WorldWideScience

Sample records for sustainable weed control

  1. Restoring interventions: eco-sustainable weed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facciotto G

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The creation and enlargement of ecological networks is paramount to conserve plant biodiversity, to offer refuge to the local fauna and to improve the environment in general. Such networks intend to conserve areas of great natural value, to restore degraded areas and to link them physically through the creation of ecological corridors. The work described was carried out in order to improve and enlarge an ecological corridor within the experimental farm “Mezzi” of CRA-ISP at Casale Monferrato (AL - Italy. One of its bigger problems, weed control, was solved by increasing the planting density, by sowing herbaceous crops and mulching with woody chips.

  2. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction.

  3. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction.

  4. Ecologically sustainable weed management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebman, Matt; Baraibar, Bàrbara; Buckley, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    , and greater weed impacts due to changes in climate and land use. Broad-scale use of new approaches is needed if weed management is to be successful in the coming era. We examine three approaches likely to prove useful for addressing current and future challenges from weeds: diversifying weed management......Weed management is a critically important activity on both agricultural and non-agricultural lands, but it is faced with a daunting set of challenges: environmental damage caused by control practices, weed resistance to herbicides, accelerated rates of weed dispersal through global trade...... strategies with multiple complementary tactics, developing crop genotypes for enhanced weed suppression, and tailoring management strategies to better accommodate variability in weed spatial distributions. In all three cases, proof-of-concept has long been demonstrated and considerable scientific innovations...

  5. Ecologically sustainable weed management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebman, Matt; Baraibar, Bàrbara; Buckley, Yvonne; Childs, Dylan; Christensen, Svend; Cousens, Roger; Eizenberg, Hanan; Heijting, Sanne; Loddo, Donato; Merotto, Aldo; Renton, Michael; Riemens, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Weed management is a critically important activity on both agricultural and non-agricultural lands, but it is faced with a daunting set of challenges: environmental damage caused by control practices, weed resistance to herbicides, accelerated rates of weed dispersal through global trade, and

  6. Allelopathic cover crop of rye for integrated weed control in sustainable agroecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Tabaglio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The allelopathic potential of rye (Secale cereale L. is mainly due to phytotoxic benzoxazinones, compounds that are produced and accumulated in young tissues to different degrees depending on cultivar and environmental influences. Living rye plants exude low levels of benzoxazinones, while cover crop residues can release from 12 to 20 kg ha–1. This paper summarizes the results obtained from several experiments performed in both controlled and field environments, in which rye was used as a cover crop to control summer weeds in a following maize crop. Significant differences in benzoxazinoid content were detected between rye cultivars. In controlled environments, rye mulches significantly reduced germination of some broadleaf weeds. Germination and seedling growth of Amaranthus retroflexus and Portulaca oleracea were particularly affected by the application of rye mulches, while Chenopodium album was hardly influenced and Abutilon theophrasti was advantaged by the presence of the mulch. With reference to the influence of agronomic factors on the production of benzoxazinoids, nitrogen fertilization increased the content of allelochemicals, although proportionally less than dry matter. The field trial established on no-till maize confirmed the significant weed suppressiveness of rye mulch, both for grass and broadleaf weeds. A significant positive interaction between nitrogen (N fertilization and notillage resulting in the suppression of broadleaf weeds was observed. The different behavior of the weeds in the presence of allelochemicals was explained in terms of differential uptake and translocation capabilities. The four summer weeds tested were able to grow in the presence of low amounts of benzoxazolin-2(3H-one (BOA, between 0.3 and 20 mmol g–1 fresh weight. Although there were considerable differences in their sensitivity to higher BOA concentrations, P. oleracea, A. retroflexus, and Ch. album represented a group of species with a consistent

  7. Benzoxazinoids in rye allelopathy - from discovery to application in sustainable weed control and organic farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Margot; Marocco, Adriano; Tabaglio, Vincenzo; Macias, Francisco A; Molinillo, Jose M G

    2013-02-01

    The allelopathic potency of rye (Secale cereale L.) is due mainly to the presence of phytotoxic benzoxazinones-compounds whose biosynthesis is developmentally regulated, with the highest accumulation in young tissue and a dependency on cultivar and environmental influences. Benzoxazinones can be released from residues of greenhouse-grown rye at levels between 12 and 20 kg/ha, with lower amounts exuded by living plants. In soil, benzoxazinones are subject to a cascade of transformation reactions, and levels in the range 0.5-5 kg/ha have been reported. Starting with the accumulation of less toxic benzoxazolinones, the transformation reactions in soil primarily lead to the production of phenoxazinones, acetamides, and malonamic acids. These reactions are associated with microbial activity in the soil. In addition to benzoxazinones, benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (BOA) has been investigated for phytotoxic effects in weeds and crops. Exposure to BOA affects transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome patterns of the seedlings, inhibits germination and growth, and can induce death of sensitive species. Differences in the sensitivity of cultivars and ecotypes are due to different species-dependent strategies that have evolved to cope with BOA. These strategies include the rapid activation of detoxification reactions and extrusion of detoxified compounds. In contrast to sensitive ecotypes, tolerant ecotypes are less affected by exposure to BOA. Like the original compounds BOA and MBOA, all exuded detoxification products are converted to phenoxazinones, which can be degraded by several specialized fungi via the Fenton reaction. Because of their selectivity, specific activity, and presumably limited persistence in the soil, benzoxazinoids or rye residues are suitable means for weed control. In fact, rye is one of the best cool season cover crops and widely used because of its excellent weed suppressive potential. Breeding of benzoxazinoid resistant crops and of rye with high

  8. INTEGRATED WEED CONTROL IN MAIZE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latré, J; Dewitte, K; Derycke, V; De Roo, B; Haesaert, G

    2015-01-01

    Integrated pest management has been implemented as a general practice by EU legislation. As weed control actually is the most important crop protection measure in maize for Western Europe, the new legislation will have its impact. The question is of course which systems can be successfully implemented in practice with respect to labour efficiency and economical parameters. During 3 successive growing seasons (2007, 2008, 2009) weed control in maize was evaluated, the main focus was put on different techniques of integrated weed control and was compared with chemical weed control. Additionally, during 4 successive growing seasons (2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014) two objects based on integrated weed control and two objects based on mechanical weed control were compared to about twenty different objects of conventional chemical weed control. One of the objects based on mechanical weed control consisted of treatment with the flex-tine harrow before and after emergence in combination with chemical weed control at a reduced rate in 3-4 leave stage. The second one consisted of broadcast mechanical treatments before and after emergence followed by a final in-row application of herbicides and an inter-row cultivation at 6-7(8) leave stage. All trials were conducted on the Experimental farm of Bottelare HoGent-UGent on a sandy loam soil. Maize was growing in 1/3 crop rotation. The effect on weed growth as well as the economic impact of the different applications was evaluated. Combining chemical and mechanical weed control is a possible option in conventional farming but the disadvantages must be taken into account. A better planned weed control based on the real present weed-population in combination with a carefully thought-out choice of herbicides should also be considered as an IPM--approach.

  9. Weed Identification and Control in Vegetable Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Peter A., Comp.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University examines weed control and identification in vegetable crops. Contents include: (1) Types of weeds; (2) Reducing losses caused by weeds, general control methods and home garden weed control; (3) How herbicides are used; (4) Specific weeds in vegetable plantings; and…

  10. WEED MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL IN POTATOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cleón de Castro Silva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This review shows instructions to potatoes' farmer about behavior of the weeds and how to manage them so as to minimize loss of productivity through the use of control strategies for potato crop. The prevention consists in adoption of practices that prevents entry of unwanted species of weeds in the planting site. The control reduces the infestation of these species, but this practice does not eradicate them completely. However, it needs to control the weeds before the area preparation for planting the tubers until complete closure of the soil by shoots of potatoes during the critical period. After covering the soil, the potato crop does not suffer negative interference caused by weeds. The cultural practices include a good plane for harvest, plant crop rotation, the planting of appropriate plants for covering the soil, the ideal space to the planting and the correct time to potato planting. The control must be efficient to reduce the number of weeds in the area to avoid economic losses to farmers. It is necessary to establish weed management strategies in order to maintain sustainable farming systems, preserving the environment and quality of life of the farmer.

  11. Brassicas limited in weed control

    OpenAIRE

    Kristiansen, P

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the limitations of using brassica cover crops for weed control. A brief overview of the role of cover crops is provided, followed by a short review of research looking at brassica cover crops.

  12. Energy options in weed control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, A.R.; Bhan, V.M.

    1985-08-01

    Taking into account the energy costs of weedicide production, formulation, transportation and the fixed energy inputs through equipment on farms in Haryana and the man-days needed for weed control, the energy inputs in weed control by manual or chemical methods have been evaluated. Use of 2,4-D accounts for about 84 Mcal/ha of wheat or rice. Methabenzthiazuron as an alternative would account for the consumption of 248 Mcal/ha. Manual weeding in wheat accounts for 46 Mcal/ha and in a crop of rice for 54 Mcal/ha. Weed control, by whatever method, accounts for 0.5-2.7% of the energy inputs needed to raise a crop of wheat or rice in Haryana and is not a significant energy user.

  13. Biotechnology in weed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotechnology can be used to enhance the management of weeds in several ways. Crops have been made resistant to herbicides by inserting transgenes that impart herbicide resistance into the plant genome. Glyphosate and glufosinate-resistant crops are commercialized in North America and crops made res...

  14. The Effects of Different Weed Control Methods on Weed Infestation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was conducted during the 2012 and 2013 rainy season at the Kwara State University Teaching and Research Farm located in Malete. The aim was to determine the effect(s) of different weed control methods on Weed infestation, growth and yield of soybeans (variety TGX 1448 – 2E). The experiment ...

  15. Site-specific weed control technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend; Søgaard, Henning Tangen; Kudsk, Per

    2009-01-01

    Site-specific weed control technologies are defined as machinery or equipment embedded with technologies that detect weeds growing in a crop and, taking into account predefined factors such as economics, takes action to maximise the chances of successfully controlling them. In the article, we...... describe the basic parts of site specific weed control technologies, comprising of weed sensing systems, weed management models and precision weed control implements. A review of state-of-the-art technologies shows that several weed sensing systems and precision implements have been developed over the last...... two decades, though barriers prevent their breakthrough. Most important among these is the lack of a truly robust weed recognition method, owing to mutual shading among plants and limitations in the capacity of highly accurate spraying and weeding apparatuses.   Another barrier is the lack...

  16. Integration of agronomic practices with herbicides for sustainable weed management in aerobic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M P; Juraimi, A S; Mohamed, M T M; Uddin, M K; Samedani, B; Puteh, A; Man, Azmi

    2013-01-01

    Till now, herbicide seems to be a cost effective tool from an agronomic view point to control weeds. But long term efficacy and sustainability issues are the driving forces behind the reconsideration of herbicide dependent weed management strategy in rice. This demands reappearance of physical and cultural management options combined with judicious herbicide application in a more comprehensive and integrated way. Keeping those in mind, some agronomic tools along with different manual weeding and herbicides combinations were evaluated for their weed control efficacy in rice under aerobic soil conditions. Combination of competitive variety, higher seeding rate, and seed priming resulted in more competitive cropping system in favor of rice, which was reflected in lower weed pressure, higher weed control efficiency, and better yield. Most of the herbicides exhibited excellent weed control efficiency. Treatments comprising only herbicides required less cost involvement but produced higher net benefit. On the contrary, treatments comprising both herbicide and manual weeding required high cost involvement and thus produced lower net benefit. Therefore, adoption of competitive rice variety, higher seed rate, and seed priming along with spraying different early-postemergence herbicides in rotation at 10 days after seeding (DAS) followed by a manual weeding at 30 DAS may be recommended from sustainability view point.

  17. Integration of Agronomic Practices with Herbicides for Sustainable Weed Management in Aerobic Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M. P.; Juraimi, A. S.; Mohamed, M. T. M.; Uddin, M. K.; Samedani, B.; Puteh, A.; Man, Azmi

    2013-01-01

    Till now, herbicide seems to be a cost effective tool from an agronomic view point to control weeds. But long term efficacy and sustainability issues are the driving forces behind the reconsideration of herbicide dependent weed management strategy in rice. This demands reappearance of physical and cultural management options combined with judicious herbicide application in a more comprehensive and integrated way. Keeping those in mind, some agronomic tools along with different manual weeding and herbicides combinations were evaluated for their weed control efficacy in rice under aerobic soil conditions. Combination of competitive variety, higher seeding rate, and seed priming resulted in more competitive cropping system in favor of rice, which was reflected in lower weed pressure, higher weed control efficiency, and better yield. Most of the herbicides exhibited excellent weed control efficiency. Treatments comprising only herbicides required less cost involvement but produced higher net benefit. On the contrary, treatments comprising both herbicide and manual weeding required high cost involvement and thus produced lower net benefit. Therefore, adoption of competitive rice variety, higher seed rate, and seed priming along with spraying different early-postemergence herbicides in rotation at 10 days after seeding (DAS) followed by a manual weeding at 30 DAS may be recommended from sustainability view point. PMID:24223513

  18. A STUDY ON WEED CONTROL IN SOYBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. TJITROSEMITO

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Two field experiments on weed control in soybeans were carried out at BIOTROP, Bogor, Indonesia from February to June, 1989. The critical period for weed control was found to be between 20 - 40 days after planting of soybean (c. v. Wilis grown at a planting distance of 40 x 10 cm. It did not coincide with the fastest growth in terms of trifoliate leaf number. Further studies were suggested to understand the physiological growth of soybean related to weed control. Pendimethalin at 660- 1320 g a.e./ha applied one day after sowing did not cause any phytotoxic effect to soybean and had good weed control performance.

  19. The future for weed control and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Dale L; Beckie, Hugh J

    2014-09-01

    This review is both a retrospective (what have we missed?) and prospective (where are we going?) examination of weed control and technology, particularly as it applies to herbicide-resistant weed management (RWM). Major obstacles to RWM are discussed, including lack of diversity in weed management, unwillingness of many weed researchers to conduct real integrated weed management research or growers to accept recommendations, influence or role of agrichemical marketing and governmental policy and lack of multidisciplinary research. We then look ahead to new technologies that are needed for future weed control in general and RWM in particular, in areas such as non-chemical and chemical weed management, novel herbicides, site-specific weed management, drones for monitoring large areas, wider application of 'omics' and simulation model development. Finally, we discuss implementation strategies for integrated weed management to achieve RWM, development of RWM for developing countries, a new classification of herbicides based on mode of metabolism to facilitate greater stewardship and greater global exchange of information to focus efforts on areas that maximize progress in weed control and RWM. There is little doubt that new or emerging technologies will provide novel tools for RMW in the future, but will they arrive in time? © 2013 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Pest Management Science © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Fungal Phytotoxins in Sustainable Weed Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurro, Maurizio; Boari, Angela; Casella, Francesca; Zonno, Maria Chiara

    2017-04-26

    Fungal phytotoxins are natural secondary metabolites produced by plant pathogenic fungi during host-pathogen interactions. They have received considerable particular attention for elucidating disease etiology, and consequently to design strategies for disease control. Due to wide differences in their chemical structures, these toxic metabolites have different ecological and environmental roles and mechanisms of action. This review aims at summarizing the studies on the possible use of thesemetabolites as tools in biological and integrated weed management, e.g. as: novel and environmentally friendly herbicideslead for novel compounds; sources of novel mechanisms of action. Moreover, the limiting factors for utilizing those metabolites in practice will also be briefly discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Organic fields sustain weed metacommunity dynamics in farmland landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckel, Laura; Börger, Luca; Meiss, Helmut; Gaba, Sabrina; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Agro-ecosystems constitute essential habitat for many organisms. Agricultural intensification, however, has caused a strong decline of farmland biodiversity. Organic farming (OF) is often presented as a more biodiversity-friendly practice, but the generality of the beneficial effects of OF is debated as the effects appear often species- and context-dependent, and current research has highlighted the need to quantify the relative effects of local- and landscape-scale management on farmland biodiversity. Yet very few studies have investigated the landscape-level effects of OF; that is to say, how the biodiversity of a field is affected by the presence or density of organically farmed fields in the surrounding landscape. We addressed this issue using the metacommunity framework, with weed species richness in winter wheat within an intensively farmed landscape in France as model system. Controlling for the effects of local and landscape structure, we showed that OF leads to higher local weed diversity and that the presence of OF in the landscape is associated with higher local weed biodiversity also for conventionally farmed fields, and may reach a similar biodiversity level to organic fields in field margins. Based on these results, we derive indications for improving the sustainable management of farming systems. PMID:25994672

  2. Organic fields sustain weed metacommunity dynamics in farmland landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckel, Laura; Börger, Luca; Meiss, Helmut; Gaba, Sabrina; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2015-06-07

    Agro-ecosystems constitute essential habitat for many organisms. Agricultural intensification, however, has caused a strong decline of farmland biodiversity. Organic farming (OF) is often presented as a more biodiversity-friendly practice, but the generality of the beneficial effects of OF is debated as the effects appear often species- and context-dependent, and current research has highlighted the need to quantify the relative effects of local- and landscape-scale management on farmland biodiversity. Yet very few studies have investigated the landscape-level effects of OF; that is to say, how the biodiversity of a field is affected by the presence or density of organically farmed fields in the surrounding landscape. We addressed this issue using the metacommunity framework, with weed species richness in winter wheat within an intensively farmed landscape in France as model system. Controlling for the effects of local and landscape structure, we showed that OF leads to higher local weed diversity and that the presence of OF in the landscape is associated with higher local weed biodiversity also for conventionally farmed fields, and may reach a similar biodiversity level to organic fields in field margins. Based on these results, we derive indications for improving the sustainable management of farming systems. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Economic potentials of oil palm products and weed control on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out at the Research Farm of National Root Crops Research Institute Umudike, southeastern Nigeria (05o, 29'N, 07o 33'E and 122 m above sea level), in 2015 and 2016 cropping seasons to study the economic potentials of oil palm products and weed control on sustainable turmeric production and some ...

  4. Soil solarization for weed control in carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARENCO RICARDO ANTONIO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil solarization is a technique used for weed and plant disease control in regions with high levels of solar radiation. The effect of solarization (0, 3, 6, and 9 weeks upon weed populations, carrot (Daucus carota L. cv. Brasília yield and nematode infestation in carrot roots was studied in São Luís (2º35' S; 44º10' W, MA, Brazil, using transparent polyethylene films (100 and 150 mm of thickness. The maximum temperature at 5 cm of depth was about 10ºC warmer in solarized soil than in control plots. In the study 20 weed types were recorded. Solarization reduced weed biomass and density in about 50% of weed species, including Cyperus spp., Chamaecrista nictans var. paraguariensis (Chod & Hassl. Irwin & Barneby, Marsypianthes chamaedrys (Vahl O. Kuntze, Mitracarpus sp., Mollugo verticillata L., Sebastiania corniculata M. Arg., and Spigelia anthelmia L. Approximately 40% of species in the weed flora were not affected by soil mulching. Furthermore, seed germination of Commelina benghalensis L. was increased by soil solarization. Marketable yield of carrots was greater in solarized soil than in the unsolarized one. It was concluded that solarization for nine weeks increases carrot yield and is effective for controlling more than half of the weed species recorded. Mulching was not effective for controlling root-knot nematodes in carrot.

  5. Effect of stale seedbed preparations and subsequent weed control in lettuce (cv. Iceboll) on weed densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, M.M.; Weide, van der R.Y.; Bleeker, P.O.; Lotz, L.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of stale seedbed preparations and several weed control methods on the emergence of weeds in lettuce were studied. The specific goal was to evaluate the use of a stale seedbed in combination with chemical or mechanical weed control methods in the field. Depending on location and year,

  6. The effect of sowing strategy, row distance and mechanical weed control on weeds and yield in organic winter wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Ilse A.

    2002-01-01

    A series of field experiments were carried out in winter wheat grown under organic conditions in Denmark on fields with different weed pressure. The treatments were sowing strategy (normal sowing time, late sowing and false seedbed), row distance (12 cm and 24 cm row distance) and weed control method (untreated, mechanical weed control (weed harrowing at 12 cm supplemented with row hoeing at 24 cm), and herbicide weed control). Weed biomass was largest at the normal sowing time and was reduce...

  7. of different weed control methods on weed infestation, growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thinkexploitsint'l

    Poor soybean yield in farmers' plots is attributable to weed-crop competition and low soil fertility. (Sodangi et al. ... The Kwara State government is determined to modernize agriculture and make farming more attractive through ..... integrated with hand weeding recorded far superior yields of soybean seed. Also, a number of.

  8. Effects of Planting Date, Time and Methods of Weed Control on Weed Density and Biomass in Cumin Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ghorbani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two field experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the effect of planting date, method and date of weed control on weed density and biomass in the experimental research field, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, during 2006 and 2007. Treatments included planting date (30 December, 20 January and 30 February, weeding date (first true leaf, start of branching and beginning of flowering stages and weed control methods (hand weeding, fire treatment and control. The results showed that there were significant differences in the number of weeds between different sowing dates, weeding dates and control methods. The highest mean density and biomass of weeds were obtained on the planting date, 30 February, and when weed was controlled at the first leaf appearance stage with fire treatment. The most appropriate time for weed control was at the beginning of cumin flowering. Fire treatment reduced weed growth in the first half of growing season. However, hand weeding significantly reduced weed density and biomass in the second half of cumin growing season. The first planting date caused the lowest mean weed biomass and the highest cumin yield compared to later planting dates. Hand weeding treatment contained lower mean weed density and biomass compared to fire treatment, however, cumin yield was lower in hand weeding plots than fire treatment. Keywords: Cultural control, Cuminum cyminum, Fire, Hand weeding, Control time

  9. Developments in physical weed control in Northwest Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riemens, Marieen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In North West Europe there is an increasing need for advanced weed control methods. This paper gives an overview of the developments in physical weed control methods. Current innovations in interrow weeding focus on systems that take over the steering function of the driver in order to make them more precise and reduce crop losses. The latest developments in intrarow weeding techniques involve technologies that automatically detect and classify crop and weed plants and use this information to guide a weeding device. Several commercially available examples are presented.

  10. WEED SURVEYING OF PHACELIA (PHACELIA TANACETIFOLIA L.) AND EVALUATING THE EFFICIENCY OF THE WEED CONTROL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, E; Szabó, R

    2014-01-01

    The experiment was set up in an area of 9 ha that was split into 4 plots: in plot 1 the row spacing was 12 cm and the seeding rate was 10 kg; in plot 2 the row spacing was 24 cm and the seeding rate was 10 kg; in plot 3 the row spacing was 24 cm and the seeding rate was 8 kg; in plot 4 the row spacing was 12 cm and the seeding rate was 8 kg. After the weed surveying, the total weed coverage was established as follows: in plot 1 the total weed coverage was 11.34%, in plot 2 it was 12.3%, in plot 3 it was 18%, and in plot 4 the total weed coverage was 15%. Based on the weed survey, on the test area the following dicotyledon weeds belonging to the T4 Raunkiaer plant life-form category occupied the highest percentage: heal-all, black-bindweed, goosefoot. The proportion of the perennial dicotyledons: field bindweed (G3), tuberous pea (G1), white campion (H3) was negligible. In all four cases the weed control was executed using the same herbicide in the same doses and with regard to the weed species it showed the same level of efficiency. The smaller row spacing and higher seeding rate has a beneficial effect on the weed suppressing capacity of the crop, the crop's weed suppressing capacity is better and the development of the weeds becomes worse.

  11. Weed Control Trials in Cottonwood Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Krinard

    1964-01-01

    Weed control in the first year is essential for establishing a cottonwood plantation, for the young trees can neither survive nor grow well if they must compete with other plants. Once the light and moisture conditions are established in its favor, cottonwood becomes the fastest growing tree in the South.

  12. Weed Control in Black Walnut Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin F. Bey; Robert D. Williams

    1976-01-01

    Weeds must be controlled for at least 3 years to successfully establish walnut plantations. Whether by cultivating or applying chemicals, a strip or spot 4 feet wide is sufficient the first 2 years, followed by a 6-foot spot or strip for the third and fourth years.

  13. Natural Compounds for Pest and Weed Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The control of insect pests and invasive weeds has become more species-selective because of activity-guided isolation, structure elucidation, and total synthesis of naturally produced substances with important biological activities. Examples of isolated compounds include insect pheromones, antifeed...

  14. Bioactive compounds for pest and weed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The control of insect pests and invasive weeds has become more species-selective because of activity-guided isolation, structure elucidation, and total synthesis of naturally produced substances with important biological activities. Examples of isolated compounds include insect pheromones, antifeed...

  15. INFLUENCE OF WEED CONTROL METHODS, POULTRY MANURE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    INFLUENCE OF WEED CONTROL METHODS, POULTRY MANURE AND PLANTING. PATTERN ON GROWTH AND YIELD ATTRIBUTES OF MAIZE (Zea mays L.) IN THE. NORTHERN GUINEA SAVANNAH ZONE OF NIGERIA. Bature, M.S.,1 Ishaya, D.B.,2 2Mahadi, M.A2, Sharifai, A.I2; Muhammed, A.A2; Hassan, A. H1;.

  16. Weed clearance in Hudiara Nallah by chemical weed control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhillon, G.S

    1981-11-15

    Hudiara Nallah is a flood stream in West Punjab. It has a length of about 45km and breadth of nearly 25 metres. About 20 subsidiary drains join with the Nallah. These drains have a length of about 270km. The Nallah has a discharge capacity of 1248 cusecs. Most of the subsidiary drains start from ponds which are generally infected with Eichhornia plants. These plants enter into the subsidiary drains and finally into Hudiara Nallah. The plants float freely on the surface of water and multiply at a high rate. One plant of the weed propagates to 24 plants in a period of one month. The plants thus cover the whole drain in a few months. The weed also originates from seeds. Their heavy growth forms a mat-like surface. The weeds also choke bridges and sometimes cause damage to their structures. These obstruct the flow of water and decrease the carrying capacity of the drain. Their infestation thus causes floods and the very purpose of the drains gets lost. Thus the Nallah is heavily infested with Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth weed). Due to its fast propagation and heavy infestation it was not possible to clear the weed manually. The problem was, therefore, referred to the Chemistry Division of the Irrigation and Power Research Institute, Amritsar, by the Drainage Circle of the Irrigation Department in June 1978 when weed propagation was in full swing. A chemical treatment method of eradication was attempted.

  17. Pest Control in Corn and Soybeans: Weeds - Insects - Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doersch, R. E.; And Others

    This document gives the characteristics and application rates for herbicides used to control annual weeds in corn, annual and perennial broadleaf weeds in corn, quackgrass and yellow nutsedge in corn, and annual weeds in soybeans. It also gives insecticide use information for corn and soybeans. A brief discussion of disease control in corn and…

  18. Level of threshold weed density does not affect the long-term frequency of weed control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Oijen, van M.

    1997-01-01

    Weed control thresholds are often presented as a means to reduce unnecessary control measures, thereby increasing the effectiveness of weed management. While the threshold is a useful tool for cost-effective application of control on a single-year base, its role over the longer term is more

  19. A century of progress in weed control in hardwood seedbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. South

    2009-01-01

    Weeds have existed in nurseries since before the time Bartram grew hardwoods during the 18th century. Hand weeding was the primary method of weed control during the first part of the 20th century. From 1931 to 1970, advances in chemistry increased the use of herbicides, and advances in engineering increased the reliance on machines for cultivation. Many managers now...

  20. Critical period of weed control In cumin (Cuminum cyminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    azade hoseyni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the critical period of weed control in Cumin, an experiment with Complete Randomized Block Design and three replications was conducted in experimental field of Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, During 2004-2005 growing season. Treatments included different combinations of weed free and weed infested periods (20, 30, 40 and 80 days after germination plus weedy check and weed free check. Critical period weed control was evaluated with Gompertz and Logestic functions. Traits measured were yield and yield components, harvest index of cumin and also number and weight of weed species. Results showed the critical period was between 24-38 days after germination. With increasing interfereing period at early or late growth stages of cumin, the economic yield was reduced. By extending weeding periods at early stage of growth or during the growth period, dry weight of weeds were reduced, while extending weeding period at the end of growth stage and also weed free during growth period, early or late stages of growth had no significant effects on yield components except on number of umbels per plant. Harvest index was positively affected by early weeding. It appears that early weeding was somehow more effective on yield components for cumin.

  1. Applicator Training Manual for: Aquatic Weed Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, James W.

    The aquatic weeds discussed in this manual include algae, floating weeds, emersed weeds, and submerged weeds. Specific requirements for pesticide application are given for static water, limited flow, and moving water situations. Secondary effects of improper application rates and faulty application are described. Finally, techniques of limited…

  2. Weed control in energy forest production. Ograesbekaempning vid energiskogsodling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danfors, B.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of the work was to collect, analyse and present experiences from mechanical and chemical weed control. The drainage status of the soil have to be good if mechanical control shall be used. Chemical weed control with soil-active herbicides requires less herbicide on mineral soils than on organic soils. Weed control must be started the year before planting the cuttings. The energy forestry plantation should be planted with the greatest possible precision to enable weed control between the rows. If weed control is neglected the energy forestry plantation will be unsuccessful. In all such plantations an intensive supervision of the weeds is required for the 2 first years. When the plantation has become established, the weed will have difficulties in competing with the energy plants. Seed-propagated weeds can be controlled if the entire area is sprayed with a soil-active herbicide immediately after the planting of the cuttings. Soils with different organic contents require different doses of herbicide. At present, research is being concentrated on preparing recommendations on doses for different soils. If the spraying with soil-active herbicides is unsuccessful there must be alternative forms of weed control. Weed control in growing stands protect the plants. After harvest the competitive conditions change radically for the weeds. There may now be justification in applying an early spraying before new shoots have developed. Granulated soil-active herbicides may be an alternative. Under favourable conditions the energy plantations is capable of growing faster than the weeds without the help of herbicides or mechanical weed control. Recommendations for the use of herbicides have been prepared for different situations. (BoK).

  3. Determining treatment frequency for controlling weeds on traffic islands using chemical and non-chemical weed control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Anne Merete; Larsen, S.U.; Andreasen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    /flame, hot water or left untreated. The treatments were carried out at regular, predetermined intervals throughout the growing season in 2004, whereas in 2005 and 2006 how many treatments that were required to keep weed cover below a predetermined acceptance level of 2% were investigated. Percentage weed...... of treatments per year were required: glyphosate 2.5, hot water 3, flames 5, hot air/flames 5.5 and steam 5.5 treatments. The results demonstrate that the weed control should be adjusted to the prescribed quality for the traffic islands by regularly assessing the need for weed control. They also show......Many public authorities rely on the use of non-chemical weed control methods, due to stringent restrictions on herbicide use in urban areas. However, these methods usually require more repeated treatments than chemical weed management, resulting in increased costs of weed management. In order...

  4. Chemical and mechanical weed control in soybean (Glycine max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber, Jonas Felix

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the possibility of chemical and mechanical weed control strategies in soybean. Soybean field experiments were carried out in 2013 and 2014 in Southern Germany. Five treatments including common herbicide mixtures and four mechanical weed control treatments, implementing a harrow and a hoe, were tested at different locations. In the herbicide experiments two treatments were applied by PRE emergence herbicides (metribuzin, clomazone, dimethenamid and metribuzin, flufenacet, clomazone and another two treatments were sprayed with a combination of PRE + POST emergence herbicides (metribuzin, flufenacet, thifensulfuron and pendimethalin, thifensulfuron, bentazone, cycloxydim. Furthermore, a POST herbicide treatment was implemented (thifensulfuron, bentazone, thifensulfuron and fluazifop-P-butyl. In the mechanical weed control experiments, treatments were: three times hoeing, PRE emergence harrowing plus three times hoeing, hoeing and harrowing in rotation or three times harrowing. In both experiments an untreated control was included. A 90% weed control efficacy and 23% yield increase was observed in the POST herbicide treatment. PRE + POST treatments resulted in 92% to 99% weed control efficiency and 15% yield increase compared to the untreated control. In the mechanical weed control experiments the combination of PRE emergence harrowing and POST emergence hoeing resulted in 82% weed control efficiency and 34% higher yield compared to the untreated control. Less weed control efficiency (72% was observed in the harrow treatment, leading to 20% higher yield compared to the control. The suitability of both strategies for implementation in “Integrated Weed Management” has been investigated.

  5. A Non-Chemical System for Online Weed Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Ayala, Victor; Peteinatos, Gerassimos; Gerhards, Roland; Andújar, Dionisio

    2015-01-01

    Non-chemical weed control methods need to be directed towards a site-specific weeding approach, in order to be able to compete the conventional herbicide equivalents. A system for online weed control was developed. It automatically adjusts the tine angle of a harrow and creates different levels of intensity: from gentle to aggressive. Two experimental plots in a maize field were harrowed with two consecutive passes. The plots presented from low to high weed infestation levels. Discriminant capabilities of an ultrasonic sensor were used to determine the crop and weed variability of the field. A controlling unit used ultrasonic readings to adjust the tine angle, producing an appropriate harrowing intensity. Thus, areas with high crop and weed densities were more aggressively harrowed, while areas with lower densities were cultivated with a gentler treatment; areas with very low densities or without weeds were not treated. Although the weed development was relatively advanced and the soil surface was hard, the weed control achieved by the system reached an average of 51% (20%–91%), without causing significant crop damage as a result of harrowing. This system is proposed as a relatively low cost, online, and real-time automatic harrow that improves the weed control efficacy, reduces energy consumption, and avoids the usage of herbicide. PMID:25831085

  6. A non-chemical system for online weed control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Ayala, Victor; Peteinatos, Gerassimos; Gerhards, Roland; Andújar, Dionisio

    2015-03-30

    Non-chemical weed control methods need to be directed towards a site-specific weeding approach, in order to be able to compete the conventional herbicide equivalents. A system for online weed control was developed. It automatically adjusts the tine angle of a harrow and creates different levels of intensity: from gentle to aggressive. Two experimental plots in a maize field were harrowed with two consecutive passes. The plots presented from low to high weed infestation levels. Discriminant capabilities of an ultrasonic sensor were used to determine the crop and weed variability of the field. A controlling unit used ultrasonic readings to adjust the tine angle, producing an appropriate harrowing intensity. Thus, areas with high crop and weed densities were more aggressively harrowed, while areas with lower densities were cultivated with a gentler treatment; areas with very low densities or without weeds were not treated. Although the weed development was relatively advanced and the soil surface was hard, the weed control achieved by the system reached an average of 51% (20%-91%), without causing significant crop damage as a result of harrowing. This system is proposed as a relatively low cost, online, and real-time automatic harrow that improves the weed control efficacy, reduces energy consumption, and avoids the usage of herbicide.

  7. Domestic geese: biological weed control in an agricultural setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricia L. Wurtz

    1995-01-01

    Vertebrate herbivores can be effective agents of biological weed control in certain applications. I compared the use of domestic geese for weed control in an agricultural field with the herbicide hexazinone and with hand control. Newly planted spruce seedlings acted as a prototype crop that would be unpalatable to the geese. Trampling by geese led to as much as 47%...

  8. Problems and achievements of cotton (Gossypium Hirsutum L. weeds control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Barakova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Weed control in the cultivation of cotton is critical to the yield and quality of production. The influence of economically important weeds was studied. Chemical control is the most effective method of weed control in cotton but much of the information on it relates to primary weed infestation. Problems with primary weed infestation in cotton have been solved to a significant extent. The question of secondary weed infestation with annual and perennial graminaceous weeds during the period of cotton vegetation is also determined largely by the use of antigraminaceous herbicides. The data related to herbicides to effectively control secondary germinated broadleaf weeds in conventional technology for cotton growing are quite scarce, even globally. We are still seeking effective herbicides for control of these weeds in cotton crops. Studies on their influence on the sowing characteristics of cotton seed and the quality of cotton fiber are still insufficient. In the scientific literature there is not enough information on these questions. The combinations of herbicides, as well as their tank mixtures with fertilizers or plant growth regulators are more efficient than autonomous application. Often during their combined application higher synergistic effect on yield is produced. There is information about cotton cultivars resistant to glyphosate. These cultivars are GMO and they are banned within the European Union, including Bulgaria.

  9. Critical Period of Weed Control in Aerobic Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M. P.; Juraimi, A. S.; Samedani, B.; Puteh, A.; Man, A.

    2012-01-01

    Critical period of weed control is the foundation of integrated weed management and, hence, can be considered the first step to design weed control strategy. To determine critical period of weed control of aerobic rice, field trials were conducted during 2010/2011 at Universiti Putra Malaysia. A quantitative series of treatments comprising two components, (a) increasing duration of weed interference and (b) increasing length of weed-free period, were imposed. Critical period was determined through Logistic and Gompertz equations. Critical period varied between seasons; in main season, it started earlier and lasted longer, as compared to off-season. The onset of the critical period was found relatively stable between seasons, while the end was more variable. Critical period was determined as 7–49 days after seeding in off-season and 7–53 days in main season to achieve 95% of weed-free yield, and 23–40 days in off-season and 21–43 days in main season to achieve 90% of weed-free yield. Since 5% yield loss level is not practical from economic view point, a 10% yield loss may be considered excellent from economic view point. Therefore, aerobic rice should be kept weed-free during 21–43 days for better yield and higher economic return. PMID:22778701

  10. Critical period of weed control in aerobic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M P; Juraimi, A S; Samedani, B; Puteh, A; Man, A

    2012-01-01

    Critical period of weed control is the foundation of integrated weed management and, hence, can be considered the first step to design weed control strategy. To determine critical period of weed control of aerobic rice, field trials were conducted during 2010/2011 at Universiti Putra Malaysia. A quantitative series of treatments comprising two components, (a) increasing duration of weed interference and (b) increasing length of weed-free period, were imposed. Critical period was determined through Logistic and Gompertz equations. Critical period varied between seasons; in main season, it started earlier and lasted longer, as compared to off-season. The onset of the critical period was found relatively stable between seasons, while the end was more variable. Critical period was determined as 7-49 days after seeding in off-season and 7-53 days in main season to achieve 95% of weed-free yield, and 23-40 days in off-season and 21-43 days in main season to achieve 90% of weed-free yield. Since 5% yield loss level is not practical from economic view point, a 10% yield loss may be considered excellent from economic view point. Therefore, aerobic rice should be kept weed-free during 21-43 days for better yield and higher economic return.

  11. Big Data for weed control and crop protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evert, van F.K.; Fountas, S.; Jakovetic, D.; Crnojevic, V.; Travlos, I.; Kempenaar, C.

    2017-01-01

    Farmers have access to many data-intensive technologies to help them monitor and control weeds and pests. Data collection, data modelling and analysis, and data sharing have become core challenges in weed control and crop protection. We review the challenges and opportunities of Big Data in

  12. How to Identify and Control Water Weeds and Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applied Biochemists, Inc., Mequon, WI.

    Included in this guide to water management are general descriptions of algae, toxic algae, weed problems in lakes, ponds, and canals, and general discussions of mechanical, biological and chemical control methods. In addition, pictures, descriptions, and recommended control methods are given for algae, 6 types of floating weeds, 18 types of…

  13. Field Applications of Automated Weed control: Northwest Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstee, J.W.; Nieuwenhuizen, A.T.

    2014-01-01


    In Northwest Europe there is high need for advanced weed control methods. The use of crop protection chemicals has become stricter, and integrated pest management is required by regulations from the European Union. This need has resulted in the development of several advanced weed control

  14. Weed control of growing stands of energy forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noren, O.; Danfors, B.; Stambeck, A.

    1983-01-01

    Investigations that would lead to the selection of suitable methods of weed control in growing stands of energy forests were started. Different methods of accomplishing the weed control measures, i.e., both mechanical and chemical methods must be available. The mechanical measures can be done either with powered or nonpowered tillage implements. The chemical weed control will require special techniques and equipment. As regards mechanical weed control, a tool-bar was built upon which different tillage units could be attached. Weed control with non-powered tillage implements gives best results on mineral soils. On orgnogenic soils the degree of humification and the number of weeds are decisive for the result. The tool-bar was also used to test ground-driven discs, diameter 520 mm. These work well under most conditions and can also be used on organogenic soils with abundant growth of weeds. The placement of the implement, preferably in two parts, one in front and one at the rear of the tractor permits greater precision to be achieved when driving at the same time as the implement can be slightly more roomy. On organogenic soils a rotary cultivator often gives good results in weed control. Where the weed growth was too dense leaves and stems became entwined around the axles. On low-humified soils residues of roots and stumps caused problems. The bulletin discusses weed-wiper technique as well as spraying, and different technical solutions are proposed. In order to achieve effective mechanical or chemical weed control it is necessary to place high demands on the precision in the planting of the cuttings. Another requirement that arises in different situations is the accessibility. Machinery and vehicles must be designed so that they can be fitted with suitable wheel equipment or tracks that provide better carying capacity. Long-term soil compaction can also be reduced if the wheel equipment is suitably designed.

  15. Weed sustainable managment in agricultral and non-agricultural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Arcangeli

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable agriculture is a way to assure the availability of natural resources for future generations.Weed managementin cultivated and not cultivated areas is part of sustainable agriculture as well, and has to face three important challenges:economical (to increase income and competitiveness of farm sector, social (give rural areas opportunity of economicdevelopment and improvement of living conditions, environmental (promote good agricultural practices andpreserve habitats, biodiversity and landscape. The first two challenges involve the in-depth study of models, the economicthreshold of intervention, the management of herbicide resistance phenomena, the study and development ofnew herbicide molecules, or even modern formulations, leading to the optimization of treatments with possible reductionof distributed doses per hectare. Environmental issues must be set in the studies to assess and manage the factorsleading to phenomena of diffuse or point pollution (i.e. water volumes, soil, etc.. However, a sustainable agricultureproduction must take into account consumers’ needs and concerns, especially about food health and safety withrespect to production methods (traditional, integrated and biological. In this context, the results obtained by the developmentof more advanced active principles, the spread of public and private Integrated Production Specifications(Disciplinari di Produzione Integrata and the greater and greater commitment by the institutions in charge of monitoringthe agro-pharmaceutical residues in agro-food products, can be set. The SIRFI SIRFI (Società Italiana per laRicerca sulla Flora Infestante, thanks to the multi-disciplinarity of the structures supporting it, always takes an activepart into innovation especially aimed to the identification of tools implementing farm activity sustainability.

  16. Evaluation of Different Weed Control Techniques in Soyabean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten weed control treatments consisting of wheel type weeder [3 and 6 weeks after planting (wap)]; hoe weeding (3 and 6 wap); Pre-emergence application of metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide] + prometryn [N, N'-bis (1-methylethyl)-6-(methylthio)-1,3,5-triazine-2 ...

  17. Economic assessment of tillage systems and weed control methods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to appraise the economics of different land preparation systems and weed management options in maize cultivation in three ecological zones (Ikenne, Ibadan and Ilorin) of southwestern Nigeria. Four tillage systems as main treatments and six weed control methods as sub-treatments were ...

  18. Chemical and Mechanical Control of Soybean (Glycin max L. Weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Gholamalipour Alamdari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate effects of the various concentrations of two herbicides of the trifluralin and Imazethapyr and weeding on weeds control, yield and yield components of soybean (Glycin max L., an experiment was carried out based on randomized complete block design with three replications at the Agriculture Land of Ghravolhaji Village in Kallale district of Golestan province in 2014. Treatments consisted of planting soybean under weeding, without weeding and application of trifluralin and Imazethapyr as 100% trifluralin, 75% trifluralin + 25% Imazethapyr, 50% trifluralin + 50% Imazethapyr, 25% trifluralin + 75% Imazethapyr, 100% pursuit, 100% Imazethapyr + 25% trifluralin, 25% Imazethapyr + 100% trifluralin, 100% Imazethapyr + 50% trifluralin and 50% Imazethapyr + 100% trifluralin. density of each weed, their total density and inhibition percentage were measured. Results showed that the effect of chemical weed control on all traits measured, except seed number per pot, 1000 seed weight, content of chlorophyll a and total chlorophyll, were significant. The highest leaf area, plant height, number of pods per plant, aerial plant dry weight, seed number per plant and seed weight per plant were observed in the treatment of the 100% Imazethapyr (238.67 cm2, weeding (57.69 cm, both treatments of weeding (33.10 and 25% Imazethapyr +100% trifluralin (28.3, both treatment of weeding (163.92 g and 100%  Imazethapyr (163.70 g, weeding (67.10 seed per plant, both treatment of weeding and 100%  Imazethapyr + 50% trifluralin (10.27 seed per plant respectively. The highest seed yield was obtained from weeding treatment (2383 kg/h. Based on the results, the highest content of protein and chlorophyll b in soybean were obtained from weeding treatment. The highest inhibition percentage of weeds was found in the additional treatment of 50% Imazethapyr + 100% trifluralin (75.19 and 100% Imazethapyr + 25% trifluralin (72.86. The lowest and highest total phenols content and

  19. The Effect of Laser Treatment as a Weed Control Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Bak, Thomas; Christensen, Svend

    2006-01-01

    A laser beam directed towards weeds can be an efficient weed control method as an alternative to herbicides. Lasers may deliver high-density energy to selected plant material, raising the temperature of the water in the plant cells and thereby stop or delay the growth. A commercial use of lasers ...... (exposure time and spot size of the laser beam). The experiment also showed a significant difference between two wavelengths. In order to improve the performance and to validate the efficacy on a broader spectrum of weed species, further research and development is needed.......A laser beam directed towards weeds can be an efficient weed control method as an alternative to herbicides. Lasers may deliver high-density energy to selected plant material, raising the temperature of the water in the plant cells and thereby stop or delay the growth. A commercial use of lasers...

  20. Effect of Different Methods of Chemical Weed Control Irrigation Regimes on Weed Biomass and Safflower Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Matinfar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of different weed control methods and moisture regimes on safflower (Carthamus tinctorius, a field split plot experiment based on randomized complete block design with 4 replications was conducted in Takestan Iran, during growing seasons of 2007-8. Three irrigations regimes (normal irrigation, restricted irrigation at stem elongation and restricted irrigation at  flowering stage were assigned to the main plots and nine chemical weed control method (complete hand weeding, treflan with 2 L/ha as pre plant herbicide, sonalan with 3 L/ha ad pre plant herbicide, estomp with 3 L/ha as pre plant herbicide, gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide, treflan with 2 L/ha as pre plant herbicide+ gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide, sonalan with 3 L/ha as pre plant herbicide + gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide estomp with 3 L/ha as pre plant herbicide + gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide and without hand weeding to sub- plots. At the end of growing period traits like number of head   per plant, number of seed per head, 1000 grain weight, percent of seed oil, yield of seed oil and grain yield were measured. Results indicated that treflan + gallant super treatment in restricted irrigation at stem elongation stage had the lowest dry weight of weeds. In this study maximum grain yield (2927 Kg/ha was achieved from hand weeding + usual irrigation treatments. In general treflan + gallant super treatment was the most effective treatment on safflower yield and weed control.

  1. Preliminary studies on chemical weed control in eucalyptus (hybrid) nursery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, N.S.; Desappa; Singh, C.D.

    1985-12-01

    Weeds adversely affect the germination and growth of seedlings in the Eucalyptus hybrid nursery beds. Manual weeding which is generally followed is time consuming, difficult and less effective. In order to overcome this problem a study was undertaken for effective control of weeds in Eucalyptus hybrid nursery by means of preemergence weedicides viz. Baseline (profluralin), Pendimethaline (Stemp 30 EC), Ronster (Oxadiazen) and Simazine. They were applied to nursery beds as pre-emergence spray, at 1.5, 1.5, 0.5 and 1 kg/ha respectively. Basalin was most effective in controlling both dicot and monocot weeks followed by pendimethaline and Ronster. Simazine was lethal to both Eucalyptus and weed seed germination. Seedling of Eucalyptus in Basalin treated plots were more in number (153/sq ft.), taller (24 cm) and healthier compared to other weedicide treatments. Maximum number of dicot and monocot weeds were found in control plot, consequently, seedling growth was very much suppressed. The studies indicated that preemergence chemical weedicides could be effectively used to control nursery weeds and that Basalin weedicide is more effective in controlling both dicot and monocot weeds and appear to be a suitable chemical weedicide for Eucalyptus hybrid nurseries. 8 references, 3 tables.

  2. Weed Control Sprayers: Calibration and Maintenance. Special Circular 81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Arthur L.

    This manual covers aspects of calibration and maintenance of weed control sprayers including variables affecting application rate, the pre-calibration check, calculations, band spraying, nozzle tip selection, agitation, and cleaning. (BB)

  3. Biological control of weeds in European crops: recent achievements and future work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müllerer-Schärer, H.; Greaves, M.P.

    2000-01-01

    Approaches to the biological control of weeds in arable crops and integration of biological weed control with other methods of weed management are broadly discussed. Various types of integrative approaches to biological control of weeds in crops have been studied within the framework of a concerted

  4. Effectiveness of the Primextra Gold in controlling weeds of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy of Primextra Gold herbicide in controlling weeds in cucumber was evaluated in this research. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Seven weed control treatments – 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.25 and 1.5 kg a.i/pot – were applied pre-emergent for this study.

  5. Benefits of Precision Farming Technologies for Mechanical Weed Control in Soybean and Sugar Beet—Comparison of Precision Hoeing with Conventional Mechanical Weed Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kunz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Weed infestations and associated yield losses require effective weed control measures in soybean and sugar beet. Besides chemical weed control, mechanical weeding plays an important role in integrated weed management systems. Field experiments were conducted at three locations for soybean in 2013 and 2014 and at four locations for sugar beet in 2014 to investigate if automatic steering technologies for inter-row weed hoeing using a camera or RTK-GNSS increase weed control efficacy, efficiency and crop yield. Treatments using precision farming technologies were compared with conventional weed control strategies. Weed densities in the experiments ranged from 15 to 154 plants m−2 with Chenopodium album, Polygonum convolvulus, Polygonum aviculare, Matricaria chamomilla and Lamium purpureum being the most abundant species. Weed hoeing using automatic steering technologies reduced weed densities in soybean by 89% and in sugar beet by 87% compared to 85% weed control efficacy in soybean and sugar beet with conventional weeding systems. Speed of weed hoeing could be increased from 4 km h−1 with conventional hoes to 7 and 10 km·h−1, when automatic steering systems were used. Precision hoeing technologies increased soybean yield by 23% and sugar beet yield by 37%. After conventional hoeing and harrowing, soybean yields were increased by 28% and sugar beet yield by 26%.

  6. Effect of weed control treatments and cutting frequency on weed dry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two experiments were conducted during the rainy seasons of 2012 and 2013 at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Department of Crop Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, to evaluate the growth and leaf yield of Telfairia occidentials Hook F. as influenced by weed control treatments and cutting frequencies.

  7. Determination of critical period for weed control in the second crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... Weeds are a major constraint in corn production. Understanding the critical period for weed control. (CPWC) can be a tool for effective weed control and reducing the impacts of weeds. Three experiments were conducted to determine CPWC in the second corn crop from 1996 to 1998. The critical period for.

  8. Dynamics of weed populations : spatial pattern formation and implications for control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.

    1998-01-01

    Modelling studies were carried out to analyse spatio-temporal dynamics of annual weed populations and to identify the key factors that determine the long-term herbicide use of weed control programmes. Three different weed control programmes were studied.

    In the first weed

  9. Evaluation of Basta ( glufosinate ammonium ) for weed control in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Basta at the rate of 0.6 - 1.0 kg a.i./ha effectively controlled most of the weeds found in coffee growing areas of Ghana, over much longer periods than the use of paraquat at the rate of 0.3 - 0.6 kg a.i./ha. However both herbicides could not effectively suppress perennial weeds such as Imperata cylindrica, Panicum maximum, ...

  10. Ecologically sustainable weed management: How do we get from proof-of-concept to adoption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Matt; Baraibar, Bàrbara; Buckley, Yvonne; Childs, Dylan; Christensen, Svend; Cousens, Roger; Eizenberg, Hanan; Heijting, Sanne; Loddo, Donato; Merotto, Aldo; Renton, Michael; Riemens, Marleen

    2016-07-01

    Weed management is a critically important activity on both agricultural and non-agricultural lands, but it is faced with a daunting set of challenges: environmental damage caused by control practices, weed resistance to herbicides, accelerated rates of weed dispersal through global trade, and greater weed impacts due to changes in climate and land use. Broad-scale use of new approaches is needed if weed management is to be successful in the coming era. We examine three approaches likely to prove useful for addressing current and future challenges from weeds: diversifying weed management strategies with multiple complementary tactics, developing crop genotypes for enhanced weed suppression, and tailoring management strategies to better accommodate variability in weed spatial distributions. In all three cases, proof-of-concept has long been demonstrated and considerable scientific innovations have been made, but uptake by farmers and land managers has been extremely limited. Impediments to employing these and other ecologically based approaches include inadequate or inappropriate government policy instruments, a lack of market mechanisms, and a paucity of social infrastructure with which to influence learning, decision-making, and actions by farmers and land managers. We offer examples of how these impediments are being addressed in different parts of the world, but note that there is no clear formula for determining which sets of policies, market mechanisms, and educational activities will be effective in various locations. Implementing new approaches for weed management will require multidisciplinary teams comprised of scientists, engineers, economists, sociologists, educators, farmers, land managers, industry personnel, policy makers, and others willing to focus on weeds within whole farming systems and land management units. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. Bioactive Compound From Mangoes Leaves Extract as Potential Soil Bioherbicide to Control Amaranth Weed (Amaranthus Spinosus Linn.)

    OpenAIRE

    Syahri, Rifauldin; Widaryanto, Eko; Wicaksono, Karuniawan Puji

    2017-01-01

    Bioherbicide is important approach for sustainable farming practices. One of plant that has potentially as bioherbicide, which is environmentally safe, is mango. Mango leaf extract is useful as bioherbicide because it produces allelochemical compounds, which could inhibit the weed growth. This research was designed to study the effect of several mangoes species leaves extract to control dominant weed (amaranth). Split plot design was implemented using mango species (S) as the main plot; S1 (M...

  12. Bioactive compound from mangoes leaves extract as potential soil bioherbicide to control amaranth weed (Amaranthus spinosus Linn.)

    OpenAIRE

    Rifauldin Syahri; Eko Widaryanto; Karuniawan Puji Wicaksono

    2017-01-01

    Bioherbicide is important approach for sustainable farming practices. One of plant that has potentially as bioherbicide, which is environmentally safe, is mango. Mango leaf extract is useful as bioherbicide because it produces allelochemical compounds, which could inhibit the weed growth. This research was designed to study the effect of several mangoes species leaves extract to control dominant weed (amaranth). Split plot design was implemented using mango species (S) as the main plot; S1 (M...

  13. Designing, modeling and controlling a novel autonomous laser weeding system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahrak Nadimi, Esmaeil; Andersson, Kim Johan; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm

    2009-01-01

    conveyor belts fully controlled by a Siemens PLC controller (programmable logic controller), a stereo vision system consisting of two cameras, a 2-axis laser beam deflection unit and a laser source. The main challenge in this project was to accurately estimate and reconstruct the weed growth center using...... the stereo vision system. The growth center was then targeted by a laser beam controlled by a deflection unit. The preliminary test results showed a good performance of the system than can replace usage of herbicides. Keywords: laser weeding system, herbicide, stereo vision system, deflection unit...

  14. Irrigation and weed control alter soil microbiology and nutrient availability in North Carolina Sandhill peach orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Liangju; Yuan, Yongge; Xu, Jing; Tu, Cong; Fisk, Connie; Zhang, Weijian; Chen, Xin; Ritchie, David; Hu, Shuijin

    2018-02-15

    Orchard management practices such as weed control and irrigation are primarily aimed at maximizing fruit yields and economic profits. However, the impact of these practices on soil fertility and soil microbiology is often overlooked. We conducted a two-factor experimental manipulation of weed control by herbicide and trickle irrigation in a nutrient-poor peach (Prunus persica L. cv. Contender) orchard near Jackson Springs, North Carolina. After three and eight years of treatments, an array of soil fertility parameters were examined, including soil pH, soil N, P and cation nutrients, microbial biomass and respiration, N mineralization, and presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Three general trends emerged: 1) irrigation significantly increased soil microbial biomass and activity, 2) infection rate of mycorrhizal fungi within roots were significantly higher under irrigation than non-irrigation treatments, but no significant difference in the AMF community composition was detected among treatments, 3) weed control through herbicides reduced soil organic matter, microbial biomass and activity, and mineral nutrients, but had no significant impacts on root mycorrhizal infection and AMF communities. Weed-control treatments directly decreased availability of soil nutrients in year 8, especially soil extractable inorganic N. Weed control also appears to have altered the soil nutrients via changes in soil microbes and altered net N mineralization via changes in soil microbial biomass and activity. These results indicate that long-term weed control using herbicides reduces soil fertility through reducing organic C inputs, nutrient retention and soil microbes. Together, these findings highlight the need for alternative practices such as winter legume cover cropping that maintain and/or enhance organic inputs to sustain the soil fertility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. New possibilities for weed control in conventional soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen, Jan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In field trials in was investigated, if the use of the in Germany new active ingredient imazamox enlarge the possibilities of post emergence weed control in soybeans. Furthermore new herbicide strategies were tested on efficacy and selectivity in soybeans. The use of imazamox was very selective and showed a relative broad spectrum of controlled weed species. However, efficacy of imazamox must be supported by a pre-emergence treatment and in most cases by a tank mix partner. For example cleavers (Galium aparine can not be controlled by imazamox. Tankmixtures of imazamox and bentazon indicated an antagonism. Efficacy to some weed species was reduced compared to solo application. The low dose concept – three applications of low doses at cotyledon stage of weeds led to some success. However, these strategies must be further investigated, before they can be recommended to commercial farming practice. All herbicide strategies tested showed some surviving weed species. This indicates that choice of herbicides, dose rates and application strategies must be done very careful and site specific.

