified and grouped according to the facial thirds. Intra- and interreader variability was calculated, and confirmed fracture patterns were compared to fracture patterns listed by ICD-9 codes. Concomitant injuries and demographic data were additionally evaluated. Four thousand three hundred ninety-eight patients with 8127 fractures were identified. Intra- and interreader variability was 2% and 7%, respectively. ICD-9 coding misdiagnosed 12.5% of all fractures. Eighty-two percent of patients sustained associated injuries, including basilar skull fractures (7.6%) and cervical spine fractures (6.6%). 1.1% had at least one fracture in each facial third (panfacial fracture pattern). Significant relationships were found between demographic parameters, concomitant injuries, specific fractures, and fracture patterns. Studies investigating facial fractures should report fracture patterns confirmed by author review of available radiographic imaging. Large retrospective data sets containing confirmed fractures and capable of addressing rare fracture patterns can be compiled with low inter- and intrauser variability, and are useful for generating mechanistic hypotheses suitable for evaluation in prospective series or by directed biomechanical studies.

  15. Limitation of life-sustaining treatment in severe trauma in the elderly after admission to an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñasco, Y; González-Castro, A; Rodríguez Borregán, J C; Ortiz-Lasa, M; Jáuregui Solórzano, R; Sánchez Arguiano, M J; Escudero Acha, P

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the factors associated to limitation of life-sustaining treatment (LLST) measures in elderly patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) due to trauma. A retrospective, descriptive, observational study was carried out. ICU. A total of 149 patients aged 65 years or older admitted to the ICU due to trauma. Hospital mortality, the decision to limit life-sustaining treatment and the factors associated to these measures were analyzed. None. The mean patient age was 76.3±6.36 years. The average APACHE II and ISS scores were 15.9±7.4 and 19.6±11.4 points, respectively. LLST were used in 37 patients (24.8%). Factors associated to the use of these measures were patient age (OR 1.16; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.25], APACHE II score (OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.05-1.67), ISS score (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.06), admission due to neurological impairment (OR 19.17; 95% CI 2.33 to 157.83) and traumatic brain injury (OR 2.89; 95% CI 1.05 to 7.96). LLST is frequently established in elderly patients admitted to the ICU due to trauma, and is associated to hospital mortality. Factors associated with the use of these measures are patient age, higher APACHE II and ISS scores, admission due to neurological impairment, and the presence of head injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Sonography of scrotal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meka Srinivasa Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to depict the spectrum of scrotal injuries in blunt trauma. Scrotal injuries are not very common and are mostly due to blunt trauma from direct injury, sports injuries or motor vehicle accidents. To minimize complications and ensure testicular salvage, rapid and accurate diagnosis is necessary. High-resolution USG is the investigation of choice, as it is readily available, accurate and has been seen to improve outcomes. An understanding of and familiarity with the sonographic appearance of scrotal injuries on the part of the radiologist/sonographer is therefore of key importance.

  17. Thoracic duct injury from blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, G P; Bhatti, N A; Ellison, R G; Rubin, J W; Moore, H V

    1984-05-01

    We have reported a case of traumatic chylothorax occurring as a rare complication of fracture dislocation of the dorsal spine. When conservative management by drainage, low-fat diet, and parenteral alimentation proved unsuccessful, thoracic duct ligation effected a cure.

  18. Blunt Liver Trauma In Mulago Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2004-12-02

    Dec 2, 2004 ... classification of the liver injuries, 24 patients had class I (Table 4). In 28 patients, nothing was done at laparotomy (Table 5). Postoperatively, 40 patients had fever. There were 10 deaths (Table 6). According to Calne's classification there were 4 deaths in class II, 3 in class IV and 2 in class V (Table 7).

  19. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured - A Retrospective Multicentre Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Hanschen

    Full Text Available Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients.In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009, characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6, the revised injury severity score (RISC allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6 (2.3% of patients.Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%. The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1 and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6 are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6 is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49 of the study collective.Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients' outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury.

  20. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured - A Retrospective Multicentre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanschen, Marc; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Khalil, Philipe N; Wierer, Matthias; van Griensven, Martijn; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Biberthaler, Peter; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients. In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009), characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6), the revised injury severity score (RISC) allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6) (2.3% of patients). Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%). The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1) and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6) are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6) is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively) as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49) of the study collective. Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients' outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury.

  1. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured – A Retrospective Multicentre Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanschen, Marc; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Khalil, Philipe N.; Wierer, Matthias; van Griensven, Martijn; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Biberthaler, Peter; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients. Methods In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009), characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6), the revised injury severity score (RISC) allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6) (2.3% of patients). Results Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%). The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1) and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6) are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6) is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively) as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49) of the study collective. Conclusion Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients’ outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury. PMID:26136126

  2. Hemobilia. An unusual complication of liver trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baeza Herrera Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemobilia is a complication following a hepatic trauma. It is common in adults, but it is very rare in children. Clinically it is characterized by a triad including jaundice, inter- mittent abdominal pain and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Case report. We report a case of hemobilia in a four-year-old boy who sustained an abdominal blunt trauma caused by a motor vehicle. He had to be operated. A laparotomy disclosed a ruptured spleen which required a splenorraphy. He was subsequently discharged. Eighteen days later he was readmitted presenting with the classic triad. A computed tomography (CT scan showed an image sug- gestive of hemobilia. Management was conservative. The child had an uneventful course.