  16. Weed control changes and genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops in the USA 1996–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Crops that have been genetically modified (GM) to be tolerant to herbicides have been widely grown in the USA since 1996. The rapid and widespread adoption of this technology reflects the important economic and environmental benefits that farmers have derived from its use (equal to $21.7 billion additional farm income and a 225 million kg reduction in herbicide active ingredient use 1996–2012). During this time, weed control practices in these crops relative to the ‘conventional alternative’ have evolved to reflect experience of using the technology, the challenges that have arisen and the increasing focus in recent years on developing sustainable production systems. This paper examines the evidence on the changing nature of herbicides used with these crops and in particular how farmers addressed the challenge of weed resistance. The evidence shows that use of the technology has resulted in a net reduction in both the amount of herbicide used and the associated environmental impact, as measured by the EIQ indicator when compared to what can reasonably be expected if the area planted to GM HT crops reverted to conventional production methods. It also facilitated many farmers being able to derive the economic and environmental benefits associated with switching from a plough-based to a no tillage or conservation tillage production system. In terms of herbicide use, the technology has also contributed to a change the profile of herbicides used. A broad range of, mostly selective herbicides has been replaced by one or 2 broad-spectrum herbicides (mostly glyphosate) used in conjunction with one or 2 other (complementary) herbicides. Since the mid-2000s, the average amount of herbicide applied and the associated environmental load, as measured by the EIQ indicator, have increased on both GM HT and conventional crops. A primary reason for these changes has been increasing incidence of weed species developing populations resistant to herbicides and increased

  17. Weed control changes and genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops in the USA 1996-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Crops that have been genetically modified (GM) to be tolerant to herbicides have been widely grown in the USA since 1996. The rapid and widespread adoption of this technology reflects the important economic and environmental benefits that farmers have derived from its use (equal to $21.7 billion additional farm income and a 225 million kg reduction in herbicide active ingredient use 1996-2012). During this time, weed control practices in these crops relative to the 'conventional alternative' have evolved to reflect experience of using the technology, the challenges that have arisen and the increasing focus in recent years on developing sustainable production systems. This paper examines the evidence on the changing nature of herbicides used with these crops and in particular how farmers addressed the challenge of weed resistance. The evidence shows that use of the technology has resulted in a net reduction in both the amount of herbicide used and the associated environmental impact, as measured by the EIQ indicator when compared to what can reasonably be expected if the area planted to GM HT crops reverted to conventional production methods. It also facilitated many farmers being able to derive the economic and environmental benefits associated with switching from a plough-based to a no tillage or conservation tillage production system. In terms of herbicide use, the technology has also contributed to a change the profile of herbicides used. A broad range of, mostly selective herbicides has been replaced by one or 2 broad-spectrum herbicides (mostly glyphosate) used in conjunction with one or 2 other (complementary) herbicides. Since the mid-2000s, the average amount of herbicide applied and the associated environmental load, as measured by the EIQ indicator, have increased on both GM HT and conventional crops. A primary reason for these changes has been increasing incidence of weed species developing populations resistant to herbicides and increased awareness of

  18. Alternative surfacing materials for weed control at BC Hydro substations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, T.C.; Shrimpton, G.M.

    1997-04-01

    A two year study was conducted by BC Hydro in which a variety of surfacing materials were tested for their suitability for use in substations. Ideally, surfacing materials should have the following characteristics: high electrical resistivity in both dry and wet conditions, resistance to invasion by weeds, good driveability, good drainage, non-flammable, reasonably priced, no dust to foul conductors, and be aesthetically pleasing. Trials at Vernon Koksilah, and Ingledow substations were conducted to test the materials. A qualitative estimate of the amount of weed control provided by each material was recorded. The trials were meant to provide operational recommendations and screening information to allow for future testing of promising materials or combination of materials. Results showed that no single material meets all the desired criteria. The surfaces that best combined good weed control, electrical resistance and surface stability was a 15 cm deep layer of crushed gravel, especially if underlain by a layer of geotextile. 4 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig.

  19. Weed control through crop rotation and alternative management practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böhm, Herwart

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Economic as well as agricultural and socio-political changes have an impact on crop management and thus also on crop rotation design and the related effects on the weed flora. Likewise other changes in cultivation such as reduced tillage practices, earlier sowing date, etc. cause an increase in weed infestation resp. an increased use of herbicides and if so contribute to herbicide resistance. The positive effects of crop rotation, but also of alternative management practices such as choice of varieties, catch crops, mixed cropping, green chop, and the share of predators, as well as methods of direct non-chemical weed control are presented and discussed for both, conventional and organic farming. If alternative management methods should be more practiced, especially trade-offs need to be broken, or incentives be offered.

  20. WEED CONTROL AND BORON NUTRITION ON Eucalyptus IN SILVOPASTORAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Magno Brighenti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the control of weeds in the rows of eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urograndis with herbicides applied singly or combined with boron (B, as well as, the response of Eucalyptus plants to this micronutrient. The experiments were carried out in a split-plot with randomized complete block design, with three replicates. Six treatments were applied to the plots: (i weeded control, (ii control without weeding, (iii glyphosate (1080 g ae ha-1 + chlorimuron-ethyl (10 g ai ha-1 + 0.05% v / v mineral oil, (iv glyphosate (1080 g ae  ha-1 + isoxaflutole (112.5 g ai ha-1,  (v glyphosate (1080 g ae ha-1 and  (vi oxyfluorfen (480 g ai ha-1. The sub-plots consisted of the absence or presence of 4 kg of boric acid (H3BO3 - 17% B in 100 L of water. The addition of boric acid in the solution containing the herbicides did not affect the weed control. There was an increase in boron content in the soil and consequently an increase in the boron levels in the eucalyptus leaves. The combined application of herbicides plus boric acid is perfectly suitable for preventing dry of the pointer on eucalyptus plants. Keywords: Eucalyptus urograndis; chemical control; herbicides; micronutrients; Urochloa decumbens.

  1. Sweat, Brain-Power, Horsepower, and Time - The Keys to Controlling Weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control in organic crop production is difficult and costly. Early studies on organic weed control in conservation tillage systems were disappointing. Research shifted to organic weed control in conventional tillage systems. Intense cultivation with a tine weeder was the most consistent metho...

  2. Weed control using ammonium nonanoate and cultivation in organic Vidalia sweet onion production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonium nonanoate is registered for weed control in certified organic crop production and may be useful to control cool-season weeds in organic Vidalia® sweet onion. Cultivation with a tine weeder has been identified as a cost-effective means of weed control, but delays in cultivation cause some w...

  3. Effect of weed control methods on some soil properties of a newly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Weed control constitutes a high percentage of the total field maintenance cost of newly planted cocoa. Soil samples were collected from an experiment that was designed to evaluate some weed control methods during cocoa establishment. The objective of the experiment was to assess the effect of the weed control ...

  4. Use of Essential Oils of Cinnamon, Lavender and Peppermint for Weed Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enio Campiglia

    Full Text Available The indiscriminate use of synthetic chemical compounds for weed control has been often responsible of damage to both the environment and the human health. To challenge these problems, in the last years research has increased its effort to find out alternative farming strategies. A feasible alternative could be the identification of natural substances with allelopathic effects for the realization of natural herbicides. Some research has already highlighted the possibility of using essential oils, extracted from aromatic plants, for weed control. The advantage in the utilization of such natural compounds is the quickly breaking down process into the environment and so the possible application in sustainable agriculture like organic farming. Objective of this research was the evaluation of the inhibition effect exerted by the essential oils of cinnamon, peppermint and lavender on seeds germination of some of the most common weeds species of the Mediterranean environment (pigweed, wild mustard and ryegrass. The results have highlighted a control in the weeds germination. Among the essential oils tested, cinnamon oil has exerted the highest inhibition effect compared with lavender and peppermint ones. The dicotyledonous species have been more susceptible compared with the monocotyledonous, even if it has been recorded only for redroot pigweed a dose able to inhibit totally the seed germination.

  5. Effects of Weed Control and Cow Dung Manure on Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field trials were conducted during the 2006, 2007 and 2008 rainy seasons at the Institute for Agricultural Research Samaru, in the Northern guinea savanna zone of Nigeria to evaluate the effects of weed control and cow dung manure treatments on growth of Quality Protein Maize. The trial consisted of factorial ...

  6. Organic weed control in certified organic watermelon production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing perception by consumers that organic food tastes better and is healthier continues to expand the demand for organically produced crops. Field research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma to determine the impact of organic production systems on weed control and watermelon (Citrullus l...

  7. Funding needed for assessments of weed biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Maron; Dean E. Pearson; Stephen M. Hovick; Walter P. Carson

    2010-01-01

    Invasive non-native plants are a serious economic and ecological problem worldwide, and major efforts are therefore devoted to reducing weed abundance in agricultural and natural settings. Effective options for reducing invasive abundance and spread are few, although one common approach is biological control - the introduction of specialist herbivores or pathogens from...

  8. Influence of weed control methods, poultry manure and planting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field trials were conducted during the rainy seasons (2012 and 2013) at the Research Farm of Institute for Agricultural Research, Samaru Zaria and College of Agriculture and Animal Science, Mando Kaduna, in the Northern Guinea Savannah Zone of Nigeria, to determine the Influence of weed control methods, poultry ...

  9. Effects of Weed Control and Cow Dung Manure on Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: Field trials were conducted during the 2006, 2007 and 2008 rainy seasons at the Institute for. Agricultural Research Samaru, in the Northern guinea savanna zone of Nigeria to evaluate the effects of weed control and cow dung manure treatments on growth of Quality Protein Maize. The trial consisted of factorial.

  10. Herbaceous weed control in loblolly pine plantations using flazasulfuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew W. Ezell; Jimmie L. Yeiser

    2015-01-01

    A total of 13 treatments were applied at four sites (two in Mississippi and two in Texas) to evaluate the efficacy of flazasulfuron applied alone or in mixtures for providing control of herbaceous weeds. All sites were newly established loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations. Plots were evaluated monthly until 180 days after treatment. No phytotoxicity on pine...

  11. effect of fluazitopbutyl and atrazine/metolachlor for weed control

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COCOYAM

    ABSTRACT. Field studies were conducted at the research farm of the National Root Crops Research. Institute (NRCRI), Umudike, south-eastern Nigeria in 2008 and 2009 cropping seasons, to determine the effect of herbicides and the economic implications of chemical weed control in sweetpotato using herbicides.

  12. Efficacy of primextra gold in controlling weeds of melon ( Citrillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was conducted in the Center of Ecological Studies, University of Port Harcourt, Rivers State to evaluate the efficacy of Primextra Gold (290g /l S – Metalochlor and 370g/l Atrazine) herbicide in controlling weeds in melon and to determine its safety for use in melon. The experiment was carried out between ...

  13. The critical period of weed control in corn Zea mays at Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    majid abaspoor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the critical period of weed control in corn, an experiment was conducted at Research Station, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in year 2000. The experiment consisted of two discrete periods, a weed-free and a weed infested period. The weed-free period consisted of removing all weeds till 4th (19 days after planting, 7th (34 days after planting, 11th (48 days after planting, 13th (52 days after planting, and 17th (59 days after planting, leaf growth stages and weed free check for growing season (123 days after planting, and the critical time of weed infested consisted of removing all weeds from fourth (19 days after planting, 7th (34 days after planting, 11th (48 days after planting, 13th (52 days after planting, and 17th (59 days after planting, leaf growth stages and weedy infested check for growing season. All treatments were compared in a randomized complete block design with four replications. The results showed that by prolonging weed-infested period, dry matter and leaf surface area of weeds per square meter were increased, but by increasing weed-infested period, weed density was decreased. The lowest weed density (23 weed plants per m2 was shown at infested all period of corn growing season. By passing the growing season, C4 weed species such as red root pigweed and barnyard grass were dominant compared with C3 weed species. At weed infested all period of corn growing season, red root pigweed had the highest dry matter (93% of all weeds dry matter and leaf surface area (86% of all weeds leaf surface compared with other weed species. At the first treatment of critical weed-free (19 days after planting the regrowth of weeds were substantial which resulted in decreasing growth of corn. Grain yield of corn were significantly higher at 52, 59 and 123 days after planting in weed free treatments compared with 48, 52, 59 and 123 days after planting in weed infested treatments. However, there were no

  14. Weeds and their control in cassava | Melifonwu | African Crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Root yields from farmers' fields are generally low, partly due to effects of weed competition. Hoe-weeding is the common practice among cassava farmers. The frequency and timing of weeding depend on such factors as climate, cultural practices, crop growth, soil fertility and weed species. Some common noxious weeds of ...

  15. Control of aquatic weeds through pollutant reduction and weed utilization: a weed management approach in the lower Kafue River of Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkala, Thomson; Mwase, Enala T.; Mwala, Mick

    The aquatic weed situation in the Kafue River in Zambia continues to be a major challenge to the sustainable utilization of the water resources of the river. The general methods for managing the weeds, especially the water hyacinth, include use of bio-agents, chemicals, mechanical and physical approaches. These have had very little impact. This paper reports on a project that is investigating weed management strategies which involve use of cleaner production (CP) approach and the utilization of the weed for economic purposes. In addition, the ecological implications of these methods are being assessed. Effluent assessments indicated that apart from nitrates and phosphates, other effluent parameters met the Environmental Council of Zambia standards. Results further show that all the 24 areas surveyed for CP have uncontrolled socio-economic activities which generate both point and non-point sources of pollution that enter the water bodies. To minimize pollution, efforts include devising policy and technical strategies with the involvement of the affected riparian community. Production of mushroom by the communities using the water hyacinth substrate has been demonstrated. Up to 2.1 kg of mushroom was harvested from a single flush over a period of 4-5 weeks. Vegetables grown on soils treated with water hyacinth manure performed better than those grown using commercial fertiliser. The economics of the production are however, yet to be confirmed. If weed usage is proven economically and ecologically viable, the riverine community is envisaged to play a big role in aquatic weed management. High numbers of invertebrates known to be sensitive to pollution have been recorded in the weed-infested Kafue River implying that the water is of ;good; quality for these aquatic invertebrates. This observed quality of water may be due to water hyacinth playing a role by sieving pollutants from the river.

  16. Determination of critical period for weed control in intensive and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted in Zuenoula and Yamoussoukro for determining Critical Period for Weed Control (CPWC) in sugarcane. The treatments consisted in two sets of weed interference. In the first set, the crop was kept weed-free until 31, 61, 92, 123 days after planting (DAP) in Zuenoula and until 32, 69, 98 and ...

  17. Turning the aquatic weed Azolla into a sustainable crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, P.

    2017-01-01

    Growing worldwide demands for food, energy and chemicals threatens natural ecosystems and global climate. Plants are crucial for food production, but may also be used to produce sustainable energy and materials. Hereto novel crops are sought with high productivity per hectare, whilst requiring

  18. Weed control in a native rubber crop (Parthenium argentatum gray)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitworth, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in the production of rubber from guayule (Parthenium argentatum). Excellent control of several weed species in guayule has been obtained with Varsol (a naphtha oil) at 30-40 gal/acre applied at the cotyledon stage. At this stage, guayule survival averaged 86-63% according to dose, but plants up to 10 days old at the time of treatment showed increasing tolerance. Paraffin was somewhat more selective that Varsol.

  19. Agronomic Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Nathan L.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University examines agronomic weed problems and control. Contents include a listing of the characteristics of weeds, a section on herbicides, and a section on the important weeds of agronomic crops in Pennsylvania. The herbicide section discusses systemic herbicides, contact…

  20. Efficacy of Maister OD (Foramsulfuron + Idosulfuron a New Herbicide in Controlling Weeds of Corn Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Abdi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy of a new herbicide Foramsulfuron +Idosulfuron (Maister OD against other herbicides in corn fields, this experiment was fulfielld in 2010 at Mahidasht, Research Center of Agriculture and Natural Resources of Kermanshah, Iran. It was concucted in randomized complete block design with four replications and 11 treatments. In this experiment, three doses of herbicides (38.75, 46.5 and 54.25 g/ha including foramsulfuron + idosulfuron along with Nicusulfuron, ForamSulfuron, Rimsulfuron, Foramsulfuron + Rimsulfuron , Bromicid + hand weeding narrow leaf weeds, Bromicid + Nicusulfuron and U46 + hand weeding of narrow leaf weeds and a complete weeding as the control treatments were investigated. Weeds present in the field were Xanthium stromarium,Chenopedium album, Portulaca oleracea, Sorgum halepense and Setaria virdis. The results of this study showed that doses 38.75 and 46.5 g/ha of herbicide foramsulfuron + idosulfuron after treatments of Bromicid + Nicusulfuron and, Bromicid + narrow leaf weed, hand weeding respectively could control 90 and 86 % of weeds in corn field and increase its yields significantly. Because there are presently few registered herbicide available in Iran, necessity of finding proper herbicides to control weeds in corn field and based on the results oblained from this experiment it seems using 46.5 and 38-75 grams per hectare respectively of foramsulfuron + idosulfuron could be a better option than other herbicides to control weeds in corn fields and increase its seed yield.

  1. Experience with GOLTIX® TITAN® controlling annual dicotyledonous weeds in beets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fell, Martina

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The herbicide GOLTIX® TITAN® is the unique combination of two active ingredients, Metamitrone (525 g/L and Quinmerac (40 g/L. GOLTIX® TITAN® is used for the control of annual dicotyledonous weeds in sugar and fodder beets. Registration was granted for the post emergence splitting application with 3 x 2,0 L/ha (3 applications. This corresponds to the amount of 3150 g Metamitrone and 240 g Quinmerac per hectare at maximum application rate. The registration application for pre-emergence application has been submitted. Several field trials were carried out between 2009 and 2013. These trials revealed the optimized efficacy on important weeds in sugar beet production including Fool´s parsley (Aethusa cynapium, Cleavers (Gallium aparine and Fat-hen (Chenopodium album. Selectivity was examined in all of these trials and showed good results with all relevant mixtures at all application times. The two active ingredients have different modes of action; hence, the product plays an important role in resistance management. They can be applied flexibly and do not have any known negative influence on the environment. The successful formulation of this highly sophisticated sugar beet herbicide was confirmed by the available trial results. GOLTIX® TITAN® with its specified characteristics is the base for every weed control measure.

  2. Aquatic weeds as the next generation feedstock for sustainable bioenergy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kumar, Manoj; Sachdeva, Sarita; Puri, S K

    2017-11-28

    Increasing oil prices and depletion of existing fossil fuel reserves, combined with the continuous rise in greenhouse gas emissions, have fostered the need to explore and develop new renewable bioenergy feedstocks that do not require arable land and freshwater resources. In this regard, prolific biomass growth of invasive aquatic weeds in wastewater has gained much attention in recent years in utilizing them as a potential feedstock for bioenergy production. Aquatic weeds have an exceptionally higher reproduction rates and are rich in cellulose and hemicellulose with a very low lignin content that makes them an efficient next generation biofuel crop. Considering their potential as an effective phytoremediators, this review presents a model of integrated aquatic biomass production, phytoremediation and bioenergy generation to reduce the land, fresh water and fertilizer usage for sustainable and economical bioenergy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Weed control and crop selectivity of post-emergence herbicides in common beans

    OpenAIRE

    Marchioretto, Lucas De Ross; Dal Magro, Taísa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: There are few options of wide spectrum selective herbicides registered for post-emergence weed control in common beans crop. The experiment aimed to test crop selectivity and weed control of post-emergence herbicides on common beans. Weed control, injury and grain yield were evaluated. Treatments consisted on: cloransulam-methyl, imazethapyr, fomesafen, bentazon and diclosulam isolated and tank-mixed with clethodim; imazamox+bentazon, fomesafen+fluazifop, clethodim; cloransulam+bent...

  4. Integrated Weed Control for Land Stewardship at Legacy Management's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado - 13086

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Jody K. [Stoller LMS Team, Contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, Colorado 80021 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Land stewardship is one of nine sustainability programs in the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management System. Land stewardship includes maintaining and improving ecosystem health. At the Rocky Flats Site near Westminster, Colorado, land stewardship is an integral component of the Office of Legacy Management's post-closure monitoring and management at the site. Nearly 263 hectares (650 acres) were disturbed and re-vegetated during site cleanup and closure operations. Proactive management of revegetation areas is critical to the successful reestablishment of native grasslands, wetlands, and riparian communities. The undisturbed native plant communities that occur at the site also require active management to maintain the high-quality wetlands and other habitats that are home to numerous species of birds and other wildlife such as elk and deer, rare plant communities, and the federally listed threatened Preble's meadow jumping mouse. Over the past several decades, an increase of Noxious weeds has impacted much of Colorado's Front Range. As a result, weed control is a key component of the land stewardship program at Rocky Flats. Thirty-three species of state-listed Noxious weeds are known to occur in the Central and Peripheral Operable Units at Rocky Flats, along with another five species that are considered invasive at the site. Early detection and rapid response to control new invasive species is crucial to the program. An integrated weed control/vegetation management approach is key to maintaining healthy, sustainable plant communities that are able to resist Noxious weed invasions. Weed mapping, field surveys, and field-staff training sessions (to learn how to identify new potential problem species) are conducted to help detect and prevent new weed problems. The integrated approach at Rocky Flats includes administrative and cultural techniques (prevention), mechanical controls, biological controls, and chemical controls. Several

  5. Use of rhizobacteria and endophytes for biological control of weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trognitz, Friederike

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Weeds cause severe yield losses in agriculture, with a maximum estimate of 34% of yield loss worldwide due to competition between the crops and the weeds for nutrition, light and humidity (OERKE, 2006. Invasive plants contribute partially to other problems. The pollen of common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia L., for example, is five times more allergenic than grass pollen; already ten pollen grains per m3 air can trigger allergy in sensitized patients, including rhinitis, conjunctivitis and asthma. This neophyte from America has extended the season of allergy in European patients to October. Common ragweed is currently most frequent in Hungary, France and Italy. In Austria, ragweed populations along roads have increased dramatically since 2000. The effective means to control this weed of the Asteraceae family are limited; a single plant can produce up to 6000 seeds which stay in the soil for 40 years. Control using selective herbicides is not possible within stands of the Asteraceae member sunflower. Efforts to use herbivore insects as biological control agents also failed due to the unavailability of insects specializing on this ragweed. The use of plant-associated rhizobacteria and endophytes as bio-herbicides offers a novel alternative to conventional methods. By analogy to experiences from other plant-microbe systems, the chances to find microbes of the desired characteristics are highest when isolating and testing specimens directly from ragweed plants. These organisms often have an extremely narrow host range that permits their use for the control of among several even closely related plant species growing together in a field.

  6. The role of plant-microbiome interactions in weed establishment and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trognitz, Friederike; Hackl, Evelyn; Widhalm, Siegrid; Sessitsch, Angela

    2016-10-01

    The soil microbiome plays an important role in the establishment of weeds and invasive plants. They associate with microorganisms supporting their growth and health. Weed management strategies, like tillage and herbicide treatments, to control weeds generally alter soil structure going alongside with changes in the microbial community. Once a weed population establishes in the field, the plants build up a close relationship with the available microorganisms. Seeds or vegetative organs overwinter in soil and select early in the season their own microbiome before crop plants start to vegetate. Weed and crop plants compete for light, nutrition and water, but may differently interact with soil microorganisms. The development of new sequencing technologies for analyzing soil microbiomes has opened up the possibility for in depth analysis of the interaction between 'undesired' plants and crop plants under different management systems. These findings will help us to understand the functions of microorganisms involved in crop productivity and plant health, weed establishment and weed prevention. Exploitation of the knowledge offers the possibility to search for new biocontrol methods against weeds based on soil and plant-associated microorganisms. This review discusses the recent advances in understanding the functions of microbial communities for weed/invasive plant establishment and shows new ways to use plant-associated microorganisms to control weeds and invasive plants in different land management systems. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Bioactive compound from mangoes leaves extract as potential soil bioherbicide to control amaranth weed (Amaranthus spinosus Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifauldin Syahri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bioherbicide is important approach for sustainable farming practices. One of plant that has potentially as bioherbicide, which is environmentally safe, is mango. Mango leaf extract is useful as bioherbicide because it produces allelochemical compounds, which could inhibit the weed growth. This research was designed to study the effect of several mangoes species leaves extract to control dominant weed (amaranth. Split plot design was implemented using mango species (S as the main plot; S1 (Mangifera odorata Griff., S2 (Mangifera foetida Lour and S3 (Mangifera indica L.. While the sub plots were concentrations of mango’s leaf extract (K, that included 0, 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 ppm. Results of the research showed that all parameters of weed growth (amaranth were inhibited along with the increase of concentration of the mango’s leaf extract. The results also showed the significant inhibition of amaranth’s dry weight. Among three species of mangoes, M. indica L. showed the best inhibition mechanism to the amaranth weed, which significantly suppressed the weed growth on just 1000 ppm concentration.

  8. Impact of the timing and duration of weed control on the establishment of a rubber tree plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzo, Caio D; Carvalho, Leonardo B de; Giancotti, Paulo R F; Alves, Pedro L C A; Gonçalves, Elaine C P; Martins, José V F

    2014-03-01

    Rubber tree production is reduced by weeds that compete for environmental resources; therefore, the timing and duration of weed control influences weed interference. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the growth of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) plants, to determine the critical period for weed control, and to evaluate the growth recovery of rubber trees that coexisted with weeds for different periods of time after planting. Two groups of treatments were established under field conditions in the first year of the investigation: one group contained crescent periods of weed infestation, while the other contained crescent periods of weed control, also including a weed-free check and a total weedy check. In the second year of the investigation, the weeds were totally controlled. Urochloa decumbens was the dominant weed (over 90% groundcover). Crop growth was greatly reduced due to the weed interference. Plant height decreased more rapidly than did any other characteristic. Plant height, leaf dry mass, and leaf area decreased by 99%, 97% and 96%, respectively, and were the most reduced characteristics. Plant height also recovered more rapidly than did any characteristic when the period of weed control was lengthened. However, stem dry mass increased by 750%, making it the most recovered characteristic. The critical period for weed control was between 4 and 9½ months after planting in the first year; however, the rubber trees showed an expressive growth recovery when the weeds were controlled throughout the second year.

  9. Chemical control of curled dock (Rumex crispus L.) and other weeds in noncropped areas

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrova Tsvetanka; Marinov-Serafimov Plamen

    2008-01-01

    Rumex crispus L. is an invasive species widespread in our country and in particular in the region of North Bulgaria. It is characterized by high biological and ecological plasticity. Owing to its great reproductive potential, the weed has been assigned to the list of economically most important weeds in the country. With the purpose of studying the possibility of chemical weed control in noncropped areas with heavy natural background infestation with R. crispus L. and other dicotyledonous wee...

  10. The Use of Protein Hydrolysates for Weed Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christians, Nick; Liu, Dianna; Unruh, Jay Bryan

    Corn gluten meal, the protein fraction of corn (Zea mays L.) grain, is commercially used as a natural weed control agent and nitrogen source in horticultural crops and in the turf and ornamental markets. Corn gluten hydrolysate, a water soluble form of gluten meal, has also been proposed for the same purpose, although it could be sprayed on the soil rather than applied in the granular form. Five depeptides, glutaminyl-glutamine (Gln-Gln), glycinyl-alanine (Gly-Ala), alanyl-­glutamine (Ala-Glu), alanyl-asparagine (Ala-Asp), and alaninyl-alanine (Ala-Ala) and a pentapeptide leucine-serine-proline-alanine-glutamine (Leu-Ser-Pro-Ala-Gln) were identified as the active components of the hydrolysate. Microscopic analysis revealed that Ala-Ala acted on some metabolic process rather than directly on the mitotic apparatus. Similar to the chloracetamides and sulfonyl-urea hebicides, Ala-Ala inhibits cell division rather than disrupting of cell division processes. Cellular ultrastructure changes caused by exposure to Ala-Ala implicate Ala-Ala as having membrane-disrupting characteristics similar to several synthetic herbicides. The potential use of the hydrolysate and the peptides as weed controls is discussed.

  11. Weed control in distress – can all weeds still be controlled with herbicides in future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobny, Hans G.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The introduction and availability of highly active and selective herbicides in all important field crops, in the last decades, enabled the simplification and money saving in crop rotations and agronomic measures. This resulted in respective specialized and adapted weed populations, and consequently an increasing selection of resistant populations. Since the introduction of the ALS-inhibitors (starting 1985 and the 4-HPPD-inhibitors (2001, no new MoA-Classes were registered, and there are none in the registration process. Several established herbicides were not registered or re-registered in the EU, or were severely restricted in their application. The cost and the risk to develop and register a new selective herbicide in the EU are hardly justified, in relation to their market potential. The only solution on problem fields, with resistant populations, is to change the agronomic practices, like crop rotation, soil tillage, seeding time, etc., as a precautionary principle also on still „normal“ fields. The different advising institutions have to integrate these aspects into their recommendations, besides the proper herbicide management.

  12. Pelargonic acid for weed control in organic Vidalia sweet onion production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultivation using a tine weeder is a proven means to manage weeds in organic Vidalia® sweet onion production. If the initial cultivation is delayed, emerged weeds are not controlled by the tine weeder. In these cases, herbicides derived from natural products could be used to control the emerged we...

  13. Applying molecular-based approaches to classical biological control of weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern advances in molecular techniques are only recently being incorporated into programs for the classical biological control of weeds. Molecular analyses are able to elucidate information about target weeds that is critical to improving control success, such as taxonomic clarification, evidence o...

  14. Impact of mustard seed meal applications on direct-seeded cucurbits and weed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control in organic production systems can be a labor intensive and expensive process. Mustard seed meal (MSM) is phytotoxic and a potential pre-emergent and preplant-incorporated organic herbicide for controlling germinating and emerging weed seedlings: unfortunately, MSM may also adversely imp...

  15. Mechanical pre-planting weed control in short rotation coppice using deep forestry ploughing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This report describes a trial by Border biofuels to investigate the deep forestry plough as a mechanical pre-planting weed control method to reduce weed infestations in willow coppice and thus contribute to improved establishment and eventual yield. The results suggest that there was a considerable increase in biomass productivity from the deep ploughed area compared to the conventionally cultivated area at all three SRC sites tested. This technique also suggests that the deep forestry ploughing provides the benefit of much reduced levels of seed germination of many annual weed species and a reduction in levels of perennial weed infestation. It is not possible at this stage to predict the longer term benefits in terms of harvestable biomass productivity but it may be considered that the improved establishment and lack of weed competition would consistently produce higher yields of biomass than plantations which suffer from persistent and invasive weed competition. (author)

  16. ECOLOGICAL WEED MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Radicetti, Emanuele

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays there is much concern over environmental and human health impacts on weed management practices which has led agricultural producers and scientists in many countries to seek innovative strategies for weed control. As weed management systems are being developed, ecological knowledge will become more and more important and the complexity of weed management must be considered. Therefore understanding weed-crop ecology will lead to more effective weed prevention, management, and control t...

  17. Opportunities and challenges for harvest weed seed control in global cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael J; Broster, John C; Schwartz-Lazaro, Lauren M; Norsworthy, Jason K; Davis, Adam S; Tidemann, Breanne D; Beckie, Hugh J; Lyon, Drew J; Soni, Neeta; Neve, Paul; Bagavathiannan, Muthukumar V

    2017-11-28

    The opportunity to target weed seeds during grain harvest was established many decades ago following the introduction of mechanical harvesting and the recognition of high weed-seed retention levels at crop maturity; however, this opportunity remained largely neglected until more recently. The introduction and adoption of harvest weed seed control (HWSC) systems in Australia has been in response to widespread occurrence of herbicide-resistant weed populations. With diminishing herbicide resources and the need to maintain highly productive reduced tillage and stubble-retention practices, growers began to develop systems that targeted weed seeds during crop harvest. Research and development efforts over the past two decades have established the efficacy of HWSC systems in Australian cropping systems, where widespread adoption is now occurring. With similarly dramatic herbicide resistance issues now present across many of the world's cropping regions, it is timely for HWSC systems to be considered for inclusion in weed-management programs in these areas. This review describes HWSC systems and establishing the potential for this approach to weed control in several cropping regions. As observed in Australia, the inclusion of HWSC systems can reduce weed populations substantially reducing the potential for weed adaptation and resistance evolution. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Weed control in dormant alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. with active ingredients’ metribuzin, imazetapyr and pronamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonko Pacanoski

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Field trials were conducted during 2008 – 2010 to evaluate weed control in dormant alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. with metribuzin, imazetapyr and pronamide. The weed population in all experimental years was consisted mainly of annual winter and spring grass and broadleaf weeds, and some perennial weeds. The number of weed species and weed density increased with the years of alfalfa growing, from second to the fourth year. Weed density in the untreated control plots was 201.0, 217.2 and 240.5 plants per m2 in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. The most dominant weeds were Anthemis cotula, Capsell bursa-pastoris and Taraxacum officinale in 2008, Alopecurus myosuroides and Poa pratensis in 2009 and Millium vernale and Arabidopsis thaliana in 2010. Efficacy of herbicides in control of weeds was ranged of 91.8% (pronamide to 98.4% (metribuzin 1.0 kg*ha-1 in 2008, 93.1% (imazetapyr to 97.3% (metribuzin 1.0 kg*ha-1 in 2009 and 92.1% (imazetapyr to 97.3% (metribuzin 1.0 kg*ha-1 in 2010, respectively. Efficacy of herbicides in control of prevailing weeds during the 3 years field trial period was ranged of 48.5% to 100.0%. No visual alfalfa injured was determined by any rates during the experimental period, and consequently, none of the applied herbicides reduced first-harvest alfalfa yields. Alfalfa yield was markedly affected by herbicide efficacy in all experimental years, particularly in the second year, where yields of herbicide treatments were similar to that of the weed free control.

  19. Integrated Weed Management Strategies for Control of Hydrilla

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Linda S; Shearer, Judy F

    2009-01-01

    ...), and the fungal pathogen Mycoleptodiscus terrestris (Gerd.) Ostazeski, applied alone and in combination with one another, as an integrated weed management strategy against the nuisance aquatic plant, hydrilla...

  20. Robotic weeding and automated weed measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S.; Søgaard, H.T.; Jørgensen, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of decreasing herbicide usage has so far focused on reducing the herbicide dosage or replacing chemical weed control by hoeing and harrowing. The conventional weed control strategy is to apply the same dose of herbicide or the same intensity of hoeing and harrowing in the whole field...... the state-of-the-art of automated weed measurement methods and the research projects concerning autonomous platform and information system for crop and weed monitoring and robotic weeding....

  1. Biodiversity of segetal weed community in continuous potato cultivated with metribuzin-based weed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlonka Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work reported here was to determine the relationship between herbicide rate and the biodiversity of weed communities in potato cultivated in continuous cropping. A seven-year field experiment was conducted to examine the effect of 4 metribuzin rates and an uncontrol on weed infestation in successive years of continuous potato cultivation. The following indices were calculated: the Shannon-Wiener and Simpson’s indices of species diversity and the Simpson’s index of domination. A total of 33 species were recorded in the experimental plots. Echinochoa crus-galli was the dominant species. The most abundant segetal communities were observed in untreated plots. An application of the herbicide reduced the biodiversity of the agrophytocenosis. Cultivation in continuous cropping increased the species number of the weed community in potato. The herbicide and cultivation in continuous cropping did not significantly affect the biodiversity indices but their values, to a great extent, confirmed the trends revealed by the analysis of weed infestation

  2. Releases of natural enemies in Hawaii since 1980 for classical biological control of weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Conant; J. N. Garcia; M. T. Johnson; W. T. Nagamine; C. K. Hirayama; G. P. Markin; R. L. Hill

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive review of biological control of weeds in Hawaii was last published in 1992, covering 74 natural enemy species released from 1902 through 1980. The present review summarizes releases of 21 natural enemies targeting seven invasive weeds from 1981 to 2010. These projects were carried out by Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA), USDA Forest Service (USFS...

  3. Weed Control Strategies for Organic Peanut Production and Transition: A Lesson in Basic Agronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control in organic peanut production is difficult and costly. The only production inputs that consistently improved weed management in organic peanut production were modified production practices and intense cultivation with a tine weeder. Research trials evaluated row patterns, seeding rates...

  4. Density and dry weight of pigweed by various weed control methods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates effects of various weeds control methods and nitrogen fertilizer resources on density and dry weight of pigweed and the performance of corn forage as factorial in full random block design with 3 repetitions in research farm of Ferdowsi Mashhad University in 2014. The test treatments include weed ...

  5. Effect of ecological management of weed control on economical income, yield and yield components of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zare Feizabadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to compare of ecological management of weed control on economical income, yield and yield components of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L., a Randomized Complete Block design with 12 treatments and four replications was conducted in Mahvelat of Khorasan Razavi province, Iran. Treatments consisted of weeding, harrowing, burning, two times weeding, weeding + harrowing, weeding + burning, harrowing + harrowing, harrowing + weeding, harrowing + burning, weeding+ harrowing+ burning, weed free and weedy as a check treatment. Investigated traits were plant height, number of boll in plant, 20 boll weight, 20 boll cotton lint weight, cotton lint yield per plant, cotton yield, number and biomass of weeds, outcome, net and gross income. The result showed that treatments had significant effect (p

  6. Rice Tolerance to Saflufenacil in Clomazone Weed Control Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Camargo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to evaluate (1 rice tolerance to saflufenacil applied preemergence (PRE and postemergence (POST and (2 the combination of saflufenacil and clomazone in light-textured soils. No injury from PRE application of saflufenacil was observed in 2009, and minimal injury for saflufenacil alone was observed in 2010. Injury as high as 68% was observed with combinations of 505 g ha−1 of clomazone applied PRE and 50 g ha−1 of saflufenacil applied POST in 2009 early evaluations. No interaction between clomazone and POST saflufenacil rates was observed in 2010. Rice injury intensified with increasing rates of saflufenacil applied POST. However, rice recovered with time for herbicide treatments applied PRE and POST in both years. Consequently, rice yield was not affected by any of the saflufenacil rates applied either PRE or POST in a clomazone weed control program.

  7. Effect of fertilizer in controlling weeds under intercropping of pearl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-25

    Jul 25, 2011 ... Carr et al. (1995) and Bulson et al. (1997) found a greater weed biomass in sole cropped legumes than in ... advantage, while there is a yield disadvantage from intercropping if. LERT is less than one (LERT < 1) (Raji, ... petition and consequently, increased weeds biomass. (Liebman and Robichaux, 1990).

  8. Managing invasive plants in natural areas: Moving beyond weed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean Pearson; Yvette Ortega

    2009-01-01

    Exotic invasive plants present one of the greatest challenges to natural resource management. These weeds can alter entire communities and ecosystems, substantially degrading important ecosystem services such as forage for wild and domestic herbivores, water and soil quality, recreational values, and wildlife habitat. Traditionally, weed management in natural areas has...

  9. Weed control and soil management systems for short-rotation coppice: present knowledge and future requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay, D.V.

    1993-06-01

    The current information available on weed management in short-rotation coppice (SRC) in the U.K. has been reviewed and aspects where more information or action is required are indicated. Weeds clearly are the main agronomic problem facing the grower of energy coppice who must achieve maximum growth from the start to achieve an economic yield of wood by the first harvest. While there is information on the importance of weed competition in the first year, the need to weed in subsequent years is less well understood and work is needed to define the situations where control is necessary. Most successful plantations have been established with the use of herbicides. There is a need for more selective contact herbicides and better equipment for applying treatments directly to the weeds. All herbicides used in coppice must have Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries (MAFF) Approval, given after consideration of toxicology and environmental fate. More such Approvals are needed to provide farmers with the range of herbicides required for efficient production. The scope for reducing herbicide input in crops in SRC is reviewed. Other practical aspects that require more attention are: the susceptibility of many weed species to commonly-used herbicides; differing coppice variety responses to weed competition and herbicides; detailed guidance for growers on weed management and control programmes. (5 tables, 50 references). (author)

  10. Efficacy evaluation of selected herbicides on weed control and productivity evaluation of Bt cotton in Punjab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kulvir; Rathore, Pankaj

    2015-07-01

    Field experiments were conducted during Kharif 2012 and 2013 to evaluate the efficacy of different herbicides for weed management in cotton. Highest seed cotton yield (3537.3 kg ha(-1)) was recorded in weed free plots followed by pendimethalin @1.0 kg a.i ha(-1) as Pre.em.+quizalofopethyl @50 g a.i ha(-1) post-em at 2-4 weed leaf stage + one hoeing (3318.9 kg ha") owing to improved number of bolls per plant and boll weight. Statistically least yield was recorded underweedy check (1435.4 kg ha(-1)). Application of pyrithiobac sodium could not express any visible toxic effect on crop indicating its selectivity for cotton, although none of the tested new chemicals i.e., pyrithiobac sodium@ 62.5g a.i ha(-1) and quizalofopethyl @50g a.i ha(-1) when applied alone could not outperform the existing recommended chemicals for weed management. Yield losses to the extent of 6.2-59.4% were recorded due to weed competition. Weed control efficiency (WCE) was highest under weed free check (86.8%) followed by pendimethalin @1.0 kg a.i ha(-1) as Pre. em.+quizalofopethyl @50g a.i ha(-1), at 2-4 weed leaf stage + one hoeing (73.7%), whereas minimum values were for weedy check (24.7%). Though net returns (r94660 ha(-1)) were highest for weed free check but higher B:C ratio (2:11) was observed for pendimethalin @1.0 kg a.i ha(-1) as Pre em.+quizalofopethyl @50 g a.i ha(-1) post-em at 2-4 weed leaf stage+one hoeing. Therefore, for reasons such as labor shortage besides their timely availability, using these herbicides in combination with cultural practices could be the practical solution foreconomically efficient and effective weed management.

  11. New weed control strategies in maize considering narrow crop rotations with maize, greater ALSresistance in common weeds and application restrictions with regard to active substance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewert, Katrin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many herbicides with different HRAC-groups are available for weed control in maize. Because of narrow maize crop rotation summer weeds and warmth loving weeds are encouraged. On the other hand the new confirmed cases of an ALS target site resistance in the weed species Echinochloa crus-galli and Amaranthus retroflexus in Brandenburg, Stellaria media in Saxony and Matricaria recutita and Tripleurospermum perforatum in Brandenburg and Thuringia, warn that in the future the sulfonylureas must be used only according to the management of herbicide resistance. In this way the selection of resistant weed biotypes will be prevented. Moreover in protected water areas it may be a requirement to reduce and to substitute the input of some active substances, for example terbuthylazine and bentazon. The control of E. crus-galli and P. convolvulus with non-sulfonylurea or/and non-terbuthylazine herbicides according to management of herbicide resistance will be discussed.

  12. Estimating economic thresholds for site-specific weed control using manual weed counts and sensor technology: an example based on three winter wheat trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Martina; Gutjahr, Christoph; Möhring, Jens; Weis, Martin; Sökefeld, Markus; Gerhards, Roland

    2014-02-01

    Precision experimental design uses the natural heterogeneity of agricultural fields and combines sensor technology with linear mixed models to estimate the effect of weeds, soil properties and herbicide on yield. These estimates can be used to derive economic thresholds. Three field trials are presented using the precision experimental design in winter wheat. Weed densities were determined by manual sampling and bi-spectral cameras, yield and soil properties were mapped. Galium aparine, other broad-leaved weeds and Alopecurus myosuroides reduced yield by 17.5, 1.2 and 12.4 kg ha(-1) plant(-1)  m(2) in one trial. The determined thresholds for site-specific weed control with independently applied herbicides were 4, 48 and 12 plants m(-2), respectively. Spring drought reduced yield effects of weeds considerably in one trial, since water became yield limiting. A negative herbicide effect on the crop was negligible, except in one trial, in which the herbicide mixture tended to reduce yield by 0.6 t ha(-1). Bi-spectral cameras for weed counting were of limited use and still need improvement. Nevertheless, large weed patches were correctly identified. The current paper presents a new approach to conducting field trials and deriving decision rules for weed control in farmers' fields. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Overview of glyphosate-resistant weeds worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Ian; Duke, Stephen O

    2017-10-10

    Glyphosate is the most widely used and successful herbicide discovered to date, but its utility is now threatened by the occurrence of several glyphosate-resistant weed species. Glyphosate resistance first appeared in Lolium rigidum in an apple orchard in Australia in 1996, ironically the year that the first glyphosate-resistant crop (soybean) was introduced in the USA. Thirty-eight weed species have now evolved resistance to glyphosate, distributed across 37 countries and in 34 different crops and six non-crop situations. Although glyphosate-resistant weeds have been identified in orchards, vineyards, plantations, cereals, fallow and non-crop situations, it is the glyphosate-resistant weeds in glyphosate-resistant crop systems that dominate the area infested and growing economic impact. Glyphosate-resistant weeds present the greatest threat to sustained weed control in major agronomic crops because this herbicide is used to control weeds with resistance to herbicides with other sites of action, and no new herbicide sites of action have been introduced for over 30 years. Industry has responded by developing herbicide resistance traits in major crops that allow existing herbicides to be used in a new way. However, over reliance on these traits will result in multiple-resistance in weeds. Weed control in major crops is at a precarious point, where we must maintain the utility of the herbicides we have until we can transition to new weed management technologies. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Evaluation of yield quality and weed infestation of common valerian (Valeriana officinalis L. in dependence on weed control method and forecrop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary Kwiatkowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment involving the cultivation of common valerian was conducted on loess soil in Abramów (Lublin region in the period 2007-2009. Qualitative parameters of herbal raw material obtained from this plant as well as in-crop weed infestation were evaluated depending on the protection method and forecrop. Hand-weeded plots, in which a hand hoe was used, were the control. In the other treatments, weeds were controlled using various herbicides and a mechanical implement (brush weeder. Potato and winter wheat + field pea cover crop were the forecrops for common valerian crops. A hypothesis was made that the use of a brush weeder and herbicides not registered for application in valerian crops would have a positive effect on this plant's productivity and weed infestation in its crops. It was also assumed that the introduction of a cover crop would allow the elimination of differences in the forecrop value of the crop stands in question. The best quantitative and qualitative parameters of common valerian raw material as well as the largest reduction of incrop weed infestation were recorded after the application of the herbicides which were not type approved. The use of the brush weeder in the interrows also had a beneficial effect on productivity of the plant in question, but secondary weed infestation at the end of the growing season of common valerian turned out to be its disadvantage. Traditional crop protection methods used in common valerian crops were less effective in weed infestation reduction and they resulted in lower plant productivity and raw material quality. Potato proved to be a better forecrop for common valerian than winter wheat + field pea; however, this positive effect was not confirmed statistically. The following annual weeds: Chenopodium album, Galinsoga parviflora, Stellaria media, were predominant in the common valerian crop. Traditional weed control methods resulted in the dominance of some dicotyledonous weeds, such

  15. Laboratory host range testing of Neomusotima conspurcatalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) - a potential biological control agent of the invasive weed, Old World climbing fern, Lygodium microphyllum (Lygodiaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Old World climbing fern, Lygodium microphyllum, is a serious invasive weed in south Florida. Development of biological control is vital for sustainable management of L. microphyllum. Neomusotima conspurcatalis was discovered in Hong Kong in 1997 and was subsequently found causing feeding damage on L...

  16. FruitGrowth - Gasburning in Orchards - Environment friendly weed control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Keld Kjærhus; Duzel, Jasmin; Nielsen, Søren Hundevadt

    Gas burning makes treatment of weed organic. The new ENVO-DAN burner saves 40% gas and treats ½ meter in width. It can be mounted on a standard lawn tractor, orchard tractor or a mobile robot.......Gas burning makes treatment of weed organic. The new ENVO-DAN burner saves 40% gas and treats ½ meter in width. It can be mounted on a standard lawn tractor, orchard tractor or a mobile robot....

  17. Non-chemical Control of Root Parasitic Weeds with Biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizenberg, Hanan; Plakhine, Dina; Ziadne, Hammam; Tsechansky, Ludmila; Graber, Ellen R

    2017-01-01

    This study tested whether soil-applied biochar can impact the seed germination and attachment of root parasitic weeds. Three hypotheses were evaluated: (i) biochar adsorbs host-exuded signaling molecules; (ii) biochar activates plants' innate system-wide defenses against invasion by the parasite; and (iii) biochar has a systemic influence on the amount of seed germination stimulant produced or released by the host plant. Three types of experiments were performed: (I) pot trials with tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) infested with Phelipanche aegyptiaca PERS. (Egyptian broomrape) and three different types of biochar at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.5% weight, wherein tomato plant biomass, P. aegyptiaca biomass, and number of P. aegyptiaca-tomato root attachments were quantified; (II) split-root biochar/no-biochar experiments under hydroponic growing conditions performed in polyethylene bags with tomato plant rootings, wherein P. aegyptiaca seed germination percentage and radicle attachment numbers were quantified; and (III) germination trials, wherein the effect of biochar adsorption of GR-24 (artificial germination stimulant) on P. aegyptiaca seed germination was quantified. Addition of biochar to the pot soil (Experiment I) resulted in lower levels of P. aegyptiaca infection in the tomato plants, mainly through a decrease in the number of P. aegyptiaca attachments. This led to improved tomato plant growth. In Experiment II, P. aegyptiaca seed germination percentage decreased in the biochar-treated root zone as compared with the no-biochar control root zone; P. aegyptiaca radicle attachment numbers decreased accordingly. This experiment showed that biochar did not induce a systemic change in the activity of the stimulant molecules exuded by the tomato roots, toxicity to the radicles, or a change in the ability of the radicles to penetrate the tomato roots. The major cause for the decrease in germination percentage was physical adsorption of the stimulant molecule

  18. Non-chemical Control of Root Parasitic Weeds with Biochar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Eizenberg

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study tested whether soil-applied biochar can impact the seed germination and attachment of root parasitic weeds. Three hypotheses were evaluated: (i biochar adsorbs host-exuded signaling molecules; (ii biochar activates plants’ innate system-wide defenses against invasion by the parasite; and (iii biochar has a systemic influence on the amount of seed germination stimulant produced or released by the host plant. Three types of experiments were performed: (I pot trials with tomato (Solanum lycopersicum infested with Phelipanche aegyptiaca PERS. (Egyptian broomrape and three different types of biochar at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.5% weight, wherein tomato plant biomass, P. aegyptiaca biomass, and number of P. aegyptiaca-tomato root attachments were quantified; (II split-root biochar/no-biochar experiments under hydroponic growing conditions performed in polyethylene bags with tomato plant rootings, wherein P. aegyptiaca seed germination percentage and radicle attachment numbers were quantified; and (III germination trials, wherein the effect of biochar adsorption of GR-24 (artificial germination stimulant on P. aegyptiaca seed germination was quantified. Addition of biochar to the pot soil (Experiment I resulted in lower levels of P. aegyptiaca infection in the tomato plants, mainly through a decrease in the number of P. aegyptiaca attachments. This led to improved tomato plant growth. In Experiment II, P. aegyptiaca seed germination percentage decreased in the biochar-treated root zone as compared with the no-biochar control root zone; P. aegyptiaca radicle attachment numbers decreased accordingly. This experiment showed that biochar did not induce a systemic change in the activity of the stimulant molecules exuded by the tomato roots, toxicity to the radicles, or a change in the ability of the radicles to penetrate the tomato roots. The major cause for the decrease in germination percentage was physical adsorption of the

  19. Effect of weed control and fertilization on growth of hybrid poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwart, P. D.; Miller, M. H. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Ontario Agricultural Coll.; Baldock, J. A.; Burgess, D. [Canadian Forestry Service, Chalk River, ON (Canada). Petawawa National Forestry Inst.

    1996-09-01

    The effects of weed control and fertilization on the growth of the hybrid poplar clone DN181 were studied on a short rotation plantation in eastern Ontario in an effort to find cultural practices that would shorten the time to harvest the plantation. In the course of this study trees were sprayed on a yearly basis with glyphosphate, and the effects of the treatment on biomass and foliar nutrient concentrations were assessed. Statistical analysis showed significant treatment effects both on tree biomass and foliar nutrient concentrations. Weed control without fertilizer improved biomass production to about the same extent as fertilizer without weed control. Best yield was achieved when weed control and fertilizer were applied together. Broadcasting the fertilizer yielded significantly more biomass than banding. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Chemical weed control in triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack): review of five years of field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerle, Derycke; Joos, Latré; Geert, Haesaert

    2014-01-01

    During five subsequent growing seasons field experiments were carried out at the experimental farm of the University College Ghent (Belgium) to evaluate the selectivity and efficacy of herbicides for chemical weed control in triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack). The experiments were set up on a sandy loam soil, according to a completely randomised block design with four replications. Several herbicides and combinations of herbicides were applied pre- and post-emergence, at different rates. The influence of the different treatments on weed diversity, weed density, growth inhibition and chlorosis of the crop and grain yield was studied. Results obtained from these field trials indicated differences between the different treatments.

  1. Ecophysiological responses of a young blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) plantation to weed control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, Alieta; Worledge, Dale; Sands, Peter; Ottenschlaeger, Maria L; Paterson, Steve C; Mendham, Daniel; O'Grady, Anthony P

    2012-08-01

    Early weed control may improve the growth of forest plantations by influencing soil water and nutrient availability. To understand eucalypt growth responses to weed control, we examined the temporal responses of leaf gas-exchange, leaf nitrogen concentration (N) and water status of 7-month-old Eucalyptus globulus L. trees in a paired-plot field trial. In addition, we monitored the growth, leaf N and water status of the competing vegetation in the weed treatment. By the end of the 11-month experiment, complete weed control (WF treatment) of largely woody competitors increased the basal diameter of E. globulus by 14%. As indicated by pre-dawn water potentials of > - 0.05 MPa, interspecies competition for water resources was minimal at this site. In contrast, competition for N appeared to be the major factor limiting growth. Estimations of total plot leaf N (g m(-2) ground) showed that competing vegetation accounted for up to 70% of the total leaf N at the start of the trial. This value fell to 15% by the end of the trial. Despite increased leaf N(area) in WF trees 5 months after imposition of weed control, the photosynthetic capacity (A(1500)) of E. globulus was unaffected by treatment suggesting that the growth gains from weed control were largely unrelated to changes in leaf-level photosynthesis. Increased nutrient availability brought about by weed control enabled trees to increase investment into leaf-area production. Estimates of whole-tree carbon budget based on direct measurements of dark respiration and A(1500) allowed us to clearly demonstrate the importance of leaf area driving greater productivity following early weed control in a nutrient-limited site.

  2. Mechanical weed control on small-size dry bean and its response to cross-flaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martelloni, L.; Frasconi, C.; Fontanelli, M.; Raffaelli, M.; Peruzzi, A.

    2016-11-01

    Dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) can be a profitable crop for farmers; however controlling weeds effectively without a decrease in yield remains a problem. An example where mechanical weed control is difficult to conduct is dry bean ‘Toscanello’, which is a small sized high-income niche product growing low to the ground. Concerning intra-row weed control, also flame weeding could be an opportunity but the dry bean heat tolerance needs to be studied. The aims of this research were to study the weed control efficacy of a spring-tine harrow and an inter-row cultivator in this bean variety, and to test the tolerance of dry bean cultivated under weed-free conditions to cross-flaming applied with different liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) doses. Flame weeding was applied at BBCH 13 and BBCH 14 bean growth stages by pairs of burners producing direct double flame acting into the intra-row space, with bean plants placed in the middle. The results suggest that the spring-tine harrow used two times at BBCH 13 and 14, respectively, lead to a yield similar to that of the weedy control. The inter-row cultivator could be an opportunity for small-sized dry bean crops producers, enabling them to obtain a similar yield compared to the hand-weeded control. Concerning the bean tolerance to cross-flaming the results showed that bean flamed at BBCH 13 stage had little tolerance to cross-flaming. Bean flamed at BBCH 14 stage was tolerant until an LPG dose of 39 kg/ha, giving yield responses similar to those observed in the non-flamed control. (Author)

  3. Greenhouse and field evaluation of isoxaflutole for weed control in maize in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Zuo, Lan; Li, Wei; Guo, Wenlei; Liu, Weitang; Wang, Jinxin

    2017-10-04

    Greenhouse and field studies were conducted to provide a reference for pre-emergence (PRE) application of isoxaflutole on maize in China. In greenhouse study, the isoxaflutole PRE application at 30 g active ingredient (a.i.) ha -1 could effectively control large numbers of weeds, especially some large-seeded broadleaves, tested in this study. The tolerance results indicated 21 maize hybrids showed different responses to isoxaflutole under greenhouse conditions. In 2015 and 2016, field experiments were conducted to determine and compare the weed control efficacy and safety to Zhengdan 958 maize with 6 herbicide treatments. In both years, isoxaflutole PRE at 100 to 250 g a.i. ha -1 was sufficient to provide satisfactory full-season control of the dominant common broadleaf and grass weeds in the field. Temporary injury to maize was observed with isoxaflutole treatments of 125, 150, and 250 g a.i. ha -1 in both years, but plants recovered within 4 to 6 wk. To maximize maize yield and provide satisfactory weed control, a range of 100 to 150 g a.i. ha -1 of isoxaflutole is recommended, depending on the soil characteristics, weather, and weed species present at the experimental site. Based on the results, isoxaflutole PRE has good potential for weed control in maize in China.

  4. Cruciferous weeds in oil seed rape – appearance and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingenhagen, Günter

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Different cruciferous weeds were drilled in autumn 2011 and 2012 in a field near Münster. Beside common species like hedge mustard (Sisymbrium officinale Scop., shepherd`s purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris, pennycress (Thlaspiarvense, tall hedge mustard (Sisymbrium loeselii and flixweed (Descurainia sophia, we tried to establish weeds that are not common on arable land in Germany until now. These were: Yellow rocket (Barbarea vulgaris, hoary cress (Lepidium draba and Turkish rocket (Bunias orientalis. In autumn 2011 emergence of the sown weeds was poor. In the second year of experiment we got good emergence of the named weeds excluding hoary cress (Lepidium draba. In autumn 2011 and 2012 different herbicidecombinations were applied across the stripes. The best results were achieved with Colzor Trio (clomazone + dimethachlor + napropamid which was applied in pre-emergence state, a spray sequence Butisan Gold (metazachlor + quinmerac + dimethenamid-P applied in pre-emergence followed by Salsa (ethametsulfuronmethyl + Trend (adjuvant in post-emergence and Clearfield-Vantiga (metazachlor + quinmerac + imazamox + Dash (adjuvant, also applied in post-emergence state of the weeds.

  5. Reduced doses of herbicides to control weeds in barley crops under temperate conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, José; G. Basch; Calado, José; Carvalho, Mário

    2011-01-01

    Yield losses in cereal crops under temperate climate conditions due to weed-crop competition, namely Lolium rigidum G., can reach up to 80%, depending on the season and infestation level. Nevertheless, the costs of chemical weed control and the environmental impact caused by herbicides recommend the search for strategies to reduce their input. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the possibility of reducing the input of different post-emergence herbicides (diclofop-methyl ...

  6. Organic Weed Control in White Lupin (Lupinus albus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legumes such as white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) provide a valuable nitrogen source in organic agriculture. With organic farming becoming an increasing sector of US agriculture and white lupin interest increasing in the southeastern USA because winter hardy cultivars are available, non-chemical weed c...

  7. Herbicides for shrub and weed tree control in western Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Gratkowski

    1978-01-01

    Herbicides were tested on 16 common shrubs and weed trees during the past 24 years. The woody plants included snowbrush ceanothus, deerbrush ceanothus, mountain whitethorn, varnishleaf ceanothus, sprouting and nonsprouting forms of greenleaf manzanita, hairy manzanita, hoary manzanita, golden chinkapin, golden evergreenchinkapin, Saskatoon serviceberry, Pacific madrone...

  8. Effect of fertilizer in controlling weeds under intercropping of pearl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plants were planted as replacement method. The results showed that the lowest dry matter for crops and total dry matter of weeds was achieved from 50% fertilizer + 50% manure treatment. Also, the highest total dry matter of millet and bean was obtained from this treatment. The highest dry matter of millet and bean was ...

  9. Nematodes and Weeds Control Effects of Pueraria phaseoloides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The yield of plantain (Musa spp., AAB Simmonds) declines sharply after 1–2 years of cropping in West and Central Africa, due mainly to weeds and nematodes. A trial was carried out from January 2002 to October 2005 under two land-use systems (LUS) comprising 4–5 year-old bush fallow, dominated by Chromolaena ...

  10. Assessing the impact of revegetation and weed control on urban sensitive bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Carla L; McKinney, Matthew; Mustin, Karen; Shanahan, Danielle F; Possingham, Hugh P

    2017-06-01

    Nature in cities is concentrated in urban green spaces, which are key areas for urban biodiversity and also important areas to connect people with nature. To conserve urban biodiversity within these natural refugia, habitat restoration such as weed control and revegetation is often implemented. These actions are expected to benefit biodiversity, although species known to be affected by urbanization may not be interacting with restoration in the ways we anticipate. In this study, we use a case study to explore how urban restoration activities impact different bird species. Birds were grouped into urban sensitivity categories and species abundance, and richness was then calculated using a hierarchical species community model for individual species responses, with "urban class" used as the hierarchical parameter. We highlight variable responses of birds to revegetation and weed control based on their level of urban sensitivity. Revegetation of open grassy areas delivers significant bird conservation outcomes, but the effects of weed control are neutral or in some cases negative. Specifically, the species most reliant on remnant vegetation in cities seem to remain stable or decline in abundance in areas with weed control, which we suspect is the result of a simplification of the understorey. The literature reports mixed benefits of weed control between taxa and between locations. We recommend, in our case study site, that weed control be implemented in concert with replanting of native vegetation to provide the understory structure preferred by urban sensitive birds. Understanding the impacts of revegetation and weed control on different bird species is important information for practitioners to make restoration decisions about the allocation of funds for conservation action. This new knowledge can be used both for threatened species and invasive species management.

  11. Selectivity and weed control efficacy of some herbicides applied to sprinkler irrigated rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavero, J.; Zaragoza, C.; Cirujeda, A.; Anzalone, A.; Faci, J. M.; Blanco, O.

    2011-07-01

    Sprinkler irrigation can reduce the irrigation water needed to grow rice. However, most available information on weed control with herbicides is related to flood irrigated rice because this is the main growing method. Field experiments were conducted at Zaragoza (Spain) during two years to study weed control and tolerance of sprinkler irrigated rice to several herbicides. The main weeds were Atriplex prostrata Boucher ex DC., Cyperus rotundus L., Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) Beauv. and Sonchus oleraceus L. Rice cv Guadiamar was tolerant to preemergence (PRE) application of clomazone at 0.36 kg ha{sup -}1 and oxadiazon at 0.5 kg ha{sup -}1. PRE application of pendimethalin at 1.32 kg ha{sup -}1 combined with clomazone at 0.36 kg ha{sup -}1 decreased rice yield. Postemergence (POST) application of bentazon at 1.6 kg ha{sup -}1 + MCPA at 0.25 kg ha{sup -}1 did not injure rice but POST application of azimsulfuron at 0.025 kg ha{sup -}1 produced visual crop injury. Only treatments that controlled grassy weeds since rice was planted and by more than 80% at harvest time lead to acceptable rice yield (> 5,000 kg ha{sup -}1). Clomazone applied PRE at 0.36 kg ha{sup -}1 provided good control of grassy weeds (> 80%) and the highest rice yield, so it is recommended as a selective and efficacious PRE treatment for weed control of annual weeds in sprinkler irrigated rice. The perennial purple nutsedge was difficult to control at high plant densities (> 150 plants m{sup -}2) and the recommended herbicide is azimsulfuron applied at POST at 0.02 kg ha{sup -}1. (Author) 37 refs.

  12. Weed supression by smother crops and selective herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Francisco José

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a smother crop is thought to suppress weed density and to add other beneficial effects in sustainable agricultural systems. Weed suppression ought to be considered an essential component of integrated weed management. However, very little is known about the effects of green manure plants on weeds. This study evaluated the influence of three green manure species on weed suppression and selectivity of herbicides. A field experiment was designed to determine the effect of the green manure species Crotalaria juncea, Arachis pintoi and pigeon pea on the weeds Brachiaria decumbens, guineagrass and hairy beggarticks, and on the natural weed infestation in the inter rows area of an avocado orchard. The weed species were suppressed differently by each green manure species. Soil samples collected from the field experiment presented a residual effect, of at least 30 d, in suppressing weed seed bank recruitment; this residual effect was caused by the residues of the green manure present in the soil. When the green manure was incorporated into the top 5 cm of soil or left on the surface, in a greenhouse experiment, the emergence of weed seeds was significantly inhibited, depending on the species, and on the amount and depth of green manure incorporation. Greenhouse experiments indicate that pre-emergence herbicides cause lower phytotoxicity than post-emergence Arachis pintoi. Smother crops using green manure species, when well established in an area, provide additional weed control to the cropping system and are effective and valuable tools in integrated weed management.

  13. A combined flamer-cultivator for weed control during the harvesting season of asparagus green spears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Martelloni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Weed competition during spears harvesting reduces asparagus yields. The application of herbicides during this period is illegal, and alternative non-chemical practices are needed. This research tested the effectiveness and efficiency of a custom-built combined flamer-cultivator to control weeds (both in the inter- and intra- spears production bands during the spears harvest season. It also analysed the effects of various liquefied petroleum gas (LPG doses on total asparagus yield, mean spear weight, and total number of marketable spears. In both years, the asparagus spears were generally not damaged by flame weeding using LPG doses of between 43 to 87 kg/ha. The same LPG doses were effective in controlling weeds, showing the same total marketable yields as the weed-free control. At high LPG doses (e.g. 130 and 260 kg/ha, yields decreased as a consequence of the damage caused to the spears, resulting in a lower number of marketable spears. Flaming did not affect the mean spear weight, and can be applied repeatedly during harvesting to maintain the weeds at a level that does not lead to a yield reduction. The repeated use of the combined flamer-cultivator (every seven days led to higher yields than plots where weed control was not conducted. The new machine can be used in a period when herbicides are not possible. Flaming could be introduced by asparagus producers as an alternative, or in addition to herbicides applied in the pre-emergence and post-harvest of spears.

  14. Research on the weed control degree and glyphosate soil biodegradation in apple plantations (Pioneer variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersilia ALEXA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we follow control degree of glyphosate herbicide on weeds in apple plantations (Pioneer variety of the Research Station Timisoara. It was also followed glyphosate biodegradation capacity in the soil by determining the amount of CO2 released by the action of microorganisms on C14 glyphosate marked isotope. Laboratory analysis of glyphosate residues in soil was made using a Liquid Scintillation TRIATHLER. Glyphosate biodegradation ability in the presence of soil microorganisms is high, so glyphosate residues remaining in soil, in terms of its use in weed combating, are minimal. Study of glyphosate biodegradation capacity in the experimental field indicates that the CO2 fraction accumulated after 50 days is 28.02% for samples exposed in the experimental field. Weather conditions, especially temperature variations between day and night, influences the activity of soilmicroorganisms and affect biodegraded glyphosate percentage.Chemical method of weed control consisted in: herbicide used was Roundup 3 l/ha (glyphosate isopropyl amine salt 360 g/l and are based on chemical application on weeds, on the rows of trees, on their uptake and translocation in their organs having as principal scope the total destruction of weeds. The experimental results obtained reveal a weed combat degree of 82.98% , in the case of chemical variant, compared with control variant. The species combated mainly due to glyphosate herbicide, which is no longer found in the final mapping are: Capsella bursa-pastoris, Chenopodium album, Echinochloa crus-galli, Plantago major, Polygonum aviculare. Total combated weeds /m2 with glyphosate is 126.67.

  15. Non-chemical Control of Root Parasitic Weeds with Biochar

    OpenAIRE

    Hanan Eizenberg; Dina Plakhine; Hammam Ziadne; Ludmila Tsechansky; Graber, Ellen R.

    2017-01-01

    This study tested whether soil-applied biochar can impact the seed germination and attachment of root parasitic weeds. Three hypotheses were evaluated: (i) biochar adsorbs host-exuded signaling molecules; (ii) biochar activates plants’ innate system-wide defenses against invasion by the parasite; and (iii) biochar has a systemic influence on the amount of seed germination stimulant produced or released by the host plant. Three types of experiments were performed: (I) pot trials with tomato (S...

  16. Effect of chemical and mechanical weed control on cassava yield, soil quality and erosion under cassava cropping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Titiek; Wisnubroto, Erwin; Utomo, Wani

    2016-04-01

    Three years field experiments were conducted to study the effect of chemical and mechanical weed control on soil quality and erosion under cassava cropping system. The experiment were conducted at University Brawijaya field experimental station, Jatikerto, Malang, Indonesia. The experiments were carried out from 2011 - 2014. The treatments consist of three cropping system (cassava mono culture; cassava + maize intercropping and cassava + peanut intercropping), and two weed control method (chemical and mechanical methods). The experimental result showed that the yield of cassava first year and second year did not influenced by weed control method and cropping system. However, the third year yield of cassava was influence by weed control method and cropping system. The cassava yield planted in cassava + maize intercropping system with chemical weed control methods was only 24 t/ha, which lower compared to other treatments, even with that of the same cropping system used mechanical weed control. The highest cassava yield in third year was obtained by cassava + peanuts cropping system with mechanical weed control method. After three years experiment, the soil of cassava monoculture system with chemical weed control method possessed the lowest soil organic matter, and soil aggregate stability. During three years of cropping soil erosion in chemical weed control method, especially on cassava monoculture, was higher compared to mechanical weed control method. The soil loss from chemical control method were 40 t/ha, 44 t/ha and 54 t/ha for the first, second and third year crop. The soil loss from mechanical weed control method for the same years was: 36 t/ha, 36 t/ha and 38 t/ha. Key words: herbicide, intercropping, soil organic matter, aggregate stability.

  17. Are herbicides a once in a century method of weed control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Adam S; Frisvold, George B

    2017-11-01

    The efficacy of any pesticide is an exhaustible resource that can be depleted over time. For decades, the dominant paradigm - that weed mobility is low relative to insect pests and pathogens, that there is an ample stream of new weed control technologies in the commercial pipeline, and that technology suppliers have sufficient economic incentives and market power to delay resistance - supported a laissez faire approach to herbicide resistance management. Earlier market data bolstered the belief that private incentives and voluntary actions were sufficient to manage resistance. Yet, there has been a steady growth in resistant weeds, while no new commercial herbicide modes of action (MOAs) have been discovered in 30 years. Industry has introduced new herbicide tolerant crops to increase the applicability of older MOAs. Yet, many weed species are already resistant to these compounds. Recent trends suggest a paradigm shift whereby herbicide resistance may impose greater costs to farmers, the environment, and taxpayers than earlier believed. In developed countries, herbicides have been the dominant method of weed control for half a century. Over the next half-century, will widespread resistance to multiple MOAs render herbicides obsolete for many major cropping systems? We suggest it would be prudent to consider the implications of such a low-probability, but high-cost development. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. What do farmers' weed control decisions imply about glyphosate resistance? Evidence from surveys of US corn fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Seth J; McFadden, Jonathan R; Smith, David J

    2017-04-26

    The first case of glyphosate-resistant weeds in the United States was documented in 1998, 2 years after the commercialization of genetically engineered herbicide-resistant (HR) corn and soybeans. Currently, over 15 glyphosate-resistant weed species affect US crop production areas. These weeds have the potential to reduce yields, increase costs, and lower farm profitability. The objective of our study is to develop a behavioral model of farmers' weed management decisions and use it to analyze weed resistance to glyphosate in US corn farms. On average, we find that weed control increased US corn yields by 3700 kg ha -1 (worth approximately $US 255 ha -1 ) in 2005 and 3500 kg ha -1 (worth approximately $US 575 ha -1 ) in 2010. If glyphosate resistant weeds were absent, glyphosate killed approximately 99% of weeds, on average, when applied at the label rate in HR production systems. Average control was dramatically lower in states where glyphosate resistance was widespread. We find that glyphosate resistance had a significant impact on weed control costs and corn yields of US farmers in 2005 and 2010. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Effect of sprayer output volume and adjuvants on efficacy of clove oil for weed control in organic Vidalia sweet onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timely cultivation with a tine weeder is the primary tool for successful weed control in organic Vidalia® sweet onion, but conditions frequently arise that delay the initial cultivation. Weeds that emerge during the delay are not effectively controlled by cultivation and herbicides derived from nat...

  20. CONVISO® SMART – a new solution to control monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous weeds in ALStolerant sugar beets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balgheim, Natalie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CONVISO SMART is a new system to control monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous weeds in ALS-inhibitor tolerant sugar beets. This system consists of an ALS-inhibiting herbicide and a sugar beet variety which is tolerant against the complementary herbicide due to classic breeding mechanisms. The herbicide CONVISO is a combination of the two active ingredients foramsulfuron and thiencarbazonemethyl. Whereas foramsulfuron is the leaf active compound, thiencarbazone-methyl is leaf as well as soil active. The product will be formulated as an oily dispersion (OD. The registration was requested with an application rate of 1 x 1 l/ha or 2 x 0.5 l/ha in ALS-inhibitor tolerant sugar beets. Application should be done from BBCH 10 – 14 of the weeds, especially of Chenopodium album as well as from BBCH 12 – 18 of the sugar beet. The estimated introduction of this system on the German market will be 2018. CONVISO is well active against the most important weeds in sugar beets, including Polygonum and Chenopodium species. Furthermore several difficult to control weeds as Aethusa cynapium and Mercurialis annua will be controlled by CONVISO. The addition of special herbicides to control those difficult weeds will no longer be necessary. The tolerance of the variety against CONVISO is very strong, which will be shown by the results of the weed free selectivity trials. Due to the high tolerance of the variety against CONVISO and the not occurring of negative herbicide effects, the full yield potential can be utilized.

  1. Use of Multicopy Transposons Bearing Unfitness Genes in Weed Control: Four Example Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressel, Jonathan; Levy, Avraham A.

    2014-01-01

    We speculate that multicopy transposons, carrying both fitness and unfitness genes, can provide new positive and negative selection options to intractable weed problems. Multicopy transposons rapidly disseminate through populations, appearing in approximately 100% of progeny, unlike nuclear transgenes, which appear in a proportion of segregating populations. Different unfitness transgenes and modes of propagation will be appropriate for different cases: (1) outcrossing Amaranthus spp. (that evolved resistances to major herbicides); (2) Lolium spp., important pasture grasses, yet herbicide-resistant weeds in crops; (3) rice (Oryza sativa), often infested with feral weedy rice, which interbreeds with the crop; and (4) self-compatible sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), which readily crosses with conspecific shattercane and with allotetraploid johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense). The speculated outcome of these scenarios is to generate weed populations that contain the unfitness gene and thus are easily controllable. Unfitness genes can be under chemically or environmentally inducible promoters, activated after gene dissemination, or under constitutive promoters where the gene function is utilized only at special times (e.g. sensitivity to an herbicide). The transposons can be vectored to the weeds by introgression from the crop (in rice, sorghum, and Lolium spp.) or from planted engineered weed (Amaranthus spp.) using a gene conferring the degradation of a no longer widely used herbicide, especially in tandem with an herbicide-resistant gene that kills all nonhybrids, facilitating the rapid dissemination of the multicopy transposons in a weedy population. PMID:24820021

  2. Allelopathy--a natural alternative for weed control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Francisco A; Molinillo, José M G; Varela, Rosa M; Galindo, Juan C G

    2007-04-01

    Allelopathy studies the interactions among plants, fungi, algae and bacteria with the organisms living in a certain ecosystem, interactions that are mediated by the secondary metabolites produced and exuded into the environment. Consequently, allelopathy is a multidisciplinary science where ecologists, chemists, soil scientists, agronomists, biologists, plant physiologists and molecular biologists offer their skills to give an overall view of the complex interactions occurring in a certain ecosystem. As a result of these studies, applications in weed and pest management are expected in such different fields as development of new agrochemicals, cultural methods, developing of allelopathic crops with increased weed resistance, etc. The present paper will focus on the chemical aspects of allelopathy, pointing out the most recent advances in the chemicals disclosed, their mode of action and their fate in the ecosystem. Also, attention will be paid to achievements in genomics and proteomics, two emerging fields in allelopathy. Rather than being exhaustive, this paper is intended to reflect a critical vision of the current state of allelopathy and to point to future lines of research where in the authors' opinion the main advances and applications could and should be expected.

  3. Study on different densities of cumin and chickpea intercropping with emphasis on weed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    reza abasi ali kamar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of different densities of intercropping cumin and chickpea, an experiment was conducted in the farm of Agriculture College of Mashhad. This experiment was conducted as a strip design based on RCBD with four replications. Main plots included weed control treatments (I- one time control in growing season on emergence stage. II- without control and subplots included 5 different densities (I- 120 pl/m2 cumin. II- 90 pl/m2 cumin + 15 pl/m2 chickpea. III- 60 pl/m2 cumin + 30 pl/m2 chickpea. IV- 30 pl/m2 cumin + 45 pl/m2 chickpea. V- 60 pl/m2 chickpea.. The results showed a significant difference in all growth indices in all one time weed control and without weed control treatments. As the densities decreased, both crop's growth indices decreased. The decrease of chickpea yield in all densities in both weed control treatments, showed significant difference. Crop growth rate (CGR and leaf area index (LAI in cumin despite of chickea has affected positively by intercropping. Total land equivalent ratio (LER in all treatments was more than one and partial LER only in 90 pl/m2 was more than one that shows the positive effect of intercropping on cumin yield.

  4. Weed Control in Maize-Cowpea Intercropping System Related to Environmental Resources Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdollah ESKANDARI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was carried out in Ramhormoz, Iran during the 2008-2009 growing season to investigate the effects of different planting pattern of intercropping on environmental resource consumption and weed biomass. A randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications was employed to compare the treatments. Treatments included maize sole crop (M, cow pea sole crop (C, within row intercropping (I1, row intercropping (I2 and mix cropping (I3. The density of intercropping was according to replacement design (one maize replaced by three cow pea plants. The results showed that environmental resource consumption was significantly (P?0.05 affected by cropping system, where PAR interception, moisture and nutrients uptake were higher in intercropping systems compared to sole crop systems. Regarding to weed control, intercrops were more effective than sole crops and it was related to lower availability of environmental resources for weeds in intercropping systems.

  5. Diversifying cereal-based rotations to improve weed control. Evaluation with the AlomySys model quantifying the effect of cropping systems on a grass weed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colbach Nathalie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Simplified rotations often select weed flora consisting of one or several dominant species. In rotations consisting mainly of winter cereals, one of the most frequent weeds in Atlantic European countries is blackgrass (Alopecurus myosuroides Huds.. In order to reduce environmental impacts and avoid the selection of herbicide-resistant populations, alternative weed management strategies are necessary. The objective of the present study was to develop a methodology for using a weed dynamics model called ALOMYSYS for evaluating prospective diversified crop rotations based on expert opinion. These prospective rotations were developed for a particular region aiming at reducing herbicide use while keeping weed infestation similar to that in current cropping systems. The prospective systems were also evaluated economically by calculating costs and margins for the farmer. The simulations showed that the more diverse the rotation, the better blackgrass was controlled and the less herbicides (rates and frequencies were necessary. Optimal herbicide spraying conditions and mouldboard ploughing were also less essential in diverse rotations. It was though essential to reason herbicide programs over the whole rotation and not simply as function of the preceding crop. The economic evaluation identified the interest of spring or winter pea either replacing or preceding oilseed rape (OSR in OSR/wheat/barley rotations.

  6. Chemical Control of Curled Dock (Rumex crispus L. and Other Weeds in Noncropped Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetanka Dimitrova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumex crispus L. is an invasive species widespread in our country and in particular in the region of North Bulgaria. It is characterized by high biological and ecological plasticity. Owing to its great reproductive potential, the weed has been assigned to the list of economically most important weeds in the country. With the purpose of studying the possibility of chemical weed control in noncropped areas with heavy natural background infestation with R. crispus L. and other dicotyledonous weeds, two field trials were carried out. A ready-to-use herbicide mixture 2,4-D 140.2 g/l-1 + Triclopyr 144 g/l-1, trade product Genoxon 3X (X0050, was tested at two doses of active ingredient, 3552 and 2842 ml/ha-1. It was found that: (1 population density of Rumex crispus L. can be successfully reduced by treatment at the stage of early stem formation; herbicideefficacy with 3552 and 2882 ml/ha-1 doses on the 21st day after treatment was 100% and 90.5%, respectively, at the end of vegetation 94.4 and 85.7%, respectively; (2 herbicidal efficacy was lower when R. crispus L. was treated at the 5 - 6 leaf stage, being 100 – 94.1%and 80 – 76.5% respectively for the indicated doses and time of recording; (3 at the studied doses the herbicide controlled both annual dicotyledonous weeds (Amaranthus spp., Chenopodium album L., Portulaca oleracea L. and perennial dicotyledonous ones (Cirsiumarvense L., Sonchus arvensis L., Convolvulus arvensis L., Carduus acanthoides L., but it was not toxic to monocotyledonous weeds.

  7. Modelling weed emergence patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleeshouwers, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    Anticipating weed pressure may be important in selecting and timing weed control measures in order to optimize their effectiveness, and thus reduce herbicide use. Therefore, a predictive model of the time of emergence and the numbers of seedling emerging (the weed emergence pattern) after

  8. Impact of atrazine prohibition on the sustainability of weed management in Wisconsin maize production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fengxia; Mitchell, Paul D; Davis, Vince M; Recker, Ross

    2017-02-01

    Controversy has surrounded atrazine owing to its susceptibility to leaching and run-off, with regular calls for a ban or restrictions on its use. In the context of a decreasing trend in the percentage of US maize using no-till since 2008, coinciding with the trend of glyphosate-resistant weeds becoming problematic in the Midwestern United States, we empirically examine how atrazine use restrictions have impacted the diversity of weed management practices used by Wisconsin maize farmers. Using survey data from farms inside and outside atrazine prohibition areas, we found that prohibiting atrazine did not directly impact tillage practices, but rather it increased the adoption of herbicide-resistant seed, which then increased adoption of conservation tillage systems. We also found that prohibiting atrazine and using herbicide-resistant seed reduced the number of herbicide sites of action used. The results indicate that prohibiting atrazine reduced the diversity of weed management practices, which increased the risk of herbicide resistance. Our concern is that a regulatory policy to address one issue (atrazine in groundwater) has induced farmer responses that increase problems with another issue (herbicide-resistant weeds) that longer term will contribute to water quality problems from increased soil erosion and offset the initial benefits. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. The effect of herbaceous weed control on planted loblolly pine during a drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Kushla

    2015-01-01

    Seedling survival in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation establishment is often mentioned as a justification for herbaceous weed control (HWC). However, the effects of HWC treatment during drought have been difficult to find. Sometimes this research was proprietary in nature. Also, since weather patterns vary from year to year, drought may not have coincided with...

  10. effects of weed control and cow dung manure on growth indices of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2012-12-02

    Dec 2, 2012 ... Keywords - Weed control, Cow dung manure, Growth indices, Quality protein maize. INTRODUCTION. Maize (Zea mays L.) is ... amino acid digestibility score of 67% compared to. 28.5, 31.0 and 33% values for pioneer, ..... vegetable production.http:/www.agnet org. Badu-Apraku, B.; Menkir, A.; Fakorede, ...

  11. Weed Control and Seedling Performance Using Oust, Velpar, and Velpar+Oust Impregnated Diammonium Phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Yeiser

    2002-01-01

    Technology that combines herbicide and fertilizer into one treatment thereby reducing application costs while enhancing growth is needed. Four clean and well-prepared sites in TX, MS, and AL were tested. Study objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness of diammonium phosphate (DAP) impregnated with Oust, Velpar, or Velpar+Oust for herbaceous weed control and newly...

  12. Dominus® for Meloidogyne Arenaria and weed control in Florida cut flower production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two years of field research was conducted at a commercial flower farm in Florida to evaluate DOMINUS® (allylisothiocyanate (AITC); 374 L/ha) for nematode and weed control compared to methyl bromide (MeBr 392 kg/ha 80:20 MeBr:chlorpicrin). Dominus is a biofumigant registered for conventional and orga...

  13. Enhanced s-triazine Degradation and Sugar Cane Weed Control Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil borne bacteria on all continents except Antarctica have developed the ability to rapidly degrade the herbicide atrazine. Reduced residual weed control with atrazine in soils exhibiting enhanced degradation was confirmed under Mississippi Delta corn production and is expected to be occurring in...

  14. Biological Control Of Witch Weed In Fields Of Burkina Faso Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifteen Fusarium oxysporum isolates from diseased parasitic weeds (Striga hermonthica plants) were evaluated over two years (1997-98) to identify the most effective isolates for the control of the parasite in infested sorghum fields in Burkina Faso. In both years the fungus was found to reduce Striga infection in sorghum by ...

  15. Diapause in Abrostola asclepiadis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) may make for an ineffective weed biological control agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale and black swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum and V. nigrum; Apocynaceae, subfamily Asclepiadoideae) are perennial vines from Europe that are invasive in various terrestrial habitats in the northeastern USA and southeastern Canada. A classical weed biological control program has been in develop...

  16. Phosphate fertilizer and weed control effects on growth and yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of phosphate fertilizer and weed control on yield and yield components of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) were studied on acidic Nitisols of farmers' fields of Welmera Woreda, West Shoa. Factorial combinations of four levels of phosphate fertilizer (0, 10, 20 and 30 kg P ha-1) as triple super-phosphate (TSP) and two ...

  17. Status of biological control projects on terrestrial invasive alien weeds in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    In cooperation with foreign scientists, we are currently developing new classical biological control agents for five species of invasive alien terrestrial weeds. Cape-Ivy. A gall-forming fly, Parafreutreta regalis, and a stem-boring moth, Digitivalva delaireae, have been favorably reviewed by TAG...

  18. The issues of weed infestation with environmentally hazardous plants and methods of their control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, V. L.; Posternak, T. S.; Pasko, O. A.; Kovyazin, V. F.

    2016-09-01

    The authors analyze expansion of segetal and ruderal vegetation on agricultural lands in Leningrad and Tomsk oblasts, typical for the European and Asian parts of Russia. The spreading conditions, composition of species, biological features and ecological requirements of the most aggressive species are identified. Some effective ways of weed control are suggested.

  19. Evaluating subsoiling and herbaceous weed control on shortleaf pine planted in retired farm land

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Kushla

    2010-01-01

    In March 2005, shortleaf pine was planted on retired fields of the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Experiment Station in Holly Springs. The objectives were to evaluate subsoiling and herbaceous weed control on first year seedling stocking, survival, and size. First year seedling measurements were made on stocking, survival, and size. Only results for first year...

  20. Effect of oil palm sludge on cowpea nodulation and weed control in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field trial was conducted at the Rivers State University of Science and Technology Research and Training farm Port Harcourt to test the effect of oil palm sludge on cowpea nodulation and weed control. The cultivars of cowpea used were Dan Kano, Bornu local and Sokoto local while the oil palm sludge levels applied ...

  1. Effects of weed control and cow dung manure on growth indices of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field trials were conducted during the 2006, 2007 and 2008 rainy seasons at the Institute for Agricultural Research farm Samaru, in the Northern guinea savanna zone of Nigeria to evaluate the effects of weed control and cow dung manure treatments on growth of quality protein maize. The trials consisted of factorial ...

  2. Split-season herbaceous weed control for full-season seedling performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimmie L. Yeiser; Andrew W. Ezell

    2010-01-01

    Results from four loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) sites, one in each of MS and TX in 2001 and again in 2002, are presented. Twelve herbicide treatments and an untreated check were tested. Herbicide treatments were applied early (mid-March), late (mid-May), both timings, or not at all to achieve, early- late-, full-season, or no weed control. When...

  3. A sterile-female technique proposed for control of Striga hermonthica and other intractable weeds: Advantages, shortcomings, and risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeds have posed intractable challenges to farmers since the dawn of agriculture. This article describes in detail a proposed control strategy based on the introduction of genes conferring female-sterility into the genomes of intractable target weeds. Spread of these genes through target populations...

  4. Weed Diversity Affects Soybean and Maize Yield in a Long Term Experiment in Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Rosana; Lima, Mauricio; Davis, Adam S; Gonzalez-Andujar, Jose L

    2017-01-01

    Managing production environments in ways that promote weed community diversity may enhance both crop production and the development of a more sustainable agriculture. This study analyzed data of productivity of maize (corn) and soybean in plots in the Main Cropping System Experiment (MCSE) at the W. K. Kellogg Biological Station Long-Term Ecological Research (KBS-LTER) in Michigan, USA, from 1996 to 2011. We used models derived from population ecology to explore how weed diversity, temperature, and precipitation interact with crop yields. Using three types of models that considered internal and external (climate and weeds) factors, with additive or non-linear variants, we found that changes in weed diversity were associated with changes in rates of crop yield increase over time for both maize and soybeans. The intrinsic capacity for soybean yield increase in response to the environment was greater under more diverse weed communities. Soybean production risks were greatest in the least weed diverse systems, in which each weed species lost was associated with progressively greater crop yield losses. Managing for weed community diversity, while suppressing dominant, highly competitive weeds, may be a helpful strategy for supporting long term increases in soybean productivity. In maize, there was a negative and non-additive response of yields to the interaction between weed diversity and minimum air temperatures. When cold temperatures constrained potential maize productivity through limited resources, negative interactions with weed diversity became more pronounced. We suggest that: (1) maize was less competitive in cold years allowing higher weed diversity and the dominance of some weed species; or (2) that cold years resulted in increased weed richness and prevalence of competitive weeds, thus reducing crop yields. Therefore, we propose to control dominant weed species especially in the years of low yield and extreme minimum temperatures to improve maize yields

  5. Effect of Plowing Frequency and Weeding Methods on Weeds and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of repeated tillage and weed control methods on weed infestation and ... Grain yield reduction in zero-till and three times plowing was 59 and 21%, ... Twice weeding reduced weed population by 28% and increased wheat grain yield ...

  6. Mechanical and chemical weed control in newly established Salix plantations. Mekanisk och kemisk ograesbekaempning i nyanlagda salixodlingar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danfors, B.

    1991-01-01

    Different methods for chemical and mechanical weed control have been studied. The studies have comprised the counting and weighing of weeds both before and after different weed control inputs. Performances studies have also been made on repeated occasions for assessment of the labour capacity required with different techniques and at different stages of development. On mineral soils that are low to moderately low in humus content it is recommended to use a soil-applied herbicide that is sprayed using a normal sprayer immediately after planting. On humus-rich mineral soils and pure humus soils the experiences are that the effect of a treatment with soil-applied herbicides will be extremely limited or, alternatively, may be totally absent. Under such conditions it is necessary to use mechanical weed control already from the start. In the mechanical control of weeds, use has usually been made of cultivators or harrow sections which have been adapted to shallow tillage. Rotary cultivators have also been used and in some cases even side delivery rakes. In the case of mechanical weed control there is a lack of both experience and technology for removing the weeds within the rows of small and delicate Salix shoots. Some experience and technology can be obtained, however, from sectors such as field production of vegetables and from vineyards where there are techniques for mechanically removing weeds. Both technique and experience must be further developed if mechanical weed control within the rows is to be accomplished successfully in larger plantations. With suitably chosen herbicides even large weeds can be eradicated and thus the competition can be reduced decisively- Here it is necessary that the Salix cuttings are effectively protected against contact with most herbicides. (12 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.).

  7. Organic weed conrol and cover crop residue integration impacts on weed control, quality, and yield and economics in conservation tillage tomato - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increased use of conservation tillage in vegetable production requires more information be developed on the role of cover crops in weed control, tomato quality and yield. Three conservation-tillage systems utilizing crimson clover, brassica and cereal rye as winter cover crops were compared to ...

  8. The effects of cover crop on weed control in collard (Brassica olerecea var acephala) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennan, H; Ngouajio, M; Isik, D; Kose, B; Kaya, E

    2006-01-01

    Leafy vegetables are not very competitive and weed interference can cause considerable yield losses in collard (Brassica olerecea var acephala) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). Currently there are no pre or post emergence herbicides registered for weed control in these vegetables in Turkey. For this reason, alternative weed control strategies need to be developed. Cover crop residue could represent an alternative method of weed management in these crops. Field studies were conducted in 2004 at the Black Sea Agricultural Research Institute experimental field in Samsun, Turkey. The cover crop treatments consisted of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, Sorghum vulgare Pers., Vicia villosa L., Amaranthus cruentus L., Pisum sativum L. and the bare ground with no cover crop. All cover crops were seeded by hand and incorporated into the soil on 11 May, 2004. Each plot was 10 m2 (2 x 5 m) and arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications. All cover crops were incorporated into the soil by discing on 1 September 2004 at flowering stage of the cover crops. Broadleaved weed species were dominant in the experimental area. Most cover crops established well and S. bicolor biomass was the highest. The number of weed species emerging in all treatments was different at 14 DAD (days after desiccation). Similar results were observed at 28 and 56 DAD. Treatments with Vicia villosa residues had fewer weed species and lower total weed densities than other treatments.

  9. Strip Tillage and Early-Season Broadleaf Weed Control in Seeded Onion (Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Gegner-Kazmierczak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted in 2007 and 2008 near Oakes, North Dakota (ND, USA, to evaluate if strip tillage could be incorporated into a production system of seeded onion (Allium cepa to eliminate the standard use of a barley (Hordeum vulgare companion crop with conventional, full width tillage, yet support common early-season weed control programs. A split-factor design was used with tillage (conventional and strip tillage as the main plot and herbicide treatments (bromoxynil, DCPA, oxyfluorfen, and pendimethalin as sub-plots. Neither tillage nor herbicide treatments affected onion stand counts. Common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album densities were lower in strip tillage compared to conventional tillage up to three weeks after the post-emergence applied herbicides. In general, micro-rate post-emergence herbicide treatments provided greater early-season broadleaf weed control than pre-emergence herbicide treatments. Onion yield and grade did not differ among herbicide treatments because the mid-season herbicide application provided sufficient control/suppression of the early-season weed escapes that these initial weed escapes did not impact onion yield or bulb diameter. In 2007, onion in the strip tillage treatment were larger in diameter resulting in greater total and marketable yields compared to conventional tillage. Marketable onion yield was 82.1 Mg ha−1 in strip tillage and 64.9 Mg ha−1 in conventional tillage. Results indicate that strip tillage use in direct-seeded onion production was beneficial, especially when growing conditions were conducive to higher yields and that the use of strip tillage in onion may provide an alternative to using a companion crop as it did not interfere with either early-season weed management system.

  10. Biological control of weeds: research by the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service: selected case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Paul C; DeLoach, C Jack; Wineriter, Susan A; Goolsby, John A; Sobhian, Rouhollah; Boyette, C Douglas; Abbas, Hamed K

    2003-01-01

    Research by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) on biological control of weeds has been practiced for many years because of its inherent ecological and economic advantages. Today, it is further driven by ARS adherence to Presidential Executive Order 13112 (3 February 1999) on invasive species and to USDA-ARS policy toward developing technology in support of sustainable agriculture with reduced dependence on non-renewable petrochemical resources. This paper reports examples or case studies selected to demonstrate the traditional or classical approach for biological control programs using Old World arthropods against Tamarix spp, Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav) ST Blake and Galium spurium L/G aparine L, and the augmentative approach with a native plant pathogen against Pueraria lobata Ohwi = P montana. The examples illustrated various conflicts of interest with endangered species and ecological complexities of arthropods with associated microbes such as nematodes.

  11. Emerging Challenges and Opportunities for Education and Research in Weed Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Matloob, Amar; Mahajan, Gulshan; Aslam, Farhena; Florentine, Singarayer K; Jha, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    In modern agriculture, with more emphasis on high input systems, weed problems are likely to increase and become more complex. With heightened awareness of adverse effects of herbicide residues on human health and environment and the evolution of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes, a significant focus within weed science has now shifted to the development of eco-friendly technologies with reduced reliance on herbicides. Further, with the large-scale adoption of herbicide-resistant crops, and uncertain climatic optima under climate change, the problems for weed science have become multi-faceted. To handle these complex weed problems, a holistic line of action with multi-disciplinary approaches is required, including adjustments to technology, management practices, and legislation. Improved knowledge of weed ecology, biology, genetics, and molecular biology is essential for developing sustainable weed control practices. Additionally, judicious use of advanced technologies, such as site-specific weed management systems and decision support modeling, will play a significant role in reducing costs associated with weed control. Further, effective linkages between farmers and weed researchers will be necessary to facilitate the adoption of technological developments. To meet these challenges, priorities in research need to be determined and the education system for weed science needs to be reoriented. In respect of the latter imperative, closer collaboration between weed scientists and other disciplines can help in defining and solving the complex weed management challenges of the 21st century. This consensus will provide more versatile and diverse approaches to innovative teaching and training practices, which will be needed to prepare future weed science graduates who are capable of handling the anticipated challenges of weed science facing in contemporary agriculture. To build this capacity, mobilizing additional funding for both weed research and weed management

  12. Emerging Challenges and Opportunities for Education and Research in Weed Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagirath S. Chauhan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In modern agriculture, with more emphasis on high input systems, weed problems are likely to increase and become more complex. With heightened awareness of adverse effects of herbicide residues on human health and environment and the evolution of herbicide-resistant weed biotypes, a significant focus within weed science has now shifted to the development of eco-friendly technologies with reduced reliance on herbicides. Further, with the large-scale adoption of herbicide-resistant crops, and uncertain climatic optima under climate change, the problems for weed science have become multi-faceted. To handle these complex weed problems, a holistic line of action with multi-disciplinary approaches is required, including adjustments to technology, management practices, and legislation. Improved knowledge of weed ecology, biology, genetics, and molecular biology is essential for developing sustainable weed control practices. Additionally, judicious use of advanced technologies, such as site-specific weed management systems and decision support modeling, will play a significant role in reducing costs associated with weed control. Further, effective linkages between farmers and weed researchers will be necessary to facilitate the adoption of technological developments. To meet these challenges, priorities in research need to be determined and the education system for weed science needs to be reoriented. In respect of the latter imperative, closer collaboration between weed scientists and other disciplines can help in defining and solving the complex weed management challenges of the 21st century. This consensus will provide more versatile and diverse approaches to innovative teaching and training practices, which will be needed to prepare future weed science graduates who are capable of handling the anticipated challenges of weed science facing in contemporary agriculture. To build this capacity, mobilizing additional funding for both weed research and

  13. Phytotoxicity Study on Bidens sulphurea Sch. Bip. as a Preliminary Approach for Weed Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Bruna P; Nepomuceno, Mariluce P; Varela, Rosa M; Torres, Ascensión; Molinillo, José M G; Alves, Pedro L C A; Macías, Francisco A

    2017-06-28

    Farmers of the Franca region in Brazil observed that Bidens sulphurea was able to eliminate the Panicum maximum weed, which infected coffee plantations, without affecting the crop. In an effort to determine if the inhibitory effects observed were due to the presence of phytotoxic compounds from leaves and roots, a biodirected isolation and spectroscopic characterization has been carried out. The leaf dichloromethane and root acetone extracts were the most active, and the former appeared to be more phytotoxic to the target species, including four weeds. A total of 26 compounds were isolated from leaves and roots, and four of them are described here for the first time. The major compounds in the leaf extract are the sesquiterpene lactones costunolide, reynosin, and santamarine, and these showed marked inhibition. Amaranthus viridis and Panicum maximum were the most sensitive species of the weeds tested. These three phytotoxic lactones were also evaluated on A. viridis and P. maximum under hydroponic conditions. A. viridis was the most affected species with the three lactones, and santamarine was the most phytotoxic compound on both. This is the first time that the phytotoxicity of sesquiterpene lactones has been evaluated on hydroponic culture. The work described here is a preliminary approach for the use of B. sulphurea for weed control in agriculture, both as a cover crop and by use of its components as natural herbicide leads.

  14. Foliar Potassium Fertilizer Additives Affect Soybean Response and Weed Control with Glyphosate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A. Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in 2004 and 2005 determined the effects of foliar-applied K-fertilizer sources (0-0-62-0 (%N-%P2O5-%K2O-%S, 0-0-25-17, 3-18-18-0, and 5-0-20-13 and additive rates (2.2, 8.8, and 17.6 kg K ha−1 on glyphosate-resistant soybean response and weed control. Field experiments were conducted at Novelty and Portageville with high soil test K and weed populations and at Malden with low soil test K and weed populations. At Novelty, grain yield increased with fertilizer additives at 8.8 kg K ha−1 in a high-yield, weed-free environment in 2004, but fertilizer additives reduced yield up to 470 kg ha−1 in a low-yield year (2005 depending on the K source and rate. At Portageville, K-fertilizer additives increased grain yield from 700 to 1160 kg ha−1 compared to diammonium sulfate, depending on the K source and rate. At Malden, there was no yield response to K sources. Differences in leaf tissue K (P=0.03, S (P=0.03, B (P=0.0001, and Cu (P=0.008 concentrations among treatments were detected 14 d after treatment at Novelty and Malden. Tank mixtures of K-fertilizer additives with glyphosate may provide an option for foliar K applications.

  15. Optimization of foramsulfuron doses for post-emergence weed control in maize (Zea mays L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannacci, E.

    2016-11-01

    Four field experiments were carried out from 2011 to 2014 in order to evaluate the effects of foramsulfuron, applied at the recommended (60.8 g a.i./ha) and reduced doses (1/3 and 2/3), on the efficacy against several of the most important weeds in maize. For each “year-weed” combination, dose-response curves were applied to estimate the dose of foramsulfuron required to obtain 90% and 95% weed control (ED90 and ED95). Foramsulfuron phytotoxicity on maize and crop yield were assessed. Foramsulfuron at 1/3 of the recommended dose (20.3 g a.i./ha) provided 95% efficacy against redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.), green foxtail (Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv.), wild mustard (Sinapis arvensis L.) and black nightshade (Solanum nigrum L.). Velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medik.), common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L.) and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) Beauv.) were satisfactorily controlled (95% weed efficacy) with ED95 ranged from 20 to 50 g/ha of foramsulfuron (about from 1/3 to 5/6 of the recommended dose) depending on growth stage. The recommended dose was effective against pale smartweed (Polygonum lapathifolium L.) at 2-4 true leaves (12-14 BBCH scale), but this dose did not kill plants larger than 2-4 true leaves. The ranking among weed species based on their susceptibility to foramsulfuron was: redroot pigweed = green foxtail = wild mustard = black nightshade > velvetleaf = common lambsquarters = barnyardgrass > pale smartweed. Dose of foramsulfuron can be reduced below recommended dose depending on weed species and growth stage. Foramsulfuron showed a good crop selectivity and had no negative effect on maize yield. (Author)

  16. Biology, ecology and management of the invasive parthenium weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Steve; Shabbir, Asad

    2014-07-01

    Parthenium weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.) is one of the most aggressive invasive weeds, threatening natural ecosystems and agroecosystems in over 30 countries worldwide. Parthenium weed causes losses of crops and pastures, degrading the biodiversity of natural plant communities, causing human and animal health hazards and resulting in serious economic losses to people and their interests in many countries around the globe. Several of its biological and ecological attributes contribute towards its invasiveness. Various management approaches (namely cultural, mechanical, chemical and biological control) have been used to minimise losses caused by this weed, but most of these approaches are ineffective and uneconomical and/or have limitations. Although chemical control using herbicides and biological control utilising exotic insects and pathogens have been found to contribute to the management of the weed, the weed nevertheless remains a significant problem. An integrated management approach is proposed here for the effective management of parthenium weed on a sustainable basis. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Weed control and crop selectivity of post-emergence herbicides in common beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas De Ross Marchioretto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: There are few options of wide spectrum selective herbicides registered for post-emergence weed control in common beans crop. The experiment aimed to test crop selectivity and weed control of post-emergence herbicides on common beans. Weed control, injury and grain yield were evaluated. Treatments consisted on: cloransulam-methyl, imazethapyr, fomesafen, bentazon and diclosulam isolated and tank-mixed with clethodim; imazamox+bentazon, fomesafen+fluazifop, clethodim; cloransulam+bentazon and imazethapyr+bentazon. Treatments were tested on the cultivars 'ANfc 9', 'IPR Uirapuru' and 'BRS Estilo'. The high-yielding treatments to the cultivar 'ANfc 9' were fomesafen alone and tank-mixed with clethodim or fluazifop, cloransulam and diclosulam tank-mixed with clethodim, and imazamox+bentazon. The high-yielding treatments with the cultivar 'IPR Uirapuru' was fomesafen tank-mixed with clethodim or fluazifop. High-yielding treatment to BRS Estilo was fomesafen+fluazifop. Bidens pilosa was controlled by all the treatments with broadleaf herbicides with exception of imazethapyr. Digitaria spp . was controlled by all treatments containing clethodim, fluazifop, fomesafen and imazethapyr. Treatments with cloransulam, diclosulam, fomesafen and imazamox were efficient to control Parthenium hysterophorus .

  18. The biological control of aquatic weeds in South Africa: Current status and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P. Hill

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aquatic ecosystems in South Africa are prone to invasion by several invasive alien aquatic weeds, most notably, Eichhornia crassipes (Mart. Solms-Laub. (Pontederiaceae (water hyacinth; Pistia stratiotes L. (Araceae (water lettuce; Salvinia molesta D.S. Mitch. (Salviniaceae (salvinia; Myriophyllum aquaticum (Vell. Conc. Verd. (parrot’s feather; and Azolla filiculoides Lam. (Azollaceae (red water fern. Objective: We review the biological control programme on waterweeds in South Africa. Results: Our review shows significant reductions in the extent of invasions, and a return on biodiversity and socio-economic benefits through the use of this method. These studies provide justification for the control of widespread and emerging freshwater invasive alien aquatic weeds in South Africa. Conclusions: The long-term management of alien aquatic vegetation relies on the correct implementation of biological control for those species already in the country and the prevention of other species entering South Africa.

  19. Residue and bio-efficacy evaluation of controlled release formulations of metribuzin against weeds in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Nisar, Keyath; Shakil, N A; Sharma, Rajvir

    2010-09-01

    Controlled release formulations of metribuzin in polyvinyl chloride, (emulsion); carboxy methyl cellulose, CMC and carboxy methyl cellulose- kaolinite composite, CMC-KAO are reported. The MET-CMC-KAO-3 (T(9)) formulation provided a superior control (76.1%) of weeds in field grown wheat in comparison to metribuzin 75 DF (57.14%) at the dose (350 g a.i. ha(-1)) after 90 days of sowing. The treatment (T(9)) reduced the dry weight of the weed flora after 30 days of sowing (4.0 g m(-2)) and significantly superior over metribuzin 75 DF (6.0 g m(-2)) and control (17.72 g m(-2)). There were nil to negligible metribuzin residue in soil at harvest of wheat crop and were within prescribed limit of 10 mg L(-1) in drinking water (EPA).

  20. Study of different herbicide molecules for the control of durum wheat weed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Perniola

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the chances to rotate the herbicide molecules, the effectiveness of a new molecule, pinoxaden, was tested, comparing it with other herbicides used in wheat weed control. The trial was carried out comparing the following herbicide mixtures: 1 no weed control treatment; 2 Tribenuron Methyl (TM; 3 Clodinafop (C; 4 Tribenuron Methyl + Clodinafop (TM+C; 5 Pinoxaden + clodinafop + propargile (PCP; 6 Pinoxaden + clodinafop + propargile + Triasulfuron (PCP+T; 7 Pinoxaden + clodinafop + propargile + absolute Ioxinil and Mecoprop (PCP+IM. The new PCP+T herbicides mixture didn’t differ statistically from the traditional TMC treatment in terms of effectiveness, but the agronomic result of the new mixture was totally satisfactory, even taking into account that the marketing of this mixture is not aimed to compete with other existing herbicides but to widen the chance to rotate active principles in time and space, in order to control the onset of resistance phenomena.

  1. Weed control in short rotation coppice crops: a review of recently published literature and current guidance for farmers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, C.

    2000-07-01

    This review with 41 references is based on a literature review and consultation with experts, and examines the importance of effective weed control. Herbicides currently approved for use in short rotation coppice plantations are listed. Current practices and recommendations to farmers on pre-planting, post-planting, post cut-back, post-harvest, and directed herbicide applications in the growing crop are outlined, and the results of recent research on chemical and mechanical weed control, mulches, and ground cover plants are addressed. Research need relating to weed competition, herbicide evaluation, vegetation management without chemicals, and quantification of post-harvest herbicide applications are identified.

  2. The influence of strip cropping and weed control methods on weed diversity in dent maize (Zea mays L., narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L. and oats (Avena sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Głowacka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted in 2008–2010 at the Experimental Station of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences in Zamość, University of Life Sciences in Lublin. The research design included two factors: I. Method of cultivation – sole cropping and strip cropping (the cultivation of three plants: maize, narrow-leafed lupin and oats, in neighboring strips; II. Weed control method – mechanical and chemical. The subject of this study was weed infestation in maize, narrow-leafed lupin and oats. The greatest diversity of weeds was found in the narrow-leafed lupine crop, while the lowest diversity in maize. The dominant weed species in maize, lupine and oats were Echinochloa crus-galli, Chenopodium album and Galinsoga parviflora which ranged from 34% to 99% of the total number of weeds. Strip cropping clearly reduced the number of weeds per unit area in the narrow-leafed lupin and oat crops as well as the aboveground dry weight of weeds in all plant species. Chemical weed control significantly decreased both the number and weight of weeds in comparison with the mechanical method.

  3. Achievements and problems in the weed control in grain sorghum (Sorghum Bicolor Moench.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gr. Delchev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Chemical control has emerged as the most efficient method of weed control. Herbicides combinations and tank mixtures of herbicides with adjuvants, fertilizers, growth regulators, fungicides, insecticides are more effective than when applied alone on sorghum crops. Their combined use often leads to high synergistic effect on yield. The use of herbicide antidotes for the treatment of seeds in sorghum is a safe way to overcome its high sensitivity to many herbicides. Data regarding herbicide for chemical control of annual graminaceous weeds in sorghum crops are quite scarce even worldwide. Problem is the persistence of some herbicides used in the predecessors on succeeding crops, which is directly related to the weather conditions during their degradation. Most of the information on sorghum relates to the conventional technology for weed control. There is no information about the new Concep technology in grain sorghum. A serious problem is also the volunteers of the Clearfield and Express sun sunflower. They have resistance to herbicides different from that of conventional sunflower hybrids. There is no information yet in scientific literature on control of these volunteers.

  4. Chemical weed control by planting of poplar (Populus and willow (Salix short rotation coppice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehring, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Five field trials were carried out from 2010 – 2012 on three different locations. The trials conformed high requirement of effective weed control by planting poplar and willow short rotation coppice (SRC on arable area. The selectivity of different pre-emergent and post-emergent herbicide treatments was tested. Further trials focused on sufficient and long-standing herbicide efficacy of tank mixture and sequence treatments. As results of these trials it is advisable to use proper soil active herbicides like Artist, Cadou SC, Sencor WG, Spectrum, Spectrum Plus or Stomp Aqua as pre-emergent tank mixture treatment after planting of poplar and willow SRC. Aramo and Lontrel 100 can be used as post-emergent treatment for control of specific weeds. We intend to register the successful tested herbicides for minor use in poplar and willow SRC under licensing referred to Art. 51 regulation (EC no 1107/2009.

  5. Weed Resistance to Synthetic Auxin Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Roberto; Goggin, Danica E; Heap, Ian; Horak, Michael J; Jugulam, Mithila; Masters, Robert A; Napier, Richard; Riar, Dilpreet S; Satchivi, Norbert M; Torra, Joel; Westra, Phillip; Wright, Terry R

    2017-12-13

    Herbicides classified as synthetic auxins have been most commonly used to control broadleaf weeds in a variety of crops and in non-cropland areas since the first synthetic auxin herbicide (SAH), 2,4-D, was introduced to the market in the mid-1940s. The incidence of weed species resistant to SAHs is relatively low considering their long-term global application with 29 broadleaf weed species confirmed resistant to date. An understanding of the context and mechanisms of SAH resistance evolution can inform management practices to sustain the longevity and utility of this important class of herbicides. A symposium was convened during the 2nd Global Herbicide Resistance Challenge (May 2017 in Denver, CO, USA) to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of SAH resistance mechanisms including case studies of weed species resistant to SAHs and perspectives on mitigating resistance development in SAH-tolerant crops. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Broomrape weeds. Underground mechanisms of parasitism and associated strategies for their control: a review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eFernandez-Aparicio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Broomrapes are plant-parasitic weeds which constitute one of the most difficult-to-control of all biotic constraints that affect crops in Mediterranean, central and eastern Europe, and Asia. Due to their physical and metabolic overlap with the crop, their underground parasitism, their achlorophyllous nature, and hardly destructible seed bank, broomrape weeds are usually not controlled by management strategies designed for non-parasitic weeds. Instead, broomrape are in a current state of intensification and spread due to lack of broomrape-specific control programs, unconscious introduction to new areas and may be decline of herbicide use and global warming to a lesser degree. We reviewed relevant facts about the biology and physiology of broomrape weeds and the major feasible control strategies. The points of vulnerability of some underground events, key for their parasitism such as crop-induced germination or haustorial development are reviewed as inhibition targets of the broomrape-crop association. Among the reviewed strategies are those aimed 1 to reduce broomrape seed bank viability, such as fumigation, herbigation, solarization and use of broomrape-specific pathogens; 2 diversion strategies to reduce the broomrape ability to timely detect the host such as those based on promotion of suicidal germination, on introduction of allelochemical interference, or on down-regulating host exudation of germination-inducing factors; 3 strategies to inhibit the capacity of the broomrape seedling to penetrate the crop and connect with the vascular system, such as biotic or abiotic inhibition of broomrape radicle growth, crop resistance to broomrape penetration either natural, genetically engineered or elicited by biotic- or abiotic-resistance-inducing agents and 4 strategies acting once broomrape seedling has bridged its vascular system with that of the host, aimed to impede or to endure the parasitic sink such as those based on the delivery of herbicides

  7. Assessing the impact of revegetation and weed control on urban sensitive bird species

    OpenAIRE

    Archibald, Carla L.; McKinney, Matthew; Mustin,Karen; Danielle F Shanahan; Hugh P Possingham

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nature in cities is concentrated in urban green spaces, which are key areas for urban biodiversity and also important areas to connect people with nature. To conserve urban biodiversity within these natural refugia, habitat restoration such as weed control and revegetation is often implemented. These actions are expected to benefit biodiversity, although species known to be affected by urbanization may not be interacting with restoration in the ways we anticipate. In this study, we u...