  3. A comparison of functional outcome in patients sustaining major trauma: a multicentre, prospective, international study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy H Rainer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare 6 month and 12 month health status and functional outcomes between regional major trauma registries in Hong Kong and Victoria, Australia. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Multicentres from trauma registries in Hong Kong and the Victorian State Trauma Registry (VSTR. METHODS: Multicentre, prospective cohort study. Major trauma patients and aged ≥18 years were included. The main outcome measures were Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE functional outcome and risk-adjusted Short-Form 12 (SF-12 health status at 6 and 12 months after injury. RESULTS: 261 cases from Hong Kong and 1955 cases from VSTR were included. Adjusting for age, sex, ISS, comorbid status, injury mechanism and GCS group, the odds of a better functional outcome for Hong Kong patients relative to Victorian patients at six months was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.66, 1.17, and at 12 months was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.12. Adjusting for age, gender, ISS, GCS, injury mechanism and comorbid status, Hong Kong patients demonstrated comparable mean PCS-12 scores at 6-months (adjusted mean difference: 1.2, 95% CI: -1.2, 3.6 and 12-months (adjusted mean difference: -0.4, 95% CI: -3.2, 2.4 compared to Victorian patients. Keeping age, gender, ISS, GCS, injury mechanism and comorbid status, there was no difference in the MCS-12 scores of Hong Kong patients compared to Victorian patients at 6-months (adjusted mean difference: 0.4, 95% CI: -2.1, 2.8 or 12-months (adjusted mean difference: 1.8, 95% CI: -0.8, 4.5. CONCLUSION: The unadjusted analyses showed better outcomes for Victorian cases compared to Hong Kong but after adjusting for key confounders, there was no difference in 6-month or 12-month functional outcomes between the jurisdictions.

  4. Renal Trauma from Recreational Accidents Manifests Different Injury Patterns than Urban Renal Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Granville L.; Slack, Sean; McWilliams, Kelly L.; Black, Aaron; Nicholson, Tristan M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The majority of blunt renal trauma is a consequence of motor vehicle collisions and falls. Prior publications based on urban series have shown that significant renal injuries are almost always accompanied by gross hematuria alone or microscopic hematuria with concomitant hypotension. We present a series of blunt renal trauma sustained during recreational pursuits, and describe the mechanisms, injury patterns and management. Materials and Methods Database review from 1996 to 2009 identified 145 renal injuries. Children younger than age 16 years, and trauma involving licensable motor vehicles, penetrating injuries and work related injuries were excluded from analysis. Grade, hematuria, hypotension, age, gender, laterality, mechanism, management, injury severity score and associated injuries were recorded. Results We identified 106 patients meeting the criteria and 85% of the injuries were snow sport related. Age range was 16 to 76 years and 92.5% of patients were male. There were 39 grade 1 injuries, 30 grade 2, 22 grade 3, 12 grade 4 and 3 grade 5 injuries. Gross hematuria was present in 56.7%, 77.2% and 83.3% of grade 2, grade 3 and grade 4 injuries, respectively. None of the patients with grade 2 or greater injuries and microscopic hematuria had hypotension except 1 grade 5 pedicle injury. The nephrectomy and renorrhaphy rate for grade 1 to grade 4 injuries was 0%. Conclusions Compared to urban series of blunt renal trauma, recreationally acquired injuries appear to follow different patterns, including a paucity of associated injuries or hypotension. If imaging were limited to the presence of gross hematuria, or microscopic hematuria with hypotension, 23% of grade 2 to grade 4 injuries would be missed. Men are at higher risk than women. However, operative intervention is rarely helpful. PMID:22591969

  5. Ultrasonography in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) protocol is considered beneficial in emergent evaluation of trauma patients with blunt or penetrating injury and has become integrated into the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocol. No guidelines exist as to the use...... of ultrasonography in trauma in Denmark. We aimed to determine the current use of ultrasonography for assessing trauma patients in Denmark. METHODS: We conducted a nation-wide cross-sectional investigation of ultrasonography usage in trauma care. The first phase consisted of an Internet-based investigation....... Twenty-one (95.5%) of the guidelines included and recommended FAST as part of trauma assessment. The recommended person to perform the examination was the radiologist in n = 11 (50.0%), the surgeon in n = 6 (27.3%), the anesthesiologist in n = 1 (4.5%), and unspecified in n = 3 (13.6%) facilities. FAST...

  6. Blunt injury of the infrarenal inferior vena cava — imaging and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blunt injury of the infrarenal inferior vena cava — imaging and conservative management. Ian C Duncan, Basil J Sher, Leslie M Fingleson. Abstract. Isolated rupture of the infrarenal segment of the inferior vena cava due to blunt trauma is relatively rare. It may be missed clinically and even diagnostic peritoneal lavage may ...

  7. NK1.1+ cells promote sustained tissue injury and inflammation after trauma with hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuhua; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Scott, Melanie; Manson, Joanna; Loughran, Patricia; Ramadan, Mostafa; Demetris, Anthony J; Billiar, Timothy R

    2017-07-01

    Various cell populations expressing NK1.1 contribute to innate host defense and systemic inflammatory responses, but their role in hemorrhagic shock and trauma remains uncertain. NK1.1+ cells were depleted by i.p. administration of anti-NK1.1 (or isotype control) on two consecutive days, followed by hemorrhagic shock with resuscitation and peripheral tissue trauma (HS/T). The plasma levels of IL-6, MCP-1, alanine transaminase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were measured at 6 and 24 h. Histology in liver and gut were examined at 6 and 24 h. The number of NK cells, NKT cells, neutrophils, and macrophages in liver, as well as intracellular staining for TNF-α, IFN-γ, and MCP-1 in liver cell populations were determined by flow cytometry. Control mice subjected to HS/T exhibited end organ damage manifested by marked increases in circulating ALT, AST, and MCP-1 levels, as well as histologic evidence of hepatic necrosis and gut injury. Although NK1.1+ cell-depleted mice exhibited a similar degree of organ damage as nondepleted animals at 6 h, NK1.1+ cell depletion resulted in marked suppression of both liver and gut injury by 24 h after HS/T. These findings indicate that NK1.1+ cells contribute to the persistence of inflammation leading to end organ damage in the liver and gut. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  8. Operation Brain Trauma Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    OBTT.85 However, blunting of hyperglycemia that is seen in CNS insults could play some role in the observed benefit. 18 Beam Balance Days Post...62. Abrahamson EE, Ikonomovic MD, Dixon CE, DeKosky ST. Simvastatin therapy prevents brain trauma- induced increases in β-amyloid peptide levels

  9. Implementation and Analysis of Initial Trauma Registry in Iquitos, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Duron

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Peru, 11% of deaths are due to trauma. Iquitos is a large underserved Peruvian city isolated from central resources by its geography. Our objective was to implement a locally driven trauma registry to sustainably improve trauma healthcare in this region. Methods: All trauma patients presenting to the main regional referral hospital were included in the trauma registry. A pilot study retrospectively analyzed data from the first two months after implementation. Results: From March to April 2013, 572 trauma patients were entered into the database. Average age was 26.9 years. Ten percent of patients presented more than 24 hours after injury. Most common mechanisms of injury were falls (25.5%, motor vehicle collisions (23.3%, and blunt assault (10.5%. Interim analysis revealed that 99% of patients were entered into the database. However, documentation of vital signs was poor: 42% of patients had temperature, 26% had oxygen saturation documented. After reporting to registry staff, a significant increase in temperature (42 to 97%, P < 0.001 and oxygen saturation (26 to 92%, P < 0.001 documentation was observed. Conclusion: A trauma registry is possible to implement in a resource-poor setting. Future efforts will focus on analysis of data to enhance prevention and treatment of injuries in Iquitos.

  10. MAIN CONTROVERSIES IN THE NONOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF BLUNT SPLENIC INJURIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARLOTTO, Jorge Roberto Marcante; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; COLLEONI-NETO, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : The nonoperative management of traumatic spleen injuries is the modality of choice in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and hemodynamic stability. However, there are still questions about the treatment indication in some groups of patients, as well as its follow-up. Aim: Update knowledge about the spleen injury. Method : Was performed review of the literature on the nonoperative management of blunt injuries of the spleen in databases: Cochrane Library, Medline and SciELO. Were evaluated articles in English and Portuguese, between 1955 and 2014, using the headings "splenic injury, nonoperative management and blunt abdominal trauma". Results : Were selected 35 articles. Most of them were recommendation grade B and C. Conclusion : The spleen traumatic injuries are frequent and its nonoperative management is a worldwide trend. The available literature does not explain all aspects on treatment. The authors developed a systematization of care based on the best available scientific evidence to better treat this condition. PMID:27120744

  11. Non-operative management of renal trauma in very young children: experiences from a dedicated South African paediatric trauma unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Alex; Lazarus, John; Sebastian van As, A B

    2012-09-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma results in renal injury in 10% of paediatric cases. Over the last twenty years, the management of paediatric renal trauma has shifted towards a primarily non-operative approach that is now well-established for children up to 18 years old. This retrospective study reviews our experiences of non-operatively managing blunt renal trauma in a very young cohort of patients up to 11 years old. Between June 2006 and June 2010, 118 children presented to the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town with blunt abdominal trauma. 16 patients shown to have sustained renal injury on abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed for the mechanism of injury, severity of renal injury, clinical presentation, associated injuries, management method and clinical outcomes. All renal injuries were graded (I-V) according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Organ Injury Severity Scale. All renal trauma patients included in this study were aged between 1 and 11 years (mean of 6.5 years). 1 patient sustained grade V injuries; 2 grade IV, 6 grade III and 7 grade I injuries. The majority of injuries (9/16) were caused by motor vehicle crashes, whilst 5 children fell from height, 1 was struck by a falling tree and 1 hit by a moving train. 1 of 16 patients was haemodynamically unstable on presentation as a result of multiple splenic and hepatic lacerations. He was resuscitated and underwent immediate laparotomy. However, his renal injuries were not indications for surgical management. 15 haemodynamically stable patients were non-operatively managed for their renal injuries. Following lengths of admissions ranging from 4 to 132 days, all 16 patients were successfully discharged with no mortalities. No significant complications of renal trauma, such as new-onset hypertension, were detected during their first follow up outpatient appointments. Our findings successfully extend non

  12. Determinants of splenectomy in splenic injuries following blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spleen is the most commonly injured abdominal organ following blunt abdominal trauma.1-3 Management of splenic ... surgery for those operated on, packed cell volume at presen- tation, pre-operative transfusion, .... from a height, possibly as a result of the high energy transfer on impact causing physiological damage ...