  8. Effect of tillage on the efficacy of CGA362622 on weed control in maize

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... time and resources managing weeds. Tillage alone or in combination with good cropping methods is ... help in managing herbicide resistance weeds and may also increase weed density as well as reduce crop yield .... This change in weed compo- sition agrees with Richley et al. (1977) indicating shift.

  9. The chemical weed control of maize culture in the Danube meadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poienaru, S; Sarpe, N; Sarpe, I

    2005-01-01

    In the world, maize covers about 150 million hectares, following close to rice and wheat. (Balteanu 2000) In Romania, maize culture covers an area of more than 3,500,000 hectares from the overall arable soil, being cultivated in all Romanian districts. Chemical weed control took the greatest extension in the world, at the same time with the synthesis of Atrazine, in 1956, in the laboratories of J.R. Geigy Company, as a super-selective herbicide for the maize culture. This is why many researchers from all continents studied weed control of maize culture, using Atrazine together with other 50 herbicides synthesized until 2004. In the embanked meadow of the Danube, from the 500,000 hectares of arable soil, the maize covers the greatest area. For this reasons, the chemical weed control was granted a great attention by using different herbicides based on Atrazine, Alachlor, Acetochlor, Butilat, Pendimethalin, Dicamba, 2,4-D. At the same time, in the experiments from the Danube Meadow, the authors also studied the efficiency of some combined herbicides: Butizin, Magnific, Guardian Extra is Tazastomp.

  10. Control of an Autonomous Vehicle for Registration of Weed and Crop in Precision Agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Andersen, Palle; Pedersen, Tom Søndergaard

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the development of an autonomous electrical vehicle to be used for weed mapping in precision agriculture with special focus on the conceptual framework of the control system. The lowest layer of the control system is the propulsion and steering control, the second layer...... coordinates the movements of the wheel units, the third layer is path execution and perception and the upper layer performs planning and reasoning. The control system is implemented on an autonomous vehicle. The vehicle has been tested for path following and position accuracy. Based on the results a new...... vehicle is under construction....

  11. Field sprayer for inter and intra-row weed control: performance and labor savings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Carballido

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of new tools and methods for weed control have been motivated by increased consumer demand for organic produce, consumer and regulatory demands for a reduction in environmentally harmful herbicide use, and the decreased availability of farm workers willing to perform manual tasks, such as hand weeding. This study describes the performance of a new sprayer system for commercial production that integrates two herbicide applications in a single pass, selective herbicide (SH application in narrow bands over the crop row, and a non-selective herbicide (NSH application between crop rows. A real-time kinematic (RTK global positioning system (GPS was used for auto-guidance in seeding and spraying operations. Conventional broadcast SHs and experimental treatments were applied at a constant nominal speed of 5.5 km h-1 for comparison. Trials in commercial sugar beet fields demonstrated the following: (i average hand-weeding time can be reduced by 53% (ii the new sprayer system reduced SH use by 76%, and (iii sugar beet density did not change significantly during treatment. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using the new RTK-GPS controller sprayer system for differential and efficient herbicide application in inter- and intra-row zones in row crop production.

  12. Controle de plantas daninhas na cultura da batata Potato weed control by application of herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson Zagonel

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido na Fazenda Escola da UEPG, em Ponta Grossa-PR, em Latossolo Vermelho Escuro de textura média argilosa, com o objetivo de verificar a praticabilidade e a eficiência agronômica dos herbicidas metolachlor e metribuzin + metolachlor no controle de plantas daninhas na cultura da batata. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos ao acaso com nove tratamentos e quatro repetições, quais sejam: metolachlor (1,92; 2,88 e 3,84 kg i.a./ha; metribuzin + metolachlor (0,24 + 1,68; 0,36 + 2,52 e 0,48 + 3,36 kg i.a./ha; metribuzin (0,48 kg i.a./ha; testemunha capinada e testemunha sem capina. O plantio foi realizado em outubro/95 utilizando-se a cultivar Elvira, no espaçamento 0,70 x 0,35 m. As plantas daninhas predominantes foram Brachiaria plantaginea (capim-papuã, Digitaria horizontalis (capim-milhã e Galinsoga parviflora (fazendeiro. As avaliações foram efetuadas aos 15, 30 e 45 dias após a aplicação dos tratamentos onde verificou-se que foram eficientes os seguintes herbicidas: metolachlor no controle sobre capim-papuã e capim-milhã nas doses de 2,88 e 3,84 kg i.a./ha; a mistura metribuzin + metolachlor no controle sobre capim-papuã e capim-milhã nas doses 0,36 + 2,52 e 0,48 + 3,36 kg i.a./ha; metolachlor (1,92; 2,88 e 3,84 kg i.a./ha e metribuzin + metolachlor (0,24 + 1,68; 0,36 + 2,52 e 0,48 + 3,36 kg i.a./ha no controle sobre fazendeiro. Não foram observados efeitos fitotóxicos dos produtos sobre as plantas de batata.The presented field trial was conducted at the Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Paraná State, Brazil, on a Dark Red Latossoil, to evaluate the availability and efficiency of herbicides metolachlor and metribuzin + metolachlor in the control of weeds in the potato crop. The experiment was laid out in a randomized block design with nine treatments and four replications as follows: metolachlor (1.92; 2.88 and 3.84 kg a.i/ha; metribuzin + metolachlor (0.24 + 1.68; 0.36 + 2.52 and 0.48 + 3

  13. Living Mulch Performance in a Tropical Cotton System and Impact on Yield and Weed Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Bhaskar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. is a major crop in the Vidarbha region of central India. The vertisol soils on which much of the cotton is grown have been severely degraded by the tropical climate, excessive tillage and depletion of organic matter. Living mulches have the ability to mitigate these problems but they can cause crop losses through direct competition with the cotton crop and unreliable weed control. Field experiments were conducted in 2012 and 2013 at four locations in Vidarbha to study the potential for growing living mulches in mono-cropped cotton. Living mulch species evaluated included gliricidia [Gliricidia sepium (Jacq. Kunth ex Walp.], sesbania [Sesbania sesban (L. Merr.], sorghum sudan grass [Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench × Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench ssp. Drummondii (Nees ex Steud. de Wet & Harlan] and sunnhemp (Crotalaria juncea L.. Living mulch height was controlled through mowing and herbicides were not used. Living mulches generated 1 to 13 tons ha−1 of dry matter across sites and years. Weed cover was negatively correlated with both living mulch biomass and cover. Where living mulches were vigorous and established quickly, weed cover was as low as 7%, without the use of herbicides, or inter-row tillage. In a dry year, living mulch growth had a negative impact on cotton yield; however, in a year when soil moisture was not limiting, there was a positive relationship between cotton yield and living mulch biomass. Use of living mulches in cotton production in the Vidarbha region of India is feasible and can lead to both effective weed suppression and acceptable cotton yields.

  14. Phosphite: a novel P fertilizer for weed management and pathogen control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achary, V Mohan M; Ram, Babu; Manna, Mrinalini; Datta, Dipanwita; Bhatt, Arun; Reddy, Malireddy K; Agrawal, Pawan K

    2017-12-01

    The availability of orthophosphate (Pi) is a key determinant of crop productivity because its accessibility to plants is poor due to its conversion to unavailable forms. Weed's competition for this essential macronutrient further reduces its bio-availability. To compensate for the low Pi use efficiency and address the weed hazard, excess Pi fertilizers and herbicides are routinely applied, resulting in increased production costs, soil degradation and eutrophication. These outcomes necessitate the identification of a suitable alternate technology that can address the problems associated with the overuse of Pi-based fertilizers and herbicides in agriculture. The present review focuses on phosphite (Phi) as a novel molecule for its utility as a fertilizer, herbicide, biostimulant and biocide in modern agriculture. The use of Phi-based fertilization will help to reduce the consumption of Pi fertilizers and facilitate weed and pathogen control using the same molecule, thereby providing significant advantages over current orthophosphate-based fertilization. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Bermudagrass: Spring weed control programs and biotype research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research conducted from 2008 through 2012 evaluated bermudagrass control with Sencor (metribuzin) and Command (clomazone) plus Direx (diuron). Averaged across experiments, bermudagrass was controlled 54, 41, and 43% four weeks after Sencor application at 3 lb/A in mid-February, early-March, and mid-...

  16. Biological control of weeds release sites : Kulm Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Table of release sites of insects for biological control of invasive plants at Kulm Wetland Management District (WMD). Insects were released on Kulm WMD to...

  17. Imazapyr-resistant maize technology adoption for witch weed control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa. A new technology known as imazapyr-resistant maize (IRM) has proven to be effective in controlling it. This study examined the status of IRM adoption in western Kenya. A cross sectional survey that included 600 households, ...

  18. Evaluation of Selected Pre-Emergence Herbicides for Weed Control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While all the plantlets treated with 25% and above of the recommended dosage rate of diuron were all killed, those treated with 10% were comparable to the control in performance. Similarly, plantlets treated with more than 10% of atrazine and premextra Gold had retarded and stunted growth. Pendimentalin had no ...

  19. Weed management in short rotation coppice: current status and future requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay, D.V. [Avon Vegetation Research, Nailsea (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    The current status of weed management in short rotation coppices (SRCs) is reviewed in this updated report from the Energy Technology Support Unit, which draws on data from recently published material and from experimental work on advisory and vegetation monitoring activities from large scale SRC plantings. The report covers the need for weed control in SRCs, current methods, the properties and costs of herbicides, problem weed control. The need for the development and operation of sustainable integrated weed management systems is also highlighted. (UK)

  20. Mechanical control of floating aquatic weed: Kainji Lake experience

    OpenAIRE

    F.Daddy; Ladu, B.M.B.; Salzwedel, H.; Isa, A.U.

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the uniqueness and invasiveness of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) on Lake Kainji (Nigeria). The mechanical blocking device design concept based on the Kainji Lake flooding regime is also highlighted. Water hyacinth coverage, that was over 23% at high water in level in 1994, was reduced to 0.75% in the same period in 2000. Although this feat cannot be wholly ascribed to mechanical control effort alone, the first year of the device's full operation more than 1.04 mill...

  1. Using flame for control of emerged aquatic weeds

    OpenAIRE

    Marchi, S.R.; E.D. Velini; E. Negrisoli; Corrêa,M.R.

    2005-01-01

    Dois estudos foram conduzidos com o objetivo de avaliar os efeitos da aplicação de chama no controle de Eichhornia crassipes, Brachiaria subquadripara, Pistia stratiotes e Salvinia auriculata. No primeiro estudo foram utilizadas diferentes doses de chama, representadas pela quantidade de gás consumida durante a aplicação, e, no segundo, usaramse duas aplicações de chama em intervalo de 14 dias, uma aplicação seqüencial (intervalo de sete dias) e aplicação única. As diferentes doses, tanto no ...

  2. Weed control by direct injection of plant protection products according to specific situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krebs, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Precision Farming in agriculture allows a site-specific management of the crop. The aim of plant protection is to apply plant protection products (PPP according to the site specific requirements on the field. Within the context of a research program to promote innovation, a sprayer with direct injection of plant protection products was developed. The direct injection offers site specific spraying of different individual PPP in a single pass. The sprayer prototype is equipped with a special spray boom combining three nozzle lines. In order to prevent delay times, the nozzle lines are preloaded before spraying. First results for weed control from test stand measurements and field trials showed that the injection pumps work with high accuracy. The prototype can be used without delay times site specific with up to three different herbicides. Field trials for site-specific weed control in winter wheat demonstrate the applicability of the system under practical conditions. By treatment of subareas herbicides and therefore costs could be saved. A reduction in yield compared with the conventionally treated field areas could not be ascertained. Also an efficacy reduction through washout of active ingredient from target surfaces due to simultaneous use of all three nozzle lines with up to 1050 l/ha application rate could not be detected. At high water spray rates, the efficacy effect occurs delayed. Overall, the newly developed direct injection system proved fieldabillity during the first tests. So weed control can be carried out situation-responsive, which can save herbicides and environmental impacts are reduced.

  3. Lawn Weed Control with Herbicides. Home and Garden Bulletin No. 123.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Information and diagrams are given for identification and treatment of weed grasses and broadleaf weeds. Herbicides are suggested for use against each weed and instructions are given for proper application. Information is given for buying herbicides, and applying sprays and cleaning sprayers. (BB)

  4. Weed Control Efficiency of wild Safflower (Carthamus oxyacanthus M. Bieb in Replacement Series Technique of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. and Common Vetch (Vicia sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abdolreza ahmadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In agronomy, natural outlook has been expressed in different forms which stable agriculture is an example. Stable agriculture is ascribed to the authentic management of agricultural resources, which in addition to fulfilling the ever-changing needs of humans, maintains the health of environment and capacity of water and soil resources. Application of herbicides, besides being costly, resulted in the selection of herbicide resistant weed species and has become an environmental contamination factor. However, reduction of herbicide consumption is one of the goals of modern agriculture, with several methods being suggested, including intercropping. In natural conditions of production, environment conservation of weed existence requires cost. One of the important preparations in weed control from the perspective of sustainable agriculture, is using intercropping system. The aim of this study was to determine the role of crop diversity on weed and crop production based on the beneficial effects of intercropping system than pure. Materials and methods In order to study effects of mixed and sole cropping of barley with common vetch on their biologic yield and utilization indices, an experiment was conducted in Agricultural college of the University of Lorestan, during the growing season of 2013-2014 with 24 treatments using the method of rows replacement series technique by the randomized complete block design in a factorial arrangement with three replications. First factor included 6 levels of intercropping: sole cropping of common vetch (100%, 55-45 (Common vetch-barley, 35-65, 45-55, 65-35 and sole cropping of barley and second factor included 4 levels of weed wild safflower, control, 10, 15 and 20 plants per m2. In this experiment WCE, LER and CR were measured. The data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA using Mstat-C computer software. Mean comparisons were performed using Duncan’s multiple range test at two levels of

  5. Herbicide Resistant Weed Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metribuzin and rimsulfuron are the only two herbicides registered for postemergence broadleaf weed control in potatoes, and represent the two classes of herbicides, triazines and ALS inhibitors, with the most reported cases of resistant weeds world wide. Other postemergence grass herbicides belongin...

  6. Direct control of perennial weeds between crops - Implication for organic farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melander, Bo; Holst, Niels; Rasmussen, Ilse Ankjær

    2012-01-01

    season that followed the post-harvest treatments. In the one experiment, repeated tine cultivation caused an 80–90% annual reduction of the population of mainly Cirsium arvense. With treatments conducted in two consecutive years, the accumulated effects reached 99% control. In the second experiment...... and ending the strategy with mouldboard ploughing in the succeeding spring. Grain yields did not differ among the treatments in the two experiments as a result of the generally high effectiveness exerted by the control strategies. Especially post-harvest control strategies based on rotating weed devices...... of different implement types and strategies. The treatments were employed against mixed stands of perennials after harvest of spring barley in two consecutive years. Time of treatment, cultivation depth and combinations of implements constituted the strategies. Treatment effects were evaluated in the growing...

  7. Complex Outcomes from Insect and Weed Control with Transgenic Plants: Ecological Surprises?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bøhn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture is fundamental for human survival through food production and is performed in ecosystems that, while simplified, still operate along ecological principles and retain complexity. Agricultural plants are thus part of ecological systems, and interact in complex ways with the surrounding terrestrial, soil, and aquatic habitats. We discuss three case studies that demonstrate how agricultural solutions to pest and weed control, if they overlook important ecological and evolutionary factors, cause “surprises”: (i the fast emergence of resistance against the crop-inserted Bt-toxin in South Africa, (ii the ecological changes generated by Bt-cotton landscapes in China, and (iii the decline of the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, in North America. The recognition that we work with complex systems is in itself important, as it should limit the belief in reductionist solutions. Agricultural practices lacking eco-evolutionary understanding result in “surprises” like resistance evolution both in weeds and pest insects, risking the reappearance of the “pesticide treadmill”—with increased use of toxic pesticides as the follow-up. We recommend prioritization of research that counteracts the tendencies of reductionist approaches. These may be beneficial on a short term, but with trade-off costs on a medium- to long-term. Such costs include loss of biodiversity, ecosystem services, long-term soil productivity, pollution, and reduced food quality.

  8. The Effect of Nozzle Types and Time of Herbicide Incorporation in Soil on Corn (Zea mays L. Weed Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gerami

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to study the effect of nozzle types and the time of herbicide incorporation in soil on weed control, using split plot design by randomized block design. The main plots were soil and herbicide mixing time and the subplots were nozzle types with three replications. This study was performed in Karaj station of Seed and Plant Improvement Institute, located 25 km west of Tehran, in 2008. Treatments were including: T-Jet standard nozzle, Flood-Jet nozzle and Air induction nozzle as well as mixing with the soil immediately, three, six and nine hours after spraying. The parameters were measured includes: the number of weeds before spraying, 15 days and 30 days after spraying; dry weed at two stages of 15 and 30 days after the spraying; and yield of corn. The results revealed that the spraying quality coefficient was greater for T-jet nozzle compared to the other types. However Flood-jet nozzle had a wide range of corn weeds control in comparison to other treatments. Regardless of the nozzle type, the immediate incorporation of herbicide in soil after spraying significantly increased the yield. The time of herbicide incorporation in soil and poison intermixture with soil, from zero to 4.5 hours after spraying was superior to the other times. This was mainly due to different weeds reactions to the times of herbicide incorporation in soil after spraying, and also treatments effect on yield and weed dry weight. Combined data analysis showed that treatment combination of T-Jet nozzle (with time of herbicide incorporation in soil immediately and three hours after spraying, Flood-jet nozzle (with time of herbicide incorporation in soil immediately after spraying and air induction nozzle (with time of herbicide incorporation in soil immediately, three and six hours after spraying produced the highest yield than the other treatment combinations.

  9. Phytotoxicity and weed control of oxyfluorfen and napropamide on container-grown conifer seedlings. Research memo No. 123

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Factsheet assessing the affects of oxyfluorfen and napropamide applications on the designated crop plants and evaluating how well the herbicides controlled typical weed species. The study used recently-seeded Douglas-fir, white spruce and lodgepole pine and one-year-old Douglas-fir and white spruce. The oxyfluorfen formulation used was Goal and the napropamide formulation was Devrinol.

  10. Evaluation of an autonomous GPS-based system for intra-row weed control by assessing the tilled area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørremark, Michael; Griepentrog, Hans W.; Nielsen, Jon

    2012-01-01

    An automatic tillage system for inter- and intra-row weed control based on real-time kinematic GPS navigation and control has been used to address the problem of mechanically removing weeds within rows of precision seeded crops. The system comprised a side-shifting frame with an attached tine...... crop plants. The system evaluation was based on quantification of treated areas for uprooting and burial and the corresponding prediction of weed control efficiencies. A single pass of an 80 mm wide row band provided tillage of 30–49% of the intra-row area, with highest coverage at a speed of 0.32 m s......-1 and at even plant spacing. A double pass, once on each side of the row in opposite directions, provided higher soil disturbance intensity and resulted in tillage of 31–58% of the intra-row area with highest coverage at a speed of 0.32 m s-1. The intra-row weed control effect was predicted to be up...

  11. Proceedings of the XIII International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds; September 11-16, 2011; Waikoloa, Hawaii, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun Wu; Tracy Johnson; Sharlene Sing; S. Raghu; Greg Wheeler; Paul Pratt; Keith Warner; Ted Center; John Goolsby; Richard Reardon

    2013-01-01

    A total of 208 participants from 78 organizations in 19 countries gathered at the Waikoloa Beach Marriott on the Big Island of Hawaii on September 11-16, 2011 for the XIII International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds. Following a reception on the first evening, Symposium co-chairs Tracy Johnson and Pat Conant formally welcomed the attendees on the morning of...

  12. Introduction to Agronomy, Grain Crops, Weeds and Controls. A Learning Activity Pac in Agricultural Education Courses in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Div. of Instructional Services.

    This learning activity pac contains information to help the teachers of high school vocational agriculture in the instructional area of agronomy. Each of the two main sections, grain crops and weeds and controls, includes teacher and student units for the section lessons. Teacher units include special instructions--equipment needed (film…

  13. Effect of Tillage in Day or Night and Application of Reduced Dosage of Imazethapyr and Trifluralin on Weed Control, Yield and Yield Components of Chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Abbasian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This Experiment was arranged as a strip-plot on the base of a completely randomized block design with three replications to study the effect of tillage (whether in day or night or in day by light-proof cover and application of reduced dosage of imazethapyr and trifluralin on weed control, yield and yield components of chickpea. Main plots consisted of tillage methods and subplots consisted of trifluralin (at doses of 480, 960 and 1440 g ai /ha and imazethapyr (at doses of 50, 100 and 150 g ai /ha, plus weed free and weedy checks. Results showed weed biomass in day tillage, night tillage and in light-proof cover tillage were respectively 86, 127 and 148 g m-2. Therefore tillage at night or by light-proof cover in day time showed not enough efficiency in weed control. Weed biomass increased when application dose of herbicides decreased. Chickpea grain yield showed significant differences when different doses of herbicides applied. The minimum and the maximum seed yield were obtained respectively in weed free (by 208 g m-2 and weedy checks (by 123 g m-2. Reduced dosage of imazethapyr and trifluralin could control weeds good enough by no significant decrease in chickpea yield. Efficacy of imazethapyr to control weeds grown in chickpea was significantly better than that of trifluralin

  14. Development of a standard test procedure for devices on thermal weed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verschwele, Arnd

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the standard evaluation of the efficacy of pesticides and the testing of spraying equipment there are no comparable testing procedure for equipment of thermal weed control. It is the aim of the investigations described here to develop a standard procedure for assessing temperature distribution and biological efficacy. This will be the basis for quality testing which can be directly used by practical users. Also it can help engineers to improve devices if constructive gaps will be identified by these tests. The results from testing a flaming device (Green-Flame 850 E demonstrated such a potential for technical improvement: The temperature decreased from 159 °C to 89 °C by increasing driving speed from 0.35 m/s to 0.81 m/s. The variation of the temperature related to the working width was extremely high: The range was 60 °C at highest speed and 79 °C at lowest speed, respectively. The biological efficacy against the test plant species Sinapis arvensis was also affected by the driving speed and the corresponding temperature. A driving speed not higher than 0.53 m/s resulted in efficacy rates of almost 95%. However, the efficacy was only 66% at the highest tested speed of 0.81 m/s. Thus, the needed effective temperature is between 89 °C und 106 °C. In contrast, Lolium perenne was controlled by only 72% under the tested conditions. Here a dose-response relationship was not observed. The variation of the temperature, as well as the biological efficacy, was extremely heterogeneous and not satisfying in terms of an economic and safe use. Similar results were found for other devices on thermal weed control.

  15. CONTROL DE MALEZA EN DISTRITOS DE RIEGO CON EQUIPOS LIGEROS WEED CONTROL IN IRRIGATION DISTRICTS WITH LIGHT WEIGHT EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Lomelí Villanueva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available En México el control mecánico de maleza, tradicionalmente se realizaba con maquinaria inadecuada lo cual provocaba daños en los taludes y modificaciones de la sección hidráulica. Para resolver este problema, actualmente se utilizan los equipos ligeros que permiten el desarrollo de una cubierta vegetal, que no interfiere con el flujo del agua y su sistema radical retiene el suelo, lo cual reduce la erosión y mantiene en condiciones estables los taludes. El presente trabajo aborda los aspectos relativos a características y criterios para la selección de los implementos y la secuencia para su utilización. El costo de las operaciones para el control de maleza en canales, drenes y caminos se ha reducido un 39,21% con respecto a utilizar maquinaria inadecuada. La versatilidad de los equipos ligeros permite emplear el implemento más adecuado para cada tipo de maleza. En México, el inventario actual es de 263 equipos ligeros que tienen un potencial de aplicación para el control de la maleza, en la totalidad de los caminos, el 90% de canales y el 70% de drenes de los Distritos de Riego.In Mexico, the mechanical weed control was traditionally carried out with inadequate equipment which caused damage to the slopes and changes in the hydraulic section. In order to solve this problem, light weight equipment is currently being used to allow the development of a vegetation cover to retain soil with no interference with water flow, reducing erosion and maintaining stable conditions in the slopes. This paper addresses aspects related to characteristics and criteria for selecting and sequencing tools for use. The costs of weed control in irrigation channels, drains and roads have been reduced 39.21% compared to using inadequate equipment. The versatility of light weight equipment allows the use of the most appropriate implement for each weed. In Mexico, the current inventory includes 263 light weight devices with which a potential weed control of 90

  16. Efeito de diferentes períodos de controle das plantas daninhas na produtividade da cultura da cebola Effect of different weed control periods on onion crop yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. Soares

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um experimento em Monte Alto-SP, visando estudar os efeitos de diferentes períodos de controle das plantas daninhas sobre a produção de bulbos da cultura da cebola (Allium cepa, cultivar 'Mercedes', no sistema de transplantio. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições. Parte dos tratamentos experimentais foi disposta num esquema fatorial 4 x 6, em que constituíram variáveis quatro períodos em que se fez o controle (0-0, 0-7, 0-14 e 0-21 DAT e seis períodos em que se reiniciou o controle das plantas daninhas prolongando até a colheita: 28, 42, 56, 70, 84 e 98 DAT. Duas testemunhas foram adotadas: uma com controle e outra sem controle das plantas daninhas durante todo o ciclo da cultura. Lycopersicon esculentum, Portulaca oleracea, Eragrostis pilosa e Galinsoga parviflora foram as plantas daninhas mais importantes na área. Não houve interação entre os diferentes períodos de controle das plantas daninhas. O controle inicial destas plantas deve se prolongar até 14 DAT e ser reiniciado aos 28 DAT, a fim de prevenir reduções significativas na produtividade em relação à testemunha no limpo A convivência com as plantas daninhas durante todo o ciclo da cebola reduziu a produtividade em 94,5%.An experiment was carried out in Monte Alto, SP to study the effects of different of weed control periods on the yield of onion (Allium cepa bulb, 'Mercedes' cultivar, under the transplanting system. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized block design, with four replications. The treatments were arranged in 4 x 6 factorial design with four initial weed removal periods (after transplanting until 0, 7, 14 and 21 days and six final weed removal periods (from 28, 42, 56, 70, 84 or 98 days after transplanting until harvest. Two controls were adapted with and without weed control throughout the onion cycle. Lycopersicon esculentum, Portulaca oleracea, Eragrostis pilosa and

  17. Possibilities of chemical weed control in Lupinus albus and Lupinus luteus-screening of herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitte, K; Latré, J; Haesaert, G

    2006-01-01

    Weed control in sweet lupins is still a problem. Especially the phytotoxicity of herbicides in sweet lupins is not enough studied. Therefore a screening with 16 selected herbicides and 4 lupin varieties has been set up. During the growing season 2005, 10 of the tested herbicides were applied in pre-emergence, 6 in post-emergence. Pre-emergence: Most of the active matters tested in pre-emergence were not phytotoxic for lupins. Pendimethalin (1000 g/ha), linuron (500 g/ha), chlorotoluron (1500 g/ha), prosulfocarb (2400 g/ha), clomazone (72 g/ha), isoxaben (100 g/ha), metamitron (1050 g/ha) and dimethenamid-P (720 g/ha) were applied without causing any significant phytotoxic symptoms. Only the lupins treated with aclonifen (1200 g/ha) showed a significant growth inhibition, 3 weeks after treatment. Significantly more chlorosis was noticed when the lupins were treated with aclonifen or with diflufenican, in preemergence. Post-emergence: In post-emergence, diflufenican (50 g/ha) did not cause any crop damage. Florasulam (5 g/ha) caused almost 100% necrosis in L. albus as well as in L. luteus. Bentazon (652 g/ha), thifensulfuron-methyl (15 g/ha) and metribuzin (175 g/ha) caused obvious necrosis and growth inhibition of the crop. The growth inhibition was significantly more severe for lupins treated with bentazon than if they were treated with thifensulfuron-methyl or metribuzin. Three weeks after treatment, clomazone (90 g/ha) and diflufenican (50 g/ha), did not cause any crop injury at all. The results indicated an interesting range of active matters which can be applied in pre-emergence, but weed control in post-emergence stays difficult.

  18. Original Paper Weeds control through tree-crop associations in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012; Ludwig et al., 2004). In sum, trees in parklands agroforestry systems seem to increase weeds problem which is known as the most pest in West. African savannah agriculture. Indeed, the major cereal crops (C4 plants) are less competitive than C3 weeds species under tree. (Bayala et al., 2015). In addition, due to the.

  19. Evaluation of tillage, cover crop, and herbicide effects on weed control, yield, and grade in peanut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanut production plays a large role in agriculture in the Southeastern United States. Weeds are detrimental to their production because of the competition that they create; weeds will compete with crops for resources such as nutrients and sunlight, among others. Therefore, it is important to reduce...

  20. Evaluation of the Effects of Integrated Management Weed Control on Corn Field by Using Reduced Dose of Foramsulfuron and Nicosulfuron Herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Matinfar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effects of integrated weed management on weed control by using reduced herbicide dose, a field experiment was conducted in 2010 in Qazvin. The experiment was conducted in randomized complete block design with 24 treatments and 4 replications. The treatments were: different planting patterns at three levels (single row, square double rows and zigzag double row  plantings and doses of  Nicosulfuron and Foramsulfuron application at four levels (1, 1/5, 2 and 2/5 liters per hectare, The results showed that among the different planting patterns, zigzag planting reduced weed populations and their dry weights significantly. Foramsulfuron herbicide could control weeds better than Nicosulfuron. Among the herbicide dosages, 2/5 litter dose per hectare highly reduced weed density its dry weight as compared to one litter dose.

  1. Seeding method and rate influence on weed suppression in aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High weed pressure is amongst the major constraints to the extensive adoption of aerobic rice system as a water-wise technique. Towards developing a sustainable weed management strategy, seeding method and rate may substantially contribute to weed suppression and reduce herbicide use and weeding cost. A trough ...

  2. Chemical and Mechanical Weed Control Methods and Their Effects on Photosynthetic Pigments and Grain Yield of Kidney Bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S Ghatari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the integrated management of weeds in red kidney bean, a split-plot experiment using randomized complete block design with three replications was conducted in 2013 in the Damavand County. In this experiment, the mechanical control treatments consisted of two levels (no cultivation and one cultivation asseigned to main plots and controlling chemical treatments consisted of six levels (non-application of herbicides, pre-emergence herbicide application of Pursuit with full dose of 1 liter per hectare, pre-emergence herbicide application of Pursuit a dose decreased 0.5 liters per hectare, post-emergence herbicide application of Pursuit dose reduced to 0.3 liters per hectare + 2 thousand citogate, post-emergence herbicide application of Pursuit with a reduced dose of 0.5 liters per hectare + 2 thousand citogate, post-emergence herbicide application of Pursuit full dose of 1 liter per hectar + 2 thousand citogate to subplots. The results showed that the effects of interaction between herbicide application and cultivation for traits of carotenoids, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll contents, density of weeds and their dry weights were significant at 1 %, and grain yield at the 5% probability levels. The highest bean seed yield with an average of 5461.6 kg.ha-1 and lowest weed dry weight with an average of 345.9 kg.ha-1 were related to pre-emergence herbicide and cultivation with a dose of 1 liter per hectare treatment. The difference between full and reduced doses of chemical weed control was non-significant. It could be concluded that integrated mechanical and chemical weed control not only may increase seed yield but also reduce, environmental hazards.

  3. Weed Mapping with Co-Kriging Using Soil Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisel, Torben; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Andreasen, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Our aim is to build reliable weed maps to control weeds in patches. Weed sampling is time consuming but there are some shortcuts. If an intensively sampled variable (e.g. soil property) can be used to improve estimation of a sparsely sampled variable (e.g. weed distribution), one can reduce weed...

  4. Downy Brome (Bromus tectorum L. and Broadleaf Weed Control in Winter Wheat with Acetolactate Synthase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick W. Geier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted for three seasons in northwest Kansas, USA to evaluate acetolactate synthase (ALS-inhibiting herbicides for downy brome (Bromus tectorum L. and winter annual broadleaf weed control in winter wheat. Herbicides included pyroxsulam at 18.4 g ai ha−1, propoxycarbazone-Na at 44 g ai ha−1, premixed propoxycarbazone-Na & mesosulfuron-methyl at 27 g ai ha−1, and sulfosulfuron at 35 g ai ha−1. The herbicides were applied postemergence in fall and spring seasons. Averaged over time of application, no herbicide controlled downy brome more than 78% in any year. When downy brome densities were high, control was less than 60%. Pyroxsulam controlled downy brome greater than or similar to other herbicides tested. Flixweed (Descurainia sophia L., blue mustard [Chorispora tenella (Pallas DC.], and henbit (Lamium amplexicaule L. control did not differ among herbicide treatments. All herbicides tested controlled flixweed and blue mustard at least 87% and 94%, respectively. However, none of the herbicides controlled henbit more than 73%. Fall herbicide applications improved weed control compared to early spring applications; improvement ranged from 3% to 31% depending on the weed species. Henbit control was greatly decreased by delaying herbicide applications until spring compared to fall applications (49% vs. 80% control. Herbicide injury was observed in only two instances. The injury was ≤13% with no difference between herbicides and the injury did not impact final plant height or grain yield.

  5. Weed Control in Corn (Zea mays L. as Influenced by Preemergence Herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis W. Janak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Field studies were conducted in central and south-central Texas from 2013 through 2015 to evaluate crop tolerance and efficacy of various preemergence herbicides alone and in combination for weed control in field corn. Acetochlor and pendimethalin alone, S-metolachlor plus mesotrione, and the three-way combination of S-metolachlor plus atrazine plus mesotrione provided the most consistent control of annual grasses including browntop panicum (Panicum fasciculatum L., Texas millet (Urochloa texana L., barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli L., and sprawling signalgrass (Brachiaria reptans L.. Palmer amaranth [Amaranthus palmeri (S. Wats.] control was at least 90% with fluthiacet-methyl plus pyroxasulfone, atrazine plus either acetochlor, alachlor, dimethenamid-P, S-metolachlor, or S-metolachlor plus mesotrione, saflufenacil plus dimethenamid-P, and S-metolachlor plus mesotrione. Hophornbeam copperleaf (Acalypha ostryifolia L. was difficult to control; however, acetochlor, saflufenacil or pyroxasulfone alone, saflufenacil plus dimethenamid-P, and S-metolachlor plus mesotrione provided at least 90% control. Acetochlor or saflufenacil alone, thiencarbazone-methyl plus isoxaflutole, dimethenamid-P plus atrazine, rimsulfuron plus mesotrione, and saflufenacil plus dimethenamid-P controlled common sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. at least 90%. Corn injury was minimal (≤3% with all herbicides. In general, corn grain yield was greatest with herbicide treatments containing more than one active ingredient compared with a single active ingredient.

  6. Proactive sustainability strategy and corporate sustainability performance: The mediating effect of sustainability control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijethilake, Chaminda

    2017-07-01

    This study examines to what extent corporations use sustainability control systems (SCS) to translate proactive sustainability strategy into corporate sustainability performance. The study investigates the mediating effect of SCS on the relationship between proactive sustainability strategy and corporate sustainability performance. Survey data were collected from top managers in 175 multinational and local corporations operating in Sri Lanka and analyzed using Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM). SCS were observed to only partially mediate the relationship between proactive sustainability strategy and corporate sustainability performance. The mediating effect of SCS is further examined under three sustainability strategies; environmental and social strategies reveal a partial mediation, while the economic strategy exhibits no mediation. The study also finds that (i) a proactive sustainability strategy is positively associated with SCS and corporate sustainability performance and (ii) SCS are positively associated with corporate sustainability performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Autonomous Mower vs. Rotary Mower: Effects on Turf Quality and Weed Control in Tall Fescue Lawn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Pirchio

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous mowers are battery-powered machines designed for lawn mowing that require very low human labour. Autonomous mowers can increase turf quality and reduce local noise and pollution compared with gasoline-powered rotary mowers. However, very little is known about the effects of autonomous mowing on encroaching weeds. The aim of this research was to compare the effects of an autonomous mower and an ordinary gasoline-powered mower on weed development in an artificially infested tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb. turf with different nitrogen (N rates. A three-way factor experimental design with three replications was adopted. Factor A consisted of three N rates (0, 75, and 150 kg ha−1, factor B consisted of two mowing systems (autonomous mower vs. walk-behind gasoline rotary mower equipped for mulching, and factor C which consisted of four different transplanted weed species: (a Bellis perennis L., (b Trifolium repens L.; (c Trifolium subterraneum L.; and (d Lotus corniculatus L. Of these, B. perennis is a rosette-type plant, while the other three species are creeping-type plants. The interaction between mowing system and transplanted weed species showed that the four transplanted weed species were larger when mowed by the autonomous mower than by the rotary mower. The autonomous mower yielded larger weeds probably because the constant mowing height caused the creeping weed species to grow sideways, since the turfgrass offered no competition for light. N fertilization increased turf quality and mowing quality, and also reduced spontaneous weed infestation. Autonomous mowing increased turf quality, mowing quality, but also the percentage of spontaneous weed cover.

  8. Castor (Ricinus communis L. Tolerance to Postemergence Herbicides and Weed Control Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. James Grichar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Potential US castor production is limited due to only one labeled herbicide (trifluralin. Field studies were conducted at two Texas locations during 2008 and 2009 to evaluate postemergence herbicides for castor tolerance and weed control efficacy. Clethodim and fluazifop-P-butyl caused no castor stunting while acifluorfen, bentazon, imazethapyr, and lactofen caused stunting which ranged from 5 to 46%. Imazapic and 2,4-DB caused the greatest stunting (44 to 99% and resulted in castor yields of 0 to 45% of the untreated check. Acifluorfen, imazapic, imazethapyr, lactofen, and 2,4-DB controlled at least 80% smellmelon (Cucumis melo L. var. Dudaim Naud. while clethodim and fluazifop-P-butyl controlled at least 98% Texas millet [Urochloa texana (Buckl. R.Webster]. Imazapic and imazethapyr provided 57 to 75% Texas millet control. Results suggest that castor tolerance to the graminicides, clethodim, and fluazifop-P-butyl is high; however, castor injury and yield reductions with the postemergence applications of broadleaf herbicides suggest that these herbicides should not be used in castor production.

  9. Effect of Row Intercropping Patterns on Yield, Yield Components, and Weed Control of Fenugreek (Trigonellafoenumgreacum L. and Anise (Pimpinellaanisum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Mardani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Due to population growth and food shortage agricultural production is on increasing demand. In this order increasing cultivation area and yield per unit area are two ways of obtaining higheragricultural production (20. There is another important way that without incurring additional costs and use of water and fertilizer could result in higher production. This approach is increasing agricultural production per unit area by growing more than one crop in a year. Intercropping will be successful when competition for sources issless than competition within a species. Plants in the mixture can be chosen in a way that a species benefits from environmental changes caused by other species in mixed cultures directly (7, 15. Intercropping inhibits the growth and development of weeds and leads to increased production. Since the system will reduce the pesticide use, environmental pollution will be also less proportionally (37. Materials and Methods In order to evaluate the yield, yield components and potential weeds control under intercropping fenugreek and anise, an experiment was carried out based on a randomized complete block design with three replicationsat the Agricultural Research Field of Yasouj University during growing season of 2012-2013. Treatments included pure cultures of fenugreek and anise, single-row, double-row and three-tier intercropping of fenugreek and anise at no weed control and weed control conditions. Results and Discussion The results showed that different intercropping treatments had significant effects on pod number per plant, grain weight and grain and biological yield of fenugreek and also, on number of lateral branches, number of grains per plant and grain and biological yield of anise. There were nosignificant effects on plant height, number of lateral branches, number of grain per pod, harvest index of fenugreek, as well as plant height, number of umbel let per plant, seed weight and harvest index of anise. The

  10. Weed control based on real time patchy application of herbicides using image analysis as a non-destructive estimation method for weed infestation and herbicide effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Ali

    on crop yield. The excessive use of spraying can potentially be reduced by spraying only those parts of the field where it has economic importance. The competition relation between weeds and crop was ana-lyzed in context of real time patch spray. A non-destructive image analysis method was developed...... to estimate infestation of weeds at early growth stage. The image analysis method was further developed to estimate colour response of applying increasing doses of herbicides in selectivity experiments and to evaluate the weed-suppressing effect of mulches....

  11. Effect of Planting Date and Weed Control Methods on Yield and Agronomic Traits of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. in Khoy Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akbari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Effects of planting dates and weed control methods on yield and agronomic traits of sunflower was investigated. A factorial experiment based on a complete randomized blocks design with four replications was conducted in 2009. Treatments consisted of three planting date (April 4th, May5th and Juns5th and five weed control methods, Trifluralin (2 Lit/ha + Fokus (1.5 Lit/ha, Trifluralin+Nabu-s (3Lit/ha, Trifluralin, Hand weeding and without control. Results indicated that planting dates and weed control methods significantly affected head diameter, 100 grain weight, seed number per head and grain yield. Harvest index and oil percent was affected only by planting dates. The highest grain yield (630.1 g/m2, was produced in the second planting date (May 5 by using Trifluralin+Fokus. Delaying sowing date (after May 5 significantly decreased grain yield. The most important weeds in the experimental site were common lambsquarter (Chenopodium album, field bind weed (Convolvulus arvensis, bastard cabbage (Rapistrum rugosum, flower-of-an-hour (Hibiscus trionum, cockspur grass (Echinochloa colorum and green bristle grass (Setaria verticillata. It was observed that the dry matter weight sharply varied in all weed species in different planting dates, that is, in the 4th April the dry matter production of common lambsquarter and bastard cabbage, in June 5th planting date were maximum. Dry matter of broad leaf and narrow leaf weeds in the date of May 5th was lower than the other two planting dates. The interaction of planting date ×control methods on head diameter, seed number per head, grain yield and weeds dry matter was significant.

  12. Capabilities of unmanned aircraft vehicles for low altitude weed detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflanz, Michael; Nordmeyer, Henning

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable crop production and food security require a consumer and environmental safe plant protection. It is recently known, that precise weed monitoring approaches could help apply pesticides corresponding to field variability. In this regard the site-specific weed management may contribute to an application of herbicides with higher ecologically aware and economical savings. First attempts of precision agriculture date back to the 1980's. Since that time, remote sensing from satellites or manned aircrafts have been investigated and used in agricultural practice, but are currently inadequate for the separation of weeds in an early growth stage from cultivated plants. In contrast, low-cost image capturing at low altitude from unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAV) provides higher spatial resolution and almost real-time processing. Particularly, rotary-wing aircrafts are suitable for precise path or stationary flight. This minimises motion blur and provides better image overlapping for stitching and mapping procedures. Through improved image analyses and the recent increase in the availability of microcontrollers and powerful batteries for UAVs, it can be expected that the spatial mapping of weeds will be enhanced in the future. A six rotors microcopter was equipped with a modified RGB camera taking images from agricultural fields. The hexacopter operates within predefined pathways at adjusted altitudes (from 5 to 10 m) by using GPS navigation. Different scenarios of optical weed detection have been carried out regarding to variable altitude, image resolution, weed and crop growth stages. Our experiences showed high capabilities for site-specific weed control. Image analyses with regard to recognition of weed patches can be used to adapt herbicide application to varying weed occurrence across a field.

  13. Weed control under integrated nutrient management systems in faba bean (Vicia faba) production in Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    I.M. El-Metwally; M.T. Abdelhamid

    2008-01-01

    Two field experiments were conducted in two successive seasons, 2005/2006 and 2006/2007, to determine whether management can improve faba bean competitiveness with weeds, thus helping to achieve its yield potential...

  14. Influence of cowpea and melon populations on weed infestation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Small farmers in the humid regions of tropical Africa spend 30–42% of their total farm labour input in controlling weeds. Chemical weed control is normally recommended but high cost of herbicides and environmental pollution are specific problems with chemical weed control. A three year bio-weed control system with three ...

  15. RESEARCH REGARDING THE INFLUENCE WEED CONTROL TREATMENTS ON PRODUCTION AND QUALITATIVE INDICATORS SOYBEAN CULTIVATED IN MINIMUM TILLAGE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Chetan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of herbicides abused, without a thorough knowledge can be dangerous for the environment through the introduction of toxic waste in agricultural ecosystems. It is necessary to reduce the doses used in relation to the use of conservative technology, finding solutions optimized for effective weed control. Research conducted at ARDS Turda in the years 2013 and 2014 have followed the effect of 12 variants of herbicides used to control weeds in soybean crop, sown in two tillage systems (classical system and minimal tillage system, on the soybean production and quality indicators. Tillage system significantly influenced both qualitative indices and soybean crop production (being 2635 kg/ha to the classical and 2131 kg/ha minimum tillage system. The significant influence of tillage soybeans in fat content (20.34% in minimum tillage system; 19.94% to the classical and on protein (39.89% minimum tillage system; 40.56% in the classic.

  16. Evaluation of Broadleaf Weeds Control with Selectivity of Post-Emergence Herbicides in Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar CHITBAND

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of herbicide applications is a main research priority in recent years. In order to study the effect of individual post-emergence application of sugar beet broad-leaf herbicides at four to six true-leaf stage of weeds, experiments were conducted during 2013. Treatments included untreated control and several rates of desmedipham + phenmedipham + ethofumesate, chloridazon and clopyralid on Portulaca oleracea, Solanum nigrum, Amaranthus retroflexus and Chenopodium album. A completely randomized layout with three replications was used for each herbicide. Three weeks after spraying (WAS, plants were harvested and measured their dry weight. These herbicides were more effective to control Portulaca oleracea than other weeds, thereupon minimum dose required for a satisfactory efficacy of 90% reduction of Portulaca oleracea aboveground dry matter (ED90 were 299.22, 1138.31 and 129.44 g a.i ha-1 of desmedipham + phenmedipham + ethofumesate, chloridazon and clopyralid, respectively. Solanum nigrum was more affected by clopyralid application (132.40 g a.i ha-1, and did not make significant difference in Portulaca oleracea. Chloridazon had lower effect for control of Chenopodium album due to existence of powdery covering on abaxial side of the leaves. Biomass ED50 or ED90, based on log-logistic dose–response curves, for Chenopodium album was considerably higher than other species. These results showed that tank mixtures with other herbicides may be required for satisfactory weed control and reduction in applied herbicides doses.

  17. Secondary invasions of noxious weeds associated with control of invasive Tamarix are frequent, idiosyncratic and persistent

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Eduardo; Sher, Anna A.; Anderson, Robert M.; Bay, Robin F.; Bean, Daniel W.; Bissonnete, Gabriel J.; Cooper, David J.; Dohrenwend, Kara; Eichhorst, Kim D.; El Waer, Hisham; Kennard, Deborah K.; Harms-Weissinger, Rebecca; Henry, Annie L.; Makarick, Lori J.; Ostoja, Steven M.; Reynolds, Lindsay V.; Robinson, W. Wright; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Tabacchi, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Control of invasive species within ecosystems may induce secondary invasions of non-target invaders replacing the first alien. We used four plant species listed as noxious by local authorities in riparian systems to discern whether 1) the severity of these secondary invasions was related to the control method applied to the first alien; and 2) which species that were secondary invaders persisted over time. In a collaborative study by 16 research institutions, we monitored plant species composition following control of non-native Tamarix trees along southwestern U.S. rivers using defoliation by an introduced biocontrol beetle, and three physical removal methods: mechanical using saws, heavy machinery, and burning in 244 treated and 79 untreated sites across six U.S. states. Physical removal favored secondary invasions immediately after Tamarix removal (0–3 yrs.), while in the biocontrol treatment, secondary invasions manifested later (> 5 yrs.). Within this general trend, the response of weeds to control was idiosyncratic; dependent on treatment type and invader. Two annual tumbleweeds that only reproduce by seed (Bassia scoparia and Salsola tragus) peaked immediately after physical Tamarix removal and persisted over time, even after herbicide application. Acroptilon repens, a perennial forb that vigorously reproduces by rhizomes, and Bromus tectorum, a very frequent annual grass before removal that only reproduces by seed, were most successful at biocontrol sites, and progressively spread as the canopy layer opened. These results demonstrate that strategies to control Tamarix affect secondary invasions differently among species and that time since disturbance is an important, generally overlooked, factor affecting response.

  18. A digital photography and analysis system for estimation of root and shoot development in rice weed suppression studies in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice germplasm with an inherent ability to suppress weeds can potentially improve the economics and sustainability of weed control in rice. We devised a simple, rapid, and inexpensive digital imaging system to quantify several shoot and root growth characteristics in field-grown rice plants that ha...

  19. Field performance and genetic makeup of RU1001161, a good quality selection from crosses between weed-suppressive indica rice and commercial U.S. southern long grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable, economically viable weed control is an ongoing challenge in U.S. rice production, particularly in light of increased resistance to herbicides in populations of Echinochloa crus-galli (barnyardgrass) and other weed species. Indica rice lines such as PI 312777 and PI 338046 have been sho...

  20. Managing weeds with a population dynamics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    No-till cropping systems are increasing land productivity. A critical aspect of no-till is controlling weeds. Herbicides are a crucial tool for weed management, but weed resistance is decreasing control efficacy and increasing input costs. Scientists and producers are seeking a broader perspectiv...

  1. Effect of Weeds and Some Methods for their Control in Seed Production Stands of Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetanka Dimitrova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2007-2009 period in the experimental field of the Institute of Forage Cropsa study was conducted with the purpose of investigating the effect of weeds and somemethods for their control in seed production stands of sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop..The trial was carried out on a slightly leached chernozem on an area with a natural backgroundof weed infestation. As a result of the study it was found:Establishment of very uniform and productive seed production stands of sainfoinrequired effective weed control concentrated mainly in the first year when the degree ofweed infestation was the highest and reached to a number of 245 plants/m2 and the freshweed biomass to 1311 g/m2.The chemical control method showed the highest efficacy had the highest efficiencywhen, in the year of stand establishment at the stage of second-fourth true leaf of sainfoin,the treatment was conducted with imazamox 40g/l (Pulsar 40 at the dose of 48 g a.i./haor with the system of Bentazon 600 g/l (Basagran 600 SL – 900 g a.i./ha – fluazifop-P-butylg/l (Fusilad Forte – 120 g a.i./ha. In the years of seed production in spring at the beginningof vegetation, the treatment was conducted with imazamox 40 g/l (Pulsar 40 at the doseof 20 g a.i./ha + adjuvant DESH at the dose of 1000 ml/ha.An alternative to the chemical method is to sow sainfoin under cover of spring barleyachieving more complete use of the area in the first year, a weed suppressive and ecologicaleffect, but some negative residual effect on the crop was also observed;The pure stands of sainfoin with chemical control of weeds had the highest seed productivity,exceeding the zero check by 24 to 28%, followed by the stands with spring barleyas a cover crop with an increase of 12% and the mixed stands of sainfoin with crestedwheatgrass had the lowest productivity.

  2. What's a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ansong

    Full Text Available Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as 'plants that grow where they are not wanted'. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people's age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors' overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63% having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks.

  3. What’s a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as ‘plants that grow where they are not wanted’. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people’s age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors’ overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63%) having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks. PMID:26252004

  4. Effect of Tillage Systems and Herbicide Application in ‎Weed Control of Canola (Brassica napus L.‎

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ali Forouzandeh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Integrated weed management in canola (Hyola 401 was studied in an experiment conducted in 2014-2015 growing season in “Kohghilooyeh and Boyer Ahmad”, Iran. The experiment was performed in strip split plots based on randomized complete block design with three replications. Tillage systems with three levels (conventional tillage, reduced tillage and no-tillage assigned to main plots, and herbicide applications at four levels consisted of trifluralin (1200 g ai ha-1,48% EC, quinmerac+metazachlor (1040 g ai ha-1, 41.6% SC, clopyralid (180 g ai ha-1, 30% SL + setoxydim (375 g ai ha-1, 12.5% EC, clopyralid (180 g ai ha-1 + haloxyfop-R methyl ester (81 g ai ha-1, 10.8 % EC and weed free treatments. Results showed that weed density and dry weight reductions were 76.84% and 68.08% in reduced tillage system + quinmearc+metazachlor application, respectively. It was, also, observed that treatment influenced plant height, biological yield, harvest Index, silique number per plant, seed number per silique, 1000-seed weight and seed yield. The maximum yield (3226 kg.ha-1 was obtained by using reduced tillage + quinmearc+metazachlor application. Therefore, it would be concluded that reduced tillage + quinmearc+metazachlor was the best treatment to control weed and achieve high canola seed yield. The results, also, revealed that use of clopyralid+ Haloxyfop-R-methyl ester + no-tillage resulted in lowest yield (467 kg.ha-1 So, it was considered as inefficient treatment.

  5. Effect of oil palm sludge on cowpea nodulation and weed control in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-18

    Aug 18, 2008 ... Training farm Port Harcourt to test the effect of oil palm sludge on cowpea nodulation and weed ... functional root nodules during both seasons and in all the cultivars ..... (1985) also indicated that long term effect of oil in soil.

  6. Effect of tillage on the efficacy of CGA362622 on weed control in maize

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The subplots were herbicide (H) and no herbicide (NH). Weed regeneration was significantly higher under NT compared with other methods of land preparation. The herbicide treatment depressed maize yield. Grain yields were 1619.58 and 277.46 kg/ha for H and NH, respectively. Tillage treatment significantly affected ...

  7. Spent coffee grounds as air-propelled abrasive grit for weed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spent coffee grounds (SCG) represent a significant food waste residue. Value-added uses for this material would be beneficial. Gritty agricultural residues, such as corncob grit, can be employed as abrasive air-propelled agents for organically-compatible postemergence shredding of weed seedlings sel...

  8. Weeds control through tree-crop associations in a parkland of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of microclimate due to tree presence on weeds development were assessed under Baobab (Adansonia digitata) and Néré (Parkia biglobosa) in a parkland in Nobéré (Burkina Faso). In association with these trees, two crops were grown: a shade tolerant crop (Colocasia esculenta, taro) and a shade intolerant ...

  9. Long-term effects of weed control with picloram along a gradient of spotted knapweed invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvette K. Ortega; Dean E. Pearson

    2011-01-01

    Broadleaf herbicides are commonly used in rangelands to suppress exotic weeds and release native communities from negative impacts of invasion. However, few studies have comprehensively evaluated treatment effects on differing community components across a gradient of initial invasion levels.We conducted a 6-yr experiment within grasslands of western Montana to measure...

  10. Pine growth following chemical site prep and postplant herbaceous weed control compared to chemical site prep only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwight K. Lauer; Harold E. Quicke

    2013-01-01

    Three site prep vegetation control systems were compared on two Piedmont and two Upper Coastal Plain sites. Systems were (1) a one-time site prep application of Chopper® GEN2™ 2, (2) a one-time application of Chopper® GEN2™ tank mixed with sulfometuron, and (3) two applications consisting of site prep with Chopper® GEN2™ followed by herbaceous weed control with Arsenal...

  11. Weed seed predation in organic and conventional fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, S; Wratten, S D; Kristensen, K

    2009-01-01

    % in conventional fields although variation was high. Significantly different removal rates between the two field types were found only 9 m from the field edge with approximately four times higher losses of fathen seeds in organic fields. There was also a strong tendency towards higher seed losses at organic field......Enhanced biological control of weed seeds may improve sustainability of agricultural production. Biological control due to seed predation may be higher in organic fields because organic production generally supports more seed predators. To investigate such a difference, weed seed predation...... was studied in autumn in eight organic and eight conventional mixed cropping fields in New Zealand. Predation rates were estimated by observing removal rates of seeds of the annual weeds fathen or common lambsquarter (Chenopodium album) and Persian speedwell (Veronica persica). The seed losses were recorded...

  12. Growth stage of Phalaris minor Retz. and wheat determines weed control and crop tolerance of four post-emergence herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubia Rasool

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phalaris minor Retz. has evolved multiple herbicide resistance in wheat growing areas in northwestern India. An understanding of the effect of growth stage on herbicide tolerance of wheat and control of P. minor will help in selecting the most appropriate herbicide for different situations. The weed control and crop safety of four commonly used wheat herbicides (sulfosulfuron, pinoxaden, fenoxaprop plus metribuzin and mesosulfuron plus iodosulfuron, each applied at four different wheat growth stages was investigated in field studies for two years. P. minor plants were at 1, 2-3, 3-4 and 7-8 leaf stages when the herbicides were applied at Zadok 12-Z12, Z13, Z21 and Z23 stages of wheat, respectively. Sulfosulfuron application at Z12 and Z13 wheat stages (before first irrigation, provided >80% control of P. minor and produced wheat grain yield (4.5-4.7 t/ha similar to the weed-free check (4.9 t/ha in both years. Pinoxaden, fenoxaprop plus metribuzin and mesosulfuron plus iodosulfuron application at Z12 and Z13 wheat stages recorded significantly lower wheat grain yield (3.62-3.95 t/ha due to poor weed control, crop toxicity or both. All the four herbicides were equally effective on P. minor when applied at Z21 wheat stage. At Z23 wheat stage, pinoxaden gave >90% control of P. minor and the highest wheat grain yield (4.82 t/ha. The results are expected to allow changes in the current recommendation of the timing of post-emergence herbicides for the management of P. minor in wheat.