  13. Use of urethral catheters for diagnostic peritoneal lavage in blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL) has been reported to be a reliable diagnostic tool in assessing the need for liparotomy in blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) with a diagnostic accuracy of more thin 95% when using a peritoneal lavage catheter (PLC). The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic ...

  14. Determinants of splenectomy in splenic injuries following blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Files of 55 patients managed for isolated splenic injuries from blunt abdominal trauma between 1998 and 2007 were retrospectively analysed using a pro forma. Management options were classified into nonoperative, operative salvage and splenectomy. Results. The majority of patients suffered splenic injury as a result of ...

  15. Non‑operative Management of Gallbladder Perforation After Blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolated gallbladder perforations following blunt abdominal trauma are very rare. They often present with insidious onset of symptoms a few days after the initial insult and an operative course of management ensues. This is in the form of a cholecystectomy and peritoneal lavage; more often via laparotomy rather than ...

  16. Original article Accuracy of Ultrasound Diagnosis after Blunt Scrotal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    specificity for the diagnosis of testicular rupture after blunt scrotal trauma. Moreover, tunica ... emergency scrotal US examination with the use of a 7.5-10 MHz linear transducer. US findings ... a focal area of altered echogenicity within the testis ...

  17. Perioperative care of a pregnant trauma victim: a review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-03

    May 3, 2004 ... Key words: Pregnancy, trauma, abdominal trauma, head injury, cervical spine injury, fetal injury, gun shot wounds, blunt trauma, motor vehicle accidents, falls, violent assaults, .... ventilation for both, the airway control and control of the in- tracranial pressure. However, trauma victims with “good”. GCS's can ...

  18. Urological injuries following trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N. [Department of Urology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Fotheringham, T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  19. THE BLUNT LIVER TRAUMA—REVIEW OF CURRENT DIAGNOSTIC AND MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doklestic Krstina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The liver is one of the most commonly injured organs in blunt abdominal trauma. Major liver trauma in polytraumatic patients accounts for significant morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic options for blunt hepatic trauma include both non-operative and operative management. Hemodynamic status, not the grade of the injury, should dictate the management. CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis is a standard diagnostic modality in hemodynamically stable trauma patients. Recent advancements in imaging studies and enhanced critical care strategies have shifted the paradigm for the management of liver injuries. Nonoperative management of both low- and high-grade injuries can be successful in hemodynamically stable patients. Direct suture of bleeding vessels, vascular isolation of the liver, and damage control surgery have improved outcomes in the hemodynamically unstable patients.We have reviewed current position in the treatment of blunt hepatic trauma.

  20. Does hemopericardium after chest trauma mandate sternotomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Chad M; Namias, Nicholas; Van Haren, Robert M; Guarch, Gerardo A; Ginzburg, Enrique; Salerno, Tomas A; Schulman, Carl I; Livingstone, Alan S; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2012-06-01

    Recently, three patients with hemopericardium after severe chest trauma were successfully managed nonoperatively at our institution. This prompted the question whether these were rare or common events. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with similar injuries to test the hypothesis that trauma-induced hemopericardium mandates sternotomy. Records were retrospectively reviewed for all patients at a Level I trauma center (December 1996 to November 2011) who sustained chest trauma with pericardial window (PCW, n = 377) and/or median sternotomy (n = 110). Fifty-five (15%) patients with positive PCW proceeded to sternotomy. Penetrating injury was the dominant mechanism (n = 49, 89%). Nineteen (35%) were hypotensive on arrival or during initial resuscitation. Most received surgeon-performed focused cardiac ultrasound examinations (n = 43, 78%) with positive results (n = 25, 58%). Ventricular injuries were most common, with equivalent numbers occurring on the right (n = 16, 29%) and left (n = 15, 27%). Six (11%) with positive PCW had isolated pericardial lacerations, but 21 (38%) had no repairable cardiac or great vessel injury. Those with therapeutic versus nontherapeutic sternotomies were similar with respect to age, mechanisms of injury, injury severity scores, presenting laboratory values, resuscitation fluids, and vital signs. Multiple logistic regression revealed that penetrating trauma (odds ratio: 13.3) and hemodynamic instability (odds ratio: 7.8) were independent predictors of therapeutic sternotomy. Hemopericardium per se may be overly sensitive for diagnosing cardiac or great vessel injuries after chest trauma. Some stable blunt or penetrating trauma patients without continuing intrapericardial bleeding had nontherapeutic sternotomies, suggesting that this intervention could be avoided in selected cases. Therapeutic study, level III. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  1. Trauma in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Kenneth L; Goetzl, Laura

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this article was to review the existing standards of practice regarding trauma which occurs during pregnancy. The design of this study was to review the available data from the surgical and obstetrical literature regarding trauma during pregnancy. The design was also to incorporate the contemporary recommendations from the trauma resuscitation courses relating to trauma during pregnancy. Trauma occurs in 5% of pregnancies. A fetus is not considered to be viable until week 25. Motor vehicle accidents account for more than 50% of all trauma during pregnancy, with 82% of fetal deaths occurring during these automobile accidents. With life threatening trauma a 50% fetal loss rate exists. As anatomy, physiology, and even laboratory findings change during pregnancy, the clinician must consider both patients, the mother and fetus. Following blunt trauma abruption of the placenta is the more common cause of fetus loss. Anterior abdominal penetrating trauma almost never fails to injury the uterus and fetus in the last half of pregnancy. Preventive strategies exist in the areas of social violence, automobile restraints and use of alcohol and drugs by the mother. Perimortem caesarian section is rarely successful. Trauma during pregnancy is uncommon, but with increasing trauma severity leads to increased fetal loss. Preventive strategies exist and when admitted monitoring standards should be followed.

  2. Use of intubating laryngeal mask airway in a morbidly obese patient with chest trauma in an emergency setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripat Bindra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A morbidly obese male who sustained blunt trauma chest with bilateral pneumothorax was referred to the intensive care unit for management of his condition. Problems encountered in managing the patient were gradually increasing hypoxemia (chest trauma with multiple rib fractures with lung contusions and difficult mask ventilation and intubation (morbid obesity, heavy jaw, short and thick neck. We performed awake endotracheal intubation using an intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA size 4 and provided mechanical ventilation to the patient. This report suggests that ILMA can be very useful in the management of difficult airway outside the operating room and can help in preventing adverse events in an emergency setting.

  3. Trauma in pregnancy: assessment and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, P; Asensio, J A

    2006-01-01

    Women between the ages of 10 and 50 year-old have the potential for pregnancy; therefore this condition must be taken into consideration when a woman is examined in the Emergency Room after sustaining a traumatic event. Pregnancy produces significant physiologic and anatomic changes in every system of the female body. The evaluation of the traumatized pregnant patient, the approach, and the interpretation of the diagnostic tests results must be accompanied by the full knowledge of all changes that take place during pregnancy. In the same context, although the physician treating a pregnant trauma victim must remember that there are two patients, the treatment priorities are the same as for the non-pregnant trauma patient. The best initial treatment for the fetus is the optimum resuscitation of the mother. A thorough exam should take place to discover unique conditions that might be present in any pregnant patient such as blunt or penetrating injury to the uterus, placental abruption, amniotic fluid embolism, isoimmunization, and premature rupture of membranes. The obstetrician should be present at all times and be considered a part of the trauma team in the evaluation and treatment of a pregnant trauma patient.

  4. [Thoracic Trauma - Prehospital Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michael; Hachenberg, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Penetrating thoracic injuries are rare in Germany and common in urban regions. 10 percent of the patients in Emergency Departments suffer from blunt thoracic trauma. Mechanism of trauma can predict the severity of the injuries. Very fast life-threatening injuries with hemodynamic problems like tension pneumothorax or cardiac tamponade have to be diagnosed. Prehospital emergency physicians need skills in ultrasound for diagnosis and in invasive therapy like chest tube or pericardium drainage tube. The application of an algorithm in exploration of a thoracic trauma seems to be useful. The selection of trauma center depends on the severity of the trauma, if necessary with the availability of extracorporeal circulation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Successful Nonoperative Management of High-Grade Blunt Renal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Allison M; Darwish, Oussama; Dang, Brian; Monda, John J; Adsul, Prajakta; Syed, Johar; Siddiqui, Sameer A

    2016-01-01

    Current management of high-grade blunt renal trauma favors a nonoperative approach when possible. We performed a retrospective study of high grade blunt renal injuries at our level I trauma center to determine the indications and success of nonoperative management (NOM). 47 patients with blunt grade IV or V injuries were identified between October 2004 and December 2013. Immediate operative patients (IO) were compared to nonoperatively managed (NOM). Of the 47 patients, 3 (6.4%) were IO and 44 (95.6%) NOM. IO patients had a higher heart rate on admission, 133 versus 100 in NOM ( P = 0.01). IO patients had a higher rate of injury to the renal vein or artery (100%) compared to NOM group (18%) ( P = 0.01). NOM failed in 3 of 44 patients (6.8%). Two required nonemergent nephrectomy and one required emergent exploration resulting in nephrectomy. Six NOM patients had kidney-related complications (13.6%). The renal salvage rate for the entire cohort was 87.2% and 93.2% for NOM. Nonoperative management for hemodynamically stable patients with high-grade blunt renal trauma is safe with a low risk of complications. Management decisions should consider hemodynamic status and visualization of active renal bleeding as well as injury grade in determining operative management.

  6. Prevalence, management and outcome of traumatic diaphragm injuries managed by the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, N; Clarke, D; Laing, G

    2017-05-01

    INTRODUCTION This audit of traumatic diaphram injury (TDI) from a busy South African trauma service reviews the spectrum of disease and highlights current approaches to these injuries. METHODS The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service (PMTS) has maintained an Electronic Surgical Registry (ESR) and a Hybrid Electronic Medical Record (HEMR) system since January 1 st 2012. RESULTS A total of 105 TDIs were identified and repaired during the study period. The mean patient age was 30 years (range 15-68 years - SD 9.7). The majority (92.4%) of patients were male (97/105). Penetrating trauma was the leading mechanism of injury (94%). 75 patients sustained a TDI from a stab wound, and the remaining 24 injuries resulted from gunshot wounds. Multiple associated injuries and high morbidity was seen with right diaphragm injury, blunt trauma, gunshot wounds and chronic diaphragmatic hernias. CONCLUSIONS TDI is a fairly uncommon injury with a local incidence of 1.6%. It presents in a spectrum from the obvious to the occult. Multiple associated injuries and high morbidity occur following blunt trauma or gunshot wounds, right diaphragm injury and chronic diaphragmatic hernias. Diagnostic laparoscopy offers a diagnostic and therapeutic tool to prevent progression of occult TDI to chronic diaphragmatic hernias.