  13. Short-term and long-term effects of weed control and fertilization on growth and wood anatomy of a Populus deltoides clone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Estela Monteoliva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims of study: The short- and long-term effects of weed control and fertilization on growth and wood anatomy of 10-y-old Populus deltoides were investigated. Weed control and fertilization usually leads to an increase the growth rate of trees, and consequently, a possible modification in the quality of produced wood. Area of study: We analyzed trees from an experimental plantation in Buenos Aires, Argentina (34° 50’ S Lat; 60° 30’ W Long. Methods: 32 trees from three treatments: mechanical weed control (M, chemical and mechanical weed control (CHM and fertilized plus chemical and mechanical weed control (CHM-F were analyzed. Basal area, fibre morphology, cell wall area and vessel size were measured in the growth ring 1, 3 and 10. Results: differences on wood anatomy among treatments were mainly observed at the third year (short-term effect. Long-term negative effects were not observed. Fertilized trees had greater proportion and quality of wood closer to pith. Research highlights: fibre and vessel differences seen in CHM and CHM-F compared to controls in year 3 could be interpreted as evidence of maturation in cambial development (thicker, longer and wider fibres and greater vessels. The CHM-F treatment had a greater proportion of wood that showed characteristics of more mature wood.

  14. Competitive influence of Eleusine indica and other weeds on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (Received 13 December, 2000; accepted 5 February, 2002) ABSTRACT Delayed weed removal is the primary cause of maize yield loss in smallholder agriculture. The slog for weed management could probably be reduced if the initial weed control removal is restricted to the in-row weeds, followed soon after by elimation of ...

  15. Efficacy and Compatibility for Fenamiphos and EPTC Applied in Irrigation Water for Nematode and Weed Control in Snapbean Production

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, A. W.; Smittle, D. A.; Sumner, D. R.; Glaze, N. C.

    1994-01-01

    A nematicide (fenamiphos) and a herbicide (EPTC) were injected into a sprinkler irrigation system separately and as tank mixtures and applied in 25.4 kl water/ha for nematode and weed control on snapbean. There were no differences (P = 0.05) between methods of injection of fenamiphos + EPTC on efficacy or crop response. The root-gall indices of cultivars Eagle and GV 50 were lower in fenamiphos-treated plots than those treated with EPTC alone and untreated plots. The yield and crop value were...

  16. Effect of Roundup-Salt Mixtures on Weed Control and Soil Microbial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy of roundup at 0.47 kg a.i./ha mixed with either 0.23 kg/ha of sodium chloride or 0.53 kg/ha of ammonium sulphate or 0.24 kg/ha of urea was compared with roundup at 1.44 kg a.i/ha and manual weeding. The treatments were arranged in randomized complete block design and replicated four times. The roundup ...

  17. Droplet deposition during spray and leaf pH in aquatic weed control

    OpenAIRE

    Costa,Neumárcio Vilanova da; Martins,Dagoberto; Rodella,Roberto Antonio; Costa,Lívia Duarte Neves de Camargo da

    2005-01-01

    The morphological diversity of leaf surface and structures such as trichomes, stomata, cuticle, and waxes that exists among plant species can have great influence on the adherence and deposition of spray droplets, as well as on herbicide absorption. The aim of this research was to study leaf pH and to evaluate wetting areas after applications of solution surfactants on the following aquatic weeds: Enhydra anagallis, Eichhornia crassipes, Heteranthera reniformis, and Typha subulata. The aquati...

  18. EFFECTIVENESS OF GLYPHOSATE AND 2.4 D AMIN HERBICIDES TO CONTROL WEEDS UNDER Shorea selanica Bl. PLANTATION IN CARITA TRIAL GARDEN, BANTEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Wibowo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A trial was carried out in Carita, West Java, to identify the effectiveness of Glyphosate and 2.4 D Amin Herbicide to control weeds under Shorea selanica Bl. plantation. The trial was conducted through the application of Glyphosate and 2.4 D Amin Herbicide with dosages of 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 liter per ha and compared with Glyphosate herbicide 5 liter per ha, manual treatment, and control (no treatment. The result showed that Glyphosate and 2.4 D Amin Herbicide could be used to control weeds in order to maintaining S. selanica Bl. plantation. Minimum dosage of 6 liter/ha was effective to control weeds such as Chromolaena odorata DC, Mikania micrantha Will, Lantana camara L, Imperata cylindrica Beauv., Melastoma malabathricum L, and Boreria latifolia Bl. Furthermore, there was no symptom of poison on S. selanica Bl. plantation after herbicide application with all dosages applied.

  19. Milestone – a selective herbicide for the control of important grasses and broadleaved weeds in winter oilseed rape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zotz, Agnes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available MilestoneTM herbicide contains the active substance propyzamide (500 g/L and aminopyralid (5.3 g a.e./L and is formulated as a suspension concentrate (SC. Registration for Milestone for the use in winter oilseed rape was granted in Germany in July 2014. The active substance propyzamide is well known from the product KerbTM FLO (containing 500 g/L propyzamide, suspension concentrate, SC which is widely used in winter oilseed rape (WITTROCK et al., 2008. Aminopyralid is formulated in the commercial product Runway (clopyralid + picloram + aminopyralid. Milestone is applied with a use rate of 1.5 L/ha as a post-emergence herbicide from growth stage BBCH 14 of the crop at the beginning of November until February. Kerb FLO is applied with a use rate of 1.875 L/ha at the same timing. The efficacy of Milestone and Kerb FLO was tested in randomised and replicated plot trials in Germany, France and the United Kingdom. Milestone and Kerb FLO showed comparable and very high control levels against monocotyledonous species such as Alopecurus myosuroides, Apera spica-venti, Bromus species and volunteer cereals. Milestone shows a broader spectrum of activity vs. Kerb FLO against dicotyledonous weeds such as Matricaria chamomilla, Papaver rhoeas and Centaurea cyanus. The use of Milestone in dense crops (as the situation was in autumn 2014 for many areas in Germany shows very high efficacy levels as well. The comparison of various application timings between end of October until beginning of December confirms the application date early November for best results. Milestone controls herbicide-resistant weed populations and can be considered an important part of a resistance management program not only in winter oilseed rape but as a component of an integrated weed management strategy in cropping systems.

  20. The Invasive American Weed Parthenium hysterophorus Can Negatively Impact Malaria Control in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent O Nyasembe

    Full Text Available The direct negative effects of invasive plant species on agriculture and biodiversity are well known, but their indirect effects on human health, and particularly their interactions with disease-transmitting vectors, remains poorly explored. This study sought to investigate the impact of the invasive Neotropical weed Parthenium hysterophorus and its toxins on the survival and energy reserves of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. In this study, we compared the fitness of An. gambiae fed on three differentially attractive mosquito host plants and their major toxins; the highly aggressive invasive Neotropical weed Parthenium hysterophorus (Asteraceae in East Africa and two other adapted weeds, Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae and Bidens pilosa (Asteraceae. Our results showed that female An. gambiae fitness varied with host plants as females survived better and accumulated substantial energy reserves when fed on P. hysterophorus and R. communis compared to B. pilosa. Females tolerated parthenin and 1-phenylhepta-1, 3, 5-triyne, the toxins produced by P. hysterophorus and B. pilosa, respectively, but not ricinine produced by R. communis. Given that invasive plants like P. hysterophorus can suppress or even replace less competitive species that might be less suitable host-plants for arthropod disease vectors, the spread of invasive plants could lead to higher disease transmission. Parthenium hysterophorus represents a possible indirect effect of invasive plants on human health, which underpins the need to include an additional health dimension in risk-analysis modelling for invasive plants.

  1. Competition of rapeseed ( Brassica napus L.) cultivars with weeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the agronomic methods in weeds management is to recognize cultivars possessing high competitive ability with weeds and to recognize the effective characters in order to breed competitive cultivars in weeds sustainable management. Cultivar identification and discrimination has become an important issue in ...

  2. EFFECTIVENESS OF GLYPHOSATE AND 2.4 D AMIN HERBICIDES TO CONTROL WEEDS UNDER Shorea selanica Bl. PLANTATION IN CARITA TRIAL GARDEN, BANTEN

    OpenAIRE

    Ari Wibowo; Muhamad Nazif

    2007-01-01

    A trial was carried out in Carita, West Java, to identify the effectiveness of Glyphosate and 2.4 D Amin Herbicide to control weeds under Shorea selanica Bl. plantation. The trial was conducted through the application of Glyphosate and 2.4 D Amin Herbicide with dosages of 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 liter per ha and compared with Glyphosate herbicide 5 liter per ha, manual treatment, and control (no treatment). The result showed that Glyphosate and 2.4 D Amin Herbicide could be used to control weeds in ...

  3. Effects of pollutant accumulation by the invasive weed saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) on the biological control agent Diorhabda elongata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, Mary A. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)], E-mail: mary.sorensen@ucr.edu; Parker, David R. [Department of Environmental Science, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Trumble, John T. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Hydroponic greenhouse studies were used to investigate the effect of four anthropogenic pollutants (perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}), selenium (Se), manganese (Mn), and hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI))) on the biological control agent Diorhabda elongata Brulle. Contaminant concentrations were quantified for experimental Tamarix ramosissima Ledab. plants and D. elongata beetles. Growth of larvae was significantly reduced by Se contamination, but was not affected by the presence of perchlorate, Mn, or Cr (VI). All of the contaminants were transferred from plants to D. elongata beetles. Only Cr (VI) was accumulated at greater levels in beetles than in their food. Because T. ramosissima grows in disturbed areas, acquires salts readily, and utilizes groundwater, this plant is likely to accumulate anthropogenic pollutants in contaminated areas. This study is one of the first to investigate the potential of an anthropogenic pollutant to influence a weed biological control system. - The presence of Se, but not perchlorate, Mn, or Cr (VI), in foliage of the invasive weed saltcedar was shown to reduce growth of the biological control agent Diorhabda elongata.

  4. Effects of different sowing date by some of companion crops on the weeds control, morphological traits and yield of corn (Zea mays L. SC 504

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yeganehpoor

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of different sowing dates by some of companion crops on the weeds control, morphological traits and yield of corn Sc 504, a field experiment was carried out of Research Field at Tabriz University during 2010 growing season. Treatments were arranged in a factorial experiment using randomized complete blocks design with three replicatins. Factors was include four levels of companion crops (clover red (Trifolium pretense L., hairy vetch (Vicia sativa L., basil (Ocimum basilicum L. and dill (Anethum graveolens L. sowing date companion crops with two levels (synchronic cultivation with corn and cultivation 15 days after corn. The result showed that the plant length trait was significantly influenced by companion crops and sowing date interaction, as maximum plant length was observed in synchronized planting corn with clover and minimum plant length was observed in cultivation of hairy vetch in 15 after cultivation of corn. There was significant difference between forage plants for leaf number, as maximum leaf number of plant was observed in the synchronic cultivation of corn with clover. Maximum and minimum grain yield of corn were 4062.9 kg.ha-1 and 3034.2 kg.ha-1 in cultivation of corn with clover and basil respectively. Biomass weed and maximum weed length in the maturity stage of corn were significantly affected by sowing date and companion crops interaction, as maximum and minimum biomass and weed length were significantly in the synchronic cultivation of corn with dill and the concurrent cultivation of corn with clover respectively and this is to rapid growth and high competitive power of clover in the early stage of growth. Also, with increasing of biomass weed and weed length, grain yield of corn linearly reduced. Synchronize cultivation of corn with dill was the best treatment than performance and weed control of other treatments.

  5. Linking Farmer Weed Management Behavior with Weed Pressure: More than Just Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, M.M.; Groeneveld, R.M.W.; Kropff, M.J.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Renes, R.J.; Sukkel, W.; Weide, van der R.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Most studies on weed population dynamics in farming systems have focused on the effects of different weed control strategies. Those studies usually assume that farmers, operating within a particular system, have a uniform management style. However, it is likely that weed management decision making

  6. Efficacy and Compatibility for Fenamiphos and EPTC Applied in Irrigation Water for Nematode and Weed Control in Snapbean Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A W; Smittle, D A; Sumner, D R; Glaze, N C

    1994-12-01

    A nematicide (fenamiphos) and a herbicide (EPTC) were injected into a sprinkler irrigation system separately and as tank mixtures and applied in 25.4 kl water/ha for nematode and weed control on snapbean. There were no differences (P = 0.05) between methods of injection of fenamiphos + EPTC on efficacy or crop response. The root-gall indices of cultivars Eagle and GV 50 were lower in fenamiphos-treated plots than those treated with EPTC alone and untreated plots. The yield and crop value were greater (P = 0.05) for cultivars Eagle and Nemasnap than GV 50. Fenamiphos 4.48 kg a.i./ha + EPTC 3.36 kg a.i./ha controlled root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne incognita, ring nematodes, Criconemella ornata, and weeds, and resulted in greater plant growth, yield, and crop value than those from untreated plots. No benefits (P = 0.05) resulted from treatment with fenamiphos at 6.72 kg a.i./ha + EPTC treatment compared with fenamiphos at 4.48 kg a.i. + EPTC.

  7. Modeling and Advanced Control for Sustainable Process ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter introduces a novel process systems engineering framework that integrates process control with sustainability assessment tools for the simultaneous evaluation and optimization of process operations. The implemented control strategy consists of a biologically-inspired, multi-agent-based method. The sustainability and performance assessment of process operating points is carried out using the U.S. E.P.A.’s GREENSCOPE assessment tool that provides scores for the selected economic, material management, environmental and energy indicators. The indicator results supply information on whether the implementation of the controller is moving the process towards a more sustainable operation. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is illustrated through a case study of a continuous bioethanol fermentation process whose dynamics are characterized by steady-state multiplicity and oscillatory behavior. This book chapter contribution demonstrates the application of novel process control strategies for sustainability by increasing material management, energy efficiency, and pollution prevention, as needed for SHC Sustainable Uses of Wastes and Materials Management.

  8. Controle de plantas daninhas na cultura do milho com gliricídia em consorciação Weed control in maize crop with gliricidia intercropping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Araújo Jr.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A gliricídia (Gliricidia sepium é leguminosa perene, cultivada para propósitos múltiplos, que apresenta crescimento rápido e várias substâncias com propriedades alelopáticas. Existem indicações de que a consorciação com gliricídia também pode trazer benefícios no controle das plantas daninhas do milho. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o controle das plantas daninhas no milho (híbrido duplo AG 1051 com gliricídia em consorciação. Utilizou-se o delineamento em blocos completos casualizados, com oito repetições. Os tratamentos consistiram em: cultivo do milho com capinas (duas, aos 20 e 40 dias após a semeadura, sem capinas e em consorciação com a gliricídia. A gliricídia foi semeada a lanço, com 25 sementes m-2, por ocasião da semeadura do milho, entre as fileiras deste. Quinze espécies de plantas daninhas foram catalogadas na área experimental, sendo Commelina benghalensis a mais frequente. Os rendimentos de espigas verdes (empalhadas e despalhadas obtidos com a consorciação foram iguais ou superiores a 85% dos rendimentos obtidos com capinas. Além disso, o rendimento de grãos no consórcio chegou a 80% do rendimento de grãos do milho capinado. Portanto, a consorciação com a gliricídia pode ser uma alternativa viável para as produções de milho verde e de grãos, embora essa consorciação não tenha influenciado a densidade e a biomassa seca das plantas daninhas.Gliricidia (Gliricidia sepium, a perennial leguminous species presenting fast growth and several allelopathic substances, is cultivated for multiple purposes. There are good evidences that gliricidia intercropped with maize efficiently controls weeds. This work aimed to evaluate the use of gliricidia intercropped with maize as a method of weed control in maize (hybrid AG 1051. The experiment was carried out in a randomized complete block design with eight replications. The treatments consisted of: maize cropping with hand-hoeing weed control

  9. Controle de plantas daninhas em cultivos orgânicos de soja por meio de descarga elétrica Weed control in organic soybean using electrical discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Magno Brighenti

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Dois experimentos foram instalados em semeadura direta, em área de cultivo orgânico de soja, no município de São Miguel do Iguaçu, Paraná (PR, com o objetivo de avaliar o controle de plantas daninhas na cultura da soja (BRS 232 por meio de descarga elétrica. O delineamento experimental foi blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições. No experimento 1, fixou-se a voltagem de 4400V e, no experimento 2, de 6800V. Em ambos os experimentos, os tratamentos consistiram das variações de rotação do motor do trator (i 2200rpm (rotações por minutos; (ii 2000rpm; (iii 1600rpm e as testemunhas (iv capinada e (v sem capina. O equipamento utilizado para aplicação dos tratamentos foi o Eletroherb (Sayyou do Brasil. As plantas daninhas existentes na área experimental foram o amendoim-bravo (Euphorbia heterophylla, a corda-de-viola (Ipomoea spp., a guanxuma (Sida spp., o capim-marmelada (Brachiaria plantaginea e o capim-colchão (Digitaria spp.. O emprego de descarga elétrica é eficiente no controle das plantas daninhas da cultura da soja. A rotação 2200rpm proporcionou o melhor controle e, consequentemente, a maior produtividade da soja.Two experiments were carried out in no-till organic soybean area in São Miguel do Iguaçu, Paraná State, Brazil, in order to evaluate the weed control using electrical discharge. The experiments were arranged in a complete block design, with four replicates. The voltages were fixed in 4400V (experiment 1 and 6800V (experiment 2. In both experiments, the treatments consisted by different revolution tractor: (i 2200rpm (revolutions per minute; (ii 2000rpm; (iii 1600rpm; and two checks [(iv unweeded control and (v weeded control]. The equipment Eletroherb (Sayyou do Brasil was used to apply the electrical discharges. The weeds presented in the experimental area were wild poinsettia (Euphorbia heterophylla, morningglory (Ipomoea spp., prickly Sida (Sida spp., alexandergrass (Brachiaria plantaginea and crabgrass

  10. Weed Recognition Framework for Robotic Precision Farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kounalakis, Tsampikos; Triantafyllidis, Georgios; Nalpantidis, Lazaros

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel framework which applies known image features combined with advanced linear image representations for weed recognition. Our proposed weed recognition framework, is based on state-of-the-the art object/image categorization methods exploiting enhanced performance...... using advanced encoding and machine learning algorithms. The resulting system can be applied in a variety of environments, plantation or weed types. This results in a novel and generic weed control approach, that in our knowledge is unique among weed recognition methods and systems. For the experimental...... evaluation of our system, we introduce a challenging image dataset for weed recognition. We experimentally show that the proposed system achieves significant performance improvements in weed recognition in comparison with other known methods....

  11. Gaining and sustaining schistosomiasis control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezeamama, Amara E.; He, Chun-La; Shen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    chemotherapy (PCT) with praziquantel (PZQ)? This paper describes the process SCORE used to transform this question into a harmonized research protocol, the study design for answering this question, the village eligibility assessments and data resulting from the first year of the study. METHODS: Beginning......-aged children. Seven studies are currently being implemented in five African countries. During the first year, villages were screened for eligibility, and data were collected on prevalence and intensity of infection prior to randomisation and the implementation of different schemes of PZQ intervention...... strategies. RESULTS: These studies of different treatment schedules with PZQ will provide the most comprehensive data thus far on the optimal frequency and continuity of PCT for schistosomiasis infection and morbidity control. CONCLUSIONS: We expect that the study outcomes will provide data for decision...

  12. [Effects of conservation tillage and weed control on soil water and organic carbon contents in winter wheat field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui-Fang; Ning, Tang-Yuan; Li, Zeng-Jia; Tian, Shen-Zhong; Wang, Yu; Zhong, Wei-Lei; Tian, Xin-Xin

    2011-05-01

    Taking a long-term (since 2004) straw-returning winter wheat field as the object, an investigation was made in the wheat growth seasons of 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 to study the effects of different tillage methods (rotary tillage, harrow tillage, no-tillage, subsoil tillage, and conventional tillage) and weed management on the soil water and organic carbon contents. No matter retaining or removing weeds, the weed density under subsoil tillage and no-tillage was much higher than that under rotary tillage, harrow tillage, and conventional tillage. From the jointing to the milking stage of winter wheat, retaining definite amounts of weeds, no matter which tillage method was adopted, could significantly increase the 0-20 cm soil water content, suggesting the soil water conservation effect of retaining weeds. Retaining weeds only increased the soil organic carbon content in 0-20 cm layer at jointing stage. At heading and milking stages, the soil organic carbon contents in 0-20, 20-40, and 40-60 cm layers were lower under weed retaining than under weed removal. Under the conditions of weed removal, the grain yield under subsoil tillage increased significantly, compared with that under the other four tillage methods. Under the conditions of weed retaining, the grain yield was the highest under rotary tillage, and the lowest under conventional tillage.

  13. Effects of different methods to control the parasitic weed Phelipanche ramosa (L. Pomel in processing tomato crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Disciglio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The root-parasitic weed Phelipanche ramosa (L. Pomel represents a major problem for processing tomato crops. The control of this holoparasitic plant is difficult, and better understanding of treatment methods is needed to develop new and specific control strategies. This study investigated 12 agronomic, chemical, biological and biotechnological strategies for the control of this parasitic weed, in comparison with the untreated situation. The trial was carried out in 2014 at the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Environment of the University of Foggia (southern Italy, using processing tomato plants grown in pots filled with soil from a field that was heavily infested with P. ramosa. After transplantation, top dressing was performed with 70 kg ha–1 nitrogen. A randomised block design with 3 replicates (pots was adopted. During the growing cycle of the tomato, at 70, 75, 81 and 88 days after transplantation, the number of parasitic shoots (branched plants that had emerged in each pot was determined, and the leaf chlorophyll of the plants was measured using a soil-plantanalysis- development meter. At harvesting on 8 August 2014, the major quanti-qualitative yield parameters were determined, including marketable yield, mean weight, dry matter, soluble solids, and fruit colour. The results show lower chlorophyll levels in the parasitised tomato plants, compared to healthy plants. None of the treatments provided complete control against P. ramosa. However, among the methods tested, Radicon® biostimulant (Radicon, Inc., Elk Grove Village, IL, USA, compost activated with Fusarium oxysporum, nitrogen and sulphur mineral fertilisers, EnzoneTM soil fumigant (Elliott Chemicals Ltd., Auckland, New Zealand, and a resistant tomato genotype mitigated the virulence of the attacks of this parasite. These effects should be improved by combining some of these treatments, especially for gradual and continued reduction in the seed bank of the parasite in the

  14. Modern advances in sustainable tick control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticks are the vector of the many different organisms responsible for both animal and human diseases. Understanding the progress we have made and new directions in tick control is critical to the sustainability of human and animal health. The integration of vaccines, acaricides, and new acaricide ap...

  15. Variação da competição interespecífica em milho em função do controle de plantas daninhas em faixas Variation of interspecific weed competition in corn as a function of banded weed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Merotto Jr.

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available O controle de plantas daninhas em faixas é mais uma estratégia que pode ser utilizada no manejo integrado de plantas daninhas (MIPD para aumentar a racionalização do uso do ambiente no cultivo de plantas. Os objetivos deste trabalho foram determinar o efeito do controle de plantas daninhas em faixas na linha ou na entrelinha e avaliar suas conseqüências sobre a competição interespecífica na cultura do milho. Os tratamentos constaram do estabelecimento de um gradiente de infestação de Brachiaria plantaginea, obtido com a variação da intensidade do controle em pré-emergência, e do controle de plantas daninhas em pós-emergência realizado em faixas na linha, na entrelinha ou em área total. O controle de plantas daninhas em pós-emergência em faixas não foi suficiente para reduzir os efeitos da competição interespecífica sobre o rendimento de grãos de milho, mesmo em baixas densidades de plantas daninhas. Os prejuízos causados pela presença de plantas daninhas na linha da cultura são duas a três vezes maiores em comparação com a presença destas plantas na entrelinha ou em área total da cultura. O controle de plantas daninhas na linha da cultura necessita de complementação com práticas culturais ou outros métodos de controle destas plantas na entrelinha.Banded weed control is one of the methods used for integrated weed management (IWM to increase the rationalization of environmental use in crop activities management. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of in-and between-row weed control and the effects of weed competition on corn. The treatments consisted in the establishment of a range of Brachiaria plantaginea densities by varying the intensity of weed control in pre-emergence, complemented with post-emergence weed control in-row, between row and broadcast. Banded weed control was not efficient in decreasing weed competition and reducing corn grain yield, even at low weed infestation. In-row weed

  16. Evaluation of sowing patterns and weed control on mung bean (Vigna radiate L. Wilczek - black cumin (Nigella sativa L. intercropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    parviz Rezvani Moghadam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study different arrangements and weed controls effects on mung bean (Vigna radiate L. Wilczek – black cumin (Nigella sativa L. intercropping an experiment was conducted at the Research Station of Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, during growing season 2005 – 2006. Sixteen treatments comprising combinations of eight sowing patterns [A1: Sole black cumin, A2: Sole mung bean, A3: 3 rows black cumin– 2 rows mung bean, A4: 3 rows black cumin – 2 rows mung bean, A5: 2 rows black cumin – 1 rows mung bean, A6: 1 row black cumin – 2 rows mung bean, A7: 3 rows black cumin – 3 rows mung bean (Striped, A8: 1 row black cumin – 1 row mung bean (alternative rows] and two weed controls [V1: unweeded, V2: completely hand weeding] were arranged in a factorial experiment based on randomized complete block design with three replications. Results showed that in intercropping systems leaf area index (LAI of mung bean reduced but in the case of black cumin increased. Mung bean total dry matter in intercropping system did not differ comparing with sole crop but total dry matter in black cumin increased. All yield components in both crops affected by sowing patterns and weed control treatments. Number of branches/plant, number of pods or follicules/plant and number of seed/pods or follicules increased in A8, A4, A5 and A3 sowing patterns in mung bean and A3, A5 and A7 sowing patterns in black cumin compared with other arrangements. By increasing mung bean ratio in rows, the number of weed species, weed density, dry weight of weeds and abundance of weed species decreased. In unweeded treatment, number of branches/plant, number of pods or follicules/plant and number of seed/pods or follicules decreased in both crops. Land equivalent ratio (LER was more than 1.00 in all sowing patterns.

  17. Studies on planting, weed control and fertilizing when growing short rotation willow coppice; Utvaerdering av teknik foer plantering, ograesbekaempning och goedsling vid salixodling. Studier 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danfors, B.

    1998-12-01

    The report describes work studies into planting of Salix, weed control in newly planted plantations and annual stands, and fertilization in tall stands of Salix. The study is a continuation of work on Salix performed at JTI during 1989 and 1991. The report gives a description of the background to the problem, a brief review of earlier work, a description of the purpose of the study, and an account of its planning, extent and accomplishment. The results presented cover planting and weed control at four sites with an early follow-up of results, a description of the weed control and, further, a review of the results after the end of the growing season. The fertilization procedure used on six occasions is also discussed, together with spreading results using diagrams illustrating the distribution of the fertilizer. As mentioned above, similar studies were conducted at JTI during 1989 and 1991 In comparisons both concerning the level of knowledge and access to mechanical equipment, we may note that there has been considerable development within the sectors dealing with planting, weed control and fertilizing. Continued major tasks are to take the technical development further and to disseminate the new knowledge to growers prepared to invest in production of Salix as biofuel 13 refs, 18 figs, 9 figs

  18. Using CA model to obtain insight into mechanism of plant population spread in a controllable system : annual weeds as an example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Kropff, M.J.; Bastiaans, L.; Christensen, S.; Hansen, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    Using cellular automata (CA) model, in this article, a mechanistic approach has been conducted to help to insight into spread process of plant population such as annual weed population. A controllable CA model with 25 neighbourhood cells has been built, in which seed dispersal, as a key process of

  19. Weed control and green ear yield in maize Controle de plantas daninhas e rendimento de espigas verdes de milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S.L. Silva

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of weeding frequency on cultivar Centralmex green corn yield. Two experiments were conducted in Mossoró-RN (Brazil, with the use of sprinkler irrigation. A random block design with four replicates was used. It was observed that the total number and weight (TW of unhusked green ears, the number and weight of marketable unhusked ears and the number and weight of marketable husked ears were reduced under no weeding treatment. The number timing of weedings did not influence green corn yield, except for one weeding at 60 DAP, which was equivalent to the "no weeding" treatment, for TW. When maize is marketed considering the total number of green ears, higher net income is obtained when one weeding is carried out 45 days after planting.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as influências da freqüência de capinas sobre o rendimento de milho-verde do cultivar Centralmex. Dois experimentos foram realizados em Mossoró-RN, com irrigação por aspersão. Utilizou-se o delineamento de blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições. Verificou-se que a ausência de capinas reduz o número e o peso (PT totais de espigas verdes empalhadas, o número e o peso de espigas empalhadas comercializáveis e o número e o peso de espigas despalhadas comercializáveis. O número e a época de realização das capinas não influenciaram o rendimento de milho-verde, exceto uma capina aos 60 DAP, que é equivalente ao tratamento "sem capina", para PT. Quando o milho é comercializado considerando-se o número total de espigas verdes, maior receita líquida é obtida com a realização de uma capina, aos 45 dias após o plantio.

  20. A New Hoe Blade for Inter-Row Weeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, O.; Znova, L.; Melander, Bo

    2016-01-01

    . The aim is mainly to improve weeding effectiveness against tall-growing and tap-rooted weed species. The ‘Ducksfoot’ hoe blade is commonly used for traditional inter-row weeding in row crops such as sugar beets and maize. This blade usually provides satisfactory weed control, if soils are not too wet...... and weeds are relatively small. The term ‘Ducksfoot’ covers a range of hoe blade configurations where all have some resemblance with the shape of a ducks foot. However, the ‘Ducksfoot’ blade is not an optimal solution for weed control in narrow inter-row spaces. Several disadvantages have been encountered...

  1. Effect of Cultural Practices in Night on Weed Density and Weed Dry Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H Rashed Mohasel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to evaluate the response of weed seeds to light, two experiments, at two different locations were conducted at Ferdowsi university of Mashhad in 2009. At the first experiment, field was ploughed in day and night. Weed density was evaluated 70 d after plough, with 1×1 quadrate. At the second experiment, at night treatment, ploughing, potato planting and weeding with cultivator were done at night. Weed sampling was done twice at 43 and 130 days after planting with 1×1 quadrate and weeds were identified and counted. Result showed pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L., sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus L., crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis (L. scop, jimsonweed (Datura stramonium L. and mallow (Hibiscus trionum L. did not observed at night plough, in contrast, night plough has no significance influence on common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L., and black nightshade (Solanum nigrum L.. Only common lambsquarters had similar appearance in two treatments, indicating insusceptibility of this weed to time of plough. Interestingly, at the second experiment, result was very similar. Potato yield was higher at night treatment, but not significant. This research showed that some cultural practice like plough, planting and weeding with cultivator in night can reduce weed density and weed dry matter. Keywords: Germination, Time of plough, Sustainable weeds management, Light

  2. A sustainable approach to controlling oil spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Majed, Abdul Aziz; Adebayo, Abdulrauf Rasheed; Hossain, M Enamul

    2012-12-30

    As a result of the huge economic and environmental destruction from oil spills, studies have been directed at improving and deploying natural sorbents which are not only the least expensive but also the safest means of spill control. This research reviews the limitations and environmental impact of existing cleanup methods. It also justifies the need for concerted research effort on oil spill control using natural and sustainable technology concepts. The article proposes future guidelines for the development of a sustainable cleanup technology. Finally, guidelines for the development of a new technology for the Middle East are proposed, which is the use of an abundant resource--date palm fibers--for such techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigating of growth characteristics, yield, yield components and potential weed control in intercropping of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and vegetative sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Alizadeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study yield and yield components in intercropping bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L. and evaluating effect of intercropping on weed control, a field experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad during growing season of 2008. Treatments: included 1- sole crop of bean 2- sole crop of sweet basil 3- strip intercropping of bean and sweet basil (four rows of bean and two rows of sweet basil 4- strip intercropping of bean and sweet basil (two rows of sweet basil and four rows of bean 5- row intercropping of bean and sweet basil were with and without weed control. For this purpose a complete randomized block design with three replications was used. Results showed that dry weight of vegetative organs and stem percent of sweet basil, in sole crop with weed control treatment were significantly higher than in other treatments. And highest leaf percentage was in four rows bean and two rows sweet basil intercropping. There was no significant difference in plant height in the first harvest of sweet basil but in second harvest row intercropping had highest height. Maximum leaf area index (LAI was absorbed in four rows of sweet basil two rows of bean. Effect of different treatments on essential oil percentage was not significant. Highest essential oil yield was in sole crop sweet basil and four rows of sweet basil two rows of bean intercropping. For bean economic and biological yield, number of pods, number of seeds per plant and height were affected by different treatments and but there was no significant difference in number of seeds per pod, 100-seed weight and harvest index in bean. The highest leaf area index in bean was in row intercropping. Lowest dry mater of weed was in row intercropping and the highest in sole crop. The highest land equivalent ratio (LER was obtained in row intercropping with weed control.

  4. Herbicidas no transplante de mudas de sisal (Agave sisalana perr. Weed control and herbicide selectivity to sisal (Agave sisalana perr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Luiz de Barros Salgado

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de verificar a eficiência de hebraicas no controle de plantas daninhas e sua seletividade à cultura do sisal, foi instalado, em setembro de 1976, um experimento de campo em solo argiloso, com os seguintes tratamentos (i.a./hectare trifluralin a 0,84 e 0,96kg em pré-plantio com incorporação; alachlor a 2,40 e 3,26kg; metribuzin a 0,70 e 0,84kg; bromacil a 1,60 e 2,40kg; terbacil a 1,60 e 2,40kg; diuron a 2,40 e 3,20kg; simazine a 3,20 e 4,00kg; fluometuron a 1,20 e 1,60kg, todos em pré-emergência; uma testemunha carpida e outra sem capina. Foram feitas avaliações de controle do mato aos 67 e 114 dias e da condição da cultura aos 600 dias após a aplicação. Aos 114 dias, o controle de gramíneas foi acima de 90% pelo trifluralin, bromacil e terbacil, em torno de 80% pelo simazine, e inferior a 75% pelos demais; para dícotiledôneas, o controle foi de 90 a 100% pelo bromacil e terbacil, e de 80 a 85%o pelo simazine. Nenhum dos tratamentos afetou a cultura durante o período considerado, que foi de 600 dias. Aos 550 dias, fez-se avaliação da área coberta por reinfestação do mato, tendo o terbacil controlado ainda 75 e 95% do total, respectivamente, para as doses menor e maior; o trifluralin, 60 e 70% e, os demais, abaixo de 45%. Na avaliação final da cultura, aos 600 dias, foram considerados: população de plantas, número de plantas com perfilhos e condição da cultura. Os tratamentos que realizaram melhor controle do mato apresentaram também os melhores índices de desenvolvimento da cultura, atestando sua seletividade.The weed control with herbicides and its selectivity to sisal were studied on a clay soil field trial. The treatments (in a.i./ha were: 0.84 and 0.96kg of pre-plant incorporated trifluralin; 2.40 and 3.26kg of alachlor; 0.70 and 0.84kg of metribuzin; 1.60 and 2.40kg of bromacil; 1.60 and 2.40kg of terbacil; 2.40 and 3.20k- of diuron; 3.20 and 4.00kg of simazine; 1.20 and 1.60kg of fluometuron

  5. Species and dynamics of floating weed seeds in paddy field

    OpenAIRE

    Ranling Zuo; Sheng Qiang

    2008-01-01

    In order to explore effective methods for weed control in paddy fields, we investigated the dynamics of weed seeds in Nanjing from June to November of 2005. A total of 24 weed species representing 15families were found before seedling transplanting and at late growth stage of rice, while during irrigation stage, 26 species of 17 families were identified from floating weed seeds. The two stages shared 18 weed species, accounting for 56.25% of the total weeds. Most of them belonged to Gramineae...

  6. Weeds in a Changing Climate: Vulnerabilities, Consequences, and Implications for Future Weed Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Kulasekaran; Matloob, Amar; Aslam, Farhena; Florentine, Singarayer K; Chauhan, Bhagirath S

    2017-01-01

    role in developing future management programs for future weed threats. This review has presented a comprehensive discussion of the recent research in this area, and has identified key deficiencies which need further research in crop-weed eco-systems to formulate suitable control measures before the real impacts of climate change set in.

  7. Response of okra ( Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench) to weed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three mulch types–plastic mulch, grass mulch (Panicum maximum) and wood shavings (of Tectonia grandis)– were compared with hand weeding and no weeding control in a randomized complete block experiment with three replications. Growth and yield characteristics of okra were assessed together with weed control ...

  8. Focus on ecological weed management : what is hindering adoption?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, L.; Paolini, R.; Baumann, D.T.

    2008-01-01

    Despite increased concerns regarding the heavy reliance of many cropping systems on chemical weed control, adoption of ecological weed management practices is only steadily progressing. For this reason, this paper reflects on both the possibilities and limitations of cultural weed control practices.

  9. Controle de plantas daninhas em soja com doses reduzidas de herbicidas Soybean weed control with reduced rates of herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson G. Fleck

    1995-01-01

    . It was obtained Alexandergrass control around 95% for all the treatments, with small but not significant variations among them. Soybean seed yield was equivalent for the hoeing check, haloxyfop-methvl at 90 and 60 g/ha and sethoxydim at 220, 110, and 55+55 g/ha. The additional treatments were equivalents among them, but all surpassed the weeded check, which produced the lowest yield. These results evidence the possibility of using reduced herbicides rates, which may reach yield levels as high as those attained with full rates.

  10. Avaliação de herbicidas no controle de plantas daninhas em mandioquinha-salsa Herbicide efficiency in controlling weeds in peruvian carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Nogueira Sediyama

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a eficiência de herbicidas aplicados em pré e pós-emergência no controle de plantas daninhas e na produção de mandioquinha-salsa na Fazenda Experimental da EPAMIG, em Oratórios (MG, de maio a dezembro de 2002. Utilizou-se o delineamento de blocos casualizados com quatro repetições e 15 tratamentos incluindo duas testemunhas, com e sem capina. Em cada tratamento, foi usado um herbicida em pré e outro em pós-emergência das plantas, aplicados aos três e aos 45 dias após o plantio (DAP respectivamente. A eficiência de controle e a toxidez dos herbicidas foram avaliadas aos 60 DAP e a produção de matéria seca de plantas daninhas aos 60 e 130 DAP. Na colheita, avaliou-se produção de raízes, coroa e parte aérea. A emergência de plantas foi máxima aos 45 DAP e, posteriormente, houve redução no estande, quando se utilizaram os herbicidas atrazine + óleo mineral e oxadiazon, em pós-emergência. Esses herbicidas, apesar de eficientes no controle de plantas daninhas, causaram toxidez à cultura. Na produção de raízes, destacaram-se os tratamentos: atrazine +fluazifop-p-butil; diuron + fluazifop-p-butil; diuron + Oxadiazon; linuron + fluazifop-p-butil; metolachlor + metribuzin + linuron e oxadiazon + diuron, com bom controle de plantas daninhas e rendimentos de raízes comerciais semelhantes ao da testemunha mantida no limpo (8,62 t ha-1.The efficiency of herbicides applied in pre- and post-emergence for weed control in Peruvian carrot production was evaluated at the EPAMIG Experimental Farm, Oratórios, Minas Gerais State, from May to December, 2002. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design, with four replications and 15 treatments, including two controls (with and without weeding. Pre- and post-emergence herbicides were used in each treatment applied at 3 and 45 days after planting (DAP, respectively. Efficiency and toxicity were evaluated at 60 DAP and weed dry matter yield at 60 and 130 DAP. At

  11. Crop–weed competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallandt, Eric R.; Weiner, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Competition from weeds is the most important of all biological factors that reduce agricultural crop yield. This occurs primarily because weeds use resources that would otherwise be available to the crop. The magnitude of yield loss is affected by numerous agronomic and environmental factors, most...... importantly, weed density and time of emergence relative to the crop. Practices that (1) reduce the density of weeds, (2) maximise occupation of space or uptake of resources by the crop or (3) establish an early-season size advantage of the crop over the weeds will minimise the competitive effects of weeds...... on crops. Longer term management of crop–weed competition can be achieved through crop rotations, specifically crop sequences that reduce the weed seed bank, and therefore seedling density, and prevent proliferation of perennial weeds. Key ConceptsKey Concepts * Plant growth requires sunlight, water...

  12. Sistemas de control de malezas en maiz (Zea mays L.: efecto de metodos de control, densidad y distribucion del cultivo Weed control systems in corn: effects of control methods, density and plant distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Martinez

    1982-12-01

    realización de una escarda adicional no mejora significativamente el control de malezas, no afectando tampoco la incidencia de enfermedades, ni el desarrollo del cultivo, por lo cual resulta innecesaria. Las escardas tienen como principal efecto eliminar la interfe rencia presentada por las malezas y si éstas son eliminadas de otra manera, la realización de aquéllas no apareja beneficios significativos.An experiment was conducted at the Research Station of the University of Chapingo (Mexico (2250 m above sea level, average annual rainfall 550 mm( loamy soil, 1,7% O.M., where different cultural practices were combined in order to design a weed control system for corn. The work was done under rainfed conditions and the variables included were: two population densities (44.400 and 66.600 pl/ha, two plant distributions (normal and equidistant and seven weed control methods (cyanazine + alachlor (1,2 + 1,92 kg/ha, atrazine + alachlor (1,2 + 1,44 kg/ha, one cultivation, two cultivations, a weeded check, a weeded check + two cultivations and a weedy check. The main weed species were: pigweed (Amaranthus sp., Lopezia mexicana Jacq., hairy galinsoga (Galin-soga parviflora Cay., Encelia mexicana Mart., Sporobulus poiretti (Roem. et Sch. Hich., and large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis (L. Scop.. The increase in plant population had no effect on the degree of weed control, incidence of diseases and crop growth. The equidistant distribution improved weed control over the normal one, but it also had a nigher incidence of diseases; this, is turn, may have caused the lack of differences in vegetative growth, a lower amount of cobs per ha and the lack of difference in grain yield between the two distributions. Atrazine + alachlor was better than cyanazine + alachlor in terms of weed control, although the difference was statistically observed only for the visual ratings. There were no differences between both chemical treatments in terms of incidence of diseases or their effect on crop

  13. Effects of cover crops and weed management on corn yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhood Yeganehpoor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important replacement methods used instead of chemical herbicide and conventional tillage is cover and companion crops’ application which is a major factor in sustainable agriculture. In order to determine the best cover crop in controlling weeds of corn field and its further effects on corn yield, an experiment was carried out in a factorial arrangement based on RCB design with three replicates. The treatments of this experiment included companion crops (clover, hairy vetch, basil and dill as first factor and time of sowing cover and medicinal plant (synchronic sowing with corn and sowing 15 days after corn sowing as second factor. The results showed that ear weight, ear length, leaf weight, grain length and yield were significantly influenced by companion crops and sowing date. Whereas, weed biomass was influenced by cover crop type × sowing date interaction. Also, the results indicated that increasing biomass weed resulted in linear reduction of grain yield. The highest ear weight, ear length, leaf weight, grain length and yield were obtained for cultivation of clover with corn. Synchronic cultivation of companion crops with corn had higher grain length and yield compared with cultivation 15 days after corn. The lowest weed biomass was recorded for concurrent cultivation of corn with clover due to rapid growth and high competitive power of clover in the early stage of growth.

  14. Split application of glyphosate in herbicide-tolerant maize provides efficient weed control and favors beneficial epigeic arthropods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Zdeňka; Skoková Habuštová, Oxana; Holec, J.; Holec, M.; Boháč, J.; Jursík, M.; Soukup, J.; Sehnal, František

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 251, JAN 01 (2018), s. 171-179 ISSN 0167-8809 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) L200961652 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : herbicide-tolerant maize * weed management * conventional tillage Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 4.099, year: 2016 http://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S0167880917304188

  15. Producing bulbs and perennials : sustainable control of diseases, pests and weeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de M.

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands every year flower bulbs and perennials are produced representing a value of € 500 m (flower bulbs) and of € 65 m (perennials, 2004). The growers are faced with several threatening pests and diseases during the production. They usually deal with these problems by using pesticides.

  16. Utilization of sunn hemp for cover crops and weed control in temperate climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The need to develop increasingly integrated pest management and sustainable food production systems has encouraged a greater interest to thoroughly evaluate effective utilization of cover crops in agricultural systems. Sunn hemp, a tropical legume that originated most likely from the Indo-Pakistani ...

  17. Weed management strategies for castor bean crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Guerreiro Fontoura Costa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Castor bean crops are agriculturally relevant due to the quality and versatility of their oil, both for the chemical industry and for biodiesel production. Proper weed management is important for both the cultivation and the yield of castor bean crops; therefore, the intention of the present work is to review pertinent information regarding weed management, including the studies regarding weed interference periods, chemical controls for use in different crop production systems and herbicide selectivity, for castor bean crops. Weed science research for castor bean crops is scarce. One of the main weed management challenges for castor bean crops is the absence of herbicides registered with the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (MALFS. Research for viable herbicides for weed control in castor bean crops should be directed by research and/or rural extension institutions, associations and farmers cooperatives, as well as by manufactures, for the registration of these selective herbicides, which would be primarily used to control eudicotyledons in castor bean crops. New studies involving the integration of weed control methods in castor bean also may increase the efficiency of weed management, for both small farmers using traditional crop methods in the Brazilian Northeast region, as well as for areas with the potential for large scale production, using conservation tillage systems, such as the no-tillage crop production system.

  18. Control of amphibious weed ipomoea (Ipomoea carnea by utilizing it for the extraction of volatile fatty acids as energy precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rafiq Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile fatty acids (VFAs, comprising mainly of acetic acid and lesser quantities of propionic and butyric acids, are generated when zoomass or phytomass is acted upon by acidogenic and acetogenic microorganisms. VFAs can be utilized by methanogens under anaerobic conditions to generate flammable methane–carbon dioxide mixtures known as ‘biogas’. Acting on the premise that this manner of VFA utilization for generating relatively clean energy can be easily accomplished in a controlled fashion in conventional biogas plants as well as higher-rate anaerobic digesters, we have carried out studies aimed to generate VFAs from the pernicious weed ipomoea (Ipomoea carnea. The VFA extraction was accomplished by a simple yet effective technology, appropriate for use even by laypersons. For this acid-phase reactors were set, to which measured quantities of ipomoea leaves were charged along with water inoculated with cow dung. The reactors were stirred intermittently. It was found that VFA production started within hours of the mixing of the reactants and peaked by the 10th or 11th day in all the reactors, effecting a conversion of over 10% of the biomass into VFAs. The reactor performance had good reproducibility and the process appeared easily controllable, frugal and robust.

  19. Image-based thresholds for weeds in maize fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Ali; Streibig, Jens Carl; Christensen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    in some parts of the field and if late germinating weeds do not affect yield, it may not be necessary the spray such places from an economic point of view. Consequently, it makes sense to develop weed control thresholds for patch spraying, based on weed cover early in the growing season. In Danish maize...

  20. Evaluation of Botanical Herbicides against Common Weed Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    growth weed species in coffee farm. The future research should give emphasis to develop. IPM of coffee weeds with integrating biocontrol approaches such as bioherbicides as the proven finding of this investigation. Introduction. Weed control is one of the most difficult problems in organic farming where synthetic herbicides ...

  1. Cover crop-based ecological weed management: exploration and optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords: organic farming, ecologically-based weed management, cover crops, green manure, allelopathy, Secale cereale, Brassica napus, Medicago sativa Cover crop-based ecological weed management: exploration and optimization. In organic farming systems, weed control is recognized as one of the

  2. Evaluation of Broadleaf Weeds Control with Selectivity of Post-Emergence Herbicides in Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar CHITBAND

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of herbicide applications is a main research priority in recent years. In order to study the effect of individual post-emergence application of sugar beet broad-leaf herbicides at four to six true-leaf stage of weeds, experiments were conducted during 2013. Treatments included untreated control and several rates of desmedipham + phenmedipham + ethofumesate, chloridazon and clopyralid on Portulaca oleracea, Solanum nigrum, Amaranthus retroflexus and Chenopodium album. A completely randomized layout with three replications was used for each herbicide. Three weeks after spraying (WAS, plants were harvested and measured their dry weight. These herbicides were more effective to control Portulaca oleracea than other weeds, thereupon minimum dose required for a satisfactory efficacy of 90% reduction of Portulaca oleracea aboveground dry matter (ED90 were 299.22, 1138.31 and 129.44 g a.i ha-1 of desmedipham + phenmedipham + ethofumesate, chloridazon and clopyralid, respectively. Solanum nigrum was more affected by clopyralid application (132.40 g a.i ha-1, and did not make significant difference in Portulaca oleracea. Chloridazon had lower effect for control of Chenopodium album due to existence of powdery covering on abaxial side of the leaves. Biomass ED50 or ED90, based on log-logistic dose–response curves, for Chenopodium album was considerably higher than other species. These results showed that tank mixtures with other herbicides may be required for satisfactory weed control and reduction in applied herbicides doses.

  3. Investigating of growth characteristics, yield, yield components and potential weed control in intercropping of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and vegetative sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Alizadeh, Y.; A Koocheki; M. Nassiri Mahallati

    2016-01-01

    In order to study yield and yield components in intercropping bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and evaluating effect of intercropping on weed control, a field experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad during growing season of 2008. Treatments: included 1- sole crop of bean 2- sole crop of sweet basil 3- strip intercropping of bean and sweet basil (four rows of bean and two rows of sweet basil) 4- strip inter...

  4. Crop rotation and its ability to suppress perennial weeds

    OpenAIRE

    Askegaard, Margrethe

    2016-01-01

    The appropriate combination of crops and green manures prevents spread of perennial weeds and increases crop yields and quality. Weed-suppressing crop rotations are absolutely essential for sustainable organic arable farming. Practical recommendation Basic rules • Implement green manures, such as clover or lucerne, in at least 20 % of the rotation. • Do not grow more than 50 % of cereals with low weed competitiveness in the rotation. Do not cultivate such crops for more than 2 con...

  5. Horny Goat Weed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horny goat weed is an herb. The leaves are used to make medicine. As many as 15 horny goat weed species are known as “yin yang huo” in Chinese medicine. Horny goat weed is used for weak back and knees, joint ...

  6. Weed exterminator and method of exterminating weed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Tempel, J.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of exterminating weed, which method comprises the steps of: providing an extermination chamber (14, 14a, 14b, 14c) having at least one open side (14d), placing the open side (14d) over weed to be exterminated; substantially closing off the edge of the open side of

  7. Smart energy control systems for sustainable buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Spataru, Catalina; Howlett, Robert; Jain, Lakhmi

    2017-01-01

    There is widespread interest in the way that smart energy control systems, such as assessment and monitoring techniques for low carbon, nearly-zero energy and net positive buildings can contribute to a Sustainable future, for current and future generations. There is a turning point on the horizon for the supply of energy from finite resources such as natural gas and oil become less reliable in economic terms and extraction become more challenging, and more unacceptable socially, such as adverse public reaction to ‘fracking’. Thus, in 2016 these challenges are having a major influence on the design, optimisation, performance measurements, operation and preservation of: buildings, neighbourhoods, cities, regions, countries and continents. The source and nature of energy, the security of supply and the equity of distribution, the environmental impact of its supply and utilization, are all crucial matters to be addressed by suppliers, consumers, governments, industry, academia, and financial institutions. Thi...

  8. Effect of weed management and seed rate on crop growth under direct dry seeded rice systems in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif Ahmed

    Full Text Available Weeds are a major constraint to the success of dry-seeded rice (DSR. The main means of managing these in a DSR system is through chemical weed control using herbicides. However, the use of herbicides alone may not be sustainable in the long term. Approaches that aim for high crop competitiveness therefore need to be exploited. One such approach is the use of high rice seeding rates. Experiments were conducted in the aman (wet seasons of 2012 and 2013 in Bangladesh to evaluate the effect of weed infestation level (partially-weedy and weed-free and rice seeding rate (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 kg ha(-1 on weed and crop growth in DSR. Under weed-free conditions, higher crop yields (5.1 and 5.2 t ha(-1 in the 2012 and 2013 seasons, respectively were obtained at the seeding rate of 40 kg ha(-1 and thereafter, yield decreased slightly beyond 40 kg seed ha(-1. Under partially-weedy conditions, yield increased by 30 to 33% (2.0-2.2 and 2.9-3.2 t ha(-1 in the 2012 and 2013 seasons, respectively with increase in seeding rate from 20 to 100 kg ha(-1. In the partially-weedy plots, weed biomass decreased by 41-60% and 54-56% at 35 days after sowing and at crop anthesis, respectively, when seeding rate increased from 20 to 100 kg ha(-1. Results from our study suggest that increasing seeding rates in DSR can suppress weed growth and reduce grain yield losses from weed competition.

  9. Effect of weed management and seed rate on crop growth under direct dry seeded rice systems in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sharif; Salim, Muhammad; Chauhan, Bhagirath S

    2014-01-01

    Weeds are a major constraint to the success of dry-seeded rice (DSR). The main means of managing these in a DSR system is through chemical weed control using herbicides. However, the use of herbicides alone may not be sustainable in the long term. Approaches that aim for high crop competitiveness therefore need to be exploited. One such approach is the use of high rice seeding rates. Experiments were conducted in the aman (wet) seasons of 2012 and 2013 in Bangladesh to evaluate the effect of weed infestation level (partially-weedy and weed-free) and rice seeding rate (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 kg ha(-1)) on weed and crop growth in DSR. Under weed-free conditions, higher crop yields (5.1 and 5.2 t ha(-1) in the 2012 and 2013 seasons, respectively) were obtained at the seeding rate of 40 kg ha(-1) and thereafter, yield decreased slightly beyond 40 kg seed ha(-1). Under partially-weedy conditions, yield increased by 30 to 33% (2.0-2.2 and 2.9-3.2 t ha(-1) in the 2012 and 2013 seasons, respectively) with increase in seeding rate from 20 to 100 kg ha(-1). In the partially-weedy plots, weed biomass decreased by 41-60% and 54-56% at 35 days after sowing and at crop anthesis, respectively, when seeding rate increased from 20 to 100 kg ha(-1). Results from our study suggest that increasing seeding rates in DSR can suppress weed growth and reduce grain yield losses from weed competition.

  10. Sustainable malaria control: transdisciplinary approaches for translational applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkholtz Lyn-Marie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the adoption of the Global Malaria Action Plan, several countries are moving from malaria control towards elimination and eradication. However, the sustainability of some of the approaches taken may be questionable. Here, an overview of malaria control and elimination strategies is provided and the sustainability of each in context of vector- and parasite control is assessed. From this, it can be concluded that transdisciplinary approaches are essential for sustained malaria control and elimination in malaria-endemic communities.

  11. Sustainable malaria control: transdisciplinary approaches for translational applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Bornman, Riana; Focke, Walter; Mutero, Clifford; de Jager, Christiaan

    2012-12-26

    With the adoption of the Global Malaria Action Plan, several countries are moving from malaria control towards elimination and eradication. However, the sustainability of some of the approaches taken may be questionable. Here, an overview of malaria control and elimination strategies is provided and the sustainability of each in context of vector- and parasite control is assessed. From this, it can be concluded that transdisciplinary approaches are essential for sustained malaria control and elimination in malaria-endemic communities.

  12. Designing a sustainable strategy for malaria control?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mharakurwa Sungano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malaria in the 21st century is showing signs of declining over much of its distribution, including several countries in Africa where previously this was not thought to be feasible. Yet for the most part the strategies to attack the infection are similar to those of the 1950s. Three major Journals have recently drawn attention to the situation, stressing the importance of research, describing the successes and defining semantics related to control. But there is a need to stress the importance of local sustainability, and consider somewhat urgently how individual endemic countries can plan and implement the programmes that are currently financed, for the most part, by donor institutions. On an immediate basis research should be more focused on a data driven approach to control. This will entail new thinking on the role of local infrastructure and in training of local scientists in local universities in epidemiology and field malariology so that expanded control programmes can become operational. Donor agencies should encourage and facilitate development of career opportunities for such personnel so that local expertise is available to contribute appropriately.

  13. GWN-3189 B – A new selective herbicide based on Triallate for control of herbicide resistant grass weed in cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mühlschlegel, Friedrich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With substantial work on the formulation, Gowan offers a new herbicide (GWN-3189 B based on Triallate for use on winter wheat, winter barley, winter rye, winter triticale and spring barley. GWN-3189B will be applied from pre-emergence to early post-emergence of the crop and offers a broad spectrum against grass-weeds. GWN-3189 B is selective on all cereal species. As soil herbicide GWN-3189 B offers interesting alternatives in grass-weed resistance management. The efficacy on grass weed, especially on Alopecurus myosuroides (blackgrass, Apera spica venti (silky bentgrass and Lolium multiflorum (italian ryegrass is demonstrated with results of field trials performed in France, Great Britain and Germany.

  14. An Ultrasonic System for Weed Detection in Cereal Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionisio Andújar

    2012-12-01

    discrimination were assessed by discriminant analysis. The ultrasonic readings permitted the separation between weed infested zones and non-infested areas with up to 92.8% of success. This system will potentially reduce the cost of weed detection and offers an opportunity to its use in non-selective methods for weed control.

  15. An ultrasonic system for weed detection in cereal crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Dionisio; Weis, Martin; Gerhards, Roland

    2012-12-13

    assessed by discriminant analysis. The ultrasonic readings permitted the separation between weed infested zones and non-infested areas with up to 92.8% of success. This system will potentially reduce the cost of weed detection and offers an opportunity to its use in non-selective methods for weed control.