  7. Blunt traumatic celiac artery avulsion managed with celiac artery ligation and open aorto-celiac bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Kronick

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic celiac artery injuries are rare and highly lethal with reported mortality rates of 38–62%. The vast majority are caused by penetrating trauma with only 11 reported cases due to blunt trauma (Graham et al., 1978; Asensio et al., 2000, 2002. Only 3 of these cases were complete celiac artery avulsions. Management options described depend upon the type of injury and have included medical therapy with anti-platelet agents or anti-coagulants, endovascular stenting, and open ligation. We report a case of a survivor of complete celiac artery avulsion from blunt trauma managed by open bypass.

  8. Moving from "optimal resources" to "optimal care" at trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shahid; Rayan, Nadine; Barnes, Sunni; Fleming, Neil; Gentilello, Larry M; Ballard, David

    2012-04-01

    The Trauma Quality Improvement Program has shown that risk-adjusted mortality rates at some centers are nearly 50% higher than at others. This "quality gap" may be due to different clinical practices or processes of care. We have previously shown that adoption of processes called core measures by the Joint Commission and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services does not improve outcomes of trauma patients. We hypothesized that improved compliance with trauma-specific clinical processes of care (POC) is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality. Records of a random sample of 1,000 patients admitted to a Level I trauma center who met Trauma Quality Improvement Program criteria (age ≥ 16 years and Abbreviated Injury Scale score 3) were retrospectively reviewed for compliance with 25 trauma-specific POC (T-POC) that were evidence-based or expert consensus panel recommendations. Multivariate regression was used to determine the relationship between T-POC compliance and in-hospital mortality, adjusted for age, gender, injury type, and severity. Median age was 41 years, 65% were men, 88% sustained a blunt injury, and mortality was 12%. Of these, 77% were eligible for at least one T-POC and 58% were eligible for two or more. There was wide variation in T-POC compliance. Every 10% increase in compliance was associated with a 14% reduction in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality. Unlike adoption of core measures, compliance with T-POC is associated with reduced mortality in trauma patients. Trauma centers with excess in-hospital mortality may improve patient outcomes by consistently applying T-POC. These processes should be explored for potential use as Core Trauma Center Performance Measures.

  9. Blunt thoracic aortic injuries: an autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro G R; Inaba, Kenji; Barmparas, Galinos; Georgiou, Chrysanthos; Toms, Carla; Noguchi, Thomas T; Rogers, Christopher; Sathyavagiswaran, Lakshmanan; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the incidence and patterns of thoracic aortic injuries in a series of blunt traumatic deaths and describe their associated injuries. All autopsies performed by the Los Angeles County Department of Coroner for blunt traumatic deaths in 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had a traumatic thoracic aortic (TTA) injury were compared with the victims who did not have this injury for differences in baseline characteristics and patterns of associated injuries. During the study period, 304 (35%) of 881 fatal victims of blunt trauma received by the Los Angeles County Department of Coroner underwent a full autopsy and were included in the analysis. The patients were on average aged 43 years±21 years, 71% were men, and 39% had a positive blood alcohol screen. Motor vehicle collision was the most common mechanism of injury (50%), followed by pedestrian struck by auto (37%). A TTA injury was identified in 102 (34%) of the victims. The most common site of TTA injury was the isthmus and descending thoracic aorta, occurring in 67 fatalities (66% of the patients with TTA injuries). Patients with TTA injuries were significantly more likely to have other associated injuries: cardiac injury (44% vs. 25%, p=0.001), hemothorax (86% vs. 56%, pinjury (74% vs. 49%, pinjury. Patients with a TTA injury were significantly more likely to die at the scene (80% vs. 63%, p=0.002). Thoracic aortic injuries occurred in fully one third of blunt traumatic fatalities, with the majority of deaths occurring at the scene. The risk for associated thoracic and intra-abdominal injuries is significantly increased in patients with thoracic aortic injuries.

  10. Abdominal Trauma Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, David V

    2017-11-01

    Although abdominal trauma has been described since antiquity, formal laparotomies for trauma were not performed until the 1800s. Even with the introduction of general anesthesia in the United States during the years 1842 to 1846, laparotomies for abdominal trauma were not performed during the Civil War. The first laparotomy for an abdominal gunshot wound in the United States was finally performed in New York City in 1884. An aggressive operative approach to all forms of abdominal trauma till the establishment of formal trauma centers (where data were analyzed) resulted in extraordinarily high rates of nontherapeutic laparotomies from the 1880s to the 1960s. More selective operative approaches to patients with abdominal stab wounds (1960s), blunt trauma (1970s), and gunshot wounds (1990s) were then developed. Current adjuncts to the diagnosis of abdominal trauma when serial physical examinations are unreliable include the following: 1) diagnostic peritoneal tap/lavage, 2) surgeon-performed ultrasound examination; 3) contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis; and 4) diagnostic laparoscopy. Operative techniques for injuries to the liver, spleen, duodenum, and pancreas have been refined considerably since World War II. These need to be emphasized repeatedly in an era when fewer patients undergo laparotomy for abdominal trauma. Finally, abdominal trauma damage control is a valuable operative approach in patients with physiologic exhaustion and multiple injuries.

  11. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for paediatric pancreatic trauma with a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The management plan must be tailored to the nature and severity of trauma, patient profi le, surgeon's expertise and the resources available at surgeon's disposal. We describe a pancreaticoduodenal injury in 3-year-old child with successful outcome and follow-up of a decade. Key words: Blunt trauma abdomen, ...

  12. The Performance of the Pediatric Trauma Score in a Pediatric Emergency Department: A Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Anıl; Serdar Sarıtaş; Yüksel Bıcılıoğlu; Gamze Gökalp; Fulya Kamit Can; Ayşe Berna Anıl

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of the Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) in predicting significant trauma in patients presenting with blunt trauma to a high-level pediatric emergency department. Methods: Patients younger than 15 years of age presenting to the pediatric emergency department of the Tepecik Training and Research Hospital with acute high-energy blunt trauma were analyzed prospectively. The PTS was calculated on arrival at the pediatric emergency depar...

  13. Role of focused assessment with sonography for trauma as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The objective of the study was to review the utility of focused assessement with sonography for trauma (FAST) as a screening tool for blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) in children involved in high energy trauma (HET), and to determine whether a FAST could replace computed tomography (CT) in clinical ...

  14. Validation of a field spinal motion restriction protocol in a level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, James M; Melo, Nicolas; Ko, Ara; Dhillon, Navpreet K; Smith, Eric J T; Yim, Dorothy A; Barmparas, Galinos; Ley, Eric J

    2017-05-01

    Spinal motion restriction (SMR) after traumatic injury has been a mainstay of prehospital trauma care for more than 3 decades. Recent guidelines recommend a selective approach with cervical spine clearance in the field when criteria are met. In January 2014, the Department of Health Services of the City of Los Angeles, California, implemented revised guidelines for cervical SMR after blunt mechanism trauma. Adult patients (aged ≥18 y) with an initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of ≥13 presented to a single level I trauma center after blunt mechanism trauma over the following 1-y period were retrospectively reviewed. Demographics, injury data, and prehospital data were collected. Cervical spine injury (CSI) was identified by International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, codes. Emergency medical services transported 1111 patients to the emergency department who sustained blunt trauma. Patients were excluded if they refused c-collar placement or if documentation was incomplete. A total of 997 patients were included in our analysis with 172 (17.2%) who were selective cleared of SMR per protocol. The rate of Spinal Cord Injury was 2.2% (22/997) overall and 1.2% (2/172) in patients without SMR. The sensitivity and specificity of the protocol are 90.9% (95% confidence interval: 69.4-98.4) and 17.4% (95% confidence interval: 15.1-20.0), respectively, for CSI. Patients with CSI who arrived without immobilization having met field clearance guidelines, were managed without intervention, and had no neurologic compromise. Guidelines for cervical SMR have high sensitivity and low specificity to identify CSI. When patients with injuries were not placed on motion restrictions, there were no negative clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Retrospective Evaluation of Pediatric Major Trauma Related to Sport and Recreational Activities in Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert S; Butler, Michael B; Kureshi, Nelofar; Erdogan, Mete

    2016-03-01

    A small proportion of pediatric sport- and recreation-related injuries are serious enough to be considered "major trauma." However, the immediate and long-term consequences in cases of pediatric major trauma are significant and potentially life-threatening. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence and outcomes of pediatric major traumas related to sport and recreational activities in Nova Scotia. This study was a retrospective case series. Data on major pediatric traumas related to sport and recreational activities on a provincial scope were extracted from the Nova Scotia Trauma Program Registry between 2000 and 2013. We evaluated frequency, type, severity, and outcomes of major traumas. Outcomes assessed included length of hospital stay, admission to a special care unit (SCU), and mortality. Overall, 107 children aged three to 18 years sustained a major trauma (mean age 12.5 [SD 3.8]; 84% male). Most injuries were blunt traumas (97%). The greatest proportion were from cycling (59, 53%), followed by hockey (8, 7%), skateboarding (7, 7%) and skiing (7, 7%). The Nova Scotia Pediatric Trauma Team was activated in 27% of cases. Mean in-hospital length of stay was five days (SD 5.6), and nearly half (49%) of patients required SCU admission. Severe traumatic brain injury occurred in 52% of cases, and mortality in five cases. Over a 13-year period, the highest incidence of pediatric major trauma related to sport and recreational activities was from cycling, followed by hockey. Severe traumatic brain injury occurred in over half of pediatric major trauma patients.