  16. Métodos de controle de plantas daninhas no cafeeiro afetam os atributos químicos do solo Effects of weed control methods on coffee crop on soil chemical attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elifas Nunes de Alcântara

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nos ecossistemas agrícolas sob cafeeiro, nos quais o manejo do solo se resume, basicamente, à aplicação de corretivos, fertilizantes e controle de plantas daninhas, faz com que alternativas de manejo que preservam ou aumentam os teores de matéria orgânica no solo, a exemplo de alguns métodos de controle de plantas daninhas, sejam consideradas, quando se busca a sustentabilidade da cultura. Neste estudo o objetivo foi avaliar o efeito de alguns métodos comumente utilizadas na cultura do cafeeiro sobre os atributos químicos de um Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico sob cafeeiro, durante 15 anos. Os tratamentos avaliados consistiram de sete métodos de controle, envolvendo o uso de roçadora (RC, grade (GR, enxada rotativa (ER, herbicida de pré-emergência (HPRE, herbicida de pós-emergência (HPOS, capina manual (CM e uma testemunha sem capina (TEST. Foram determinados, nas profundidades de 0-0,15m e 0,15-0,30m, os teores de P, K+, Ca2+ + Mg2+, soma de bases (SB, saturação por bases (V, CTC efetiva (t e potencial (T. Os resultados mostraram que o tratamento sem capina (TEST influenciou, positivamente, os teores de P, K+, Ca2+ + Mg2+, valores de CTC efetiva, potencial e V, enquanto o HPRE exerceu um efeito contrário, ou seja, de redução nos valores das variáveis analisadas. Demais métodos RC, GR, ER, HPOS e CM apresentam um comportamento intermediário entre os métodos TEST e HPRE sobre as condições de fertilidade do solo.In agricultural ecosystems under coffee cultivation, soil management is based on liming, fertilizers and weed control. Alternatives that preserve or increase soil organic matter content are considered when the sustainability is the goal. This study was conducted to evaluate the chemical attributes of a dystroferric Red Latosol (Oxisols under coffee cultivation submitted to 15 years of weed control methods. Seven interrows coffee plant weed control methods were used; a mower (RC, tanden disk harrow (GR, rotative

  17. Extracts from Field Margin Weeds Provide Economically Viable and Environmentally Benign Pest Control Compared to Synthetic Pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkenda, Prisila; Mwanauta, Regina; Stevenson, Philip C; Ndakidemi, Patrick; Mtei, Kelvin; Belmain, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Plants with pesticidal properties have been investigated for decades as alternatives to synthetics, but most progress has been shown in the laboratory. Consequently, research on pesticidal plants is failing to address gaps in our knowledge that constrain their uptake. Some of these gaps are their evaluation of their efficacy under field conditions, their economic viability and impact on beneficial organisms. Extracts made from four abundant weed species found in northern Tanzania, Tithonia diversifolia, Tephrosia vogelii, Vernonia amygdalina and Lippia javanica offered effective control of key pest species on common bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) that was comparable to the pyrethroid synthetic, Karate. The plant pesticide treatments had significantly lower effects on natural enemies (lady beetles and spiders). Plant pesticide treatments were more cost effective to use than the synthetic pesticide where the marginal rate of return for the synthetic was no different from the untreated control, around 4USD/ha, compared to a rate of return of around 5.50USD/ha for plant pesticide treatments. Chemical analysis confirmed the presence of known insecticidal compounds in water extracts of T. vogelii (the rotenoid deguelin) and T. diversifolia (the sesquiterpene lactone tagitinin A). Sesquiterpene lactones and the saponin vernonioside C were also identified in organic extracts of V. amygdalina but only the saponin was recorded in water extracts which are similar to those used in the field trial. Pesticidal plants were better able to facilitate ecosystem services whilst effectively managing pests. The labour costs of collecting and processing abundant plants near farm land were less than the cost of purchasing synthetic pesticides.

  18. Extracts from Field Margin Weeds Provide Economically Viable and Environmentally Benign Pest Control Compared to Synthetic Pesticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prisila Mkenda

    Full Text Available Plants with pesticidal properties have been investigated for decades as alternatives to synthetics, but most progress has been shown in the laboratory. Consequently, research on pesticidal plants is failing to address gaps in our knowledge that constrain their uptake. Some of these gaps are their evaluation of their efficacy under field conditions, their economic viability and impact on beneficial organisms. Extracts made from four abundant weed species found in northern Tanzania, Tithonia diversifolia, Tephrosia vogelii, Vernonia amygdalina and Lippia javanica offered effective control of key pest species on common bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris that was comparable to the pyrethroid synthetic, Karate. The plant pesticide treatments had significantly lower effects on natural enemies (lady beetles and spiders. Plant pesticide treatments were more cost effective to use than the synthetic pesticide where the marginal rate of return for the synthetic was no different from the untreated control, around 4USD/ha, compared to a rate of return of around 5.50USD/ha for plant pesticide treatments. Chemical analysis confirmed the presence of known insecticidal compounds in water extracts of T. vogelii (the rotenoid deguelin and T. diversifolia (the sesquiterpene lactone tagitinin A. Sesquiterpene lactones and the saponin vernonioside C were also identified in organic extracts of V. amygdalina but only the saponin was recorded in water extracts which are similar to those used in the field trial. Pesticidal plants were better able to facilitate ecosystem services whilst effectively managing pests. The labour costs of collecting and processing abundant plants near farm land were less than the cost of purchasing synthetic pesticides.

  19. Qualitative suggestions about chemical weed control of poplar in the nursery and possible improvement on the basis of experimental trials over fifteen years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the results of over fifteen years of experimentation are summarized, concerning the possibility of use of herbicides included in several chemical classes and with various mechanisms of action on poplar clones of different species, European and North American. The active ingredients were tested mainly singly or in commercial mixtures as well, applied before emergence (interpreted here as sprout of poplar cuttings not yet occurred and before weed infestation or after emergence (interpreted here as cuttings with sprouts 20-25 cm long and after weed colonisation. Almost 50% of the 43 tested formulations has proved to be unserviceable in poplar nursery because of the hard damage induced on plantlets, i.e. dicotyledonicides and those with a wide action range, especially applied after emergence. It was the case of acetolactate synthase inhibitors and synthetic auxins. About 25% of formulations has proved to be utilizable with limited risks and 20% without risk. After emergence, the lowest damage was caused by graminicide compounds included in the class of acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors (e.g. diclofop-methyl, cycloxydim; before emergence, very good applicative opportunities were showed by microtubule assembly inhibitors, especially propyzamide, and the cellulose synthesis inhibitor isoxaben. Among the herbicides utilizable with some risk after emergence, the photosynthesis inhibitors pyridate and phenmedipham (singly or in mixture were interesting since they are the only ones that allow the control of broad-leaved weeds in the presence of herbaceous poplar shoots. Before emergence, flufenacet and isoxaflutole were remarkable as well, the latter being active versus hardly limited weeds. In summary, besides the two aforesaid compounds, the graminicide cycloxydim and - more cautiously - clodinafop and propaquizafop may be hopefully introduced in poplar nurseries after emergence, in association with the wide action range mixture of

  20. Characterization of weed flora in rubber trees plantations of Bongo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: the main objective of this study is to characterize the weed floristic diversity of the Bongo rubber trees plantation and to provide a map for sustainable weed management. Methodology and results: a floristic survey of the Para rubber plantations of Bongo (Southeast Côte d'Ivoire) was conducted in 2007 and early ...

  1. Integrated weed management (IWM): will it reduce herbicide use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, S R

    2010-01-01

    The Sustainable Use of Pesticides Directive (2009/128/EC), part of the EU Thematic Strategy for Pesticides, requires Integrated Pest Management (IPM) to be actively promoted. A key objective is to give greater priority to non-chemical methods of plant protection to reduce the impact of pesticides on human health and the environment. Integrated Weed Management (IWM) can be considered part of IPM, and many non-chemical methods are available. For example, a recent review of methods for control of Alopecurus myosuroides (black-grass) in winter wheat found the following mean annual levels of control: ploughing 67%; delayed drilling 37%; fallowing 70%; higher seed rates 30%; competitive cultivars 27%. In comparison with herbicides these efficacy levels are mediocre, and A. myosuroides would be classified as resistant (R) or moderately resistant (MR) to all these methods if the criteria used by the Chemicals Regulation Directorate in the UK for assigning ratings to herbicide efficacy were used. It is, therefore, not surprising that farmers are reluctant to embrace IWM and continue to place greater.reliance on herbicides as a more reliable and cost effective method of weed control. While non-chemical methods will not replace herbicides on most farms, reduced reliance on herbicides will be necessary both for practical (increasing resistance, lack of new herbicides) and political reasons (complying with EU legislation). Farmers will use nonchemical control methods when they have a major weed problem, and have no alternative, but they must be encouraged to adopt IWM at an earlier stage. Research into IWM must be relevant and practical, and not simply conducted as some sort of 'academic' exercise. More effective knowledge transfer is vital, and this is a challenge due to the decline in independent, state funded, advisory services in many European countries. The question arises; is it possible to achieve reductions in pesticide use by simply promoting non-chemical methods of

  2. Weed exterminator and method of exterminating weed

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Tempel, J.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of exterminating weed, which method comprises the steps of: providing an extermination chamber (14, 14a, 14b, 14c) having at least one open side (14d), placing the open side (14d) over weed to be exterminated; substantially closing off the edge of the open side of the extermination chamber (14, 14a, 14b) and the ground or soil in which the weed is present; providing a refrigerant in the extermination chamber (14, 14a, 14b, 14c); keeping the extermination cham...

  3. Controle de plantas daninhas em milho em função de quantidades de palha de nabo forrageiro Weed control in corn as a function of amount of turnip crop residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Rizzardi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este experimento avaliar a influência da quantidade de palha de nabo forrageiro (Raphanus sativus var. oleiferus no controle de plantas daninhas em milho. O delineamento experimental foi o de parcelas subdivididas, em blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições. Os tratamentos constaram das quantidades de 0, 6 e 9 t ha-1 de palha de nabo forrageiro, além do pousio, dispostas na parcela principal e, ainda, de seis momentos de controle de plantas daninhas (milho com 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 e 7 folhas, mais duas testemunhas (sem a presença de plantas daninhas e sem o controle destas, dispostos nas subparcelas. Houve interação de quantidades de palha e momentos de controle em relação ao grau de controle de plantas daninhas; o melhor momento ocorreu entre os estádios de duas a quatro folhas do milho. Na ausência de controle químico, o rendimento de grãos de milho foi superior no tratamento com 9 t ha-1 de palha de nabo forrageiro. O controle químico não proporcionou aumento significativo no rendimento de grãos do milho quando a quantidade de palha de nabo forrageiro foi de 9 t ha-1.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the amount of turnip (Raphanus sativus var. oleiferus crop residue on weed control in corn. The experimental design was a split-plot, in randomized blocks, with four replications. The treatments tested were 0, 6, and 9 t ha-1 of turnip crop residues, fallow period (the amount of residues was equivalent to the amount of natural vegetation residues, arranged as main plots, and six weed control periods (corn plants with 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 developed leaves, besides two controls (one without weeds and another without weed control, arranged as subplots. Interactions occurred between residue amounts and control periods in relation to the degree of weed control. The best control period was achieved when the corn plants presented from 2 to 4 developed leaves. Corn grain yield was higher in the control

  4. Biological Control of the weed hemp sesbania (Sesbania exaltata) in rice (Oryza sativa) by the fungus Myrothecium verrucaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    In greenhouse and field experiments, a mycelial formulation of the fungus Myrothecium verrucaria (IMI 361690; henceforth designated MV) containing 0.20% Silwet L-77 surfactant exhibited high bioherbicidal efficacy against the problematic weed hemp sesbania. High infection and mortality (100%) of he...

  5. The initiation of a biological control programme against pompom weed Campuloclinium macrocephalum (LESS.)DC (Asteraceae)in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompom weed, Campuloclinium macrocephalum (Less.) DC. (Asteraceae), is a South American invasive that was first recorded in South Africa in the early 1960s. In the 1980s, C. macrocephalum started slowly extending its range and in the 1990s and 2000s it entered a dramatic expansion phase. It invade...

  6. Effect of new auxin herbicide formulations on control of herbicide resistant weeds and on microbial activities in the rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread distribution of glyphosate-resistant weeds in soybean-growing areas across Mississippi has economically affected soybean planting and follow-up crop management operations. New multiple herbicide-resistant crop (including soybean) technologies with associated formulations will soon be comm...

  7. Establishment and dispersal of the biological control weevil Rhinoncomimus latipes on mile-a-minute weed, Persicaria perfoliata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen C. Lake; Judith Hough-Goldstein; Kimberley J. Shropshire; Vincent D' Amico

    2011-01-01

    Mile-a-minute weed, Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross (Polygonaceae), is an annual vine from Asia that has invaded the eastern US where it can form dense monocultures and outcompete other vegetation in a variety of habitats. The host-specific Asian weevil Rhinoncomimus latipes Korotyaev (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was first...

  8. MYCOPOPULATION OF WEEDS IN ARABLE CROPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Vrandečić

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A large number of weeds are alternative hosts to numerous pathogenic agents of fungus diseases to arable crops and they represent inoculum source to cultivated plants. The aim of our investigation was to determine weed mycopopulation, to establish pathogenicity of some fungi to cultivated plants as well as to choose potential parasites for biological control of weeds. During a two year investigation of weed mycopopulation obtained from root crops at five localities in East Slavonia and Baranya 32 fungus species were established at 25 weeds that were characterized by disease symptoms. Seven fungi species were determined on roots of 18 weeds, although there were no obvious disease symptoms. Obligated parasites along with 21 determined fungi are of Oomycetes, Plectomycetes and Hemibasidiomycetes genus. Facultative parasites from 18 determined fungus species are of Discomycetes, Pyrenomycetes, Coelomycetes and Hyphomycetes genus. Isolates of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were tested for their pathogenicity to soybean. The results showed that there were no significant differences in pathogenicity of isolates in artificial conditions in laboratory. In natural conditions isolates from soybean were more pathogenic to soybean than the isolates from weeds. Experiments done with sunflower showed that the isolates from weeds were more pathogenic than isolates from sunflower. The isolates of Phomopsis/Diaporthe complex affected the length of germ, the length of necrosis and seed disease differently. Results showed that the isolates from weeds of Phomopsis species are pathogenic to soybean representing an important source of inoculum to soybean. Isolates of Fusarium species isolated from weeds were pathogenic for popcorn seedlings. Artificial infection of Abutilon theophrasti by Colletotrichum coccodes showed that foliar mass wilted earlier and whole plants died. For the first time in Croatia the presence of 14 fungus species was determined on 27 new hosts.

  9. Sustainable Acoustic Metasurfaces for Sound Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Gori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound attenuation with conventional acoustic materials is subject to the mass law and requires massive and bulky structures at low frequencies. A possible alternative solution is provided by the use of metamaterials, which are artificial materials properly engineered to obtain properties and characteristics that it is not possible to find in natural materials. Theory and applications of metamaterials, already consolidated in electromagnetism, can be extended to acoustics; in particular, they can be applied to improve the properties of acoustical panels. The design of acoustic metasurfaces that could effectively control transmitted sound in unconventional ways appears a significant subject to be investigated, given its wide-ranging possible applications. In this contribution, we investigate the application of a metasurface-inspired technique to achieve the acoustical insulation of an environment. The designed surface has subwavelength thickness and structuring and could be realized with cheap, lightweight and sustainable materials. We present a few examples of such structures and analyze their acoustical behavior by means of full-wave simulations.

  10. Yield loss prediction models based on early estimation of weed pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Ali; Streibig, Jens Carl; Andreasen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    been proposed to predict yield loss, relative to yield in weed free environment from early measurements of weed infestation. The models are integrated in some weed management advisory systems. Generally, the recommendations from the advisory systems are applied to the whole field, but weed control...... thresholds are more relevant for site-specific weed management, because weeds are unevenly distributed in fields. Precision of prediction of yield loss is influenced by various factors such as locations, yield potential at the site, variation in competitive ability of mix stands of weed species and emergence...

  11. Hybrid weeds! Agent biotypes!: Montana's ever-evolving toadflax biological control soap opera

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. E. Sing; D. K. Weaver; S. M. Ward; J. Milan; C. L. Jorgensen; R. A. Progar; A. Gassmann; I. Tooevski

    2013-01-01

    An exotic toadflax stem mining weevil conventionally identified as Mecinus janthinus Germar has become widely established on Dalmatian toadflax [Linaria dalmatica (Linnaeus) Miller] in western North America, although agent density and control efficacy are highly variable across release sites (De Clerck-Floate & Miller, 2002; McClay & Hughes, 2007; Van Hezewijk...

  12. Activities of five enzymes following soil disturbance and weed control in a Missouri forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Jr. Ponder; Frieda Eivazi

    2008-01-01

    Forest disturbances associated with harvesting activities can affect soil properties including enzyme activity and overall soil quality. The activities of five enzymes (acid and alkaline phosphatases, betaglucosidase, aryl-sulfatase, and beta-glucosominidase) were measured after 8 years in soil from clearcut and uncut control plots of a Missouri oak-hickory (...

  13. Effect of weed control treatments on total leaf area of plantation black walnut (Juglans nigra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason Cook; Michael R. Saunders

    2013-01-01

    Determining total tree leaf area is necessary for describing tree carbon balance, growth efficiency, and other measures used in tree-level and stand-level physiological growth models. We examined the effects of vegetation control methods on the total leaf area of sapling-size plantation black walnut trees using allometric approaches. We found significant differences in...

  14. Research Note Study on the early effects of several weed-control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Broadleaf species, 10 out of 15 of which were alien, were severely affected by herbicides but alien forbs appeared to benefit by the selective removal of parthenium in the manual control treatments. Native grasses filled the space vacated by broadleaf species in the plots treated with herbicide. However, none of the ...

  15. Image analysis as a non-destructive method to assess regrowth of weeds after repeated flame weeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Anne Merete; Kristoffersen, Palle; Andreasen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    , and therefore it may influence the long-term effect of repeated treatments. Visual assessment of weed cover or image analysis do not affect the remaining parts of the weed plants after treatment, but the methods may have other disadvantages. In order to evaluate and compare three methods we measured changes...... treatment frequency (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 yearly treatments). Image analysis and visual assessment of images were easy methods to measure vegetation cover. The experiments showed that increasing dosages and frequent treatments resulted in increasing reduction of plant weight and vegetation cover. However......Efficient non-chemical weed control like flame weeding often requires repeated treatments. In weed control experiments the effect of each treatment may be estimated by removing and weighing the remaining weed biomass after the treatment, but the method influences the weed plants ability to regrow...

  16. ROLE OF ALLELOPATHY IN THE STIMULATORY AND INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF HAIRY VETCH COVER CROP RESIDUE IN NO-TILLAGE SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops can provide multiple benefits to sustainable cropping systems including building soil organic matter, controlling soil and nutrient losses from fields, moderating radiation and moisture exchange, releasing nutrients for subsequent crops, and suppressing weed and pest populations. Many o...

  17. Controle de plantas daninhas na cultura do arroz de sequeiro (Oryza sativa L. Weed control in upland rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Victoria Filho

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de verificar o controle de plantas daninhas com herbicidas na cultura do arroz de sequeiro, foi conduzido o presente experimento em um latossolo roxo, série Jaboticabal com 4,82% de m.o, utilizando-se a variedade Pratão Precoce. Foram util izados os seguintes tratamentos com as respectivas doses em kg do i.a/ha: pendimethalin a 0,75, 1,00 e 1,50; AC-92390 a 1,00, 2,00 e 3,00; butachlor a 2,05; benthiocarb a 4,50; oxadiazon a 1,0 todos em pré emergência; e propanil a 4,32; propanil + 2,4-D amina a 2,88 + 0,36 e propanil + parathion metílico a 1,98 + 0,24, em pósemergência aos 29 dias após o plantio. As plantas daninhas que ocorreram em maior densidade foram: carrapicho-de-carneiro (Acanthospermum hispidum D.C. , trapoe raba (Commelina sp., falsa-dormideira (Cassia patellaria D.C., anileira (Indigofera hirsuta L., capimcarrapicho (Cenchrus echinatus L., beldroega (Portulacca oleracea L. e guanxuma (Sida sp.. O carrapicho-de-carneiro só foi controlado pelos tratamentos em pós -emergência; a falsa-dormideira pelo butachlor e pelos tratamentos em pós-emergência. No controle geral os melhores indices foram obtidos com os tratamentos em pós-emergência. Os tratamentos em pré-emergência foram capinados aos 36 dias após o pl antio devido ao baixo controle do carrapicho-de-carneiro, e os de pós-emergência aos 54 di as devid o ao baixo controle da trapoeraba. Quanto à fitotoxicidade à cultura o tratamento propanil + parathion metflico atingiu fitotoxicidade quase forte (nota 5,8 pela escala E.W.R.C., todavia não houve diferença significativa entre os diferentes tratamentos com herbicida na produção de grãos.A field trial was performed, on a oxisol (Latos - solic B containing 4.82% organic matter, with the objetive to verify the weed control with pre and postemergence herbicides in upland rice cv "Pratão Precoce". The following treatments were used (kg a.i/ha : pendimethal in at 0,75, 1,00 and 1,50; AC-92390 at 1

  18. Vineyard weeds control practices impact on surface water transfers: using numerical tracer experiment coupled to a distributed hydrological model to manage agricultural practices spatial arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, F.; Moussa, R.

    2009-04-01

    In rural basins, agricultural landscape management highly influences water and pollutants transfers. Landuse, agricultural practices and their spatial arrangements are at issue. Hydrological model are widely used to explore impacts of anthropogenic influences on experimental catchments. But planning all spatial arrangements leads to a possible cases count which cannot be considered. On the basis of the recent « numerical experiment » approach, we propose a « numerical tracer function » which had to be coupled to a distributed rainfall-runoff model. This function simulate the transfer of a virtual tracer successively spread on each distributed unit inside the catchment. It allows to rank hydrological spatial units according to their hydrological contribution to the surface flows, particularly at the catchment outlet. It was used with the distributed model MHYDAS in an agricultural context. The case study concerns the experimental Roujan vine-growing catchment (1km², south of France) studied since 1992. In this Mediterranean context, we focus on the soil hydraulic conductivity distributed parameter because it highly depends on weed control practices (chemical weeding induces a lot more runoff than mechanical weeding). We checked model sensitivity analysis to soil hydraulic conductivity spatial arrangement on runoff coefficient, peak discharge and catchment lag-time. Results show (i) the use of the tracer function is more efficient than a random approach to improve sensitivity to spatial arrangements from point of view of simulated discharge range, (ii) the first factor explaining hydrological simulations variability was practices area ratio, (iii) variability induced by practices spatial arrangements was significant on runoff coefficient and peak discharge for balanced practices area ratio and on lag-time for low area ratio of chemical weeding practices. From the actual situation on the experimental Roujan catchment (40% of tilled and 60% of non tilled vineyard

  19. Weed Identification Using An Automated Active Shape Matching (AASM) Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swain, K C; Nørremark, Michael; Jørgensen, R N

    2011-01-01

    Weed identification and control is a challenge for intercultural operations in agriculture. As an alternative to chemical pest control, a smart weed identification technique followed by mechanical weed control system could be developed. The proposed smart identification technique works on the con......Weed identification and control is a challenge for intercultural operations in agriculture. As an alternative to chemical pest control, a smart weed identification technique followed by mechanical weed control system could be developed. The proposed smart identification technique works......-leaf growth stage model for Solanum nigrum L. (nightshade) is generated from 32 segmented training images in Matlab software environment. Using the AASM algorithm, the leaf model was aligned and placed at the centre of the target plant and a model deformation process carried out. The parameters used...

  20. Controle das plantas daninhas em cultura de soja (Glycine Max L. Merril com misturas de herbicidas Soybean weed control with mixtures of herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. P. Cruz

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Em ensaio de campo, onde as principais plantas daninhas eram representadas por duas gramíneas e seis ervas de folhas largas, foi comparada a ação de misturas de trifluralin, pendimethalin, dinitramine e alachlor com metribuzin e de alachlor com linuron, no seu controle. Os resultados mostraram que as misturas de alachlor a 2,00 kg/ha e metribuzin a 0,35 kg/ha, e desses mesmos herbicidas a 3,00 kg/ha e 0,50 kg/ha, feitas no tanque, aplicadas em pré-emergência, seguidas da mistura de trifluralin a 1,00 kg/ha, aplicado em pré-plantio incorporado, com metribuzin a 0,50 kg/ha, aplicado em pré-emergência, foram as mais eficientes. Acanthospermum australe foi a planta daninha de mais difícil controle. Somente a mistura de tanque de alachlor a 2,00 kg/ha e linuron a 0,75 kg/ha foi eficiente no seu controle. As misturas de pendimenthalin a 1,30 kg/ha e de dinitramine a 0,50 kg/ha, ambos com metribuzin a 0,50 kg/ha, retardaram o crescimento inicial da soja, porém sem prejudicar o stand e a produção. Os demais tratamentos também não foram prejudiciais à produção dessa leguminosa.Different mixtures of metribuzin with trifluralin, prendimetalin, dinitramine or alachlor were compared in order to evaluate weed control efficiency on soybean crop. Tank mixtures of 2,00 Kg/ha of alachlor and 0.35 Kg/ha of metribuzin, or 3,00 Kg/ha of alachlor and 0,50 Kg/ha of metribuzin, and 1,00 Kg/ha of trifluralin and 0,50 Kg/ha of metribuzin were the most efficient in controlling grasses and dicotyledons. Acanthospermum au strale was the most difficult weed to be controled. Only alachlor at 2,00 Kg/ha plus linuron at 0,75 Kg/ha gave satisfactory results. The mixtures of pendimethalin at 1,30 K/ha or dinitramine at 0,50 Kg/ha plus metribuzin at 0,50 Kg/ha were fitotoxic at the initial growth stage of soybeans, but did not affect stand or yield. The other mixtures did not show any fitotoxicity and did not affect stand or yield either.

  1. Chemical control of aquatic weed plants: Alternanthera philoxeroides, Enhydra anagallis and Pycreus decumbens

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, N.V. [UNESP; Cardoso, L.A. [UNESP; Marchi, S.R. [UNESP; Domingos, V.D. [UNESP; Martins, D. [UNESP

    2005-01-01

    As espécies de plantas aquáticas podem causar inúmeros inconvenientes ao uso múltiplo da água quando elas se desenvolvem desordenadamente. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência de diferentes herbicidas no controle químico de plantas de Alternanthera philoxeroides, Enhydra anagallis e Pycreus decumbens em caixa-d'água. Quando as plantas atingiram o seu pleno desenvolvimento (antes do florescimento), foram aplicados, nas espécies Alternanthera philoxeroides e Enhydra anagall...

  2. Weeds optimally grow in peat swamp after burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Susanti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available After clearing land by burning the peat, then the weeds and undergrowth will flourish. Even sometimes, the weeds are eventually burned again. Weed is known as a destroyer plant that has to be controlled. Through proper treatment, the existing weeds in peatlands can be potentiallly exploited. The purpose of this study was to determine the calorific value of briquettes as one of peatland weeds utilization. The results showed that the calorific value ranged from 2,492 cal/g to 5,230 cal/g. The lowest calorific value was on ‘teki kecil’ grass (Scirpus grossus Lf, while the highest calorific value was observed for ‘bantalaki grass’ (Hymenachne amplexicaulis Nees. The high calorific value of the peat weeds are potential for biomass briquettes raw materials. The utilization and use of peat weed briquettes as a raw materials expected can reduce land degradation due to peat swamp burning

  3. Modeling and Advanced Control for Sustainable Process Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter introduces a novel process systems engineering framework that integrates process control with sustainability assessment tools for the simultaneous evaluation and optimization of process operations. The implemented control strategy consists of a biologically-insp...

  4. RNAseq reveals weed-induced PIF3-like as a candidate target to manipulate weed stress response in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, David P; Hansen, Stephanie A; Moriles-Miller, Janet P; Pierik, Ronald; Yan, Changhui; Clay, David E; Scheffler, Brian; Clay, Sharon A

    2015-07-01

    Weeds reduce yield in soybeans (Glycine max) through incompletely defined mechanisms. The effects of weeds on the soybean transcriptome were evaluated in field conditions during four separate growing seasons. RNASeq data were collected from six biological samples of soybeans growing with or without weeds. Weed species and the methods to maintain weed-free controls varied between years to mitigate treatment effects, and to allow detection of general soybean weed responses. Soybean plants were not visibly nutrient- or water-stressed. We identified 55 consistently downregulated genes in weedy plots. Many of the downregulated genes were heat shock genes. Fourteen genes were consistently upregulated. Several transcription factors including a PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 3-like gene (PIF3) were included among the upregulated genes. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated roles for increased oxidative stress and jasmonic acid signaling responses during weed stress. The relationship of this weed-induced PIF3 gene to genes involved in shade avoidance responses in Arabidopsis provide evidence that this gene may be important in the response of soybean to weeds. These results suggest that the weed-induced PIF3 gene will be a target for manipulating weed tolerance in soybean. No claim to original US government works New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Potential Use of Essential oils from Four Tunisian Species of Lamiaceae: Biological Alternative for Fungal and Weed Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Hanana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of the essential oils (EOs of four Lamiaceae (Thymus capitatus Hoff. et Link. , Rosmarinus officinalis L., Origanum vulgare L. and Mentha pulegium L. growing wild in Tunisia was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Obtained results showed significant variations among the different species. The major constituents identified for each species were respectively carvacrol (69% and δ-terpinene (17% for T. capitatus, 1,8-cineole (41% and α-pinene (24% for R. officinalis, menthol (39% and 1.8-cineole (17% for M. pulegium , thymol (30%, p-cymene (30% and δ-terpinene (27% for O. vulgare . EO herbicidal effects were evaluated against three invasive weed species in most cultivated crops: Sinapis arvensis L., Phalaris paradoxa L. and Lolium rigidum Gaud. The study of herbicidal activity was carried out on seed germination and seedling vigor and growth. All tested EOs significantly inhibited the germination and growth of weeds in a dose dependent manner and their herbicidal activity could be attributed mainly to their high content in oxygenated monoterpenes. The antifungal ability of EOs was assessed by using disc agar diffusion against ten plant pathogenic fungi affecting crops and stored foods. The EOs displayed strong inhibitory effect on all tested fungi. Our results on EOs chemical composition and biological activities showed properties that could be valorized in managing biocontrol of weeds and plant fungi.

  6. Biology and management of Avena fatua and Avena ludoviciana: two noxious weed species of agro-ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Ali Ahsan; Akhter, Muhammad Javaid; Iqbal, Nadeem; Peerzada, Arslan Masood; Hanif, Zarka; Manalil, Sudheesh; Hashim, Saima; Ali, Hafiz Haider; Kebaso, Lynda; Frimpong, David; Namubiru, Halima; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh

    2017-08-01

    Avena fatua and Avena ludoviciana are closely related grass weed species infesting a large number of crops around the world. These species are widely distributed in diverse agro-ecosystems from temperate to sub-tropical regions due to their unique seed traits, successful germination ecology, high competitive ability, and allelopathic potential. A. fatua is more widespread, adaptable, and problematic than A. ludoviciana. Both these species infest major winter and spring crops, including wheat, oat, barley, canola, maize, alfalfa, and sunflower, causing up to 70% yield losses depending on crop species and weed density. Chemical control has been challenged by large-scale herbicide resistance evolution in these weed species. A. fatua is the most widespread herbicide-resistant weed in the world, infesting about 5 million hectares in 13 countries. The use of alternative herbicides with different modes of action has proved effective. Several cultural practices, including diverse crop rotations, cover crops, improved crop competition (using competitive cultivars, high seed rates, narrow row spacing, altered crop geometry), and allelopathic suppression, have shown promise for controlling A. fatua and A. ludoviciana. The integrated use of these cultural methods can reduce the herbicide dose required, and lower dependency on herbicides to control these grasses. Moreover, integrated management may successfully control herbicide-resistant populations of these weed species. The use of integrated approaches based on the knowledge of biology and ecology of A. fatua and A. ludoviciana may help to manage them sustainably in the future.

  7. Selectivity of weed harrowing in lupin

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Rikke K.; Rasmussen, Jesper; Melander, Bo

    2004-01-01

    Three field experiments were conducted in lupin in 1997, 1998 and 1999 to study two aspects of selectivity of post-emergence weed harrowing; the ability of the crop to resist soil covering (the initial damage effect), and the ability of the crop to tolerate soil covering (the recovery effect). Each year soil covering curves and crop tolerance curves were established in three early growth stages of lupin. Soil covering curves connected weed control and crop soil cover in weedy plots, and crop ...

  8. Controle químico de plantas daninhas na semeadura direta de tomate (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. Weed control on direct seeded tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Ferreira

    1982-12-01

    with metribuzin at the same dose ge were evaluated in two assays, one at Viçosa, MG and the other at Domingos Martins, ES. One third assay was carried out at Viçosa, MG to evaluate the effectiveness of chloramben, napropamide, diphenamid and metr ibuzin at the dose of 3.40; 3.00; 5.00 and .70 kg/ha respectively, and pebulate at the dose of 4.32 and 1.76 kg/ha applied separated and combined with pebulate at mentioned dosages. All compounds showed some control of weeds, although the efficiency of each product was weed species dependant. Only pebulate was efficient on Cyperus rotundus control. Bachiaria plantaginea and Digitaria sanguinalis were better controled by chloramben, napropamide, diphenamid and trifluralin. Metribuzin gave excelent control of Bidens pilosa and Galinsoga parviflora. The mixtures of metr ibuzin or pebula te wi th each herbicide sudied increased the efficience of control and the number of species controled. All compounds were tolerated by the tomato plants. No visible injury were observed at the doses studied.

  9. Weed management in short rotation poplar and herbaceous perennial crops grown for biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhler, D.D. [USDA-Agricultural Research Service National Soil Tilth Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Netzer, D.A.; Riemenschneider, D.E. [USDA-Forest Service, Forestry Sciences Lab., Rhinelander, WI (United States); Hartzler, R.G. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Agrimony

    1998-12-31

    Weed management is a key element of any crop production system. Weeds are a particular problem in the production of short rotation woody and perennial herbaceous biomass crops due to the shortage of registered herbicides and integrated weed management systems. Herbicides will be an important component of weed management of biomass crops. However, producers should take a broader view of weeds and incorporate all available weed management tactics in these production systems. In both short rotation poplar and herbaceous perennial crops, weed control during the establishment period is most critical. New plantings of these species grow very slowly and do not compete well with weeds until a canopy develops. Effective weed control can double the growth of short rotation poplar crops and affect the variability of the resulting stand. In crops like switchgrass, uncontrolled weeds during establishment can result in stand failure. Cultural practices such as site preparation, using weed-free seed, fallowing, selecting the proper planting dates, companion crops and controlling weeds in previous crops must be combined with herbicides to develop integrated management systems. Weeds may also cause problems in established stands through competition with the biomass crop and by contaminating the product. Effective and economical weed management systems will be essential for the development of short rotation woody and herbaceous perennial biomass crop production systems. (Author)

  10. Development of Chemical Process Design and Control for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyun Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes a novel process systems engineering framework that couples advanced control with sustainability evaluation for the optimization of process operations to minimize environmental impacts associated with products, materials and energy. The implemented control strategy combines a biologically-inspired method with optimal control concepts for finding more sustainable operating trajectories. The sustainability assessment of process operating points is carried out by using the U.S. EPA’s Gauging Reaction Effectiveness for the ENvironmental Sustainability of Chemistries with a multi-Objective Process Evaluator (GREENSCOPE tool that provides scores for the selected indicators in the economic, material efficiency, environmental and energy areas. The indicator scores describe process performance on a sustainability measurement scale, effectively determining which operating point is more sustainable if there are more than several steady states for one specific product manufacturing. Through comparisons between a representative benchmark and the optimal steady states obtained through the implementation of the proposed controller, a systematic decision can be made in terms of whether the implementation of the controller is moving the process towards a more sustainable operation. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is illustrated through a case study of a continuous fermentation process for fuel production, whose material and energy time variation models are characterized by multiple steady states and oscillatory conditions.

  11. Weed detection using unmanned aircraft vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pflanz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to agricultural remote sensing technologies, which are based on images from satellites or manned aircrafts, photogrammetry at low altitude from unmanned aircraft vehicles lead to higher spatial resolution, real-time processing and lower costs. Moreover multicopter aircrafts are suitable vehicles to perform precise path or stationary flights. In terms of vegetation photogrammetry this minimises motion blur and provide better image overlapping for stitching and mapping procedures. Through improved image analyses and through the recent increase in the availability of powerful batteries, microcontrollers and multispectral cameras, it can be expected in future that spatial mapping of weeds from low altitudes will be promoted. A small unmanned aircraft vehicle with a modified RGB camera was tested taking images from agricultural fields. A microcopter with six rotors was applied. The hexacopter in particular is GPS controlled and operates within predefined areas at given altitudes (from 5 to 10 m. Different scenarios of photogrammetrically weed detection have been carried out regarding to variable altitude, image resolution, weed and crop growth stages. First experiences with microcopter showed a high potential for site-specific weed control. Images analyses with regards to recognition of weed patches can be used to adapt herbicide applications to varying weed occurrence across a field.

  12. Weed ecology and population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A global rise in herbicide resistant weed genotypes, coupled with a growing demand for food produced with minimal external synthetic inputs, is driving producer interest in reducing reliance on herbicides for weed management. An improved understanding of weed ecology can support the design of weed s...

  13. Biological control and sustainable food production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bale, J.S.; Lenteren, van J.C.; Bigler, F.

    2008-01-01

    The use of biological control for the management of pest insects pre-dates the modern pesticide era. The first major successes in biological control occurred with exotic pests controlled by natural enemy species collected from the country or area of origin of the pest (classical control).

  14. Effect of tillage system on yield and weed populations of soybean ( Glycin Max L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Z; Firouzi, Saeed; Aminpanah, Hashem; Sadeghnejhad, Hamid R

    2016-03-01

    Field experiment was conducted at Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Center of Golestan Province, Iran, to determine the effects of tillage system and weed management regime on yield and weed populations in soybean ( Glycin max L.). The experimental design was a split plot where the whole plot portion was a randomized complete block with three replicates. Main plots were tillage system: 1- No-till row crop seeding, 2- No-till seed drilling, 3- Tillage with disc harrow and drill planting, 4- Tillage with chisel packer and drill planting. The subplots were weed management regimes: 1-Weed control with herbicide application, 2- Hand weeding, 3- Herbicide application plus hand weeding, and 4- Non-weeding. Results indicated that the main effects of tillage system and weed management regime were significant for seed yield, pod number per plant, seed number per pod, weed density and biomass, while their interaction were significant only for weed density, weed biomass, and seed number per pod. The highest grain yields (3838 kg ha-1) were recorded for No-till row crop seeding. The highest seed yield (3877 kg ha-1) also was recorded for weed control with herbicide and hand weeding treatment, followed by hand weeding (3379 kg ha-1).

  15. Controle de plantas daninhas em feijão num sistema de rotação culturas em plantio direto Weed control in beans in a no-tillage crop rotation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito N. Rodrigues

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar culturas de inverno para formação de cobertura morta que reduza a população de plantas daninhas na cultura do feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris. Ocupou-se o terreno durante o ano todo, com a sucessão, em plantio direto, de pousio ou cultura de inverno/feijão/cultura para silagem, estudando-se três modalidades de controle de plantas daninhas na cultura do feijão. A maior renda líquida acumulada após duas safras foi obtida com feijão semeado sobre palha de aveia-preta e controle de plantas daninhas com um gramicida pré-emergente, completando-se com capinas, quando necessário.This study was undertaken to select winter crops for mulching to reduce the weed infestation and to lower weed control costs in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris production. The soil was kept convered all the year under no-tillage with a sequence of a winter crop or fallow/beans/silage crop. Three weed control methods for beans were studied. After two complete crop sequences, the highest total net income was obtained with the beans directly drilled on the black oats (Avena strigosa mulching, spraying a pre-emergence grasskiller plus hoeing when needed.

  16. Hierarchical Model Predictive Control for Sustainable Building Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Mayer; Michaela Killian; Martin Kozek

    2017-01-01

    A hierarchicalmodel predictive controller (HMPC) is proposed for flexible and sustainable building automation. The implications of a building automation system for sustainability are defined, and model predictive control is introduced as an ideal tool to cover all requirements. The HMPC is presented as a development suitable for the optimization of modern buildings, as well as retrofitting. The performance and flexibility of the HMPC is demonstrated by simulation studies of a modern office bu...

  17. Pendimethalin aplicado à casca de arroz e serragem para o controle de plantas daninhas em Ixora chinensis Lam. Pendimethalin applied on rice husks and sawdust for weed control on Ixora chinensis Lam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Seixas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A aplicação de herbicidas residuais à coberturas mortas pode aumentar a eficiência desses materiais no manejo da comunidade infestante. Objetivou-se, com este trabalho, avaliar a possibilidade de aplicação do pendimethalin à casca de arroz e à serragem para o controle de plantas daninhas em Ixora chinensis. Dois experimentos foram conduzidos aplicando-se o pendimethalin às coberturas mortas através de embebição e pulverização do herbicida, variando-se também a quantidade de cobertura utilizada. As espécies de plantas daninhas que ocorreram com maior frequência foram Alternanthera tenella, Blainvillea rhomboidea, Cenchrus echinatus e Commelina benghalensis. Há possibilidade de aplicação do herbicida pendimethalin à palha de arroz ou à serragem para controle de plantas daninhas em I. chinensis, principalmente quando ocorrem chuvas regulares e bem distribuídas. Há evidências de que a embebição da cobertura morta no herbicida seja um pouco mais eficiente no controle das plantas daninhas que a sua pulverização sobre a cobertura. Possivelmente, a quantidade de cobertura morta utilizada influencia na eficiência de controle, apesar deste fato não ter ficado claro neste trabalho.Applying herbicides at mulches may increase the efficiency of these materials for weed management. The objective of this research was to evaluate the possibility of pendimethalin applied on rice husks and sawdust for weed control on Ixora chinensis. In two field trials, pendimethalin was applied to the mulches through imbibition and spraying herbicide, also varying the amount of mulches. Higher frequent weeds were Alternanthera tenella, Blainvillea rhomboidea, Cenchrus echinatus and Commelina benghalensis. There are possibility of pendimethalin application on rice husks or sawdust for controlling weeds in I. chinensis mainly when regular and well-distributed rainfalls occur. There are evidences that the imbibition of these mulches to the herbicide

  18. Weed-cover versus weed-removal management in olive orchards: influence on the carbon balance at the ecosystem scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, Sonia; Serrano-Ortiz, Penélope; Vicente-Vicente, José Luis; Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; López-Ballesteros, Ana; Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2016-04-01

    value of NEE (26 and 23 g C m-2). Regarding the annual balance, significant differences were found in NEE between both treatments. The weed cover treatment showed 1.6 times higher annual net C assimilation (-132 g C m-2) than the weed removal treatment (-83 g C m-2). These results highlight the importance of sustainable management practices in agriculture to strengthen the behavior of cropping systems as C sinks.

  19. Role of herbicide-resistant crops in integrated weed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical weed control began with the use of 2,4-D in the mid-1940s. Since then, a wide array of herbicides has been commercialized and that has greatly contributed to increased crop yields. With the introduction of several new, more specific and more effective herbicides, the cost of weed control wi...

  20. Soil organic carbon stocks in coffee plantations under different weed control systemsEstoques de carbono orgânico do solo em cafezais sob diferentes sistemas de controle de plantas invasoras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciane Diniz Cogo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon (COS is an important indicator of soil quality, as its levels and stocks can change by soil preparation. This study aimed to evaluate COS stocks on a clayey Oxisol cultivated with coffee and subject to different weed control systems in southern Minas Gerais, Brazil. The experimental design was in randomized blocks, and weed control systems were: no weeding, manual weeding, pre-emergence herbicide, post-emergence herbicide, rotary tiller, rotary mowers and disk harrow. Undisturbed soil samples were collected at two positions in the coffee plantation (tire tracks and planting line, at depths of 0-3, 10-13, and 25-28 cm. A nearby native forest was sampled as a reference. A higher bulk density of soils under coffee plantations occurred compared to soil under the forest. There was little difference between COS concentrations in the plating line in relation to the native forest, but for the tire track position, the amount of COS was generally lower. After correction for soil compaction, it was estimated a loss of ca. 20% in SOC stock for te 0-30 cm depth for herbicide post-emergence, rotary tiller, manual weeding and disk barrow, and a 35% loss when using herbicide pre-emergence. SOC stocks under no weeding and rotary mowers did not differ from native forest (37 M-1g ha COS, indicating that the rotary mower, which allows temporary growth of weeds and does not disrupt soil structure, is the most appropriate weed control for the preservation of COS in coffee plantations.O carbono orgânico no solo (COS é um importante indicador da qualidade do solo, pois seus teores e estoques podem ser alterados conforme o sistema de preparo do solo. Objetivou-se neste trabalho avaliar os estoques de COS em um Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico argiloso cultivado com cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L e submetido a diferentes manejos de plantas invasoras no sul de Minas Gerais. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos ao acaso, sendo os tratamentos os

  1. Métodos de controle de plantas invasoras na cultura do cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L. e componentes da acidez do solo Weed control methods and soil acidity components in coffee plantation (Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elifas Nunes Alcântara

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Em lavouras perenes, como na cultura do cafeeiro, o controle de plantas invasoras tem sido feito por meio de métodos manuais, mecanizados, químicos e associações destes. De modo geral, têm-se avaliado os diferentes métodos sob o ponto de vista de eficiência e de custo no controle das plantas invasoras; no entanto, a influência deles sobre as condições químicas do solo, praticamente, não tem sido estudada, principalmente a longo prazo. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito de diferentes métodos de controle de plantas invasoras na cultura do cafeeiro sobre os componentes da acidez de um Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico da região de São Sebastião do Paraíso, MG. Sete tratamentos de controle de plantas invasoras foram avaliados: roçadora (RÇ, grade (GR, enxada rotativa (RT, herbicida de pós-emergência (HC, herbicida de pré-emergência (HR, capina manual (CM e testemunha sem capina (SC, dispostos em blocos casualizados com três repetições. Amostras de solo, em cada tratamento, foram coletadas a cada dois anos, a partir de 1980, nas camadas de 0-0,15 e 0,15-0,30 m, para avaliação de pH, Al3+, acidez potencial (H + Al e saturação por Al3+ (m. O sistema HR aumentou o teor e a saturação por Al3+ e a acidez potencial e diminuiu o pH, quando comparado com os demais métodos de controle de plantas invasoras, principalmente com a testemunha (SC. O tratamento SC mostrou efeito contrário ao do HR, aumentando os valores de pH e diminuindo o teor de Al3+ e a saturação por Al3+, em ambas as camadas de solo. O RÇ foi o tratamento que mais se aproximou do SC, e os demais tratamentos, no geral, não apresentaram comportamento diferenciado.In perennial agriculture, such as coffee plantation, weeds are controlled by hand, mechanized, and chemical weeding and their combinations. Methods that differ in terms of efficiency and costs have been evaluated; however, the influence of these methods on the soil chemical conditions has

  2. Sistemas de dessecação antecedendo a semeadura direta de milho e controle de plantas daninhas Desiccation systems prior to no-till corn sowing and weed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Constantin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available No sistema de plantio direto, a escolha do momento adequado para a dessecação da cobertura vegetal antecedente à semeadura é fundamental para o êxito da cultura do milho. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos sobre a cultura do milho de três sistemas de dessecação de manejo antecedendo o plantio direto combinados com três métodos de controle de plantas daninhas, em áreas com alta densidade de infestação de ervas. Os tratamentos foram arranjados em esquema fatorial (3x3 + 1, em delineamento de blocos casualizados, com cinco repetições. Os três sistemas de dessecação avaliados foram: (1 dessecação de manejo realizada imediatamente antes da semeadura - sistema Aplique-Plante ("AP"; (2 dessecação de manejo realizada sete dias antes da semeadura direta (DAS ("7 DAS"; e (3 manejo antecipado ("MA", quando as dessecações foram realizadas aos 25 e 1 DAS do milho. Após a emergência da cultura, as opções de controle foram: (1 nenhum controle de plantas daninhas; (2 capina manual e (3 aplicação de mesotrione + atrazine + óleo mineral em pós-emergência, além de uma testemunha sem manejo e sem controle em pós-emergência. Verificou-se que, após a emergência da cultura, a utilização do MA proporcionou maior controle das plantas daninhas, em comparação com os sistemas AP e 7 DAS. Evidenciou-se um atraso de crescimento nas plantas de milho crescidas nas áreas onde foi utilizado o sistema AP. Observou ainda que, independentemente do método de controle de plantas daninhas utilizado em pós-emergência, os maiores rendimentos de grãos de milho ocorreram no MA com ganhos que variaram entre 593 a 1060 kg ha-1.The adequate timing for cover crop management before sowing is fundamental for the success of no-till corn. This research aimed to evaluate the effects on corn growth and yield of three burndown systems before no-till sowing, combined with three weeds control methods after crop emergence, in areas with high

  3. Application of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanoparticles containing atrazine herbicide as an alternative technique to control weeds and reduce damage to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Anderson E S; Grillo, Renato; Mello, Nathalie F S; Rosa, Andre H; Fraceto, Leonardo F

    2014-03-15

    Nanoparticles of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) containing the herbicide atrazine were prepared, characterized, and evaluated in terms of their herbicidal activity and genotoxicity. The stability of the nanoparticles was evaluated over a period of three months, considering the variables: size, polydispersion index, pH, and encapsulation efficiency. Tests on plants were performed with target (Brassica sp.) and non-target (Zea mays) organisms, and the nanoparticle formulations were shown to be effective for the control of the target species. Experiments using soil columns revealed that the use of nanoparticles reduced the mobility of atrazine in the soil. Application of the Allium cepa chromosome aberration assay demonstrated that the nanoparticle systems were able to reduce the genotoxicity of the herbicide. The formulations developed offer a useful means of controlling agricultural weeds, while at the same time reducing the risk of harm to the environment and human health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sustainable Innovation, Management Accounting and Control Systems, and International Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Lopez-Valeiras

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes how Management Accounting and Control Systems (MACS facilitate the appropriation of the benefits of sustainable innovations in organizations. In particular, this paper examines the moderating role of different types of MACS in the relationships between sustainable innovation and international performance at an organizational level. We collected survey data from 123 Spanish and Portuguese organizations. Partial Least Square was used to analyze the data. Results show that the effect of sustainable innovations on international performance is enhanced by contemporary rather than traditional types of MACS. Overall our findings show that MACS can help managers to develop and monitor organizational activities (e.g., costumer services and distribution activities, which support the appropriation of the potential benefits from sustainable innovation. This paper responds to recent calls for in-depth studies about the organizational mechanism that may enhance the success of sustainable innovation.

  5. Cultivos intercalares e controle de plantas daninhas em plantios de maracujá-amarelo Intercropping and weed control in yellow passion fruit orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelise de Almeida Lima

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se identificar cultivos intercalares e métodos integrados de controle de plantas daninhas em maracujá-amarelo (Passiflora edulis Sims f. flavicarpa Deg. como fatores que viabilizem a sua produção e rentabilidade. O experimento foi instalado em maio de 1999, conduzido em espaldeira vertical com um fio de arame a 2,0m do solo, no espaçamento de 2,5m x 5,0m, em blocos casualizados, com seis tratamentos e quatro repetições, sendo T1: milho (Zea mays L. - BR 106 como cultura intercalar; T2: feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris L. - cultivar Pérola como cultura intercalar; T3: feijão-de-porco nas entrelinhas e capina com enxada nas linhas; T4: feijão-de-porco nas entrelinhas e controle químico nas linhas (glifosate a 1,5 kg/ha; T5: planta daninha controlada quimicamente (em toda a parcela com alachlor a 2,8 kg/ha + diuron a 1,2 kg/ha em pré-emergência e glifosate a 1,5 kg/ha em pós-emergência; e T6: testemunha (capina com enxada em área total. Os dados analisados, no período de produção (maio de 1999 a abril de 2000, mostraram que não houve diferenças estatísticas entre os tratamentos para produtividade (indústria, peso médio, comprimento e diâmetro dos frutos, sólidos solúveis totais e acidez. Contudo, houve significância para produtividade total e in natura, com destaque para a utilização do feijão como cultura intercalar, com produtividade do maracujazeiro de 12,82 t/ha. Tanto o milho como o feijão podem ser recomendados como culturas intercalares no primeiro ano de cultivo do maracujá-amarelo. Os herbicidas aplicados em pré e pós-emergência foram economicamente viáveis e não mostraram efeito tóxico sobre as plantas de maracujá-amarelo.This work aimed identifying crops for intercropping and integrated methods for weed control in yellow passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims f. flavicarpa Deg. orchard, that will favor its production and profitability. The experiment was set up in May 1999, with the plants

  6. Index of tobacco control sustainability (ITCS): a tool to measure the sustainability of national tobacco control programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Morris, Angela; Latif, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    To produce a tool to assess and guide sustainability of national tobacco control programmes. A two-stage process adapting the Delphi and Nominal group techniques. A series of indicators of tobacco control sustainability were identified in grantee/country advisor reports to The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease under the Bloomberg Initiative to Reduce Tobacco Control (2007-2015). Focus groups and key informant interviews in seven low and middle-income countries (52 government and civil society participants) provided consensus ratings of the indicators' relative importance. Data were reviewed and the indicators were accorded relative weightings to produce the 'Index of Tobacco Control Sustainability' (ITCS). All 31 indicators were considered 'Critical' or 'Important' by the great majority of participants. There was consensus that a tool to measure progress towards tobacco control sustainability was important. The most critical indicators related to financial policies and allocations, a national law, a dedicated national tobacco control unit and civil society tobacco control network, a national policy against tobacco industry 'Corporate Social Responsibility' (CSR), national mortality and morbidity data, and national policy evaluation mechanisms. The 31 indicators were agreed to be 'critical' or 'important' factors for tobacco control sustainability. The Index comprises the weighted indicators as a tool to identify aspects of national tobacco control programmes requiring further development to augment their sustainability and to measure and compare progress over time. The next step is to apply the ITCS and produce tobacco control sustainability assessments. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Microwave Technologies as Part of an Integrated Weed Management Strategy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Brodie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in controlling weed plants using radio frequency or microwave energy has been growing in recent years because of the growing concerns about herbicide resistance and chemical residues in the environment. This paper reviews the prospects of using microwave energy to manage weeds. Microwave energy effectively kills weed plants and their seeds; however, most studies have focused on applying the microwave energy over a sizable area, which requires about ten times the energy that is embodied in conventional chemical treatments to achieve effective weed control. A closer analysis of the microwave heating phenomenon suggests that thermal runaway can reduce microwave weed treatment time by at least one order of magnitude. If thermal runaway can be induced in weed plants, the energy costs associated with microwave weed management would be comparable with chemical weed control.

  8. Organic Versus Conventional Methods of Fertilization and Weed Control in a Long Term Rotation of Cereals in Semiarid Spain Comparación de Métodos Convencionales y Orgánicos de Fertilización y Control de Malezas en una Rotación de Larga Duración de Cereales en Secano, España

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Pardo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Under semiarid conditions the response of cereal crops to chemical fertilizers and weed control practices with herbicides is often reduced. In fact, the economic profitability of agricultural production in many dryland regions is critically affected by high costs of inputs and low crop yields. As a solution, cropping systems like organic farming, obtaining similar yields and promoting environmental sustainability by reducing fertilizer and herbicides, could be an alternative to conventional systems. In this study, 23 trials were performed in five semiarid regions of Spain during 5 yr to compare different fertilizers and weed control methods on durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf. and barley (Hordeum vulgare L. yields. The following rotation pattern was developed on the experimental plots: fallow-barley-ground ploughed vetch (Vicia sativa L.-durum wheat. Plots either received organic fertilizer, chemical fertilizer, or no fertilizer. In addition, three levels of weed control were applied in cereal plots: flex-tine harrow tillage, conventional herbicide, and no weeding. The results indicated that neither the fertilization nor the weed control have effect on the yield crop.En condiciones de clima semiárido, la agricultura de cereal tiene una reducida rentabilidad debido a los escasos rendimientos y elevados costes de abonos y herbicidas. Dado que las condiciones climáticas impiden incrementar estos rendimientos, la viabilidad económica y la sostenibilidad ambiental de la agricultura en estas regiones pasan por reducir el coste de los insumos o por conseguir precios del producto superiores mediante la obtención de un certificado ecológico para su comercialización. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de 23 ensayos de un experimento de 5 años localizado en cinco zonas semiáridas representativas de la agricultura española de secano. El objetivo del trabajo fue comparar los efectos de diferentes métodos de fertilización y control de

  9. Utilização de chama para controle de plantas daninhas emersas em ambiente aquático Using flame for control of emerged aquatic weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Marchi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Dois estudos foram conduzidos com o objetivo de avaliar os efeitos da aplicação de chama no controle de Eichhornia crassipes, Brachiaria subquadripara, Pistia stratiotes e Salvinia auriculata. No primeiro estudo foram utilizadas diferentes doses de chama, representadas pela quantidade de gás consumida durante a aplicação, e, no segundo, usaramse duas aplicações de chama em intervalo de 14 dias, uma aplicação seqüencial (intervalo de sete dias e aplicação única. As diferentes doses, tanto no primeiro quanto no segundo, foram comparadas com plantas que não receberam nenhum tratamento térmico. Avaliações de injúria foram realizadas aos 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 21 e 30 após a aplicação dos tratamentos, sendo realizadas também avaliações das biomassas secas das plantas aquáticas remanescentes em cada tratamento, ao final dos ensaios. No primeiro estudo foram observadas reduções significativas na produção da biomassa seca das espécies E. crassipes, B. subquadripara e P. stratiotes tratadas com as maiores doses referentes aos consumos de gás. Doses menores não diferiram estatisticamente da testemunha quanto à produção de biomassa seca, exceção feita para a espécie P. stratiotes. Todas as aplicações seqüenciais proporcionaram redução acima de 90% na produção da biomassa seca de E. crassipes e B. subquadripara. As aplicações seqüenciais e únicas proporcionaram reduções abaixo de 37% na produção da biomassa seca de S. auriculata. Os resultados demonstraram que existe a possibilidade de se utilizar o controle físico através da aplicação de chama como alternativa no manejo de plantas daninhas em ambientes aquáticos.Two trials were carried out to evaluate the effect of flame weeding on Eichhornia crassipes, Brachiaria subquadripara, Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia auriculata. In the first trial, different doses of flame were applied, according to the amount of gas consumed during application. In the second

  10. Automated intelligent rotor tine cultivation and punch planting to improve the selectivity of mechanical intra-row weed control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Griepentrog, Hans W.; Nielsen, Jon

    2012-01-01

    -GPS relative to geo-referenced sugar beets. Tines were moved into the row when there was enough space between crop plants to cultivate and kept outside when they were predicted to strike a crop plant. The selectivity of the cycloid hoe was tested against two machine variants without intelligent guidance...... in sugar beet and carrot crops showed no synergistic effects between plant establishment procedures and selectivity of post-emergence weed harrowing. Even if punch planting and automated intelligent rotor tine cultivation were not combined, the results indicated that there was no reason to believe......There is much research on technical aspects related to sensor and mapping techniques, which enable so-called intelligent cultivators to target the intra-row spaces within crop rows. This study investigates (i) an expected advantage of an intelligent rotor tine cultivator (the cycloid hoe) in terms...