  16. Blunt cardiac injury: case report of salvaged traumatic right atrial rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ayyan, Muna; Aziz, Tanim; El Sherif, Amgad; Bekdache, Omar

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of cardiac rupture following blunt trauma is rare, occurring in 0.3%-0.5% of all blunt trauma patients. It can be fatal at the trauma scene, and is frequently missed in the emergency room setting. The severity of a cardiac trauma is based on the mechanism and degree of the force applied. The objective of this study was to report the case of a 32-year-old male patient who was involved in a motor vehicle collision and presented to the emergency room with signs of hypovolemic shock. The patient was found to have severe chest trauma associated with massive hemothorax requiring immediate intervention. The patient had an emergent thoracotomy revealing a right atrial injury. Repair of the atrial injury reversed the state of shock. The patient was discharged after 35 days of hospitalization in good condition.

  17. Endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shan; Zhang, Xiquan; Chen, Zhong; Zhu, Wei; Pan, Xiaolin [Dept. of nterventional Vascular, The 148th Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Zibo (China); Dong, Peng; Sun, Yequan [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Weifang Medical University, Weifang (China); Qi, Deming [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Qilu Medical University, Zibo (China)

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of endovascular repair for blunt popliteal arterial injuries. A retrospective analysis of seven patients with clinical suspicion of popliteal arterial injuries that were confirmed by arteriography was performed from September 2009 to July 2014. Clinical data included demographics, mechanism of injury, type of injury, location of injury, concomitant injuries, time of endovascular procedures, time interval from trauma to blood flow restoration, instrument utilized, and follow-up. All patients were male (mean age of 35.9 ± 10.3 years). The type of lesion involved intimal injury (n = 1), partial transection (n = 2), complete transection (n = 2), arteriovenous fistula (n = 1), and pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). All patients underwent endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Technical success rate was 100%. Intimal injury was treated with a bare-metal stent. Pseudoaneurysm and popliteal artery transections were treated with bare-metal stents. Arteriovenous fistula was treated with bare-metal stent and coils. No perioperative death and procedure-related complication occurred. The average follow-up was 20.9 ± 2.3 months (range 18–24 months). One patient underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis due to stent thrombosis at 18 months after the procedure. All limbs were salvaged. Stent migration, deformation, or fracture was not found during the follow-up. Endovascular repair seems to be a viable approach for patients with blunt popliteal arterial injuries, especially on an emergency basis. Endovascular repair may be effective in the short-term. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair.

  18. Radiologic findings of thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akgul Ozmen C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cihan Akgul Ozmen,1 Serdar Onat,2 Delal Aycicek3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Chest Surgery, Dicle University School of Medicine, Diyarbakir, 3Radiology Unit, Siirt State Hospital, Siirt, Turkey Introduction: Chest trauma may be blunt or penetrating and the chest is the third most common trauma region. It is a significant cause of mortality. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT has been an increasingly used method to evaluate chest trauma because of its high success in detecting tissue and organ injuries. Herein, we aimed to present MDCT findings in patients with blunt and penetrating chest trauma admitted to our department. Methods: A total of 240 patients admitted to the emergency department of our hospital between April 2012 and July 2013 with a diagnosis of chest trauma who underwent MDCT evaluations were included. Most of the patients were male (83.3% and victims of a blunt chest trauma. The images were analyzed with respect to the presence of fractures of bony structures, hemothorax, pneumothorax, mediastinal organ injury, and pulmonary and vascular injuries. Results: MDCT images of the 240 patients yielded a prevalence of 41.7% rib fractures, 11.2% scapular fractures, and 7.5% clavicle fractures. The prevalence of thoracic vertebral fracture was 13.8% and that of sternal fracture was 3.8%. The prevalence of hemothorax, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and subcutaneous emphysema was 34.6%, 62.1%, 9.6%, and 35.4%, respectively. The prevalence of rib, clavicle, and thoracic vertebral fractures and pulmonary contusion was higher in the blunt trauma group, whereas the prevalence of hemothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, diaphragmatic injury, and other vascular lacerations was significantly higher in the penetrating trauma group than in the blunt trauma group (p<0.05. Conclusion: MDCT images may yield a high prevalence of fracture of bony structures, soft tissue lacerations, and vascular lesions, which should be well understood by

  19. Delayed presentation of blunt traumatic diaphragmatic hernia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of blunt traumatic diaphragmatic hernia in a 39-year-old man presenting 10 years after the initial abdomino-thoracic injury sustained in a road traffic accident. He had herniation of the spleen and stomach. Through a left thoracotomy, the herniated organs were reduced and diaphragmatic defect closed with ...

  20. Multidetector CT of blunt traumatic venous injuries in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Brian P; Steenburg, Scott D

    2011-01-01

    Venous injuries as a result of blunt trauma are rare. Even though current protocols for multidetector computed tomography (CT) of patients with trauma are designed to evaluate primarily the solid organs and arteries, blunt venous injuries may nevertheless be identified, or at least suspected, on the basis of the multidetector CT findings. Venous injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Diagnosis of a possible venous injury is crucial because the physical findings of a venous injury are nonspecific and may be absent. This article aims to make the radiologist aware of various venous injuries caused by blunt trauma and to provide helpful hints to aid in the identification of venous injuries. Multidetector CT technology, in combination with interactive manipulation of the raw dataset, can be useful in the creation of multiplanar reconstructed images and in the identification of a venous injury caused by blunt trauma. Familiarity with direct and indirect signs of venous injuries, as well as with examples of blunt traumatic venous injuries in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, will help in the diagnosis of these injuries.