  11. Cover crops and natural vegetation mulch effect achieved by mechanical management with lateral rotary mower in weed population dynamics in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheis, Héctor Alonso San Martín; Filho, Ricardo Victoria

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information on practical weed management in order to reduce the use of herbicides thereby contributing to the sustainable development of citrus crop. The experiment was carried out under field conditions at the experimental area of the Department of Vegetal Production at the College of Agriculture "Luiz de Queiroz," Piracicaba, SP, Brazil, during the season 2002-2003. Influence of mulches produced by four types of vegetations on the dynamic population of weeds in the line of citrus crop (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) was evaluated. The experimental design was of factorial randomized blocks (4 x 2), where the treatments were: (i) four types of vegetation: Dolichos lablab L., Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp, Penisetum glaucum (L.) Leeke, and the natural infestation composed basically by Panicum maximum Jacq.; and (ii) two types of fertilization: directed under canopy and broadcast. Mechanical management of the different vegetations was accomplished using a lateral rotary mower, KAMAQ, I model NINJA MAC 260, projected to release the green cut material under crop canopy, forming a mulch layer. The studied parameters were: (i) counting of weeds per m2 in the crop line after 30, 60, 90, 180, and 210 days following the cutting of existing vegetation; (ii) percentage of covered area by weeds; and (iii) some chemical properties of the soil. It was observed that the natural infestation showed a better weed control when compared with the other treatments, and that the broadcast fertilization, regardless of coverage used, presented a lower number of weeds.

  12. Silvicultural treatments for black spruce establishment in boreal Ontario: Effects of weed control, stock type, and planting season. NODA/NFP technical report No. TR-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, J.E.; Mitchell, E.G.

    1995-12-31

    Describes four field experiments carried out to assess the performance of black spruce (Picea mariana) outplants in relation to weed control (with or without), stock type (bareroot or paper pot), and planting season (spring versus summer). In one experiment, planting position (centre versus side) within mechanically site-prepared corridors was evaluated. The 1,800 seedlings planted in each of the four experiments were assessed after five and 11 growing seasons in the field (north-eastern Ontario`s boreal forest region). Three of the experimental sites are on upland, mixedwood, herb-rich plots; the fourth is on a feathermoss-Sphagnum site type. Performance results are presented in terms of such factors as total height, height increment, basal diameter, mortality, and competition index.

  13. Organic Agriculture and the Quest for the Holy Grail in Water-Limited Ecosystems: Managing Weeds and Reducing Tillage Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Lehnhoff

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic agricultural production has become a major economic and cultural force. However, in water-limited environments the tools used for weed control and nutrient supply, namely tillage and cover crops, may not be environmentally or economically sustainable as tillage damages soil and cover crops use valuable water. Thus, a major challenge has been finding appropriate ways to minimize tillage and terminate cover crops while still controlling weeds and obtaining cover crop ecosystem services. One approach to achieve this is through the economically viable integration of crop and livestock enterprises to manage weeds and terminate cover crops. In this article we (1 review research needs and knowledge gaps in organic agriculture with special focus on water-limited environments; (2 summarize research aimed at developing no-till and reduced tillage in organic settings; (3 assess approaches to integrate crop and livestock production in organic systems; and (4 present initial results from a project assessing the agronomic and weed management challenges of integrated crop-livestock organic systems aimed at reducing tillage intensity in a water-limited environment. The goal of eliminating tillage in water-limited environments remains elusive, and more research is needed to successfully integrate tactics, such as cover crops and livestock grazing to increase organic farm sustainability.

  14. Evolutionary Agroecology: the potential for cooperative, high density, weed-suppressing cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Jacob; Andersen, Sven B; Wille, Wibke K-M; Griepentrog, Hans W; Olsen, Jannie M

    2010-09-01

    Evolutionary theory can be applied to improve agricultural yields and/or sustainability, an approach we call Evolutionary Agroecology. The basic idea is that plant breeding is unlikely to improve attributes already favored by millions of years of natural selection, whereas there may be unutilized potential in selecting for attributes that increase total crop yield but reduce plants' individual fitness. In other words, plant breeding should be based on group selection. We explore this approach in relation to crop-weed competition, and argue that it should be possible to develop high density cereals that can utilize their initial size advantage over weeds to suppress them much better than under current practices, thus reducing or eliminating the need for chemical or mechanical weed control. We emphasize the role of density in applying group selection to crops: it is competition among individuals that generates the 'Tragedy of the Commons', providing opportunities to improve plant production by selecting for attributes that natural selection would not favor. When there is competition for light, natural selection of individuals favors a defensive strategy of 'shade avoidance', but a collective, offensive 'shading' strategy could increase weed suppression and yield in the high density, high uniformity cropping systems we envision.

  15. Analysis of Satellite and Airborne Imagery for Detection of Water Hyacinth and Other Invasive Floating Macrophytes and Tracking of Aquatic Weed Control Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Waterways of the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta have recently become infested with invasive aquatic weeds such as floating water hyacinth (Eichhoria crassipes) and water primrose (Ludwigia peploides). These invasive plants cause many negative impacts, including, but not limited to: the blocking of waterways for commercial shipping and boating; clogging of irrigation screens, pumps and canals; and degradation of biological habitat through shading. Zhang et al. (1997, Ecological Applications, 7(3), 1039-1053) used NASA Landsat satellite imagery together with field calibration measurements to map physical and biological processes within marshlands of the San Francisco Bay. Live green biomass (LGB) and related variables were correlated with a simple vegetation index ratio of red and near infra-red bands from Landsat images. More recently, the percent (water area) cover of water hyacinth plotted against estimated LGB of emergent aquatic vegetation in the Delta from September 2014 Landsat imagery showed an 80 percent overall accuracy. For the past two years, we have partnered with the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Plant Sciences, University of California at Davis to conduct new validation surveys of water hyacinth and water primrose coverage and LGB in Delta waterways. A plan is underway to transfer decision support tools developed at NASA's Ames Research Center based on Landsat satellite images to improve Delta-wide integrated management of floating aquatic weeds, while reducing chemical control costs. The main end-user for this application project will be the Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) of the California Department of Parks and Recreation, who has the responsibility for chemical control of water hyacinth in the Delta.

  16. Herbicide-resistant weed management: focus on glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckie, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    This review focuses on proactive and reactive management of glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds. Glyphosate resistance in weeds has evolved under recurrent glyphosate usage, with little or no diversity in weed management practices. The main herbicide strategy for proactively or reactively managing GR weeds is to supplement glyphosate with herbicides of alternative modes of action and with soil-residual activity. These herbicides can be applied in sequences or mixtures. Proactive or reactive GR weed management can be aided by crop cultivars with alternative single or stacked herbicide-resistance traits, which will become increasingly available to growers in the future. Many growers with GR weeds continue to use glyphosate because of its economical broad-spectrum weed control. Government farm policies, pesticide regulatory policies and industry actions should encourage growers to adopt a more proactive approach to GR weed management by providing the best information and training on management practices, information on the benefits of proactive management and voluntary incentives, as appropriate. Results from recent surveys in the United States indicate that such a change in grower attitudes may be occurring because of enhanced awareness of the benefits of proactive management and the relative cost of the reactive management of GR weeds. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Weed management in Solanaceae crops in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, M Júlia

    2008-01-01

    Portugal has very good climatic-edafic conditions for Solanaceae crops, regarding to either yield quality or quantity. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) are the most social-economically important Solanaceae and aubergine (Solanum melongena L.) area of cultivation is increasing. Tomato is cultivated for fresh consumption and, primarily, for industrial processing. Is one of the most profitable vegetable crop and the main vegetable for industry. Potato is the annual vegetable crop with the largest cultivated area. Pepper is one of the main crops for vegetable frozen industry. Tomato, pepper and aubergine are cultivated in the field (outdoor) in Spring-Summer season. In greenhouses, they're also grown during other months and, at the southmost region (Algarve), during the whole year. Potato is cultivated almost the whole year through. Weed management is essential to achieve yield rentability and, for crops growing in the field, herbicides play an important role, due to their efficacy or inherent limitations of other control measures. This paper presents the state of art, in Portugal, regarding to some cultural and social-economical aspects of these crops (e.g., cultivated areas, productions, main producer regions), main weeds, weed control methods and, in particular, registered herbicides, with indication of their usage conditions (application timings and spectrum of weeds controlled) according to the principles of Good Plant Protection Practice and Integrated Weed Management.

  18. ORGANIC VERSUS CONVENTIONAL METHODS OF FERTILIZATION AND WEED CONTROL IN A LONG TERM ROTATION OF CEREALS IN SEMIARID SPAIN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabriel Pardo; Joaquín Aibar; Pilar Ciria; Carlos Lacasta; Juan Antonio Lezaún; Carlos Zaragoza

    2011-01-01

    .... As a solution, cropping systems like organic farming, obtaining similar yields and promoting environmental sustainability by reducing fertilizer and herbicides, could be an alternative to conventional systems...

  19. Weed occurrence on pavements in five North European towns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melander, B.; Holst, N.; Grundy, A.; Kempenaar, C.; Riemens, M.M.; Verschwele, A.; Hansson, D.

    2009-01-01

    Weeds on pavements in urban areas are unwanted mainly because they cause an untidy appearance or sometimes structural damage. Glyphosate has been the principal weed control method for years, but policies in several European towns have changed to lower dependence on herbicides. Instead, less

  20. Effect of different weed management techniques on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The weed management techniques included slashing at 8-weekly intervals, mulching alone, glyphosate + slashing, glyphosate + mulching, glyphosate alone and a weed-free control. Glyphosate + mulching proved to have the greatest positive influence on plant height, plant girth, leaf area and number of leaves throughout ...

  1. Weed biocontrol in the EU: from serendipity to strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological control of weeds is a globally-recognized approach to the management of the worst invasive plants in the world. Unfortunately, accidental introduction of agents account for most weed biocontrol in the EU, but do include a number of current or emerging successes. From the redistribution of...

  2. Using evolution to generate sustainable malaria control with spatial repellents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Penelope Anne; Boots, Mike

    2016-10-25

    Evolution persistently undermines vector control programs through insecticide resistance. Here we propose a novel strategy which instead exploits evolution to generate and sustain new control tools. Effective spatial repellents are needed to keep vectors out of houses. Our approach generates such new repellents by combining a high-toxicity insecticide with a candidate repellent initially effective against only part of the vector population. By killing mosquitoes that enter treated properties the insecticide selects for vector phenotypes deflected by the repellent, increasing efficacy of the repellent against the target vector population and in turn protecting the insecticide against the spread of insecticide resistance. Using such evolved spatial repellents offers an evolutionarily sustainable, 'double-dip' system of disease control combining mortality and repellence. We formalize this idea using models which explore vector population genetics and disease transmission probabilities and show that using evolved spatial repellents is theoretically achievable, effective and sustainable.

  3. A weed compaction roller system for use with mechanical herbicide application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam H. Wiese; Daniel A. Netzer; Don E. Riemenschneider; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny

    2006-01-01

    We designed, constructed, and field-tested a versatile and unique weed compaction roller system that can be used with mechanical herbicide application for invasive weed control in tree plantations, agronomic settings, and areas where localized flora and fauna are in danger of elimination from the landscape. The weed compaction roller system combined with herbicide...

  4. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 07: fire and weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Sutherland

    2004-01-01

    Weed infestations cause an economic loss of $13 billion per year even though $9.5 billion per year is spent on weed control measures. In addition to these economic costs, weeds are replacing native species, altering native plant and animal communities, affecting ecosystem health and function, threatening biodiversity and Threatened, Endangered, and Sensitive (TES)...

  5. The effect of environmental conditions on the seasonal dormancy pattern and germination of weed seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Weeds cause considerable losses in horticultural and agricultural crops. Weeds are still predominantly controlled with herbicides. To reduce the use of chemicals, a better understanding of the biology of weeds is required. In this thesis the effect of environmental conditions on dormancy

  6. Economics of weed suppressive rice cultivars in flood- and furrow-irrigated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeds are a major constraint to rice production. In the U.S, weeds in rice are controlled primarily with synthetic herbicides. Intensive herbicide application in rice also has many potential drawbacks, resulting in environmental pollution, human health concerns, and development of weed resistance. B...

  7. Environmental and socio-economic impact of aquatic weeds on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physico-chemical assessment of water samples of the dam was done at dry and wet season in replicates. Water samples were collected from weed infested areas and also from the control site devoid of weed, using Standard laboratory methods. Field survey was done to determine the aquatic weed species present on ...

  8. Narrow rows reduce biomass and seed production of weeds and increase maize yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mashingaidze, A.B.; Werf, van der W.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Chipomho, J.; Kropff, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Smallholder farmers in southern African countries rely primarily on cultural control and hoe weeding to combat weeds, but often times, they are unable to keep up with the weeding requirements of the crop because of its laboriousness, causing them to incur major yield losses. Optimisation of crop

  9. Critical period for weed control in potatoes in the Huambo Province (Angola Período crítico do controle de infestantes na cultura da batateira na Província do Huambo (Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Monteiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different weed management periods on potatoes were studied in three areas (Bailundo, Chianga and Calenga of the central highlands of Angola and in three cropping seasons, from June 2005 to May 2007. Six weed-management treatments were used to identify critical periods of competition and to allow the development of more precise management recommendations. Total potato yield ranged from about 22 t ha-1 in weed-free plots to about 3 t ha-1 with no weed control a yield loss of 86%. Major weed species Galinsoga parviflora, Cyperus esculentus, Bidens biternata, Amaranthus hybridus, Nicandra physaloides, Portulaca oleracea and Datura stramonium differed from area to area. The species G. parviflora dominated the weed flora in all three areas 73, 97 and 72 plants m² 50 days after crop emergence in Bailundo, Chianga and Calenga respectively, in dry season trials; while C. esculentus was also present in Chianga and Calenga, with an average density of ca 30 plants m-2 in dry season trials. Gompertz and logistic equations were fitted to data representing increasing periods of weed-free growth and weed interference, respectively. Critical periods for weed control, with a 95% weed-free total yield, were estimated from 26 to 66 and from 20 to 61 days after emergence for the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. Weed competition before or after these critical periods had negligible effects on crop yield.Com o objectivo de obter recomendações mais precisas para a gestão das infestantes na cultura da batata 'Romano' avaliou-se o efeito de diferentes períodos de controle e de convivência em três locais do Planalto Central de Angola e em três épocas de crescimento da cultura. O delineamento experimental, por local, consistiu em blocos casualizados com três repetições. Os tratamentos consistiram de seis intervalos de controle nos quais a cultura foi mantida livre de infestantes e após cada período estas foram deixadas crescer livremente; e

  10. Aumento da população de plantas e uso de herbicidas no controle de plantas daninhas em milho Increase of plant population and use of herbicides to control weeds in corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Merotto Junior

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a capacidade de controle de plantas daninhas efetuada pelo aumento da população de plantas de milho em associação com diferentes métodos de controle de plantas daninhas. O experimento foi conduzido em Lages (SC sob o delineamento de blocos ao acaso em parcelas subdivididas. Nas parcelas principais foram alocados os métodos de controle de plantas daninhas: 1 sem controle; 2 atrazine + metolachlor (1,4 + 2,1 kg/h a em pré emergência; 3 nicosulfuron (60 g/ ha em pós - emergência; 4 atrazine + metolachlor em pré emergência e nicosulfuron em pós-emergência; e 5 capina até o florescimento. Nas sub parcelas foram alocadas as populações de plantas: 35.000, 50.000, 68.000 e 80.000 plantas ha-1. O aumento da população de plantas foi mais efetivo na diminuição da matéria seca de plantas daninhas nos tratamentos sem controle e com herbicida em pré emergência. As plantas daninhas promoveram maiores decréscimos no rendimento de grão s de milho na população de 80000 plantas ha-1, onde a competição com plantas daninhas somou-se à competição intraespecífica que também é maior do que nas menores populações . O uso de altas populações de plantas diminui a competição com plantas daninhas , mas deve ser complementado com outros métodos de controle no início do desenvolvimento da cultura.The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effectiveness of increasing corn plant population in association with differe nt methods to control weeds. The trial was conduted in Lages, SC, using a randomized complete block desing in a split plot arragement. Fiv e methods of weed control were located at the main plots: 1 check without control, 2 atrazine + metolachlor (1,4 + 2,1 kg/ha in pre-emergency, 3 nicosulfuron (60 g/ha in post emergency, 4 atrazine + metolachlor in pre-emergency and nicosulfuron in post emergency, and 5 hoeing up to flowerin g. Four plant population were tested at split

  11. Hierarchical Model Predictive Control for Sustainable Building Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mayer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchicalmodel predictive controller (HMPC is proposed for flexible and sustainable building automation. The implications of a building automation system for sustainability are defined, and model predictive control is introduced as an ideal tool to cover all requirements. The HMPC is presented as a development suitable for the optimization of modern buildings, as well as retrofitting. The performance and flexibility of the HMPC is demonstrated by simulation studies of a modern office building, and the perfect interaction with future smart grids is shown.

  12. Robotic intra-row weed hoeing in maize and sugar beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhards, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A prototype of robotic intra-row weed hoeing in maize and sugar beet is presented in this study. Weeds in the crop rows were identified using a bi-spectral image analysis system and shape analysis. Positions of weeds in the images were recorded. Selective weed control in the row was performed with a modified finger weeder driven by electrical motors. Speed of the finger weeder was increased at positions where only weeds were classified. The system was triggered by an encoder and controlled by a micro-controller.

  13. Transdisciplinary weed research: new leverage on challenging weed problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transdisciplinary Weed Research (TWR) is a promising path to more effective management of challenging weed problems. We define TWR as an integrated process of inquiry and action that addresses complex weed problems in the context of broader efforts to improve economic, environmental and social aspec...

  14. Transdisciplinary weed research: new leverage on challenging weed problems?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, N.; Schut, M.; Graham, S.; Barney, J.N.; Childs, D.Z.; Christensen, S.B.; Cousens, R.D.; Davis, A.S.; Eizenberg, H.; Ervin, D.E.; Fernandez-Quintanilla, C.; Harrison, L.J.; Harsch, M.A.; Heijting, S.; Liebman, M.; Loddo, D.; Mirsky, S.B.; Riemens, M.; Neve, P.; Peltzer, D.A.; Renton, M.; Williams, M.; Recasens, J.; Sønderskov, M.

    2016-01-01

    Transdisciplinary weed research (TWR) is a promising path to more effective management of challenging weed problems. We define TWR as an integrated process of inquiry and action that addresses complex weed problems in the context of broader efforts to improve economic, environmental and social

  15. Effect of plant spacing and weeding frequency on weed infestation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common bean is an important food and cash crop in eastern Ethiopia. However, its yield is constrained by weeds. Therefore, this study was conducted in 2012 main cropping season at Haramaya and Hirna research fields, eastern Ethiopia, to determine the effect of plant spacing and weeding frequency on weeds, yield ...

  16. Weeds and Wildlife: Perceptions and Practices of Weed Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma H Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative impacts of invasive plants or weeds on biodiversity have been well established yet their role in providing key habitats and resources for wildlife has been little understood. Weed removal thus has the potential to adversely affect wildlife but whether this is considered during weed management is poorly known. To determine the extent of this knowledge, we examined the perceptions of weed managers regarding wildlife and weed management in Victoria, Australia. We surveyed 81 weed managers of varying levels of experience from different types of organisations, including state and local government, community groups and private companies. We found 90% of managers had observed wildlife-weed interactions and that most (70% adjusted management programmes to accommodate wildlife. Despite this, few (19% had adopted the recommended practice of combining gradual weed removal with re-vegetation. While management programmes included monitoring of native vegetation, consideration of wildlife monitoring in weed management was rare. This highlights the need for management to better understand and respond to wildlife-weed relationships. If the improvement of wildlife habitat is included in the objectives of weed programmes, as it should be, then wildlife should also be incorporated in project monitoring. This would lead to a greater understanding of the role weeds and their management have in each situation and, ultimately, more informed decision making.

  17. Grass and weed killer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002838.htm Grass and weed killer poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Many weed killers contain dangerous chemicals that are harmful if ...

  18. Disponibilidad de agua, nitrógeno y azufre en barbechos con y sin control de malezas en distintos niveles de residuos Water, nitrogen and sulphur availability in fallows with and without weed control and different residue levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Fernández

    2009-06-01

    presence, ten experiments with different levels of residue (A: 10,000 kg MS ha-1, M: 5,000 kg MS ha-1, B: less than 2,000 kg MS ha-1 were set up in Haplustolls of the tosca and dune plains in La Pampa and south of Córdoba. Each residue treatment was divided into sub-plots with different weed management: without weed control (malezas and with control (barbecho. Soil texture, bulk density, permanent wilting pint, and organic matter were determined in each site. At the beginning and end of fallow soil water contents, nitrate (N and soluble and adsorbed sulphates (S were measured in samples from 0 -0.2m depth. At all sites the water content at the beginning of fallow was high (between 51 and 100% available water. Despite this, our results showed a positive effect of residue level on water contents at the end of fallow, with a mean difference between A and B of 33%. In weed treatments no effect of residue was observed, and the difference between A and B was 10%. Water contents were more strongly affected by the presence of weeds than by residue level. Available N and S contents showed no effect of residue level, but were strongly affected by weed presence. In weed treatments sunflower seeding would be severely limited by lower available water contents, and the expectable yields would be diminished by 200 kg ha-1 or 600 kg ha-1 due to the lower availability of N and S respectively.

  19. Misturas de herbicidas para o controle de plantas daninhas do gênero Commelina Herbicide mixtures to control weeds of the genus Commelina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Ronchi

    2002-08-01

    metsulfuron methyl (4 g ha-1; oxyfluorfen combined to sulfentrazone (480 + 375 g ha-1; sequential 21 day-spaced applications of (paraquat + diuron / (carfentrazone-ethyl + glyphosate (200+400 /(30+720 and (paraquat + diuron / (paraquat + diuron (200+400 / (200+400; and no herbicide application as check control. The percentage of weed control and shoot fresh weight were evaluated. The best treatments to control both species were the sequential applications of (paraquat + diuron / (carfentrazone-ethyl + glyphosate and of (paraquat + diuron / (paraquat + diuron, followed by 2.4-D + glyphosate and carfentrazone-ethyl + glyphosate or glyphosate-potassium salt mixtures.

  20. Effect of Serjania lethalis ethanolic extract on weed control Efeito do extrato etanólico de Serjania lethalis no controle de plantas daninhas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.U. Grisi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the ethanolic extract of Serjania lethalis leaves and stems on the diaspore germination and seedling growth of wild poinsettia (Euphorbia heterophylla and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli. The crude ethanolic extract was prepared from 100 g of dry plant material dissolved in 500 ml of ethanol. The extracts were solubilized in a buffer solution containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO at concentrations of 10.0, 7.5, 5.0 and 2.5 mg mL-1. The effect of these extracts was compared with herbicide oxyfluorfen in bioassays. The ethanolic extracts of S. lethalis leaves and stems inhibited the germination and seedling growth of barnyardgrass and wild poinsettia in a concentration-dependent manner. The reduction in the root length of E. heterophylla seedlings might be attributed to the reduced elongation of metaxylem cells. The phytotoxicity of the extracts ranged according to the receptor species, and for some variables, the inhibitory effect was similar, and even superior, to that of the commercial herbicide. Thus, S. lethalis extracts might be a promising alternative for sustainable weed management.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito do extrato etanólico de folhas e caules de Serjania lethalis sobre a germinação dos diásporos e crescimento de plântulas de amendoim-bravo (Euphorbia heterophylla e capim-arroz (Echinochloa crus-galli. O extrato bruto etanólico foi preparado na proporção de 100 g de material vegetal seco para 500 mL de etanol. A partir deste, os extratos foram solubilizados em solução tampão e dimetil sulfóxido (DMSO nas concentrações 10,0, 7,5, 5,0 e 2,5 mg mL-1. Nos bioensaios comparou-se o efeito desses extratos com o herbicida oxyfluorfen. Os extratos etanólicos de folhas e caules de S. lethalisexerceram atividade inibitória no processo de germinação e no crescimento das plântulas de capim-arroz e amendoim-bravo, com efeito dependente da concentra

  1. Optical Sensing of Weed Infestations at Harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Judit; McCallum, John; Long, Dan

    2017-10-19

    Kochia ( Kochia scoparia L.), Russian thistle ( Salsola tragus L.), and prickly lettuce ( Lactuca serriola L.) are economically important weeds infesting dryland wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) production systems in the western United States. Those weeds produce most of their seeds post-harvest. The objectives of this study were to determine the ability of an optical sensor, installed for on-the-go measurement of grain protein concentration, to detect the presence of green plant matter in flowing grain and assess the potential usefulness of this information for mapping weeds at harvest. Spectra of the grain stream were recorded continuously at a rate of 0.33 Hz during harvest of two spring wheat fields of 1.9 and 5.4 ha. All readings were georeferenced using a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver with 1 m positional accuracy. Chlorophyll of green plant matter was detectable in the red (638-710 nm) waveband. Maps of the chlorophyll signal from both fields showed an overall agreement of 78.1% with reference maps, one constructed prior to harvest and the other at harvest time, both based on visual evaluations of the three green weed species conducted by experts. Information on weed distributions at harvest may be useful for controlling post-harvest using variable rate technology for herbicide applications.

  2. Contribution of Stock Control Practices to the Sustainability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work evaluated the stock control practices and its contributions to the effective management and sustainability in hospitality establishments within Umuahia North and Umuahia South L.G.A. The data for this research was collected using a questionnaire. Simple percentages were used to analyze the data generated for ...

  3. Fault tolerant wind turbine production operation and shutdown (Sustainable Control)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Engelen, T.; Schuurmans, J.; Kanev, S.; Dong, J.; Verhaegen, M.H.G.; Hayashi, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Extreme environmental conditions as well as system failure are real-life phenomena. Especially offshore, extreme environmental conditions and system faults are to be dealt with in an effective way. The project Sustainable Control, a new approach to operate wind turbines (Agentschap NL, grant

  4. Uso do novo sistema Clearfield® na cultura do girassol para o controle de plantas daninhas dicotiledóneas Use of the new Clearfield® system in sunflower culture to control dicotyledonous weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Santos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A ocorrência de plantas daninhas dicotiledóneas tem limitado o aumento da área de cultivo de girassol no Brasil, devido ao seu impacto sobre a produtividade. Isso se deve à escassez de produtos registrados para a cultura com amplo espectro de ação. Em razão disso, desenvolveram-se dois experimentos com o objetivo de avaliar a eficácia e seletividade de herbicidas do grupo das imidazolinonas aplicados em pós-emergência de plantas daninhas dicotiledôneas na cultura do girassol Clearfield®. Os experimentos foram instalados no campo, em Iguatemi, distrito de Maringá-PR. Os tratamentos constituíram-se de duas testemunhas sem aplicação de herbicida, sendo uma sem capina e outra capinada, sulfentrazone (200,00 g ha-1 aplicado em pré-emergência e imazapic+imazapyr aplicados em pós-emergência nas doses de [36,75+12,25], [52,5+17,5], [12,25+36,75] e [17,5+52,5] g ha-1. Foram feitas avaliações de controle para Euphorbia heterophylla, Conyza bonariensis, Raphanus raphanistrum, Bidens pilosa, Ipomoea grandifolia e Portulaca oleracea. Também foram realizadas avaliações de intoxicação do girassol Clearfield®, estande e produtividade em kg ha-1. De acordo com os resultados, verificou-se que o uso do sistema Clearfield® mostrou-se uma ótima opção para áreas com infestação de plantas daninhas dicotiledôneas, pois possibilita a aplicação de herbicidas inibidores da enzima acetolactato sintase (ALS; os controles obtidos variaram de medianos a excelentes, além de ele não provocar injúrias à cultura e manter o estande inicial e a produtividade.The occurrence of dicotyledonous weeds has limited the increase of the area of sunflower cultivation in Brazil, due to their impact on crop yield. This is a result of a shortage of products registered for the crop with broad-spectrum control. Thus, two experiments were installed to evaluate the efficacy and selectivity of the imidazolinone herbicides applied on post

  5. Weed Biomass and Weed Species Diversity of Juvenile Citrus Trees Intercrop with some Arable Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Mojibade OLORUNMAIYE

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study was carried out to evaluate the performances of eight crops in the intercrop of citrus with arable crops at the National Horticultural Research Institute (NIHORT Ibadan, Nigeria. Eight arable crops: maize, cucumber, sweet potato, Corchorus olitorius, large green, grain amaranth, Mucuna pruriens var. utilis, and groundnut were intercropped with young citrus trees in the early planting season of 2010 with sole citrus as control. The experiment was laid out in a completely randomized block design with three replicates. Data were collected on weed flora, weed density and weed dry weight. Results showed that the relative frequencies of weeds in all the plots were less than 4% at both 6 and 9WAP. Gomphrena celosoides, Oldenlandia corymbosa and Tridax procumbens were most preponderant in appearing in all the plots. Tridax procumbens had a consistent relative frequency (2.34% in all the plots except in citrus/maize plot (0.78% at 9 WAP. Significantly lower broadleaf weed densities were obtained in citrus/sweet potato, citrus/large green, control plot and citrus/cucumber (28.67, 45.00, 50.00 and 76.33 m-2 respectively than in citrus/groundnut plot (143.00 m-2. Similarly, significantly lower grass weed densities were produced in citrus/Mucuna and citrus/sweet potato (0.33 m-2 each plots than the control plot (11.33 m-2. Whereas citrus/corchorus plot produced significantly lower broadleaf weed dry weight (37.59 g m-2 than citrus/Mucuna plot (126.47 g m-2 at 3WAP, citrus/large green plot (16.15 g m-2 and citrus/groundnut plot (123.25 g m-2 followed the same trend at 6 WAP. Sedges dry weights were less than 7 g m-2 in all the plots compared with control plot.

  6. Weed control under integrated nutrient management systems in faba bean (Vicia faba production in Egypt Controle de plantas daninhas sob sistemas de manejo integrado em feijão de fava (Vicia faba no Egito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. El-Metwally

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Two field experiments were conducted in two successive seasons, 2005/2006 and 2006/2007, to determine whether management can improve faba bean competitiveness with weeds, thus helping to achieve its yield potential. The experiment included five treatments, composed of organic and mineral fertilizers, alone and mixed at different rates, along with a control and six weed control treatments, including oxadiargyl, prometryn, hand hoeing treatments alone or mixed with the herbicides, and a nonweeded treatment (control.The herbicide treatments were not superior to the two hand-hoeing treatments. Using compost favored growth and yield of faba bean more than of weeds. Adding fertilizer also improved most yield parameters. Application of compost alone or combined with 50 or 100% of the recommended NPK rate improved faba bean growth in terms of net assimilation rate, specific leaf area, and leaf weight ratio as components of relative growth rate. This improvement in growth resulted in increase of seed yield, yield components and protein of faba bean. Faba bean yield performance improved under interactive fertilizer effects and weed control treatments as growth improved, as a result of nutrient release from fertilizers and weed control.Dois experimentos em condições de campo foram conduzidos em duas épocas sucessivas - 2005/2006 e 2006/2007 - para determinar se o manejo pode melhorar a competitividade do feijão-fava contra plantas daninhas e contribuir para um maior potencial de produção. Os experimentos incluíram cinco tratamentos, compostos de: fertilizantes orgânicos e minerais, isoladamente ou em mistura em diferentes doses, além do tratamento controle, e seis tratamentos de controle de plantas daninhas, incluindo tratamentos usando oxadiargyl, prometryn, manualmente ou misturados com os herbicidas e um tratamento sem plantas daninhas (controle. Os tratamentos com os herbicidas não foram superiores aos dois tratamentos manuais (hand hoeing

  7. Robotic weed monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochtis, Dionysis; Sørensen, Claus Aage Grøn; Jørgensen, R N

    2011-01-01

    -farm operating console, the mobile robotic unit, and a field server for generating and storingmaps. The hypothesis is that it is possible to automate the planning and execution of theoperation of monitoring of the in-field weed density and species distribution. The developedplanning system includes the automatic...

  8. Effect of Cover Crops on Vertical Distribution of Leaf Area and Dry Matter of Soybean (Glycine max L. in Competition with Weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyyedeh samaneh hashemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Amount and vertical distribution of leaf area are essential for estimating interception and utilization of solar radiation of crop canopies and, consequently dry matter accumulation (Valentinuz & Tollenaar, 2006. Vertical distribution of leaf area is leaf areas per horizontal layers, based on height (Boedhram et al., 2001. Above-ground biomass is one of the central traits in functional plant ecology and growth analysis. It is a key parameter in many allometric relationships (Niklas & Enquist, 2002. The vertical biomass distribution is considered to be the main determinant of competitive strength in plant species. The presence of weeds intensifies competition for light, with the effect being determined by plant height, position of the branches, and location of the maximum leaf area. So, this experiment was conducted to study the vertical distribution of leaf area and dry matter of soybean canopy in competition with weeds and cover crops. Materials and methods This experiment was performed based on complete randomized block design with 3 replications in center of Agriculture of Joybar in 2013. Soybean was considered as main crop and soybean and Persian clover (Trifolium resupinatum L., fenugreek (Trigonella foenum–graecum L., chickling pea (Lathyrus sativus L. and winter vetch (Vicia sativa L. were the cover crops. Treatments were included cover crops (Persian clover, fenugreek, chickling pea and winter vetch aDid you mean: nd cover crop planting times (simultaneous planting of soybean with cover crops and planting cover crops three weeks after planting of soybeans and also monoculture of soybeans both in weedy and weed free conditions were considered as controls. Soybean planted in 50 cm row spacing with 5 cm between plants in the same row. Each plot was included 5 rows soybeans. Cover crop inter-seeded simultaneously in the main crop. Crops were planted on 19 May 2013 for simultaneous planting of soybean. The dominant weed species

  9. Weed Science and Technology. MP-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Harold P.; Lee, Gary A.

    This document is one in a series distributed by the Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Wyoming-Laramie. It presents the principles and methods of weed control especially as it relates to the use of herbicides. The factors influencing the effectiveness of both foliar-applied and soil-applied herbicides are discussed. A listing of…

  10. Root distribution and interactions between allelopathic rice and c4 grass weed species as determined by 13c isotope discrimination analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultivars which carry allelopathic traits (traits that enable them to suppress weeds) could improve the economical management and sustainability of rice production. Interactions between roots of rice and weeds are thought to be modulated by the weed-suppressive activity of some rice cultivars, but ...

  11. Efeito de períodos de controle de plantas daninhas sobre o desenvolvimento inicial de plantas de eucalipto Effects of weed control periods on initial growth and development of eucalypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.E.B. Toledo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar os efeitos dos períodos de convivência e de controle de Brachiaria decumbens sobre o desenvolvimento inicial de clones de Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla. Para isso, um ensaio foi conduzido, no município de Três Lagoas-MS, no período de janeiro a dezembro de 1997. Os tratamentos experimentais consistiram de diferentes épocas e períodos de convivência das plantas daninhas na cultura do eucalipto. As épocas foram divididas em dois grupos. No primeiro, a convivência se iniciava no transplante das mudas e era estendida até 28, 56, 84, 112, 140, 168, 224, 252 e 364 dias após. No segundo grupo, a convivência se iniciava aos 0, 28, 56, 84, 112, 140, 168, 224 e 252 dias após o transplante e era estendida até o final de um ano. As principais plantas daninhas que ocorreram na área experimental foram Brachiaria decumbens e Spermacocea latifola. As plantas jovens de eucalipto foram bastante suscetíveis à interferência das plantas daninhas, apresentando um período anterior à interferência inferior a 14-28 dias. Para assegurar o desenvolvimento da cultura, o período total de prevenção à interferência foi de 140 dias, e o período crítico de prevenção à interferência, de 14-28 a 140 dias após o transplante, considerando o índice de 5% de redução em diâmetro.A field trial was carried out in Três Lagoas-MS, Brazil, from January to December of 1997, to study the effects of control and coexistence period of Brachiaria decumbens on the growth of Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla clones. The experimental design was a complete randomized block design, with four replications. The treatments consisted of different periods of weed-eucalypt association. The periods were divided in two groups. In the first one, the weed-eucalypt coexistence initiated during the eucalypt transplanting, continuing up to 28, 56, 112, 140, 168, 224, 252 and 364 days after it. In the second group, the

  12. Glyphosate Resistance of C3 and C4 Weeds under Rising Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Nimesha; Manalil, Sudheesh; Florentine, Singarayer K; Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Seneweera, Saman

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reviews current knowledge on how changes of plant metabolism under elevated CO2 concentrations (e[CO2]) can affect the development of the glyphosate resistance of C3 and C4 weeds. Among the chemical herbicides, glyphosate, which is a non-selective and post-emergence herbicide, is currently the most widely used herbicide in global agriculture. As a consequence, glyphosate resistant weeds, particularly in major field crops, are a widespread problem and are becoming a significant challenge to future global food production. Of particular interest here it is known that the biochemical processes involved in photosynthetic pathways of C3 and C4 plants are different, which may have relevance to their competitive development under changing environmental conditions. It has already been shown that plant anatomical, morphological, and physiological changes under e[CO2] can be different, based on (i) the plant's functional group, (ii) the available soil nutrients, and (iii) the governing water status. In this respect, C3 species are likely to have a major developmental advantage under a CO2 rich atmosphere, by being able to capitalize on the overall stimulatory effect of e[CO2]. For example, many tropical weed grass species fix CO2 from the atmosphere via the C4 photosynthetic pathway, which is a complex anatomical and biochemical variant of the C3 pathway. Thus, based on our current knowledge of CO2 fixing, it would appear obvious that the development of a glyphosate-resistant mechanism would be easier under an e[CO2] in C3 weeds which have a simpler photosynthetic pathway, than for C4 weeds. However, notwithstanding this logical argument, a better understanding of the biochemical, genetic, and molecular measures by which plants develop glyphosate resistance and how e[CO2] affects these measures will be important before attempting to innovate sustainable technology to manage the glyphosate-resistant evolution of weeds under e[CO2]. Such information will be of

  13. Influence of Weed Competition on Potato Growth, Production and Radiation Use Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad MONDANI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Weed management in potato production is one of the main cost and time consuming practices. Understanding the most effective time of weed control could reduce the costs and increase potato yield. Field study was conducted in the west region of Iran during 2006 to evaluate the effect of weeds damage in potato fields. Twelve treatments used consisted of six initial weed-free periods in which plots were kept free of weeds for 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 days after crop emergence (DAE, and then weeds were allowed to grow until harvest, and six initial weed-infested periods in which, weeds were allowed to grow for 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 DAE, then the plots were kept free of weeds until harvest. Experiment was arranged as a randomized complete block design with three replications. The results showed effect of weed competition on crop dry matter started about 40 DAE and about 90 DAE reached its maximum. The weeds competition decreased dry matter accumulation, leaf area index, crop growth rate, leaf area index duration, light absorption, light extinction coefficient and radiation use efficiency (RUE of potato. Weeds reduced the potato yield 54.8 percent. The beginning and the end of the critical period of weed control in potato (CPWC was based on 5% and 10% tuber yield loss. The onset of the CPWC ranged from 486 to 572 GDD, at 5% and 10% yield loss level corresponding to 11 and 19 days after crop emergence, respectively. The end of the CPWC varied from 1372 to 1164 GDD, at 5% and 10% yield loss level corresponding to 65 and 51 days after crop emergence, respectively. RUE in the weed infestation treatment in comparison to the weed free treatment, reduced 11.8 percent.

  14. Avaliação de angustifoliadicidas na cultura da soja em Minas Gerais Grass weed control with herbicides in soybeans in Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamar Ferreira de Souza

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available Três experimentos de campo foram conduzidos em Latossolos Vermelho-Escuro e Vermelho-Amarelo, nos anos 1981/82 e 1982/83 com o objetivo de determinar o efeito de herbicidas para o controle de plantas daninhas angustifoliadas e fitotoxidade sobre a cultura de soja, cultivares UFV-1 e Cristalina. O grupo das acetanilidas e pendimethalin controlaram a trapoeraba. Para as três espécies latifoliadas, o acetochlor, trifluralin e oryzalin foram eficientes. Além disso, o metolachlor controlou a poaia e o pendimethalin controlou a poaia e o apaga-fogo. Para o controle do capim-marmelada, todos os produtos foram eficientes, exceto quizalofop-etil e mefluidide, enquanto que para o capim-colchão apenas o mefluidide não foi eficiente. Finalmente, o timbete não foi eficientemente controlado por alachlor, metolachlor, pentimethalin e mefluidide. Acetochlor e oryzalin afetaram negativamente o stand inicial. Além disso, o acetochlor reduziu altura da inserção da primeira vagem. O quizalofop-etil causou uma redução na produção de grãos.Three field experiments were carried out on Dark Red Latosol and Yellow Red Latosol in 1981/82 and 1982/83 to evaluate the efficiency of herbicides upon grassy and their phytotoxicity upon “UFV-1” and Cristalina soybeans cultivars. The acetoanilide group and pendimethalin showed good epiderwort control. For the three broadleaved weed species, acetochlor, trifluralin and oryzalin were efficient. More over, metolachlor controlled Brazil pusley and A. ficoidea. For alexandergrass control all herbicides tested were efficient but quizalofop-ethyl and mefluidide, whereas crabgrass was not controlled by mefluidide only. Acetochlor and oryzalin treatments decreases initial stand. Besides, acetochlor decreased height of insertion of first pod. Quizalofop-ethil reduced grain yield of soybeans.

  15. Growing oganic cereals in Northern Ireland - disease and weed problems

    OpenAIRE

    MERCER, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    The small organic arable sector in N. Ireland could be expanded to provide winter feed for cattle. Spring barley or wheat are likely to be the most suitable crops as they are reported to have fewer weed and disease problems than winter cereals. Trials from 2003 –05 on weed control showed no consistent effect of cultivar, although higher seed rates reduced weed biomass and tended to increase yield, albeit marginally. Trials on disease control showed no synergistic effects of two- or three-way ...

  16. Eficácia de herbicidas inibidores da ACCase no controle de gramíneas em lavouras de soja Efficacy of ACCase-inhibiting herbicides in controlling grass weeds in soybean crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L.L. Barroso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar a eficácia de herbicidas inibidores da ACCase, aplicados isoladamente ou em associações, no controle das espécies de plantas daninhas pertencentes à família das gramíneas Brachiaria decumbens, Digitaria ciliaris, Eleusine indica, Brachiaria plantaginea e Cenchrus echinatus, na cultura da soja. O experimento foi conduzido em campo, em delineamento de blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições. Os tratamentos avaliados foram: clethodim (84 g ha-1, clethodim + quizalofop-p-ethyl (48 + 40 g ha-1, [clethodim + fenoxaprop-p-ethyl] (50 + 50 g ha-1, sethoxydim (230 g ha-1, tepraloxydim (100 g ha-1, fluazifop-p-butyl (125 g ha-1, haloxyfop-methyl (60 g ha-1 e testemunha sem herbicida. A convivência das plantas de soja com as gramíneas infestantes resultou em perda significativa na produtividade de grãos. Os melhores níveis de controle de B. decumbens foram verificados com a utilização de haloxyfop-methyl. Tepraloxydim pode ser considerado seletivo a B. decumbens. Nenhum tratamento proporcionou controle final de D. ciliaris superior a 90%, porém menor eficiência foi verificada quando se aplicaram sethoxydim e fluazifop-p-butyl. Apenas os tratamentos sethoxydim e [clethodim + fenoxaprop-p-ethyl] não mostraram controle satisfatório de E. indica. B. plantaginea foi a espécie mais facilmente controlada pelos herbicidas avaliados; no entanto, haloxyfop-methyl, tepraloxydim, clethodim e [clethodim + fenoxaprop-p-ethyl] se destacaram no controle dessa invasora. A adição de quizalofop-p-ethyl ao clethodim proporcionou incremento significativo no controle de C. echinatus. Também os herbicidas haloxyfop-methyl e tepraloxydim apresentaram controle satisfatório dessa espécie daninha.The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of ACCase-inhibitors (ariloxyfenoxypropionates and cyclohexanodiones, applied alone or in combination, in controlling the grass weed species Brachiaria decumbens, Digitaria

  17. Herbicide-resistant crops: utilities and limitations for herbicide-resistant weed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jerry M; Owen, Micheal D K

    2011-06-08

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds.

  18. WeedML: a Tool for Collaborative Weed Demographic Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Niels

    2010-01-01

    WeedML is a proposed standard to formulate models of weed demography, or maybe even complex models in general, that are both transparent and straightforward to re-use as building blocks for new models. The paper describes the design and thoughts behind WeedML which relies on XML and object-oriented systems development. Proof-of-concept software is provided as open-source C++ code and executables that can be downloaded freely.

  19. Evaluation effect of density and weeds control in corn (Zea mays L and peanut (Arachis hypogaea L intercropping by competition indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Rajaii

    2016-03-01

    treatments and increasing sowing ratio with bush density change (the distance change between two bushes on a row and variable distance between two rows (40 and 50 cm were carried out. In monoculture and alternative intercropping systems, the distance between bushes for both plants was identical, but alternative intercropping, a row of corn and a row peanut were planted and there were 30 plants of corn and 40 plants of peanut per unit area on each row. To intensify the intercropping, the distance between plants on the rows decreased and due to variable spacing between rows, number of plants per unit area increased and there were 60 corn plants and 80 peanuts plants per unit area on each row. Results and discussion The highest yield for corn (3.18 t.ha-1 was obtained in a intercropping of 100% corn+100% peanut and peanut (9.43 t.ha-1 in 50% corn+50% intercropping of peanut respectively. This means that the proximity of the legumes and grasses can be more productive in terms of intercropping than mono cropping system. The reason could be due to biological nitrogen fixation and increases in light absorption by roots of peanuts. Results indicated that various factors had significant effects on valuated index. The highest and least LER was in 100% corn + 100% peanut and 50% corn + 50% peanut. The highest RCC was for peanut, treatment non-weedy at higher population (7.41 and least was in the corn, treatment once-weedy at lower population (0.4. Corn competitive ratio on peanut in all treatments was less than one, which indicated peanut had advantage over corn. Based on this scale treatment with less density and twice-weedy was more dominate. The Aggressivity index for corn in all the treatments were negative but increased. Therefore in the all indices peanut was the dominant species, this was referred to better use of resources and weed control. Conclusion The results showed that both morphology and structure of the components of a intercropping, in dominant and recessive forms are

  20. Wallowa Canyonlands Weed Partnership : Completion Report November 19, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Mark C.; Ketchum, Sarah

    2008-12-30

    Noxious weeds threaten fish and wildlife habitat by contributing to increased sedimentation rates, diminishing riparian structure and function, and reducing forage quality and quantity. Wallowa Resources Wallowa Canyonlands Partnership (WCP) protects the unique ecological and economic values of the Hells Canyon grasslands along lower Joseph Creek, the lower Grande Ronde and Imnaha Rivers from invasion and degradation by noxious weeds using Integrated Weed Management techniques. Objectives of this grant were to inventory and map high priority weeds, coordinate treatment of those weeds, release and monitor bio-control agents, educate the public as to the dangers of noxious weeds and how to deal with them, and restore lands to productive plant communities after treatment. With collaborative help from partners, WCP inventoried {approx} 215,000 upland acres and 52.2 miles of riparian habitat, released bio-controls at 23 sites, and educated the public through posters, weed profiles, newspaper articles, and radio advertisements. Additionally, WCP used other sources of funding to finance the treatment of 1,802 acres during the course of this grant.

  1. Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    My Engström

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was an in-depth investigation of the change process experienced by patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A prospective interview study was performed prior to as well as 1 and 2 years after surgery. Data analyses of the transcribed interviews were performed by means of the Grounded Theory method. A core category was identified: Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight, comprising three related categories: hoping for deburdening and control through surgery, feeling deburdened and practising control through physical restriction, and feeling deburdened and trying to maintain control by own willpower. Before surgery, the participants experienced little or no control in relation to food and eating and hoped that the bariatric procedure would be the first brick in the building of a foundation that would lead to control in this area. The control thus achieved in turn affected the participants’ relationship to themselves, their roles in society, and the family as well as to health care. One year after surgery they reported established routines regarding eating as well as higher self-esteem due to weight loss. In family and society they set limits and in relation to health care staff they felt their concern and reported satisfaction with the surgery. After 2 years, fear of weight gain resurfaced and their self-image was modified to be more realistic. They were no longer totally self-confident about their condition, but realised that maintaining control was a matter of struggle to obtaining a foundation of sustainable control. Between 1 and 2 years after surgery, the physical control mechanism over eating habits started to more or less fade for all participants. An implication is that when this occurs, health care professionals need to provide interventions that help to maintain the weight loss in order to achieve a good long-term outcome.

  2. Underpinning sustainable vector control through informed insecticide resistance management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Edward K; Strode, Clare; Hemmings, Kay; Hughes, Angela J; Chanda, Emmanuel; Musapa, Mulenga; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Phiri, Faustina N; Muzia, Lucy; Chanda, Javan; Kandyata, Alister; Chirwa, Brian; Poer, Kathleen; Hemingway, Janet; Wondji, Charles S; Ranson, Hilary; Coleman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    There has been rapid scale-up of malaria vector control in the last ten years. Both of the primary control strategies, long-lasting pyrethroid treated nets and indoor residual spraying, rely on the use of a limited number of insecticides. Insecticide resistance, as measured by bioassay, has rapidly increased in prevalence and has come to the forefront as an issue that needs to be addressed to maintain the sustainability of malaria control and the drive to elimination. Zambia's programme reported high levels of resistance to the insecticides it used in 2010, and, as a result, increased its investment in resistance monitoring to support informed resistance management decisions. A country-wide survey on insecticide resistance in Zambian malaria vectors was performed using WHO bioassays to detect resistant phenotypes. Molecular techniques were used to detect target-site mutations and microarray to detect metabolic resistance mechanisms. Anopheles gambiae s.s. was resistant to pyrethroids, DDT and carbamates, with potential organophosphate resistance in one population. The resistant phenotypes were conferred by both target-site and metabolic mechanisms. Anopheles funestus s.s. was largely resistant to pyrethroids and carbamates, with potential resistance to DDT in two locations. The resistant phenotypes were conferred by elevated levels of cytochrome p450s. Currently, the Zambia National Malaria Control Centre is using these results to inform their vector control strategy. The methods employed here can serve as a template to all malaria-endemic countries striving to create a sustainable insecticide resistance management plan.

  3. Avaliação de herbicidas no controle de plantas daninhas na cultura da soja Evaluation of herbicides in the control of weeds in the soybean crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. De Barros

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi conduzido em Serranópolis, GO, um ensaio objetivando avaliar a eficiência e a seletividade de herbicidas no controle de plantas daninhas na cultura da soja (Glycine max (L. Merril, utilizando-se os seguintes tratamentos: A 100 g/ha de imazethapyr (ácido 2-[4,5-dihidro-4-metil-4(1-metiletil-5-oxo-1H-imidazol-2-ilo]-5-etil-3-piridinacarboxilico + surfactante, a 0,25% v/v; B tratamento A e 15 dias após, 230 g/ha de sethoxydim (2-1-etoximino-butil-5-2(etiltio-propil-3-hidroxi-2-ciclohexeno-1-ona + óleo mineral, a 0,25% v/v; C 230 g/ha de sethoxydim + óleo mineral, a 0,25% v/v; D 480 + 200 + 230 g/ha de bentazon (3-isopropil-2,1,3-benzotiadiazinona-(4-2,2-dióxido + fomesafen (5-2-cloro-4-(trifluorometil-fenoxiN-metilsulfonil-2-nitrobenzamida + sethoxydim + óleo mineral, 0,25% v/v; E 150 g/ha de imazaquim (2-[4,5-dihidro-4-metil-4-(1-metiletil-5-oxo-1H-imidazol-2-ilo]-3-quinolinacarboxílico pré-e e 230 g/ha de sethoxydim + óleo mineral, 0,25% v/v; F 250 g/ha de fomesafen + 187 g/ha de fluazipop-p-butil (butil-(R-2-(4-(5-trifluorometil-2-piridiloxi-fenoxi-propionato + surfactante a 0,2% v/v; G 120 g/ha de imazethapyr + surfactante a 0,2% v/v; H testemunha capinada; I testemunha não capinada. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições. O capim-custódio (Pennisetum setosum (Swartz L. Rich foi eficientemente controlado por todos os tratamentos químicos, enquanto a falsa-serralha (Emilia sonchifolia DC. foi somente pelo tratamento D. O capim-carrapicho (Cenchrus echinatus L. por C, D, E e F. O joá-de-capote (Nicandra physaloides (L. Pers. por D.F. e G. Ocorreram injúrias iniciais às plantas de soja, nos tratamentos D, E. e F. As alturas de plantas e de inserção da primeira vagem, além do rendimento de grãos, não foram influenciados significativamente pelos herbicidas.An experiment was carried out in Serranópolis, State of Goiás, Brazil, aiming to evaluate herbicides efficiency in weeds control

  4. ArylexTM active – new herbicide active and base for new cereals herbicides: ZyparTM and Pixxaro™ EC to control wide range of broadleaf weeds in cereals in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzikowski, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Arylex™ active is a new auxinic herbicide for postemergence control of a range of important broadleaf weeds in cereals. It has been discovered and developed by Dow AgroSciences globally as a first member of the new ‘arylpicolinate‘ structural class. Arylex applied together with safener brings excellent crop safety and due to the rapid degradation in soil and plant tissue it does not limit the following crop choice. In Europe the first two herbicides containing this active are Zypar™ and Pixxaro™ EC. Zypar is a premix of Arylex and florasulam, delivering at the 1 L/ha maximum use rate 6 g ae/ha of Arylex and 5 g/ha of florasulam. It can be applied to all cereals, apart from oats, in autumn and spring. Spring application is allowed from BBCH 13 till BBCH 45, however the best performance is reached up to BBCH 32. Zypar’s spectrum of controlled weeds is very wide. Pixxaro EC is a combination of Arylex and fluroxypyr and at 0.5 l/ha dose rate delivers 6 g ae/ha of Arylex and 140 g ae/ha of fluroxypyr. It can be applied in all cereals, apart from oats, in spring from BBCH 13 till BBCH 45, while the best performance is observed between BBCH 30 and 45. Pixxaro EC shows excellent efficacy against key weeds, especially Galium aparine and at all growth stages. This herbicide brings a novel non-ALS solution and will be a key component of anti-resistance strategies for broadleaf weeds in cereals.

  5. Panaceas, uncertainty, and the robust control framework in sustainability science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderies, John M; Rodriguez, Armando A; Janssen, Marco A; Cifdaloz, Oguzhan

    2007-09-25

    A critical challenge faced by sustainability science is to develop strategies to cope with highly uncertain social and ecological dynamics. This article explores the use of the robust control framework toward this end. After briefly outlining the robust control framework, we apply it to the traditional Gordon-Schaefer fishery model to explore fundamental performance-robustness and robustness-vulnerability trade-offs in natural resource management. We find that the classic optimal control policy can be very sensitive to parametric uncertainty. By exploring a large class of alternative strategies, we show that there are no panaceas: even mild robustness properties are difficult to achieve, and increasing robustness to some parameters (e.g., biological parameters) results in decreased robustness with respect to others (e.g., economic parameters). On the basis of this example, we extract some broader themes for better management of resources under uncertainty and for sustainability science in general. Specifically, we focus attention on the importance of a continual learning process and the use of robust control to inform this process.

  6. Durum wheat and allelopathy: toward wheat breeding for natural weed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragasso, Mariagiovanna; Iannucci, Anna; Papa, Roberto

    2013-09-24

    Wheat-derived foodstuffs represent about one-fifth of the calories consumed by humans worldwide. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most important crops throughout the world, and it has been extensively studied for its allelopathic potential. In contrast, for allelopathy in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum), our knowledge is partial and fragmentary. Through highlighting recent advances in using allelopathy as a crop-breeding tool, we provide an overview of allelopathy in Triticum spp., to stimulate further coordinated breeding-oriented studies, to favor allelopathy exploitation for the sustainable cultivation of wheat, and in particular, to achieve improved biological weed control.

  7. Real-time weed detection, decision making and patch spraying in maize, sugarbeet, winter wheat and winter barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerhards, R; Christensen, Svend

    2003-01-01

    with weed infestation levels higher than the economic weed threshold; a review of such work is provided. This paper presents a system for site-specific weed control in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.), maize (Zea mays L.), winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), including...

  8. Sustainability in a state comprehensive cancer control coalition: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Renee A; Chapman, Kathryn; Graf, Gavin; Stanfield, Bret; Waterbor, John W

    2014-03-01

    The Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition (ACCCC) has developed an integrated and coordinated approach to reducing cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, and to improving the quality of life for cancer survivors, their families, and their caregivers. The ACCCC is currently in a maintenance phase and a formal plan for sustainability of the coalition was needed to keep the members engaged and productive. A training session in coalition sustainability conducted in 2013 identified the following elements as essential to success: (1) increased marketing of the coalition by simplifying its mission; (2) improved networking including flexibility in coalition meeting location and attendance; (3) increased membership satisfaction through transformational leadership; (4) revision of the working structure of committees and improved accountability; and (5) enhancement of partner satisfaction with coalition activities designed to recruit and retain new partners. A self-administered membership satisfaction survey was given to assess coalition mission, meeting logistics, organization, capacity building, and coalition goals. Results indicated that the subcategories of communication, mission, and meeting logistics were rated satisfied to very satisfied on a five-point scale. Although the ACCCC had clearly written goals, improvement could be made in leadership participation and new member orientation could be improved. Most members rated their parent organization as highly involved with the ACCCC and many offered suggestions on capacity building. Results of the sustainability training have clarified the ACCCC's plans to ensure coalition viability and improve strategies to inform stakeholders of the benefits of participation in the coalition.

  9. Material Protection, Control, and Accountancy (MPC&A) Sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Mark; Farmer, James; Haase, Michael; Mann, Greg; Soo Hoo, Mark; Toth, William

    1999-07-21

    To date, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Material Protection, Control, and Accountancy (MPC and A) program has assisted in the implementation of operational site-wide MPC and A systems at several nuclear facilities in Russia. Eleven sites from the civilian sector have completed the site-wide installations and two have completed sub-site installations. By the end of 1999, several additional sites will have completed site-wide and sub-site system installations through DOE assistance. the effort at the completed sites has focused primarily on the design, integration, and installation of upgraded MPC and A systems. In most cases, little work has been performed to ensure that the installed systems will be sustained. Because of concerns that the installed systems would not be operated in the future, DOE established a sustainability pilot program involving the 11 sites. The purpose of DOE's MPC and A Sustainability Program is to ensure that MPC and A upgrades installed at sites in Russia are effective and will continue to operate over the long term. The program mission is to work with sites where rapid upgrades have been completed to cultivate enduring and consistent MPC and A practices. The program attempts to assist the Russian sites to develop MPC and A organizations that will operate, maintain, and continue to improve the systems and procedures. Future assistance will strive to understand and incorporate culturally sensitive approaches so that the sites take ownership for all MPC and A matters. This paper describes the efforts of the sustainability program to date.

  10. Establishment of mixed reforestation with typical Atlantic forest species as a function of minimum or intensive soil cultivation and weed control; Estabelecimento de reflorestamentos mistos com especies tipicas da mata Atlantica, em funcao do cultivo minimo ou intensivo do solo e do controle de plantas invasoras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Jose Leonardo de Moraes; Gandara, Flavio [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Ciencias Florestais]. E-mail: jlmgonca@carpa.ciagri.usp.br; Goncalves, Janio Carlos; Oliveira, Donizete Barbosa de; Simionato, Jose Luiz do Amaral [Companhia Energetica de Sao Paulo (CESP), SP (Brazil); Cenci, Silvia [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ)

    1999-07-15

    The objectives of this research were: to study the effect of different methods of site cleaning and soil preparation on the reforestation growths established with typical species of the Atlantic Forest; and to evaluate the efficiency of different methods of weed control from planting time to canopy closure. The trial was installed (from Feb to May 1995) around the reservoir of Mario Lopes Leao hydroelectric plant owned by the Electric Power of Sao Paulo (CESP), municipal district of Promissao, SP. The climate of the area is tropical with dry winter (Cwa, classification of Koeppen). The soil was characterized as an Red-Dark Latosol, medium texture. Six treatments arranged in a randomized block design with four replications were tested: 1) herbicide application over total area, planting in furrows (PF), manual weeding in the planting row (MWR) and herbicide application inter rows (HAI); 2) slashing in total area (STA), planting hole (Ph), MW R and slashing inter rows: 3) STA, slash burning (SB), heavy and light harrowing (HLH), PF, MWR and HAI; 4) STA, SB, PF, MWR and HAI; 5) STA, SB, PF, HLH, MWR and HAI; and 6) SAT, SB, two heavy harrowing, PH, selective weed control in the rows and inter rows. The plantation was accomplished with a composition of nine species: pioneers - Trema micrantha, Guazuma ulmifolia and Croton urucurana; secondary - Peltophorum dubium, Gallesia integrifolia and Ormosia arborea and climax - Tabebuia avellanedae, Hymenaea courbaril and Genipa americana. The pioneer and secondary species presented the highest results to the applied treatments. In all treatments where weed control was made with herbicide (glyphosate), the occurrence of Panicum maximum, common species in the area, was very restricted. The growth rates were intensified and the under story presented more diversified composition of weed species, with predominance of broad leaves. Opposite results were observed when weed controlled was manually or mechanically. The largest

  11. A Case Study of Allelopathic Effect on Weeds in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaveya T. Petrova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most powerful and effective method of weed control is by chemical substances called herbicides. In recent years, they were published quite data on different side effects of herbicides on humans, animals, crops and the environment as a whole. Therefore, the increased interest for biological weed control lately is reasonable, since its improvement and expansion will contribute to limiting excessive use of herbicides, respectively their harmful effects and will support the successful implementation of complex weed control. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of selected plant species, containing allelopathic active substances, on germination, growth and biomass of some widespread weeds in wheat. Experiments were carried out at laboratory conditions using seeds of wheat (Triticum aestivum L., sort Sadovo 1 and most common weeds therein: Johnson grass (Sorghum halepense (L Pers, white pigweed (Chenopodium album L., twitch (Cynodon dactylon L. and curly dock (Rumex crispus L.. Allelopathic substances were extracted with distilled water from flowers of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill., leaves of basil (Ocimum basilicum L., leaves of spearmint (Mentha longifolia (L Huds., and leaves of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.. Of the tested active allelopathic plants, the most negative impact on germination of all weeds seeds (including wheat, as well as on the development of plants exhibited the water extract of lavender. Lavender and basil had a stronger negative effect on white pigweed and twitch compared with both mint species. A significant inhibitory effect of spearmint even at low concentrations was recorded on the germination of all weed species tested while the wheat was slightly affected, which manifests this plant as a potential effective species in strategies for weed control management.

  12. Effect of externally applied electrostatic fields, microwave radiation and electric currents on plants and other organisms, with special reference to weed control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diprose, M.F.; Benson, F.A.; Willis, A.J.

    High electric fields are reported to damage plants if currents greater than 10/sup -6/ A are induced to flow through leaves causing corona discharges from the tips. The nature of the damage and the effects on metabolic processes are discussed. The results from experiments on the growth of plants in which the density and charge of air ions have been varied are also reviewed. The effects of microwave radiation (mostly 2450 MHz) upon seeds, plants and other organisms in soil are discussed. These effects depend upon the power density of the radiation and the electrical properties of the targets. Although microwaves can be effective in killing plants and also seeds that are buried several centimeters deep in soil, high power equipment is required and treatment times are long e.g. a 60 kW machine could take up to 92.6 hours per hectare. Other experiments reported show that microwave radiation can kill nematodes in the soil and that it is also very effective in killing fungi and bacteria. The potential of the various possible uses of microwave radiation in agriculture is also described. Electric currents have been caused to flow through plants by the applicaton of electrodes to the leaves. The effects range from nil, when 50-100 V and 1 or 2 ..mu..A are used, to very striking when voltages from 5 to 15 kV are applied causing currents of several amperes to flow and resulting in the rapid destruction of the target. Small electric currents passed through soil containing plants are reported to increase their growth. The effects of small current on the growth of individual leaves are reviewed. The use of high voltage tractor-borne equipment for weed control is also considered. 152 references, 9 tables.

  13. Underpinning sustainable vector control through informed insecticide resistance management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward K Thomsen

    Full Text Available There has been rapid scale-up of malaria vector control in the last ten years. Both of the primary control strategies, long-lasting pyrethroid treated nets and indoor residual spraying, rely on the use of a limited number of insecticides. Insecticide resistance, as measured by bioassay, has rapidly increased in prevalence and has come to the forefront as an issue that needs to be addressed to maintain the sustainability of malaria control and the drive to elimination. Zambia's programme reported high levels of resistance to the insecticides it used in 2010, and, as a result, increased its investment in resistance monitoring to support informed resistance management decisions.A country-wide survey on insecticide resistance in Zambian malaria vectors was performed using WHO bioassays to detect resistant phenotypes. Molecular techniques were used to detect target-site mutations and microarray to detect metabolic resistance mechanisms. Anopheles gambiae s.s. was resistant to pyrethroids, DDT and carbamates, with potential organophosphate resistance in one population. The resistant phenotypes were conferred by both target-site and metabolic mechanisms. Anopheles funestus s.s. was largely resistant to pyrethroids and carbamates, with potential resistance to DDT in two locations. The resistant phenotypes were conferred by elevated levels of cytochrome p450s.Currently, the Zambia National Malaria Control Centre is using these results to inform their vector control strategy. The methods employed here can serve as a template to all malaria-endemic countries striving to create a sustainable insecticide resistance management plan.

  14. Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

  15. Interference of allelopathic wheat with different weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song-Zhu; Li, Yong-Hua; Kong, Chui-Hua; Xu, Xiao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Interference of allelopathic wheat with weeds involves a broad spectrum of species either independently or synergistically with competitive factors. This study examined the interference of allelopathic wheat with 38 weeds in relation to the production of allelochemical 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA) in wheat with and without root-root interactions. There were substantial differences in weed biomass and DIMBOA concentration in wheat-weed coexisting systems. Among 38 weeds, nine weeds were inhibited significantly by allelopathic wheat but the other 29 weeds were not. DIMBOA levels in wheat varied greatly with weed species. There was no significant relationship between DIMBOA levels and weed suppression effects. Root segregation led to great changes in weed inhibition and DIMBOA level. Compared with root contact, the inhibition of eight weeds was lowered significantly, while significantly increased inhibition occurred in 11 weeds with an increased DIMBOA concentration under root segregation. Furthermore, the production of DIMBOA in wheat was induced by the root exudates from weeds. Interference of allelopathic wheat with weeds not only is determined by the specificity of the weeds but also depends on root-root interactions. In particular, allelopathic wheat may detect certain weeds through the root exudates and respond by increasing the allelochemical, resulting in weed identity recognition. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. How Local Landholder Groups Collectively Manage Weeds in South-Eastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Sonia; Rogers, Sarah

    2017-09-01

    For two decades researchers and policy makers have been arguing that community-based collective action is needed to effectively control weeds. Yet there has been little social research into the ways that collective weed control emerges at local scales. The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanisms through which three local landholder groups in south-eastern Australia collectively manage weeds and the measures they use to evaluate success. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with members of three Landcare groups—Jerrawa Creek/Upper Lachlan, MacLaughlin River and Towamba Valley—as well as government staff external to the groups. The results reveal that for all three groups collective weed control is about supporting individual weed control efforts as well as proactively engaging landholders with the worst infestations. The groups were seen to be successful because they focused on the common challenge that weeds pose to all landholders, thereby removing the shame associated with having weeds, and because they organised community events that were as much about building and maintaining social relationships as improving weed control. Groups were positive about what they had achieved as collectives of landholders, but also saw an important role for government in providing funding, engaging with landholders who were unwilling to engage directly with the group, and controlling weeds on public lands.

  17. Manejo de plantas daninhas na cultura da mandioca Weed management in cassava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Silva

    2012-12-01

    use of integrated management as a sustainable way of controlling weeds in this crop are presented.

  18. Successfully controlling intrusive memories is harder when control must be sustained

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. van Schie (Kevin); M.C. Anderson (Michael)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAfter unpleasant events, people often experience intrusive memories that undermine their peace of mind. In response, they often suppress these unwanted memories from awareness. Such efforts may fail, however, when inhibitory control demands are high due to the need to sustain control, or

  19. Successfully Controlling Intrusive Memories is Harder When Control Must be Sustained

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, K.; Anderson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    After unpleasant events, people often experience intrusive memories that undermine their peace of mind. In response, they often suppress these unwanted memories from awareness. Such efforts may fail, however, when inhibitory control demands are high due to the need to sustain control, or when

  20. Weed management practices in natural ecosystems: a critical overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F. Reinhardt

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing public pressure against the use of pesticides and other agricultural inputs has placed increased emphasis on the development of ecologically based pest management. One distinct reaction of the Weed Science discipline has been the swing away from herbicide research to increased research on the basic biology and ecology of weeds in hopes of reduced reliance on "technological crutches" such as herbicides and other practices that are potentially harmful to the environment. Biological control is the long-standing alternative to the use of herbicides and interest in the former practice has been boosted by the realization that the use of herbicides may lead to the development of herbicide resistance in weed populations, and that herbicide residues occur in surface and groundwater. Supporters of herbicide use would point out that biological control is generally not effective in crop production systems, and is basically slow-acting. Debates between protagonists for the exclusive use of one or the other weed management practice tend to obscure the benefits that integration of different techniques are likely to have. For natural ecosystems it is proposed that integration of the more subtle practice of biological control with the use of herbicides, which relatively quickly overwhelm a biological system with mortality, is likely to be the most effective weed management tool. Different weed management practices that could be considered in natural ecosystems are discussed in terms of three key performance rating criteria, viz. activity, selec- tivity and persistence In this concise review, general discussion is focussed on the fundamentals of weed management practices, with the view to promote concept-based approaches that are critical for the development of effective weed management strate- gies.

  1. Underseeding clovers in small grains to suppress weeds in organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic producers are seeking alternative tactics for weed control so that they can reduce their need for tillage. In this study, we examined the impact of underseeding clovers into small grains to control weeds after harvest. Also, if the clovers winterkill, then control actions would not be need...

  2. Evaluation of Weed IT model 2006 MKII: spray volume and dose response tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempenaar, C.; Groeneveld, R.M.W.; Uffing, A.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Common weed control methods on pavements are chemical control (herbicides), brushing, flaming, mowing and hot water treatment. Managers of pavements often choose for herbicide weed control on pavements because this method is most cost-effective and most easy to use. Four out of five municipalities

  3. INVASIVE WEEDS IN BOGOR BOTANIC GARDENS, INDONESIA AND ITS IMPLICATION ON SURROUNDING LANDSCAPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Santosa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Conservation areas with the objective for collection and exchange plant materials have been speculated as weed bank for surrounding areas. Objective of this study was to identify and characterize ruderal invasive weeds in the Bogor Botanic Gardens (BBG. Observations were conducted in all vak (collection blocks in the BBG in order to identify the weeds species, determine their invasiveness, dominance and distribution. Weeds associations with host plants were observed. Current weed control program and data of dead trees collection were analyzed in relevant to weed. Distribution of weeds outside BBG was observed by transects method following river and road directions. Results showed that there were seven invasive weeds, i.e., Cecropia adenopus (Cecropiaceae, Cissus nodosa Blume (Vitaceae, Cissus sicyoides Blume (Vitaceae, Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreaceae, Ficus elastica Roxb. (Moraceae, Mikania micrantha H.B.K. (Asteraceae and Paraserianthes falcataria (L. Nielsen (Fabaceae. These seven weeds species invaded 41 out of 215 plant families in BBG. Six species of weeds, i.e., C. adenopus, C. nodosa Blume., C. sicyoides Blume., D. bulbifera L., M. micrantha H.B.K. and P. falcataria (L. Nielsen, were introduced as BBG collections for the first time while the F. elastica Roxb was considered as native. It is most likely that the weeds dispersal agents are the wind, birds, bats, visitors, and waters. All of these weeds existed in surrounding areas outside BBG. Given the detrimental impact of invasive weeds on the plant collection in BBG, it is necessary to develop long–term comprehensive control measures both inside and neighboring areas by involving other government authorities beyond BBG.

  4. Controle de dez espécies daninhas em cana-de-açúcar com o herbicida mesotrione em mistura com ametryn e metribuzin Control of ten weed species in sugarcane using mesotrione mixed with ametryn and metribuzin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.T. Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    -emergence control is the great challenge. The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of the herbicide mesotrione in mixture with ametryn and metribuzin in the post-emergence control of ten weeds sown in sugarcane, variety RB86-7515. The weeds used in the experiment were: Brachiaria decumbens, Brachiaria plantaginea, Cenchrus echinatus, Digitaria horizontalis, Panicum maximum, Amaranthus deflexus, Bidens pilosa, Euphorbia heterophylla, Ipomoea nil and Sida glaziovii, sown in between the rows after crop emergence. The herbicides were applied on the 45th day after sugarcane planting when the monocotyledon weeds reached the third tiller phase and the dicotyledon weeds completed three to four leaves. The following treatments were carried out: mesotrione (120 g ha-1; ametryn (2,000 g ha-1; metribuzin (1,920 g ha-1; mesotrione + ametryn (120 g + 2,000 g ha-1; mesotrione + metribuzin (120 g + 1,920 g ha-1 and control with and without weeds. It was concluded that the herbicides, isolated or in mixture, were selective to sugarcane. Regarding control efficiency, it was observed that the herbicide mesotrione was efficient in the control of A. deflexus; ametryn was efficient in the control of A. deflexus, B. pilosa and I. nil; metribuzin was efficient in the control of A. deflexus, B. pilosa and S. glaziovii; mesotrione + ametryn were efficient in the control of B. decumbens, B. plantaginea, D. horizontalis, P. maximum, A. deflexus, B. pilosa, I. nil and S. glaziovii, and mesotrione + metribuzin was efficient in the control of B. plantaginea, D. horizontalis, P. maximum, A. deflexus, B. pilosa and S. glaziovii. A high synergistic effect of mesotrione was verified with the tested herbicides, with the mixture with ametryn being the most prominent.

  5. Effect of attention control on sustained attention during induced anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillon, Christian; Robinson, Oliver J; Mathur, Ambika; Ernst, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety has wide-reaching and complex effects on cognitive performance. Although it can intrude on cognition and interfere with performance, it can also facilitate information processing and behavioural responses. In a previous study, we showed that anxiety induced by threat of shock facilitates performance on the Sustained Attention to Response Task, a vigilance test, which probes response inhibition to infrequent nogo stimuli. The present study sought to identify factors that may have contributed to such improved performance, including on- and off-task thinking (assessed with thought probes) and individual differences in attention control, as measured with the Attention Control Scale. Replicating our prior finding, we showed that shock threat significantly reduced errors of commission on the nogo trials. However, we extended this finding in demonstrating that this effect was driven by subjects with low attention control. We therefore confirm that anxiety increases inhibitory control of prepotent responses--a mechanism which is adaptive under threat--and show that this effect is greater in those who rely more upon such prepotent responding, i.e., those with low attentional control.

  6. Control mechanisms in the third-generation planning. Case study: Control to realize sustainable cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicaksono, A. D.

    2017-06-01

    Since the last few years, Indonesia has experienced important events that bring significant changes to the social, political and economic life. The changes directly or indirectly impact the field of planning. With the challenging condition which grows fast and is more complex ahead, and the greater demands on the role of planning, it is required that planning should have higher quality. This paper seeks to answer some questions as follows: (i) How are changes in paradigm and also the development of planning model for the current transition era?, (ii) What is the best way to improve the quality of planning control on the last generation planning model to realize sustainable city?. Analysis steps that will be used to achieve the paper objectives are: (i) Review of planning and sustainable cities theory, (ii) Pattern recognition, (iii) Identifying control mechanisms and sustainable urban forms, (iv) conceptualization. Based on discussion about sustainable cities and control mechanism, some conclusions can be generated as follows: (i) The third generation planning model is based on the theory of expanded system, emphasizing on the constraint of capacity and the ability of planners within the context of larger environment, (ii) There are various theoretical studies that recommend prescriptive model or solution for sustainable urban form and structure. The concepts of Sustainable Cities can be grouped in Neotraditional Development, Urban Containment, Compact City and The Eco-City. The four models above have criteria, namely (i) high density; (ii) a high level of diversity; (iii) mixed land use; (iv) compactness; (5) sustainable transport; (6) passive solar design; (7) Greening Ecological Design. The three main activities in control mechanisms are: Monitoring and Recommendation; a comparative review of the facts (conditions that exist or are developing) with the purpose (expected conditions, set out in urban planning) and recommendations; Evaluation, a review on the

  7. Experimental weed control of Najas marina ssp. intermedia and Elodea nuttallii in lakes using biodegradable jute matting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A. Hoffmann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of jute matting in managing the invasive aquatic macrophyte species Elodea nuttallii (Planch. H. St. John and Najas marina ssp. intermedia (Wolfg. ex Gorski Casper (Najas intermedia was studied in laboratory experiments and field trials. Four German lakes with predominant population of Najas intermedia or Elodea nuttalli were chosen for the experiment and areas between 150 and 300 m² were covered with jute textile. The effect of the matting on the growth of invasive and non-invasive macrophytes was determined through comparison with control transects. Biodegradable jute matting successfully suppressed the invasive macrophyte Najas intermedia and significantly reduced the growth of Elodea nuttalli in lakes. The results indicate that the capability of the matting to inhibit the growth of Elodea nuttallii and Najas intermedia depends on the mesh size of the jute weaving and that environmental conditions can affect its efficiency. Various indigenous species like Charales or Potamogeton pusillus L. were able to grow through the jute fabric and populate the treated areas. Until the end of the vegetation period, none of the invasive species were able to penetrate the covering and establish a stable population; in fact, in the subsequent year the jute matting affected only the spread of Najas intermedia. Jute matting proved to be an easy-to-use and cheap method to control the growth of Elodea nuttallii and Najas intermedia.

  8. Drought Tolerance and Perennial Weed Management

    OpenAIRE

    Nkurunziza, Libère; Andreasen, Christian; Liu, Fulai; Streibig, Jens Carl

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of controlled soil water deficits on sprouting and shoot growth of Canada thistle, coltsfoots and quackgrass. A gradient of soil water contents was created by establishing different densities of barley. The plants were harvested 14 days after watering was stopped. On Canada thistle and coltsfoots, relative water content (RWC) in leaves was measured prior to harvest and biomass of all weed shoots were recorded at harvest. In terms of shoot bi...

  9. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation or...

  10. A new hoe share design for weed control – measurements of soil movement and draft forces during operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Znova, Liubava; Melander, Bo; Lisowski, Aleksander

    2018-01-01

    were 0.84, 1.67 and 2.31 m s−1. Cubes were used to measure soil movement by recording the displacement from their initial positions. The soil surface and furrow profile were measured by using a 2D laser range scanner. Results: The results showed that increasing operation speed and cultivation depths......This research introduces a new share design (L-share) that reduces the undesired random soil movement, providing a more controlled disturbance of the upper soil layer. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate draught forces and soil movements when operating the new share. Materials...... generally increased draught forces and soil movement. Changing the cultivation depth from 30 to 50 mm resulted in a 63% greater longitudinal force (Fx), and 71% greater Fx when increasing the cultivation depth from 50 to 70 mm. Conclusion: The study showed that the new L-share mounted on a modified spring...

  11. The Use of Bio-Guided Fractionation to Explore the Use of Leftover Biomass in Dutch Flower Bulb Production as Allelochemicals against Weeds

    OpenAIRE

    Rob Verpoorte; Kirsten Leiss; Klinkhamer, Peter G.L.; Frank van der Kooy; Dinar S. C. Wahyuni

    2013-01-01

    A major problem in flower bulb cultivation is weed control. Synthetic herbicides are mainly used, although they cause a range of problems, and integrated weed control through application of naturally occurring allelochemicals would be highly desirable. Flower bulb production creates large amounts of leftover biomass. Utilizing this source for weed control may provide new applications of the bulb crops. We therefore screened 33 flower bulb extracts for allelochemical activity against weeds. Se...

  12. The effect of intercropping on weed infestation of a spring barley crop cultivated in monoculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Kwiecińska-Poppe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study carried out in the years 2005-2007 in the Bezek Experimental Farm near the city of Chełm, Poland, on heavy mixed rendzina soil. The effect of intercropping, using red clover (cv. Dajana and white clover (cv. Astra, on weed infestation of a spring barley crop was studied. The species composition of weeds in the spring barley crop changed to a small extent under the influence of the application of clover intercropping, whereas the population size of particular species showed large fluctuations. In the spring barley crop with the red clover intercrop, Sonchus arvensis occurred in greatest numbers among dicotyledonous weed species. In the barley crop with white clover and without intercrop, Viola arvensis and Sonchus arvensis were the dominant dicotyledonous species. Setaria pumila was the dominant monocotyledonous species in all the treatments. Intercropping using red and white clover clearly limited the growth and development of weeds. The red clover intercrop in the spring barley crop better reduced the infestation with dicotyledonous weeds and also significantly reduced the number of monocotyledonous weeds and the total number of weeds, whereas the white clover intercrop limited only the number of monocotyledonous weeds. The application of the herbicide Chwastox Extra 300 SL significantly reduced the fresh weight of weeds found in the spring barley crop. The presence of the intercrop resulted in different total numbers of weeds in particular treatments. Intercropping distinctly limited the occurrence of the following weed species: Sonchus arvensis, Fallopia convolvulus, Melandrium album, Amaranthus retroflexus, Veronica arvensis and Medicago lupulina. The investigated intercrop species also reduced the biomass of weeds. The application of the herbicide did not differentiate the number of monocotyledonous weeds, which resulted from the application of Chwastox Extra 300 SL that controls only

  13. Prospects and Challenges towards Sustainable Liver Fluke Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripa, Banchob; Echaubard, Pierre

    2017-10-01

    The liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini (Ov) is endemic in Southeast Asia where more than 10 million people are estimated to be infected. The infection is associated with several hepatobiliary diseases, including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Northeast Thailand is a hotspot for Ov transmission, and, despite extensive public health prevention campaigns led by the government, the prevalence of Ov infection is still high. High infection rates result from cultural and ecological complexities where wet-rice agrarian habitats, centuries-old raw-food culture, and the parasite's complex biology combine to create an ideal transmission arena. Here we review the state of our knowledge regarding the social-ecological determinants underlying Ov transmission. We also describe an integrative research rationale for liver fluke control better aligned with sustainable health development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Weeds and their effect on the performance of maize and fingermillet in the mid-hills of Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relay cropping of maize with fingermillet (maize/fingermillet) is the predominant cropping system for sustaining food security in the hilly regions of Nepal. In this region weed pressure severely reduces crop yields, yet basic information on weed species composition, biomass production and their eff...

  15. Sustainability criteria: their indicators, control, and monitoring (with examples from the biofuel sector).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovskaia, Evgenia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to research and analyze the notion of sustainability criteria in their function of an emerging tool to promote and safeguard sustainable products and their sustainable production. The article addresses critical issues, which are important for deeper understanding of sustainability criteria and their practical use. In this, the article examines the existing definitions of sustainability criteria, explores what indicators for sustainability criteria are, researches the issue of costs for following sustainability criteria, and discusses what groups of actors can be responsible for setting and supporting sustainability criteria. The research is done from a legal perspective, which involves much attention on how sustainability criteria can efficiently be implemented and used in legal constructions. Examples from the biofuel sector, which is regulated through a variety of legal frameworks and voluntary sustainability standards with sustainability criteria, are provided. The research results highlight that sustainability criteria is not a clearly defined concept. Their content should be linked to the understanding of what sustainable development and sustainability in each particular branch are. Purposes of sustainability criteria have to be explained and clarified so that it is easier to interpret and fulfill them. In some cases, sustainability criteria can set an upper limit to the use of natural resources and provide institutional guidance. It is desirable that sustainability criteria are applied at initial stages of an industry development. Control of how sustainability criteria are fulfilled and its quality are very important. Thoroughly elaborated regulations on control mechanisms and their components, such as monitoring, reporting, verification, and transparency, should be included into legal frameworks and voluntary sustainability standards. Different groups of actors at different levels can be responsible for setting and supporting

  16. Optimizing the width of strip weeding in arabica coffee in relation to crop age Largura da faixa de controle de plantas daninhas em café arábica em função da idade do cafeeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FC. Araújo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the weed strip control (WSC required for adequate coffee growth after transplanting. A non-irrigated, field-planted (spaced 3.80 x 0.70 m crop was used. The experimental design was a randomized block, with four replicates. The treatments were arranged in a 9 x 18 split-plot design to test the WSC of 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 190 cm, which involved continuously hand-weeding at each side of the coffee row, and 18 coffee growth measurements. Multiple regression analyses were carried out relating to growth-variables as a function of both WSC and growth-evaluation times. Brachiaria decumbens was the main weed accomplishing 88.5% of the total weed dry mass. The minimum width of the WSC increases as the crop ages after transplanting. Assuming reductions of 2% and 5% in the maximum coffee growth, the recommended WSC was 75 and 52 cm at 4 months after transplanting (MAT, 104 and 85 cm at 6 MAT, 123 and 105 cm at 9 MAT, 134 and 116 cm at 12 MAT, 142 and 124 cm at 15 MAT, and 148 and 131 cm at 18 MAT, respectively. It was concluded that integrated weed management in young coffee crops must focus on the weed control only in a minimum range along coffee rows, which increases with coffee plant age, keeping natural vegetation in the inter-rows.O objetivo deste estudo consistiu em determinar a faixa ideal de controle de plantas daninhas (FCPD necessária para um crescimento adequado do cafeeiro após o transplantio. Foi utilizada uma lavoura não irrigada, implantada no espaçamento de 3,80 x 0,70 m, em dezembro de 2008. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições. Os tratamentos foram dispostos em um esquema de parcelas subdivididas (9 x 18 para testar as FCPDs de 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 e 190 cm, mantidas com capina contínua em cada lado da linha de café, bem como seus efeitos ao longo de 18 meses após o transplantio (MAT. Efetuaram-se análises de regressão m

  17. Controle de plantas daninhas na cultura do milho-pipoca com herbicidas aplicados em pós-emergência Weed control in popcorn maize using post emergence herbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jakelaitis

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar a eficiência de controle de plantas daninhas, a tolerância e a produção de milho-pipoca UFVM2 aos herbicidas atrazine (1.500 g ha-1, foramsulfuron + iodosulfuron methyl sodium + atrazine (15+1+1.500 e 30+2+1.500 g ha-1, foramsulfuron + iodosulfuron methyl sodium (15+1, 30+2, 45+3 e 60+4 g ha-1, nicosulfuron + atrazine (8+1.500 e 16+1.500 g ha-1 e nicosulfuron (16 g ha-1. A aplicação dos herbicidas foi realizada aos 25 dias após a emergência da cultura. As plantas daninhas predominantes na área foram Brachiaria plantaginea, Brachiaria decumbens e Ipomoea spp. Os herbicidas foramsulfuron + iodosulfuron methyl sodium, em todas as doses testadas, proporcionaram maiores índices de toxidez à cultura, aos 7, 14 e 28 dias após a aplicação dos tratamentos (DAA. Todas as combinações de herbicidas proporcionaram controle acima de 90% para B. plantaginea e B. decumbens, aos 28 DAA. O nicosulfuron aplicado isoladamente proporcionou controle de apenas 80% e o atrazine não controlou essas espécies daninhas. Para Ipomoea spp., nenhum tratamento herbicida proporcionou controle equivalente ao da testemunha capinada. A competição das plantas daninhas resultou em menores teores de clorofila total, N, P e K no tecido foliar das plantas de milho-pipoca e menor rendimento de grãos. Para o cultivar UFVM2, as sulfoniluréias isoladas ou associadas ao atrazine não afetaram o estado nutricional da cultura, o rendimento e a capacidade de expansão dos grãos de milho-pipoca.The efficiency of different herbicide combinations for weed control and tolerance and yield of UFVM2 popcorn maize were evaluated. The herbicide treatments and respective doses were: atrazine (1.500 g ha-1; foramsulfuron + iodosulfuron methyl sodium + atrazine (15+1+1.500 and 30+2+1.500 g ha-1; foramsulfuron + iodosulfuron methyl sodium (15+1, 30+2, 45+3, and 60+4 g ha-1; nicosulfuron + atrazine (8+1.500 and 16+1.500 g ha-1 and nicosulfuron (16 g ha-1. The

  18. [Promoting sustainable behavior change in body weight control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camolas, José; Santos, Osvaldo; Moreira, Pedro; do Carmo, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    There is a wide acknowledgement of obesity as a relevant clinical entity. Such relevance can be inferred by the huge worldwide amount of research and related health promotion and clinical efforts. Though the evidence sustains some cues for the therapeutic success, the overall long-term effectiveness of obesity treatment tends to be not so satisfactory. Scientific literature is not unequivocal in key areas of nutritional intervention, such as the magnitude of caloric restriction, proportion of macronutrients, meal frequency, among others. The same applies to the area of physical activity recommendation for weight control. As a correlate of this scenario of incertitude, there is a proliferation of interventions and there is a clear need to integrate the scientific and clinical evidence. This paper presents a narrative literature review of key issues of clinical practice in obesity, regarding a set of actions that, in the overall, have as main purpose the promotion of reduction and/or control of body weight. The role of the health professional is highlighted as a facilitator of acquisition of habits that favor weight control, by integrating the professional's scientific knowledge with the patient's readiness for and capacity to change.

  19. Evaluation and Modeling of Camel Thorn (Alhagi Maurorum Weed Cutting by Water Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Naghipour Zade Mahani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the importance of weed control and the limitations of mechanical methods in some places, in this research the water jet cutting for weed control was investigated. The cutting tests were performed on camel thorn weed in Shahid Bahonar university of Kerman. The water jet pressure of 90 bars was achieved with the aid of a suitable pump. The cutting time was studied in a completely randomized factorial design experiment (CRD with five replications. Factors of experiments are: stem diameter in 2 levels (smaller and larger than 5 mm, distance of spraying jet from weeds in 3 levels (10, 20 and 30 cm and two types of plant holders: blade and plate. The results showed that stem diameter and jet distance from the weed stem had significant effects on cutting time (at the 1%. The mean comparison of parameters showed that with increase of stem diameter the cutting time increased and any increase in jet distance from the weeds decreased the cutting time linearly with R2=0.96 and R2=0.99 for small and large diameter weeds, respectively. The minimum cutting time was measured at 30 cm of the jet from small diameter of stems. A multivariate linear regression model was also proposed for cutting weed parameters. It can be concluded that due to the flexibility of water jet cutting for restricted places, hydrodynamic control of weeds is proposed as a complementary method and sometimes a competing substitute method.

  20. Taxonomic and life history bias in herbicide resistant weeds: implications for deployment of resistant crops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie S Holt

    Full Text Available Evolved herbicide resistance (EHR is an important agronomic problem and consequently a food security problem, as it jeopardizes herbicide effectiveness and increases the difficulty and cost of weed management. EHR in weeds was first reported in 1970 and the number of cases has accelerated dramatically over the last two decades. Despite 40 years of research on EHR, why some weeds evolve resistance and others do not is poorly understood. Here we ask whether weed species that have EHR are different from weeds in general. Comparing taxonomic and life history traits of weeds with EHR to a control group ("the world's worst weeds", we found weeds with EHR significantly over-represented in certain plant families and having certain life history biases. In particular, resistance is overrepresented in Amaranthaceae, Brassicaceae and Poaceae relative to all weeds, and annuality is ca. 1.5 times as frequent in weeds with EHR as in the control group. Also, for perennial EHR weeds, vegetative reproduction is only 60% as frequent as in the control group. We found the same trends for subsets of weeds with EHR to acetolactate synthase (ALS, photosystem II (PSII, and 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP synthase-inhibitor herbicides and with multiple resistance. As herbicide resistant crops (transgenic or not are increasingly deployed in developing countries, the problems of EHR could increase in those countries as it has in the USA if the selecting herbicides are heavily applied and appropriate management strategies are not employed. Given our analysis, we make some predictions about additional species that might evolve resistance.

  1. Taxonomic and life history bias in herbicide resistant weeds: implications for deployment of resistant crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jodie S; Welles, Shana R; Silvera, Katia; Heap, Ian M; Heredia, Sylvia M; Martinez-Berdeja, Alejandra; Palenscar, Kai T; Sweet, Lynn C; Ellstrand, Norman C

    2013-01-01

    Evolved herbicide resistance (EHR) is an important agronomic problem and consequently a food security problem, as it jeopardizes herbicide effectiveness and increases the difficulty and cost of weed management. EHR in weeds was first reported in 1970 and the number of cases has accelerated dramatically over the last two decades. Despite 40 years of research on EHR, why some weeds evolve resistance and others do not is poorly understood. Here we ask whether weed species that have EHR are different from weeds in general. Comparing taxonomic and life history traits of weeds with EHR to a control group ("the world's worst weeds"), we found weeds with EHR significantly over-represented in certain plant families and having certain life history biases. In particular, resistance is overrepresented in Amaranthaceae, Brassicaceae and Poaceae relative to all weeds, and annuality is ca. 1.5 times as frequent in weeds with EHR as in the control group. Also, for perennial EHR weeds, vegetative reproduction is only 60% as frequent as in the control group. We found the same trends for subsets of weeds with EHR to acetolactate synthase (ALS), photosystem II (PSII), and 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase-inhibitor herbicides and with multiple resistance. As herbicide resistant crops (transgenic or not) are increasingly deployed in developing countries, the problems of EHR could increase in those countries as it has in the USA if the selecting herbicides are heavily applied and appropriate management strategies are not employed. Given our analysis, we make some predictions about additional species that might evolve resistance.

  2. Identifying indicators of the spatial variations of agricultural practices by a tree partitioning methods: the case of weed control practices in vine growing catchment

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Environmental impact assessments of agricultural practices on a regional scale may be computed by running spatially distributed biophysical models using mapped input data on agricultural practices. In cases of hydrological impact assessments, such as herbicide pollution through run-off, methods for generating these data over the entire water resource catchment and at the plot resolution are needed. In this study, we aimed to identify indicators for simulating the spatial distribution of weed ...

  3. Identifying indicators of the spatial variation of agricultural practices by a tree partitioning method : the case of weed control practices in a vine growing catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Biarnès, Anne; J. S. Bailly; Boissieux, Yannick

    2009-01-01

    Environmental impact assessments of agricultural practices on a regional scale may be computed by running spatially distributed biophysical models using mapped input data on agricultural practices. In cases of hydrological impact assessments, Such as herbicide pollution through runoff, methods for generating these data over the entire water resource catchment and at the plot resolution are needed. In this study, we aimed to identify indicators for simulating the spatial distribution of weed c...

  4. 75 FR 68945 - Update of Noxious Weed Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ..., carnation weed. Geraldton carnation-weed, leiteira. Inula britannica British elecampane British elecampane..., fingergrass),'' ``Euphorbia terracina Linnaeus (false caper, Geraldton carnation weed)'', ``Inula britannica...

  5. Weed control in young coffee plantations through post emergence herbicide application onto total area Controle de plantas daninhas em cafezais recém-implantados, com herbicidas aplicados em pós-emergência em área total

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Ronchi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the efficiency of several herbicides under field conditions, by post-emergence application onto the entire area, their effect on the control of weeds in young coffee plantations and commercial coffee and bean intercropping system, as well as on both crops. Seedlings of Coffea arabica cv. Red Catuaí with four to six leaf pairs were transplanted to the field and treated according to conventional agronomic practices. A bean and coffee intercropping system was established by sowing three lines of beans in the coffee inter-rows. At the time the herbicides were sprayed, the coffee plants had six to ten leaf pairs; the bean plants, three leaflets; and the weeds were at an early development stage. Fluazifop-p-butyl and clethodim were selective for coffee plants and controlled only Brachiaria plantaginea and Digitaria horizontalis efficiently. Broad-leaved weeds (Amaranthus retroflexus, Bidens pilosa, Coronopus didymus, Emilia sonchifolia, Galinsoga parviflora, Ipomoea grandifolia, Lepidium virginicum, and Raphanus raphanistrum were controlled with high efficiency by sole applications of fomesafen, flazasulfuron, and oxyfluorfen, except B. pilosa, C. didymus, and R. raphanistrum for oxyfluorfen. Sequential applications in seven-day intervals of fomesafen + fluazifop-p-butyl, or clethodim, and two commercial mixtures of fomesafen + fluazifop-p-butyl simultaneously controlled both types of weed. Cyperus rotundus was only controlled by flazasulfuron. Except for fluazifop-p-butyl and clethodim, all herbicide treatments caused only slight injuries on younger coffee leaves. However, further plant growth was not impaired and coffee plant height and stem diameter were therefore similar in the treatments, as evaluated four months later. Fomesafen, fluazifop-p-butyl, and clethodim, at sole or sequential application, and the commercial mixtures of fomesafen + fluazifop-p-butyl were also highly selective for bean crop; thus

  6. Report on experiments on weed management in coppice - 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay, D.V.; Dixon, F.L. [Avon Vegetation Research, Nailsea (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    This report includes research on various aspects of effective weed control in short rotation coppices (SRCs). Programs described here have sought to establish the level of weed control required for SRCs and the best methods of achieving this aim. Crop tolerances to contact herbicides after planting and after cutting back and to residual herbicides are also investigated. (UK)

  7. Weed map generation from UAV image mosaics based on crop row detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtiby, Henrik Skov

    is used as input for the method. Issues related to perspective distortion are reduced by using an orthomosaic, which is a high resolution image of the entire field, built from hundreds of images taken by a UAV. A vegetation map is generated from the orthomosaic by calculating the excess green color index......To control weed in a field effectively with a minimum of herbicides, knowledge about the weed patches is required. Based on images acquired by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), a vegetation map of the entire field can be generated. Manual analysis, which is often required, to detect weed patches...... in this vegetation map is a major obstacle to site specific weed management based on the vegetation map. A semiautomatic method for detecting weed patches based on crop row detection is described in this study. Vegetation outside the crop rows is considered as weeds. A color image (RGB) mosaic of the entire field...

  8. Efeito do eptc + r 25788 em combinação com o diuron no controle de plantas daninhas e seletividade para a cultura da batata-doce Weed control in sweet potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurílio F. de Oliveira

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito das doses de EPTC + R 25788 combinadas com doses de diuron no controle de plantas daninhas na cultura de batata-doce, realizou-se um ensaio sob condições de campo num Podzólico Vermelho Amarelo, fase terraço, argiloso, com 3,5 % de matéria orgânica. Foram avaliadas quatro doses de EP TC + R 25 78 8 aplicado em pré-plantio incorporado: 0,0; 1,6; 3,2 e 4,8 kg/ha por quatro doses dediuron : 0,0 ; 0,8 ; 1,2 e 1,6 kg/ha, em quatro repetições. O EPTC + R25788 apresentou bom controle das plantas de tiririca quando aplicado nas maiores doses, principalmente na ausência do diuron. As maiores doses de EPTC + R 25788 aplicadas isoladamente, apresentaram significativos aumentos na população de plantas de folhas largas. As maiores doses de diuron promoveram melhor controle das plantas de folhas largas, na presença das maiores doses de EPTC + R 25788. A combinação das maiores doses dos herbicidas não refletiram em maiores produções. A maior produção de batata-doce ocorreu quando se aplicou 6 L/ha de Eradicane e 1,32 kg/ha de Karmex 800.Four levels of EPTC + R 25788 (0.0; 1.6; 3.2 e 4.8 kg/ha and diuron (0.0; 0.8; 1.2 and 1.6 kg/ha with four replications were evaluated in a fatorial field experiment in a Utisol containg 3.5 % organic matter. Better control of nutsedge was obtained with the highest dosage of EPTC + R 25788, mainly in the absence of diuron. However, when the highest eradicane levels were applied as single treatments there was a marked increase in the broadleaf weed population. The best control of broadleaf weed population was achieved when the highest diuron levels were combined with the highest EPTC + R 25788 levels although this condition have not resulted in highest productions. The greatest sweet potato production was obtained with the combination of 6 1/ha of Eradicane plus 1.32 kg/ha of Karmex 800.

  9. Integrated weed management systems with herbicide-tolerant crops in the European Union: lessons learnt from home and abroad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Devos, Yann; Beckie, Hugh J.

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally bred (CHT) and genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) crops have changed weed management practices and made an important contribution to the global production of some commodity crops. However, a concern is that farm management practices associated with the cultivation...... of herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops further deplete farmland biodiversity and accelerate the evolution of herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds. Diversification in crop systems and weed management practices can enhance farmland biodiversity, and reduce the risk of weeds evolving herbicide resistance. Therefore, HT crops...... are most effective and sustainable as a component of an integrated weed management (IWM) system. IWM advocates the use of multiple effective strategies or tactics to manage weed populations in a manner that is economically and environmentally sound. In practice, however, the potential benefits of IWM...

  10. Controlled Release System for Localized and Sustained Drug Delivery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Lidia Betsabe

    Current controlled release formulations has many drawbacks such as excess of initial burst release, low drug efficiency, non-degradability of the system and low reproducibility. The present project aims to offer an alternative by developing a technique to prepare uniform, biodegradable particles ( ˜19 mum ) that can sustainably release a drug for a specific period of time. Chitosan is a natural polysaccharide that has many characteristics to be used for biomedical applications. In the last two decades, there have been a considerable number of studies affirming that chitosan could be used for pharmaceutical applications. However, chitosan suffers from inherent weaknesses such as low mechanical stability and dissolution of the system in acidic media. In the present study, chitosan microparticles were prepared by emulsification process. The model drug chosen was acetylsalicylic acid as it is a small and challenging molecule. The maximum loading capacity obtained for the microparticles was approximately 96%. The parameters for the preparation of uniform particles with a narrow size distribution were identified in a triangular phase diagram. Moreover, chitosan particles were successfully coated with thin layers of poly lactic-coglycolic acid (PLGA) and poly lactic acid (PLA). The performance of different layerswas tested for in vitro drug release and degradation studies. Additionally, the degradability of the system was evaluated by measuring the weight loss of the system when exposed to enzyme and without enzyme. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) were used to characterize the controlled release system. Additionally, the in vitro drug release was monitored by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The results obtained from this project showed that it is

  11. Allelopathic assessment of selected common weeds in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurul Ain, M. B.; Nornasuha, Y.; Ismail, B. S.

    2016-11-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the allelopathic potential of eight common weed species in Malaysia, namely, Ageratum conyzoides, Tridax procumbens, Cyperus iria, Fimbristylis miliacea, Eleusine indica, Imperata cylindrica, Lygodium flexuosum and Nephrolepis biserrata of different morphological characteristics (broadleaves, sedges, grasses and ferns). The allelopathic study of these weeds was carried out by testing the leaf litter leachate through the Sandwich method and the volatile compounds of these weeds through the Dish pack method with three replicates for each donor species. The results obtained from both methods were statistically analyzed and the means had converted to percentage growth inhibition to determine the inhibition pattern on the radicle and hypocotyl growth of lettuce seedlings. Among the eight weed species tested, Ageratum conyzoides showed the strongest growth inhibition on lettuce radicle elongation (86%) in the sandwich bioassay compared to the control, followed by Tridax procumbens (71%), which both species being broadleaves weeds. In the dish pack bioassay Lygodium flexuosum (fern) demonstrated maximum inhibition on the growth the radicle and hypocotyl for each different distance from the source well. On the other hand, two weed species exhibited enhanced on the growth radicle and hypocotyl when compared to that of the control in dish pack bioassay. Nephrolepis biserrata and Fimbristylis miliacea were the species that showed the highest growth stimulatory effect. The results presented can be utilized as benchmark information for further research on the elucidation of leachates and volatile chemicals involved in allelopathy in nature. The information can also be helpful in the development of new bioactive chemicals from natural products in weed control strategies.

  12. Dynamic Facades: Environmental Control Systems for Sustainable Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riham Nady

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Façades are the most strategic and visible part of the building which leads to an improvement in appearance and environmental performances in buildings. Facades play a significant role in the quality of a building. It forms the barrier between the internal space and the outside climate. This means that the façade is the medium through which the interaction takes place between the activities, inside and outside. The image of a building, and therefore for the users, is reflected through the design of the façade.In recent practices, architects and engineers are strategically designing and installing dynamic facades not only for their aesthetic values, but also for improving the buildings’ energy performance. The high integration of these strategies for dynamic facades increases their durability and suitability, with current building demands, which targets for energy efficiency and thermal comfort level.  In the meantime, recent studies show that the majority of people spend up to 90% of their time indoors especially in hot climates. This trend has had a high impact on the requirements of the indoor environment, consequently turning the buildings into complex devices that ensure the wellbeing of the people who use them.  Therefore, users are starting to look for new products for the façade design that comply with the requirements of energy. This poses an important question, is there anything to be done to this specific part of the building in order to positively influence the overall energy need of the building?The paper will discuss the concept and the importance of dynamic facades according to their design and types, implementations, current challenges and climate impacts. It will highlight the history of these facades and the essential parameters which make the building sustainable through its facades. Moreover, the paper will analyze two examples of buildings with dynamic facades with automated control systems and its effect on the

  13. WEED INFESTATION IN DIFFERENT FARMING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAGDALENA LACKO-BARTOŠOVÁ

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of ecological and conventional farming systems on weed seedbank and actual weed infestation of winter wheat at agricultural farms Sebechleby, Plavé Vozokany and Dačov Lom. Significant differences between systems were determined only at the co-operative Sebechleby where the higher weed seedbank was in ecological system. Higher number of determined weed species in weed seedstock was in ecological system at Plavé Vozokany and Sebechleby. Dominant weed species in both systems were Chenopodium album L. and Amaranthus retroflexus L.. Higher degree of actual weed infestation was determined in ecological system. Characteristics of systems was the occurrence of perennial species Cirsium arvense and non detection of Amaranthus retroflexus L., weed that had very high weed seedbank in soil.

  14. Avaliação de herbicidas de pós-emergência na cultura da batata Evaluation of herbicides on post emergent weed control in potato crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson Zagonel

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi instalado na Fazenda Escola da UEPG, Ponta Grossa-PR, em solo Latossolo Vermelho Escuro de textura média argilosa, tendo como objetivo avaliar a eficiência e a seletividade do herbicida propaquizafop no controle pós-emergente de plantas daninhas na cultura da batata. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos ao acaso com seis tratamentos: propaquizafop (100, 125 e 150 g i.a./ha; fluazifop-p-butil (188 g i.a./ha; testemunha capinada e testemunha sem capina, em quatro repetições. O plantio foi realizado em 26 de outubro com a cultivar Elvira, usando-se o espaçamento de 0,70 x 0,35 m. As plantas daninhas presentes foram: Brachiaria plantaginea (capim-papuã, Digitaria horizontalis (capim-milhã e Eleusine indica (capim pé-de-galinha. As avaliações foram efetuadas aos 15, 30 e 45 dias após a aplicação dos tratamento. Observou-se que a aplicação de herbicidas pós-emergentes após a amontoa, permite controle adequado de plantas daninhas desde a emergência até a colheita; o herbicida propaquizafop mostrou-se eficiente no controle sobre capim-papuã e capim pé-de-galinha nas doses de 100, 125 e 150 g i.a./ha e sobre capim-milhã nas doses de 125 e 150 g i.a./ha. As perdas na produção causadas pela competição com plantas daninha foram da ordem de 57,4 %. Não foram observados efeitos fitotóxicos nas plantas de batata que pudessem ser atribuídos aos tratamentos aplicados.The presented field experiment was conducted at the Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Paraná State, Brazil, on Dark Red Latossoil, to evaluate the efficiency and selectivity of herbicides on post emergence weed control in potato crops. The experiment was laid out in a randomized block design with six treatments and four replications: propaquizafop (100, 125 and 150 g a.i/ha; fluazifop-p-butil (188 g a.i/ha, weed free and weedy. Planting was conducted on October 26, using the cultivar Elvira. Potato plants were spaced 0.70 x 0.35 m. The

  15. Gender Differences in Sustained Attentional Control Relate to Gender Inequality across Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Elizabeth; Okabe, Hidefusa; Germine, Laura; Wilmer, Jeremy; Esterman, Michael; DeGutis, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Sustained attentional control is critical for everyday tasks and success in school and employment. Understanding gender differences in sustained attentional control, and their potential sources, is an important goal of psychology and neuroscience and of great relevance to society. We used a large web-based sample (n = 21,484, from testmybrain.org) to examine gender differences in sustained attentional control. Our sample included participants from 41 countries, allowing us to examine how gender differences in each country relate to national indices of gender equality. We found significant gender differences in certain aspects of sustained attentional control. Using indices of gender equality, we found that overall sustained attentional control performance was lower in countries with less equality and that there were greater gender differences in performance in countries with less equality. These findings suggest that creating sociocultural conditions which value women and men equally can improve a component of sustained attention and reduce gender disparities in cognition.

  16. Weed control under integrated nutrient management systems in faba bean (Vicia faba) production in Egypt Controle de plantas daninhas sob sistemas de manejo integrado em feijão de fava (Vicia faba) no Egito

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    I.M. El-Metwally; M.T. Abdelhamid

    2008-01-01

    Two field experiments were conducted in two successive seasons, 2005/2006 and 2006/2007, to determine whether management can improve faba bean competitiveness with weeds, thus helping to achieve its yield potential...

  17. INTEGRATED WEED MANAGEMENT ON THE PROCESSING TOMATO CROP AND TOMATO FOR CONSUMPTION IN NATURA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. O. Castro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Weeds cause direct and indirect damage to processing tomato and tomato for consumption in natura. The coexistence period is decisive for the intensity of damage, although the economic cost is also considered for decision making when to control the weeds. There are similarities between processing tomato and tomato for consumption in natura cropping system and peculiarities. This causes the management has adopted its common applications and its variables within each system. As control alternative, the farmer has basically the preventive control, mechanical, cultural, biological and chemical. The application of a single method is not recommended. Ideally, the methods needs to be integrated in order to combat weeds, highly evolved populations and resistant to unfavorable conditions. Consider weed management taking only one control measure is to underestimate the evolutionary ability of such species. Therefore, it is necessary to integrate the various methods available to the weed interference not impede the tomato production.

  18. Can global weed assemblages be used to predict future weeds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Morin

    Full Text Available Predicting which plant taxa are more likely to become weeds in a region presents significant challenges to both researchers and government agencies. Often it is done in a qualitative or semi-quantitative way. In this study, we explored the potential of using the quantitative self-organising map (SOM approach to analyse global weed assemblages and estimate likelihoods of plant taxa becoming weeds before and after they have been moved to a new region. The SOM approach examines plant taxa associations by analysing where a taxon is recorded as a weed and what other taxa are recorded as weeds in those regions. The dataset analysed was extracted from a pre-existing, extensive worldwide database of plant taxa recorded as weeds or other related status and, following reformatting, included 187 regions and 6690 plant taxa. To assess the value of the SOM approach we selected Australia as a case study. We found that the key and most important limitation in using such analytical approach lies with the dataset used. The classification of a taxon as a weed in the literature is not often based on actual data that document the economic, environmental and/or social impact of the taxon, but mostly based on human perceptions that the taxon is troublesome or simply not wanted in a particular situation. The adoption of consistent and objective criteria that incorporate a standardized approach for impact assessment of plant taxa will be necessary to develop a new global database suitable to make predictions regarding weediness using methods like SOM. It may however, be more realistic to opt for a classification system that focuses on the invasive characteristics of plant taxa without any inference to impacts, which to be defined would require some level of research to avoid bias from human perceptions and value systems.

  19. The Impact of Management Control on Sustainability Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliona Birca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays sustainable development is no longer seen only as a way to reduce costs or increase efficiency, but also as a tool for competitiveness and development through product placement, services related to the preferences of the entity’s stakeholders. Sustainability reports are designed to justify and present public policy actions of each entity. The holistic approach to the structure and content of sustainability reports lead us to notice their various features. Examining the content of sustainability reports of various national and international entities was based on the theory of corporate governance, agency theory and the theory of positive stakeholders. In order to ensure a full study we have examined various international bodies and position with respect to sustainable development.

  20. Targeted treatment strategies for sustainable worm control in small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besier, R B

    2008-02-01

    Sustainable worm control strategies are based largely on ensuring that a source of worms not exposed to anthelmintics ("in refugia") remains after treatments are given, so that resistant worms do not become a dominant part of the total population. In environments with seasonally poor survival of worm larvae on pasture, this may require withholding treatments from a proportion of animals when the whole group would normally be treated. The "targeted treatment" approach involves using anthelmintics on an individual animal basis according to indications of parasitic effects, regardless of parasite burdens. For Haemonchus contortus, the FAMACHA system, based on the easily-visualised index of anaemia, has proved effective provided that labour is available for frequent inspections. For non-haematophagous nematodes, recent research indicates the potential of production parameters such as body weight change (sheep) and milk yield (dairy goats), providing that parasitic effects can be differentiated from nutritional and other factors. Continuing investigations are necessary to indicate the most appropriate indices for different situations, so that the refugia effect is maximized for the least risk of disease and production loss. Of prime importance, targeted treatment strategies must be practical to implement if they are to achieve widespread adoption.